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Sample records for capacity mercury adsorption

  1. High capacity mercury adsorption on freshly ozone-treated carbon surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Manchester, Shawn; Wang, Xuelei; Kulaots, Indrek; Gao, Yuming; Hurt, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    A set of carbon materials was treated by a choice of common oxidizers to investigate the mercury capture capacities at varying temperature conditions. It was found that ozone treatment dramatically increases the mercury capture capacity of carbon surfaces by factors up to 134, but the activity is easily destroyed by exposure to the atmosphere, to water vapor, or by mild heating. Freshly ozone-treated carbon surfaces are shown to oxidize iodide to iodine in solution and this ability fades with...

  2. Removal of mercury by adsorption: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin-Gang; Yue, Bao-Yu; Wu, Xiong-Wei; Liu, Qi; Jiao, Fei-Peng; Jiang, Xin-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Qing

    2016-03-01

    Due to natural and production activities, mercury contamination has become one of the major environmental problems over the world. Mercury contamination is a serious threat to human health. Among the existing technologies available for mercury pollution control, the adsorption process can get excellent separation effects and has been further studied. This review is attempted to cover a wide range of adsorbents that were developed for the removal of mercury from the year 2011. Various adsorbents, including the latest adsorbents, are presented along with highlighting and discussing the key advancements on their preparation, modification technologies, and strategies. By comparing their adsorption capacities, it is evident from the literature survey that some adsorbents have shown excellent potential for the removal of mercury. However, there is still a need to develop novel, efficient adsorbents with low cost, high stability, and easy production and manufacture for practical utility. PMID:26620868

  3. Preparation of hybrid organic-inorganic mesoporous silicas applied to mercury removal from aqueous media: Influence of the synthesis route on adsorption capacity and efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Quintanilla, Damián; Sánchez, Alfredo; Sierra, Isabel

    2016-06-15

    New hybrid organic-inorganic mesoporous silicas were prepared by employing three different synthesis routes and mercury adsorption studies were done in aqueous media using the batch technique. The organic ligands employed for the functionalization were derivatives of 2-mercaptopyrimidine or 2-mercaptothiazoline, and the synthesis pathways used were post-synthesis, post-synthesis with surface ion-imprinting and co-condensation with ion-imprinting. The incorporation of functional groups and the presence of ordered mesopores in the organosilicas was confirmed by XRD, TEM and SEM, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, (13)C MAS-NMR, (29)Si MAS-NMR, elemental and thermogravimetric analysis. The highest adsorption capacity and selectivity observed was for the material functionalized with 2-mercaptothiazoline ligand by means the co-condensation with ion-imprinting route (1.03mmolg(-1) at pH 6). The prepared material could be potential sorbent for the extraction of this heavy metal from environmental and drinking waters. PMID:27023632

  4. Enhanced mercury ion adsorption by amine-modified activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Jianzhong [Center of Environmental Sciences, Lincoln University of Missouri, Jefferson City, MO 65102 (United States); Yang, John, E-mail: yangj@lincolnu.edu [Center of Environmental Sciences, Lincoln University of Missouri, Jefferson City, MO 65102 (United States); Deng Baolin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2009-07-30

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic metals found in water and sediments. In an effort to develop an effective adsorbent for aqueous Hg removal, activated carbon (AC) was modified with an amino-terminated organosilicon (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APTES). Surface properties of the APTES-modified AC (MAC) were characterized by the scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with the energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and potentiometry. The impacts of solvent, APTES concentration, reactive time and temperature on the surface modification were evaluated. The aqueous Hg adsorptive kinetics and capacity were also determined. Results demonstrated that the strong Hg-binding amine ligands were effectively introduced onto the AC surfaces through the silanol reaction between carbon surface functional groups (-COOH, -COH) and APTES molecules. The modification lowered the pH at the point of zero charge (pH{sub pzc}) to 4.54 from 9.6, favoring cation adsorption. MAC presented a faster rate of the Hg (II) adsorption and more than double adsorptive capacity as compared with AC.

  5. Vapor-phase elemental mercury adsorption by residual carbon separated from fly ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-gang; CHEN Chang-he; Kruse H.Kolker

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption capacity for vapor-phase elemental mercury(Hg0 ) of residual carbon separated from fly ash was studied in an attempt for the control of elemental mercury emissions from combustion processes. At Iow mercury concentrations ( < 200 μg/m3),unburned carbon had higher adsorption capacity than commercial activated carbon. The adsorbality of unburned carbon was also found to be source dependent. Isotherms of FS carbon(separated from fly ash of a power plant of Shishi in Fujian Province) were similar to those classified as type Ⅱ. Isotherms of XJ carbon (separated from fly ash of a power plant of Jingcheng in Shanxi Province) were more like those classified as type Ⅲ. Due to the relatively Iow production costs, these residual carbons would likely be considerably more costeffective for the full-scale removal of mercury from combustion flue gases than other technology.

  6. ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON TREATED WITH SULFURIC ACID

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of a study of the adsorption of elemental mercury at 125 C by a sulfuric-acid (H2S04, 50% w/w/ solution)-treated carbon for the removal of mercury from flue gas. The pore structure of the sample was characterized by nitrogen (N2) at -196 C and the t-plot m...

  7. Adsorption of mercury (II from liquid solutions using modified activated carbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Soé Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is one of the most toxic metals present in the environment. Adsorption has been proposed among the technologies for mercury abatement. Activated carbons are universal adsorbents which have been found to be a very effective alternative for mercury removal from water. The effectiveness with which a contaminant is adsorbed by the solid surface depends, among other factors, on the charge of the chemical species in which the contaminant is in solution and on the net charge of the adsorbent surface which depend on the pH of the adsorption system. In this work, activated carbon from carbonized eucalyptus wood was used as adsorbent. Two sulphurization treatments by impregnation with sulphuric acid and with carbon disulphide, have been carried out to improve the adsorption capacity for mercury entrapment. Batch adsorption tests at different temperatures and pH of the solution were carried out. The influence of the textural properties, surface chemistry and operation conditions on the adsorption capacity, is discussed.

  8. Adsorption of azithromycin dehydrate at stationary mercury and solid electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Karbainov, Yu. A.; Puchkovskaya, E. S.; Karbainova, S. N.

    2007-01-01

    Adsorptive component in oxidation and renewal processes at different types of electrodes for antibiotic-macrolide azithromycin dihydrate has been studied. Adsorption parameters for azithromycin oxidation processes at glass-carbon electrode and for renewal processes at mercury-film electrode were calculated

  9. Evidence of the direct adsorption of mercury in human hair during occupational exposure to mercury vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queipo Abad, Silvia; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2016-07-01

    We have found clear evidence of direct adsorption of mercury in human hair after the occupational exposure to mercury vapour. We have performed both longitudinal analysis of human hair by laser ablation ICP-MS and speciation analysis by gas chromatography ICP-MS in single hair strands of 5 individuals which were occupationally exposed to high levels of mercury vapour and showed acute mercury poisoning symptoms. Hair samples, between 3.5 and 11cm long depending on the individual, were taken ca. three months after exposure. Single point laser ablation samples of 50μm diameter were taken at 1mm intervals starting from the root of the hairs. Sulfur-34 was used as internal standard. The ratio (202)Hg/(34)S showed a distinct pattern of mercury concentration with much lower levels of mercury near the root of the hair and high levels of mercury near the end of the hair. In all cases a big jump in the concentration of mercury in hair occurred at a given distance from the root, between 32 and 42mm depending on the individual, with a high and almost constant concentration of mercury for longer distances to the root. When we took into account the rate of hair growth in humans, 9-15mm/month, the jump in mercury concentration agreed approximately with the dates when the contamination occurred with the new growing hair showing much lower mercury concentration. In some cases the concentration of mercury at the tip of the hair was ca. 1000 times higher than that near the root. Additionally, speciation studies confirmed that mercury in all hair samples was present as inorganic mercury. The only explanation for these results was the direct adsorption of mercury vapour in hair at the time of exposure. PMID:27259347

  10. Development of coconut pith chars towards high elemental mercury adsorption performance - Effect of pyrolysis temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Khairiraihanna; Saman, Norasikin; Song, Shiow Tien; Cheu, Siew Chin; Kong, Helen; Mat, Hanapi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, chars from coconut pith (CP) were prepared aiming for superior adsorption towards elemental mercury (Hg(o)). The yield, proximate analysis, textural characteristics, surface functional groups and elemental composition analyses of the chars produced at pyrolysis temperature of 300 °C, 500 °C, 700 °C and 900 °C were compared. The surface area, pore volume, ash and carbon content of chars increased, while the yield and moisture content decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperatures. The changing of physical and chemical properties of the chars produced at variety pyrolysis temperature was much effect on the Hg(o) adsorption performance and definitely provides important information on the Hg(o) adsorption mechanism. The highest Hg(o) adsorption capacity was observed for CP900 (6067.49 μg/g), followed by CP700 (2395.98 μg/g), CP500 (289.76 μg/g), CP300 (1.68 μg/g), and CP (0.73 μg/g). The equilibrium data were well described by the Freundlich adsorption isotherm model. The pseudo-second order best described the kinetic data of the Hg(o) adsorption onto CP and CP300. For chars produced at higher pyrolysis temperature, however, the pseudo-zero order and pseudo-second order fitted well for the adsorption and breakthrough regions, respectively. The Hg(o) adsorption capacity of chars obtained from high pyrolysis temperature of CP significantly outperformed the commercial activated carbon (Darco KB-B) as well as superior to chars reported in the literature indicating the CP can be used as a precursor for preparation of chars as elemental mercury adsorbents. PMID:27160635

  11. Adsorption of mercury in coal-fired power plants gypsum slurry on TiO2/chitosan composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, P.; Gao, B. B.; Gao, J. Q.; Zhang, K.; Chen, Y. J.; Yang, Y. P.; Chen, H. W.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a simple method was used to prepare a chitosan adsorbent to mix with KI and TiO2. Gravimetric analysis (TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to characterize the samples before and after adsorption of Hg2+. A mercury adsorption experiment was also conducted in the gypsum slurry. The results show that using hydrobromic acid as a solvent of adsorbent resulted in a better adsorption effect than using acetic acid alone. Also, the sample (CS-KI/TiO2-HBr) had a maximum mercury adsorption capacity when the pH=5 and the t=50°C. The characterization experiments showed that the thermal stability of composite materials declined and the TiO2 uniformly dispersed in the surface of the samples with a lamellar structure, generating a lot of cracks and recesses that increased the reactive sites. Furthermore, when the TiO2 reacted with CS, it resulted in Ti-C, Ti-O and Ti-N bonds. The Br- can prevent the growth of TiO2 crystal grains and strengthen the ability of I- to remove mercury. The adsorption isotherm and kinetic results indicated that the adsorption behaviour of CS-KI/TiO2-HBr as it removes Hg2+ is an inhomogeneous multilayer adsorption process. The surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion effects are both important in the Hg2+ adsorption process.

  12. Cadmium adsorption by coal combustion ashes-based sorbents-Relationship between sorbent properties and adsorption capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very interesting possibility of coal combustion ashes reutilization is their use as adsorbent materials, that can also take advantage from proper beneficiation techniques. In this work, adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solutions was taken into consideration, with the emphasis on the intertwining among waste properties, beneficiation treatments, properties of the beneficiated materials and adsorption capacity. The characterization of three solid materials used as cadmium sorbents (as-received ash, ash sieved through a 25 μm-size sieve and demineralized ash) was carried out by chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy, laser granulometry and mercury porosimetry. Cadmium adsorption thermodynamic and kinetic tests were conducted at room temperature, and test solutions were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Maximum specific adsorption capacities resulted in the range 0.5-4.3 mg g-1. Different existing models were critically considered to find out an interpretation of the controlling mechanism for adsorption kinetics. In particular, it was observed that for lower surface coverage the adsorption rate is governed by a linear driving force while, once surface coverage becomes significant, mechanisms such as the intraparticle micropore diffusion may come into play. Moreover, it was shown that both external fluid-to-particle mass transfer and macropore diffusion hardly affect the adsorption process, which was instead regulated by intraparticle micropore diffusion: characteristic times for this process ranged from 4.1 to 6.1 d, and were fully consistent with the experimentally observed equilibrium times. Results were discussed in terms of the relationship among properties of beneficiated materials and cadmium adsorption capacity. Results shed light on interesting correlations among solid properties, cadmium capture rate and maximum cadmium uptake.

  13. Thorough removal of inorganic and organic mercury from aqueous solutions by adsorption on Lemna minor powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Shunxing, E-mail: lishunxing@fjzs.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Analytical Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou (China); Zheng Fengying; Huang Yang [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Analytical Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou (China); Ni Jiancong [Department of Chemistry, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2011-02-15

    The adsorption ability of duckweed (Lemna minor) powders for removing inorganic and organic mercury (methyl and ethyl mercury) has been studied using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimal adsorption conditions were: (a) the pH value of the solution 7.0 for inorganic and ethyl mercury, 9.0 for methyl mercury, and (b) equilibrium adsorption time 10, 20, and 40 min for inorganic mercury, methyl mercury, and ethyl mercury, respectively. After adsorption by L. minor powder for 40 min, when the initial concentrations of inorganic and organic mercury were under 12.0 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 50.0 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively, the residual concentrations of mercury could meet the criterion of drinking water (1.0 {mu}g L{sup -1}) and the permitted discharge limit of wastewater (10.0 {mu}g L{sup -1}) set by China and USEPA, respectively. Thorough removal of both inorganic and organic mercury from aqueous solutions was reported for the first time. The significant adsorption sites were C-O-P and phosphate groups by the surface electrostatic interactions with aqueous inorganic and organic mercury cations, and then the selective adsorption was resulted from the strong chelating interaction between amine groups and mercury on the surface of L. minor cells.

  14. Adsorption and Desorption of Mercury(II) in Three Forest Soils in Shandong Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Tong; WANG Ren-Qing; ZHANG Meng-Meng; DAI Jiu-Lan

    2013-01-01

    As one of the most toxic heavy metals with persistence,bioaccumulation,and toxicity in environment,mercury and its environmental problems have caused a global concern.To fully understand the behavior and fate of mercury (Hg)(II) in forest soils,a series of batch experiments were conducted to determine the adsorption and desorption characteristics of Hg(II) by three dark brown forest soils from Mount Taishan,Laoshan Mountain,and Fanggan Village in Shandong Province,China.The adsorption solution was prepared using 0.1 mol L-1 NaNO3 as background electrolyte,with Hg(II) at rising concentration gradients of 0.0,2.0,4.0,6.0,8.0,and 10.0 mg L-1.Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was adopted to characterize the soil samples and soil-Hg complexes.It was found that Hg(II) adsorption isotherms could be well fitted with both Langmuir and Freundlich equations.The soil from Mount Taishan had the largest potential Hg(II) adsorption capacity,though with less adsorptive intensity.The percentages of Hg(II) desorbed from all soil samples were less than 0.6%,which suggested that all the soils studied had a high binding strength for Hg(II).The soil from Mount Taishan had a higher Hg(II) desorption capacity than the other soils,which indicated that the Hg(II) deposited on the topsoil of Mount Taishan from atmosphere may easily discharge to surface water through runoff.Results of the FTIR spectroscopy showed that the three soils contained the same functional groups.The relative absorbencies of soil-Hg complexes changed significantly compared with those of the soil samples and the adsorption of Hg(II) mainly acted on the O-H,C-O,and C=O groups of the soils.

  15. Influence of the pore structure and surface chemical properties of activated carbon on the adsorption of mercury from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Activated carbons with different pore structure and surface chemical properties were prepared by modification process. • HgCl2 as a pollution target to evaluate the adsorption performance. • Influence of pore structure and surface chemical properties of activated carbon on adsorption of mercury was investigated. -- Abstract: Reactivation and chemical modification were used to obtain modified activated carbons with different pore structure and surface chemical properties. The samples were characterized by nitrogen absorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the Bothem method. Using mercury chloride as the target pollutant, the Hg2+ adsorption ability of samples was investigated. The results show that the Hg2+ adsorption capacity of samples increased significantly with increases in micropores and acidic functional groups and that the adsorption process was exothermic. Different models and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated to establish the mechanisms. It was concluded that the adsorption occurred through a monolayer mechanism by a two-speed process involving both rapid adsorption and slow adsorption. The adsorption rate was determined by chemical reaction

  16. Adsorption of mercury ions by mercapto-functionalized amorphous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Quintanilla, Damian; Hierro, Isabel del; Fajardo, Mariano; Sierra, Isabel [Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Departamento de Tecnologia Quimica y Ambiental, E.S.C.E.T, Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Carrillo-Hermosilla, Fernando [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Organica y Bioquimica, Facultad de Quimicas, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2006-02-01

    Amorphous silicas have been functionalized by two different methods. In the heterogeneous route the silylating agent, 3-chloropropyltriethoxysilane, was initially immobilized onto the silica surface to give the chlorinated silica Cl-Sil. In a second reaction, multifunctionalized N,S donor compounds were incorporated to obtain the functionalized silicas, which are denoted as L-Sil-Het (where L=mercaptothiazoline, mercaptopyridine or mercaptobenzothiazole). In the homogeneous route, the functionalization was achieved through a one-step reaction between the silica and an organic ligand containing the chelating functions; this gave the modified silicas denoted as L-Sil-Hom. The functionalized silicas were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. These materials were employed as adsorbents for mercury cations from aqueous and acetone solutions at room temperature. The results indicate that, in all cases, mercury adsorption was higher in the modified silicas prepared by the homogeneous method. (orig.)

  17. Lead adsorption capacities of different components in natural surface coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG De-ming; HUA Xiu-yi; LI Yu; JI Liang; ZHANG Jing-jing

    2004-01-01

    Pb adsorption capacities of Fe oxide, Mn oxide and organic materials in natural surface coatings( biofilms and associated minerals) collected in three lakes, two ponds and a river in Jilin Province, China and Cayuga Lake in US were studied. A novel extraction technique was employed to remove one or more component(s) from the surface coatings. Pb adsorption to surface coatings before and after extraction was performed to determine the adsorptive properties of the extracted component(s). The statistical analysis of observed Pb adsorption was carried out using nonlinear least squares fitting(NLSF) to estimate the Pb adsorption capacity of each component of surface coatings. For each body of water, the estimated Pb adsorption capacity of Mn oxide(mol Pb/mol Mn) was significantly higher than that of Fe oxide( mol Pb/ mol Fe). The value of estimated adsorption capacities of organic materials with the unit mol Pb per kg COD was similar to or less than that of Fe oxides with the unit mol Pb per mol Fe. Comparison of components of surface coatings in different waters showed that the estimated Pb adsorption capacities of components in surface coatings developed in different natural waters were different,especially for Mn oxides.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and mercury adsorption properties of hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve prepared with fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve (HMAS) was prepared with fly ash and impregnated with zeolite A precursors. This improved the mercury adsorption of HMAS compared to original MCM-41. The HMAS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and 29Si and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. These showed that the HMAS structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A. But the surface area and pore diameter of HMAS decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution was studied on untreated MCM-41and HMAS. The mercury adsorption rate of HMAS was higher than that of origin MCM-41. The adsorption of mercury was investigated on HMAS regarding the pH of mercury solution, initial mercury concentration, and the reaction temperature. The experimental data fit well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Dublin–Radushkevich isotherm and the characterization show that the mercury adsorption on HMAS involved the ion-exchange mechanisms. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. The adsorption of mercury on HMAS followed the first order kinetics.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and mercury adsorption properties of hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve prepared with fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Minmin [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Hou, Li-an, E-mail: 11liuminmin@tongji.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Xunfeng [China Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 200012 (China)

    2013-05-15

    A novel hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve (HMAS) was prepared with fly ash and impregnated with zeolite A precursors. This improved the mercury adsorption of HMAS compared to original MCM-41. The HMAS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. These showed that the HMAS structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A. But the surface area and pore diameter of HMAS decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution was studied on untreated MCM-41and HMAS. The mercury adsorption rate of HMAS was higher than that of origin MCM-41. The adsorption of mercury was investigated on HMAS regarding the pH of mercury solution, initial mercury concentration, and the reaction temperature. The experimental data fit well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Dublin–Radushkevich isotherm and the characterization show that the mercury adsorption on HMAS involved the ion-exchange mechanisms. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. The adsorption of mercury on HMAS followed the first order kinetics.

  20. Evaluating the Adsorptive Capacities of Chemsorb 1000 and Chemsorb 1425

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Oscar Alberto Monje; Surma, Jan M.; Johnsey, Marissa N.; Melendez, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    The Air Revitalization Lab at KSC tested Chemsorb 1000 and 1425, two candidate sorbents for use in future air revitalization technologies being evaluated by the ARREM project. Chemsorb 1000 and 1425 are granular coconut-shell activated carbon sorbents produced by Molecular Products, Inc. that may be used in the TCCS. Chemsorb 1000 is a high grade activated carbon for organic vapor adsorption. In contrast, Chemsorb 1425 is a high-grade impregnated activated carbon for adsorption of airborne ammonia and amines. Chemsorb 1000 was challenged with simulated spacecraft gas streams in order to determine its adsorptive capacities for mixtures of volatile organics compounds. Chemsorb 1425 was challenged with various NH3 concentrations to determine its adsorptive capacity.

  1. Adsorption of mercury (II) from liquid solutions using modified activated carbons

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Soé Silva; Silvia Virginia Ruiz; Dolly Lucía Granados; Juan Manuel Santángelo

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is one of the most toxic metals present in the environment. Adsorption has been proposed among the technologies for mercury abatement. Activated carbons are universal adsorbents which have been found to be a very effective alternative for mercury removal from water. The effectiveness with which a contaminant is adsorbed by the solid surface depends, among other factors, on the charge of the chemical species in which the contaminant is in solution and on the net charge of the adsorbent...

  2. Simultaneous Removal of NOx and Mercury in Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neville G. Pinto; Panagiotis G. Smirniotis

    2006-03-31

    The results of a 18-month investigation to advance the development of a novel Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor (LTSCAR), for the simultaneous removal of NO{sub x} and mercury (elemental and oxidized) from flue gases in a single unit operation located downstream of the particulate collectors, are reported. In the proposed LTSCAR, NO{sub x} removal is in a traditional SCR mode but at low temperature, and, uniquely, using carbon monoxide as a reductant. The concomitant capture of mercury in the unit is achieved through the incorporation of a novel chelating adsorbent. As conceptualized, the LTSCAR will be located downstream of the particulate collectors (flue gas temperature 140-160 C) and will be similar in structure to a conventional SCR. That is, it will have 3-4 beds that are loaded with catalyst and adsorbent allowing staged replacement of catalyst and adsorbent as required. Various Mn/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to reduce NO at low temperature using CO as the reductant. It has been shown that with a suitably tailored catalyst more than 65% NO conversion with 100% N{sub 2} selectivity can be achieved, even at a high space velocity (SV) of 50,000 h-1 and in the presence of 2 v% H{sub 2}O. Three adsorbents for oxidized mercury were developed in this project with thermal stability in the required range. Based on detailed evaluations of their characteristics, the mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) adsorbent was found to be most promising for the capture of oxidized mercury. This adsorbent has been shown to be thermally stable to 200 C. Fixed-bed evaluations in the targeted temperature range demonstrated effective removal of oxidized mercury from simulated flue gas at very high capacity ({approx}>58 mg Hg/g adsorbent). Extension of the capability of the adsorbent to elemental mercury capture was pursued with two independent approaches: incorporation of a novel nano-layer on the surface of the

  3. Characteristic and mercury adsorption of activated carbon produced by CO2 of chicken waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yaji; JIN Baosheng; ZHONG Zhaoping; ZHONG Wenqi; XIAO Rui

    2008-01-01

    Preparation of activated carbon from chicken waste is a promising way to produce a useful adsorbent for Hg removal.A three-stage activation process (drying at 200℃,pyrolysis in N2 atmosphere,followed by CO2 activation) was used for the production of activated samples.The effects of carbonization temperature (400-600 ℃),activation temperature (700-900 ℃),and activation time (1-2.5 h) on the physicochemieal properties (weight-loss and BET surface) of the prepared carbon were investigated.Adsorptive removal of mercury from real flue gas onto activated carbon has been studied.The activated carbon from chicken waste has the same mercury capacity as commercial activated carbon (Darco LH) (HgV:38.7% vs.53.5%,HgO:50.5% vs.68.8%),although its surface area is around 10 times smaller,89.5 m2/g vs.862 m2/g.The low cost activated carbon can be produced from chicken waste,and the procedure is suitable.

  4. Mercury oxidation and adsorption characteristics of potassium permanganate modified lignite semi-coke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huawei Zhang; Jitao Chen; Peng Liang; Li Wang

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of virgin and potassium permanganate modified lignite semi-coke (SC) for gaseous Hg0 were investigated in an attempt to produce more effective and lower price adsorbents for the control of elemental mercury emission.Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements,X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to analyze the surface physical and chemical properties of SC,Mn-SC and Mn-H-SC before and after mercury adsorption.The results indicated that potassium permanganate modification had significant influence on the properties of semi-coke,such as the specific surface area,pore structure and surface chemical functional groups.The mercury adsorption efficiency of modified semi-coke was lower than that of SC at low temperature,but much higher at high temperature.Amorphous Mn7+,Mn6+ and Mn4+ on the surface of Mn-SC and Mn-H-SC were the active sites for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous Hg0,which oxidized the elemental mercury into Hg2+ and captured it.Thermal treatment reduced the average oxidation degree of Mnx+ on the surface of Mn-SC from 3.80 to 3.46.However,due to the formation of amorphous MnOx,the surface oxidation active sites for gaseous Hg0 increased,which gave Mn-H-SC higher mercury adsorption efficiency than that of Mn-SC at high temperature.

  5. Relationship between carbon microstructure, adsorption energy and hydrogen adsorption capacity at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various microporous materials such as activated carbons, nano-tubes, synthetic microporous carbons as well as metal organic framework materials are being considered for hydrogen storage applications by means of physical adsorption. To develop materials of practical significance for hydrogen storage it is important to understand the relationships between pore sizes, adsorption energies and adsorption capacities. The pore size distribution (PSD) characterization is traditionally obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms measured at 77 K. However, a portion of the pores accessible to H2 may not be accessible to N2 at this temperature. Therefore, it was recently proposed to use the DFT analysis of H2 adsorption isotherms to characterize pore structure of materials considered for hydrogen storage applications. In present work, adsorption isotherms of H2 and N2 at cryogenic temperatures are used for the characterization of carbon materials. Adsorption measurements were performed with Autosorb 1 MP (Quantachrome Instruments, Boynton Beach, Florida, USA). As an example, Fig 1 compares PSDs calculated for the activated carbon sample (F400, Calgon Carbon) using combined H2 and N2 data, and using N2 isotherm only. The nitrogen derived PSD does not include certain amount of micropores which are accessible to H2 but not to N2 molecules. Obviously, the difference in the calculated PSDs by the two methods will depend on the actual content of small micropores in a given sample. Carbon adsorption properties can also be characterized by the isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, related to the adsorption energy and dependent on the carbon pore/surface structure. Fig 2 shows Qst data calculated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation from H2 isotherms measured at 77 K and 87 K for the carbon molecular sieve CMS 5A (Takeda), oxidized single wall nano-tubes (SWNT), and graphitized carbon black (Supelco). The Qst values decrease with increasing pore sizes. The highest Qst is

  6. Removal of trace level aqueous mercury by adsorption and photocatalysis on silica-titania composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silica-titania composites (STCs) were applied to trace level mercury solutions (100 μg/L Hg) to determine the degree of mercury removal that could be accomplished via adsorption and photocatalysis. STCs are a porous, high surface area silica substrate (>200 m2/g), manufactured using sol-gel methodology, impregnated with TiO2 nanoparticles. The performance of this material along with its precursors, silica and Degussa P25 TiO2 were compared. Under adsorption alone (no UV illumination), STCs were able to achieve approximately 90% removal of mercury, which is comparable to that of Degussa P25. Silica without TiO2 performed poorly in comparison and was minimally affected by UV illumination. Contrary to expectations, the performance of Degussa P25 was not largely changed by UV irradiation and the STC was detrimentally affected under the same conditions. It was concluded that elemental mercury was formed under UV irradiation with or without the presence of TiO2 due to photochemical reactions, decreasing the mercury removal by STC. Additionally, the primary particle size of the STC was reduced to increase mass transfer. The result was improved Hg removal under adsorption and photocatalysis conditions. Improved adsorption kinetics were also achieved by altering the STC pore size and TiO2 loading.

  7. Effect of calcium on adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Shang, Junteng; Wang, Ying; Li, Yansheng; Gao, Hong

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of calcium ion on the adsorption of humic acid (HA) (as a target pollutant) by powered activated carbon. The HA adsorption isotherms at different pH and kinetics of two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), were performed. It was showed that the adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for HA was markedly enhanced when Ca(2+) was doped into HA. Also, HA and Ca(2+) taken as nitrate were tested on the uptake of each other respectively and it was showed that the adsorbed amounts of both of them were significantly promoted when HA and calcium co-existed. Furthermore, the adsorbed amount of HA slightly decreased with the increasing of Ca(2+) concentration, whereas the amount of calcium increased with the increasing of HA concentration, but all above the amounts without addition. Finally, the change of pH before and after adsorption process is studied. In the two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), pH had a small rise, but the extent of pH of later solution was bigger. PMID:25078809

  8. Oxygen Storage Capacity and Adsorptive Property of Praseodymium Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万颖; 马建新; 方明; 刘毅廷

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen storage and adsorptive properties of praseodymium oxides were investigated by pulse experiments and temperature-programmed desportion/reduction (TPD/TPR) experiments. Pr2O3 possesses the similar oxygen storage properties to CeO 2, and its dynamic oxygen storage capacity is 14.9 μmolg-1. The studies on TPD of O2, H2O and CO and TPR show that Pr2O3 provides more active sur face oxygen species and at a lower temperature than CeO2. It is suggested that Pr2O3 can be a well candidate as an oxygen storage component in automobile three-way catalyst.

  9. Determination of mercury in discharge water from plastic manufactory by neutron activation analysis and copper powder adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through copper powder adsorption, neutron activation analysis was used to determine the mercury in discharge water from a plastic manufactory where the water samples were taken from various discharge ditches. The experimental results showed that waste water from mercury cells contained 1.7x10-9 approximately 8.19x10-6 g Hg/ml while water samples taken from other areas did not show significant mercury level and were below the limit of detection. (author)

  10. Adsorption of mercury on lignin: Combined surface complexation modeling and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorption of mercury (Hg) on lignin was studied at a range of pH values using a combination of batch adsorption experiments, a surface complexation model (SCM) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Surface complexation modeling indicates that three types of acid sites on lignin surfaces, namely aliphatic carboxylic-, aromatic carboxylic- and phenolic-type surface groups, contributed to Hg(II) adsorption. The bond distance and coordination number of Hg(II) adsorption samples at pH 3.0, 4.0 and 5.5 were obtained from extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy analysis. The results of SCM and XAS combined reveal that the predominant adsorption species of Hg(II) on lignin changes from HgCl20 to monodentate complex –C–O–HgCl and then bidentate complex –C–O–Hg–O–C– with increasing pH value from 2.0 to 6.0. The good agreement between SCM and XAS results provides new insight into understanding the mechanisms of Hg(II) adsorption on lignin. - Highlights: ► Lignin exhibits a high Hg(II) adsorption capability. ► Adsorption of Hg(II) on lignin is strongly pH-dependent. ► HgCl20, –C–O–HgCl and –C–O–Hg–O–C– are the main adsorption species of Hg(II). - Adsorption of Hg(II) on lignin is strongly pH-dependent, and the main adsorption Hg(II) species change from HgCl20 to –C–O–HgCl and –C–O–Hg–O–C– as pH increases from 2.0 to 6.0.

  11. Alkali metal cation doping of metal-organic framework for enhancing carbon dioxide adsorption capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Cao; Yunxia Zhao; Fujiao Song; Qin Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted much attention as adsorbents for the separation of CO2 from flue gas or natural gas. Here, a typical metal-organic framework HKUST-1(also named Cu-BTC or MOF-199) was chemically reduced by doping it with alkali metals (Li, Na and K) and they were further used to investigate their CO2 adsorption capacities. The structural information, surface chemistry and thermal behavior of the prepared adsorbent samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm analysis. The results showed that the CO2 storage capacity of HKUST-1 doped with moderate quantities of Li+, Na+ and K+, individually, was greater than that of unmodified HKUST-1. The highest CO2 adsorption uptake of 8.64 mmol/g was obtained with 1K-HKUST-1, and it was ca. 11%increase in adsorption capacity at 298 K and 18 bar as compared with HKUST-1. Moreover, adsorption tests showed that HKUST-1 and 1K-HKUST-1 displayed much higher adsorption capacities of CO2 than those of N2. Finally, the adsorption/desorption cycle experiment revealed that the adsorption performance of 1K-HKUST-1 was fairly stable, without obvious deterioration in the adsorption capacity of CO2 after 10 cycles.

  12. Adsorption Capacity of Kaolinite for Copper (II) under Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Wei

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of Cu2+ on kaolinite under magnetic field was studied at 25℃.The magnetic effects were investigated by designing the variation of exposure time,magnetic flux density and the method of magnetic exposure.The results from these study show that the magnetic treatment significantly enhance the fraction of adsorption of Cu2+,the adsorption of Cu2+ by kaolinite increases with the increase of pH value from 2 to 6.Both the magnetic exposure time and the magnetic flux density promote the fraction of adsorption Cu2+ on kaolinite.

  13. Studies on The Adsorption Capacity for Bilirubin of The Adsorbent Chitosan-β-Cyclodextrin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The adsorbent crosslinked chitosan-β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was prepared by the reaction of glutaraldehyde with chitosan and β-cyclodextrin. This type of adsorbent has high adsorption capacity for unconjugated bilirubin. The adsorption capacity was related to the β-CD content of the adsorbent; phosphate buffer concentration; temperature; pH value; ionic strength and the adsorbent beads. The results indicated that the chitosan-β-CD was a good adsorbent for unconjugated bilirubin with high capacity.

  14. Removal of mercury(II) ions in aqueous solution using the peel biomass of Pachira aquatica Aubl: kinetics and adsorption equilibrium studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Andrea J; Dos Santos, Walter N L; Silva, Laiana O B; das Virgens, Cesário F

    2016-05-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic substance that is a health hazard to humans. This study aims to investigate powders obtained from the peel of the fruit of Pachira aquatica Aubl, in its in natura and/or acidified form, as an adsorbent for the removal of mercury ions in aqueous solution. The materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The infrared spectra showed bands corresponding to the axial deformation of carbonyls from carboxylic acids, the most important functional group responsible for fixing the metal species to the adsorbent material. The thermograms displayed mass losses related to the decomposition of three major components, i.e., hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin. The adsorption process was evaluated using cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV AFS) and cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS). Three isotherm models were employed. The adsorption isotherm model, Langmuir-Freundlich, best represented the adsorption process, and the maximum adsorption capacity was predicted to be 0.71 and 0.58 mg g(-1) at 25 °C in nature and acidified, respectively. Adsorption efficiencies were further tested on real aqueous wastewater samples, and removal of Hg(II) was recorded as 69.6 % for biomass acidified and 76.3 % for biomass in nature. Results obtained from sorption experiments on real aqueous wastewater samples revealed that recovery of the target metal ions was very satisfactory. The pseudo-second-order model showed the best correlation to the experimental data. The current findings showed that the investigated materials are potential adsorbents for mercury(II) ion removal in aqueous solution, with acidified P. aquatica Aubl being the most efficient adsorbent. PMID:27084802

  15. Mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers are presented on future observations of and missions to Mercury, the photometry and polarimetry of Mercury, the surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry, the Goldstone radar observations of Mercury, the radar observations of Mercury, the stratigraphy and geologic history of Mercury, the geomorphology of impact craters on Mercury, and the cratering record on Mercury and the origin of impacting objects. Consideration is also given to the tectonics of Mercury, the tectonic history of Mercury, Mercury's thermal history and the generation of its magnetic field, the rotational dynamics of Mercury and the state of its core, Mercury's magnetic field and interior, the magnetosphere of Mercury, and the Mercury atmosphere. Other papers are on the present bounds on the bulk composition of Mercury and the implications for planetary formation processes, the building stones of the planets, the origin and composition of Mercury, the formation of Mercury from planetesimals, and theoretical considerations on the strange density of Mercury

  16. Experimental Investigation on Adsorption Capacity of a Variety of Activated Carbon/Refrigerant Pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed N. Shmroukh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop a device with minimum heat and mass transfer limitations between adsorbent and adsorbate, and subsequently to obtain practically applicable adsorption capacity data. Also, 5 kW adsorption chillers (evaporators, condensers and adsorbers are designed based on the experimental output data of the whole tested pairs. A finned-tube heat exchanger was employed and installed at the center adsorber, and each employed adsorbent was immobilized on its surfaces by using an adhesive agent. A variety of pairs: are activated carbon powder (ACP/R-134a, ACP/R-407c, ACP/R-507A, activated carbon granules (ACG/R-507A, ACG /R-407c and ACG /R-134a, were examined at different adsorption temperatures of 25, 30, 35 and 50°C. It was found that, at the adsorption temperature of 25°C the maximum adsorption capacity was 0.8352 kg kg-1 for ACP/R-134a, while at the adsorption temperature of 50°C the maximum adsorption capacity was 0.3207 kg kg-1 for ACP/R- 134a. Therefore, the ACP/R-134a pair is highly recommended to be employed as adsorption refrigeration working pair because of its higher maximum adsorption capacity higher than the other examined pairs.

  17. Capability of defective graphene-supported Pd13 and Ag13 particles for mercury adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeprasert, Jittima; Junkaew, Anchalee; Rungnim, Chompoonut; Kunaseth, Manaschai; Kungwan, Nawee; Promarak, Vinich; Namuangruk, Supawadee

    2016-02-01

    Reactivity of single-vacancy defective graphene (DG) and DG-supported Pdn and Agn (n = 1, 13) for mercury (Hg0) adsorption has been studied using density functional theory calculation. The results show that Pdn binds defective site of DG much stronger than the Agn, while metal nanocluster binds DG stronger than single metal atom. Metal clustering affects the adsorption ability of Pd composite while that of Ag is comparatively less. The binding strength of -8.49 eV was found for Pd13 binding on DG surface, indicating its high stability. Analyses of structure, energy, partial density of states, and d-band center (ɛd) revealed that the adsorbed metal atom or cluster enhances the reactivity of DG toward Hg adsorption. In addition, the Hg adsorption ability of Mn-DG composite is found to be related to the ɛd of the deposited Mn, in which the closer ɛd of Mn to the Fermi level correspond to the higher adsorption strength of Hg on Mn-DG composite. The order of Hg adsorption strength on Mn-DG composite are as follows: Pd13 (-1.68 eV) >> Ag13 (-0.67 eV) ∼ Ag1 (-0.69 eV) > Pd1 (-0.62 eV). Pd13-DG composite is therefore more efficient sorbent for Hg0 removal in terms of high stability and high adsorption reactivity compared to the Ag13. Further design of highly efficient carbon based sorbents should be focused on tailoring the ɛd of deposited metals.

  18. Adsorption capacity of various adsorbents for decolorization of wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Romčević, Gorana

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption is applied for the removal of dyes from wastewater effluent from textile and other industries. Dyes from wastewater need to be removed before it mixes with water bodies. Among the treatment options, adsorption appears to have considerable potential for the removal of colour from wastewaters. Activated carbon is the most widely used adsorbent, but its use is limited due to its high cost. This cost problem has led to a search for the use of alternate cheap and efficient materials. ...

  19. Dynamic measurement of mercury adsorption and oxidation on activated carbon in simulated cement kiln flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Anker Degn; Windelin, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    of the sulfite converter is short and typically within 2min. Dynamic mercury adsorption and oxidation tests on commercial activated carbons Darco Hg and HOK standard were performed at 150°C using simulated cement kiln gas and a fixed bed reactor system. It is shown that the converter and analyzer...... applied. A sodium sulfite-based converter material was prepared by dry impregnation of sodium sulfite and calcium sulfate powders on zeolite pellets using water glass as binder. The sulfite converter works well at 500°C with less than 10ppmv HCl in the simulated cement kiln flue gas. The 95% response time...

  20. Modeling high adsorption capacity and kinetics of organic macromolecules on super-powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Kurotobi, Ryuji; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    The capacity to adsorb natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonates (PSSs) on small particle-size activated carbon (super-powdered activated carbon, SPAC) is higher than that on larger particle-size activated carbon (powdered-activated carbon, PAC). Increased adsorption capacity is likely attributable to the larger external surface area because the NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle; they preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle. In this study, we propose a new isotherm equation, the Shell Adsorption Model (SAM), to explain the higher adsorption capacity on smaller adsorbent particles and to describe quantitatively adsorption isotherms of activated carbons of different particle sizes: PAC and SPAC. The SAM was verified with the experimental data of PSS adsorption kinetics as well as equilibrium. SAM successfully characterized PSS adsorption isotherm data for SPACs and PAC simultaneously with the same model parameters. When SAM was incorporated into an adsorption kinetic model, kinetic decay curves for PSSs adsorbing onto activated carbons of different particle sizes could be simultaneously described with a single kinetics parameter value. On the other hand, when SAM was not incorporated into such an adsorption kinetic model and instead isotherms were described by the Freundlich model, the kinetic decay curves were not well described. The success of the SAM further supports the adsorption mechanism of PSSs preferentially adsorbing near the outer surface of activated carbon particles. PMID:21172719

  1. Structural properties and adsorption capacity of holocellulose aerogels synthesized from an alkali hydroxide-urea solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Gu-Joong; Kim, Dae-Young; Hwang, Jae-Hyun; Kang, Joo-Hyon [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    A tulip tree was used to synthesize a holocellulose aerogel from an aqueous alkali hydroxide-urea solution with the substitution of an organic solvent followed by freeze-drying. For comparison, the synthesized holocellulose aerogels were divided into two groups according to the source of the hydrogel, an upper suspended layer and a bottom concentrated layer of the centrifuged solution of cellulose and NaOH/urea solvents. We investigated the effects of the temperature of the pre-cooled NaOH/urea solution (i.e., dissolution temperature) on the pore structure and the adsorption capacity of the holocellulose aerogel. A nano-fibrillar network structure of the holocellulose aerogel was observed, with little morphological difference in pore structure for different dissolution temperatures. Both micropores and mesopores were observed in the holocellulose aerogel. The specific surface area of the holocellulose aerogel was generally greater at lower dissolution temperatures. In a series of adsorption tests using methylene blue, the holocellulose aerogel showed the greatest adsorption capacity at the lowest dissolution temperature tested ( -2 .deg. C). However, the dissolution temperature generally had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The holocellulose aerogel produced from the upper suspended layer of the centrifuged hydrogel solution showed a greater porosity and adsorption capacity than the one produced from the bottom concentrated layer. Overall, the aerogel made by utilizing a delignified tulip tree display a high surface area and a high adsorption property, indicating its possible application in eco-friendly adsorption materials.

  2. Structural properties and adsorption capacity of holocellulose aerogels synthesized from an alkali hydroxide-urea solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tulip tree was used to synthesize a holocellulose aerogel from an aqueous alkali hydroxide-urea solution with the substitution of an organic solvent followed by freeze-drying. For comparison, the synthesized holocellulose aerogels were divided into two groups according to the source of the hydrogel, an upper suspended layer and a bottom concentrated layer of the centrifuged solution of cellulose and NaOH/urea solvents. We investigated the effects of the temperature of the pre-cooled NaOH/urea solution (i.e., dissolution temperature) on the pore structure and the adsorption capacity of the holocellulose aerogel. A nano-fibrillar network structure of the holocellulose aerogel was observed, with little morphological difference in pore structure for different dissolution temperatures. Both micropores and mesopores were observed in the holocellulose aerogel. The specific surface area of the holocellulose aerogel was generally greater at lower dissolution temperatures. In a series of adsorption tests using methylene blue, the holocellulose aerogel showed the greatest adsorption capacity at the lowest dissolution temperature tested ( -2 .deg. C). However, the dissolution temperature generally had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The holocellulose aerogel produced from the upper suspended layer of the centrifuged hydrogel solution showed a greater porosity and adsorption capacity than the one produced from the bottom concentrated layer. Overall, the aerogel made by utilizing a delignified tulip tree display a high surface area and a high adsorption property, indicating its possible application in eco-friendly adsorption materials.

  3. A new methodology to evaluate adsorption capacity on nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanomaterials preparation has undergone great development in recent years, with important applications. The adsorbent properties of these nanomaterials cannot be always done using batch studies, because the nanometric particle size often hinders its physical separation, and this may affect the conclusions regarding adsorption studies. A new and simple method was developed, based on electrochemical measurements. For the validation process, synthetic alumina was used as adsorbent with copper solutions. The solid/solution ratio was kept constant in both the electrochemical and batch methods, optimizing in each case the adsorption equilibration time. Peak current versus Cu2+ concentration linearity was assessed from voltammograms. The electrochemical adsorption was accomplished utilizing cyclic voltammetry before and after the addition of the adsorbent. The amount of sorbed element was determined from the difference between the amount of Cu2+ added and that present in solution at equilibrium. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and Langmuir–Freundlich models were used to fit the experimental data obtained by both methods. The results of the electrochemical methodology have precision and accuracy statistically comparable to those obtained with the batch method. The electrochemical technique has the advantage of shorter adsorbent/adsorbate equilibration times than batch and do not require physical separation, allowing the adsorption on the imogolite to be established

  4. Adsorption capacity of phenolic compounds onto cellulose and xylan

    OpenAIRE

    Telma dos Santos Costa; Hervé Rogez; Rosinelson da Silva Pena

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between three phenolic compounds (catechin, caffeic acid and ferulic acid) onto two dietary fibres (cellulose and xylan) has been evaluated to inquire possible interferences on the biodisponibility of phenolic compounds. The adsorption kinetics were performed using solutions containing 100 mg/L of phenolic compounds during a contact time ranging between 10 and 120 minutes at pH 2.0, 4.5, and 7.0. After the kinetics, isotherms were obtained using phenolic compounds concentratio...

  5. Efficient removal and highly selective adsorption of Hg2+ by polydopamine nanospheres with total recycle capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The PDA nanospheres with uniform diameter of 150–200 nm were used to remove Hg2+ efficiently and selectively. • The desorption capacity of PDA nanospheres was 100% in pH 1. • The structure and removal capacity of PDA nanospheres remained almost unchanged after recycling five times. - Abstract: This study reported a new method for efficient removal of Hg2+ from contaminated water using highly selective adsorptive polydopamine (PDA) nanospheres, which were uniform and had a small diameter (150–200 nm). The adsorption isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamics were investigated. Also, the effects of ionic strength, co-existing ions on removing ability of PDA nanospheres for Hg2+ were studied. Adsorption of Hg2+ was very fast and efficient as adsorption equilibrium was completed within 4 h and the maximum adsorption capacities were 1861.72 mg/g, 2037.22 mg/g, and 2076.81 mg/g at 298 K, 313 K, and 328 K respectively, increasing with increasing of temperature. The PDA nanospheres exhibited highly selective adsorption of Hg2+ and had a total desorption capacity of 100% in hydrochloric acid solution, pH 1. The results showed that the structure of PDA nanospheres remained almost unchanged after recycling five times. Furthermore, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to determine the elements of PDA nanospheres before and after Hg2+ adsorption. Considering their efficient and highly Hg2+ selective adsorption, total recycle capacity, and high stability, PDA nanospheres will be feasible in a number of practical applications

  6. Effects of carbon nano-tubes treatments on their hydrogen adsorption capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquero, T.; Pierre, Y.; David, P. [CEA Centre d' Etudes du Ripault, 37 - Tours (France); Begin-Colin, S. [Institut National Polytechnique, Laboratoire de Sciences et Genie des Materiaux et de Metallurgie (INPL), 54 - Nancy (France); Lebbou, K.; Tillement, O. [Universite Claude Bernard, Laboratoire de Physico-chimie des Materiaux Luminescents, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Perriat, P. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), GEMPPM, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2003-09-01

    Since experimental confirmations of the excellent ability of gas storage of carbon nano-tubes have been carried out, tremendous work have been done to understand and to improve hydrogen adsorption in carbon nano-tubes. In this context, opening nano-tubes is a way to improve adsorption, since their internal volume may be considered as a supplementary gas reservoir. Experimentally, such an operation is carried out using thermal treatments, sonication or ball-milling. Herein, we studied ball-milling of bundle-organized single wall carbon nano-tubes. Experiments have been carried out in a planetary ball mill, using chemical agents as shock absorbers. Their effects are quantified by X-ray diffraction, transmission electronic microscope, nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Hydrogen adsorption measurements at low temperature show that it is not easy to improve in a significant way the H{sub 2} adsorption capacity of carbon nano-tubes. (authors)

  7. Optimization of layered double hydroxide stability and adsorption capacity for anionic surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Schouten, Natasja; Ham, Louis G.J. van der; Euverink, Gert-Jan W.; Haan, André B. de

    2007-01-01

    Low cost adsorption technology offers high potential to clean up laundry rinsing water. From an earlier selection of adsorbents, layered double hydroxide (LDH) proved to be an interesting material for the removal of anionic surfactant, linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) which is the main contaminant in rinsing water. The main research question was to identify the effect of process parameters of the LDH synthesis on the stability of the LDH structure and the adsorption capacity of LAS. LDH w...

  8. Correlation and prediction of adsorption capacity and affinity of aromatic compounds on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenhao; Yang, Kun; Chen, Wei; Wang, Wendi; Zhang, Jie; Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption of 22 nonpolar and polar aromatic compounds on 10 carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with various diameters, lengths and surface oxygen-containing group contents was investigated to develop predictive correlations for adsorption, using the isotherm fitting of Polanyi theory-based Dubinin-Ashtakhov (DA) model. Adsorption capacity of aromatic compounds on CNTs is negatively correlated with melting points of aromatic compounds, and surface oxygen-containing group contents and surface area ratios of mesopores to total pores of CNTs, but positively correlated with total surface area of CNTs. Adsorption affinity is positively correlated with solvatochromic parameters of aromatic compounds, independent of tube lengths and surface oxygen-containing group contents of CNTs, but negatively correlated with surface area ratios of mesopores to total pores of CNTs. The correlations of adsorption capacity and adsorption affinity with properties of both aromatic compounds and CNTs clearly have physical significance, can be used successfully with DA model to predict adsorption of aromatic compounds on CNTs from the well-known physiochemical properties of aromatic compounds (i.e., solvatochromic parameters, melting points) and CNTs (i.e., surface area and total acidic group contents), and thus can facilitate the environmental application of CNTs as sorbents and environmental risk assessment of both aromatic contaminants and CNTs. PMID:26521219

  9. Carbon nanotube membranes with ultrahigh specific adsorption capacity for water desalination and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui Ying; Han, Zhao Jun; Yu, Siu Fung; Pey, Kin Leong; Ostrikov, Kostya; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Development of technologies for water desalination and purification is critical to meet the global challenges of insufficient water supply and inadequate sanitation, especially for point-of-use applications. Conventional desalination methods are energy and operationally intensive, whereas adsorption-based techniques are simple and easy to use for point-of-use water purification, yet their capacity to remove salts is limited. Here we report that plasma-modified ultralong carbon nanotubes exhibit ultrahigh specific adsorption capacity for salt (exceeding 400% by weight) that is two orders of magnitude higher than that found in the current state-of-the-art activated carbon-based water treatment systems. We exploit this adsorption capacity in ultralong carbon nanotube-based membranes that can remove salt, as well as organic and metal contaminants. These ultralong carbon nanotube-based membranes may lead to next-generation rechargeable, point-of-use potable water purification appliances with superior desalination, disinfection and filtration properties. PMID:23941894

  10. Non-Contact Analysis of the Adsorptive Ink Capacity of Nano Silica Pigments on a Printing Coating Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Huang, Yu Dong

    2014-01-01

    Near infrared spectra combined with partial least squares were proposed as a means of non-contact analysis of the adsorptive ink capacity of recording coating materials in ink jet printing. First, the recording coating materials were prepared based on nano silica pigments. 80 samples of the recording coating materials were selected to develop the calibration of adsorptive ink capacity against ink adsorption (g/m2). The model developed predicted samples in the validation set with r2  = 0.80 and SEP  = 1.108, analytical results showed that near infrared spectra had significant potential for the adsorption of ink capacity on the recording coating. The influence of factors such as recording coating thickness, mass ratio silica: binder-polyvinyl alcohol and the solution concentration on the adsorptive ink capacity were studied. With the help of the near infrared spectra, the adsorptive ink capacity of a recording coating material can be rapidly controlled. PMID:25329464

  11. Non-contact analysis of the adsorptive ink capacity of nano silica pigments on a printing coating base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Huang, Yu Dong

    2014-01-01

    Near infrared spectra combined with partial least squares were proposed as a means of non-contact analysis of the adsorptive ink capacity of recording coating materials in ink jet printing. First, the recording coating materials were prepared based on nano silica pigments. 80 samples of the recording coating materials were selected to develop the calibration of adsorptive ink capacity against ink adsorption (g/m2). The model developed predicted samples in the validation set with r2  = 0.80 and SEP = 1.108, analytical results showed that near infrared spectra had significant potential for the adsorption of ink capacity on the recording coating. The influence of factors such as recording coating thickness, mass ratio silica: binder-polyvinyl alcohol and the solution concentration on the adsorptive ink capacity were studied. With the help of the near infrared spectra, the adsorptive ink capacity of a recording coating material can be rapidly controlled. PMID:25329464

  12. Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury is an element that is found in air, water and soil. It has several forms. Metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white, odorless liquid. If ... with other elements to form powders or crystals. Mercury is in many products. Metallic mercury is used ...

  13. Polyhydroxyl-aluminum pillaring improved adsorption capacities of Pb2+ and Cd2+ onto diatomite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱健; 王平; 雷明婧; 张伟丽

    2014-01-01

    In order to greatly improve adsorption capacity, the diatomite was pillared by polyhydroxyl-aluminum.A series of adsorption tests were conducted to obtain the optimum condition for pillared diatomite synthesis. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), surface area and porosity analyzer and micro-electrophoresis were used to determine pore structure and surface property.The pillared diatomite attaining the optimal adsorption densities (qe) of Pb2+ and Cd2+ was synthesized with the following conditions: Addition of pillaring solution containing Al3+-oligomers with a concentration range of 0.1-0.2 mol/L to a suspension containing Na+-diatomite to obtain the required Al/diatomite ratio of 10 mmol/g; synthesis temperature of 80 °C for 120 min; aging at a temperature of 105 °C for 16 h. The adsorption capacities of Pb2+ and Cd2+ on pillared diatomite increase by 23.79% and 27.36% compared with natural diatomite, respectively. The surface property of pillared diatomite is more favorable for ion adsorption than natural diatomite. The result suggests that diatomite can be modified by pillaring with polyhydroxyl-aluminum to improve its adsorption properties greatly.

  14. Facile preparation of hierarchical hollow structure gamma alumina and a study of its adsorption capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shi; Guo, Na; Liu, Lu; Wu, Xiaomin; Li, Linlin; Gan, Shucai

    2013-10-01

    The hierarchical shell and hollow core structure gamma alumina (γ-Al2O3) with high adsorption affinity toward organic pollutants was fabricated via a facile homogeneous precipitation method. The microstructure, morphology, and functional groups of the as-synthesized γ-Al2O3 were characterized in detail. The N2 adsorption-desorption measurement (BET) experimental result showed the surface area of γ-Al2O3 (Al90-600) is 320.6 m2/g and the average pore size is 17.8 nm. The effects of reaction parameters on the synthesis of hierarchical hollow structure were systematically investigated. The dye removal ability of this adsorbent was determined by batch adsorption procedure. The isotherms and kinetics of adsorption process were determined and analyzed in detail, which were found to obey the Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order for both the Congo red (CR) and Methyl orange (MO). The maximum adsorption capacity of γ-Al2O3 for CR is 835.0 mg/g, which is higher than that of many other previously reported hierarchical structured adsorbents. This facile synthetic approach is a very promising way for the design and synthesis of the typical hierarchical hollow structure materials with powerful adsorption capacity for the removal of organic contaminants from wastewater.

  15. Effect of purity on adsorption capacities of a Mars-like clay mineral at different pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Traci; Mcdoniel, Bridgett; Bustin, Roberta; Allton, Judith H.

    1992-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in adsorption of carbon dioxide on Marslike clay minerals. Some estimates of the carbon dioxide reservoir capacity of the martian regolith were calculated from the amount of carbon dioxide adsorbed on the ironrich smectite nontronite under martian conditions. The adsorption capacity of pure nontronite could place upper limits on the regolith carbon dioxide reservoir, both at present martian atmospheric pressure and at the postulated higher pressures required to permit liquid water on the surface. Adsorption of carbon dioxide on a Clay Mineral Society standard containing nontronite was studied over a wide range of pressures in the absence of water. Similar experiments were conducted on the pure nontronite extracted from the natural sample. Heating curves were obtained to help characterize and determine the purity of the clay sample.

  16. Assessment of CO₂ adsorption capacity on activated carbons by a combination of batch and dynamic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Marco; Silvestre-Albero, Ana; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Erto, Alessandro; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Lancia, Amedeo

    2014-05-27

    In this work, batch and dynamic adsorption tests are coupled for an accurate evaluation of CO2 adsorption performance of three different activated carbons (AC) obtained from olive stones by chemical activation followed by physical activation with CO2 at varying times (i.e., 20, 40, and 60 h). Kinetic and thermodynamic CO2 adsorption tests from simulated flue gas at different temperatures and CO2 pressures are carried out under both batch (a manometric equipment operating with pure CO2) and dynamic (a lab-scale fixed-bed column operating with a CO2/N2 mixture) conditions. The textural characterization of the AC samples shows a direct dependence of both micropore and ultramicropore volume on the activation time; hence, AC60 has the higher contribution. The adsorption tests conducted at 273 and 293 K showed that when CO2 pressure is lower than 0.3 bar, the lower the activation time, the higher CO2 adsorption capacity; a ranking of ω(eq)(AC20) > ω(eq)(AC40) > ω(eq)(AC60) can be exactly defined when T = 293 K. This result is likely ascribed to the narrower pore size distribution of the AC20 sample, whose smaller pores are more effective for CO2 capture at higher temperature and lower CO2 pressure, the latter representing operating conditions of major interest for decarbonation of flue gas effluent. Moreover, the experimental results obtained from dynamic tests confirm the results derived from the batch tests in terms of CO2 adsorption capacity. It is important to highlight the fact that the adsorption of N2 on the synthesized AC samples can be considered to be negligible. Finally, the importance of proper analysis for data characterization and adsorption experimental results is highlighted for the correct assessment of the CO2 removal performance of activated carbons at different CO2 pressures and operating temperatures. PMID:24784997

  17. Application of epithermal neutron activation analysis to investigate accumulation and adsorption of mercury by Spirulina platensis biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis was used to study interaction of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis with toxic metal mercury. Various concentrations of Hg(II) were added to cell cultures in a nutrient medium. The dynamics of accumulation of Hg was investigated over several days in relation to Spirulina biomass growth. The process of Hg adsorption by Spirulina biomass was studied in short-time experiments. The isotherm of adsorption was carried out in Freindlich coordinates. Natural Spirulina biomass has potential to be used in the remediation of sewage waters at Hg concentrations ∼100 μg/1

  18. Application of Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis to Investigate Accumulation and Adsorption of Mercury by Spirulina platensis Biomass

    CERN Document Server

    Mosulishvili, L M; Khizanishvili, A I; Frontasyeva, M V; Kirkesali, E I; Aksenova, N G

    2004-01-01

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis was used to study interaction of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis with toxic metal mercury. Various concentrations of Hg(II) were added to cell cultures in a nutrient medium. The dynamics of accumulation of Hg was investigated over several days in relation to Spirulina biomass growth. The process of Hg adsorption by Spirulina biomass was studied in short-time experiments. The isotherm of adsorption was carried out in Freindlich coordinates. Natural Spirulina biomass has potential to be used in the remediation of sewage waters at Hg concentrations \\sim 100 {\\mu}g/l.

  19. The Adsorption Capacity, Pore Structure, and Thermal Behavior of the Modified Clay Containing SSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge ash (SSA was created by burning municipal sludge. The potential of clay containing 1 or 3 or 5% SSA was assessed for use as a landfill liner-soil material. Batch adsorption, low temperature N2 adsorption, and TG-DTA tests were performed to evaluate the adsorption capacity, micropore structure, thermostability, and components of soils under Cr(VI and Pb(II chemical solutions. With the increasing amount of SSA in modified clay, the adsorption capacity of Cr(VI and Pb(II to the modified clay increases gradually. After absorption, the pore size of modified clay ranges from 2 nm to 8 nm. With the increasing amount of absorption, the pore volume decreases and the specific surface area increases. With the increasing of adsorption concentration of Cr(VI and Pb(II, the mass loss percentage of modified clay increases to 23.4% and 12.6%, respectively. The modified clay containing SSA may be used as a good barrier material to attenuate contamination of Cr(VI and Pb(II in landfills.

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigations of mercury adsorption on hematite (1-102) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, J.; Wilcox, J.; Jew, A. D.; Rupp, E. C.; Brown, G. E.

    2013-12-01

    Fly ash is a primary byproduct of the coal combustion process. The release of fly ash into the environment and its use in consumer products are public health concerns because of the presence of toxic trace metals and metalloids, such as mercury (Hg), selenium (Se), and arsenic (As), which may exist as components of fly ash, partition onto fly ash as it cools, or is lost to the environment through smoke stacks in a vapor phase. Therefore, it is important to understand the components of fly ash and their interaction with trace metals. In this study, calculations using density functional theory (DFT) were carried out in conjunction with experimental studies to investigate the interaction between Hg and hematite, an important mineral component of fly ash. Our experimental study, designed to simulate Hg sorption in a coal-fired power plant exhaust system, involved exposure of the fine fraction of bituminous coal fly ash (≤ 0.1 μm) to methane combustion flue gas, supplemented with SO2, NOx, HCl, and Hg in a packed-bed reactor. Sorption reaction products were characterized by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence mapping (s-XRF), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Preliminary s-XRF results showed that Hg in the sample is correlated with Fe, S, Cl, Br, and to a lesser extent with Se and As. From the XRD analysis, the dominant mineral phases detected were quartz, iron oxide (hematite), and various sulfate-bearing cements. Based on the experimental results, DFT studies were carried out to investigate the adsorption of Hg on hematite (α-Fe2O3) (1-102) surfaces. The two α-Fe2O3 (1-102) surfaces modeled consisted of two different surface terminations: (1) M2-clean, which corresponds to the oxygen terminated r-cut surface with the first layer of cations removed and no hydroxyl group and (2) M2-OH2-OH which has bihydroxylated top oxygen atoms and a second layer of hydroxylated oxygen atoms. These surface terminations

  1. Characteristics of fly ashes from full-scale coal-fired power plants and their relationship to mercury adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chang, R.; Richardson, C.; Paradis, J.

    2007-01-01

    Nine fly ash samples were collected from the particulate collection devices (baghouse or electrostatic precipitator) of four full-scale pulverized coal (PC) utility boilers burning eastern bituminous coals (EB-PC ashes) and three cyclone utility boilers burning either Powder River Basin (PRB) coals or PRB blends,(PRB-CYC ashes). As-received fly ash samples were mechanically sieved to obtain six size fractions. Unburned carbon (UBC) content, mercury content, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET)-N2 surface areas of as-received fly ashes and their size fractions were measured. In addition, UBC particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission microscopy, and thermogravimetry to obtain information on their surface morphology, structure, and oxidation reactivity. It was found that the UBC particles contained amorphous carbon, ribbon-shaped graphitic carbon, and highly ordered graphite structures. The mercury contents of the UBCs (Hg/UBC, in ppm) in raw ash samples were comparable to those of the UBC-enriched samples, indicating that mercury was mainly adsorbed on the UBC in fly ash. The UBC content decreased with a decreasing particle size range for all nine ashes. There was no correlation between the mercury and UBC contents of different size fractions of as-received ashes. The mercury content of the UBCs in each size fraction, however, generally increased with a decreasing particle size for the nine ashes. The mercury contents and surface areas of the UBCs in the PRB-CYC ashes were about 8 and 3 times higher than UBCs in the EB-PC ashes, respectively. It appeared that both the particle size and surface area of UBC could contribute to mercury capture. The particle size of the UBC in PRB-CYC ash and thus the external mass transfer was found to be the major factor impacting the mercury adsorption. Both the particle size and surface reactivity of the UBC in EB-PC ash, which generally had a lower carbon oxidation reactivity than the PRB

  2. Foam-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2015-06-02

    Foam-based adsorbents and a related method of manufacture are provided. The foam-based adsorbents include polymer foam with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the foam-based adsorbents includes irradiating polymer foam, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Foam-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  3. Powder-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2016-05-03

    A powder-based adsorbent and a related method of manufacture are provided. The powder-based adsorbent includes polymer powder with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the powder-based adsorbent includes irradiating polymer powder, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Powder-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  4. Mercury reduction and cell-surface adsorption by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Haiyan [ORNL; Lin, Hui [ORNL; Zheng, Wang [ORNL; Feng, Xinbin [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Both reduction and surface adsorption of mercuric mercury [Hg(II)] are found to occur simultaneously on G. sulfurreducens PCA cells under dark, anaerobic conditions. Reduction of Hg(II) to elemental Hg(0) initially follows a pseudo-first order kinetics with a half-life of < 2 h in the presence of 50 nM Hg(II) and 1011 cells L-1 in a phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Multiple gene deletions of the outer membrane cytochromes in this organism resulted in decrease in reduction rate from ~ 0.3 to 0.05 h-1, and reduction was nearly absent with heat-killed cells or in the cell filtrate. Adsorption of Hg(II) by cells is found to compete with, and thus inhibit, Hg(II) reduction. Depending on the Hg to cell ratio, maximum Hg(II) reduction was observed at about 5 10-19 mol Hg cell-1, but reduction terminated at a low Hg to cell ratio (< 10-20 mol Hg cell-1). This inhibitory effect is attributed to strong binding between Hg(II) and the thiol ( SH) functional groups on cells and validated by experiments in which the sorbed Hg(II) was readily exchanged by thiols (e.g., glutathione) but not by carboxylic ligands such as ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA). We suggest that coupled Hg(II)-cell interactions, i.e., reduction and surface binding, could be important in controlling Hg species transformation and bioavailability and should therefore be considered in microbial Hg(II) uptake and methylation studies.

  5. Comparative study of carbon nanotubes and granular activated carbon: Physicochemical properties and adsorption capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangupomu, Roja Haritha; Sattler, Melanie L; Ramirez, David

    2016-01-25

    The overall goal was to determine an optimum pre-treatment condition for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to facilitate air pollutant adsorption. Various combinations of heat and chemical pre-treatment were explored, and toluene was tested as an example hazardous air pollutant adsorbate. Specific objectives were (1) to characterize raw and pre-treated single-wall (SW) and multi-wall (MW) CNTs and compare their physical/chemical properties to commercially available granular activated carbon (GAC), (2) to determine the adsorption capacities for toluene onto pre-treated CNTs vs. GAC. CNTs were purified via heat-treatment at 400 °C in steam, followed by nitric acid treatment (3N, 5N, 11N, 16N) for 3-12 h to create openings to facilitate adsorption onto interior CNT sites. For SWNT, Raman spectroscopy showed that acid treatment removed impurities up to a point, but amorphous carbon reformed with 10h-6N acid treatment. Surface area of SWNTs with 3 h-3N acid treatment (1347 m(2)/g) was higher than the raw sample (1136 m(2)/g), and their toluene maximum adsorption capacity was comparable to GAC. When bed effluent reached 10% of inlet concentration (breakthrough indicating time for bed cleaning), SWNTs had adsorbed 240 mg/g of toluene, compared to 150 mg/g for GAC. Physical/chemical analyses showed no substantial difference for pre-treated vs. raw MWNTs. PMID:26476807

  6. Effect of surface modification of activated carbon on its adsorption capacity for NH3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Xiao-mei; ZHU Shu-quan; ZHANG Wen-hui

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effects of carbon surface characteristics on NH3 adsorption, coal-based and coconut shell activated carbons were modified by treatment with oxidants. The surface properties of the carbons were characterized by low temperature nitrogen sorption, by Boehm's titrations and by XPS techniques. NH3 adsorption isotherms of the original and the modified carbons were determined. The results show that the carbons were oxidized by HNO3 and (NH4)2S2O8, and that there was an increase in oxygen containing functional groups on the surface. However, the pore-size distribution of the coal-based carbons was changed after KMnO4 treatment. It was found that the NH3 adsorption capacity of the modified carbons was enhanced and that the most pronounced enhancement results from (NH4)2S2O8 oxidation. Under our experimental conditions, the capacity is positively corrected to the number of surface functional groups containing oxygen, and to the number of micro-pores. Furthermore, an empirical model of the relationship between NH3 adsorption and multiple factors on the carbon surface was fit using a complex regression method.

  7. Examination of zinc adsorption capacity of soils treated with different pyrolysis products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rétháti Gabriella

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter input into soils is essential regarding agricultural, environmental and soil science aspects as well. However, the application of the pyrolysed forms of biochars and materials with different organic matter content gained more attention in order to decrease the emission of the green house gases (CO2, N2O from the soil. During pyrolysis, the materials containing high organic matter (biomass-originated organic matter are heated in oxygen-free (or limited amount of oxygen environment. As a result, the solid phase, which remains after eliminating the gases and liquid phase, is more stable compared to the original product, it cannot be mineralized easily in the soil and its utilization is more beneficial in terms of climatic aspects. Furthermore, it can improve soil structure and it can retain soil moisture and cations in the topsoil for long periods of time, which is very important for plants. In our experiment, the effects of biochar and bone char were examined on soils by zinc adsorption experiments. Based on our experiments, we concluded that the pyrolysis products can have significant Zn adsorption capacity compared to the soil. Bone ash can adsorb more Zn than the charcoal product. The Zn adsorption capacity of soils treated by pyrolysis products can be described by Langmuir adsorption isotherms. However, based on the amount of pyrolysis products, one or two term Langmuir isotherm fits well on the experiment data, which depends on the time the pyrolysis product has spent in the soil.

  8. A Porous Aromatic Framework Constructed from Benzene Rings Has a High Adsorption Capacity for Perfluorooctane Sulfonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qin; Zhao, Changwei; Liu, Guixia; Ren, Hao

    2016-02-01

    A low-cost and easily constructed porous aromatic framework (PAF-45) was successfully prepared using the Scholl reaction. PAF-45 was, for the first time, used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from aqueous solution. Systematic experiments were performed to determine the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS and to characterize the kinetics of the adsorption process. The adsorption of PFOS onto PAF-45 reached equilibrium in 30 min, and the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS was excellent (5847 mg g-1 at pH 3). The amount of PFOS adsorbed by PAF-45 increased significantly as the cation (Na+, Mg2+, or Fe3+) concentration increased, which probably occurred because the cations enhanced the interactions between the negatively charged PFOS molecules and the positively charged PAF-45 surface. The cations Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+ were found to form complexes with PFOS anions in solution. Density functional theory was used to identify the interactions between PFOS and Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+. We expect that materials of the same type as PAF-45 could be useful adsorbents for removing organic pollutants from industrial wastewater and contaminated surface water.

  9. Adsorptive behaviour of mercury on algal biomass: Competition with divalent cations and organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carro, Leticia; Barriada, Jose L. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica e Ingenieria Quimica I, Universidad de A Coruna, c/Rua da Fraga 10, 15008 A Coruna (Spain); Herrero, Roberto, E-mail: r.herrero@udc.es [Departamento de Quimica Fisica e Ingenieria Quimica I, Universidad de A Coruna, c/Rua da Fraga 10, 15008 A Coruna (Spain); Sastre de Vicente, Manuel E. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica e Ingenieria Quimica I, Universidad de A Coruna, c/Rua da Fraga 10, 15008 A Coruna (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Native and protonated macroalga S. muticum are good materials for mercury removal. {yields} Fast kinetic process and high mercury uptakes have been found for those materials. {yields} Diffusion control is the rate limiting step of the process. {yields} Competition effects by organic compounds, inorganic salts and divalent cations were analyzed. {yields} Continuous flow experiments allowed identification of mercury reduction during metal removal. - Abstract: Biosorption processes constitute an effective technique for mercury elimination. Sorption properties of native and acid-treated Sargassum muticum have been studied. Effect of pH, initial mercury concentration and contact time studies provided fundamental information about the sorption process. This information was used as the reference values to analyse mercury sorption under competition conditions. Saline effect has shown little influence in sorption, when only electrostatic modifications took place upon salt addition. On the contrary, if mercury speciation dramatically changed owing to the addition of an electrolyte, such as in the case of chloride salt, very large modifications in mercury sorption were observed. Competition with other divalent cations or organic compounds has shown little or none effect on mercury, indicating that a different mechanism is taking place during the removal of these pollutants. Finally, continuous flow experiments have clearly shown that a reduction process is also taking place during mercury removal. This fact is not obvious to elucidate under batch sorption experiments. Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis of the surface of the materials show deposits of mercury(I) and metallic mercury which is indicative of the reduction process proposed.

  10. Adsorptive behaviour of mercury on algal biomass: Competition with divalent cations and organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Native and protonated macroalga S. muticum are good materials for mercury removal. → Fast kinetic process and high mercury uptakes have been found for those materials. → Diffusion control is the rate limiting step of the process. → Competition effects by organic compounds, inorganic salts and divalent cations were analyzed. → Continuous flow experiments allowed identification of mercury reduction during metal removal. - Abstract: Biosorption processes constitute an effective technique for mercury elimination. Sorption properties of native and acid-treated Sargassum muticum have been studied. Effect of pH, initial mercury concentration and contact time studies provided fundamental information about the sorption process. This information was used as the reference values to analyse mercury sorption under competition conditions. Saline effect has shown little influence in sorption, when only electrostatic modifications took place upon salt addition. On the contrary, if mercury speciation dramatically changed owing to the addition of an electrolyte, such as in the case of chloride salt, very large modifications in mercury sorption were observed. Competition with other divalent cations or organic compounds has shown little or none effect on mercury, indicating that a different mechanism is taking place during the removal of these pollutants. Finally, continuous flow experiments have clearly shown that a reduction process is also taking place during mercury removal. This fact is not obvious to elucidate under batch sorption experiments. Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis of the surface of the materials show deposits of mercury(I) and metallic mercury which is indicative of the reduction process proposed.

  11. Adsorption capacity of methylene blue, an organic pollutant, by montmorillonite clay

    KAUST Repository

    Feddal, I.

    2013-11-19

    The isotherms and kinetics of the adsorption of a cationic dye in aqueous solution, methylene blue, on a local Algerian montmorillonite clay mineral (raw, sodium and thermally activated at 300 and 500°C) were determined experimentally. Various parameters influencing the adsorption were optimized, mainly solid-liquid contact time, mass of adsorbent, initial concentration of dye, pH of the solution and temperature. Results showed that the adsorption kinetics were fast: 30 min for the raw clay mineral, and 20 min for sodium clay mineral (SC) and thermally activated at 300°C, whereas with the clay mineral calcined at 500°C, the equilibrium was reached after 150 min only. The maximum adsorption capacity was reached at pH 6.6. Results deducted from the adsorption isotherms also showed that the retention follows the Langmuir model. In addition, it was found that the kinetics were in the order of 2 (K = 2.457 × 106 g/mg.h) for sodium clay and were limited by an intra-particle diffusion. SC was found to be a better adsorbent to remove methylene blue from industrial wastewater. © 2013 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  12. Simulation of Gaseous Mercury Adsorption of Different Building Materials%不同建筑材料对气态汞的吸附模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高小峰; 谷依露; 谢田; 刘阳; 黄晟; 赵由才

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties ,phase change energy storage ,environmental protection ,and recycling of building materials are extensively studied ,but few studies focus on the mercury adsorption of different building materials .Five types of cement brick pow der including foam concrete ,red brick ,aggregate and gravel as well as several standard concrete blocks were exposed to gaseous mercury in constant temperature to determine most vulnerable building material to mercury contamination and the contamination depth of concrete blocks .Results showed that small particle contributed to large mercury adsorption , however different performance was found amongvarious materials . Red brick was the likely to have strong adsorption capacity followed by foam concrete and gravel . For concrete block ,the pollution mainly concentratedat the 0~1.5cm of the surface .As a result ,for some seriously mercury polluted factories and workshops ,mercury pollution can be removed by peeling the skin of the buildings before demolition , renovation process .%建筑材料的力学性质、相变蓄能、生态环保、再生利用等受到广泛关注,但很少有关于不同建筑材料对汞的吸附研究。通过对水泥砖、泡沫混凝土、红砖、骨料、砂石等5种建筑材料细粉和水泥混凝土立方体标准试块置于恒温室内进行气态汞吸附模拟,探索出最易受汞污染的建筑材料和水泥混凝土块的受污染深度。通过XRD和XRF对5种建筑材料分析得出其成分以SiO2为主,其次是CaCO3。5种建筑材料进行汞吸附实验结果表明,整体上粒径越小吸附量越大,但不同材料之间存在差异性,红砖是最容易受污染的建筑材料,其次泡沫混凝土和砂石对汞也具有较大吸附性,水泥砖和骨料对汞吸附能力较弱。水泥混凝土块吸附模拟表明污染主要存在于表层0~1.5 cm范围内,汞污染严重的工厂和车间等在拆迁、改建过程中,需要对其表层剥离,去除汞污染。

  13. Oil Spill Adsorption Capacity of Activated Carbon Tablets from Corncobs in Simulated Oil-Water Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonalyn V. Maulion

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil spill in bodies of water is one of severe environmental problems that is facing all over the country and in the world. Since oil is an integral part of the economy, increasing trend for its demand and transport of has led to a great treat in the surface water. One of the promising techniques in the removal of the oil spills in water bodies is adsorption using activated carbon form waste material such as corn cobs. The purpose of this study is to determine the adsorption capacity of activated carbon tablets derived from corncobs in the removal of oil. The properties of activated carbon produced have a pH of 7.0, bulk density of 0.26 g//cm3 , average pore size of 45nm, particle size of 18% at 60 mesh and 39% at 80 mesh, iodine number of 1370 mg/g and surface area of 1205 g/m2. The amount of bentonite clay as binder (15%,20%,30%, number of ACT (1,2,3 and time of contact(30,60,90 mins has been varied to determine the optimum condition where the activated carbon will have the best adsorption capacity in the removal of oil. Results showed that at 15% binder, 60 mins contact time and 3 tablets of activated carbon is the optimum condition which give a percentage adsorption of 22.82% of oil. Experimental data also showed that a Langmuir isotherm was the best fit isotherm for adsorption of ACT.

  14. Synthesis of alumina nano-sheets via supercritical fluid technology with high uranyl adsorptive capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supercritical carbon dioxide is beneficial to the synthesis of superior ultrafine and uniform materials due to its high chemical stability, low viscosity, high diffusivity, and 'zero' surface tension. γ-Alumina nano-sheets were obtained by a simple hydrothermal route in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide. XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM and nitrogen sorption isotherm were employed to characterize the samples. Alumina as-prepared has a high specific surface area of up to 200 ± 6 m2 g-1, which presents a high adsorption capacity (4.66 ± 0.02 mg g-1) for uranyl ions from aqueous solution. Furthermore, the adsorption process was found to be endothermic and spontaneous in nature. (authors)

  15. ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBER FABRIC IN CYANIDE LEACHING LIQUOR OF GOLD ORES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption capacity of ACFF in cyanide leaching liquor of gold ores was studied withcyanide leaching liquor of gold ores, containing various kinds of ions. The adsorbed leaching liquorwas analyzed by atomic emission spectroscopy and colorimetric method. The contents of variouskinds of ions in ACFF were determined with X-ray photoctron spectroscopy. ACFF not onlyadsorbed gold but also adsorbed arsenic, nickel, zinc, calcium, sulphur, bismuth, copper, iron. silverand cyanide anion. Atomic percentage of C and those of O, N, Zr, Fe increase and decreaserespectively with the increase of the layer depth, while those of Ca, Au, Ag keep constant.

  16. Unified method for the total pore volume and pore size distribution of hierarchical zeolites from argon adsorption and mercury intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenvin, Jeffrey; Jagiello, Jacek; Mitchell, Sharon; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-02-01

    A generalized approach to determine the complete distribution of macropores, mesopores, and micropores from argon adsorption and mercury porosimetry is developed and validated for advanced zeolite catalysts with hierarchically structured pore systems in powder and shaped forms. Rather than using a fragmented approach of simple overlays from individual techniques, a unified approach that utilizes a kernel constructed from model isotherms and model intrusion curves is used to calculate the complete pore size distribution and the total pore volume of the material. An added benefit of a single full-range pore size distribution is that the cumulative pore area and the area distribution are also obtained without the need for additional modeling. The resulting complete pore size distribution and the kernel accurately model both the adsorption isotherm and the mercury porosimetry. By bridging the data analysis of two primary characterization tools, this methodology fills an existing gap in the library of familiar methods for porosity assessment in the design of materials with multilevel porosity for novel technological applications. PMID:25603366

  17. Adsorption capacities of activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol vary with activated carbon particle size: Effects of adsorbent and adsorbate characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Sakamoto, Asuka; Taniguchi, Takuma; Pan, Long; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-11-15

    The adsorption capacities of nine activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) were evaluated. For some carbons, adsorption capacity substantially increased when carbon particle diameter was decreased from a few tens of micrometers to a few micrometers, whereas for other carbons, the increase of adsorption capacity was small for MIB and moderate for geosmin. An increase of adsorption capacity was observed for other hydrophobic adsorbates besides geosmin and MIB, but not for hydrophilic adsorbates. The parameter values of a shell adsorption model describing the increase of adsorption capacity were negatively correlated with the oxygen content of the carbon among other characteristics. Low oxygen content indicated low hydrophilicity. The increase of adsorption capacity was related to the hydrophobic properties of both adsorbates and activated carbons. For adsorptive removal of hydrophobic micropollutants such as geosmin, it is therefore recommended that less-hydrophilic activated carbons, such as coconut-shell-based carbons, be microground to a particle diameter of a few micrometers to enhance their equilibrium adsorption capacity. In contrast, adsorption by hydrophilic carbons or adsorption of hydrophilic adsorbates occur in the inner pores, and therefore adsorption capacity is unchanged by particle size reduction. PMID:26302219

  18. Diamine-appended metal-organic frameworks: enhanced formaldehyde-vapor adsorption capacity, superior recyclability and water resistibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong; Wang, WenZhong; Jiang, Dong; Zhang, Ling; Zheng, Yali

    2016-07-28

    Capturing formaldehyde (HCHO) from indoor air with porous adsorbents still faces challenges due to their low uptake capacity, difficult regeneration, and especially, the sorption capacity reduction that is caused by the competitive adsorption of H2O when exposed to a humid atmosphere. In this work, MIL-101 is modified with ethylenediamine (ED) on its open-metal sites to substantially improve the HCHO adsorption properties. The HCHO uptake capacity of modified MIL-101 can be up to 5.49 mmol g(-1) in this study, which is among the highest-levels of various adsorbents reported thus far. Moreover, this modification both improved the material's recyclability and water resistibility, allowing for cyclic and selective tests with stable adsorption capacities, revealing the potential utility of amine-modified MOFs for indoor air purification. PMID:27338802

  19. Efficient removal and highly selective adsorption of Hg{sup 2+} by polydopamine nanospheres with total recycle capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiulan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory for Green Processing of Chemical Engineering of Xinjiang bingtuan, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003 (China); Jia, Xin, E-mail: jiaxin@shzu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory for Green Processing of Chemical Engineering of Xinjiang bingtuan, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003 (China); Zhang, Guoxiang [Gansu Dayu Water-saving Group Co., Ltd, Jiuquan 735000 (China); Hu, Jiamei; Sheng, Wenbo; Ma, Zhiyuan; Lu, Jianjiang; Liu, Zhiyong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory for Green Processing of Chemical Engineering of Xinjiang bingtuan, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003 (China)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • The PDA nanospheres with uniform diameter of 150–200 nm were used to remove Hg{sup 2+} efficiently and selectively. • The desorption capacity of PDA nanospheres was 100% in pH 1. • The structure and removal capacity of PDA nanospheres remained almost unchanged after recycling five times. - Abstract: This study reported a new method for efficient removal of Hg{sup 2+} from contaminated water using highly selective adsorptive polydopamine (PDA) nanospheres, which were uniform and had a small diameter (150–200 nm). The adsorption isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamics were investigated. Also, the effects of ionic strength, co-existing ions on removing ability of PDA nanospheres for Hg{sup 2+} were studied. Adsorption of Hg{sup 2+} was very fast and efficient as adsorption equilibrium was completed within 4 h and the maximum adsorption capacities were 1861.72 mg/g, 2037.22 mg/g, and 2076.81 mg/g at 298 K, 313 K, and 328 K respectively, increasing with increasing of temperature. The PDA nanospheres exhibited highly selective adsorption of Hg{sup 2+} and had a total desorption capacity of 100% in hydrochloric acid solution, pH 1. The results showed that the structure of PDA nanospheres remained almost unchanged after recycling five times. Furthermore, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to determine the elements of PDA nanospheres before and after Hg{sup 2+} adsorption. Considering their efficient and highly Hg{sup 2+} selective adsorption, total recycle capacity, and high stability, PDA nanospheres will be feasible in a number of practical applications.

  20. Study on the Adsorption Capacities for Airborne Particulates of Landscape Plants in Different Polluted Regions in Beijing (China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Kang Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Urban landscape plants are an important component of the urban ecosystem, playing a significant role in the adsorption of airborne particulates and air purification. In this study, six common landscape plants in Beijing were chosen as research subjects, and the adsorption capacities for each different plant leaf and the effects of the leaf structures for the adsorption capacities for particulates were determined. Preliminary results show that needle-leaved tree species adsorbed more airborne particulates than broad-leaved tree species for the same leaf area. Pinus tabuliformis exhibits the highest adsorption capacity, at 3.89 ± 0.026 μg·cm−2, almost two times as much as that of Populus tomentosa (2.00 ± 0.118 μg·cm−2. The adsorption capacities for PM10 of the same tree species leaves, in different polluted regions had significant differences, and the adsorption capacities for PM10 of the tree species leaf beside the Fifth Ring Road were higher than those of the tree species leaves in the Botanical Garden, although the adsorption capacities for PM2.5 of the same tree species in different polluted regions had no significant differences. By determining the soluble ion concentrations of the airborne particulates in two regions, it is suggested that the soluble ion concentrations of PM10 in the atmosphere in the Botanical Garden and beside the Fifth Ring Road have significant differences, while those of PM2.5 in the atmosphere had no significant differences. In different polluted regions there are significant adaptive changes to the leaf structures, and when compared with slightly polluted region, in the seriously polluted region the epidermis cells of the plant leaves shrinked, the surface textures of the leaves became rougher, and the stomas’ frequency and the pubescence length increased. Even though the plant leaves exposed to the seriously polluted region changed significantly, these plants can still grow normally and healthily.

  1. Reservoir capacity estimates in shale plays based on experimental adsorption data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Tan

    from different measurement techniques using representative fluids (such as CH4 and CO2) at elevated pressures, and the adsorbed density can range anywhere between the liquid and the solid state of the adsorbate. Whether these discrepancies are associated with the inherent heterogeneity of mudrocks and/or with poor data quality requires more experiments under well-controlled conditions. Nevertheless, it has been found in this study that methane GIP estimates can vary between 10-45% and 10-30%, respectively, depending on whether the free or the total amount of gas is considered. Accordingly, CO2 storage estimates range between 30-90% and 15-50%, due to the larger adsorption capacity and gas density at similar pressure and temperature conditions. A manometric system has been designed and built that allows measuring the adsorption of supercritical fluids in microporous materials. Preliminary adsorption tests have been performed using a microporous 13X zeolite and CO 2 as an adsorbing gas at a temperature of 25oC and 35oC and at pressures up to 500 psi. Under these conditions, adsorption is quantified with a precision of +/- 3%. However, relative differences up to 15-20% have been observed with respect to data published in the literature on the same adsorbent and at similar experimental conditions. While it cannot be fully explained with uncertainty analysis, this discrepancy can be reduced by improving experiment practice, thus including the application of a higher adsorbent's regeneration temperature, of longer equilibrium times and of a careful flushing of the system between the various experimental steps. Based on the results on 13X zeolite, virtual tests have been conducted to predict the performance of the manometric system to measure adsorption on less adsorbing materials, such as mudrocks. The results show that uncertainties in the estimated adsorbed amount are much more significant in shale material and they increase with increasing pressure. In fact, relative

  2. Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Mahoney, T J

    2014-01-01

    This gazetteer and atlas on Mercury lists, defines and illustrates every named (as opposed to merely catalogued) object and term as related to Mercury within a single reference work. It contains a glossary of terminology used, an index of all the headwords in the gazetteer, an atlas comprising maps and images with coordinate grids and labels identifying features listed in the gazetteer, and appendix material on the IAU nomenclature system and the transcription systems used for non-roman alphabets. This book is useful for the general reader, writers and editors dealing with astronomical themes, and those astronomers concerned with any aspect of astronomical nomenclature.

  3. Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André; Steiger, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Mercury, the planet closest to the Sun, is different in several respects from the other three terrestrial planets. In appearance, it resembles the heavily cratered surface of the Moon, but its density is high, it has a magnetic field and magnetosphere, but no atmosphere or ionosphere. This book reviews the progress made in Mercury studies since the flybys by Mariner 10 in 1974-75, based on the continued research using the Mariner 10 archive, on observations from Earth, and on increasingly realistic models of its interior evolution.

  4. Effects of Igneous Intrusion on Microporosity and Gas Adsorption Capacity of Coals in the Haizi Mine, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jingyu Jiang; Yuanping Cheng

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of igneous intrusions on pore structure and adsorption capacity of the Permian coals in the Huaibei Coalfield, China. Twelve coal samples were obtained at different distances from a ~120 m extremely thick sill. Comparisons were made between unaltered and heat-affected coals using geochemical data, pore-fracture characteristics, and adsorption properties. Thermal alteration occurs down to ~1.3 × sill thickness. Approaching the sill, the vitrinite reflectance (R...

  5. Effectiveness of Alkali-Acid Treatment in Enhancement the Adsorption Capacity for Rice Straw: The Removal of Methylene Blue Dye

    OpenAIRE

    Nady A. Fathy; El-Shafey, Ola I.; Khalil, Laila B.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of alkali-acid modification in enhancement the adsorption capacity of rice straw (RS) for removing a basic dye was studied. The obtained adsorbents were characterized by slurry pH, pHPZC, iodine number, methylene blue number, FTIR, and SEM analyses. Adsorption of methylene blue (MB) was described by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin, and Redlich-Peterson isotherm models. Effects of contact time, initial concentration of MB dye, pH of solution, adsorbent dose, salt concentrat...

  6. Reservoir capacity estimates in shale plays based on experimental adsorption data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Tan

    from different measurement techniques using representative fluids (such as CH4 and CO2) at elevated pressures, and the adsorbed density can range anywhere between the liquid and the solid state of the adsorbate. Whether these discrepancies are associated with the inherent heterogeneity of mudrocks and/or with poor data quality requires more experiments under well-controlled conditions. Nevertheless, it has been found in this study that methane GIP estimates can vary between 10-45% and 10-30%, respectively, depending on whether the free or the total amount of gas is considered. Accordingly, CO2 storage estimates range between 30-90% and 15-50%, due to the larger adsorption capacity and gas density at similar pressure and temperature conditions. A manometric system has been designed and built that allows measuring the adsorption of supercritical fluids in microporous materials. Preliminary adsorption tests have been performed using a microporous 13X zeolite and CO 2 as an adsorbing gas at a temperature of 25oC and 35oC and at pressures up to 500 psi. Under these conditions, adsorption is quantified with a precision of +/- 3%. However, relative differences up to 15-20% have been observed with respect to data published in the literature on the same adsorbent and at similar experimental conditions. While it cannot be fully explained with uncertainty analysis, this discrepancy can be reduced by improving experiment practice, thus including the application of a higher adsorbent's regeneration temperature, of longer equilibrium times and of a careful flushing of the system between the various experimental steps. Based on the results on 13X zeolite, virtual tests have been conducted to predict the performance of the manometric system to measure adsorption on less adsorbing materials, such as mudrocks. The results show that uncertainties in the estimated adsorbed amount are much more significant in shale material and they increase with increasing pressure. In fact, relative

  7. Elemental mercury adsorption on sulfur-impregnated porous carbon - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Suresh Kumar; Shoaibi, Ahmed Al; Srinivasakannan, C

    2014-01-01

    The presence of elemental mercury in wellhead natural gas is an important industrial problem, since even low levels of mercury can damage cryogenic aluminium heat exchangers and other plant equipment. Mercury present in the natural gas stream will also dramatically shorten the useful life of precious metal catalysts. The present work reviews the overall process of elemental mercury removal in practice using non-regenerative adsorbents (e.g. sulfur-impregnated porous carbon), addressing the various influencing parameters such as the method of sulfur impregnation, the impregnation temperature, the sulfur to carbon ratio, the impregnation time, the impact of flue gas constituents, the effect of processing temperature, and the nature of any carbon-containing functional groups present. The distribution of elemental sulfur is found to be the key to developing an effective adsorbent, rather than quantity of sulfur impregnated. Modifying or developing an adsorbent for elemental mercury removal from natural gas needs a detail physical and chemical characteristics assessment of the adsorbent. PMID:24600836

  8. Evaluation of Adsorption Capacity of Montmorillonite and Aluminium-pillared Clay for Pb2+, Cu2+ and Zn2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humelnicu, Doina; Ignat, Maria; Suchea, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption capacity of the two adsorbents was investigated as a function of contact time between adsorbent and heavy metal ions solutions, the initial heavy metals concentration of the synthetic wastewater, pH value, temperature and adsorbent mass. Preliminary experiments at different pH values between 2.0 and 7.0 were performed, and were observed that maximum adsorption occurs at pH 5 for copper (q(max) = 92.59 mg · g(–1)), 6.0 for lead (qmax = 97.08 mg · g(–1)) and 6.5 for zinc ions (q(max) = 73.52 mg · g(–1)), respectively. The sorption capacity of studied adsorbents for Pb(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) was calculated using Langmuir and Freundlich models. Thermodynamic parameters – enthalpy change (ΔH(0)), entropychange (ΔS(0)) and free energy (ΔG(0)) – were calculated for predicting the nature of adsorption. Scanning electron micrograph(SEM) revealed changes in the surface morphology of the adsorbent as a result of heavy metal ions adsorption.EDS characterization confirmed qualitatively the presence of adsorbed species in the samples. On the basis of the obtained results the adsorption it was proposed an ordered adsorption: Pb(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), on the sorbents we investigated. PMID:26680724

  9. Preparation of mesoporous poly (acrylic acid)/SiO2 composite nanofiber membranes having adsorption capacity for indigo carmine dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ran; Jia, Min; Li, Fengting; Wang, Hongtao; Zhang, Bingru; Qiao, Junlian

    2012-03-01

    Mesoporous poly (acrylic acid)/SiO2 (PAA/SiO2) composite nanofiber membranes functionalized with mercapto groups were fabricated by a sol-gel electrospinning method, and their adsorption capacity for indigo carmine was investigated. The membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. SEM and TEM observation results showed that the PAA/SiO2 fibers had diameters between 400-800 nm and mesopores with an average pore size of 3.88 nm. The specific surface area of the mesoporous nanofiber membranes was 514.89 m2/g. The characteristic peaks for mercapto group vibration in FTIR and Raman spectra demonstrated that the mercapto groups have been incorporated into the silica skeleton. The adsorption isotherm data of indigo carmine on the membranes fit well with Redlich-Peterson model, and the maximum adsorption capacity calculated was 523.11 mg/g. It was found that the removal rate of indigo carmine by the membranes reached a maximum of 98% in 90 min and the adsorption kinetics followed a pseudo-second-order model. The high adsorption capacity of PAA/SiO2 nanofiber membrane makes it a promising adsorbent for indigo carmine removal from the wastewater.

  10. Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mercury pollution from artisanal and small-scale gold mining. Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, ... 简体版 Tiếng Việt 한국어 EPA Home Privacy and Security Notice Accessibility Last updated on October 22, 2015 ...

  11. Determinants of natural zeolite clinoptilolite adsorption capacity for removing NO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabiollah Mansouri

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: NO2 is a poisonous gas that potential to cause major threat to human being health and the environment, as a result, removing this gas from environment seems to be essential. Methods: The study aimed to remove this gas from environment using Iranian natural zeolite, clinoptilolite. After crushing and preparing two sizes of 1 and 2 mm zeolite they were activated in 380 to 420 ºC for 20 minutes. NO2 was produced by reaction of copper (Cu and nitric acid (HNO3 and diluted with enough air to achieve desired concentration. A laboratory reactor set with different concentration of NO2 (20, 30, and, 45 ppm, flows through the zeolite absorbent bed was prepared. Different parameters affected No2 absorption, such as concentration, height, and diameter of zeolite bed, zeolite granulation, and activation temperature were examined.Results: In different condition, the adsorption range of the zeolite for NO2 was varied from 0.35% W for 2mm granulation and the 20 ppm concentration to 1.5% W using 1mm granulation and 45 ppm concentration of NO2. Activation temperature of 420 ºC for 20 min was the best condition removing NO2. Efficiency of 1mm granulation was higher than 2mm. Conclusion: Reducing parameters such as height and diameter of zeolite bed decreased but increasing concentration of gas flow increased adsorption capacity of zeolite. Using Iranian zeolite in gas masks still not recommended.

  12. Fiber-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2016-09-06

    A fiber-based adsorbent and a related method of manufacture are provided. The fiber-based adsorbent includes polymer fibers with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight over known fibers to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. The polymer fibers include a circular morphology in some embodiments, having a mean diameter of less than 15 microns, optionally less than about 1 micron. In other embodiments, the polymer fibers include a non-circular morphology, optionally defining multiple gear-shaped, winged-shaped or lobe-shaped projections along the length of the polymer fibers. A method for forming the fiber-based adsorbents includes irradiating high surface area polymer fibers, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting the grafted fibers with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. High surface area fiber-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  13. Synthesis of polycationic bentonite-ionene complexes and their benzene adsorption capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquíria Campos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to structurally modify clays in order to incorporate water-insoluble molecules, such as petroleum hydrocarbons. The potential for ion exchange of quaternary ammonium salts was studied, which revealed their ability to interact with anions on the cationic surface, for environmental applications of the material. Ionenes, also known as polycations, have many potential uses in environmental applications. In this work, cationic aliphatic ammonium polyionenes, specifically 3,6-ionene and 3,6-dodecylionene, were prepared for incorporation into clay to form bentonite-ionene complexes. The intercalation of bentonite with ionene polymers resulted in an increase in the basal spacing of 3,6-dodecylionene from 1.5-3.5 nm. The higher d001 spacing of 3,6-dodecylionene samples than that of 3,6-ionene samples may be attributed to their longer tail length. The behavior of the TG/DTG curves and the activation energy values suggest that 3,6-dodecylionene (E = 174.85 kJ mol–1 is thermally more stable than 3,6 ionene (E = 115.52 kJ mol–1 complexes. The adsorption of benzene by 3,6-ionene and 3,6-dodecylionene was also investigated. The increase in benzene concentrations resulted in increased benzene adsorption by the sorbents tested in this work. The sorption capacity of benzene on ionene-modified bentonite was in the order of 3,6-dodecylionene > 3,6-ionene.

  14. Porphyrin-Alkaline Earth MOFs with the Highest Adsorption Capacity for Methylene Blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yuxia; Sun, Junshan; Zhang, Daopeng; Qi, Dongdong; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2016-04-25

    A series of four porphyrin-alkaline earth metal- organic frameworks [Mg(HDCPP)2 (DMF)2 ]n ⋅(H2 O)7 n (1), [Ca(HDCPP)2 (H2 O)2 ]n (DMF)1.5 n (2), [Sr(DCPP)(H2 O)(DMA)]n (3), and [Ba(DCPP)(H2 O)(DMA)]n (4) was isolated for the first time from solvothermal reaction between metal-free 5,15-di(4- carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (H2 DCPP) and alkaline earth ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the 2D and 3D supramolecular network with periodic nanosized porosity for 1/2 and 3/4, respectively. The whole series of MOFs, in particular, compounds 1 and 2 with intrinsic low molecular formula weight, exhibit superior adsorption performance for methylene blue (MB) with excellent capture capacity as represented by the thus far highest adsorption amount of 952 mg g(-1) for 2 and good selectivity, opening a new way for the potential application of the main group metal-based MOFs. PMID:27002679

  15. Shape of the hydrogen adsorption regions of MOF-5 and its impact on the hydrogen storage capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabria, I.; López, M. J.; Alonso, J. A.

    2008-11-01

    The adsorption of molecular hydrogen on a metal-organic framework (MOF) material, MOF-5, has been studied using the density-functional formalism. The calculated potential-energy surface shows that there are two main adsorption regions: both near the OZn4 oxide cores at the vertices of the cubic skeleton of MOF-5. The adsorption energies in those regions are between 100 and 130 meV/molecule. Those adsorption regions have the shape of long, wide, and deep connected trenches and passage of the molecule between regions needs to surpass small barriers of 30-50 meV. The shape of these regions, and not only the presence of metal atoms, explains the large storage capacity measured for MOF-5. The elongated shape explains why some authors have previously identified only one type of adsorption site, associated to the Zn oxide core, and others identified two or three sites. One should consider adsorption regions rather than adsorption sites. A third region of adsorption is near the benzenic rings of the MOF-5. We have also analyzed the possibility of dissociative chemisorption. The chemisorption energy with respect to two separated H atoms is 1.33 eV/H atom; but, since dissociating the free molecule costs 4.75 eV, the physisorbed H2 molecule is more stable than the dissociated chemisorbed state by about 2 eV. Dissociation of the adsorbed molecule costs less energy, but the dissociation barrier is still high.

  16. Assessing The Hydrogen Adsorption Capacity Of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube / Metal Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heben, Michael J.; Dillon, Anne C.; Gilbert, Katherine E. H.; Parilla, Philip A.; Gennett, Thomas; Alleman, Jeffrey L.; Hornyak, G. Louis; Jones, Kim M.

    2003-07-01

    Carefully controlled and calibrated experiments indicate a maximum capacity for adsorption of hydrogen on SWNTs is ˜8 wt% under room temperature and pressure conditions. Samples displaying this maximum value were prepared by sonicating purified SWNTs in a dilute nitric acid solution with a high-energy probe. The process cuts the SWNT into shorter segments and introduces a Ti-6Al-4V alloy due to the disintegration of the ultrasonic probe. The Ti-6Al-4V alloy is a well-known metal hydride and its contribution to the measured hydrogen uptake was accounted for in order to assess the amount of hydrogen stored on the SWNT fraction. The principal purpose of this paper is to present key details associated with the measurement procedures in order to illustrate the degree of rigor with which the findings were obtained.

  17. Biomimetic mineralization of nano-sized, needle-like hydroxyapatite with ultrahigh capacity for lysozyme adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Zhang, Juan; Guo, Shanshan; Shi, Jie; Du, Wenying; Wang, Zheng; Ye, Ling; Gu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Because of its superior biocompatibility, hydroxyapatite (HA) has been widely exploited as a promising vehicle to deliver a broad range of therapeutics in a variety of biological systems. Herein, we report a biomimetic process to prepare nano-sized, colloidal stable HA with needle-like morphology by using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as the template. It was revealed that the needle-like HA was transformed from the spherical amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) nanoparticles after a 14-day period of aging under ambient conditions. The needle-like HA/CMC exhibited an ultra-high lysozyme adsorption capacity up to 930-940mg/g. Moreover, a sustained and pH-sensitive release of adsorbed lysozyme from HA/CMC was evidenced. Therefore, our biomimetic needle-like HA/CMC nanoparticles hold great potential in serving as an efficient carrier for the delivery and controlled release of lysozyme. PMID:27524053

  18. ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBER FABRIC IN CYANIDE LEACHING LIQUOR OF GOLD ORES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUXiaozhen

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption capacity of ACFF in cyanide leaching liquor of gold ores was studied with cyanide leaching liquor of gold ores,containing various kinds of ions.The adsorbed leaching liquor was analyzed by atomic emission spectroscopy and colorimetric method.The contents of various kinds. of ions in ACFF were determined with X-ray photoctron spectroscopy.ACFF not only adsorbed gold but also adsorbed arsenic,nickel,zinc,calcium,sulphur,bismuth,copper,iron,silver and cyanide,anion.Atomic percentage of C and those of O,N,Zn,Fe increase and decrease respectively with the increase of the layer depth,while those of Ca,Au,Ag keep constant.

  19. In-Situ Ligand Formation-Driven Preparation of a Heterometallic Metal-Organic Framework for Highly Selective Separation of Light Hydrocarbons and Efficient Mercury Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi; Zheng, Hao; Liu, Kang; Wang, Hongli; Huang, Hongliang; Xie, Lin-Hua; Wang, Lei; Li, Jian-Rong

    2016-09-01

    By means of the in situ ligand formation strategy and hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) theory, two types of independent In(COO)4 and Cu6S6 clusters were rationally embedded into the heterometallic metal-organic framework (HMOF) {[(CH3)2NH2]InCu4L4·xS}n (BUT-52). BUT-52 exhibits a three-dimensional (3D) anionic framework structure and has sulfur decorating the dumbbell-shaped cages with the external edges of 24 and 14 Å by the internal edges. Remarkably, because of the stronger charge-induced interactions between the charged MOF skeleton and the easily polarized C2 hydrocarbons (C2s), BUT-52 was used for C2s over CH4 and shows both high adsorption heats of C2s and selective separation abilities for C2s/CH4. Furthermore, BUT-52 also displays efficient mercury adsorption resulting from the stronger-binding ability beween the sulfur and the mercury and can remove 92% mercury from methanol solution even with the initial concentration as low as 100 mg/L. The results in this work indicate the feasibility of BUT-52 for the separation of light hydrocarbons and efficient adsorption/removal of mercury. PMID:27548083

  20. Changing the adsorption capacity of coal-based honeycomb monoliths for pollutant removal from liquid streams by controlling their porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal-based honeycomb monoliths extruded using methods developed for ceramic materials have been used to retain methylene blue and p-nitrophenol from aqueous solutions. The influence of the filters' thermal treatment on their textural properties and performance as adsorbents was examined. Characterization by N2 physisorption, mercury porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy along with adsorption tests under dynamic conditions suggest that, depending on the pollutant and its initial concentration, it can be more convenient to previously submit the monoliths to a simple carbonization or to an additional activation, with or without preoxidation, as a consequence of their different resulting pore structures. Infrared spectroscopy indicates that their different adsorption behaviour seems not to be related to differences in their surface chemical groups. In addition, axial crushing tests show that the monoliths have an acceptable mechanical resistance for the application investigated.

  1. Surface-Energetic Heterogeneity of Nanoporous Solids for CO2 and CO Adsorption: The Key to an Adsorption Capacity and Selectivity at Low Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon Hyeon; Cho, Il Hum; Choi, Sang Ok; Lee, In Soo

    2016-05-01

    This study has been focused on surface energetic heterogeneity of zeolite (H-mordenite, "HM"), activated carbon ("RB2") and metal-organic framework family ("Z1200") materials and their isotherm features in adsorption of CO2 and CO at 25 degrees C and low pressures ≤ 850 Torr. The nanoporous solids showed not only distinctive shape of adsorption isotherms for CO2 with relatively high polarizability and quadrupole moment but also different capacities in the CO2 adsorption. These differences between the adsorbents could be well correlated with their surface nonuniformity. The most heterogeneous surfaces were found with the HM that gave the highest CO2 uptake at all pressures allowed, while the Z1200 consisted of completely homogeneous surfaces and even CO2 adsorption linearly increased with pressure. An intermediate character was indicated on the surface of RB2 and thus this sorbent possessed isotherm features between the HM and Z1200 in CO2 adsorption. Such different surface energetics was fairly consistent with changes in CO2/CO selectivity on the nanoporous adsorbents up to equilibrated pressures near 850 Torr. PMID:27483776

  2. Response to Comment on “Modeling Maximum Adsorption Capacities of Soot and Soot-like Materials for PAHs and PCBs”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van P.C.M.; Jonker, M.T.O.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    A comment by John C. Fetzer on modeling maximum adsorption capacities of soot and soot-like materials for PAH and PCB and the adsorption behavior of PAH on soots and on other adsorptive materials is presented. The authors (van Noort et al.) base their model on van der Waal's forces only. This may be

  3. High adsorption capacity of heavy metals on two-dimensional MXenes: an ab initio study with molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xun; Zhang, Xitong; Zhao, Shijun; Huang, Qing; Xue, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculation is employed to study the adsorption properties of Pb and Cu on recently synthesized two-dimensional materials MXenes, including Ti3C2, V2C1 and Ti2C1. The influence of surface decoration with functional groups such as H, OH and F have also been investigated. Most of these studied MXenes exhibit excellent capability to adsorb Pb and Cu, especially the adsorption capacity of Pb on Ti2C1 is as high as 2560 mg g(-1). Both the binding energies and the adsorption capacities are sensitive to the functional groups attached to the MXenes' surface. Ab initio molecular dynamics (ab-init MD) simulation confirms that Ti2C1 remains stable at room temperature after adsorbing Pb atoms. Our calculations imply that these newly emerging two-dimensional MXenes are promising candidates for wastewater treatment and ion separation. PMID:26602974

  4. Integrating mercury injection and nitrogen adsorption data to characterize marine sediment pore systems: An example from the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, H.; Thomas, B.

    2013-12-01

    Fine-grained, clay-rich marine sediments typically exhibit complex pore geometries due to the presence of high-aspect-ratio clay particles, nannofossils, and diagenetically altered grain fragments. The pore systems in these sediments have a wide range of shapes and may contain significant pore volume in mesopores (1-25 nm radius) and micropores (pore size measurements difficult, even in samples with high porosity. Porosity values from mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) measurements performed on samples from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Sites C0011, C0012, and C0018 in the Nankai Trough offshore Japan were compared to porosity determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in the laboratory. The MICP porosities were systematically lower than the NMR porosities by up to 26% of the NMR porosity value. This porosity mismatch is due to the presence of pores with radii smaller than the effective lower limit of MICP measurements, which is 10-40 nm for this data set. Nitrogen gas adsorption offers a means to characterize pores between ~0.87 nm and ~100 nm radius, thus measuring the portion of the pore size distribution not investigated by MICP measurements. Combining MICP and nitrogen gas adsorption data yields a more complete characterization of the pore system of marine sediments. Merged MICP and nitrogen gas adsorption data obtained for the Nankai Trough samples yield porosity values that more accurately match the NMR porosity values, indicating that the entire pore space of the samples can be measured by a combination of the two techniques. These samples possess significant quantities of porosity below the resolution of MICP (>10% of pore volume), even in samples with porosity exceeding 65%. This work illustrates the complexity of marine sediment pore systems even at shallow depths of burial, and provides a new method for assessing pore sizes in scientific ocean drilling studies.

  5. Graphene-Diatom Silica Aerogels for Efficient Removal of Mercury Ions from Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabiri, Shervin; Tran, Diana N H; Azari, Sara; Losic, Dusan

    2015-06-10

    A simple synthetic approach for the preparation of graphene-diatom silica composites in the form of self-assembled aerogels with three-dimensional networks from natural graphite and diatomite rocks is demonstrated for the first time. Their adsorption performance for the removal of mercury from water was studied as a function of contact time, solution pH, and mercury concentration to optimize the reaction conditions. The adsorption isotherm of mercury fitted well with the Langmuir model, representing a very high adsorption capacity of >500 mg of mercury/g of adsorbent. The prepared aerogels exhibited outstanding adsorption performance for the removal of mercury from water, which is significant for environmental applications. PMID:25835089

  6. Efficient Removal of Co2+ from Aqueous Solution by 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane Functionalized Montmorillonite with Enhanced Adsorption Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhujian; Gong, Beini; Dai, Yaping; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Lai, Xiaolin; Yu, Guangwei

    2016-01-01

    To achieve a satisfactory removal efficiency of heavy metal ions from wastewater, silane-functionalized montmorillonite with abundant ligand-binding sites (-NH2) was synthesized as an efficient adsorbent. Ca-montmorillonite (Ca-Mt) was functionalized with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) to obtain the APTES-Mt products (APTES1.0CEC-Mt, APTES2.0CEC-Mt, APTES3.0CEC-Mt, APTES4.0CEC-Mt) with enhanced adsorption capacity for Co2+. The physico-chemical properties of the synthesized adsorbents were characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic methods, and the results demonstrated that APTES was successfully intercalated into the gallery of Ca-Mt or grafted onto the surface of Ca-Mt through Si-O bonds. The effect of solution pH, ionic strength, temperature, initial concentrations and contact time on adsorption of Co2+ by APTES-Mt was evaluated. The results indicated that adsorption of Co2+ onto Ca-Mt, APTES1.0CEC-Mt and APTES2.0CEC-Mt can be considered to be a pseudo-second-order process. In contrast, adsorption of Co2+ onto APTES3.0CEC-Mt and APTES4.0CEC-Mt fitted well with the pseudo-first-order kinetics. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacities of APTES1.0CEC-Mt, APTES2.0CEC-Mt, APTES3.0CEC-Mt and APTES4.0CEC-Mt were 25.1, 33.8, 61.6, and 61.9 mg·g-1, respectively. In addition, reaction temperature had no impact on the adsorption capacity, while both the pH and ionic strength significantly affected the adsorption process. A synergistic effect of ion exchange and coordination interactions on adsorption was observed, thereby leading to a significant enhancement of Co2+ adsorption by the composites. Thus, APTES-Mt could be a cost-effective and environmental-friendly adsorbent, with potential for treating Co2+-rich wastewater. PMID:27448094

  7. Integrated Removal of NOx with Carbon Monoxide as Reductant, and Capture of Mercury in a Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neville Pinto; Panagiotis Smirniotis; Stephen Thiel

    2010-08-31

    Coal will likely continue to be a dominant component of power generation in the foreseeable future. This project addresses the issue of environmental compliance for two important pollutants: NO{sub x} and mercury. Integration of emission control units is in principle possible through a Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor (LTSCAR) in which NO{sub x} removal is achieved in a traditional SCR mode but at low temperature, and, uniquely, using carbon monoxide as a reductant. The capture of mercury is integrated into the same process unit. Such an arrangement would reduce mercury removal costs significantly, and provide improved control for the ultimate disposal of mercury. The work completed in this project demonstrates that the use of CO as a reductant in LTSCR is technically feasible using supported manganese oxide catalysts, that the simultaneous warm-gas capture of elemental and oxidized mercury is technically feasible using both nanostructured chelating adsorbents and ceria-titania-based materials, and that integrated removal of mercury and NO{sub x} is technically feasible using ceria-titania-based materials.

  8. Fabrication of a magmolecule using nanoparticle and evaluation of its adsorption capacity for selenium ions from nuclear wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of present study is to fabrication of a magmolecule (amino-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles) and evaluation of its adsorption capacity for selenite (SeO32-) ions from nuclear wastewater. To accomplish this, synthesized magnetite nanoparticles is coated with a layer of SiO2 in order to be chemically stable and then functionalized with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) to be more effective. Adsorption of SeO32- ions was investigated in batch technique. The effect of parameters such as solution pH, presence of competing anions using sulfuric acid and nitric acid (NO3-, HSO4- and SO42-) and temperature were studied. Maximum adsorption occurred at pH 2.4 for magnetite (naked nanoparticle) and 1.7 for functionalized nanoparticles, while the dose of adsorbent was 1 g/L and selenite ion concentration was 50 mg/L. sulfuric acid was selected as the better acidic agent for controlling pH of solution. Thermodynamic parameters were also calculated and it has been found that the adsorption was endothermic. The obtained result showed that the naked particles had more adsorption capacity but it has been suggested usage of functionalized particles in the magmolecule process duo to stability and reusable capability. (author)

  9. Mercury Removal from Aqueous Solution and Flue Gas by Adsorption on Activated Carbon Fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Nabais, Joao; Carrott, Peter; Ribeiro Carrott, Manuela

    2006-01-01

    The use of two activated carbon fibres, one laboratorial sample prepared from a commercial acrylic textile fibre and one commercial sample of Kynol1, as prepared/received and modified by reaction with powdered sulfur and H2S gas in order to increase the sulfur content were studied for the removal of mercury from aqueous solution and from flue gases from a fluidized bed combustor. The sulfur introduced ranged from 1 to 6 wt.% depending on the method used. The most important parameter ...

  10. Preparation of Urea Nitrogen Adsorbent of Complex Type and Adsorption Capacity of Urea Nitrogen onto the Adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The urea nitroge n adsorbent of complex type, which consists of chitosan coated dialdehyde cellulose (CDAC) and immobilized urease in gelatin membrane (IE), was prepared. The cellulose, the dialdehyde cellulose (DAC) and the CDAC were characterized by scanning electronic microscope. The results indicate that the cellulose C2-C3 bond was broken under the oxidation of periodate and it was oxidated to DAC. The DAC was coated with chitosan and the CDAC was obtained. The adsorption of urea nitrogen onto the adsorbent in Na2HPO4-NaH2PO4 buffer solution was studied in batch system. The effects of the experiment parameters, including degree of oxidation of CDAC, initial urea nitrogen concentration, pH and temperature, on the adsorption capacity of urea nitrogen onto the adsorbent at CDAC/IE weight ratio 10:1 were investigated. The results indicate that these parameters affected significantly the adsorption capacity. The adsorption capacity of urea nitrogen onto the adsorbent was 36.7 mg/g at the degree of oxidation of CDAC 88%, initial urea nitrogen concentration 600 mg/L, pH 7.4 and temperature 37 ℃.

  11. Mercury species, selenium, metallothioneins and glutathione in two dolphins from the southeastern Brazilian coast: Mercury detoxification and physiological differences in diving capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrig, Helena A; Hauser-Davis, Rachel A; Seixas, Tercia G; Pinheiro, Ana Beatriz; Di Beneditto, Ana Paula M

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the concentration of trace elements, total mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) and mercury forms (MeHg, Hginorg and HgSe) in the vulnerable coastal dolphins Pontoporia blainvillei and Sotalia guianensis were appraised and compared, using metallothioneins (MT) and glutathione (GSH) as biomarkers for trace element exposure. The trace element concentrations varied between muscle and liver tissues, with liver of all dolphin specimens showing higher Hg and Se concentrations than those found in muscle. Hg, MeHg and Hginorg molar concentrations showed a clear increase with Se molar concentrations in the liver of both dolphins, and Se concentrations were higher than those of Hg on a molar basis. Se plays a relevant role in the detoxification of MeHg in the hepatic tissue of both dolphins, forming Hg-Se amorphous crystals in liver. In contrast, MT were involved in the detoxification process of Hginorg in liver. GSH levels in P. blainvillei and S. guianensis muscle tissue suggest that these dolphins have different diving capacities. Muscle Hg concentrations were associated to this tripeptide, which protects dolphin cells against Hg stress. PMID:27038210

  12. Effects of textural and surface characteristics of microporous activated carbons on the methane adsorption capacity at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to relate textural and surface characteristics of selected microporous activated carbons to their methane storage capacity. In this work, a magnetic suspension balance (Rubotherm, Germany) was used to measure methane adsorption isotherms of several activated carbon samples. Textural characteristics were assessed by nitrogen adsorption on a regular surface area analyzer (Autosorb-MP, by Quantachrome, USA). N2 adsorption was analysed by conventional models (BET, DR, HK) and by Monte Carlo molecular simulations. Elemental and surface analyses were performed by X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS) for the selected samples. A comparative analysis was then carried out with the purpose of defining some correlation among the variables under study. For the system under study, pore size distribution and micropore volume seem to be a determining factor as long as the solid surface is perfectly hydrophobic. It was concluded that the textural parameters per se do not unequivocally determine natural gas storage capacities. Surface chemistry and methane adsorption equilibria must be taken into account in the decision-making process of choosing an adsorbent for gas storage

  13. Predicting CH4 adsorption capacity of microporous carbon using N2 isotherm and a new analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Chen, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    A new analytical pore size distribution (PSD) model was developed to predict CH4 adsorption (storage) capacity of microporous adsorbent carbon. The model is based on a 3-D adsorption isotherm equation, derived from statistical mechanical principles. Least squares error minimization is used to solve the PSD without any pre-assumed distribution function. In comparison with several well-accepted analytical methods from the literature, this 3-D model offers relatively realistic PSD description for select reference materials, including activated carbon fibers. N2 and CH4 adsorption data were correlated using the 3-D model for commercial carbons BPL and AX-21. Predicted CH4 adsorption isotherms, based on N2 adsorption at 77 K, were in reasonable agreement with the experimental CH4 isotherms. Modeling results indicate that not all the pores contribute the same percentage Vm/Vs for CH4 storage due to different adsorbed CH4 densities. Pores near 8-9 A?? shows higher Vm/Vs on the equivalent volume basis than does larger pores.

  14. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of the intrinsic adsorption capacity of graphene oxide for malachite green removal from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prawit Nuengmatcha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO was produced from bare graphite (BGP material and was used as anintrinsic adsorbent for the removal of malachite green (MG from aqueous solution. In an optimization study, the effects of the initial concentration of MG, solution pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and ionic strength were investigated in detail. The water-soluble dye was analyzed at a maximum wavelength of 618 nm. The optimum conditions for MG removal from aqueous solution included a 300 mg/L initial concentration with 0.02 mg adsorbent at pH 5.1, and complete adsorption equilibrium was reached within 40 min. The maximum adsorption capacity of GO for MG was 384.62 mg/g, dramatically higher (over 10 times than that of BGP (28.73 mg/g.The adsorption process followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Thermodynamic data demonstrated that dye adsorption onto the GO surface was mainly an exothermic spontaneous reaction. The remarkably different adsorption isotherms for GO and BGP fit well with the Langmuir and Freundlich models, respectively. It is therefore evident that the prepared GO can be used as a highly effective adsorbent for this toxic dye.

  15. Study of adsorption capacity of biomass for organic contaminants; Estudo da capacidade de adsorcao de biomassas para contaminantes organicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, E.G. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Programa de Recursos Humanos da ANP, PRH-25]. E-mail: elbagomes@uol.com.br; Alsina, O.L.S.; Silva, F.L.H. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia. Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: odelsia@deq.ufpb.br; flhs@deq.ufpb.br

    2003-07-01

    Great amounts of water are found in the oil reservoirs associated to the oil generating many effluents. In the petroleum industry, the adsorption has been getting attention, because its efficiencies in the treatment of effluents. Adsorption had been proposed because their advantages when compared with other conventional purification process. Among the adsorbent materials, the biomass has a great importance due to the low cost presented. Experiments of organic pollutants adsorption were accomplished, using as biomass: corn-cob, wood powder and coconut mesocarp, in the natural forms and with acid treatment. In this paper, the behavior of the effluent with organic pollutant was simulated, by a dispersion of gas in water. By means of factorial experimental planning, it was possible to verify the influence of the input variables: gas initial concentration, amount of biomass and the system rotation, on the output variable; the adsorption capacity, as well as the effect of the acid treatment used. The results show that the most appropriate bioadsorbent for adsorption of organic pollutants was the coconut mesocarp. (author)

  16. Dose-dependent adsorptive capacity of activated charcoal for gastrointestinal decontamination of a simulated paracetamol overdose in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gude, Anne-Bolette Jill; Hoegberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Riis Angelo, Helle;

    2010-01-01

    The amount of activated charcoal needed to treat drug overdoses has arbitrarily been set at a charcoal-drug ratio of 10:1. Recent in vitro studies have shown a larger adsorptive capacity for activated charcoal when used in a model of paracetamol overdose. In the present study, we investigated...... not be reproduced for the smallest dose of activated charcoal. An activated charcoal-drug ratio of 10:1 is therefore still recommendable....

  17. The determination of adsorption capacity of anion exchange resin Dowex-Marathon for Ti(IV) and Fe(III) chlorocomplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The adsorption capacity of anion exchange resin Dowex-Marathon for Ti(IV) and Fe(III) chlorocomplexes from HCl solution was determined. The measurements were performed for different HCl solution concentrations and temperatures using batch operation as contact method between solution and resin. The Fe(III) adsorption capacities increased with HCl solution concentrations and contact temperatures. In the case of Ti(IV) considerable adsorption capacities were observed only at HCl concentrations >7 M. For the same ion the adsorption capacity does not depend on temperature in the range of 30 - 70 deg C. At 50 deg C there is an important difference between adsorption capacity for Fe(III), (105.7 mg Fe/g dry resin) and for U(VI), (227 mg U/g dry resin), allowing the recovery of uranium adsorption band in the 235U enriching column, using band displacement technique. A solution of TiCl3 0.1 M in HCl >7 M can be utilized as reduction agent at the rear edge of the uranium band, according to the important adsorption capacity of Ti(IV) in those conditions. (author)

  18. Adsorption of Pb(II) on mesoporous activated carbons fabricated from water hyacinth using H3PO4 activation: Adsorption capacity, kinetic and isotherm studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated carbons with high mesoporosity and abundant oxygen-containing functional groups were prepared from water hyacinth using H3PO4 activation (WHAC) to eliminate Pb(II) in water. Characterizations of the WHAC were performed using Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The BET analysis showed that WHAC possesses a high mesoporosity (93.9%) with a BET surface area of 423.6 m2/g. The presence of oxygen-containing functional groups including hydroxyl, carbonyl, carboxyl and phosphate groups renders the WHAC a favorable adsorbent for Pb(II) with the maximum monolayer capacity (qm) 118.8 mg/g. The adsorption behavior follows pseudo-first order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm. The desorption study demonstrated that the WHAC could be readily regenerated using 0.1 M HCl (pH = 1.0). The desorbed WHAC could be reused at least six times without significant adsorption capacity reduction. The adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic with ΔG (−0.27, −1.13, −3.02, −3.62, −5.54, and −9.31 kJ/mol) and ΔH (38.72 kJ/mol). Under the optimized conditions, a small amount of the adsorbent (1.0 g/L) could remove as much as 90.1% of Pb(II) (50 mg/L) in 20 min at pH 6.0 and temperature of 298 K. Therefore, the WHAC has a great potential to be an economical and efficient adsorbent in the treatment of lead-contaminated water.

  19. Adsorption of Pb(II) on mesoporous activated carbons fabricated from water hyacinth using H3PO4 activation: Adsorption capacity, kinetic and isotherm studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yang; Li, Shunxing; Chen, Jianhua; Zhang, Xueliang; Chen, Yiping

    2014-02-01

    Activated carbons with high mesoporosity and abundant oxygen-containing functional groups were prepared from water hyacinth using H3PO4 activation (WHAC) to eliminate Pb(II) in water. Characterizations of the WHAC were performed using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The BET analysis showed that WHAC possesses a high mesoporosity (93.9%) with a BET surface area of 423.6 m2/g. The presence of oxygen-containing functional groups including hydroxyl, carbonyl, carboxyl and phosphate groups renders the WHAC a favorable adsorbent for Pb(II) with the maximum monolayer capacity (qm) 118.8 mg/g. The adsorption behavior follows pseudo-first order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm. The desorption study demonstrated that the WHAC could be readily regenerated using 0.1 M HCl (pH = 1.0). The desorbed WHAC could be reused at least six times without significant adsorption capacity reduction. The adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic with ΔG (-0.27, -1.13, -3.02, -3.62, -5.54, and -9.31 kJ/mol) and ΔH (38.72 kJ/mol). Under the optimized conditions, a small amount of the adsorbent (1.0 g/L) could remove as much as 90.1% of Pb(II) (50 mg/L) in 20 min at pH 6.0 and temperature of 298 K. Therefore, the WHAC has a great potential to be an economical and efficient adsorbent in the treatment of lead-contaminated water.

  20. Oxygen-induced Decrease in the Equilibrium Adsorptive Capacities of Activated Carbons

    OpenAIRE

    Ovín Ania, María Concepción; Parra Soto, José Bernardo; Pis Martínez, José Juan

    2004-01-01

    Special attention was paid in this work to the role of surface chemistry in the adsorption of phenol and salicylic acid onto activated carbons. To this end, two commercial activated carbons (granular and powdered) were oxidised using ammonium peroxodisulphate [(NH4) 2S2O8] and nitric acid in different concentrations. The structural and chemical properties of the oxidised adsorbents were characterised via nitrogen adsorption isotherms measured at –196 ° C and Boehm titrations. Phenol adsorptio...

  1. Regeneration of thiol-functionalized mesostructured silica adsorbents of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Amaya; Aguado, José; Arsuaga, Jesús M.

    2010-06-01

    The regeneration of thiol-functionalized SBA-15 adsorbents of mercury is presented in this article. The influence of temperature and pH on the adsorption process was studied. The effect due to the presence of complexing agents in aqueous solution on the desorption step was also evaluated. Hg(II) maximum adsorption capacities at different temperatures ranging from 20 °C to 60 °C were obtained and it was found that temperature does not affect the adsorption process. Mercury adsorption capacity was also determined in the presence of HNO 3 and HCl up to 3 M concentration. The comparison of the results showed that whereas hydrochloric acid exhibits an appreciable capacity to regenerate the thiol-functionalized SBA-15 adsorbent, the nitric acid results inefficient. The difference was attributed to the mercury complexing ability of chloride anion. Four complexing compounds, KBr, KSCN, (NH 2) 2CS, and HBr were tested for desorbing mercury in regeneration experiments. All agents were able to remove significant amounts of adsorbed mercury, being hydrobromic acid the complexing compound that yields the best results.

  2. Experimental evidence for the influence of charge on the adsorption capacity of carbon dioxide on charged fullerenes

    CERN Document Server

    Ralser, Stefan; Probst, Michael; Postler, Johannes; Renzler, Michael; Bohme, Diethard K; Scheier, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We show, with both experiment and theory, that adsorption of $CO_2$ is sensitive to charge on a capturing model carbonaceous surface. In the experiment we dope superfluid helium droplets with $C_{60}$ and $CO_2$ and expose them to ionising free electrons. Both positively and negatively charged $C_{60}(CO_2)_n^{+/-}$ cluster ion distributions are observed with a high-resolution mass spectrometer and these show remarkable and reproducible anomalies in intensities that are strongly dependent on the charge. The highest adsorption capacity is seen with $C_{60}^+$. Complementary density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations provided insight into the nature of the interaction of charged $C_{60}$ with $CO_2$ as well as trends in the packing of $C_{60}^+$ and $C_{60}^-$. The quadrupole moment of $CO_2$ itself was seen to be decisive in determining the charge dependence of the observed adsorption features. Our findings are expected to apply to adsorption of $CO_2$ by charged surfaces in gene...

  3. Functionalized graphene sheets with poly(ionic liquid)s and high adsorption capacity of anionic dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weifeng; Tang, Yusheng; Xi, Jia; Kong, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Graphene sheets were covalently functionalized with poly(1-vinylimidazole) (PVI) type poly(ionic liquid), by utilizing a diazonium addition reaction and the subsequent grafting of PVI polymers onto the graphene sheet surface by a quaternarization reaction. The resultant modified graphene sheets showed improved dispersion property when being dissolved in DMF and ethanol. FTIR, XPS, XRD and TEM observations confirmed the success of the covalent functionalization, and thermogravimetric analysis revealed that the grafting ratio of PVI was ∼12 wt%. The obtained PVI-functionalized graphene showed a high capability for removing anionic dyes such as methyl blue (MB) from water solution. The experimental data of isotherm fitted well with the Langmuir adsorption model. The adsorption capacity of 1910 mg g-1 for methyl blue (MB) dye was observed for functionalized graphene sheets with poly(ionic liquid)s, which was higher than that of unmodified graphene. The high adsorption capacity observed in this study emphasizes that poly(ionic liquid)s-modified graphene materials have a great potential for water purification as they are highly efficient and stable adsorbents for sustainability.

  4. The effects of pH on the adsorption of mercury on laterite from Guizhou Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiaohong; ZHU Lijun; GUO Baiwei; LUO Yi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the role of pH value on the adsorption of Hg2+ on the laterite from Guizhou Province was studied. The lower pH is unfavorable to the adsorption of Hg2+ whereas the higher pH is favorable to the adsorption of Hg2+. When pH reached a certain value, the amount of Hg2+ adsorption reached the maximum. Then the amount of Hg2+ adsorption was reduced with increasing pH value.

  5. Removal of Mercury from chlor-alkali Industry Wastewater using Acetobacter xylinum Cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rezaee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the removal of mercury ions by cellulose of Acetobacter xylinum was investigated in the synthetic and chlor-alkali wastewater. Biofilms of Acetobacter xylinum were grown in laboratory column bioreactors. The biofilms were continuously treated with sterile synthetic model wastewater or nonsterile, neutralized chloralkali wastewater.The extent of adsorption was studied as function of pH, adsorbent dose and contact time. Efficiency of mercury ion removal from chlor-alkali industry wastewater by aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride was also determined. Under acidic condition the adsorption of mercury by cellulose was quite low and increasing processing time more than 10min has no remarkably effect on the adsorption rate. Adsorption capacity of cellulose under dynamic condition for chlor-alkali wastewater was 65mg/µg which was less than the value (80mg/µg that obtained from batch adsorption experiments for synthetic wastewater.

  6. Oil Spill Adsorption Capacity of Activated Carbon Tablets from Corncobs in Simulated Oil-Water Mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Rhonalyn V. Maulion; Sheila Adarlo Abacan; Gerald Garces Allorde; Ma. Cherrielyne Silda Umali

    2015-01-01

    Oil spill in bodies of water is one of severe environmental problems that is facing all over the country and in the world. Since oil is an integral part of the economy, increasing trend for its demand and transport of has led to a great treat in the surface water. One of the promising techniques in the removal of the oil spills in water bodies is adsorption using activated carbon form waste material such as corn cobs. The purpose of this study is to determine the adsorption capaci...

  7. An in vitro Study on the Adsorption, Absorption and Uptake Capacity of Zn by the Bioremediator Trichoderma atroviride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyar Yazdani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of Zn in the sediment of a polluted river at the Serdang Industrial Area were determined. These polluted sediment samples revealed high level of Zn (219. 27 µg/g. Isolation of fungi from this polluted sediment was also carried out using Rose Bengal Agar (RBA. The isolated fungi were exposed to different concentrations of Zn (0-6000 mg/L on Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA to find the most tolerant isolate. Trichoderma atroviride was found to have the highest tolerance and it was studied for growth rate, Zn uptake capacity, its tolerance to Zn and also localization of Zn by using Potato Dextrose Broth (PDB as the liquid culture medium. In the present study the results found out that the uptake capacity of T. atroviride ranged from 18.1-26.7 mg/g in liquid media at Zn concentrations from 500 to 1000 mg/L. The isolate showed 47.6-64% adsorption and 30.4¬45.1% absorption for Zn. Based on the present study, 5.7-7.4% of Zn removal was observed due to biomass washing. The high adsorption, relatively low absorption and high uptake capacity of Zn suggest that T. atroviride is a potential bioremediator of Zn. However, further studies are needed to confirm its practical use as a bioremediating agent for Zn under field conditions.

  8. 2,4-D adsorption to biochars: effect of preparation conditions on equilibrium adsorption capacity and comparison with commercial activated carbon literature data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, J P; Wellborn, L S; Summers, R S; Knappe, D R U

    2014-10-01

    Batch isotherm experiments were conducted with chars to study adsorption of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Chars generated from corncobs, bamboo and wood chips in a laboratory pyrolyzer at 400-700 °C were compared with traditional kiln charcoals collected from villages in S/SE Asia and with activated carbons (ACs). 2,4-D uptake by laboratory chars obtained from bamboo and wood chips after 14 h of pyrolysis at 700 °C, from wood chips after 96 h of pyrolysis at 600 °C, and one of the field-collected chars (basudha) was comparable to ACs. H:C and O:C ratios declined with pyrolysis temperature and duration while surface area increased to >500 m(2)/g. Increasing pyrolysis intensity by increasing temperature and/or duration of heating was found to positively influence adsorption capacity yield (mg(2,4-D/g(feedstock))) over the range of conditions studied. Economic analysis showed that high temperature chars can be a cost-effective alternative to ACs for water treatment applications. PMID:24934321

  9. Adsorption of cadmium and mercury ions onto cost effective sawdust of picea smithiana (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sawdust (Picea Smithiana), an agricultural waste, has been thoroughly investigated for the removal of toxic Cd(II) and Hg(II) ions from aqueous media. The parameters like nature and composition of electrolyte, concentration of toxic ions, dosage of coconut husk, equilibration time between the two phases are optimized for their maximum accumulation onto solid surface. The effect of common ions on the uptake of metal ions has been monitored under optimal conditions. The sorption is subjected to different sorption isotherms like Langmuir, Freundlich and D-R sorption Isotherms. The sorption capacity and energy are evaluated for each metal ion. To check the selectivity of the sorbent, co-sorption have been studied. For the analytical separation of divalent Hg(II) and Cd(II) ions by the sorbent the effect of different anions and cations on sorption have also investigated. This economical scavenger has potential applications in analytical chemistry, water decontamination, industrial effluent treatment and in pollution abatement. (author)

  10. Evaluation of phosphorus adsorption capacity of sesame straw biochar on aqueous solution: influence of activation methods and pyrolysis temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J H; Ok, Y S; Kim, S H; Cho, J S; Heo, J S; Delaune, R D; Seo, D C

    2015-12-01

    The phosphorus (P) adsorption characteristic of sesame straw biochar prepared with different activation agents and pyrolysis temperatures was evaluated. Between 0.109 and 0.300 mg L(-1) in the form of inorganic phosphate was released from raw sesame straw biochar in the first 1 h. The release of phosphate was significantly enhanced from 62.6 to 168.2 mg g(-1) as the pyrolysis temperature increased. Therefore, sesame straw biochar cannot be used as an adsorbent for P removal without change in the physicochemical characteristics. To increase the P adsorption of biochar in aqueous solution, various activation agents and pyrolysis temperatures were applied. The amount of P adsorbed from aqueous solution by biochar activated using different activation agents appeared in the order ZnCl2 (9.675 mg g(-1)) > MgO (8.669 mg g(-1)) ⋙ 0.1N-HCl > 0.1N-H2SO4 > K2SO4 ≥ KOH ≥ 0.1N-H3PO4, showing ZnCl2 to be the optimum activation agent. Higher P was adsorbed by the biochar activated using ZnCl2 under different pyrolysis temperatures in the order 600 °C > 500 °C > 400 °C > 300 °C. Finally, the amount of adsorbed P by activated biochar at different ratios of biochar to ZnCl2 appeared in the order 1:3 ≒ 1:1 > 3:1. As a result, the optimum ratio of biochar to ZnCl2 and pyrolysis temperature were found to be 1:1 and 600 °C for P adsorption, respectively. The maximum P adsorption capacity by activated biochar using ZnCl2 (15,460 mg kg(-1)) was higher than that of typical biochar, as determined by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Therefore, the ZnCl2 activation of sesame straw biochar was suitable for the preparation of activated biochar for P adsorption. PMID:26040973

  11. An Analysis Of NH3 Adsorption Capacities of Natural And Pretreated Zeolites--EAC Presentation 2004

    OpenAIRE

    Reesa, Chee-Wah; Glass, Charles; Khunjar, Wendell; Sinclair, Hugh Berk

    2004-01-01

    This project plays a vital role which is to remove excess ammonia produced from the Solid Thermophilic Aerobic Reactor (STAR) system using a natural ion exchangers, zeolites. The analyses were carried out in laboratory scale batch reactors and column reactors. The preliminary batch studies showed that zeolites adsorbed ammonia at low concentrations with over 90% removal and the preliminary column study showed that zeolites had steep adsorption curves, which is effectual as resin media. The...

  12. Influence of oxidation process on the adsorption capacity of activated carbons from lignocellulosic precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourao, P.A.M.; Laginhas, C.; Custodio, F.; Nabais, J.M.V.; Carrott, P.J.M.; Carrott, M.M.L. Ribeiro [Evora Univ. (Portugal). Centro de Quimica de Evora

    2011-02-15

    A set of activated carbon materials non-oxidised and oxidised, were successfully prepared from two different lignocellulosic precursors, almond shell and vine shoot, by physical activation with carbon dioxide and posterior oxidation with nitric acid. All samples were characterised in relation to their structural properties and chemical composition, by different techniques, namely nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, elemental analysis (C, H, N, O and S), point of zero charge (PZC) and FTIR. A judicious choice was made to obtain carbon materials with similar structural properties (apparent BET surface area {proportional_to} 850-950 m{sup 2}g{sup -1}, micropore volume {proportional_to} 0.4 cm{sup 3}g{sup -1}, mean pore width {proportional_to} 1.2 nm and external surface area {proportional_to} 14-26 m{sup 2}g{sup -1}). After their characterisation, these microporous activated carbons were also tested for the adsorption of phenolic compounds (p-nitrophenol and phenol) in the liquid phase at room temperature. The performance in liquid phase was correlated with their structural and chemical properties. The oxidation had a major impact at a chemical level but only a moderate modification of the porous structure of the samples. The Langmuir and Freundlich equations were applied to the experimental adsorption isotherms of phenolic compounds with good agreement for the different estimated parameters. (author)

  13. Synthesis, characterisation and methyl orange adsorption capacity of ferric oxide-biochar nano-composites derived from pulp and paper sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaukura, Nhamo; Murimba, Edna C.; Gwenzi, Willis

    2016-02-01

    A Fe2O3-biochar nano-composite (Fe2O3-BC) was prepared from FeCl3-impregnated pulp and paper sludge (PPS) by pyrolysis at 750 °C. The characteristics and methyl orange (MO) adsorption capacity of Fe2O3-BC were compared to that of unactivated biochar (BC). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the composite material was nano-sized. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of hydroxyl and aromatic groups on BC and on Fe2O3-BC, but Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) porosity were lower for Fe2O3-BC than BC. Despite the lower BET surface area and porosity of Fe2O3-BC, its MO adsorption capacity was 52.79 % higher than that of BC. The equilibrium adsorption data were best represented by the Freundlich model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 20.53 mg g-1 at pH 8 and 30 min contact time. MO adsorption obeyed pseudo-second-order kinetics for both BC and Fe2O3-BC with R 2 values of 0.996 and 0.999, respectively. Higher MO adsorption capacity for Fe2O3-BC was attributed to the hybrid nature of the nano-composites; adsorption occurred on both biochar matrix and Fe2O3 nanocrystals. Gibbs free energy calculations confirmed the adsorption is energetically favourable and spontaneous with a high preference for adsorption on both adsorbents. The nano-composite can be used for the efficient removal of MO (>97 %) from contaminated wastewater.

  14. Zeolite Y adsorbents with high vapor uptake capacity and robust cycling stability for potential applications in advanced adsorption heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, XS; Narayanan, S; Michaelis, VK; Ong, TC; Keeler, EG; Kim, H; Mckay, IS; Griffin, RG; Wang, EN

    2015-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg2+ ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg, Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the lab-scale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N-2 sorption, Al-27/Si-29 MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick's 2nd law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N-2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fate and aqueous transport of mercury in light of the Clean Air Mercury Rule for coal-fired electric power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzuman, Anry

    Mercury is a hazardous air pollutant emitted to the atmosphere in large amounts. Mercury emissions from electric power generation sources were estimated to be 48 metric tons/year, constituting the single largest anthropogenic source of mercury in the U.S. Settled mercury species are highly toxic contaminants of the environment. The newly issued Federal Clean Air Mercury Rule requires that the electric power plants firing coal meet the new Maximum Achievable Mercury Control Technology limit by 2018. This signifies that all of the air-phase mercury will be concentrated in solid phase which, based on the current state of the Air Pollution Control Technology, will be fly ash. Fly ash is utilized by different industries including construction industry in concrete, its products, road bases, structural fills, monifills, for solidification, stabilization, etc. Since the increase in coal combustion in the U.S. (1.6 percent/year) is much higher than the fly ash demand, large amounts of fly ash containing mercury and other trace elements are expected to accumulate in the next decades. The amount of mercury transferred from one phase to another is not a linear function of coal combustion or ash production, depends on the future states of technology, and is unknown. The amount of aqueous mercury as a function of the future removal, mercury speciation, and coal and aquifer characteristics is also unknown. This paper makes a first attempt to relate mercury concentrations in coal, flue gas, fly ash, and fly ash leachate using a single algorithm. Mercury concentrations in all phases were examined and phase transformation algorithms were derived in a form suitable for probabilistic analyses. Such important parameters used in the transformation algorithms as Soil Cation Exchange Capacity for mercury, soil mercury selectivity sequence, mercury activity coefficient, mercury retardation factor, mercury species soil adsorption ratio, and mercury Freundlich soil adsorption isotherm

  16. Biochar characteristics produced from food-processing products and their sorptive capacity for mercury and phenanthrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulou, Kalliopi N.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2015-04-01

    Various organic-rich wastes including wood chips, animal manure, and crop residues have been used for biochar production. Biochar is used as an additive to soils to sequester carbon and improve soil fertility but its use as a sorbent for environmental remediation processes is gaining increased attention. Surface properties such as point of zero charge, surface area and pore volume, surface topography, surface functional groups and acid-base behavior are important factors, which affect sorption efficiency. Understanding the surface alteration of biochars increases our understanding of the pollutant-sorbent interaction. The scope of the present work was to evaluate the effect of key characteristics of biochars on their sorptive properties. Raw materials for biochar production were evaluated including byproducts from brewering, coffee, wine, and olive oil industry. The charring process was performed at different temperatures under limited-oxygen conditions using specialized containers. The surface area, the pore volume, and the average pore size of the biochars were determined. Open surface area and micropore volume were determined using t-plot method and Harkins & Jura equation. Raw food-processing waste demonstrates low surface area that increases by 1 order of magnitude by thermal treatment up to 750oC. At temperatures from 750 up to 900oC, pyrolysis results to biochars with surface areas 210-700 m2/g. For the same temperature range, a high percentage (46 to73%) of the pore volume of the biochars is due to micropores. Positive results were obtained when high surface area biochars were tested for their ability to remove organic (i.e. phenanthrene) and inorganic (i.e. mercury) compounds from aqueous solutions. All these properties point to new materials that can effectively be used for environmental remediation.

  17. One-step synthesis of a novel N-doped microporous biochar derived from crop straws with high dye adsorption capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Fei; Cui, Guannan; Liu, Zhongqi; Duo, Lian; Zhang, Guilong; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-07-01

    N-doping is one of the most promising strategies to improve the adsorption capacity and selectivity of carbon adsorbents. Herein, synthesis, characterization and dye adsorption of a novel N-doped microporous biochar derived from direct annealing of crop straws under NH3 is presented. The resultant products exhibit high microporosity (71.5%), atomic percentage of nitrogen (8.81%), and adsorption capacity to dyes, which is about 15-20 times higher than that of original biochar. Specifically, for the sample NBC800-3 pyrolyzed at 800 °C in NH3 for 3 h, its adsorption for acid orange 7 (AO7, anionic) and methyl blue (MB, cationic) is up to 292 mg g(-1) and 436 mg g(-1), respectively, which is among the highest ever reported for carbonaceous adsorbents. The influences of N-doping and porous structure on dye adsorption of the synthesized carbons are also discussed, where electrostatic attraction, π-π electron donor-accepter interaction, and Lewis acid-base interaction mainly contribute to AO7 adsorption, and surface area (especially pore-filling) dominates MB adsorption. The N-doped biochar can be effectively regenerated and reused through direct combustion and desorption approaches. PMID:27039365

  18. High surface-area amidoxime-based polymer fibers co-grafted with various acid monomers yielding increased adsorption capacity for the extraction of uranium from seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Dai, Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Uranium is dissolved in the ocean at a uniform concentration of 3.34 ppb, which translates to approximately 4-5 billion tons of uranium. The development of adsorbents that can extract uranium from seawater has been a long term goal, but the extremely dilute uranium concentration along with the competition of other metal salts (which are at higher concentrations) has hindered the development of an economical adsorption process. Several acid monomers were co-grafted with acrylonitrile (AN) to help increase the hydrophilicity of the adsorbent to improve access to the metal adsorption sites. Grafting various acid monomers on PE fibers was found to significantly affect the uranium adsorption in simulated seawater in the following order: acrylic acid (AA) uranium adsorption capacity significantly increased when Mohr's salt was added with acrylic acid, most likely due to the reduction of co-polymerization of the monomers. When testing under more realistic conditions, the acid-grafted PE fiber adsorbents were exposed to natural seawater (more dilute uranium), the uranium adsorption capacity increased in the following order: MAA uranium adsorption capacity with each acid monomer was related to higher grafting of AN and therefore a higher conversion to amidoxime (AO). PMID:27145863

  19. Effect of carboxyethylation degree on the adsorption capacity of Cu(II) by N-(2-carboxyethyl)chitosan from squid pens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Xie, Haihua; Ye, Hui; Xie, Tian; Lin, Yuecheng; Gong, Jinyan; Jiang, Chengjun; Wu, Yuanfeng; Liu, Shiwang; Cui, Yanli; Mao, Jianwei; Mei, Lehe

    2016-03-15

    Chitosan was prepared by N-deacetylation of squid pens β-chitin, and N-carboxyethylated chitosan (N-CECS) with different degrees of substitution (DS) were synthesized. DS values of N-CECS derivatives calculated by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were 0.60, 1.02 and 1.46, respectively. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II) by N-CECS correlated well with the DS and pH ranging from 3.2 to 5.8. The maximum Cu(II) adsorption capacity (qm) of all three N-CECS at pH 5.4 was 207.5mg g(-1), which was 1.4-fold higher than that of chitosan. The adsorption equilibrium process was better described by the Langmuir than Freundlich isotherm model. Adsorption of Cu(II) ion onto N-CECS followed a pseudo-second order mechanism with chemisorption as the rate-limiting step. In a ternary adsorption system, the adsorption capacity of Cu(II) by N-CECS also presented high values, and qm for Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) were 150.2, 28.8, and 187.9mg g(-1), respectively. PMID:26794766

  20. High pressure chromatography for removal of trace amount of aqueous boron. An improvement in dynamic adsorption capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a goal to facilitate removal of trace amounts of radioisotopes dissolved in water, we conducted column chromatographic experiments with an anion-exchanger at high pressures up to 19 MPa at 5 and 25degC to recover stable boron isotopes, as a substitute for radioisotopes, from its 0.10 mmol L-1 solution. The results showed that the dynamic adsorption capacity, q, increased with increasing pressure and decreasing temperature. The largest q value obtained was 2.33 mmol g-1 at 19 MPa(5degC), 1.7 times larger than that at the standard temperature and pressure. This indicates that the chromatographic technique to purify waters contaminated by trace amounts of toxic solutes can be improved by controlling pressure and temperature. (author)

  1. Modification of cyanobacterial bloom-derived biomass using potassium permanganate enhanced the removal of microcystins and adsorption capacity toward cadmium (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Jihai [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gu, Ji-Dong [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology and Toxicology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Peng, Liang; Luo, Si; Luo, Huili [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Yan, Zhiyong, E-mail: zhyyan111@163.com [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Wu, Genyi, E-mail: wugenyi99@163.com [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Potassium permanganate removed microcystins in the cyanobacterial bloom-derived biomass (CBDB). • Potassium permanganate oxidation caused the transformation of hydroxyl to carboxyl on the CBDB. • Manganese dioxide was formed on the surface of CBDB. • Potassium permanganate oxidation process increased the adsorption capacity of CBDB toward Cd(II). - Abstract: Cyanobacterial biomass shows high adsorption capacity toward heavy metal ions. However, the cyanotoxins in the cyanobacterial biomass inhibit its application in heavy metals removal. In order to safely and effectively remove Cd(II) from water using cyanobacterial bloom-derived biomass (CBDB), KMnO{sub 4} was used to modify CBDB. The results indicated that the microcystins in the CBDB were successfully removed by KMnO{sub 4}. Potassium permanganate oxidation caused the transformation of hydroxyl to carboxyl on the CBDB, and formed manganese dioxide on the surface of CBDB. The oxidized CBDB showed higher adsorption capacity toward Cd(II) than that of unoxidized treatment. The optimal KMnO{sub 4} concentration for increasing the adsorption capacity of CBDB toward Cd(II) was 0.2 g/L. The adsorption isotherm of Cd(II) by oxidized- or unoxidized-CBDB was well fitted by Langmuir model, indicating that the adsorption of Cd(II) by CBDB was monolayer adsorption. The desorption ratio of Cd(II) from oxidized CBDB was higher than that from unoxidized CBDB in the desorption process using NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} and EDTA as desorbent. The results presented in this study suggest that KMnO{sub 4} modified CBDB may be used as a safe and high efficient adsorbent in Cd(II) removal from water.

  2. Modification of cyanobacterial bloom-derived biomass using potassium permanganate enhanced the removal of microcystins and adsorption capacity toward cadmium (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Potassium permanganate removed microcystins in the cyanobacterial bloom-derived biomass (CBDB). • Potassium permanganate oxidation caused the transformation of hydroxyl to carboxyl on the CBDB. • Manganese dioxide was formed on the surface of CBDB. • Potassium permanganate oxidation process increased the adsorption capacity of CBDB toward Cd(II). - Abstract: Cyanobacterial biomass shows high adsorption capacity toward heavy metal ions. However, the cyanotoxins in the cyanobacterial biomass inhibit its application in heavy metals removal. In order to safely and effectively remove Cd(II) from water using cyanobacterial bloom-derived biomass (CBDB), KMnO4 was used to modify CBDB. The results indicated that the microcystins in the CBDB were successfully removed by KMnO4. Potassium permanganate oxidation caused the transformation of hydroxyl to carboxyl on the CBDB, and formed manganese dioxide on the surface of CBDB. The oxidized CBDB showed higher adsorption capacity toward Cd(II) than that of unoxidized treatment. The optimal KMnO4 concentration for increasing the adsorption capacity of CBDB toward Cd(II) was 0.2 g/L. The adsorption isotherm of Cd(II) by oxidized- or unoxidized-CBDB was well fitted by Langmuir model, indicating that the adsorption of Cd(II) by CBDB was monolayer adsorption. The desorption ratio of Cd(II) from oxidized CBDB was higher than that from unoxidized CBDB in the desorption process using NH4NO3 and EDTA as desorbent. The results presented in this study suggest that KMnO4 modified CBDB may be used as a safe and high efficient adsorbent in Cd(II) removal from water

  3. Effects of Mn, Cu doping concentration to the properties of magnetic nanoparticles and arsenic adsorption capacity in wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thi, Tran Minh, E-mail: tranminhthi@hnue.edu.vn; Trang, Nguyen Thi Huyen; Van Anh, Nguyen Thi

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Investigation the decrease of saturate magnetic moment of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} over time. • Substitution of Mn, Cu ions into Fe position to create stable properties of materials. • Investigate the surface and mesopore structure of nanoparticles. • The arsenic adsorption capacity of Cu doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanomaterials is higher than of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Mn doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanomaterials. - Abstract: The research results of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Mn, Cu doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanomaterials synthesized by a chemical method for As(III) wastewater treatment are presented in this paper. The X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy images showed that samples had the cubic spinel structure with the grain sizes were varied from 9.4 nm to 18.1 nm. The results of vibrating sample magnetometer measurements at room temperature showed that saturation magnetic moments of Fe{sub 1−x}Cu{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples decreased from 65.9 emu/g to 53.2 emu/g and 65.9 emu/g to 61.5 emu/g, respectively, with the increase of Cu, Mn concentrations from 0.0 to 0.15. The nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherm of a typical Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} sample at 77 K was studied in order to investigate the surface and porous structure of nanoparticles by BET method. The specific surface area of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles was calculated about of 100.2 m{sup 2}/g. The pore size distribution of about 15–20 nm calculated by the BJH (Barrett, Joyner, and Halendar) method at a relative pressure P/P{sub 0} of about 1. Although the saturation magnetic moments of samples decreased when the increase of doping concentration, but the arsenic adsorption capacity of Cu doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is better than that of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Mn doped Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in a solution with pH = 7. In the solution with a pH > 14, the arsenic adsorption of magnetic

  4. Effects of Mn, Cu doping concentration to the properties of magnetic nanoparticles and arsenic adsorption capacity in wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Investigation the decrease of saturate magnetic moment of Fe3O4 over time. • Substitution of Mn, Cu ions into Fe position to create stable properties of materials. • Investigate the surface and mesopore structure of nanoparticles. • The arsenic adsorption capacity of Cu doped Fe3O4 nanomaterials is higher than of Fe3O4 and Mn doped Fe3O4 nanomaterials. - Abstract: The research results of Fe3O4 and Mn, Cu doped Fe3O4 nanomaterials synthesized by a chemical method for As(III) wastewater treatment are presented in this paper. The X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy images showed that samples had the cubic spinel structure with the grain sizes were varied from 9.4 nm to 18.1 nm. The results of vibrating sample magnetometer measurements at room temperature showed that saturation magnetic moments of Fe1−xCuxFe2O4 and Fe1−xMnxFe2O4 samples decreased from 65.9 emu/g to 53.2 emu/g and 65.9 emu/g to 61.5 emu/g, respectively, with the increase of Cu, Mn concentrations from 0.0 to 0.15. The nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherm of a typical Fe3O4 sample at 77 K was studied in order to investigate the surface and porous structure of nanoparticles by BET method. The specific surface area of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles was calculated about of 100.2 m2/g. The pore size distribution of about 15–20 nm calculated by the BJH (Barrett, Joyner, and Halendar) method at a relative pressure P/P0 of about 1. Although the saturation magnetic moments of samples decreased when the increase of doping concentration, but the arsenic adsorption capacity of Cu doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles is better than that of Fe3O4 and Mn doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles in a solution with pH = 7. In the solution with a pH > 14, the arsenic adsorption of magnetic nanoparticles is insignificant

  5. Effect of carbonation temperature on CO2 adsorption capacity of CaO derived from micro/nanostructured aragonite CaCO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaing, Nwe Ni; Sreekantan, Srimala; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Thant, Aye Aye; Othman, Radzali; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Salime, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Recent years, CaO-based synthetic materials have been attracted attention as potential adsorbents for CO2 capture mainly due to their high CO2 adsorption capacity. In this study, micro/nanostructured aragonite CaCO3 was synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method with using polyacrylamide (PAM). The structural, morphological and thermal properties of the synthesized sample were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermogravimetry analysis (TG-DTA). The XRD and FESEM results showed that the obtained sample was aragonite CaCO3 with aggregated nanorods and microspheres composed of nanorods. A TG-DTA apparatus with Thermoplus 2 software was used to investigate the effect of carbonation temperature on the CO2 adsorption capacity of CaO derived from aragonite CaCO3 sample. At 300 °C, the sample reached the CO2 adsorption capacity of 0.098 g-CO2/g-adsorbent, whereas the sample achieved the highest capacity of 0.682 g-CO2/g-adsorbent at 700 °C. The results showed that the carbonation temperature significantly influenced on the CO2 adsorption capacity of the CaO derived from aragonite CaCO3.

  6. High adsorption capacity of two Zn-based metal-organic frameworks by ultrasound assisted synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoomi, Mohammad Yaser; Bagheri, Minoo; Morsali, Ali

    2016-11-01

    Micro- and nano-rods and plates of two 3D, porous Zn(II)-based metal-organic frameworks [Zn(oba)(4-bpdh)0.5]n·(DMF)1.5 (TMU-5) and [Zn(oba)(4-bpmb)0.5]n (DMF)1.5 (TMU-6) were prepared by sonochemical process and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and IR spectroscopy. These MOFs were synthesized using a non-linear dicarboxylate (H2oba=4,4-oxybisbenzoic acid) and two linear N-donor (4-bpdh=2,5-bis(4-pyridyl)-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene and 4-bpmb=N(1),N(4)-bis((pyridin-4-yl)methylene)benzene-1,4-diamine) ligands by ultrasonic irradiation. Sonication time and concentration of initial reagents influencing size and morphology of nano-structured MOFs, were also studied. Calcination of TMU-5 and TMU-6 at 550°C under air atmosphere yields ZnO nanoparticles. TMU-5 and TMU-6 exhibited maximum percent adsorption of 96.2% and 92.8% of 100ppm rhodamine B dye, respectively, which obeys first order reaction kinetics. PMID:27245956

  7. Effect of oxygen potential on sulphur dioxide activation of oil sands fluid coke and characteristics of activated coke in mercury adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sulphur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC) technology was modified for use in copper smelters in order to mitigate mercury and sulphur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Elemental sulphur was captured as a co-product. The study examined the feasibility of reducing levels of SO2 using fluid coke in the copper smelter flue. SIAC properties were optimized in order to capture vapour phase mercury. Raw fluid coke samples were used to measure SO2 flow rates. Gas composition was varied to mimic concentrations found during normal operation of copper converters. Gas chromatography was used to analyze reactions products and to prove the hypothesis that mercury capacity is influenced by the oxygen potential of the activation gas due to changes in surface sulphur types developed from reduced sulphur species. Results of the study showed that oxygen levels at 5 per cent did not play a significant role in pore development. It was concluded that increased residence times contributed to reductions in SO2 and elemental S yields. 13 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  8. The effect of low-NOx combustion on residual carbon in fly ash and its adsorption capacity for air entrainment admixtures in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Hougaard; Jensen, Anker Degn; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Fly ash from pulverized coal combustion contains residual carbon that can adsorb the air-entraining admixtures (AEAs) added to control the air entrainment in concrete. This is a problem that has increased by the implementation of low-NOx combustion technologies. In this work, pulverized fuel has...... by up to a factor of 25. This was due to a lower carbon content in the ash and a lower specific AEA adsorptivity of the carbon. The latter was suggested to be caused by changes in the adsorption properties of the unburned char and a decreased formation of soot, which was found to have a large AEA...... adsorption capacity based on measurements on a carbon black. The NOx formation increased by up to three times with more oxidizing conditions and thus, there was a trade-off between the AEA requirements of the ash and NOx formation. The type of fuel had high impact on the AEA adsorption behavior of the ash...

  9. Mercury capture within coal-fired power plant electrostatic precipitators: model evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, Herek L

    2009-03-01

    Efforts to reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions worldwide have recently focused on a variety of sources, including mercury emitted during coal combustion. Toward that end, much research has been ongoing seeking to develop new processes for reducing coal combustion mercury emissions. Among air pollution control processes that can be applied to coal-fired boilers, electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) are by far the most common, both on a global scale and among the principal countries of India, China, and the U.S. that burn coal for electric power generation. A previously reported theoretical model of in-flight mercury capture within ESPs is herein evaluated against data from a number of full-scale tests of activated carbon injection for mercury emissions control. By using the established particle size distribution of the activated carbon and actual or estimated values of its equilibrium mercury adsorption capacity, the incremental reduction in mercury concentration across each ESP can be predicted and compared to experimental results. Because the model does not incorporate kinetics associated with gas-phase mercury transformation or surface adsorption, the model predictions representthe mass-transfer-limited performance. Comparing field data to model results reveals many facilities performing at or near the predicted mass-transfer-limited maximum, particularly at low rates of sorbent injection. Where agreement is poor between field data and model predictions, additional chemical or physical phenomena may be responsible for reducing mercury removal efficiencies. PMID:19350920

  10. SILICA GEL WITH COVALENTLY IMMOBILIZED THIOSEMICARBAZIDE FOR SOLID-PHASE CONCENTRATION OF MERCURY

    OpenAIRE

    Konshina, Dzh. N.; Open'ko, V. V.; Temerdashev, Z. A.; Konshin, V. V.; Romanovskii, K. A.

    2014-01-01

    А new thiosemicarbazide modified silica gel sorbent was prepared and applied for preconcentration of trace mercury(II) prior to the measurement by spectrophotometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The optimization of some analytical parameters affecting the adsorption of the analyte such as acidity, shaking time, sample flow rate and volume, eluent condition, and interfering substances were investigated. At pH 2, the maximum static adsorption capacity of Hg(II) onto the thiosemicarbazide ...

  11. Direct observation of solid-phase adsorbate concentration profile in powdered activated carbon particle to elucidate mechanism of high adsorption capacity on super-powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Naoya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pulverization increases its adsorption capacities for natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS, which is used as a model adsorbate). A shell adsorption mechanism in which NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle and instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle has been proposed as an explanation for this adsorption capacity increase. In this report, we present direct evidence to support the shell adsorption mechanism. PAC particles containing adsorbed PSS were sectioned with a focused ion beam, and the solid-phase PSS concentration profiles of the particle cross-sections were directly observed by means of field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDXS). X-ray emission from sulfur, an index of PSS concentration, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of the particles. The X-ray emission profile observed by EDXS did not agree completely with the solid-phase PSS concentration profile predicted by shell adsorption model analysis of the PSS isotherm data, but the observed and predicted profiles were not inconsistent when the analytical errors were considered. These EDXS results provide the first direct evidence that PSS is adsorbed mainly in the vicinity of the external surface of the PAC particles, and thus the results support the proposition that the increase in NOM and PSS adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size is due to the increase in external surface area on which the molecules can be adsorbed. PMID:20851447

  12. Synthesis and granulation of a titanosilicate with adsorption capacity for Cs to be used for treating de ILLW of the Ezeiza Radioisotope Production Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sitinakite structured titanosilicate is widely used for treating ILLW thanks to its capacity for adsorbing both Cs-137 and Sr-90. Its effectiveness lies in its incredibly high selectivity for such radioisotopes, which makes it useful in complex isotope solutions and even in strong acid and alkaline conditions. In Argentina, an off-the-shelve titanosilicate was used in Ezeiza's radioisotope production plant. Because of commercial restrictions, it is no longer available so an inhouse production is being developed. The aim of this project consists of the following: 1. Synthesis of titanosilicate and structural characterization 2. Adsorption kinetics of Cs+ 3. Upscale of the synthesis process 4. Assessment of the influence of synthesis temperature and time on product crystallinity 5. Measurement of adsorption capacity of commercial titanosilicates IE910, IE911 and novel RC15H 6. Separative performance column essay and breakthrough plot 7. Chemical and radiolysis resistance of the adsorbent powder binder Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in contact with the actual waste Throughout this work we have studied the optimum synthesis conditions capable of rendering a sitinakite structured titanosilicate, assessed its Cs+ adsorption kinetics, adsorption capacity, crystal phase and purity via DRX, particle size with Laser Light Scattering technique. We have also conducted column breakthrough experiments and tried the chemical and radiolysis resistance of the final product (author)

  13. LabVIEW-based sequential-injection analysis system for the determination of trace metals by square-wave anodic and adsorptive stripping voltammetry on mercury-film electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasios Economou; Anastasios Voulgaropoulos

    2003-01-01

    The development of a dedicated automated sequential-injection analysis apparatus for anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) and adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV) is reported. The instrument comprised a peristaltic pump, a multiposition selector valve and a home-made potentiostat and used a mercury-film electrode as the working electrodes in a thin-layer electrochemical detector. Programming of the experimental sequence was performed in LabVIEW 5.1. The sequence of operations included format...

  14. A one-step thermal decomposition method to prepare anatase TiO2 nanosheets with improved adsorption capacities and enhanced photocatalytic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenting; Shang, Chunli; Li, Xue

    2015-12-01

    Anatase TiO2 nanosheets (NSs) with high surface area have been prepared via a one-step thermal decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in oleylamine (OM), and their adsorption capacities and photocatalytic activities are investigated by using methylene blue (MB) and methyl orange (MO) as model pollutants. During the synthesis procedure, only one type of surfactant, oleylamine (OM), is used as capping agents and no other solvents are added. Structure and properties of the TiO2 NSs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption analysis, UV-vis spectrum, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Photoluminescence (PL) methods. The results indicate that the TiO2 NSs possess high surface area up to 378 m2 g-1. The concentration of capping agents is found to be a key factor controlling the morphology and crystalline structure of the product. Adsorption and photodegradation experiments reveal that the prepared TiO2 NSs possess high adsorption capacities of model pollutants MB and high photocatalytic activity, showing that TiO2 NSs can be used as efficient pollutant adsorbents and photocatalytic degradation catalysts of MB in wastewater treatment.

  15. Removal of mercury(II) and methylmercury from solution by tannin adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorption of mercury(II) and methylmercury by two tannin sorbents was investigated using radiotracers. High sorption capacities for mercury are registered for both sorbents at pH 7. For Eucaliptus Saligna Sm sorbent (ETS) the maximum sorption capacity was 1.2±0.2 mmol/g and for Lysiloma latisiliqua sorbent (LTS) was 8.5±0.2 mmol/g. Methylmercury adsorption maximum was recorded at pH 4 and in buffered solutions at pH 2. This species can be recovered in the presence of mercury(II). Influence of different ions present in water was examined. High recoveries were reported for ETS in tap water samples but a decrease of uptake is observed for seawater. (author)

  16. Dye-adsorption capacity of bituminous fly ash and its pozzolanic property after used as dye-adsorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Penpolcharoen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Bituminous fly ash, which is an industrial waste, was used as an adsorbent to remove dyestuff from the textile-dye wastewater. The batch kinetic and isotherm experiments of the synthetic wastewater were firstly conducted to determine the adsorption behavior and optimal conditions for adsorption. The optimal conditions were then applied to the actual textile-dye wastewater. Under the original conditions of fly ash and wastewater, the results indicated that the color could be removed up to 86.6...

  17. Improvement of pesticide adsorption capacity of cellulose fibre by high-energy irradiation-initiated grafting of glycidyl methacrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László; Koczog Horváth, Éva; Fekete, Tamás; Borsa, Judit

    2012-09-01

    Cellulose as a renewable raw material was used for preparation of adsorbent of organic impurities in wastewater treatment. Hydrophobic surface of cellulose substrate was developed by grafting glycidyl methacrylate in simultaneous grafting using gamma irradiation initiation. Water uptake of cellulose significantly decreased while adsorption of phenol and a pesticide molecule (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid: 2,4-D) increased upon grafting. Adsorption equilibrium data fitted the Freundlich isotherm for both solutes.

  18. Removal of complexed mercury by dithiocarbamate grafted on mesoporous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesoporous silica (MCM-41) with d(100) interplanar distance of 38 A was prepared by a room temperature process through low surfactant templation technique. The surface of MCM-41 was functionalized with dithiocarbamate (dtc) ligand, named as MCM-41-dtc and this was characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, particle size analysis, 29Si MAS NMR spectra and sulphur analysis. The sorption of mercury from 0.1M HCl solution by MCM-41-dtc was studied as a function of pH, [Hg2+], time and temperature. The sorption data obtained at various initial concentrations of mercury were fitted into Langmuir adsorption model. Mercury speciation in solution and the sorption capacity measurements indicated possible formation of a 1 : 1 square planar complex in the solid phase. A very rapid sorption of mercury was observed in the initial stages of equilibration, which can be attributed to the large surface area, wide porosity and fine particle size of MCM-41-dtc, facilitating facile accessibility of mercury into the inner pores of the sorbent. The enthalpy change accompanied by the sorption of mercury was found to decrease from 83.7 to 6.2 kJ/mol, when the initial concentration of mercury was increased from 5 x 10-4M to 1.5 x 10-3M. (author)

  19. Investigations on the adsorbents for uremic middle molecular toxins (II) —Influences of crosslinking agent chain length on the adsorption capacities of crosslinked chitosan adsorbents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Chitosan resins, which clinically served as adsorbents in hemoperfusion therapy, were prepared with reversed-phase suspension methodology using three differently structured crosslinking agents, methanal, glyoxal and glutaraldehyde. And the glyoxal and glutaraldehyde crosslinked chitosan resins were reduced with NaBH4 afterwards. By analyzing the results from FTIR and SEM, it was found that the reduction treatment to the adsorbents efficiently improved the chemical stability of these chitosan resins, and the shifts in crosslinking agents exerted influences over the morphologies of the adsorbents obviously. After being put to use in the adsorption tests upon some model uremic middle molecular toxins and BSA in vitro, all three adsorbents demon- strated a fairly realistic adsorption capability to the model toxins but little to BSA. And the adsorp- tion process reached the equilibrium in a clinically qualified short time. But the adsorption capaci- ties of these adsorbents to the model toxins were quite different. It had been found that with the growing of fatty chain length of crosslinking agent, these adsorbents showed a gradually increased adsorption capacity to the model toxins, and the glutaraldehyde crosslinked chitosan resin be- haved best.

  20. Carbon nanotubes for energy storage using their hydrogen adsorption capacity: state of the art and perspectives; Nanotubos de carbono para estocagem de energia por adsorcao de hidrogenio: estado da arte e perspectivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maestro, Luis Fernando; Luengo, Carlos Alberto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Combustiveis Alternativos], e-mail: lmaestro@ifi.unicamp.br

    2004-07-01

    It is presented an updated scope of the research in carbon nanotubes synthesis, their purification and a discussion of recent results in energy storage using their hydrogen adsorption capacity. The GCA activities in this area are also discussed. (author)

  1. Comparison of the adsorption capacities of an activated-charcoal--yogurt mixture versus activated-charcoal--water slurry in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Christophersen, Anne-Bolette; Christensen, Hanne Rolighed;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An activated charcoal--yogurt mixture was evaluated in vivo to determine the effect on the gastrointestinal absorption of paracetamol, as compared to activated-charcoal--water slurry. The potential advantage of the activated-charcoal--yogurt mixture is a better palatability and general...... acceptance by the patients without loss of efficacy. In addition, paracetamol adsorption studies were carried out in vitro to calculate the maximum adsorption capacity of paracetamol to activated-charcoal--yogurt mixture. METHODS: In vivo: A randomized crossover study on 15 adult volunteers, using...... paracetamol 50 mg/kg as a simulated overdose. Each study day volunteers were given a standard meal 1 h before paracetamol, then 50 g activated charcoal 1 h later in either of two preparations: standard water slurry or mixed with 400 mL yogurt. Paracetamol serum concentrations were measured using HPLC...

  2. Surfactant-free synthesis of octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure with ultrahigh and selective adsorption capacity of malachite green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jue; Zeng, Min; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-05-01

    A new octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure has been fabricated through a facile surfactant-free solvothermal method followed by thermal treatment. It exhibits a record-high adsorption capacity (up to 4983.0 mg·g‑1) of malachite green (MG), which is a potentially harmful dye in prevalence and should be removed from wastewater and other aqueous solutions before discharging into the environment. The octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure also demonstrates strong selective adsorption towards MG from two kinds of mixed solutions: MG/methyl orange (MO) and MG/rhodamine B (RhB) mixtures, indicating its promise in water treatment.

  3. Surfactant-free synthesis of octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure with ultrahigh and selective adsorption capacity of malachite green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jue; Zeng, Min; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-01-01

    A new octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure has been fabricated through a facile surfactant-free solvothermal method followed by thermal treatment. It exhibits a record-high adsorption capacity (up to 4983.0 mg·g−1) of malachite green (MG), which is a potentially harmful dye in prevalence and should be removed from wastewater and other aqueous solutions before discharging into the environment. The octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure also demonstrates strong selective adsorption towards MG from two kinds of mixed solutions: MG/methyl orange (MO) and MG/rhodamine B (RhB) mixtures, indicating its promise in water treatment. PMID:27142194

  4. The effect of food and ice cream on the adsorption capacity of paracetamol to high surface activated charcoal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Angelo, Helle Riis; Christophersen, Anne Bolette;

    2003-01-01

    The effect of added food mixture (as if food was present in the stomach of an intoxicated patient) or 4 different types of ice cream (added as a flavouring and lubricating agent) on the adsorption of paracetamol (acetaminophen) to 2 formulations of activated charcoal was determined in vitro and c...

  5. Adsorption of Pb(II) on mesoporous activated carbons fabricated from water hyacinth using H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} activation: Adsorption capacity, kinetic and isotherm studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yang, E-mail: zzsfxyhy@163.com [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Li, Shunxing; Chen, Jianhua; Zhang, Xueliang; Chen, Yiping [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2014-02-28

    Activated carbons with high mesoporosity and abundant oxygen-containing functional groups were prepared from water hyacinth using H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} activation (WHAC) to eliminate Pb(II) in water. Characterizations of the WHAC were performed using Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The BET analysis showed that WHAC possesses a high mesoporosity (93.9%) with a BET surface area of 423.6 m{sup 2}/g. The presence of oxygen-containing functional groups including hydroxyl, carbonyl, carboxyl and phosphate groups renders the WHAC a favorable adsorbent for Pb(II) with the maximum monolayer capacity (q{sub m}) 118.8 mg/g. The adsorption behavior follows pseudo-first order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm. The desorption study demonstrated that the WHAC could be readily regenerated using 0.1 M HCl (pH = 1.0). The desorbed WHAC could be reused at least six times without significant adsorption capacity reduction. The adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic with ΔG (−0.27, −1.13, −3.02, −3.62, −5.54, and −9.31 kJ/mol) and ΔH (38.72 kJ/mol). Under the optimized conditions, a small amount of the adsorbent (1.0 g/L) could remove as much as 90.1% of Pb(II) (50 mg/L) in 20 min at pH 6.0 and temperature of 298 K. Therefore, the WHAC has a great potential to be an economical and efficient adsorbent in the treatment of lead-contaminated water.

  6. Adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals: effects of cation-exchange capacity, cation saturation, and surface area.

    OpenAIRE

    Lipson, S M; Stotzky, G

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals has been reported by several investigators, but the mechanisms defining this association have been studied only minimally. The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the mechanisms involved with this interaction. More reovirus type 3 was adsorbed, in both distilled and synthetic estuarine water, by low concentrations of montmorillonite than by comparable concentrations of kaolinite containing a mixed complement of cations on the exchange com...

  7. Dye-adsorption capacity of bituminous fly ash and its pozzolanic property after used as dye-adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penpolcharoen, M.

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Bituminous fly ash, which is an industrial waste, was used as an adsorbent to remove dyestuff from the textile-dye wastewater. The batch kinetic and isotherm experiments of the synthetic wastewater were firstly conducted to determine the adsorption behavior and optimal conditions for adsorption. The optimal conditions were then applied to the actual textile-dye wastewater. Under the original conditions of fly ash and wastewater, the results indicated that the color could be removed up to 86.65% by 12 g of the fly ash /L of the wastewater within 30 min. Its adsorption was described by the Freundlich isotherm. The dye-adsorbed fly ash was further studied on its pozzolanic property in terms of compressive strength by using it as a partial substitute to Portland cement type I to produce mortar. The result revealed that the highest compressive strength was of the sample containing 10% by weight of the dye-adsorbed fly ash in replacement of cement. It possessed 215 kg/cm2 at 28 days, which is 92.67% of the sample containing 10% by weight of the original fly ash in replacement of cement, or 83.33 of the cement mortar. For the environmental concern, leachabilities of lead (Pb, chromium (Cr, copper (Cu and zinc (Zn from all mortars were also carried out. No leaching of the heavy metals from any samples could be detected. Hence, the dye-adsorbed fly ash can be used as an environmental friendly construction material.

  8. CTAB-assisted synthesis of mesoporous F-N-codoped TiO2 powders with high visible-light-driven catalytic activity and adsorption capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the preparation of mesoporous rod-like F-N-codoped TiO2 powder photocatalysts with anatase phase via a sol-gel route at the temperature of 373 K, using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant. The as-prepared photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS). The results showed that the photocatalysts possessed a homogeneous pore diameter and a high surface area of 106.3-160.7 m3 g-1. The increasing CTAB reactive concentration extended the visible-light absorption up to 600 nm. The F-N-codoped TiO2 powders exhibited significant higher adsorption capacity for methyl orange (MO) than that of Degussa P25 and showed more than 6 times higher visible-light-induced catalytic degradation for MO than that of P25. - Graphical abstract: The introduction of surfactant CTAB not only extended the visible light absorption of mesoporous F-N-codoped TiO2 up to 600 nm but also significantly enhanced the adsorption capacity and visible-light-induced degradation for methyl orange. Mesoporous rod-like F-N-codoped TiO2 powder photocatalysts were synthesized via a sol-gel route at low temperature of 373 K

  9. Enhancement in CO2 Adsorption Capacity and Selectivity in the Chalcogenide Aerogel CuSb2S4 by Post-synthetic Modification with LiCl

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ejaz

    2015-09-11

    The new chalcogel CuSb2S4 was obtained by reacting Cu(OAc)2·H2O with KSbS2 in a water/formamide mixture at room temperature. In order to modify the gas adsorption capacity the synthesized CuSb2S4 aerogel was loaded with different amounts of LiCl. CO2 adsorption measurements on the CuSb2S4 aerogel before and after treatment with LiCl showed more than three times increased uptake of the LiCl-modified chalcogel. The selectivities of the gas pairs CO2/H2 and CO2/CH4 in the LiCl-treated chalcogel are 235 and 105 respectively and amongst the highest reported for chalcogenide-based aerogels. In comparison with other porous materials like zeolites, activated carbon and most of the Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) or Porous Organic Frameworks (POFs), our synthesized aerogels show good air and moisture stability. Although, the CO2 storage capacity of our aerogels is relatively low, however the selectivity of CO2 over H2 or CH4 in LiCl-loaded aerogels are higher than in zeolites, activated carbon as well as some MOFs like Cu-BTC and MOF-5 etc.

  10. Stabilization/solidification (S/S) of mercury-contaminated hazardous wastes using thiol-functionalized zeolite and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Yan; Wang, Qi-Chao; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Zhong-Sheng

    2009-09-15

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) of mercury-containing solid wastes using thiol-functionalized zeolite and cement was investigated in this study. The thiol-functionalized zeolite (TFZ) used in the study was obtained by grafting the thiol group (-SH) to the natural clinoptilolite zeolites, and the mercury adsorption by TFZ was investigated. TFZ was used to stabilize mercury in solid wastes, and then the stabilized wastes were subjected to cement solidification to test the effectiveness of the whole S/S process. The results show that TFZ has a high level of -SH content (0.562 mmol g(-1)) and the adsorption of mercury by TFZ conform to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The mercury adsorption capacity is greatly enhanced upon thiol grafting, the maximum of which is increased from 0.041 mmol Hg g(-1) to 0.445 mmol Hg g(-1). TFZ is found to be effective in stabilizing Hg in the waste surrogate. In the stabilization process, the optimum pH for the stabilization reaction is about 5.0. The optimum TFZ dosage is about 5% and the optimum cement dosage is about 100%. Though Cl(-) and PO(4)(3-) have negative effects on mercury adsorption by TFZ, the Portland cement solidification of TFZ stabilized surrogates containing 1000 mg Hg/kg can successfully pass the TCLP leaching test. It can be concluded that the stabilization/solidification process using TFZ and Portland cement is an effective technology to treat and dispose mercury-containing wastes. PMID:19376646

  11. Effect of cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide concentration on structure, morphology and carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of calcium hydroxide based sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaing, Nwe Ni; Vignesh, K.; Sreekantan, Srimala; Pung, Swee-Yong; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Othman, Radzali; Thant, Aye Aye; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Salim, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) has been proposed as an important material for industrial, architectural, and environmental applications. In this study, calcium acetate was used as a precursor and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as a surfactant to synthesize Ca(OH)2 based adsorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. The effect of CTAB concentration (0.2-0.8 M) on the structure, morphology and CO2 adsorption performance of Ca(OH)2 was studied in detail. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), BET surfaced area and thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) techniques. The phase purity, crystallite size, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and CO2 adsorption performance of Ca(OH)2 precursor adsorbents were significantly increased when the concentration of CTAB was increased. XRD results showed that pure Ca(OH)2 phase was obtained at the CTAB concentration of 0.8 M. TGA results exhibited that 0.8 M of CTAB-assisted Ca(OH)2 precursor adsorbent possessed a residual carbonation conversion of ∼56% after 10 cycles.

  12. New V(IV)-based metal-organic framework having framework flexibility and high CO2 adsorption capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying-Ya; Couck, Sarah; Vandichel, Matthias; Grzywa, Maciej; Leus, Karen; Biswas, Shyam; Volkmer, Dirk; Gascon, Jorge; Kapteijn, Freek; Denayer, Joeri F M; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Van Der Voort, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    A vanadium based metal-organic framework (MOF), VO(BPDC) (BPDC(2-) = biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylate), adopting an expanded MIL-47 structure type, has been synthesized via solvothermal and microwave methods. Its structural and gas/vapor sorption properties have been studied. This compound displays a distinct breathing effect toward certain adsorptives at workable temperatures. The sorption isotherms of CO(2) and CH(4) indicate a different sorption behavior at specific temperatures. In situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements and molecular simulations have been utilized to characterize the structural transition. The experimental measurements clearly suggest the existence of both narrow pore and large pore forms. A free energy profile along the pore angle was computationally determined for the empty host framework. Apart from a regular large pore and a regular narrow pore form, an overstretched narrow pore form has also been found. Additionally, a variety of spectroscopic techniques combined with N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms measured at 77 K demonstrate that the existence of the mixed oxidation states V(III)/V(IV) in the titled MOF structure compared to pure V(IV) increases the difficulty in triggering the flexibility of the framework. PMID:23256823

  13. Polyamine-Cladded 18-Ring-Channel Gallium Phosphites with High-Capacity Hydrogen Adsorption and Carbon Dioxide Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sie, Ming-Jhe; Lin, Chia-Her; Wang, Sue-Lein

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we synthesized a unique inorganic framework bearing the largest 18-membered-ring channels in gallium phosphites, denoted as NTHU-15, which displayed genuine porosity even though large organic templates were present. The idea of using the "template-cladded" strategy succeeded in releasing channel space of up to ∼24% of the unit-cell volume as highly positive-charged organic templates were manipulated to cling to the anionic inorganic walls. NTHU-15 showed both high H2 uptake of 3.8 mmol/g at 77 K and effective CO2 adsorption of ∼2.4 mmol/g at 298 K, which surpassed those of all other known extra-large-channel inorganic framework structures. NTHU-15 has been successful at overcoming the long-standing problem of organic-templated extra-large-channel structures as opposed to a "true open" framework. Moreover, it realized practical gas sorption functionality in innovated metal phosphites. In view of its high stability in hot water and high selectivity for CO2 adsorption, NTHU-15 may be the first novel inorganic framework material to be applied to the field of flue gas cleaning. PMID:27181272

  14. 低分子量N-羧丁酰壳聚糖的合成及其吸湿保湿性%Synthesis, Moisture Adsorption and Moisture Retention Capacities of Low Molecular Weight N-Succinyl-chitosan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 汪琴; 王爱勤

    2005-01-01

    Low molecular weight N-succinyl-chitosans with different degrees of substitution were synthesized by controlling reaction temperature, reaction time, and the molar ratio of the low molecular weight chitosan to succinic anhydride. The structure of the low molecular weight N-succinyl-chitosan was characterized by infrared spectroscopy(IR), by which —COCH2CH2 COOH was proved to be introduced to the —NH2 of the low molecular weight chitosan. The moisture adsorption and moisture retention capacities of the low molecular weight chitosan derivatives with different degrees of substitution were investigated. The results indicate that the moisture adsorption and moisture retention capacities of the low molecular weight N-succinyl-chitosan increase with the increase of the degree of substitution. When the degree of substitution is greater than 38%, the derivatives have better moisture adsorption and moisture retention capacities than hyaluronic acid.

  15. Modification of ASM3 for the determination of biomass adsorption/storage capacity in bulking sludge control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinia, J; Rosenwinkel, K H; Phan, L C

    2006-01-01

    The selector activated sludge (SAS) systems are known to prevent excessive growth of filamentous microorganisms responsible for bulking sludge, but these systems were hardly ever modelled. This study aimed to develop a model capable of predicting rapid substrate removal in the SAS systems. For this purpose, the Activated Sludge Model No. 3 (ASM3) was extended with three processes (adsorption, direct growth on the adsorbed substrate under aerobic or anoxic conditions). The modified ASM3 was tested against the results of batch experiments with the biomass originating from two full-scale SAS systems in Germany. The endogenous biomass was mixed with various readily biodegradable substrates (acetate, peptone, glucose and wastewater) and the utilisation of substrate (expresses as COD) and oxygen uptake rates (OURs) were measured during the experiments. In general, model predictions fitted to the experimental data, but a considerable number of kinetic (5) and stoichiometric (2) parameters needed to be adjusted during model calibration. The simulation results revealed that storage was generally a dominating process compared to direct growth in terms of the adsorbed substrate utilisation. The contribution of storage ranged from 65-71% (Plant A) and 69-92% (Plant B). PMID:16605021

  16. Characterization of Fly Ash from Coal-Fired Power Plant and Their Properties of Mercury Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Jiang, Xiumin; Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo; Ren, Jianxing

    2015-12-01

    Recent research has shown that fly ash may catalyze the oxidation of elemental mercury and facilitate its removal. However, the nature of mercury-fly ash interaction is still unknown, and the mechanism of mercury retention in fly ash needs to be investigated more thoroughly. In this work, a fly ash from a coal-fired power plant is used to characterize the inorganic and organic constituents and then evaluate its mercury retention capacities. The as-received fly ash sample is mechanically sieved to obtain five size fractions. Their characteristics are examined by loss on ignition (LOI), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectra. The results show that the unburned carbon (UBC) content and UBC structural ordering decrease with a decreasing particle size for the five ashes. The morphologies of different size fractions of as-received fly ash change from the glass microspheres to irregular shapes as the particle size increases, but there is no correlation between particle size and mineralogical compositions in each size fraction. The adsorption experimental studies show that the mercury-retention capacity of fly ash depends on the particle size, UBC, and the type of inorganic constituents. Mercury retention of the types of sp2 carbon is similar to that of sp3 carbon.

  17. Synthesis of fungus-like MoS2 nanosheets with ultrafast adsorption capacities toward organic dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, HaoJie; You, Shengsheng; Jia, XiaoHua

    2015-11-01

    Fungus-like molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets with a thickness of a few nanometers have been successfully synthesized via one-pot hydrothermal method. The as-prepared MoS2 nanosheets with a high surface area of 106.989 m2 g-1 exhibited excellent wastewater treatment performance with high removal capacities toward organic dyes. In addition, the fungus-like MoS2 nanosheets can absorb Congo red completely within 2 min. Successful access to high quality fungus-like MoS2 nanosheets will make it possible for their potential application in catalysis and other fields.

  18. Synthesis of fungus-like MoS2 nanosheets with ultrafast adsorption capacities toward organic dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fungus-like molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets with a thickness of a few nanometers have been successfully synthesized via one-pot hydrothermal method. The as-prepared MoS2 nanosheets with a high surface area of 106.989 m2 g-1 exhibited excellent wastewater treatment performance with high removal capacities toward organic dyes. In addition, the fungus-like MoS2 nanosheets can absorb Congo red completely within 2 min. Successful access to high quality fungus-like MoS2 nanosheets will make it possible for their potential application in catalysis and other fields. (orig.)

  19. Long-Life and High-Areal-Capacity Li-S Batteries Enabled by a Light-Weight Polar Host with Intrinsic Polysulfide Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Quan; Nazar, Linda F

    2016-04-26

    Lithium-sulfur batteries are attractive electrochemical energy storage systems due to their high theoretical energy density and very high natural abundance of sulfur. However, practically, Li-S batteries suffer from short cycling life and low sulfur utilization, particularly in the case of high-sulfur-loaded cathodes. Here, we report on a light-weight nanoporous graphitic carbon nitride (high-surface-area g-C3N4) that enables a sulfur electrode with an ultralow long-term capacity fade rate of 0.04% per cycle over 1500 cycles at a practical C/2 rate. More importantly, it exhibits good high-sulfur-loading areal capacity (up to 3.5 mAh cm(-2)) with stable cell performance. We demonstrate the strong chemical interaction of g-C3N4 with polysulfides using a combination of spectroscopic experimental studies and first-principles calculations. The 53.5% concentration of accessible pyridinic nitrogen polysulfide adsorption sites is shown to be key for the greatly improved cycling performance compared to that of N-doped carbons. PMID:26841116

  20. Synthesis of fungus-like MoS{sub 2} nanosheets with ultrafast adsorption capacities toward organic dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, HaoJie; You, Shengsheng [Jiangsu University, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Jia, XiaoHua [Jiangsu University, School of Environment and Safety Engineering, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-11-15

    Fungus-like molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) nanosheets with a thickness of a few nanometers have been successfully synthesized via one-pot hydrothermal method. The as-prepared MoS{sub 2} nanosheets with a high surface area of 106.989 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} exhibited excellent wastewater treatment performance with high removal capacities toward organic dyes. In addition, the fungus-like MoS{sub 2} nanosheets can absorb Congo red completely within 2 min. Successful access to high quality fungus-like MoS{sub 2} nanosheets will make it possible for their potential application in catalysis and other fields. (orig.)

  1. A new specific polymeric material for mercury speciation: Application to environmental and food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarco-Fernández, S; Mancheño, M J; Muñoz-Olivas, R; Cámara, C

    2015-10-15

    A new polymeric material (Patent: P201400535) highly specific for mercury is presented. Its great capability to pre-concentrate and selectively elute inorganic mercury and methylmercury are the main figures of merit. The polymer can be reused several times. To our knowledge, this is the only polymer proposed in the literature for direct inorganic mercury and methylmercury speciation without need of chromatography or quantification by difference. The polymer formation is based on the reaction of a vinyl derivative of 8-hydroxiquinoline as monomer, and 2-(Methacryloylamino) ethyl 2-Methyl Acrylate (NOBE) as co-monomer. Random radical polymerization by the precipitation method was carried out using Azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. The polymer was characterized by SEM and FTIR. Adsorption binding isotherms were evaluated using Langmuir and Freundlich models, showing high adsorption capacity for both inorganic and organic mercury species. The polymer was employed to sequentially determine inorganic mercury and methylmercury, using a solid phase extraction (SPE) scheme. Cross reactivity of several ions, as well as matrix effects from a high saline matrix like seawater was irrelevant as the retained fractions mostly eluted during the washing step. The procedure was first validated by analyzing a certified reference material (BCR 464) and finally applied to commercial fish samples. The speciation proposed procedure is cheap, fast, and easy to use and minimizes reagents waste. PMID:26515012

  2. Mercury release from deforested soils triggered by base cation enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farella, N; Lucotte, M; Davidson, R; Daigle, S

    2006-09-01

    The Brazilian Amazon has experienced considerable colonization in the last few decades. Family agriculture based on slash-and-burn enables millions of people to live in that region. However, the poor nutrient content of most Amazonian soils requires cation-rich ashes from the burning of the vegetation biomass for cultivation to be successful, which leads to forest ecosystem degradation, soil erosion and mercury contamination. While recent studies have suggested that mercury present in soils was transferred towards rivers upon deforestation, little is known about the dynamics between agricultural land-use and mercury leaching. In this context, the present study proposes an explanation that illustrates how agricultural land-use triggers mercury loss from soils. This explanation lies in the competition between base cations and mercury in soils which are characterized by a low adsorption capacity. Since these soils are naturally very poor in base cations, the burning of the forest biomass suddenly brings high quantities of base cations to soils, destabilizing the previous equilibrium amongst cations. Base cation enrichment triggers mobility in soil cations, rapidly dislocating mercury atoms. This conclusion comes from principal component analyses illustrating that agricultural land-use was associated with base cation enrichment and mercury depletion. The overall conclusions highlight a pernicious cycle: while soil nutrient enrichment actually occurs through biomass burning, although on a temporary basis, there is a loss in Hg content, which is leached to rivers, entering the aquatic chain, and posing a potential health threat to local populations. Data presented here reflects three decades of deforestation activities, but little is known about the long-term impact of such a disequilibrium. These findings may have repercussions on our understanding of the complex dynamics of deforestation and agriculture worldwide. PMID:16781764

  3. Removal of mercury from water using pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous study, the sorption of radiocobalt by powdered pottery materials was investigated. The use of these materials as immobilization matrix for liquid radioactive waste requires the employment of pottery vessels. Therefore, the present study aims to give detailed investigations of the decontamination of radionuclides and toxic elements using pottery containers. These investigations are equally useful to elucidate how far these vessels can be utilized for water purification through decontamination of toxic and heavy metals. The radionuclide or heavy metal removal capability using pottery pots, as low cost sorbents, has been investigated for both radioactive (203Hg) and stable mercury. The results indicated that Hg2+ is better removed by pottery from neutral to alkaline solutions. The capacity of the used pottery container (100 ml in volume) for complete removal of mercury was found to reach 3 x 10-4 mol/l, and the time needed was 8 hours. The sorption process was suggested to occur via adsorption and ion exchange. The effect of presence of humic or fulvic acid, as ligands abundant in water, is also investigated. The results imply that, in absence of humic or fulvic acid the sorption follows the expected behaviour, i.e. sorption sites with similar affinity for mercury. In presence of humic or fulvic acid, additional sorption sites are available by the organic molecule when it is associated to the pottery. (orig.)

  4. Effect of diet on the capacity to remove mercury from the body of a penguin (Spheniscus demersus) living in the ZOO

    OpenAIRE

    Falkowska L.; Szumiło E.; Hajdryh J.; Grajewska A.; Bełdowska M.; Krause I

    2013-01-01

    Birds due to its position in the trophic chain are good monitors of the marine environment in terms of mercury contamination. For the proper interpretation of results it is necessary to know both the processes of accumulation of this metal in their bodies and processes of elimination. Research involving the Penguin (Spheniscus demersus) living in a ZOO has identified the relationship between diet and the amount of mercury removed from the penguin body in guano, feathers, and in the case of fe...

  5. Effect of diet on the capacity to remove mercury from the body of a penguin (Spheniscus demersus living in the ZOO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falkowska L.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Birds due to its position in the trophic chain are good monitors of the marine environment in terms of mercury contamination. For the proper interpretation of results it is necessary to know both the processes of accumulation of this metal in their bodies and processes of elimination. Research involving the Penguin (Spheniscus demersus living in a ZOO has identified the relationship between diet and the amount of mercury removed from the penguin body in guano, feathers, and in the case of females with eggs. The research was conducted in years 2009-2011. Total mercury was determined in elements responsible for detoxification and in the diet of penguins. Mercury concentration was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry with AMA-254 automatic mercury analyzer. The highest average mercury concentrations were determined in feathers: 1781.12 ngHg•g−1d.w., lower in eggs: 950.88 ngHg•g−1 dry weight (d.w.. and in a guano: 139.18 ngHg•g−1. In food, herrings caught in the southern Baltic, Hg concentrations were relatively low with averaged value 31.81 ngHg•g−1d.w.

  6. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs), as a Novel Sorbent for Determination of Mercury in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbabaei, Farideh; Ebrahimi, Ali; Shirkhanloo, Hamid; Koohpaei, Alireza; Faghihi-Zarandi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Based on the noticeable toxicity and numerous application of mercury in industries, removal of mercury vapor through sorbent is an important environmental challenge. Purpose of the Study: Due to their highly porous and hollow structure, large specific surface area, light mass density and strong interaction, Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) sorbent were selected for this investigation. Methods: In this study, instrumental conditions, method procedure and different effective parameters such as adsorption efficiency, desorption capacity, time, temperature and repeatability as well as retention time of adsorbed mercury were studied and optimized. Also, mercury vapor was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). Obtained data were analyzed by Independent T- test, Multivariate linear regression and one way–ANOVA finally. Results: For 80 mg nanotubes, working range of SWCNT were achieved 0.02-0.7 μg with linear range (R2=0.994). Our data revealed that maximum absorption capacity was 0.5 μg g-1 as well as limit of detection (LOD) for studied sorbent was 0.006 μg. Also, optimum time and temperature were reported, 10 min and 250 °C respectively. Retention time of mercury on CNTs for three weeks was over 90%. Results of repeated trials indicated that the CNTs had long life, so that after 30 cycles of experiments, efficiency was determined without performance loss. Conclusion: Results showed that carbon nanotubes have high potential for efficient extraction of mercury from air and can be used for occupational and environmental purposes. The study of adsorption properties of CNTs is recommended.

  7. Adsorption of Ag, Cu and Hg from aqueous solutions using expanded perlite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the ability of expanded perlite (EP) to remove of silver, copper and mercury ions from aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out and the effect of pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and temperature of solution on the removal process has been investigated. The optimum pH for the adsorption was found to be 6.5. Adsorption of these metal ions reached their equilibrium concentration in 120, 240 and 180 min for Ag (I), Cu (II) and Hg (II) ions, respectively. Experimental data were also evaluated in terms of kinetic characteristics of adsorption and it was found that adsorption process for these metal ions followed well pseudo-second-order kinetics. Using Langmuir isotherm model, maximum adsorption capacity of EP was found to be 8.46, 1.95 and 0.35 mg/g for Ag (I), Cu (II) and Hg (II) ions, respectively. Finally, the thermodynamic parameters including, the change of free energy (ΔGo), enthalpy (ΔHo) and entropy (ΔSo) of adsorption were calculated for each metal ion. The results showed that the adsorption of these metal ions on EP was feasible and exothermic at 20-50 deg. C.

  8. 改性沸石和膨润土对氟离子吸附性能研究%Study on the adsorption capacity of modified zeoIite and bentonite for fIuoride ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文生; 孙彦红; 赵万明

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature roasting,sulphuric acid,and magnesium sulphate have been used for the modification of natural zeolite and bentonite. The effects of three kinds of modification methods on the adsorption capacity of zeo-lite and bentonite for fluoride ions have been investigated. The experimental results show that high-temperature roasting,sulphuric acid modification and magnesium sulphate modification can all increase the adsorption capacity of zeolite and bentonite for fluoride ions. The adsorption of modified zeolite for fluoride ions complies with Langmuir isothermal adsorption;the adsorption of sulphuric acid modified and magnesium sulphate modified bentonite for fluo-ride ions can be described with both Langmuir model and Freundlich model;while the adsorption of high-tempera-ture roasting modified bentonite for fluoride ions complies with Freundlich model.%选用高温焙烧、硫酸、硫酸镁改性天然沸石和膨润土,考察了3种改性方法对沸石和膨润土吸附氟离子性能的影响。实验结果表明,高温焙烧、硫酸改性和硫酸镁改性均提高了沸石和膨润土对氟离子的吸附能力。改性沸石对氟离子的吸附符合Langmuir等温吸附模型;硫酸改性、硫酸镁改性膨润土对氟离子的吸附可用Langmuir模型和Freundlich模型描述,高温焙烧改性膨润土对氟离子的吸附则符合Freundlich模型。

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of different thio-modified cellulose resins for the removal of mercury (II) ion from highly acidic aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagai, Yoshitaka; Shibata, Atsushi; Kiyokawa, Shigemi; Takase, Tsugiko

    2011-01-15

    Seven different types of thio- and/or amine-modified cellulose resin materials were synthesized and their mercury (II) ion adsorption properties determined. All seven resins showed good mercury (II) adsorption capability in the more neutral pH regions. However, the o-benzenedithiol- and o-aminothiophenol-modified cellulosic resins were found to be very effective in removing mercury (II) ions from strongly acidic media. For example, 93.5-100% mercury (II) ion recoveries from very acid aqueous solutions (nitric acid concentration ranged from 0.1 to 2.0 mol/L) were obtained using the o-benzenedithiol-modified resin while recoveries ranged from ca. 50% to 60% for the o-aminothiophenol-modified resin. An adsorption capacity of 23 mg (as Hg atoms) per gram of resin was observed for the o-benzenedithiol-modified cellulose in the presence of 1.0 mol/L nitric acid. This same resin shows very good selectivity for mercury (II) as only ruthenium (II) also somewhat adsorbed onto it out of 14 other metal ions studied (Ag(+), Al(3+), As(3+), Co(2+), Cd(2+), Cr(3+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Pt(2+), Pb(2+), Ru(2+), and Zn(2+)). PMID:20974469

  10. Mercury and Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Risk of Exposure to Mercury Learn About Mercury What is Mercury What is Metallic mercury? Toxicological Profile ToxFAQs Mercury Resources CDC’s National Biomonitoring Program Factsheet on Mercury ...

  11. Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    Mariner 10's first image of Mercury acquired on March 24, 1974. During its flight, Mariner 10's trajectory brought it behind the lighted hemisphere of Mercury, where this image was taken, in order to acquire important measurements with other instruments.This picture was acquired from a distance of 3,340,000 miles (5,380,000 km) from the surface of Mercury. The diameter of Mercury (3,031 miles; 4,878 km) is about 1/3 that of Earth.Images of Mercury were acquired in two steps, an inbound leg (images acquired before passing into Mercury's shadow) and an outbound leg (after exiting from Mercury's shadow). More than 2300 useful images of Mercury were taken, both moderate resolution (3-20 km/pixel) color and high resolution (better than 1 km/pixel) black and white coverage.

  12. Study of the removal of mercury(II) and chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by Moroccan stevensite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhammou, A; Yaacoubi, A; Nibou, L; Tanouti, B

    2005-01-31

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the adsorption of the heavy metals mercury(II) and chromium(VI), from aqueous solutions, onto Moroccan stevensite. A mineralogical and physicochemical characterization of natural stevensite was carried out. In order to improve the adsorption capacity of stevensite for Cr(VI), a preparation of stevensite was carried out. It consists in saturating the stevensite by ferrous iron Fe(II) and reducing the total Fe by Na(2)S(2)O(4). Then, the adsorption experiments were studied in batch reactors at 25+/-3 degrees C. The influence of the pH solution on the Cr(VI) and Hg(II) adsorption was studied in the pH range of 1.5-7.0. The optimum pH for the Cr(VI) adsorption is in the pH range of 2.0-5.0 while that of Hg(II) is at the pH values above 4.0. The adsorption kinetics were tested by a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption rate of Hg(II) is 54.35 mmol kg(-1)min(-1) and that of Cr(VI) is 7.21 mmol kg(-1)min(-1). The adsorption equilibrium time for Hg(II) and Cr(VI) was reached within 2 and 12 h, respectively. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Dubinin-Radushkevich model. The maximal adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) increases from 13.7 (raw stevensite) to 48.86 mmol kg(-1) (modified stevensite) while that of Hg(II) decreases from 205.8 to 166.9 mmol kg(-1). The mechanism of Hg(II) and Cr(VI) adsorption was discussed. PMID:15629583

  13. Study of the removal of mercury(II) and chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by Moroccan stevensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the adsorption of the heavy metals mercury(II) and chromium(VI), from aqueous solutions, onto Moroccan stevensite. A mineralogical and physicochemical characterization of natural stevensite was carried out. In order to improve the adsorption capacity of stevensite for Cr(VI), a preparation of stevensite was carried out. It consists in saturating the stevensite by ferrous iron Fe(II) and reducing the total Fe by Na2S2O4. Then, the adsorption experiments were studied in batch reactors at 25 ± 3 deg. C. The influence of the pH solution on the Cr(VI) and Hg(II) adsorption was studied in the pH range of 1.5-7.0. The optimum pH for the Cr(VI) adsorption is in the pH range of 2.0-5.0 while that of Hg(II) is at the pH values above 4.0. The adsorption kinetics were tested by a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption rate of Hg(II) is 54.35 mmol kg-1 min-1 and that of Cr(VI) is 7.21 mmol kg-1 min-1. The adsorption equilibrium time for Hg(II) and Cr(VI) was reached within 2 and 12 h, respectively. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Dubinin-Radushkevich model. The maximal adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) increases from 13.7 (raw stevensite) to 48.86 mmol kg-1 (modified stevensite) while that of Hg(II) decreases from 205.8 to 166.9 mmol kg-1. The mechanism of Hg(II) and Cr(VI) adsorption was discussed

  14. Study of the removal of mercury(II) and chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by Moroccan stevensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhammou, A. [Ecole Superieure de Technologie, Route Dar Si Aissa, BP: 89 Safi (Morocco)]. E-mail: benhammou_ab@yahoo.fr; Yaacoubi, A. [Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, Avenue My Abdellah, BP: 2390 Marrakech (Morocco); Nibou, L. [Ecole Superieure de Technologie, Route Dar Si Aissa, BP: 89 Safi (Morocco); Tanouti, B. [Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, Avenue My Abdellah, BP: 2390 Marrakech (Morocco)

    2005-01-31

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the adsorption of the heavy metals mercury(II) and chromium(VI), from aqueous solutions, onto Moroccan stevensite. A mineralogical and physicochemical characterization of natural stevensite was carried out. In order to improve the adsorption capacity of stevensite for Cr(VI), a preparation of stevensite was carried out. It consists in saturating the stevensite by ferrous iron Fe(II) and reducing the total Fe by Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Then, the adsorption experiments were studied in batch reactors at 25 {+-} 3 deg. C. The influence of the pH solution on the Cr(VI) and Hg(II) adsorption was studied in the pH range of 1.5-7.0. The optimum pH for the Cr(VI) adsorption is in the pH range of 2.0-5.0 while that of Hg(II) is at the pH values above 4.0. The adsorption kinetics were tested by a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption rate of Hg(II) is 54.35 mmol kg{sup -1} min{sup -1} and that of Cr(VI) is 7.21 mmol kg{sup -1} min{sup -1}. The adsorption equilibrium time for Hg(II) and Cr(VI) was reached within 2 and 12 h, respectively. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Dubinin-Radushkevich model. The maximal adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) increases from 13.7 (raw stevensite) to 48.86 mmol kg{sup -1} (modified stevensite) while that of Hg(II) decreases from 205.8 to 166.9 mmol kg{sup -1}. The mechanism of Hg(II) and Cr(VI) adsorption was discussed.

  15. Mercury(6)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    31. Since Mariner Ten's flight, astronomers have been trying to find out more about Mercury. Telescopes, including the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope,cannot help much. They would be damaged by the bright light of the sun if they turned to look at Mercury. So, astronomers are studying Mercury from observatories on Earth. They are recording information about the planet's radiation.

  16. Characterization and application of tourmaline and beryl from Brazilian pegmatite in adsorption process with divalent metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denis L.Guerra; Silze P.Oliveira; Ricardo A.R.Silva; Victor Leidens; Adriano C.Batista

    2012-01-01

    In this study,the original tourmaline and beryl mineral samples have been collected from a Brazilian pegmatite.The objective of this study was to examine the adsorption behavior of Brazilian ciclosilicate sampies,towards divalent metals (Pb2+,Mn2+,and Zn2+) in ethanol solution has been studies by a batch technique.The ciclosilicate samples were characterized by elemental analysis,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,helium picnometry,mercury porosity,and nitrogen adsorption-desorption.The Langmuir expression for adsorption isotherm was applied in order to determine the adsorption capacity to form a monolayer and the constant related to the adsorption intensity.In aqueous solution there was a significant adsorption increase with the temperature and pronounced synergistic effects were observed.The maximum number of moles adsorbed was determined to be 12.48 and 11.49 mmol/g for systems Pb2+/beryl and Pb2+/tourmaline,respectively.The energetic effects caused by metal cations adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations.Thermodynamics indicated the existence of favorable conditions for such Pb2+-,Mn2+-,and Zn2+-OH interactions.

  17. Insights into the adsorption capacity and breakthrough properties of a synthetic zeolite against a mixture of various sulfur species at low ppb levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellingiri, Kowsalya; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kwon, Eilhann E; Deep, Akash; Jo, Sang-Hee; Szulejko, Jan E

    2016-01-15

    The sorptive removal properties of a synthetic A4 zeolite were evaluated against sulfur dioxide (SO2) and four reference reduced sulfur compounds (RSC: hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanethiol (CH3SH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS, (CH3)2S), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS, CH3SSCH3). To this end, a sorbent bed of untreated (as-received) A4 zeolite was loaded with gaseous standards at four concentration levels (10-100 part-per-billion (ppb (v/v)) at four different volumes (0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1 L increments) in both increasing (IO: 0.1-1.0 L) and decreasing volume order (DO: 1.0 to 0.1 L). Morphological properties were characterized by PXRD, FTIR, and BET analysis. The removal efficiency of SO2 decreased from 100% for all concentrations at 0.1 L (initial sample volume) to ∼82% (100 ppb) or ∼96% (10 ppb) at 3.6 L. In contrast, removal efficiency of RSC was near 100% at small loading volumes but then fell sharply, irrespective of concentration (10-100 ppb) (e.g., 32% (DMS) to 52% (H2S) at 100 ppb). The adsorption capacity of zeolite, if expressed in terms of solid-gas partition coefficient (e.g., similar to the Henry's law constant (mmol kg(-1) Pa(-1))), showed moderate variabilities with the standard concentration levels and S compound types such as the minimum of 2.03 for CH3SH (at 20 ppb) to the maximum of 13.9 for SO2 (at 10 ppb). It clearly demonstrated a notable distinction in the removal efficiency of A4 zeolite among the different S species in a mixture with enhanced removal efficiency of SO2 compared to the RSCs. PMID:26562781

  18. Surfactant mediated synthesis of poly(acrylic acid) grafted xanthan gum and its efficient role in adsorption of soluble inorganic mercury from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Abhijit; Majumder, Kunal; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit

    2016-11-01

    Noble copolymers from xanthan gum (XG) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) were synthesised through surfactant mediated graft copolymerization. The copolymers were applied as a biosorbent for inorganic Hg(II) at higher concentration level (300ppm). The copolymers were characterized using different analytical techniques which showed, the grafting principally occurred across the amorphous region of XG. Measurement of zeta potential and hydrodynamic size indicated, the copolymers were strong polyanion and possessed greater hydrodynamic size (almost in all cases) than XG, despite a strong molecular degradation that took place simultaneously during grafting. In the dispersed form, all grades of the copolymer displayed higher adsorption capability than XG, however, the grade with maximum grafting produced the highest efficiency (68.03%). Manipulation produced further improvement in efficiency to 72.17% with the same copolymer after 75min at a pH of 5.0. The allowable biosorbent dose, however, was 1000ppm as determined from the experimental evidences. PMID:27516248

  19. COMBINED THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF MECHANISMS AND KINETICS OF VAPOR-PHASE MERCURY UPTAKE BY CARBONACOUES SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radisav D. Vidic

    2002-05-01

    The first part of this study evaluated the application of a versatile optical technique to study the adsorption and desorption of model adsorbates representative of volatile polar (acetone) and non-polar (propane) organic compounds on a model carbonaceous surface under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions. The results showed the strong correlation between optical differential reflectance (ODR) and adsorbate coverage determined by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). ODR technique was proved to be a powerful tool to investigate surface adsorption and desorption from UHV to high pressure conditions. The effects of chemical functionality and surface morphology on the adsorption/desorption behavior of acetone, propane and mercury were investigated for two model carbonaceous surfaces, namely air-cleaved highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and plasma-oxidized HOPG. They can be removed by thermal treatment (> 500 K). The presence of these groups almost completely suppresses propane adsorption at 90K and removal of these groups leads to dramatic increase in adsorption capacity. The amount of acetone adsorbed is independent of surface heat treatment and depends only on total exposure. The effects of morphological heterogeneity is evident for plasma-oxidized HOPG as this substrate provides greater surface area, as well as higher energy binding sites. Mercury adsorption at 100 K on HOPG surfaces with and without chemical functionalities and topological heterogeneity created by plasma oxidation occurs through physisorption. The removal of chemical functionalities from HOPG surface enhances mercury physisorption. Plasma oxidation of HOPG provides additional surface area for mercury adsorption. Mercury adsorption by activated carbon at atmospheric pressure occurs through two distinct mechanisms, physisorption below 348 K and chemisorption above 348 K. No significant impact of oxygen functionalities was observed in the chemisorption region. The key findings of this study

  20. Bone char surface modification by nano-gold coating for elemental mercury vapor removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Mohamad javad; Rezaee, Abbas; Rangkooy, Hossinali

    2015-07-01

    The present work was done to develop a novel nanocomposite using bone char coated with nano-gold for capture of elemental mercury (Hg0) from air. The morphologies, structures, and chemical constitute of the prepared nanocomposite were evaluated by UV-VIS-NIR, dynamic light-scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The capture performance of nanocomposite was evaluated in a needle trap for mercury vapor. An on-line setup based on cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS) was designed for Hg0 determination. Dynamic capacity of nanocomposite for Hg0 was shown high efficient operating capacity of 586.7 μg/g. As temperature increases, the dynamic adsorption capacity of the nanocomposite was decreased, which are characteristics of physicosorption processes. It was found that the surface modification of bone char with nano-gold has various advantages such as high operating dynamic adsorption capacity and low cost preparation. It was also demonstrated that the developed nanocomposite is suitable for on-line monitoring of Hg0. It could be applied for the laboratory and field studies.

  1. Basic Information about Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Basic Information about Mercury On this page: What is mercury? Emissions of ... Consumer products that traditionally contain mercury What is Mercury? Mercury is a naturally-occurring chemical element found ...

  2. Modeling study of natural emissions, source apportionment, and emission control of atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Suraj K.

    ) and CAMNet (Canadian Atmospheric Mercury Measurement Network). The model estimated a total deposition of 474 Mg yr-1 to the CONUS (Contiguous United States) domain, with two-thirds being dry deposited. Reactive gaseous mercury contributed the most to 60% of deposition. Emission speciation distribution is a key factor for local deposition as contribution from large point sources can be as high as 75% near (caused by CONUS emissions in the Northeast, Southeast and East Central regions, while emissions from natural processes are more important in the Pacific and West Central regions (contributing up to 40% of deposition). The modeling results implies that implementation of the new emission standards proposed by USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) would significantly benefit regions that have larger contributions from EGU sources. Control of mercury emissions from coal combustion processes has attracted great attention due to its toxicity and the emission-control regulations and has lead to advancement in state-of-the-art control technologies that alleviate the impact of mercury on ecosystem and human health. This part of the work applies a sorption model to simulate adsorption of mercury in flue gases, onto a confined-bed of activated carbon. The model's performances were studied at various flue gas flow rates, inlet mercury concentrations and adsorption bed temperatures. The process simulated a flue gas, with inlet mercury concentration of 300 ppb, entering at a velocity of 0.3 m s-1 from the bottom into a fixed bed (inside bed diameter of 1 m and 3 m bed height; bed temperature of 25 °C) of activated carbon (particle size of 0.004 m with density of 0.5 g cm-3 and surface area of 90.25 cm2 g -1). The model result demonstrated that a batch of activated carbon bed was capable of controlling mercury emission for approximately 275 days after which further mercury uptake starts to decrease till it reaches about 500 days when additional control ceases. An

  3. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of Hg(II) adsorption onto MCM-41 modified by ZnCl2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raji, Foad; Pakizeh, Majid

    2014-05-01

    Kinetics and thermodynamics of mercury ions sorption onto ZnCl2-MCM-41 sorbent were studied. Several rate models in the form of two main classes of mathematic kinetic models (adsorption reaction models and adsorption diffusion models) were investigated. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, film and intraparticle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic data. Results showed that the pseudo-second order model can well describe the adsorption kinetic data. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's free energy change (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy at temperature range of 20-55 °C, indicates the spontaneous nature of Hg(II) sorption by ZnCl2-MCM-41 sorbent. The adsorption capacity which was found to decrease with temperature showed the exothermic nature of the mercury sorption process (ΔH° = -49.4 kJ mol-1). The negative ΔS° value (-148.9 J mol-1 K-1) revealed a decrease in the randomness at the solid/solution interface and also indicated the fast adsorption of the Hg(II) onto active sites.

  4. Development of Nano-Sulfide Sorbent for Efficient Removal of Elemental Mercury from Coal Combustion Fuel Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Jun; Li, Liqing; Shih, Kaimin

    2016-09-01

    The surface area of zinc sulfide (ZnS) was successfully enlarged using nanostructure particles synthesized by a liquid-phase precipitation method. The ZnS with the highest surface area (named Nano-ZnS) of 196.1 m(2)·g(-1) was then used to remove gas-phase elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from simulated coal combustion fuel gas at relatively high temperatures (140 to 260 °C). The Nano-ZnS exhibited far greater Hg(0) adsorption capacity than the conventional bulk ZnS sorbent due to the abundance of surface sulfur sites, which have a high binding affinity for Hg(0). Hg(0) was first physically adsorbed on the sorbent surface and then reacted with the adjacent surface sulfur to form the most stable mercury compound, HgS, which was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and a temperature-programmed desorption test. At the optimal temperature of 180 °C, the equilibrium Hg(0) adsorption capacity of the Nano-ZnS (inlet Hg(0) concentration of 65.0 μg·m(-3)) was greater than 497.84 μg·g(-1). Compared with several commercial activated carbons used exclusively for gas-phase mercury removal, the Nano-ZnS was superior in both Hg(0) adsorption capacity and adsorption rate. With this excellent Hg(0) removal performance, noncarbon Nano-ZnS may prove to be an advantageous alternative to activated carbon for Hg(0) removal in power plants equipped with particulate matter control devices, while also offering a means of reusing fly ash as a valuable resource, for example as a concrete additive. PMID:27508312

  5. Mercury(1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    1.Mercury is the planet closest to the sun.It is thefastest moving planet.And it is the second smallestplanet in our solar system. 2.Mercury is very difficult to see.Its orbit isbetween us and the sun.So,we have to look toward thebright light of the sun to see it.The sunlight usuallyhides Mercury.When we can see it,it appears as a fuzzyball.

  6. Investigation on adsorption capacity of TiO2-P25 nanoparticles in the removal of a mono-azo dye from aqueous solution: A comprehensive isotherm analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnajady Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work TiO2-P25 nanoparticles with high surface area have been used as adsorbent for the removal of C.I Acid Red 27 (AR27, as an organic contaminant from aqueous solution. Characteristics of phases and crystallite size of TiO2-P25 nanoparticles were achieved from XRD and the surface area and pore size distribution were obtained from BET and BJH techniques. TiO2-P25 nanoparticles with almost 80% anatase and 20% rutile phases, the average crystallite size of 18 nm, have specific surface area of 56.82 m2 g-1. The effect of various parameters like initial AR27 concentration, pH, contact time and adsorbent dosage has been carried out in order to find desired adsorption conditions. The desired pH for adsorption of AR27 onto TiO2-P25 nanoparticles was 3. The equilibrium data were analyzed with various 2-, 3- and 4-parameter isotherm models. Equilibrium data fitted very well by the 4-parameter Fritz-Schluender model. Results of adsorption kinetics study indicated that the pseudo-second order kinetics provided the best fit with correlation coefficients close to unity.

  7. Mercury(5)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    26. Mercury appears to have a center of iron thattakes up seventy-five percent 0f the planet. There isonly a thin outer covering of rock around the core. Someastronomers think most of Mercury's rock was explodedoff when the planet was hit by a huge object early in itshistory.

  8. REMOVAL OF MERCURY FROM WATER USING POLYPYRROLE AND ITS COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    One of the suitable methods for removing heavy metals from water is by using surface adsorption process. In this paper, the preparation of polypyrrole and its composites as adsorbents are discussed and the capability of separating mercury from water is investigated. The results indicated that the polypyrrole and its composites are able to remove mercury from aqueous media. Furthermore the adsorption percentage is related to the surface morphology, type of additives and its concentration.

  9. Phosphorus Adsorption Capacities and Mechanisms of Different Modified Kaolin in Wastewater%改性高岭土对废水中磷的吸附性能及机理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟由涛; 杭小帅; 干方群

    2012-01-01

    采用盐酸和煅烧2种方法对苏州高岭土进行了改性,分析其对模拟含磷废水中磷的吸附效果,并初步探讨了其作用机制,继而进行了等温吸附和吸附动力学试验研究.结果显示,酸、热改性均不同程度地提高了高岭土对模拟废水中磷的吸附净化能力,尤以9%酸改性和500℃煅烧效果最为明显.在处理25 ml浓度为20 mg/L的模拟含磷废水中,高岭土投加量为2%(重量比)时,经9%酸改性高岭土对磷去除率达81.8%,较天然高岭土提高了44.6%.在处理50 ml浓度为20 mg/L的模拟含磷废水时,经500℃煅烧改性高岭土对磷的去除率高达99.5%,残留溶液中磷浓度仅为0.10 mg/L,达到我国相应排放标准.酸改性可通过改变高岭土的吸附活性点位来提高其对磷的吸附净化性能,而煅烧通过活化高岭石中的铝而提高其对磷的吸附净化性能.天然、9%酸改性及500℃煅烧高岭土磷吸附等温线均符合Freundilch和Langmuir方程,皆达极显著水平(P<0.01).天然、9%酸改性及500℃煅烧高岭土对磷的动力学吸附特征一致,皆与准二级方程拟合最佳,达极显著水平(P<0.01).500℃煅烧高岭土对磷的饱和吸附量最大,征净化含磷废水中具有良好的应用前景.%This study, by modifing kaolin with different concentrations of hydrochloric acid and different temperatures of calcinations, studied the adsorption capacities and mechanisms of phosphorus (P) in synthetic wastewater by the modified kaolin as well as P adsorption isotherms and kinetics of modified kaolin. The results showed that P adsorption capacities of kaolin with hydrochloric acid and calcination in synthetic wastewater were improved differently. Particularly, the adsorption capacities of kaolin modified with 9% acid and 500℃ calcinations improved greatly. The removal capacity of 9% acid modification raised by 44.6% than the capacity of natural kaolin, enabling kaolin, applied at a rate of

  10. Biochar from malt spent rootlets for the removal of mercury from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutsika, Lamprini; Manariotis, Ioannis; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.

    2013-04-01

    Biochar is receiving increased attention as a promising material in environmental applications. It is obtained from the incomplete combustion of carbon-rich biomass under oxygen-limited conditions. One of the many proposed applications of biochars is the removal of metals (e.g., lead, mercury, etc.) from aqueous solutions. Mercury is one of the heavy metals of particular concern due to its toxicity even at relatively low concentration and thus, its removal from aqueous systems is desirable. Malt spent rootlets is a by-product formed during beer production, it is inexpensive and it is produced in high quantities. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential use of biochar, produced from malt spent rootlets, to remove mercury from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were conducted at room temperature (25oC) to obtain the optimum sorption conditions under different pH values, biomass dose, contact time, and solution ionic strength. Sorption kinetics and equilibrium capacity constants were determined at the optimum pH value. Furthermore, the effect of different leaching solutions on mercury desorption from the biochar was examined. All studies with mercury and biochar were conducted at pH 5 that was determined to be the optimum pH for sorption. The proportion of mercury removal increased with the increased dose of the biochar, i.e. from 71% removal for biochar dose of 0.3 g/L, it reached almost 100% removal for biochar dose ˜1 g/L. Based on the isotherm data, the maximum biochar sorption capacity (qmax) for mercury was 99 mg/g. Based on the sorption kinetic data, (qmax) was achieved after 2 h; it should be mentioned that 30% of the (qmax) was observed within the first 5 min. Five leaching solutions were tested for mercury desorption (H2O, HCl, EDTA, NaCl and HNO3). HCl resulted in the highest extraction percentage of the sorbed mercury. The desorbing mercury percentages at 24 h for HCl concentrations 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 2 M were 62, 59, 62, 69

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Ni-Doped Calcium Silicate Hydrate Based on Steel Slag: Adsorption Capacity for Rhodamine B from Aqueous Solution

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate based on steel slag (SCSH) and Ni-doped SCSH (NSCSH) were synthesized under specific hydrothermal conditions at saturated vapor pressure and 185°C for 7 hours. The structure and morphology of SCSH and NSCSH were characterized by XRD, SEM, and N2 adsorption/desorption. SCSH mainly consisted of amorphous calcium silicate hydrate gel (C-S-H gel) together with some flake-like tobermorite and NSCSH consisted of crystalline tobermorite and xonotlite. The addition of Ni(NO3)...

  12. Experimental study on fly ash capture mercury in flue gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mercedes; DíAZ-SOMOANO; Patricia; ABAD-VALLE; M.Rosa; MARTíNEZ-TARAZONA

    2010-01-01

    Systematic experiments were conducted on a fixed-bed reactor to investigate the interaction between fly ash and mercury,the results implied that fly ash can capture mercury effectively.Among different fly ashes,the unburned carbon in the FA2 and FA3 fly ashes has the highest mercury capture capacity,up to 10.3 and 9.36 μg/g,respectively,which is close to that of commercial activated carbon.There is no obvious relationship between mercury content and carbon content or BET surface area of fly ash.Petrography classification standard was applied to distinguish fly ash carbon particles.Carbon content is not the only variable that controls mercury capture on fly ash,there are likely significant differences in the mercury capture capacities of the various carbon forms.Mercury capture capacity mainly depends on the content of anisotropy carbon particles with porous network structure.

  13. Preparation of Graphene Oxide Decorated Fe3O4@SiO2 Nanocomposites with Superior Adsorption Capacity and SERS Detection for Organic Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fast detection and removal of organic dyes from contaminated water has become an urgent environmental issue due to their high toxicity, chemical stability, and low biodegradability. In this paper, we have developed graphene oxide decorated Fe3O4@SiO2 (Fe3O4@SiO2-GO as a novel adsorbent aiming at the rapid adsorption and trace analysis of organic dyes followed by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS. The structure and morphology of the nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier infrared spectrometry (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. The obtained nanocomposites were used to adsorb methylene blue (MB in aqueous solution based on π-π stacking interaction and electrostatic attraction between MB and GO, and the adsorption behaviors of MB were investigated. Moreover, the obtained nanocomposites with adsorbed dyes were separated from the solution and loaded with silver nanoparticles for SERS detection. These nanocomposites showed superior SERS sensitivity and the lowest detectable concentration was 1.0 × 10−7 M.

  14. Mercury and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Mercury and pregnancy Mercury and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... vision problems. How can you be exposed to mercury? Mercury has several forms: It can be a ...

  15. Biosorption of mercury by Macrocystis pyrifera and Undaria pinnatifida: Influence of zinc, cadmium and nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Josefina Plaza; Marisa Viera; Edgardo Donati; Eric Guibal

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the adsorption of Hg(Ⅱ) on Macrocystis pyrifera and Undaria pinnatifida in monometallic system in the presence of Zn(Ⅱ),Cd(Ⅱ) and Ni(Ⅱ).The two biosorbents reached the same maximum sorption capacity (qm =0.8 mmol/g) for mercury.U.pinnatifida showed a greater affinity (given by the coefficient b of the Langmuir equation) for mercury compared to M.pyrifera (4.4 versus 2.7 L/mmol).Mercury uptake was significantly reduced (by more than 50%) in the presence of competitor heavy metals such as Zn(Ⅱ),Cd(Ⅱ) and Ni(Ⅱ).Samples analysis using an environmental scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis showed that mercury was heterogeneously adsorbed on the surface of both biomaterials,while the other heavy metals were homogeneous distributed.The analysis of biosorbents by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry indicated that Hg(Ⅱ)binding occurred on S=O (sulfonate) and N-H (amine) functional groups.

  16. Investigation of adsorption performance deterioration in silica gel–water adsorption refrigeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Adsorption deterioration of silica gel in refrigeration systems is verified. ► Possible factors to cause such deterioration are analyzed. ► Specific surface area, silanol content and adsorption capacity are tested. ► The pollution is the primary factor to decline the adsorption capacity. ► Deteriorated samples are partly restored after being processed by acid solution. - Abstract: Silica gel acts as a key role in adsorption refrigeration systems. The adsorption deterioration must greatly impact the performance of the silica gel–water adsorption refrigeration system. In order to investigate the adsorption deterioration of silica gel, many different silica gel samples were prepared according to the application surroundings of silica gel in adsorption refrigeration systems after the likely factors to cause such deterioration were analyzed. The specific surface area, silanol content, adsorption capacity and pore size distribution of those samples were tested and the corresponding adsorption isotherms were achieved. In terms of the experimental data comparisons, it could be found that there are many factors to affect the adsorption performance of silica gel, but the pollution was the primary one to decline the adsorption capacity. In addition, the adsorption performance of the deteriorated samples after being processed by acid solution was explored in order to find the possible methods to restore its adsorption performance.

  17. Removal of heavy metals from water by zeolite mineral chemically modified. Mercury as a particular case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research works on the removal of mercury from water by zeolite minerals show that a small quantity of this element is sorbed. In this work the mercury sorption from aqueous solutions in the presence and absence of Cu(l l), Ni(l l) and/or Zn(l l) by a Mexican zeolite mineral, natural and modified by cisteaminium chloride or cistaminium dichloride, was investigated in acidic p H. The zeolite minerals were characterized by X- Ray diffraction Ftir, scanning electron microscopy and semiquantitative elemental analysis (EDS), surface area analysis (BET) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Mercury from aqueous solutions was quantified by Atomic absorption spectroscopy. The amount of sulphur on the zeolite samples treated with Na CI and modified with cisteaminium chloride (0.375 mmol/g) or cistaminium dichloride(0.475 mmol/g) was found to be higher than that of the zeolite minerals modified with cisteaminium chloride and cistaminium dichloride without treating them with Na CI. The amount of sulphur on the zeolite minerals modified with thiourea was the lowest. The diffusion coefficients and sorption isotherms for mercury were determined in the natural, treated with Na CI and, treated with Na CI and then modified with the cisteaminium chloride or cistaminium dichloride zeolite samples. The retention of mercury was the highest for the zeolite minerals treated Na CI and then modified with cisteaminium chloride or cistaminium dichloride, with adsorption capacity of 0.0511 and 0.0525 mmol Hg/g, respectively. In this research work, it was found that the retention of mercury by the modified minerals was not affected by the presence of Cu (Il), Zn(l l) y Ni (I l) under the experimental conditions. (Author)

  18. Mercury separation from concentrated potassium iodide/iodine leachate using Self-Assembled Mesoporous Mercaptan Support (SAMMS) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel adsorber, the Self-Assembled Mesoporous Mercaptan Support (SAMMS) material to remove mercury (Hg) from potassium iodide/iodine (KI/I2) waste streams. This study included investigations of the SAMMS material''s binding kinetics, loading capacity, and selectivity for Hg adsorption from surrogate and actual KI/I2 waste solutions. The kinetics data showed that binding of Hg by the adsorber material occurs very rapidly, with 82% to 95% adsorption occurring within the first 5 min. No significant differences in the rate of adsorption were noted between pH values of 5 and 9 and at Hg concentrations of ∼100 mg/1. Within the same range of pH values, an approximate four-fold increase in initial Hg concentration resulted in a two-fold increase in the rate of adsorption. In all cases studied, equilibrium adsorption occured within 4 h. The loading capacity experiments in KI/I2 surrogate solutions indicated Hg adsorption densities between 26 to 270 mg/g. The loading density increased with increasing solid: solution ratio and decreasing iodide concentrations. Values of distribution coefficients (1.3x105 to >2.6x108 ml/g) indicated that material adsorbs Hg with very high specificity from KI/I2 surrogate solutions. Reduction studies showed that compared to metallic iron (Fe), sodium dithionite can very rapidly reduce iodine as the triiodide species into the iodide form. Adsorption studies conducted with actual KI/I2 leachates confirmed the highly specific Hg adsorption properties (Kd>6x107 to>1x108 ml//g) of the adsorber material. Following treatment, the Hg concentrations in actual leachates were below instrumental detection limits (i.e., < 0.00005 mg/l), indicating that the KI solutions can be recycled

  19. Got Mercury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Valerie; James, John T.; McCoy, Torin; Garcia, Hector

    2010-01-01

    Many lamps used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury, which is efficiently absorbed through the lungs as a vapor. The liquid metal vaporizes slowly at room temperature, but may be completely vaporized when lamps are operating. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, we considered short-term and long-term exposures. Using an existing study, we estimated mercury vapor releases from lamps that are not in operation during missions lasting less than or equal to 30 days; whereas we conservatively assumed complete vaporization from lamps that are operating or being used during missions lasing more than 30 days. Based on mercury toxicity, the Johnson Space Center's Toxicology Group recommends stringent safety controls and verifications for any hardware containing elemental mercury that could yield airborne mercury vapor concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/m3 in the total spacecraft atmosphere for exposures lasting less than or equal to 30 days, or concentrations greater than 0.01 mg/m3 for exposures lasting more than 30 days.

  20. Expanded bed adsorption of bromelain (E.C. 3.4.22.33) from Ananas comosus crude extract

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, E.; M. E. Souza-Jr; J. C. C. Santana; A. C. Chaves; L. F. Porto; E. B. Tambourgi

    2009-01-01

    This work focuses on the adsorption of Bromelain in expanded bed conditions, such as the adsorption kinetics parameters. The adsorption kinetics parameters showed that after 40 minutes equilibrium was achieved and maximum adsorption capacity was 6.11 U per resin mL. However, the maximum adsorption capacity was only determined by measuring the adsorption isotherm. Only by the Langmuir model the maximum adsorption capacity, Qm, and dissociation constant, kd, values could be estimated as 9.18 U/...

  1. Adsorption of Oxaliplatin by Hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papageorgiou A.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HAP is the main inorganic component of human skeleton. The last years a lot of interest is focused on its use as drug carrier. In this work the in vitro adsorption of the anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin, by HAP, from its aqueous solution was studied. Various initial concentrations of oxaliplatin aqueous solutions were used in order to determine the maximum adsorption capacity of HAP. Oxaliplatin's concentrations were determined through Pt determinations by atomic absorption spectrometry with flame technique, in the equilibrated solutions after shaking for 48 hours and filtering the HAP-oxaliplatin slurries. The maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 49.1 mg oxaliplatin/g HAP. In order to determine the time needed for the maximum adsorption to be achieved, six oxaliplatin - HAP slurries were prepared. The slurries had initial oxaliplatin concentrations the one that corresponds to the maximum adsorption capacity of the HAP added. The oxaliplatin determination was carried out after 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 48 hours in each different slurry. The maximum adsorption capacity was achieved after 20 hours. The adsorption of oxaliplatin by HAP was found to follow the Freundlich equation.

  2. Copper adsorption in tropical oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira Maria Lucia Azevedo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu adsorption, at concentrations between 0 to 800 mg L-1, was evaluated in surface and subsurface samples of three Brazilian soils: a heavy clayey-textured Rhodic Hapludalf (RH, a heavy clayey-textured Anionic ''Rhodic'' Acrudox (RA and a medium-textured Anionic ''Xanthic'' Acrudox (XA. After adsorption, two consecutive extractions were performed to the samples which received 100 mg L-1 copper. Surface samples adsorbed higher amounts of Cu than the subsurface, and exhibited lower Cu removed after the extractions, reinforcing the influence of the organic matter in the reactions. Cu adsorption was significant in the subsurface horizons of the Oxisols, despite the positive balance of charge, demonstrating the existence of mechanisms for specific adsorption, mainly related to the predominance of iron and aluminum oxides in the mineral fractions. In these samples, Cu was easily removed from the adsorption sites. RH demonstrated a higher capacity for the Cu adsorption in both horizons.

  3. Mercury(II) and methyl mercury speciation on Streptococcus pyogenes loaded Dowex Optipore SD-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzen, Mustafa, E-mail: m.tuzen@gmail.com [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Uluozlu, Ozgur Dogan [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Karaman, Isa [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Biology Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2009-09-30

    A solid phase extraction procedure based on speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury on Streptococcus pyogenes immobilized on Dowex Optipore SD-2 has been established. Selective and sequential elution with 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HCl for methyl mercury and 2 mol L{sup -1} HCl for mercury(II) were performed at pH 8. The determination of mercury levels was performed by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Optimal analytical conditions including pH, amounts of biosorbent, sample volumes, etc., were investigated. The influences of the some alkaline and earth alkaline ions and some transition metals on the recoveries were also investigated. The capacity of biosorbent for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 4.8 and 3.4 mg g{sup -1}. The detection limit (3 sigma) of the reagent blank for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 2.1 and 1.5 ng L{sup -1}. Preconcentration factor was calculated as 25. The relative standard deviations of the procedure were below 7%. The validation of the presented procedure is performed by the analysis of standard reference material (NRCC-DORM 2 Dogfish Muscle). The procedure was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury in natural water and environmental samples.

  4. Mercury removal from coal combustion flue gas by modified fly ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqing Xu; Hairui Wang; Tingyu Zhu; Junyan Kuang; Pengfei Jing

    2013-01-01

    Fly ash is a potential alternative to activated carbon for mercury adsorption.The effects of physicochemical properties on the mercury adsorption performance of three fly ash samples were investigated.X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy,and other methods were used to characterize the samples.Results indicate that mercury adsorption on fly ash is primarily physisorption and chemisorption.High specific surface areas and small pore diameters are beneficial to efficient mercury removal.Incompletely burned carbon is also an important factor for the improvement of mercury removal efficiency,in particular.The C-M bond,which is formed by the reaction of C and Ti,Si and other elements,may improve mercury oxidation.The samples modified with CuBr2,CuCl2 and FeCl3 showed excellent performance for Hg removal,because the chlorine in metal chlorides acts as an oxidant that promotes the conversion of elemental mercury (Hg0) into its oxidized form (Hg2+).Cu2+ and Fe3+ can also promote Hg0 oxidation as catalysts.HCland O2 promote the adsorption of Hg by modified fly ash,whereas SO2 inhibits the Hg adsorption because of competitive adsorption for active sites.Fly ash samples modified with CuBr2,CuCl2 and FeCl3 are therefore promising materials for controlling mercury emissions.

  5. Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Walsh; Giang Tong; Neeles Bhopatkar; Thomas Gale; George Blankenship; Conrad Ingram; Selasi Blavo Tesfamariam Mehreteab; Victor Banjoko; Yohannes Ghirmazion; Heng Ban; April Sibley

    2009-09-14

    Laboratory measurements of mercury oxidation during selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide, simulation of pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash, and synthesis of new materials for simultaneous oxidation and adsorption of mercury, were performed in support of the development of technology for control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers and furnaces. Conversion of gas-phase mercury from the elemental state to water-soluble oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) enables removal of mercury during wet flue gas desulfurization. The increase in mercury oxidation in a monolithic V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalyst with increasing HCl at low levels of HCl (< 10 ppmv) and decrease in mercury oxidation with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio during SCR were consistent with results of previous work by others. The most significant finding of the present work was the inhibition of mercury oxidation in the presence of CO during SCR of NO at low levels of HCl. In the presence of 2 ppmv HCl, expected in combustion products from some Powder River Basin coals, an increase in CO from 0 to 50 ppmv reduced the extent of mercury oxidation from 24 {+-} 3 to 1 {+-} 4%. Further increase in CO to 100 ppmv completely suppressed mercury oxidation. In the presence of 11-12 ppmv HCl, increasing CO from 0 to {approx}120 ppmv reduced mercury oxidation from {approx}70% to 50%. Conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate also decreased with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio, but the effects of HCl and CO in flue gas on SO{sub 2} oxidation were unclear. Oxidation and adsorption of mercury by unburned carbon and fly ash enables mercury removal in a particulate control device. A chemical kinetic mechanism consisting of nine homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions for mercury oxidation and removal was developed to interpret pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash in experiments at pilot

  6. Competitive adsorption of heavy metal ions on peat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi-rong; ZHOU Li-min; WEI Peng; ZENG Kai; WEN Chuan-xi; LAN Hui-hua

    2008-01-01

    The uptake capacities, and the adsorption kinetics, of copper, Cu(Ⅱ), nickel, Ni(Ⅱ), and cadmium, Cd(Ⅱ), on peat have been studied under static conditions. The results show that the adsorption rates are rapid: equilibrium is reached in twenty minutes. The adsorption of copper, nickel and cadmium is pH dependent over the pH range from 2 to 6. The adsorption kinetics can be excellently described by the Elovich kinetic equation. The adsorption isotherm fits a Langmuir model very well. The adsorption capacifies follow the order Cu2+>Ni2+>Cd2+ in single-component systems and the competitive adsorption capacities fall in the decreasing order Cu2+> Ni2+>Cd2+ in multi-component systems. The adsorption capacities of these three heavy metal ions on peat are consistent with their observed competitive adsorption capacities.

  7. Bone char surface modification by nano-gold coating for elemental mercury vapor removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel nanocomposite including bone char and gold nanoparticle was developed for capture of Hg0 vapor. • EDS and XRD results confirm the presence of nano-gold on the surface of the bone char support. • The majority of the pores were found to be in the mesoporous range. • The dynamic capacity of 586 μg/g was obtained for Hg0 vapor. - Abstract: The present work was done to develop a novel nanocomposite using bone char coated with nano-gold for capture of elemental mercury (Hg0) from air. The morphologies, structures, and chemical constitute of the prepared nanocomposite were evaluated by UV–VIS–NIR, dynamic light-scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The capture performance of nanocomposite was evaluated in a needle trap for mercury vapor. An on-line setup based on cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS) was designed for Hg0 determination. Dynamic capacity of nanocomposite for Hg0 was shown high efficient operating capacity of 586.7 μg/g. As temperature increases, the dynamic adsorption capacity of the nanocomposite was decreased, which are characteristics of physicosorption processes. It was found that the surface modification of bone char with nano-gold has various advantages such as high operating dynamic adsorption capacity and low cost preparation. It was also demonstrated that the developed nanocomposite is suitable for on-line monitoring of Hg0. It could be applied for the laboratory and field studies

  8. Bone char surface modification by nano-gold coating for elemental mercury vapor removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assari, Mohamad javad [Department of Environmental & Occupational Health, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares university, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaee, Abbas, E-mail: rezaee@modares.ac.ir [Department of Environmental & Occupational Health, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares university, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rangkooy, Hossinali [Occupational Health Department, Faculty of Health, Jondishapor Medical Sciences University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Highlights: • A novel nanocomposite including bone char and gold nanoparticle was developed for capture of Hg{sup 0} vapor. • EDS and XRD results confirm the presence of nano-gold on the surface of the bone char support. • The majority of the pores were found to be in the mesoporous range. • The dynamic capacity of 586 μg/g was obtained for Hg{sup 0} vapor. - Abstract: The present work was done to develop a novel nanocomposite using bone char coated with nano-gold for capture of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) from air. The morphologies, structures, and chemical constitute of the prepared nanocomposite were evaluated by UV–VIS–NIR, dynamic light-scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The capture performance of nanocomposite was evaluated in a needle trap for mercury vapor. An on-line setup based on cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS) was designed for Hg{sup 0} determination. Dynamic capacity of nanocomposite for Hg{sup 0} was shown high efficient operating capacity of 586.7 μg/g. As temperature increases, the dynamic adsorption capacity of the nanocomposite was decreased, which are characteristics of physicosorption processes. It was found that the surface modification of bone char with nano-gold has various advantages such as high operating dynamic adsorption capacity and low cost preparation. It was also demonstrated that the developed nanocomposite is suitable for on-line monitoring of Hg{sup 0}. It could be applied for the laboratory and field studies.

  9. DFT study of Hg adsorption on M-substituted Pd(1 1 1) and PdM/γ-Al2O3(1 1 0) (M = Au, Ag, Cu) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiancheng; Yu, Huafeng; Geng, Lu; Liu, Jianwen; Han, Lina; Chang, Liping; Feng, Gang; Ling, Lixia

    2015-11-01

    The adsorption of Hgn (n = 1-3) on the Au-, Ag-, Cu-substituted Pd(1 1 1) surfaces as well as the PdM/γ-Al2O3(1 1 0) (M = Au, Ag, Cu) surfaces has been investigated using spin-polarized density functional theory calculations. It is found that M-substituted Pd(1 1 1) surfaces show as good Hg adsorption capacity as the perfect Pd(1 1 1) at low Hg coverage, while the Hg adsorption capacity is only slightly weakened at high Hg coverage. On the basis of stepwise adsorption energies analysis, it is concluded that M-substituted Pd(1 1 1) surfaces can contribute to the binding of Hg atom on the surfaces at high Hg coverage. The electronic properties of the second metal atoms are the main factor contributes to the Hg adsorption capacity. Gas phase Pd2 shows better Hg adsorption capacity than Pd2/γ-Al2O3, while PdM/γ-Al2O3 can adsorb Hg more efficiently than bare PdM clusters. It suggests that the γ-Al2O3 support can enhance the activity of PdM for Hg adsorption and reduces the activity of Pd2. It is also found that Pd is the main active composition responsible for the interaction of mercury with the surface for PdM/γ-Al2O3 sorbent. Taking Hg adsorption capacity and economic costs into account, Cu addition is a comparatively good candidate for Hg capture.

  10. JV Task 5 - Evaluation of Residual Oil Fly Ash As A Mercury Sorbent For Coal Combustion Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Patton

    2006-12-31

    The mercury adsorption capacity of a residual oil fly ash (ROFA) sample collected form Florida Power and Light Company's Port Everglades Power Plant was evaluated using a bituminous coal combustion flue gas simulator and fixed-bed testing protocol. A size-segregated (>38 {micro}g) fraction of ROFA was ground to a fine powder and brominated to potentially enhance mercury capture. The ROFA and brominated-ROFA were ineffective in capturing or oxidizing the Hg{sup 0} present in a simulated bituminous coal combustion flue gas. In contrast, a commercially available DARCO{reg_sign} FGD initially adsorbed Hg{sup 0} for about an hour and then catalyzed Hg{sup 0} oxidation to produce Hg{sup 2+}. Apparently, the unburned carbon in ROFA needs to be more rigorously activated in order for it to effectively capture and/or oxidize Hg{sup 0}.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of LTA nanozeolite using barley husk silica: Mercury removal from standard and real solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Silica extraction from barley husk with high purity for the synthesis of A nanozeolite. ► Free template A nanozeolite synthesized via new source of silica at low temperature. ► Optimization of SiO2/Al2O3, Na2O/SiO2 ratios, temperature and time of the synthesis. ► Utilizing of synthesized A nanozeolite for mercury removal from aqueous solutions. ► Mercury removal at optimized pH, contact time and adsorbent dose from real solution. - Abstract: In this study, synthesized Lined Type A (LTA) nanozeolite from barley husk silica (BHS) was used for mercury removal from standard and real aqueous solutions. The BHS in amorphous phase with 80% purity was extracted from barley husk ash (BHA), and used effectively as a new source of silica for the synthesis of NaA nanozeolite. The NaA nanocrystal in pure phase has been synthesized at low temperature, without adding any organic additives. The effects of heating time, reaction temperature, SiO2/Al2O3, and Na2O/SiO2 mole ratios on the crystallization of NaA nanozeolite were studied. The adsorption capacity of mercury (II) was studied as a function of pH, contact time, and amount of adsorbent. The crystallization of NaA nanozeolite from BHS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), and FTIR techniques. Moreover, concentration of Hg2+ ions in the aqueous solutions was analyzed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy method (HG-AAS). The standard and real samples analysis showed that NaA nanozeolite is capable of Hg2+ ions removal from the aqueous solutions. Efficiency of mercury (II) adsorption from real solutions onto the nano-sized NaA zeolite was 98%

  12. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of Hg(II) adsorption onto MCM-41 modified by ZnCl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raji, Foad; Pakizeh, Majid, E-mail: pakizeh@um.ac.ir

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • ZnCl{sub 2}-MCM-41 introduced itself as a high performance sorbent for Hg(II) removal. • Kinetics data were analyzed by pseudo-first and second order and diffusion models. • The adsorption kinetic data were described very well by pseudo-second-order model. • Sorption of Hg(II) by ZnCl{sub 2}-MCM-41 was an exothermic chemical process. • Hg(II) sorption was a spontaneous process since of minus free energy change. - Abstract: Kinetics and thermodynamics of mercury ions sorption onto ZnCl{sub 2}-MCM-41 sorbent were studied. Several rate models in the form of two main classes of mathematic kinetic models (adsorption reaction models and adsorption diffusion models) were investigated. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, film and intraparticle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic data. Results showed that the pseudo-second order model can well describe the adsorption kinetic data. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's free energy change (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy at temperature range of 20–55 °C, indicates the spontaneous nature of Hg(II) sorption by ZnCl{sub 2}-MCM-41 sorbent. The adsorption capacity which was found to decrease with temperature showed the exothermic nature of the mercury sorption process (ΔH° = −49.4 kJ mol{sup −1}). The negative ΔS° value (−148.9 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}) revealed a decrease in the randomness at the solid/solution interface and also indicated the fast adsorption of the Hg(II) onto active sites.

  13. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of Hg(II) adsorption onto MCM-41 modified by ZnCl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ZnCl2-MCM-41 introduced itself as a high performance sorbent for Hg(II) removal. • Kinetics data were analyzed by pseudo-first and second order and diffusion models. • The adsorption kinetic data were described very well by pseudo-second-order model. • Sorption of Hg(II) by ZnCl2-MCM-41 was an exothermic chemical process. • Hg(II) sorption was a spontaneous process since of minus free energy change. - Abstract: Kinetics and thermodynamics of mercury ions sorption onto ZnCl2-MCM-41 sorbent were studied. Several rate models in the form of two main classes of mathematic kinetic models (adsorption reaction models and adsorption diffusion models) were investigated. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, film and intraparticle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic data. Results showed that the pseudo-second order model can well describe the adsorption kinetic data. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's free energy change (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy at temperature range of 20–55 °C, indicates the spontaneous nature of Hg(II) sorption by ZnCl2-MCM-41 sorbent. The adsorption capacity which was found to decrease with temperature showed the exothermic nature of the mercury sorption process (ΔH° = −49.4 kJ mol−1). The negative ΔS° value (−148.9 J mol−1 K−1) revealed a decrease in the randomness at the solid/solution interface and also indicated the fast adsorption of the Hg(II) onto active sites

  14. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John Henry

    2014-09-02

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  15. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John H.

    2012-05-01

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  16. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John H.

    2008-10-14

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  17. RECOVERY OF MERCURY FROM CONTAMINATED LIQUID WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin M. Stewart

    1999-09-29

    magnetic field was evaluated. Field results indicated good removal of this mercury fraction from the Y-12 waters. In addition, this sorbent is easily regenerated by simply removing the magnetic field and flushing the columns with water. The fourth sorbent is still undergoing laboratory development, but results to date indicate exceptionally high mercury sorption capacity. The sorbent is capable of removing all forms of mercury typically present in natural and industrial waters, including Hg{sup 2+}, elemental mercury, methyl mercury, and colloidal mercury. The process possesses very fast kinetics, which allows for higher flow rates and smaller treatment units. These sorbent technologies, used in tandem or individually depending on the treatment needs, can provide DOE sites with a cost-effective method for reducing mercury concentrations to very low levels mandated by the regulatory community. In addition, the technologies do not generate significant amounts of secondary wastes for disposal. Furthermore, the need for improved water treatment technologies is not unique to the DOE. The new, stringent requirements on mercury concentrations impact other government agencies as well as the private sector. Some of the private-sector industries needing improved methods for removing mercury from water include mining, chloralkali production, chemical processing, and medical waste treatment. The next logical step is to deploy one or more of these sorbents at a contaminated DOE site or at a commercial facility needing improved mercury treatment technologies. A full-scale deployment is planned in fiscal year 2000.

  18. Adsorbents for capturing mercury in coal-fired boiler flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongqun; Xu, Zhenghe; Fan, Maohong; Bland, Alan E; Judkins, Roddie R

    2007-07-19

    This paper reviews recent advances in the research and development of sorbents used to capture mercury from coal-fired utility boiler flue gas. Mercury emissions are the source of serious health concerns. Worldwide mercury emissions from human activities are estimated to be 1000 to 6000 t/annum. Mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are believed to be the largest source of anthropogenic mercury emissions. Mercury emissions from coal-fired utility boilers vary in total amount and speciation, depending on coal types, boiler operating conditions, and configurations of air pollution control devices (APCDs). The APCDs, such as fabric filter (FF) bag house, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD), can remove some particulate-bound and oxidized forms of mercury. Elemental mercury often escapes from these devices. Activated carbon injection upstream of a particulate control device has been shown to have the best potential to remove both elemental and oxidized mercury from the flue gas. For this paper, NORIT FGD activated carbon was extensively studied for its mercury adsorption behavior. Results from bench-, pilot- and field-scale studies, mercury adsorption by coal chars, and a case of lignite-burned mercury control were reviewed. Studies of brominated carbon, sulfur-impregnated carbon and chloride-impregnated carbon were also reviewed. Carbon substitutes, such as calcium sorbents, petroleum coke, zeolites and fly ash were analyzed for their mercury-adsorption performance. At this time, brominated activated carbon appears to be the best-performing mercury sorbent. A non-injection regenerable sorbent technology is briefly introduced herein, and the issue of mercury leachability is briefly covered. Future research directions are suggested. PMID:17544578

  19. Dye adsorption behavior of Luffa cylindrica fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, H; Top, A; Balköse, D; Ulkü, S

    2008-05-01

    Using natural Luffa cylindrica fibers as adsorbent removal of methylene blue dye from aqueous solutions at different temperatures and dye concentrations was investigated in this study. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption were also investigated. The adsorption isotherms could be well defined with Langmuir model instead of Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters of methylene blue (MB) adsorption indicated that the adsorption is exothermic and spontaneous. The average MB adsorption capacity was found out as 49 mg/g and average BET surface area of fibers was calculated as 123 m(2)/g. PMID:17919814

  20. Dye adsorption behavior of Luffa cylindrica fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using natural Luffa cylindrica fibers as adsorbent removal of methylene blue dye from aqueous solutions at different temperatures and dye concentrations was investigated in this study. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption were also investigated. The adsorption isotherms could be well defined with Langmuir model instead of Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters of methylene blue (MB) adsorption indicated that the adsorption is exothermic and spontaneous. The average MB adsorption capacity was found out as 49 mg/g and average BET surface area of fibers was calculated as 123 m2/g

  1. Dye adsorption behavior of Luffa cylindrica fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demir, H. [Izmir Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Guelbahce Campus, 35430 Urla Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: hasandemir@iyte.edu.tr; Top, A.; Balkoese, D.; Ulkue, S. [Izmir Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Guelbahce Campus, 35430 Urla Izmir (Turkey)

    2008-05-01

    Using natural Luffa cylindrica fibers as adsorbent removal of methylene blue dye from aqueous solutions at different temperatures and dye concentrations was investigated in this study. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption were also investigated. The adsorption isotherms could be well defined with Langmuir model instead of Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters of methylene blue (MB) adsorption indicated that the adsorption is exothermic and spontaneous. The average MB adsorption capacity was found out as 49 mg/g and average BET surface area of fibers was calculated as 123 m{sup 2}/g.

  2. Recovery of Mercury From Contaminated Liquid Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Base Contract program emphasized the manufacture and testing of superior sorbents for mercury removal, testing of the sorption process at a DOE site, and determination of the regeneration conditions in the laboratory. During this project, ADA Technologies, Inc. demonstrated the following key elements of a successful regenerable mercury sorption process: (1) sorbents that have a high capacity for dissolved, ionic mercury; (2) removal of ionic mercury at greater than 99% efficiency; and (3) thermal regeneration of the spent sorbent. ADA's process is based on the highly efficient and selective sorption of mercury by noble metals. Contaminated liquid flows through two packed columns that contain microporous sorbent particles on which a noble metal has been finely dispersed. A third column is held in reserve. When the sorbent is loaded with mercury to the point of breakthrough at the outlet of the second column, the first column is taken off-line and the flow of contaminated liquid is switched to the second and third columns. The spent column is regenerated by heating. A small flow of purge gas carries the desorbed mercury to a capture unit where the liquid mercury is recovered. Laboratory-scale tests with mercuric chloride solutions demonstrated the sorbents' ability to remove mercury from contaminated wastewater. Isotherms on surrogate wastes from DOE's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee showed greater than 99.9% mercury removal. Laboratory- and pilot-scale tests on actual Y-12 Plant wastes were also successful. Mercury concentrations were reduced to less than 1 ppt from a starting concentration of 1,000 ppt. The treatment objective was 50 ppt. The sorption unit showed 10 ppt discharge after six months. Laboratory-scale tests demonstrated the feasibility of sorbent regeneration. Results show that sorption behavior is not affected after four cycles

  3. Physical and thermochemical properties for inorganic mercury compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to estimate the radiation safety for the spallation target system using mercury, it is necessary to provide physical and thermochemical data of inorganic mercury compounds formed with elements including spallation products. The numbers of selected inorganic mercury compounds are 208 in the solid state, 9 in the liquid state and 22 in the gaseous state, respectively. This report presents main properties of the inorganic mercury compounds such as density, melting and boiling points, standard enthalpy of formation, standard Gibbs energy of formation, constant-pressure heat capacity, vapor pressure and solubility in mercury. Especially, the temperature dependency of the heat capacity was reestimated by using the Kelley equation. Vapor pressures were estimated with the Chemical Reaction and Equilibrium Software HSC using above thermochemical data. The interaction between mercury and other elements was shown in the form of binary phase diagram. (author)

  4. Review of technologies for mercury removal from flue gas from cement production processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Anker Degn; Windelin, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a pollutant of concern and mercury emissions from cement plants are under environmental regulation. After coal-fired power plants, mercury emissions from cement and mineral production are the second largest anthropogenic sources. Compared to fuels, cement raw materials are the major...... sources of mercury in the cement kiln flue gas. Cement plants are quite different from power plants and waste incinerators regarding the flue gas composition, temperature, residence time, and material circulation. Cement kiln systems have some inherent ability to retain mercury in the solid materials due...... to the adsorption of mercury on the solids in the cold zone. However, recirculation of the kiln dust to the kiln will cause release of the captured mercury. The mercury chemistry in cement kiln systems is complicated and knowledge obtained from power plants and incinerators cannot be directly applied in cement...

  5. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC. PMID:26871732

  6. Mercury nano-trap for effective and efficient removal of mercury(II) from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baiyan; Zhang, Yiming; Ma, Dingxuan; Shi, Zhan; Ma, Shengqian

    2014-01-01

    Highly effective and highly efficient decontamination of mercury from aqueous media remains a serious task for public health and ecosystem protection. Here we report that this task can be addressed by creating a mercury 'nano-trap' as illustrated by functionalizing a high surface area and robust porous organic polymer with a high density of strong mercury chelating groups. The resultant porous organic polymer-based mercury 'nano-trap' exhibits a record-high saturation mercury uptake capacity of over 1,000 mg g(-1), and can effectively reduce the mercury(II) concentration from 10 p.p.m. to the extremely low level of smaller than 0.4 p.p.b. well below the acceptable limits in drinking water standards (2 p.p.b.), and can also efficiently remove >99.9% mercury(II) within a few minutes. Our work therefore presents a new benchmark for mercury adsorbent materials and provides a new perspective for removing mercury(II) and also other heavy metal ions from contaminated water for environmental remediation. PMID:25410491

  7. Mercury emission, control and measurement from coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei-Ping [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering; Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States). Inst. for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology; Cao, Yan [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States). Inst. for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology; Zhang, Kai [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    that are only equipped with an Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) have to look for a control method to reduce mercury emission. So far, the most economical method has been active carbon or sorbent injection before the ESP. Active carbon or sorbent injected into the flue gas ducts to oxidize the elemental mercury and then the oxidized mercury will be captured from the flue gas, then the ESP captures the active carbon or sorbent and fly ash simultaneously. Therefore, the long distance transportation of gaseous mercury is eliminated. However, the capture efficiency of mercury is extremely important in order to reduce the increase in ESP load and control the cost. The oxidation and adsorption rate of HBr and fly ash will be discussed in this presentation.

  8. Selective adsorption of tannins onto hide collagen fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖学品; 陆忠兵; 石碧

    2003-01-01

    Hide collagen of animals is used to prepare adsorbent material and its adsorption properties to tannins are investigated. It is indicated that the collagen fibres has excellent adsorption selectivity and high adsorption capacity to tannins. The adsorption rate of tannins is more than 90% whilst less than 10% of functional components are retained by the adsorbent. The adsorption mechanism of tannins onto hide collagen fibres is hydrogen-bonding association. Freundlich model can be used to describe the adsorption isotherms, and the pseudo-second-order rate model can be used to describe adsorption kinetics.

  9. Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas K. Gale

    2005-07-01

    This Final Report contains the test descriptions, results, analysis, correlations, theoretical descriptions, and model derivations produced from many different investigations performed on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, to investigate calcium-based sorbents and injection of oxidizing agents for the removal of mercury. Among the technologies were (a) calcium-based sorbents in general, (b) oxidant-additive sorbents developed originally at the EPA, and (c) optimized calcium/carbon synergism for mercury-removal enhancement. In addition, (d) sodium-tetrasulfide injection was found to effectively capture both forms of mercury across baghouses and ESPs, and has since been demonstrated at a slipstream treating PRB coal. It has been shown that sodium-tetrasulfide had little impact on the foam index of PRB flyash, which may indicate that sodium-tetrasulfide injection could be used at power plants without affecting flyash sales. Another technology, (e) coal blending, was shown to be an effective means of increasing mercury removal, by optimizing the concentration of calcium and carbon in the flyash. In addition to the investigation and validation of multiple mercury-control technologies (a through e above), important fundamental mechanism governing mercury kinetics in flue gas were elucidated. For example, it was shown, for the range of chlorine and unburned-carbon (UBC) concentrations in coal-fired utilities, that chlorine has much less effect on mercury oxidation and removal than UBC in the flyash. Unburned carbon enhances mercury oxidation in the flue gas by reacting with HCl to form chlorinated-carbon sites, which then react with elemental mercury to form mercuric chloride, which subsequently desorbs back into the flue gas. Calcium was found to enhance mercury removal by stabilizing the oxidized mercury formed on carbon surfaces. Finally, a model was developed to describe these mercury adsorption, desorption, oxidation, and removal mechanisms, including

  10. Use of Freundlich isotherm in the study of heavy metal adsorption in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was studied the applicability of the Freundlich adsorption isotherm in cadmium, mercury, zinc, and copper extraction from water using activated carbon and cellulose as adsorbents. (author) 62 refs., 22 figs., 19 tabs

  11. Mercury contamination extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Mark; Heiser, John; Kalb, Paul

    2009-09-15

    Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

  12. Adsorption of amitraz on the clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jale Gülen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amitraz (AZ that is used as acaridies was tried to extract with a clay. The experimental data were modelled as using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption data fit well with Langmuir isotherm that indicated the AZ adsorption is homogeneous and monolayer. The monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 35.02 mg/g at 20 ºC temperature. Effect of the phases contact time, the initial solution pH and the initial pesticide concentration were investigated from the point of adsorption equilibrium and yield. The adsorption kinetics were investigated by applying pseudo first order, pseudo second order and intra particle diffusion laws. Adsorption of AZ was found to be best fitted by the pseudo second order model. The intra particle diffusion also plays an important role in adsorption phenomenon.

  13. Voltammetric and theoretical studies of electrochemical behavior of cephalosporins at the mercury electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of the adsorption and electroreduction behavior of cefpodoxime proxetil, cefotaxime, desacetylcefotaxime, cefetamet, ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, and cefuroxime axetile at the mercury electrode surface has been performed using Cyclic (CV, Differential Pulse (DPV, and Adsorptive Stripping Differential Pulse Voltammetry (AdSDPV. The Quantitative Structure Property Relationship (QSPR study of the seven cephalosporins adsorption at the mercury electrode has been based on the density functional theory DFT-B3LYP/6-31G (d,p calculations of molecular orbitals, partial charges and electron densities of analytes. The DFT-parameters and QSPR model explain well the process of adsorption of the examined cephalosporins. QSPR study defined that cefalosporins with lower charge of sulphur in the thiazine moiety, lower electron density on the nitrogen atom of the N-O bond, higher number of hydrogen bond accepting groups, and higher principal moment of inertia should express high adsorption on the mercury electrode. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172033

  14. Mercury and health care

    OpenAIRE

    Rustagi Neeti; Singh Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world ha...

  15. Pore and surface diffusion of liquid-phase multicomponent adsorption in fixed beds I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Wye; Yoon, Se Hoon; Kim, Chul [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hwo Keun; Oh, Won Zin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Insititute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The adsorption capacity were measured through two-stage adsorption experiment with the adsorption isotherm and flow system. The 3 and more activate carbons were selected with surface area and pore size distribution, the adsorption relation of cl{sub 2} were reviewed with the characteristics of the activate carbon, 500 ppm cl{sub 2} (v/v in helium, in flow system) were selected and analyzed with G. C. The variation of adsorption rate were checked with the adsorption capacity in adsorption bed (shallow bed). Through the results, it is possible to design activate carbon adsorption of single component cl{sub 2}. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Pore and surface diffusion of liquid-phase multicomponent adsorption in fixed beds I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption capacity were measured through two-stage adsorption experiment with the adsorption isotherm and flow system. The 3 and more activate carbons were selected with surface area and pore size distribution, the adsorption relation of cl2 were reviewed with the characteristics of the activate carbon, 500 ppm cl2 (v/v in helium, in flow system) were selected and analyzed with G. C. The variation of adsorption rate were checked with the adsorption capacity in adsorption bed (shallow bed). Through the results, it is possible to design activate carbon adsorption of single component cl2. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs

  17. Raw and Treated Rice Husks as Sorbents for Mercury Removal from Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befani, Maria R.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Quintero, César E.

    2014-05-01

    RHA800. The batch adsorption kinetic experiments were performed at Co = 50 mg Hg(II)/L, pH 5, and values were taken periodically since the first 5 min until 480 h. The equilibrium was attained at 240 h for RHA3 and RHA4 and at 48 h for RH2 and RHA800. According to the kinetic data, the equilibrium adsorption capacities achieved were: 12 mg/g (RH2), 15 mg/g (RHA800), 27 mg/g (RHA3) and 61 mg/g (RHA4). Sorption kinetics was well described by the pseudo-second-order model. The mercury removal capacity was found to be in the following order: RHA4> RHA3> RHA300> RH3> RHA800> RH2> RH1. The pyrolysis of rice husk resulted in an increase of the specific surface area, which is very important for the removal of mercury. The sorption values achieved in the present study is lower compared with other mesoporous materials reported in literature. Nevertheless, the mercury sorption capacity values obtained are comparable with values found by other authors in similar conditions using rice husk and its ash.

  18. Impacts of acid gases on mercury oxidation across SCR catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of bench-scale experiments were completed to evaluate acid gases of HCl, SO2, and SO3 on mercury oxidation across a commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst. The SCR catalyst was placed in a simulated flue gas stream containing O2, CO2, H2O, NO, NO2, and NH3, and N2. HCl, SO2, and SO3 were added to the gas stream either separately or in combination to investigate their interactions with mercury over the SCR catalyst. The compositions of the simulated flue gas represent a medium-sulfur and low- to medium-chlorine coal that could represent either bituminous or subbituminous. The experimental data indicated that 5-50 ppm HCl in flue gas enhanced mercury oxidation within the SCR catalyst, possibly because of the reactive chlorine species formed through catalytic reactions. An addition of 5 ppm HCl in the simulated flue gas resulted in mercury oxidation of 45% across the SCR compared to only 4% mercury oxidation when 1 ppm HCl is in the flue gas. As HCl concentration increased to 50 ppm, 63% of Hg oxidation was reached. SO2 and SO3 showed a mitigating effect on mercury chlorination to some degree, depending on the concentrations of SO2 and SO3, by competing against HCl for SCR adsorption sites. High levels of acid gases of HCl (50 ppm), SO2 (2000 ppm), and SO3 (50 ppm) in the flue gas deteriorate mercury adsorption on the SCR catalyst. (author)

  19. Traps for phosphorus adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several AL2O3 supported oxides such as: NiO, CuO, Co2O3 BaO, CeO2 and ZnO were investigated for phosphorus adsorption. Zno/y-Al2O3 exhibited the highest phosphorus adsorption capacity. However, since it diminishes the activity of to the reaction mixture it should be located upstream of the NoX catalyst, i.e. 0,3% Pd-H-MOR, in order to protect it against p poisoning. The treatment procedure with citric acid was effective for the removal of more than 70% phosphorus from the adsorbent, ZnO/y-Al2O3

  20. Mercury Quick Facts: Health Effects of Mercury Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury Quick Facts Health Effects of Mercury Exposure What is Elemental Mercury? Elemental (metallic) mercury is the shiny, silver-gray metal found in thermometers, barometers, and thermostats and other ...

  1. Adsorption of Atenolol on Kaolinite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingmo Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the adsorption of atenolol (AT, a β-blocker, on kaolinite, a clay mineral of low surface charge, was investigated under varying initial AT concentration, equilibrium time, solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature conditions. The results showed that the amounts of AT uptake by kaolinite were close to its cation exchange capacity value and the AT adsorption was almost instantaneous, suggesting a surface adsorption. The adsorption was exothermic and the free energy of adsorption was small negative, indicating physical adsorption. The increase in ionic strength of the solution drastically reduced AT uptake on kaolinite. A significant reduction in AT uptake was found at solution pH below 5 or above 10. The FTIR results showed band shifting and disappearance for NH bending vibration and benzene ring skeletal vibration at 3360 and 1515 cm−1 and band splitting at 1412 and 1240 cm−1 attributed to C–N valence vibration coupled with NH bending vibrations and alkyl aryl ether linkage, suggesting the participation of NH, –O–, and benzene ring for AT adsorption on kaolinite.

  2. Macroalgae response to a mercury contamination gradient in a temperate coastal lagoon (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal)

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, J.P.; Pereira, M. E.; Duarte, A.; Pardal, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Primary producers represent an important pathway for mercury incorporation in aquatic food webs. With eutrophication processes occurring worldwide, macroalgae may represent a substantial pool of mercury, as a result of its high growth rate and capacity to bind trace metals. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the response of the macroalgae to a human-induced environmental mercury gradient in a temperate coastal lagoon, by assessing the total and organic mercury contamination levels of t...

  3. Synthesis and application of ion-imprinted polymer nanoparticles for the extraction and preconcentration of mercury in water and food samples employing cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roushani, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Shahryar; Khani, Hossein

    2015-09-01

    We describe a nanosized Hg(II)-imprinted polymer that was prepared from methacrylic acid as functional monomer, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker, 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as radical initiator, 2, 2'-di pyrydyl amine as a specific ligand, and Hg (II) as the template ions by precipitation polymerization method in methanol as the progeny solvent. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out as a function of pH, Hg (II) imprinted polymer amount, adsorption and desorption time, volume, and concentration of eluent. The synthesized polymer particles were characterized physically and morphologically by using infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopic techniques. The maximum adsorption capacity of the ion-imprinted and non-imprinted sorbent was 27.96 and 7.89 mg g(-1), respectively. Under optimal conditions, the detection limit for mercury was 0.01 μg L(-1) and the relative standard deviation was 3.2 % (n = 6) at the 1.00 μg L(-1). The procedure was applied to determination of mercury in fish and water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26318321

  4. Application of a sorbent trap system to gas-phase elemental and oxidized mercury analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zishuo; Eom, Yujin; Lee, Michelle J; Lee, Tai Gyu

    2016-07-01

    A sorbent trap that utilizes activated carbon (AC) as the solid trapping medium is a new technology for measuring total mercury (Hg) emissions from combustion facilities. In this study, sorbent trap technology was further developed, improved and evaluated at the laboratory scale. AC was impregnated with 5% aqua regia to enhance its Hg adsorption capacity. Sorbent traps spiked with an Hg standard solution were found to be reproducibly prepared and highly stable. The effect of the Hg concentration on the spiking efficiency was further investigated. The adsorption of elemental and oxidized Hg by the sorbent trap was studied under various experimental conditions (temperature, flow rate and inlet Hg concentration). The Hg concentration of the flue gas effluent from the sorbent trap was measured. In addition, the concentration of Hg adsorbed on the AC was determined by digesting the used AC with an acid according to US EPA method 3052 and then analyzing it with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Furthermore, the gas-phase Hg emissions from a combustion source were measured using the sorbent trap according to US EPA method 30B. The results showed that the sorbent trap could be used for Hg concentrations between 10.0 and 40.0 μg m(-3) and flow rates between 0.5 and 1.0 lpm with adsorption efficiencies greater than 90%. PMID:27060637

  5. Enhanced sorption of mercury from compact fluorescent bulbs and contaminated water streams using functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxidized (CNT-OX), CNT-I, CNT-S were prepared. • Capacity of CNT-S (151.5 mg/g) was higher than other CNTs. • Applied to the removal of Hg(II) from spiked and natural coal wash waters. • Applied to the removal of Hg(0) from compact fluorescent lamps. - Abstract: Three different functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes were prepared, namely, oxidized CNTs (CNT-OX), iodide incorporated MWCNT (CNT-I) and sulfur incorporated MWCNT (CNT-S). The as prepared adsorbents were structurally characterized by various spectral techniques like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX), Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Loading of iodide and sulfur was evident from the EDAX graphs. The adsorption properties of Hg2+ as a function of pH, contact time and initial metal concentration were characterized by Cold vapor AAS. The adsorption kinetics fitted the Pseudo second order kinetics and equilibrium was reached within 90 min. The experimental data were modeled with Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Redushkevich and Temkin isotherms and various isotherm parameters were evaluated. It was found that the mercury adsorption capacity for the prepared adsorbents were in the order of CNT-S > CNT-I > CNT-OX > CNT. Studies have been conducted to demonstrate the applicability of the sorbent toward the removal of Hg(0) from broken compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs and Hg(II) from contaminated water streams

  6. Fator capacidade de fósforo em solos de pernambuco mineralogicamente diferentes e influência do pH na capacidade máxima de adsorção Phosphate capacity factor in mineralogically different soils in Pernambuco and the influence of pH on the maximum capacity of adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Broggi

    2011-02-01

    -plant relations. Moreover, the soil pH has affected adsorption, and in other cases, it has shown small and inconsistent change in the maximum adsorption capacity of P (CMAP. Thus, this study aimed to determine the different FCP soil mineralogy in Pernambuco; to correlate physical and chemical characteristics of soils with PBC and to evaluate the effect of pH on the CMAP. Subsurface soil samples from four different soils were characterized chemically and physically determined, and the PBC was determined. These samples were corrected with CaCO3 and MgCO3 in a 4:1 ratio and incubated for 30 days, except the Vertisol. The CMAP was determined before and after correction of the soil. The experiment consisted of a 4 x 2 factorial (four soils with and without correction, distributed in randomized blocks with three replicates. Soil characteristics that best reflected the PBC were the remaining P (P-rem and MPAC. Regardless of the constituents of clay mineralogy, soil with high aluminum levels had increased CMAP after correction. The energy of adsorption (EA in the limed soils was on average significantly lower, regardless of the soil.

  7. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, municipal solid waste incinerators, and biomass burning. Mercury in coal, ores and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C to below 300 °C in flue gases leaving boilers, kilns or furnaces promotes homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0 to gaseous divalent mercury (Hg2+, with a portion of Hg2+ adsorbed onto fly ash to form particulate-bound mercury (Hgp. Halogen is the primary oxidizer for Hg0 in flue gases, and active components (e.g.,TiO2, Fe2O3, etc. on fly ash promote heterogeneous oxidation and adsorption processes. In addition to mercury removal, mercury transformation also occurs when passing through air pollution control devices (APCDs, affecting the mercury speciation in flue gases. In coal-fired power plants, selective catalytic reduction (SCR system promotes mercury oxidation by 34–85 %, electrostatic precipitator (ESP and fabric filter (FF remove over 99 % of Hgp, and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFGD captures 60–95 % of Hg2+. In non-ferrous metal smelters, most Hg0 is converted to Hg2+ and removed in acid plants (APs. For cement clinker production, mercury cycling and operational conditions promote heterogeneous mercury oxidation and adsorption. The mercury speciation profiles in flue gases emitted to the atmosphere are determined by transformation mechanisms and mercury removal efficiencies by various APCDs. For all the sectors reviewed in this study, Hgp accounts for less than 5 % in flue gases. In China, mercury emission has a higher fraction (66–82 % of total mercury in flue gases from coal combustion, in contrast to a greater Hg2+ fraction (29–90

  8. Removal of Bisphenol A from Aqueous solutions using Single walled carbon nanotubes: Investigation of adsorption isotherms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Iravani

    2013-09-01

    Results: The maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 71.42 mg/g. The results of our experiments showed that maximum adsorption capacity at equilibrium was achieved at t = 60 min and pH = 9. Moreover, increasing the initial concentration is associated with an increase in adsorption capacity until it becomes constant. Conclusion: The BPA adsorption on SWCNT follows Freundlich-Langmuir isotherm.

  9. Removal of toxic mercury from petroleum oil by newly synthesized molecularly-imprinted polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairi, Nor Ain Shahera; Yusof, Nor Azah; Abdullah, Abdul Halim; Mohammad, Faruq

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIPs) have attracted the attention of several researchers due to their capability for molecular recognition, easiness of preparation, stability and cost-effective production. By taking advantage of these facts, Hg(II) imprinted and non-imprinted copolymers were prepared by polymerizing mercury nitrate stock solution (or without it) with methacrylic acid (MAA), 2-hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate (HEMA), methanol and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the monomer, co-monomer solvent (porogen) and cross-linker, respectively. Thus, the formed Hg(II) imprinted polymer was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The separation and preconcentration characteristics of Hg(II) imprinted polymer were investigated by solid phase extraction (SPE) procedures, and an optimal pH of 7 was investigated as ideal. The specific surface area of the Hg(II) imprinted polymer was found to be 19.45 m2/g with a size range from 100 to 140 µm in diameter. The maximum adsorption capacity was observed to be 1.11 mg/g of Hg(II) imprinted beads with 87.54% removal of Hg(II) ions within the first 5 min. The results of the study therefore confirm that the Hg(II) imprinted polymer can be used multiple times without significantly losing its adsorption capacity. PMID:26006226

  10. Removal of Toxic Mercury from Petroleum Oil by Newly Synthesized Molecularly-Imprinted Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Ain Shahera Khairi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIPs have attracted the attention of several researchers due to their capability for molecular recognition, easiness of preparation, stability and cost-effective production. By taking advantage of these facts, Hg(II imprinted and non-imprinted copolymers were prepared by polymerizing mercury nitrate stock solution (or without it with methacrylic acid (MAA, 2-hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate (HEMA, methanol and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA as the monomer, co-monomer solvent (porogen and cross-linker, respectively. Thus, the formed Hg(II imprinted polymer was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. The separation and preconcentration characteristics of Hg(II imprinted polymer were investigated by solid phase extraction (SPE procedures, and an optimal pH of 7 was investigated as ideal. The specific surface area of the Hg(II imprinted polymer was found to be 19.45 m2/g with a size range from 100 to 140 µm in diameter. The maximum adsorption capacity was observed to be 1.11 mg/g of Hg(II imprinted beads with 87.54% removal of Hg(II ions within the first 5 min. The results of the study therefore confirm that the Hg(II imprinted polymer can be used multiple times without significantly losing its adsorption capacity.

  11. Teor e capacidade máxima de adsorção de arsênio em Latossolos brasileiros Content and maximum capacity of arsenic adsorption in Brazilian Oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Lucia Campos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A alta toxicidade do As aos animais e humanos e a possibilidade de existência de grande número de áreas contaminadas tornam imprescindível o conhecimento do teor semitotal em solos ditos não-contaminados e dos processos de adsorção do As em solos de carga variável. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar o teor e a capacidade máxima de adsorção de As (CMADS AS em Latossolos. O teor total foi determinado pelo método USEPA 3051A, e a CMADS As, com auxílio de isotermas de Langmuir com base nos valores de adsorção obtidos em dose de As (0, 90, 190, 380, 760 e 1.150 µmol L-1 (relação solo:solução final = 1:100, a pH 5,5 e força iônica de 15 mmol L-1. Os 17 Latossolos apresentaram teor médio total de As de 5,92 mg kg-1 e CMADS As média de 2.013 mg kg-1. O teor de argila e os óxidos de Fe e Al apresentaram influência positiva na CMADS As.In view of the toxicity of As for man and animals and the possibility of existence of a great number of contaminated areas it is imperative to know the total As content in soils considered uncontaminated and about As sorption processes in soils of variable charge. The objective of this work was to determine the total content and maximum capacity of As adsorption (CMADS As in Oxisols. The total content was determined by the USEPA 3051A method. The cmADS As was determined by the Langmuir Isotherms using six solution concentrations (0, 0.09, 0.19, 0.38, 0.76, 1.15 mmol L-1 (1:100 soil: solution ratio, pH values 5.5 and ionic strength 15 mmol L-1. In the 17 Oxisols the average total As content was 5.92 mg kg-1 and mean cmADS As was 2.013 mg kg-1. Clay, and Fe and Al oxides content influenced cmADSs positively.

  12. Adsorption and Desorption of Methiopyrsulfuron in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chun-Xian; WANG Jin-Jun; ZHANG Su-Zhi; ZHANG Zhong-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Methiopyrsulfuron is a new low-rate sulfonylurea herbicide for weed control in wheat; however, there is a lack of published information on its behavior in soils. In this study, methiopyrsulfuron adsorption and desorption were measured in seven soils sampled from Heilongjiang, Shandong, Jiangxi, Sichuan, Anhui, and Chongqing provinces of China using a batch equilibrium method. The Freundlich equation was used to described its adsorption and desorption. Adsorption isotherms were nonlinear with the values of Kf-ads, the Freundlich empirical constant indicative of the adsorption capacity,ranging from 0.75 to 2.46, suggesting that little of this herbicide was adsorbed by any of the seven soils. Soil pH and organic matter content (OM) were the main factors influencing adsorption; adsorption was negatively correlated with pH and positively correlated with OM. Methiopyrsulfuron desorption was hysteretic on the soils with high OM content and low pH.

  13. Effect of piezoelectric material on hydrogen adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xuan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI, 49931 (United States); Civil and Environmental Engineering School, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100083 (China); Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Shi, Shangzhao; Sun, Xiang; Zhang, Zheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI, 49931 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    In hydrogen storage applications, the primary issue for physisorption of hydrogen onto solid-state materials is the weak interaction force between hydrogen molecules and the adsorbents. It is found that enhanced adsorption can be obtained under an external electric field, because it appears the electric field increases the hydrogen adsorption energy. Experiments were carried out to determine hydrogen adsorption on activated carbon using the piezoelectric material PMN-PT as the charge supplier under hydrogen pressure. Results indicate that more than 20% hydrogen adsorption enhancement was obtained. Parameters related to hydrogen adsorption enhancement include the amount of the charge and temperature. Higher voltage and lower temperature promote the increase of adsorption capacity but room temperature results are very encouraging. (author)

  14. Adsorption of octylamine on titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processes of adsorption and desorption of a model active substance (octylamine) on the surface of unmodified titanium dioxide (E 171) have been performed. The effects of concentration of octylamine and time of the process on the character of adsorption have been studied and the efficiency of the adsorption/desorption has been determined. The samples obtained have been studied by X-ray diffraction. The nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, particle size distribution and absorption capacities of water, dibutyl phthalate and paraffin oil have been determined. The efficiency of octylamine adsorption on the surface of the titanium dioxide has been found positively correlated with the concentration of octylamine in the initial solution. The desorption of octylamine has decreased with increasing concentration of this compound adsorbed. For octylamine in low concentrations the physical adsorption has been found to dominate, which is desirable when using TiO2 in the production of pharmaceuticals.

  15. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Shuxiao; Wu, Qingru; Wang, Fengyang; Lin, Che-Jen; Zhang, Leiming; Hui, Mulin; Yang, Mei; Su, Haitao; Hao, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, waste incinerators, biomass burning and so on. Mercury in coal, ores, and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C to below 300 °C in flue gases leaving boilers, kilns or furnaces promotes homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of Hg0 to gaseous divalent mercury (Hg2+), with a portion of Hg2+ adsorbed onto fly ash to form particulate-bound mercury (Hgp). Halogen is the primary oxidizer for Hg0 in flue gases, and active components (e.g., TiO2, Fe2O3, etc.) on fly ash promote heterogeneous oxidation and adsorption processes. In addition to mercury removal, mercury transformation also occurs when passing through air pollution control devices (APCDs), affecting the mercury speciation in flue gases. In coal-fired power plants, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system promotes mercury oxidation by 34-85 %, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter (FF) remove over 99 % of Hgp, and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFGD) captures 60-95 % of Hg2+. In non-ferrous metal smelters, most Hg0 is converted to Hg2+ and removed in acid plants (APs). For cement clinker production, mercury cycling and operational conditions promote heterogeneous mercury oxidation and adsorption. The mercury speciation profiles in flue gases emitted to the atmosphere are determined by transformation mechanisms and mercury removal efficiencies by various APCDs. For all the sectors reviewed in this study, Hgp accounts for less than 5 % in flue gases. In China, mercury emission has a higher Hg0 fraction (66-82 % of total mercury) in flue gases from coal combustion, in contrast to a greater Hg2+ fraction (29-90 %) from non-ferrous metal smelting, cement and

  16. Adsorption properties of a natural zeolite-water pair for use in adsorption cooling cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solmus, ismail; Yamali, Cemil; Baker, Derek; Caglar, Ahmet [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Kaftanoglu, Bilgin [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Atilim University, 06836 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-06-15

    The equilibrium adsorption capacity of water on a natural zeolite has been experimentally determined at different zeolite temperatures and water vapor pressures for use in an adsorption cooling system. The Dubinin-Astakhov adsorption equilibrium model is fitted to experimental data with an acceptable error limit. Separate correlations are obtained for adsorption and desorption processes as well as a single correlation to model both processes. The isosteric heat of adsorption of water on zeolite has been calculated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation as a function of adsorption capacity. The cyclic adsorption capacity swing for different condenser, evaporator and adsorbent temperatures is compared with that for the following adsorbent-refrigerant pairs: activated carbon-methanol; silica gel-water; and, zeolite 13X-water. Experimental results show that the maximum adsorption capacity of natural zeolite is nearly 0.12 kg{sub w}/kg{sub ad} for zeolite temperatures and water vapor pressures in the range 40-150 C and 0.87-7.38 kPa. (author)

  17. Mercury's heart of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The one spacecraft to visit Mercury, Mariner 10, made three passes in 1974-75 after flying by Venus en route. Now, more than a decade after its first-and-only spacecraft visit, planetary scientists have absorbed the data from that flight - and are posing new questions with answers that call for a return to Mercury. Mercury is a metallic planet

  18. Influence of coal properties on mercury uptake from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, J.; Brown, S.D.; Snape, C.E. [Miskolc University, Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary). Research Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    1999-10-01

    The uptake of mercury (II) from aqueous solution by a range of coals has been studied and the results have been compared to those for a number of other sorbents, including commercial active carbons and cation-exchange resins. At pH 5 in a buffer medium, the capacities for mercury removal of the low-rank coals and the oxidized bituminous coals investigated are comparable to those of the other sorbents tested. For the lignites investigated, a high content of organic sulfur does not markedly affect the capacity for mercury uptake in relatively neutral and low chloride media, owing to redox reactions being the most likely mechanism involved. However, in highly acidic solutions, the capacities for mercury uptake are considerably greater for the high-sulfur coals investigated than for their low-sulfur counterparts due to chelation being the major sorption process involved. 36 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Adsorption of heavy metals ions from liquid media by palygorskite

    OpenAIRE

    Melnyk, L; Bessarab, O.; Matko, S.; Malyovanyy, ?.

    2015-01-01

    The process of heavy metals adsorption by natural mineral palygorskite from wastewater and food (apple juice) has been investigated. The purification processes of copper, cadmium, lead, mercury and zinc have been studied. The rational technological parameters of these processes have been determined. The mechanism for heavy metals adsorbtion from juice by palygorskite has been defined. ?????????? ?????? ????????? ?????? ??????? ????????? ????????? ?????????????? ?? ??????? ??? ?? ???????? ????...

  20. Global Trends in Mercury Management

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dae-Seon; Choi, Kyunghee

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Environmental Program Governing Council has regulated mercury as a global pollutant since 2001 and has been preparing the mercury convention, which will have a strongly binding force through Global Mercury Assessment, Global Mercury Partnership Activities, and establishment of the Open-Ended Working Group on Mercury. The European Union maintains an inclusive strategy on risks and contamination of mercury, and has executed the Mercury Export Ban Act since December in 2010. T...

  1. A fundamental study of mercury partitioning in coal fired power plant flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senior, C.L.; Bool, L.E. III [Physical Sciences, Inc., Andover, MA (United States); Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E.; Shah, N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Sarofim, A.; Olmez, I.; Zeng, T. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Data suggest that coal-fired power plants are a significant source of atmospheric mercury. Predicting the emissions of mercury cannot be done without a fundamental understanding of the chemical reactions of mercury in flue gas. A research program has been designed to address the major mechanisms for speciation and partitioning, leading to a model that enables the utility industry to predict and, therefore, minimize the emission of regulated trace elements, particularly mercury. Results from preliminary experiments and modeling are presented and discussed. Although combustion produces elemental mercury, coals typically contain sufficient chlorine to oxidize a portion of the elemental mercury to HgCl{sub 2} at temperatures in the range of 750--900 K. At temperatures below approximately 600 K, gaseous mercury species interact with flyash and a significant portion of the gaseous mercury is converted to particulate phase mercury. The authors speculate that residual carbon from coal combustion could also act as an oxidation catalyst in the temperature range of 400--600 K. At temperatures below 400 K, adsorption on carbon-containing ash occurs. Comparison of the results of equilibrium calculations with measurements of speciation of gaseous mercury compounds in flue gas indicate that equilibrium is not attained for mercury by the time the flue gas reaches the inlet to the air pollution control device. The data suggest that the equilibrium is frozen at temperatures in the range of 800--900 K. A better understanding of the gas-to-particle conversion is also needed, particularly the relationship between char or carbon properties and oxidation and/or adsorption of mercury. The authors have completed a preliminary analysis of the forms of mercury on three types of carbon-based sorbents using XAFS.

  2. Mercury removal from solution by superconducting magnetic separation with nanostructured magnetic adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, T.; Tachibana, S.; Miura, O.; Takeuchi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Recently, mercury Hg concentration in human blood increases due to expanding the global mercury contamination. Excess mercury bioaccumulation poses a significant health risk. In order to decrease mercury concentration in the environment and human blood, we have developed two different kinds of nanostructured magnetic adsorbents for mercury to apply them to superconducting magnetic separation instead of conventional filtration. One is magnetic beads (MBs) which have nanosize magnetite particles in the core and a lot of SH radicals on the surface to adsorb Hg ions effectively. MBs were developed mainly to remove mercury from human blood. The maximum amount of the adsorption for MBs is 6.3 mg/g in the solution in less than a minute. Dithiothreitol can easily remove mercury adsorbed to MBs, hence MBs can be reusable. The other is nanostructured magnetic activated carbon (MAC) which is activated carbon with mesopores and nanosize magnetite. The maximum amount of the adsorption for MAC is 38.3 mg/g in the solution. By heat-treatment mercury can be easily removed from MAC. We have studied superconducting magnetic separation using each adsorbent for mercury removal from solution.

  3. Mercury removal from solution by superconducting magnetic separation with nanostructured magnetic adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, T., E-mail: okamoto-takayuki@ed.tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Tachibana, S.; Miura, O. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Takeuchi, M. [Komazawa Jin Clinic, 1-19-8 Komazawa, Setagayaku, Tokyo 154-0012 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Recently, mercury Hg concentration in human blood increases due to expanding the global mercury contamination. Excess mercury bioaccumulation poses a significant health risk. In order to decrease mercury concentration in the environment and human blood, we have developed two different kinds of nanostructured magnetic adsorbents for mercury to apply them to superconducting magnetic separation instead of conventional filtration. One is magnetic beads (MBs) which have nanosize magnetite particles in the core and a lot of SH radicals on the surface to adsorb Hg ions effectively. MBs were developed mainly to remove mercury from human blood. The maximum amount of the adsorption for MBs is 6.3 mg/g in the solution in less than a minute. Dithiothreitol can easily remove mercury adsorbed to MBs, hence MBs can be reusable. The other is nanostructured magnetic activated carbon (MAC) which is activated carbon with mesopores and nanosize magnetite. The maximum amount of the adsorption for MAC is 38.3 mg/g in the solution. By heat-treatment mercury can be easily removed from MAC. We have studied superconducting magnetic separation using each adsorbent for mercury removal from solution.

  4. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Konkuk University, Hwayang-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu [Department of Environmental Engineering, Anyang University, Anyang 5-Dong, Manan-Gu, Anyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 430-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Namhoon, E-mail: nhlee@anyang.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Anyang University, Anyang 5-Dong, Manan-Gu, Anyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 430-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  5. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane

  6. Determination of mercury by substoichiometric isotope dilution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhya, D. (Dept. of Chemistry, Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India)); Subramanian, M.S. (Dept. of Chemistry, Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India))

    1994-01-01

    A radiometric method based on Substoichiometric Isotope Dilution Analysis has been developed for the determination of trace amounts of mercury using [alpha]-Thiopicolin-o-anisylamide (TPA) as a substoichiometric reagent. A preconcentration procedure has also been developed based on the adsorption of mercury(II) as a dithizone complex onto microcrystalline naphthalene which when used in conjunction with the proposed radiometric method enhances its sensitivity and selectivity. As low as 0.2 [mu]g of mercury could be determined in an aqueous phase volume of 80 ml. The method has been successfully applied for the determination of trace amounts of mercury in city waste incineration ash, zinc metal and cadmium oxide samples. (orig.)

  7. Adsorption and wetting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlangen, L.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Adsorption and wetting are related phenomena. In order to improve knowledge of both and their relations, experiments, thermodynamics and a theoretical interpretation have been connected, starring n-alkanes.Starting from the Gibbs adsorption equation thermodynamic relations between vapour adsorption

  8. RECOVERY OF MERCURY FROM CONTAMINATED PRIMARY AND SECONDARY WASTES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective removal of mercury contamination from water is a complex and difficult problem. In particular, mercury treatment of natural waters is difficult because of the low regulatory standards. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency has established a national ambient water quality standard of 12 parts-per-trillion (ppt), whereas the standard is 1.8 ppt in the Great Lakes Region. In addition, mercury is typically present in several different forms, but sorption processes are rarely effective with more than one or two of these forms. To meet the low regulatory discharge limits, a sorption process must be able to address all forms of mercury present in the water. One approach is to apply different sorbents in series depending on the mercury speciation and the regulatory discharge limits. Four new sorbents have been developed to address the variety of mercury species present in industrial discharges and natural waters. Three of these sorbents have been field tested on contaminated creek water at the Y-12 Plant. Two of these sorbents have demonstrated very high removal efficiencies for soluble mercury species, with mercury concentrations at the outlet of a pilot-scale system less than 12 ppt for as long as six months. The other sorbent tested at the Y-12 Plant is targeted at colloidal mercury that is not removed by standard sorption or filtration processes. At the Y-12 Plant, colloidal mercury appears to be associated with iron, so a sorbent that removes mercury-iron complexes in the presence of a magnetic field was evaluated. Field results indicate good removal of this mercury fraction from the Y-12 waters. In addition, this sorbent is easily regenerated by simply removing the magnetic field and flushing the columns with water. The fourth sorbent is still undergoing laboratory development, but results to date indicate exceptionally high mercury sorption capacity. The sorbent is capable of removing all forms of mercury typically present in natural and

  9. Modeling of mercury speciation and capture in coal-fired flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Heyang; Ma, Zhanhua; Lu, Pisi [SmartBurn LLC, Madison, WI (United States); Cao, Yan; Pan, Wei-Ping [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States). ICSET

    2013-07-01

    A 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling tool was developed to model the mercury speciation and capture processes in coal-fired flue gas, including gaseous mercury oxidation and adsorption of mercury by the particulate matter. This CFD modeling tool was then applied to predicting enhanced mercury oxidation and capture by HBr injection in a slipstream reactor. The reaction rate constants of the mercury oxidation by HBr are extracted from the slipstream reactor testing data from the ICSET of Western Kentucky University. The modeling results show good agreement with the testing data and reasonable trends under different conditions. This CFD modeling tool can be either used to design a new mercury control system with higher efficiency and lower operating cost or to improve the performance of an existing system.

  10. Mercury Calibration System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  11. Mercury balance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed assessment of the consumption of mercury, divided into use areas, was carried out. Disposal and emissions to the environment were also qualified. The assessment is mainly based on data from 1992 - 1993. The most important source of emission of mercury to air is solid waste incineration which is assessed in particular to be due to the supply of mercury in batteries (most likely mercury oxide batteries from photo equipment) and to dental fillings. The second most important source of mercury emission to air is coal-fired power plants which are estimated to account for 200-500 kg of mercury emission p.a. Other mercury emissions are mainly related to waste treatment and disposal. The consumption of mercury is generally decreasing. During the period from 1982/83 - 1992-93, the total consumption of mercury in Denmark was about halved. This development is related to the fact that consumption with regard to several important use areas (batteries, dental fillings, thermometers etc.) has been significantly reduced, while for other purposes the use of mercury has completely, or almost disappeared, i.e. (fungicides for seed, tubes etc.). (EG)

  12. Novel sandwich structure adsorptive membranes for removal of 4-nitrotoluene from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuexin; Jia, Zhiqian

    2016-11-01

    Novel sandwich PES-SPES/PS-PDVB/PTFE adsorptive membranes were prepared by a filtration/immersion precipitation method and employed for the removal of 4-nitrotoluene from water. The static adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics, dynamic adsorption/desorption and membrane reusability were investigated. The results showed that the Freundlich model describes the adsorption isotherm satisfactorily. With increased PS-PDVB content, the maximum static adsorption capacity, partition coefficient, apparent adsorption rate constant, and dynamic adsorption capacity all significantly increased. The sandwich membranes showed much higher removal efficiency and adsorption capacity than those of mixed matrix membranes. With respect to dynamics adsorption/desorption, the sandwich membranes exhibited excellent reusability, with a removal efficiency greater than 95% even after five recycles. PMID:27322899

  13. Adsorption of molecular hydrogen on nanostructered surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Were investigated the effect of the structural characteristics of model nanoporous environments on the adsorption of molecular hydrogen. The adsorption properties of the target nanostructures (graphene and ZnO sheets, carbon foams, metal-organic frameworks) are evaluated in a broad range of thermodynamic conditions. The study is carried out within the density functional theory for quantum fluids at finite temperature (QLDFT), which allows to account for the many-body and quantum delocalization effects in a single theoretical framework. The exchange-correlation (excess) functional is derived from the empirical equation of state of the homogeneous system. We focus on the evaluation of hydrogen storage capacities of the substrates and on the emergence of quantum effects triggered by the confinement imposed by the host structure. The approach provides accurate estimates of the hydrogen storage capacities for realistic adsorptive media. The relation between the microscopic structure of the hydrogen fluid and the calculated adsorption properties is also addressed. (full text)

  14. Phosphate adsorption on aluminum-coordinated functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica: Surface structure and adsorption behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Al-coordinated functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica for phosphate removal. • It had the maximum adsorption capacity of 23.59 mg P/g. • Over 95% of the final adsorption capacity reached in the first 1 min. - Abstract: In this study, Al(III)-coordinated diamino-functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica was synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Because of well-defined and interconnecting macroporous–mesoporous networks, the resulting adsorbent (MM-SBA) exhibited a significantly better phosphate adsorption performance and faster removal rate, as compared with the mesoporous adsorbent (M-SBA). Based on the Freundlich and Langmuir models, the phosphate adsorption capacity and the maximum adsorption capacity of MM-SBA were 7.99 mg P/g and 23.59 mg P/g, respectively. In the kinetic study of MM-SBA, over 95% of its final adsorption capacity reached in the first 1 min; whereas that of M-SBA was less than 79%

  15. Phosphate adsorption on aluminum-coordinated functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica: Surface structure and adsorption behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Weiya [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Taizhou University, Linhai 317000 (China); Li, Dan [Environmetal Engineering, School of Engineering and Information Technology, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150 (Australia); Zhu, Yi; Xu, Kai; Li, Jianqiang [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Han, Boping [Institute of Hydrobiology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510460 (China); Zhang, Yuanming, E-mail: tzhangym@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Al-coordinated functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica for phosphate removal. • It had the maximum adsorption capacity of 23.59 mg P/g. • Over 95% of the final adsorption capacity reached in the first 1 min. - Abstract: In this study, Al(III)-coordinated diamino-functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica was synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Because of well-defined and interconnecting macroporous–mesoporous networks, the resulting adsorbent (MM-SBA) exhibited a significantly better phosphate adsorption performance and faster removal rate, as compared with the mesoporous adsorbent (M-SBA). Based on the Freundlich and Langmuir models, the phosphate adsorption capacity and the maximum adsorption capacity of MM-SBA were 7.99 mg P/g and 23.59 mg P/g, respectively. In the kinetic study of MM-SBA, over 95% of its final adsorption capacity reached in the first 1 min; whereas that of M-SBA was less than 79%.

  16. Removal of heavy metals from water by zeolite mineral chemically modified. Mercury as a particular case; Remocion de metales pesados del agua por mineral zeolitico quimicamente modificado. Mercurio como un caso particular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebremedhin H, T

    2002-07-01

    Research works on the removal of mercury from water by zeolite minerals show that a small quantity of this element is sorbed. In this work the mercury sorption from aqueous solutions in the presence and absence of Cu(l l), Ni(l l) and/or Zn(l l) by a Mexican zeolite mineral, natural and modified by cisteaminium chloride or cistaminium dichloride, was investigated in acidic p H. The zeolite minerals were characterized by X- Ray diffraction Ftir, scanning electron microscopy and semiquantitative elemental analysis (EDS), surface area analysis (BET) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Mercury from aqueous solutions was quantified by Atomic absorption spectroscopy. The amount of sulphur on the zeolite samples treated with Na CI and modified with cisteaminium chloride (0.375 mmol/g) or cistaminium dichloride(0.475 mmol/g) was found to be higher than that of the zeolite minerals modified with cisteaminium chloride and cistaminium dichloride without treating them with Na CI. The amount of sulphur on the zeolite minerals modified with thiourea was the lowest. The diffusion coefficients and sorption isotherms for mercury were determined in the natural, treated with Na CI and, treated with Na CI and then modified with the cisteaminium chloride or cistaminium dichloride zeolite samples. The retention of mercury was the highest for the zeolite minerals treated Na CI and then modified with cisteaminium chloride or cistaminium dichloride, with adsorption capacity of 0.0511 and 0.0525 mmol Hg/g, respectively. In this research work, it was found that the retention of mercury by the modified minerals was not affected by the presence of Cu (Il), Zn(l l) y Ni (I l) under the experimental conditions. (Author)

  17. Mercury is Moon's brother

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latest information on Mercury planet is presented obtained by studying the planet with the aid of radar and space vehicles. Rotation of Mercury about its axis has been discovered; within 2/3 of its year it executes a complete revolution about its axis. In images obtained by the ''Mariner-10'' Mercurys surface differs little from that of the Moon. The ''Mariner-10'' has also discovered the Mercurys atmosphere, which consists of extremely rarefied helium. The helium is continuously supplied to the planet by the solar wind. The Mercury's magnetic field has been discovered, whose strength is 35 x 10-4 at the Equator and 70 x 10-4 E at the poles. The inclination of the dipole axis to the Mercury's rotation axis is 7 deg

  18. Adsorption of Iminodiacetic Acid Resin for Lutetium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊春华; 姚彩萍; 王惠君

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and mechanism of a novel chelate resin,iminodiacetic acid resin(IDAAR) for Lu(Ⅲ) were investigated.The statically saturated adsorption capacity is 210.8 mg·g-1 at 298 K in HAc-NaAc medium.The Lu(Ⅲ) adsorbed on IDAAR can be eluted by 0.5 mol·L-1 HCl and the elution percentage reaches 96.5%.The resin can be regenerated and reused without obvious decrease in adsorption capacity.The apparent adsorption rate constant is k298=2.0×10-5 s-1.The adsorption behavior of IDAAR for Lu(Ⅲ) obeys the Freundlich isotherm.The thermodynamic adsorption parameters,enthalpy change ΔH,free energy change ΔG and entropy change ΔS of IDAAR for Lu(Ⅲ) are 13.1 kJ·mol-1,-1.37 kJ·mol-1 and 48.4 J·mol-1·K-1,respectively.The apparent activation energy is Ea=31.3 kJ·mol-1.The molar coordination ratio of the functional group of IDAAR to Lu(Ⅲ) is about 3∶1.The adsorption mechanism of IDAAR for Lu(Ⅲ) was examined by chemical method and IR spectrometry.

  19. Nitrate Adsorption on Clay Kaolin: Batch Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohsenipour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils possessing kaolin, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite particles have been found to have a natural capacity to attenuate pollution in aqueous phase. On the other hand, the hydroxyl group in soil increases anion exchange capacity under a low pH condition. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate effects of kaolin on nitrate reduction under acidic condition. In order to analyze the kaolin adsorption behaviour under various conditions, four different concentrations of nitrate, 45, 112.5, 225, and 450 mgNO3-/L, with a constant pH equal to 2, constant temperature equal to 25°C, and exposure period varying from 0 to 150 minutes were considered. The capacity of nitrate adsorption on kaolin has also been studied involving two well-known adsorption isotherm models, namely, Freundlich and Longmuir. The results revealed that approximately 25% of the nitrate present in the solution was adsorbed on clay kaolin. The laboratory experimental data revealed that Freundlich adsorption isotherm model was more accurate than Longmuir adsorption model in predicting of nitrate adsorption. Furthermore, the retardation factor of nitrate pollution in saturated zone has been found to be approximately 4 in presence of kaolin, which indicated that kaolin can be used for natural scavenger of pollution in the environment.

  20. Domestic metallic mercury poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeil, N.I.; Issler, H.C.; Olver, R.E.; Wrong, O.M.

    1984-02-04

    In a family exposed to metallic mercury vapour two patients had acrodynia, one had the nephrotic syndrome, and one person remained well. Recognition of the variable manifestations of the disease and prevention of further exposure were the most important aspects of management. Recovery appeared to be complete as blood mercury levels fell to normal. Urinary mercury levels were too variable to be reliable as indications of progress.

  1. Adsorption of tetracycline from aqueous solutions onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes with different oxygen contents

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Yu; Jie Ma; Sheng Han

    2014-01-01

    Oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different oxygen contents were investigated for the adsorption of tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solutions. As the surface oxygen content of the MWCNTs increased, the maximum adsorption capacity and adsorption coefficient of TC increased to the largest values and then decreased. The relation can be attributed to the interplay between the nanotubes' dispersibility and the water cluster formation upon TC adsorption. The overall adsorption kin...

  2. ORGANIC CHELATING REAGENT ON REDOX ADSORPTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBER TOWARDS Au3+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Organic chelating reagent influences upon the redox adsorption of activated carbon fibertowards Au3- were systematically investigated. The experimental results indicated that the presenceof organic chelating reagent on activated carbon fiber strongly affects adsorption capacity ofactivated carbon fiber towards Au3+. The reduction-adsorption amount of Au3+ increased three timesby the presence of 8-quinolinol. Furthermore, The reduction-adsorption amount of Au3+ depended onthe pH value of adsorption and temperature.

  3. Peru Mercury Inventory 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, William E.; Sandoval, Esteban; Yepez, Miguel A.; Howard, Howell

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, a specific need for data on mercury use in South America was indicated by the United Nations Environmental Programme-Chemicals (UNEP-Chemicals) at a workshop on regional mercury pollution that took place in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Mercury has long been mined and used in South America for artisanal gold mining and imported for chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, and other uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides information on domestic and international mercury production, trade, prices, sources, and recycling in its annual Minerals Yearbook mercury chapter. Therefore, in response to UNEP-Chemicals, the USGS, in collaboration with the Economic Section of the U.S. Embassy, Lima, has herein compiled data on Peru's exports, imports, and byproduct production of mercury. Peru was selected for this inventory because it has a 2000-year history of mercury production and use, and continues today as an important source of mercury for the global market, as a byproduct from its gold mines. Peru is a regional distributor of imported mercury and user of mercury for artisanal gold mining and chlor-alkali production. Peruvian customs data showed that 22 metric tons (t) of byproduct mercury was exported to the United States in 2006. Transshipped mercury was exported to Brazil (1 t), Colombia (1 t), and Guyana (1 t). Mercury was imported from the United States (54 t), Spain (19 t), and Kyrgyzstan (8 t) in 2006 and was used for artisanal gold mining, chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, or transshipment to other countries in the region. Site visits and interviews provided information on the use and disposition of mercury for artisanal gold mining and other uses. Peru also imports mercury-containing batteries, electronics and computers, fluorescent lamps, and thermometers. In 2006, Peru imported approximately 1,900 t of a wide variety of fluorescent lamps; however, the mercury contained in these lamps, a minimum of approximately 76 kilograms (kg), and in

  4. Sorption of mercury (II) and methyl mercury from waters by tannin sorbents, using 203 Hg As radiotracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption of mercury (II) and methyl mercury by two tannin sorbents was investigated using radiotracers. High sorption capacities for mercury are registered for both sorbents at pH 7. For Eucalyptus Saligna Sm sorbent (ETS) maximum sorption capacity was 1.2 +- 0.2 mmol/g and for Lysiloma latisiliqua B. sorbent (LTS) was 8.5 +- 0.2 mmol/g. Methylmercury sorption maximum was recorded at pH 4 and in buffered solutions at pH 2, this specie can be recovered in presence of mercury (II). Influence of different ions present in water was examined. High recoveries were reported for ETS in tap water samples but a decrease of uptake is observed for seawater

  5. Accidental inhalation of mercury vapour: respiratory and toxicologic consequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Lien, D. C.; Todoruk, D. N.; Rajani, H. R.; Cook, D A; Herbert, F. A.

    1983-01-01

    Four adults, including a pregnant woman, and three children were admitted to hospital following accidental exposure to mercury vapour produced by heating mercury-gold amalgam. Initial symptoms and signs included a paroxysmal cough, dyspnea, chest pain, tachypnea, nausea, vomiting, fever and leukocytosis. Pulmonary function testing performed on the second day after exposure revealed air-flow obstruction and minor restrictive defects in three patients. The diffusing capacity of the lung for car...

  6. Analysis for trace mercury concentration. I. Critical evaluation of current procedures. II. A proposed method for determination by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current methods of sample pretreatments, digestion, lyophilization and extraction, have been found to lead to considerable loss of mercury, at an initial mercury concentration of 1 μg/g, and less. Storage of solutions of mercury at concentrations of less than 1 μg/ml, in glass, Teflon and polyethylene containers, leads to losses by adsorption. Electrochemical reduction of mercury to the metal, and subsequent volatilization, is postulated as the mechanism of loss from the samples studied during lyophilization. A method of instrumental neutron activation analysis, which obviates the above pretreatments, has been developed for mercury concentrations as low as 1 ng/ml

  7. Adsorption and wetting.

    OpenAIRE

    Schlangen, L.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Adsorption and wetting are related phenomena. In order to improve knowledge of both and their relations, experiments, thermodynamics and a theoretical interpretation have been connected, starring n-alkanes.Starting from the Gibbs adsorption equation thermodynamic relations between vapour adsorption and wetting are derived. The surface pressure of a film, formed by vapour adsorption on a solid surface, is calculated by integrating the vapour adsorption isotherm. The surface pressure at the sat...

  8. Study on copper adsorption on olivine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The copper adsorption on olivine supplied by A/S Olivine production plant at Aheim in western Norway has been studied. The factors which affect the uptake of copper have been evaluated. The results reveal that the equilibrium pH in aqueous solution has the greatest influence on the copper adsorption thanks to the competitive adsorption between proton and copper ions, and the adsorption of copper to olivine increases rapidly with the pH increasing from 4 to 6. The initial copper concentration and olivine dose also possess significant effect on copper adsorption. The adsorption efficieny of copper increases with the increase of olivine dose or the decrease of initial copper concentration at the same pH. The ionic strength effect on the adsorption has also been investigated, but it owns little effect on the adsorption process of copper due to the formation of inner sphere surface complexation of copper on olivine. The experimental data show that olivine has a high acid buffer capacity and is an effective adsorbent for copper.

  9. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane. PMID:23684695

  10. Modeling Mercury in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, J M; Smith, J C

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively nontoxic, other forms such as Hg(2+) and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg(2+) can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg(2+) to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed molecular picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here, we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intraprotein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand-binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confer mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multiscale model of environmental mercury cycling. PMID:27497164

  11. Adsorción de cadmio, cromo y mercurio en suelos del Valle del Cauca a varios valores de pH Cadmium, chromium and mercury adsorption on Cauca Valley soils as a function of pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García O. Álvaro

    1991-12-01

    were collected and prepared for sorption experiments adjusting the pH to 5.7,6.5 and 7.8 values using, 1,4 and 12% acetic acid or 0.01 N NaOH. Six saturating solution of each metal (0.0, 0.28, 0.56, 1.12 and 2.25 mg L-1 were added to 0.25 g air dried and ground to pass a 2-mm sieve soil samples. The soil solution suspensions were shaken for 25 minutes and then extracted with 0.01N HC1. Cadmium; Cr and Hg concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrofotometry. The difference between the initial and final metal solution concentration was considered to be soil adsorbed and the amount 0.01 N HC1 extracted as the metal retained by the soil. Cadmium adsorption in all the soils was higher at neutral or alkaline pH values due to the predominance of divalent solubles or insoluble metalanion complexes formed in the soil at pH values higter than 7.0. The Cr and Hg adsorption is higher at acid values of pH due to the formation of complexes with the organic matter (chelation or with Fe, Al or Mn hydrous oxids wich are favoreced at this pH values. The lower 0.01N HC1 extraction (higher retention was observed at pH values 6.4-6.6 in all the soils suggesting that in this range of pH this heavy metals are strongly adsorbed by the exchange complex and are not available to plants.

  12. EURISOL-DS METEX: Cooling and Temperature Control of the Mercury Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Stefan Joray

    The cooling of the mercury loop is described on pages two, three and four. The gaps in the water jackets of the heat exchangers are too large and the cooling water capacity is too low. Convection from the wall into water is bad. The mercury temperature is too high. On page five is a proposal how the mercury temperature can be kept low and constant.

  13. Adsorption characteristics of zinc ions on sodium dodecyl sulfate in process of micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To separate zinc ions from aqueous solution efficiently, micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration(MEUF) of hollow ultrafiltration membrane was used with sodium dodecyl sulfate(SDS) as surfactant. The formation of micellar and the adsorption mechanism were investigated, including the influence of the ratio of SDS to zinc ions on the micelle quantity, the micelle ratio, the gross adsorptive capacity, the rejection of zinc ions and the adsorption isotherm law. The results show that the rejection rate of zinc ions reaches 97% and the adsorption of zinc ions on SDS conforms to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and the adsorption is a chemical adsorption process.

  14. Substorms on Mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mariner 10 encounter of Mercury provided data showing a strong interaction between the solar wind and the planet similar to a scaled down version of that producing the earth's magnetosphere. Some of the features observed in Mercury's night side magnetosphere suggest time-dependent processes occurring there. Interpreted as temporal events, these features bear striking resemblances to substorm phenomena in the earth's magnetosphere

  15. MERCURY RESEARCH STRATEGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Research and Development (ORD) is pleased to announce the availability of its Mercury Research Strategy. This strategy guides ORD's mercury research program and covers the FY2001 2005 time frame. ORD will use it to ...

  16. Batch and continuous adsorption of strontium by plant root tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jyhping Chen [Chang Gung Coll. of Medicience and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-06-01

    Strontium (Sr) ions in aqueous solutions could be adsorbed by root tissue powders of Amaranthus spinosus, a common weed found in the fields. The adsorption isotherm could be fitted by either the Langmuir or the Freundlich model with the maximum adsorption capacity being 12.89 mg/g from the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity of the biosorbent decreased with increasing temperature, whereas alkaline pretreatment enhanced the adsorption capacity 1.9 fold. Alginate gel beads (1 mm diameter) containing the root tissue powders were prepared and packed in a column for continuous adsorption/desorption of Sr in solution. Efficient desorption of Sr could be carried out with 0.1 M CaCl{sub 2} to give a concentrated Sr solution with 94% recovery. (author).

  17. Batch and continuous adsorption of strontium by plant root tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strontium (Sr) ions in aqueous solutions could be adsorbed by root tissue powders of Amaranthus spinosus, a common weed found in the fields. The adsorption isotherm could be fitted by either the Langmuir or the Freundlich model with the maximum adsorption capacity being 12.89 mg/g from the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity of the biosorbent decreased with increasing temperature, whereas alkaline pretreatment enhanced the adsorption capacity 1.9 fold. Alginate gel beads (1 mm diameter) containing the root tissue powders were prepared and packed in a column for continuous adsorption/desorption of Sr in solution. Efficient desorption of Sr could be carried out with 0.1 M CaCl2 to give a concentrated Sr solution with 94% recovery. (author)

  18. Mercury release from FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loreal V. Heebink; David J. Hassett [University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2005-08-01

    The release of mercury from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in the manufacture of 100% FGD wallboard was studied. Calcination, with product temperatures ranging from 150 to 180{sup o}C, appears to be the most likely process to release mercury from the FGD. Two samples evaluated in trials conducted to simulate the calcining of FGD in flash calcining and kettle processes showed that the potential of mercury release exists. The differing amounts of mercury released by the two processes could be separated by orders of magnitude. Measurements in real production facilities are essential to developing a valid answer to the question of mercury release during FGD gypsum wallboard production. 18 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Adsorption performances and refrigeration application of adsorption working pair of CaCl2-NH3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Liwei; WANG; Ruzhu; WU; Jingyi; WANG; Kai

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption performance of CaCl2-NH3 is studied under the condition of different expansion spaces for adsorbent, andthe relationships between adsorption performance of CaCl2-NH3 and the phenomena of swelling and agglomeration during adsorption are researched. It is found that the performance stability is related to the ratio of expansion space to the volume of adsorbent ras, and the performance attenuation is serious in the case of large ras. Severe adsorption hysteresis exists in the process of adsorption and desorption at the same evaporating and condensing temperatures, which is related to the stability constant of chemical reaction. This phenomenon cannot be explained by the theory of physical adsorption. Moderate agglomeration will be beneficial to the formation of ammoniate complex; the magnitude of expansion space will affect adsorption performance. Analysis shows that the activated energy needed in the process of adsorption for the sample with ras of 2:1 is less than that for the sample with ras of 3:1.The refrigeration performance of CaCl2-NH3 is predicted from experiments. The cooling capacity of one adsorption cycle is about 945.4 kJ/kg for the adsorbent with an ras of 2:1 at the evaporating temperature of 0℃.

  20. Combined homo- and heterogeneous model for mercury speciation in pulverized fuel combustion flue gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishir P. Sable; Wiebren de Jong; Hartmut Spliethoff [Delft University Technology, Delft (Netherlands). Section Energy Technology, Department of Process and Energy

    2008-01-15

    A new model is developed to predict Hg{sup 0}, Hg{sup +}, Hg{sup 2+}, and Hg{sub p} in the post-combustion zone upstream of a particulate control device (PCD) in pulverized coal-fired power plants. The model incorporates reactions of mercury with chlorinating agents (HCl) and other gaseous species and simultaneous adsorption of oxidized mercury (HgCl{sub 2}) on fly ash particles in the cooling of flue gases. The homogeneous kinetic model from the literature has been revised to understand the effect of the NO + OH + M {longleftrightarrow} HONO + M reaction on mercury oxidation. Because it is a pressure-dependent reaction, the choice of proper reaction rates was very critical. It was found that mercury oxidation reduces from 100 to 0% while going from high- to low-pressure limit rates with 100 ppmv NO. The heterogeneous model describes selective in-duct Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption of mercury chloride on ash particles. The heterogeneous model has been built using Fortran and linked to Chemkin 4.0. The final predictions of elemental, oxidized, and particulate mercury were compared to mercury speciation from power plant data. Information collection request (ICR) data were used for this comparison. The model results follow very similar trends compared to those of the plant data; however, quantitative deviation was considerable. These deviations are due to the errors in the measurement of mercury upstream of PCD, lack of adsorption kinetic data, accurate homogeneous reaction mechanisms, and certain modeling assumptions. The model definitely follows a new approach for the prediction of mercury speciation, and further refinement will improve the model significantly. 43 refs., 1 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Getting Mercury out of Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This guide was prepared while working with many Massachusetts schools to remove items that contain mercury and to find suitable alternatives. It contains fact sheets on: mercury in science laboratories and classrooms, mercury in school buildings and maintenance areas, mercury in the medical office and in medical technology classrooms in vocational…

  2. Municipal actions to reduce mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-03-15

    This paper presented proper management practices for products containing mercury. The measures can help reduce mercury releases, occupational exposure and mercury spills, thereby preventing impacts on human health and the environment. Despite mercury's toxic nature, many common products that contain mercury are commercially available. These include thermostats, thermometers, fluorescent lamps, pressure measuring devices, electrical switches and relays, and dental amalgam. Mercury emissions are also associated with base metal smelting, waste incineration and coal-fired power generation. Mercury in the environment is a global issue, because it can travel in the atmosphere on wind currents. The actions taken by municipalities to address the issue include reducing or eliminating mercury releases from internal municipal operations and sources within the community. This document provided guidance on how to develop a Municipal Mercury Elimination Policy and Plan that will help reduce mercury releases. It presented information and case studies that will help municipalities manage mercury-containing products found in municipal buildings and street lighting. Information on sources of mercury from within the community was presented along with case studies that can help municipalities determine where community action is needed to reduce mercury releases. The 5 modules of this document were intended to help municipalities identify priorities, timelines and budget requirements for mercury initiatives. It was emphasized that municipalities that adopt a Municipal Mercury Elimination Policy and Plan formally commit to reducing and eliminating mercury from the environment. tabs., figs.

  3. Fibrous polymer-grafted chitosan/clay composite beads as a carrier for immobilization of papain and its usability for mercury elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin, Ayşegül Ülkü; Alver, Erol

    2016-07-01

    Papain, which is an industrially important enzyme, has been immobilized on fibrous polymer-modified composite beads, namely poly(methacrylic acid)-grafted chitosan/clay. Characterization studies have been done using FTIR and SEM analysis. Operating parameters such as pH and initial concentration of papain have been varied to obtain the finest papain immobilized polymer-modified composite beads. The immobilization capacity of composite beads has been determined as 34.47 ± 1.18 (n = 3) mg/g. The proteolytic activity of immobilized papain was operated using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and maximum velocity (V max) and Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) values of the free and immobilized enzymes were determined using Lineweaver-Burk and Eadie-Hofstee equations. Usability of papain immobilized polymer-modified composite beads as adsorbents for the elimination of mercury was investigated. The maximum removal capacity of PIPMC beads has been found to be 4.88 ± 0.21 mg Hg/g when the initial metal concentration and weight of polymer-modified composite beads were 50 mg/L and 0.04 g at pH 7, respectively. Mercury removal performance of the papain immobilized polymer-modified composite beads was investigated in conjunction with Cu (II), Zn (II) and Cd (II) ions. The mercury adsorption capacity of papain immobilized polymer-modified composite beads was a slight reduction from 1.15 to 0.89 mg/g in presence of multiple metal salts. PMID:27013506

  4. HYDROGEN SULFIDE ADSORPTION BY ALKALINE IMPREGNATED COCONUT SHELL ACTIVATED CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUI SUN CHOO

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is one type of renewable energy which can be burnt to produce heat and electricity. However, it cannot be burnt directly due to the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S which is highly corrosive to gas engine. In this study, coconut shell activated carbon (CSAC was applied as a porous adsorbent for H2S removal. The effect of amount of activated carbon and flow rate of gas stream toward adsorption capacity were investigated. Then, the activated carbons were impregnated by three types of alkaline (NaOH, KOH and K2CO3 with various ratios. The effects of various types of alkaline and their impregnation ratio towards adsorption capacity were analysed. In addition, H2S influent concentration and the reaction temperature on H2S adsorption were also investigated. The result indicated that adsorption capacity increases with the amount of activated carbon and decreases with flow rate of gas stream. Alkaline impregnated activated carbons had better performance than unimpregnated activated carbon. Among all impregnated activated carbons, activated carbon impregnated by K2CO3 with ratio 2.0 gave the highest adsorption capacity. Its adsorption capacity was 25 times higher than unimpregnated activated carbon. The result also indicated that the adsorption capacity of impregnated activated carbon decreased with the increment of H2S influent concentration. Optimum temperature for H2S adsorption was found to be 50˚C. In this study, the adsorption of H2S on K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon was fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. The fresh and spent K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon were characterized to study the adsorption process.

  5. Adsorption of Anionic Dyes onto Chitosan-modified Diatomite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ge-shan; XUE Hong-hai; TANG Xiao-jian; PENG Fei; KANG Chun-li

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the possibility of anionic dyes Reactive Red M-8B(RR)and Direct Green B(DG)adsorbed on chitosan-modified diatomite.The characteristics of adsorbent,adsorption isotherms and the influence of adsorption time,temperature and pH were researched in this work.The results show that the modified diatomite had a much better adsorption capability than the natural diatomite.The adsorption capacities of chitosan-modified diatomite for RR and DG were 94.46 and 137.0 mg/g,respectively.Both adsorption time and adsorption temperature provided a positive effect on the dye adsorption.Within the experimental pH range,the adsorbance was enhanced at lower pH but reduced sharply at high pH.On the basis of the experimental results and discussion,electrostatic attraction is considered as the main mechanism of this chemisorption.

  6. Demonstration of Mer-Cure Technology for Enhanced Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Marion; Dave O' Neill; Kevin Taugher; Shin Kang; Mark Johnson; Gerald Pargac; Jane Luedecke; Randy Gardiner; Mike Silvertooth; Jim Hicks; Carl Edberg; Ray Cournoyer; Stanley Bohdanowicz; Ken Peterson; Kurt Johnson; Steve Benson; Richard Schulz; Don McCollor; Mike Wuitshick

    2008-06-01

    Alstom Power Inc. has completed a DOE/NETL-sponsored program (under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. De-FC26-07NT42776) to demonstrate Mer-Cure{trademark}, one of Alstom's mercury control technologies for coal-fired boilers. The Mer-Cure{trademark}system utilizes a small amount of Mer-Clean{trademark} sorbent that is injected into the flue gas stream for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous mercury. Mer-Clean{trademark} sorbents are carbon-based and prepared with chemical additives that promote oxidation and capture of mercury. The Mer-Cure{trademark} system is unique in that the sorbent is injected into an environment where the mercury capture kinetics is accelerated. The full-scale demonstration program originally included test campaigns at two host sites: LCRA's 480-MW{sub e} Fayette Unit No.3 and Reliant Energy's 190-MW{sub e} Shawville Unit No.3. The only demonstration tests actually done were the short-term tests at LCRA due to budget constraints. This report gives a summary of the demonstration testing at Fayette Unit No.3. The goals for this Mercury Round 3 program, established by DOE/NETL under the original solicitation, were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 90% at a cost significantly less than 50% of the previous target of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The results indicated that Mer-Cure{trademark} technology could achieve mercury removal of 90% based on uncontrolled stack emissions. The estimated costs for 90% mercury control, at a sorbent cost of $0.75 to $2.00/lb respectively, were $13,400 to $18,700/lb Hg removed. In summary, the results from demonstration testing show that the goals established by DOE/NETL were met during this test program. The goal of 90% mercury reduction was achieved. Estimated mercury removal costs were 69-78% lower than the benchmark of $60,000/lb mercury removed, significantly less than 50% of the baseline removal cost.

  7. Installation of the Ferranti Mercury computer in building 2 on 30 June 1958

    CERN Multimedia

    1958-01-01

    The Ferranti Mercury was CERN's first "central" computer. It was installed in building 2 on 30 June 1958. The Mercury's performance did not compare to the simplest of today's pocket calculators. Its clock speed was a modest 1 MHz and its RAM capacity was 2000 20-bit words.

  8. Detoxification of mercury pollutant leached from spent fluorescent lamps using bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Abuqaoud, Reem H; Abu-Dieyeh, Mohammed H

    2016-03-01

    The spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs) are being classified as a hazardous waste due to having mercury as one of its main components. Mercury is considered the second most toxic heavy metal (arsenic is the first) with harmful effects on animal nervous system as it causes different neurological disorders. In this research, the mercury from phosphor powder was leached, then bioremediated using bacterial strains isolated from Qatari environment. Leaching of mercury was carried out with nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions using two approaches: leaching at ambient conditions and microwave-assisted leaching. The results obtained from this research showed that microwave-assisted leaching method was significantly better in leaching mercury than the acid leaching where the mercury leaching efficiency reached 76.4%. For mercury bio-uptake, twenty bacterial strains (previously isolated and purified from petroleum oil contaminated soils) were sub-cultured on Luria Bertani (LB) plates with mercury chloride to check the bacterial tolerance to mercury. Seven of these twenty strains showed a degree of tolerance to mercury. The bio-uptake capacities of the promising strains were investigated using the mercury leached from the fluorescent lamps. Three of the strains (Enterobacter helveticus, Citrobacter amalonaticus, and Cronobacter muytjensii) showed bio-uptake efficiency ranged from 28.8% to 63.6%. PMID:26725036

  9. Interactions between mercury and dry FGD ash in simulated post combustion conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaohua; Wang, Shuai; Gao, Jihui; Wu, Yanyan; Chen, Guoqing; Zhu, Yuwen

    2011-04-15

    Two different flue gas desulfurization (FGD) ash samples were exposed to a simulated flue gas stream containing elemental mercury vapor to evaluate the interactions and determine the effects of gas components, dry FGD ash samples, and temperature on adsorption and heterogeneous oxidation of mercury. Both samples were characterized for surface area, unburned carbon content, element content, and mineralogical composition. Mercury speciation downstream from the sample was determined using Ontario Hydro Method. Results showed that higher levels of mercury oxidation were associated with higher levels of mercury capture. The NO(2), HCl, and Cl(2) promoted mercury oxidation, while SO(2) and NO had inhibitory effects on mercury oxidation. Unburned carbon of dry FGD ash sample played an important role in mercury capture. Whether the surface area was caused by unburned carbon or by calcium-based sorbents might be more significant than the level of surface area. Extent of mercury oxidation and capture increased slightly and then decreased as the temperature rising due to the interaction of mass transfer and reaction rates control. PMID:21334138

  10. Carrying Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Henning; Andersen, Jan; Kjærgård, Bente

    2012-01-01

    carrying capacity (SCC) and assimilative carrying capacity (ACC). The act mandates that the latter two aspects must be taken into consideration in the local spatial plans. The present study aimed at developing a background for a national guideline for carrying capacity in Indonesian provinces and districts...... carrying capacity (ACC). The act mandates that the latter two aspects must be taken into consideration in the local spatial plans. The present study aimed at developing a background for a national guideline for carrying capacity in Indonesian provinces and districts/cities. Four different sectors (water...

  11. The Adsorption Mechanism of Modified Activated Carbon on Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified activated carbon was prepared by thermal treatment at high temperature under nitrogen flow. The surface properties of the activated carbon were characterized by Boehm titration, BET and point of zero charge determination. The adsorption mechanism of phenol on modified activated carbon was explained and the adsorption capacity of modified activated carbon for phenol when compared to plain activated carbon was evaluated through the analysis of adsorption isotherms, thermodynamic and kinetic properties. Results shows that after modification the surface alkaline property and pHpzc value of the activated carbon increase and the surface oxygen-containing functional groups decrease. The adsorption processes of the plain and modified carbon fit with Langmuir isotherm equation well, and the maximum adsorption capacity increase from 123.46, 111.11, 103.09mg/g to 192.31, 178.57, 163,93mg/g under 15, 25 and 35°C after modification, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters show that the adsorption of phenol on activated carbon is a spontaneously exothermic process of entropy reduction, implying that the adsorption is a physical adsorption. The adsorption of phenol on activated carbon follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics (R2>0.99. The optimum pH of adsorption is 6~8.

  12. Total mercury content in fish und molluscs from Adriatic sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In regard to a long known and still persisting problem of the ecosystem loaded with mercury, total mercury contents in different species of fish and molluscs in the Adriatic Sea have been followed in an interval of 12 years. Total mercury concentrations were determined by cold vapour atomic adsorption spectrometry (CVAAS) at 253. 7 nm after digestion of the edible of fish tissues. The results of analysis reveal positive shifts and unlike the samples in a previous study all the investigated samples meet the conditions of the Public Health Regulations on the quantity of pesticides, mycotoxins, metals, histamine and similar substances that may occur in foodstuff and on other conditions as to the standards of foodstuff and objects of general use, which fixed the total Hg content at maximum of 0.5 mg/kg on the basis of fresh mass. (orig.)

  13. Total mercury content in fish und molluscs from Adriatic sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedrina-Dragojevic, I. [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Dept. of Food Chemistry; Dragojevic, D. [Water Quality Dept., Waterworks, Zagreb (Croatia); Bujan, M. [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-07-01

    In regard to a long known and still persisting problem of the ecosystem loaded with mercury, total mercury contents in different species of fish and molluscs in the Adriatic Sea have been followed in an interval of 12 years. Total mercury concentrations were determined by cold vapour atomic adsorption spectrometry (CVAAS) at 253. 7 nm after digestion of the edible of fish tissues. The results of analysis reveal positive shifts and unlike the samples in a previous study all the investigated samples meet the conditions of the Public Health Regulations on the quantity of pesticides, mycotoxins, metals, histamine and similar substances that may occur in foodstuff and on other conditions as to the standards of foodstuff and objects of general use, which fixed the total Hg content at maximum of 0.5 mg/kg on the basis of fresh mass. (orig.)

  14. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

  15. Nitrate Adsorption on Clay Kaolin: Batch Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Mohsenipour; Shamsuddin Shahid; Kumars Ebrahimi

    2015-01-01

    Soils possessing kaolin, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite particles have been found to have a natural capacity to attenuate pollution in aqueous phase. On the other hand, the hydroxyl group in soil increases anion exchange capacity under a low pH condition. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate effects of kaolin on nitrate reduction under acidic condition. In order to analyze the kaolin adsorption behaviour under various conditions, four different concentrations of nitrate, 45, 112...

  16. Defluoridation of drinking water using adsorption processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Comprehensive and critical literature review on various adsorbents used for defluoridation. ► pH, temperature, kinetics and co-existing anions effects on F adsorption. ► Choice of adsorbents for various circumstances. ► Adsorption thermodynamics and mechanisms. ► Future research on efficient, low cost adsorbents which are easily regenerated. -- Abstract: Excessive intake of fluoride (F), mainly through drinking water, is a serious health hazard affecting humans worldwide. There are several methods used for the defluoridation of drinking water, of which adsorption processes are generally considered attractive because of their effectiveness, convenience, ease of operation, simplicity of design, and for economic and environmental reasons. In this paper, we present a comprehensive and a critical literature review on various adsorbents used for defluoridation, their relative effectiveness, mechanisms and thermodynamics of adsorption, and suggestions are made on choice of adsorbents for various circumstances. Effects of pH, temperature, kinetics and co-existing anions on F adsorption are also reviewed. Because the adsorption is very weak in extremely low or high pHs, depending on the adsorbent, acids or alkalis are used to desorb F and regenerate the adsorbents. However, adsorption capacity generally decreases with repeated use of the regenerated adsorbent. Future research needs to explore highly efficient, low cost adsorbents that can be easily regenerated for reuse over several cycles of operations without significant loss of adsorptive capacity and which have good hydraulic conductivity to prevent filter clogging during the fixed-bed treatment process

  17. Enhanced sorption of mercury from compact fluorescent bulbs and contaminated water streams using functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Avinash; Vidyarthi, S.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering Harcourt Butler Technological Institute, Kanpur 208001, U.P. (India); Sankararamakrishnan, Nalini, E-mail: nalini@iitk.ac.in [Centre for Environmental Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016, U.P. (India)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Oxidized (CNT-OX), CNT-I, CNT-S were prepared. • Capacity of CNT-S (151.5 mg/g) was higher than other CNTs. • Applied to the removal of Hg(II) from spiked and natural coal wash waters. • Applied to the removal of Hg(0) from compact fluorescent lamps. - Abstract: Three different functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes were prepared, namely, oxidized CNTs (CNT-OX), iodide incorporated MWCNT (CNT-I) and sulfur incorporated MWCNT (CNT-S). The as prepared adsorbents were structurally characterized by various spectral techniques like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX), Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Loading of iodide and sulfur was evident from the EDAX graphs. The adsorption properties of Hg{sup 2+} as a function of pH, contact time and initial metal concentration were characterized by Cold vapor AAS. The adsorption kinetics fitted the Pseudo second order kinetics and equilibrium was reached within 90 min. The experimental data were modeled with Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Redushkevich and Temkin isotherms and various isotherm parameters were evaluated. It was found that the mercury adsorption capacity for the prepared adsorbents were in the order of CNT-S > CNT-I > CNT-OX > CNT. Studies have been conducted to demonstrate the applicability of the sorbent toward the removal of Hg(0) from broken compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs and Hg(II) from contaminated water streams.

  18. Mechanism of amitriptyline adsorption on Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Po-Hsiang [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Wei-Teh, E-mail: atwtj@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhaohui, E-mail: li@uwp.edu [Department of Geosciences, University of Wisconsin – Parkside, 900 Wood Road, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Kuo, Chung-Yih [Department of Public Health, College of Health Care and Management, Chung Shan Medical University, No. 110, Sec. 1, Chien-kuo N Road, Taichung 40242, Taiwan (China); Jean, Jiin-Shuh [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wan-Ru [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Lv, Guocheng [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-07-30

    Graphical abstract: XRD patterns to show AMI intercalation into SAz-2 vs. direct mixing of the same amount of AMI with SAz-2. - Highlights: • Ca-montmorillonite is proven to be an efficient adsorbent or sink for amitriptyline. • The high adsorption capacity is accompanied with intercalation into interlayers. • The adsorption is mainly governed by a cation exchange mechanism. • Horizontal mono- and bi-layer conformations occur at low and high adsorption levels. • The process is an endothermic physisorption at high adsorption levels. - Abstract: The uptake of amitriptyline (AMI) from aqueous environment by Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2) was studied in a batch system under different physicochemical conditions. The adsorbent was characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. The AMI adsorption on SAz-2 obeyed the Langmuir isotherm with a capacity of 330 mg/g (1.05 mmol/g) at pH 6–7. The adsorption kinetics was fast, almost reaching equilibrium in 2 h, and followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Desorption of exchangeable cations correlated with the AMI adsorption well, indicating that cation exchange was the major mechanism. X-ray diffraction patterns showing significant expansions of the d{sub 0} {sub 0} {sub 1} spacing and characteristic FTIR band shifts toward higher frequencies after AMI adsorption onto SAz-2 indicated that the adsorbed AMI molecules were intercalated into the interlayers of the mineral. Thermodynamic parameters based on partitioning coefficients suggested that the AMI adsorption was an endothermic physisorption at high adsorption levels. At low and higher AMI adsorption levels, the intercalated AMI molecules take a horizontal monolayer and bilayer conformation, respectively. The higher adsorption capacity suggested that SAz-2 could be a good candidate to remove AMI from wastewater and would be an important environmental sink for the fate and transport of AMI in soils and groundwater.

  19. Contribution of Ash Content Related to Methane Adsorption Behaviors of Bituminous Coals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Feng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane adsorption isotherms on coals with varying ash contents were investigated. The textural properties were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm at 77 K, and methane adsorption characteristics were measured at pressures up to 4.0 MPa at 298 K, 313 K, and 328 K, respectively. The Dubinin-Astakhov model and the Polanyi potential theory were employed to fit the experimental data. As a result, ash content correlated strongly to methane adsorption capacity. Over the ash range studied, 9.35% to 21.24%, the average increase in methane adsorption capacity was 0.021 mmol/g for each 1.0% rise in ash content. With the increasing ash content range of 21.24%~43.47%, a reduction in the maximum adsorption capacities of coals was observed. In addition, there was a positive correlation between the saturated adsorption capacity and the specific surface area and micropore volume of samples. Further, this study presented the heat of adsorption, the isosteric heat of adsorption, and the adsorbed phase specific heat capacity for methane adsorption on various coals. Employing the proposed thermodynamic approaches, the thermodynamic maps of the adsorption processes of coalbed methane were conducive to the understanding of the coal and gas simultaneous extraction.

  20. The tectonics of Mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The probable tectonic history of Mercury and the relative sequence of events are discussed on the basis of data collected by the Mariner-10 spacecraft. Results indicate that Mercury's tectonic activity was confined to its early history; its endogenic activity was principally due to a small change in the shape of its lithosphere, caused by tidal despinning, and a small change in area caused by shrinkage due to cooling. Exogenic processes, in particular the impact activity, have produced more abundant tectonic features. Many features associated with the Caloris basin are due to loading of Mercury's thick lithosphere by extrusive lavas or subsidence due to magma withdrawal. It is emphasized that tectonic features observed on Mercury yield insight into the earliest tectonic events on planets like Mars and, perhaps, the earth, where subsequent events obscured or erased the most ancient tectonic records

  1. ULF Waves at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E.-H.; Boardsen, S. A.; Johnson, J. R.; Slavin, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of the observed characteristics of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves at Mercury. It shows how field-aligned propagating ULF waves at Mercury can be generated by externally driven fast compressional waves (FWs) via mode conversion at the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Then, the chapter reviews the interpretation that the strong magnetic compressional waves near and its harmonics observed with 20 of Mercury's magnetic equator could be the ion Bernstein wave (IBW) mode. A recent statistical study of ULF waves at Mercury based on MESSENGER data reported the occurrence and polarization of the detected waves. The chapter further introduces the field line resonance and the electromagnetic ion Bernstein waves to explain such waves, and shows that both theories can partially explain the observations.

  2. Mercury(II) Acetate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dejmek, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 19 (2012), s. 2867-2868. ISSN 0936-5214 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : mercury(II) acetate * oxymercuration Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.655, year: 2012

  3. Investigation of radiotracer adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of laboratory investigation of adsorption of radiotracers in several soil materials are presented. Compounds were chosen which are applied in hydrogeology for tracer determination of underground water flow parameters. Adsorption values were measured as functions of the following parameters: solution concentration, adsorption duration, concentration of hydrogen ions and ion strength of the solution. The most interesting results are: a linear dependence of adsorption on the solution concentration (observed in a wide range of concentrations), and an extended period (several tens of minutes) necessary for the adsorption system to achieve a state approaching dynamic equilibrium. (author)

  4. Fluoride and lead adsorption on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuguang; LI Yanhui

    2004-01-01

    The properties and applications of CNT have been studied extensively since Iijima discovered them in 1991[1,2]. They have exceptional mechanical properties and unique electrical property, highly chemical stability and large specific surface area. Thus far, they have widely potential applications in many fields. They can be used as reinforcing materials in composites[3], field emissions[4], hydrogen storage[5], nanoelectronic components[6], catalyst supports[7], adsorption material and so on. However, the study on the potential application of CNT, environmental protection field in particular, was hardly begun.Long[8] et al. reported that CNT had a significantly higher dioxin removal efficiency than that of activated carbon. The Langmuir adsorption constant is 2.7 × 1052, 1.3 × 1018 respectively. The results indicated that CNT is potential candidate for the removal of micro-organic pollutants. However, the reports on the CNT used as fluoride and heavy metal adsorbent are seldom.In this paper, A novel material, alumina supported on carbon nanotubes (Al2O3/CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and Al(NO3)3. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra demonstrate that alumina is amorphous, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that CNT and alumina are homogeneously mixed. Furthermore, the fluoride adsorption behavior on the surface of Al2O3/CNT has been investigated and compared with other adsorbents. The results indicate that Al2O3/CNT has a high adsorption capacity, with a saturation adsorption capacity of 39.4 mg/g. It is also found that the adsorption capacity of Al2O3/CNT is 3.0~4.5 times that of γ-Al2O3while almost equal to that of IRA-410 polymeric resin at 25 ℃. The adsorption isotherms of fluoride on Al2O3/CNT is fit the Freundlich equation well, optimal pH ranging from 5.0 to 9.0.Also in this paper, a novel material, modified carbon nanotubes (CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and HNO3 under boiling condition. Infrared spectroscopy (IR

  5. To Mercury dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    Present significance of the study of rotation of Mercury considered as a core-mantle system arises from planned Mercury missions. New high accurate data on Mercury's structure and its physical fields are expected from BepiColombo mission (Anselmi et al., 2001). Investigation of resonant rotation of Mercury, begun by Colombo G. (1966), will play here main part. New approaches to the study of Mercury dynamics and the construction of analytical theory of its resonant rotation are suggested. Within these approaches Mercury is considered as a system of two non-spherical interacting bodies: a core and a mantle. The mantle of Mercury is considered as non-spherical, rigid (or elastic) layer. Inner shell is a liquid core, which occupies a large ellipsoidal cavity of Mercury. This Mercury system moves in the gravitational field of the Sun in resonant traslatory-rotary regime of the resonance 3:2. We take into account only the second harmonic of the force function of the Sun and Mercury. For the study of Mercury rotation we have been used specially designed canonical equations of motion in Andoyer and Poincare variables (Barkin, Ferrandiz, 2001), more convenient for the application of mentioned methods. Approximate observational and some theoretical evaluations of the two main coefficients of Mercury gravitational field J_2 and C22 are known. From observational data of Mariner-10 mission were obtained some first evaluations of these coefficients: J_2 =(8± 6)\\cdot 10-5(Esposito et al., 1977); J_2 =(6± 2)\\cdot 10-5and C22 =(1.0± 0.5)\\cdot 10-5(Anderson et al., 1987). Some theoretical evaluation of ratio of these coefficients has been obtained on the base of study of periodic motions of the system of two non-spherical gravitating bodies (Barkin, 1976). Corresponding values of coefficients consist: J_2 =8\\cdot 10-5and C22 =0.33\\cdot 10-5. We have no data about non-sphericity of inner core of Mercury. Planned missions to Mercury (BepiColombo and Messenger) promise to

  6. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  7. Mercury in human hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of mercury (Hg) in scalp hair obtained from individuals residing in five different localities in the Philippines - Metro Manila, Naga City in Bicol, Bataan, Oriental Mindoro, and Palawan is presented. An overall mean of 1.46 ug/g of hair was obtained for all samples excluding those from Palawan and represents a baseline value.'' In terms of the mercury levels found in hair, the Honda Bay area in Palawan is, relatively, a ''contaminated area.'' (author)

  8. Mercury iodide crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoret, R.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the Mercury Iodide Crystal Growth (MICG) experiment is the growth of near-perfect single crystals of mercury Iodide (HgI2) in a microgravity environment which will decrease the convection effects on crystal growth. Evaporation and condensation are the only transformations involved in this experiment. To accomplish these objectives, a two-zone furnace will be used in which two sensors collect the temperature data (one in each zone).

  9. Elemental mercury exposure: peripheral neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, S.P.; Cavender, G.D.; Langolf, G.D.; Albers, J.W.

    1982-05-01

    Nerve conduction tests were performed on the right ulnar nerve of factory workers exposed to elemental mercury vapour. Time integrated urine mercury indices were used to measure the degree of exposure. Workers with prolonged distal latencies had significantly higher urine mercury concentrations when compared with those with normal latencies. Significant correlations between increasing urine mercury concentrations and prolonged motor and sensory distal latencies were established. Elemental mercury can affect both motor and sensory peripheral nerve conduction and the degree of involvement may be related to time-integrated urine mercury concentrations.

  10. Characteristics of Phosphorous Adsorption and Desorption by Organo-Mineral Colloidal Complexes of Purple Paddy Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The kinetic characteristics of P adsorption and desorption by organo-mineral colloidal complexes (OMC)were studied using acid, calcareous and neutral purple paddy soils taken from Chongqing and Sichuan, China.The results showed that the P adsorption capacity of the organo-mineral colloidal complexes differed with the soil types, being higher for the acid and calcareous purple soils than for the neutral purple soils. Partial removal of the organic matter increased the adsorption capacity of the colloidal complexes. A very significant positive correlation was found between the amounts of P desorbed from OMC and the P saturation degrees.The P adsorption reaction was quick at the early stage and slowed later. The raise of temperature increased P adsorption capacity and P adsorption rate of the colloidal complexes. The adsorption processes could be described by the Elovich equation.

  11. Adsorption of Pb(II by Activated Pyrolytic Char from Used Tire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Ping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a renewable resource, the pyrolytic char derived from used tire has promising adsorption capacities owing to its similar structure and properties with active carbon. The purification and activation of the pyrolytic char from used tire, as well as the application of this material in the adsorption of Pb(II in water is conducted. The influences on the adsorption capacity by temperature and pH value are investigated and discussed; the adsorption thermodynamics and kinetics are also studied. The results show that the pyrolytic char from used tire has remarkable adsorption capacity for Pb(II, and the adsorption is an endothermic process complying with the Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption kinetics is a pseudo second-order reaction.

  12. Adsorptive removal of Congo red, a carcinogenic textile dye, from aqueous solutions by maghemite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption of Congo red (CR) onto maghemite nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3) and its desorption was investigated. The adsorption capacity was evaluated using both the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Maghemite nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3) were prepared easily in a surfactant-less microemulsion by co-precipitation method. The size of the produced maghemite nanoparticles was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Synthesized maghemite nanoparticles showed the highest adsorption capacities of CR compared to many other adsorbents and would be a good method to increase adsorption efficiency for the removal of CR in a wastewater treatment process. The maximum adsorption occurred at pH 5.9. The Langmuir adsorption capacity (qmax) was found to be 208.33 mg g-1 of the adsorbent.

  13. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAJENDRA S DONGRE

    2016-06-01

    Graphite chitosan binary (GCB) composite was prepared for hexavalent chromium adsorption from studied water. GCB was characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM and X-ray diffraction techniques.Wide porous sorptive surface of 3.89 m$^2$ g$^{−1}$ and absorptive functionalities of GCB was due to 20% (w/w) graphite support on chitosan evidenced from FTIR and SEM that impart maximum adsorption at pH 4, agitation with 200 rpm for 180 min. Adsorption studies revealed intraparticle diffusion models and best-fitted kinetics was pseudo 2nd order one. A wellfitted Langmuir isotherm model suggested monolayer adsorption with an adsorption capacity ($q_m$) of 105.6 mg g$^{−1}$ and $R^2 = 0.945$. Sorption mechanisms based on metal ionic interactions, intrusion/diffusion and chemisorptions onto composite. This graphite chitosan binary composite improve sorbent capacity for Cr(VI).

  14. Adsorption of Monobutyl Phthalate from Aqueous Phase onto Two Macroporous Anion-Exchange Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwen Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As new emerging pollutants, phthalic acid monoesters (PAMs pose potential ecological and human health risks. In the present study, adsorption performance of monobutyl phthalate (MBP onto two macroporous base anion-exchange resins (D-201 and D-301 was discussed. It was found that the adsorption isotherms were best fitted by the Langmuir equation while the adsorption kinetics were well described by pseudo-first-order model. Analyses of sorption isotherms and thermodynamics proved that the adsorption mechanisms for DBP onto D-201 were ion exchange. However, the obtained enthalpy values indicate that the sorption process of MBP onto D-301 is physical adsorption. The equilibrium adsorption capacities and adsorption rates of DBP on two different resins increased with the increasing temperature of the solution. D-301 exhibited a higher adsorption capacity of MBP than D-201. These results proved that D-301, as an effective sorbent, can be used to remove phthalic acid monoesters from aqueous solution.

  15. Activated Carbon Adsorption Properties of the Residual Matters in Textile Dyeing and Printing Secondary Effluent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Qing; LI Fang; LIU Fang; YANG Bo; CHEN Ji-hua

    2008-01-01

    The research employed the adsorption isotherm measurement, the batch kinetic adsorption and the rapid small-scale carbon column test (RSSCT) to find out the characteristics and main impacting factors of granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption, in treating the textile dyeing-printing/polyester alkali de-weighting secondary effluent (TSE). The adsorption affinities and capacities for the organics surrogated by CODCr, color and UV254 (UV absorbency at λ= 254 nm) predicted by isotherm, small-scale-fixed bed were discussed. Adsorption rates for CODCr, color and UV254 are much different and carbon particle size dependent. The color adsorption rate and capacity should be taken as the main consideration factors in designing bio-activated carbon filter(BACF). The breakthrough of GAC adsorption column is mainly influenced by the low MW readily adsorbable organics in TSE. UVm is a good adsorption breakthrough indicator. The study provides References for BACFs' design and operation control in textile secondary effluent (TSE) tertiary treatment.

  16. Evaluation of Thermodynamic Parameters of 2, 4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid (2, 4-D Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Ghatbandhe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic parameters of 2, 4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4-D adsorption were evaluated by studying the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of 2, 4-D at different temperatures. Uptake capacity of activated carbon increases with temperature. Langmuir isotherm models were applied to experimental data of 2, 4-D adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir equilibrium model. Adsorbent monolayer capacity , Langmuir constant and adsorption rate constant were evaluated at different temperatures for activated carbon adsorption. The activation energy of adsorption ( was determined using the Arrhenius equation. Using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficients obtained at different temperatures, the thermodynamic constants of adsorption (, , and were evaluated. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters show that the adsorption of 2, 4-D is an endothermic process.

  17. Subtask 2.7 -- Mercury capture on solid surfaces and aerosols. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    Determining the fly ash properties responsible for the capture of mercury in coal-fired power generation systems is key to understanding and controlling mercury emissions in these systems. Several capture mechanisms and interactions may be possible, such as condensation, chemical adsorption, physical adsorption, chemical bonding, and amalgamation. The chemical nature of the exposed surfaces and the amount of surface area are likely to affect the amount of mercury capture, so both of these parameters must be explored. Since much of the fly ash surface area is concentrated on submicron particles, the interaction of mercury with submicron particles needs to be evaluated. Another possible explanation of mercury capture on fly ash is the formation of amalgams with other metal species that may be present in the fly ash; if this is true, amalgamation may be a viable control technology. The project objectives are to relate mercury capture by fly ash to chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, determine mercury associations with submicron aerosols, evaluate mercury capture on metal sorbents, and relate experimental results to predictions based on state-of-the-art models. Results to date on these activities are described.

  18. Adsorption behavior of epirubicin hydrochloride on carboxylated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Pierre, Dramou; He, Hua; Tan, Shuhua; Pham-Huy, Chuong; Hong, Hao; Huang, Jilong

    2011-02-28

    The aim of this study was to understand the interaction between carboxylated carbon nanotubes (c-CNTs) and anticancer agents and evaluate the drug-loading ability of c-CNTs. We prepared carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (c-MWNTs) with nitric acid treatment, then evaluated the adsorption ability of c-MWNTs as adsorbents for loading of the anticancer drug, epirubicin hydrochloride (EPI), and investigated the adsorption behavior of EPI on c-MWNTs. Unmodified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were included as comparative adsorbents. The results showed that carbon nanotubes were able to form supramolecular complexes with EPI via π-π stacking and possessed favorable loading properties as drug carriers. The Freundilich adsorption model was successfully employed to describe the adsorption process. Because of the high surface area and hydrogen bonding, c-MWNTs' adsorption efficiency was the highest and the most stable and their drug-loading capacity was superior to that of MWNTs. With the increase of pH, the adsorption capacity of EPI on the c-MWNTs increased. Low-temperature facilitated the adsorption. More rapid EPI adsorption rate and higher drug-loading ability were observed from c-MWNTs with smaller diameter. Moreover, the adsorption kinetics of EPI on c-MWNTs could be well depicted by using the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. PMID:21145959

  19. Adsorptive Removal of Dye from Industrial Effluents Using Natural Iraqi Palygorskite Clay as Low-Cost Adsorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Dakhil Nasir Taha; Isra'a Sadi Samaka; Luma Ahmed Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Palygorskite clay has been investigated as low cost and ecofriendly adsorbent for the removal Basic Red 2(BR-2) from aqueous solution. Batch adsorption studies are carried out by observing effect of amount of adsorbent dose, contact time, pH, initial concentration of ( BR-2) and particle size of adsorbent on the adsorption capacity of the adsorbent were studied. Adsorption data fits the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The calculated value of the Langmuir parameter for adsorption...

  20. Dynamic adsorption of radon on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption of 222Rn from air onto activated carbon was studied over the range 0 to 550C. A sharp pulse of radon was injected into an air stream that flowed through a bed of activated carbon. The radon concentration in the exit from the column was continuously monitored using a zinc sulfide α-scintillation flow cell. Elution curves were analyzed to determine the dynamic adsorption coefficient and the number of theoretical stages. Five types of activated carbon were tested and the dynamic adsorption coefficient was found to increase linearly with surface area in the range 1000 to 1300 m2g-1. The adsorptive capacity of activated carbon was reduced by up to 30% if the entering gas was saturated with water vapor and the bed was initially dry. If the bed was allowed to equilibrate with saturated air, the adsorptive capacity was too low to be of practical use. The minimum height equivalent to a theoretical stage (HETS) was about four times the particle diameter and occurred at superficial velocities within the range 0.002 to 0.02 m s-1. For superficial velocities above 0.05 m s-1, the HETS was determined by the rate of mass transfer. The application of these results to the design of activated carbon systems for radon retention is discussed

  1. Experimental study on gas permeability by adsorption under 3D-stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Qing-ming; WEN Guang-cai; ZOU Yin-hui; ZHAO Xu-sheng

    2009-01-01

    Using self-developed gas-seepage experimental installation, under the same effective stress conditions, coal permeability experiments on different adsorption charac-teristics of gases, different temperatures and different gas adsorption contents were per-formed, and the influence law of adsorption on coal permeability was studied. At the same time, experimental analogy showed clearly that gas drawing plucks the permeability varia-tion law. The results show that adsorption has a major impact on coal permeability. The greater the adsorption, the more the gas adsorption capacity and the coal permeability becomes smaller. Permeability becomes smaller along with confining of pressure and temperature, and this is in accord with local practice results.

  2. Mercury pollution in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Jinap, S; Ismail, Ahmad; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have been published on levels of mercury contamination of the environment, and of food and human tissues in Peninsular Malaysia, there is a serious dearth of research that has been performed in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak). Industry is rapidly developing in East Malaysia, and, hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury contamination in environmental media in that part of the country by performing monitoring studies. Residues of total mercury and inorganic in food samples have been determined in nearly all previous studies that have been conducted; however, few researchers have analyzed samples for the presence of methlymercury residues. Because methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury, and because there is a growing public awareness of the risk posed by methylmercury exposure that is associated with fish and seafood consumption, further monitoring studies on methylmercury in food are also essential. From the results of previous studies, it is obvious that the economic development in Malaysia, in recent years, has affected the aquatic environment of the country. Primary areas of environmental concern are centered on the rivers of the west Peninsular Malaysian coast, and the coastal waters of the Straits of Malacca, wherein industrial activities are rapidly expanding. The sources of existing mercury input to both of these areas of Malaysia should be studied and identified. Considering the high levels of mercury that now exists in human tissues, efforts should be continued, and accelerated in the future, if possible, to monitor mercury contamination levels in the coastal states, and particularly along the west Peninsular Malaysian coast. Most studies that have been carried out on mercury residues in environmental samples are dated, having been conducted 20-30 years ago; therefore, the need to collect much more and more current data is urgent. Furthermore, establishing baseline levels of mercury exposure to

  3. Adsorption of uranium with multiwall carbon nanotubes modified by formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purified multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified with formaldehyde and the dispersibility of MWCNTs was greatly improved after modification. The modified MWCNTs were used to study the adsorption of uranium from aqueous solution. pH, contact time, temperature, initial concentration of uranium and modified MWCNTs concentrations were investigated to estimate the adsorptive properties. The results show that uranium adsorption percentage strongly depends on the pH, initial concentration of uranium and modified MWCNTs content, and is slightly influenced by contact time, temperature and ionic strength. The adsorptivity increases over the range of pH=2.0-7.0. The maximum adsorptivity is 46.44 mg/g as the initial concentration of uranium reaches 50 μg/mL. The equilibrium data obey both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms well, and the maximal theoretical adsorption capacity is 55.87 mg/g for the modified MWCNTs. (authors)

  4. Adsorption of anionic dyes on ammonium-functionalized MCM-41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations were conducted in a batch reactor system to study the adsorption behavior of four anionic dyes (Methyl orange (MO), Orange IV (OIV), Reactive brilliant red X-3B (X-3B), and Acid fuchsine (AF)) on ammonium-functionalized MCM-41 (NH3+-MCM-41) from aqueous medium by varying the parameters such as contact time, initial dye concentration, pH and competitive anions. Dye adsorption was broadly independent of initial dye concentration. The intraparticle diffusion model was the best in describing the adsorption kinetics for the four anionic dyes on NH3+-MCM-41. The adsorption data for the four dyes were well fitted with the Langmuir model. The electrostatic interaction was considered to be the main mechanism for the dye adsorption. Finally, it was observed that the anion of soft acid inhibited the adsorption capacity significantly

  5. Adsorption studies of methylene blue dye on tunisian activated lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriaa, A.; Hamdi, N.; Srasra, E.

    2011-02-01

    Activated carbon prepared from natural lignin, providing from a geological deposit, was used as the adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) dye from aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to evaluate various experimental parameters like pH and contact time for the removal of this dye. Effective pH for MB removal was 11. Kinetic study showed that the adsorption of dye was gradual process. Quasi equilibrium reached in 4 h. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order were used to fit the experimental data. Pseudo-second-order rate equation was able to provide realistic description of adsorption kinetics. The experimental isotherms data were also modelled by the Langmuir and Freundlich equation of adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 147 mg/g. Activated lignin was shown to be a promising material for adsorption of MB from aqueous solutions.

  6. Adsorption of Nitrobenzene from Water onto High Silica Zeolites and Regeneration by Ozone

    OpenAIRE

    Reungoat, Julien; Pic, Jean-Stéphane; Manero, Marie-Hélène; Debellefontaine, Hubert

    2007-01-01

    This work investigates the removal of nitrobenzene (NB), a model pollutant from water, by combining adsorption onto zeolites and regeneration with ozone. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms of NB onto zeolites enabled the best adsorbent to be selected and zeolites with a high Si/Al ratio were the most efficient. The adsorption capacity depended on the Si/Al ratio and on the pore size. In a sequential process coupling adsorption and oxidation by ozone, NB was completely removed from water and...

  7. Adsorption of Emerging Ionizable Contaminants on Carbon Nanotubes: Advancements and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Xingmao Ma; Sarang Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    The superior adsorption capacity of carbon nanotubes has been well recognized and there is a wealth of information in the literature concerning the adsorption of unionized organic pollutants on carbon nanotubes. Recently, the adsorption of emerging environmental pollutants, most of which are ionizable, has attracted increasing attention due to the heightened concerns about the accumulation of these emerging contaminants in the environment. These recent studies suggest that the adsorption of e...

  8. Modeling of Experimental Adsorption Isotherm Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunjun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption is considered to be one of the most effective technologies widely used in global environmental protection areas. Modeling of experimental adsorption isotherm data is an essential way for predicting the mechanisms of adsorption, which will lead to an improvement in the area of adsorption science. In this paper, we employed three isotherm models, namely: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich to correlate four sets of experimental adsorption isotherm data, which were obtained by batch tests in lab. The linearized and non-linearized isotherm models were compared and discussed. In order to determine the best fit isotherm model, the correlation coefficient (r2 and standard errors (S.E. for each parameter were used to evaluate the data. The modeling results showed that non-linear Langmuir model could fit the data better than others, with relatively higher r2 values and smaller S.E. The linear Langmuir model had the highest value of r2, however, the maximum adsorption capacities estimated from linear Langmuir model were deviated from the experimental data.

  9. Sorbent-based gaseous mercury removal from flue gas in hybrid particulate collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.K. Choi; Y.J. Rhim; S.D. Kim; Lee, S.H. Lee; S.S. Kim [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Republic of Korea)

    2007-07-01

    In this study, the hybrid particulate collector on the gaseous mercury removal performance was estimated. Hybrid particulate collector consists of sorbent injection/adsorption reactor, electrostatic precipitator and fabric filters. The hybrid particulate collector acts not only as a particulate collector but also as an adsorption reactor. Activated carbons injected in the flue gas in front of the injection/adsorption reactor, floating inside of the particulate collector and that attached on the inner walls take important role in mercury removal respectively, and also the activated carbons being attached on the filter surface do. Since the collector itself plays as an adsorption reactor, high mercury removal efficiency can be attained at the low C/Hg ratio. Overall removal efficiency was about 60%. When considering the baseline mercury removal efficiency was over the 50% in the coal fired power plants and MSW incinerators, it could be possible to obtain removal efficiency over the 90% with this hybrid particulate collector. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Biogeochemistry: Better living through mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jeffra K.

    2016-02-01

    Mercury is a toxic element with no known biological function. Laboratory studies demonstrate that mercury can be beneficial to microbial growth by acting as an electron acceptor during photosynthesis.

  11. Microemulsion synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanomaterials and their adsorption behaviors for Cr3+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y. L.; Wang, X. S.; Cui, H. H.; Mu, M. M.; Huang, F. Z.

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles with different morphologies, such as nanorods, nanospheres, and their mixtures were successfully synthesized by microemulsion method with soluble additive. Their adsorption capacity for Cr3+ ion was investigated. Most of the Cr3+ were absorbed by HAP within 60 min. The adsorption capacity of the HAP nanospheres was the best, and the maximum Cr3+ removal ratio was 96.4%, revealing that the metal ions adsorption by HAP is dependent on the morphology of its particles.

  12. Adsorptive removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions using collagen-tannin resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xia; Huang Xin [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Liao Xuepin, E-mail: xpliao@scu.edu.cn [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Shi Bi, E-mail: shibi@scu.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2011-02-28

    The collagen-tannin resin (CTR), as a novel adsorbent, was prepared via a reaction of collagen with black wattle tannin and aldehyde, and its adsorption properties to Cu(II) were systematically investigated, including pH effect, adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, and column adsorption. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II) on CTR was pH-dependent, and it increased with the increase of solution pH. The adsorption isotherms were well described by Langmuir isotherm model with correlating constant (R{sup 2}) higher than 0.99. The adsorption capacity determined at 303 K was high up to 0.26 mmol/g, which was close to the value (0.266 mmol/g) estimated from Langmuir equation. The adsorption capacity was increased with the increase of temperature, and thermodynamic calculations suggested that the adsorption of Cu(II) on CTR is an endothermic process. The adsorption kinetics were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order rate model. Further column studies suggested that CTR was effective for the removal of Cu(II) from solutions, and more than 99% of Cu(II) was desorbed from column using 0.1 mol/L HNO{sub 3} solution. The CTR column can be reused to adsorb Cu(II) without any loss of adsorption capacity.

  13. Adsorptive removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions using collagen-tannin resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collagen-tannin resin (CTR), as a novel adsorbent, was prepared via a reaction of collagen with black wattle tannin and aldehyde, and its adsorption properties to Cu(II) were systematically investigated, including pH effect, adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, and column adsorption. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II) on CTR was pH-dependent, and it increased with the increase of solution pH. The adsorption isotherms were well described by Langmuir isotherm model with correlating constant (R2) higher than 0.99. The adsorption capacity determined at 303 K was high up to 0.26 mmol/g, which was close to the value (0.266 mmol/g) estimated from Langmuir equation. The adsorption capacity was increased with the increase of temperature, and thermodynamic calculations suggested that the adsorption of Cu(II) on CTR is an endothermic process. The adsorption kinetics were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order rate model. Further column studies suggested that CTR was effective for the removal of Cu(II) from solutions, and more than 99% of Cu(II) was desorbed from column using 0.1 mol/L HNO3 solution. The CTR column can be reused to adsorb Cu(II) without any loss of adsorption capacity.

  14. Adsorption on mixtures of ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical study has been made of adsorption on mixtures of ion exchangers. The effect of variables such as the concentration of the ion being adsorbed, the concentration of the supporting electrolyte, loading, the values of the capacities and equilibrium constants for the various exchange processes, and the fraction of each adsorber in the mixture on the observed distribution coefficient has been investigated. A computer program has been written to facilitate the calculation of distribution coefficients for the adsorption of an ion on a given mixture of ion exchangers under a specified set of conditions

  15. Mercury's magnetic field and interior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic-field data collected on Mercury by the Mariner-10 spacecraft present substantial evidence for an intrinsic global magnetic field. However, studies of Mercury's thermal evolution show that it is most likely that the inner core region of Mercury solidified or froze early in the planet's history. Thus, the explanation of Mercury's magnetic field in the framework of the traditional planetary dynamo is less than certain

  16. Elemental mercury exposure: peripheral neurotoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, S P; Cavender, G D; Langolf, G D; Albers, J W

    1982-01-01

    Nerve conduction tests were performed on the right ulnar nerve of factory workers exposed to elemental mercury vapour. Time integrated urine mercury indices were used to measure the degree of exposure. Workers with prolonged distal latencies had significantly higher urine mercury concentrations when compared with those with normal latencies. Significant correlations between increasing urine mercury concentrations and prolonged motor and sensory distal latencies were established. Elemental mer...

  17. Study on the adsorption kinetics of orthophosphate anions on layer double hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Shuchuan; L(U) Lü; WANG Jin; HAN Lu; CHEN Tianhu; JIANG Shaotong

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic study was conducted on the adsorption of orthophosphate anions on layer double hydroxide (LDH). The adsorption has proved itself to be a spontaneous endothermic process and is large in capacity and rate. The adsorption isotherm correlates well with the Freundlich model, and a rise in temperature will lead to an increase in adsorption efficiency. Additionally, the results suggested that the adsorption is an entropy-increasing process and is in good agreement with the pseudo-second order kinetics. The free energy (ΔG) of adsorption of orthophosphate onto LDH varies within the range of -1.75- -3.34 kJ/mol, the enthalpy (ΔH) varies by 7.96 kJ/mol and the entropy (ΔS) by 33.59 kJ/mol. The adsorption activation energy is 8.3 kJ/mol, showing that the adsorption of orthophosphate onto LDH is determined to be a physical adsorption.

  18. Efficient adsorption of phenanthrene by simply synthesized hydrophobic MCM-41 molecular sieves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yun; He, Yinyun; Wang, Xiaowen; Wei, Chaohai

    2014-08-01

    Hydrophobic molecular sieve MCM-41 including surfactant template was synthesized by a simple method. The adsorption properties of this material toward phenanthrene were studied. The effects of adsorbent dose and pH value on the adsorption process as well as the adsorption mechanism and reuse performance were investigated. The template-containing MCM-41 showed a significant adsorption for phenanthrene, due to its hydrophobicity created by the surfactant template in MCM-41. The solution pH had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The adsorption kinetic could be fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption equilibrium was fitted well by the linear model, and the adsorption process followed the liquid/solid phase distribution mechanism. The thermodynamic results indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process.

  19. Adsorption of Lead Ions by Linde type F(K Zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chenghui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Test was to examine the adsorption property of Pb(II irons by Linde type F (K zeolite. The zeolite was synthesized by fly ash. The adsorbent dosage, pH, reaction temperature and reaction time were investigated. The adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetics equation were studied. The results showed the adsorbent dosage, pH, reaction temperature and reaction time had significant effects on the adsorption of Pb(II irons. The removal rate was improved with the increasing of zeolite dosage. The saturated adsorption capacity was decreased gradually. The adsorption of Pb(II irons tended to saturate when initial pH was 6. With the increasing of temperature, the equilibration time of adsorption was shorter. Langmuir isotherm was more applicable to explain the monolayer adsorption procedure of Pb(II on Linde type F(K zeolite. For adsorption kinetics, pseudo-second order model showed better calculation results.

  20. Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Landreth

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was

  1. Mercury (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Mercury The Basics Mercury — sometimes called quicksilver — is a natural metal. It’s ... to breathe it in without knowing it. When mercury combines with other chemical elements, it creates compounds, ...

  2. Mercury content of edible mushrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woidich, H.; Pfannhauser, W.

    1975-05-01

    The mercury content of edible fungi is different. Relatively high burdened are Boletus and Agaricus campestris. A minimum of mercury is found in Russula, Agaricus bisporus and Cantharellus cibarius. The possibilities of mercury uptake and the potential cumulation mechanism is discussed. 8 references, 3 tables.

  3. Sensing Mercury for Biomedical and Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Xiaojun Zhao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a very toxic element that is widely spread in the atmosphere, lithosphere, and surface water. Concentrated mercury poses serious problems to human health, as bioaccumulation of mercury within the brain and kidneys ultimately leads to neurological diseases. To control mercury pollution and reduce mercury damage to human health, sensitive determination of mercury is important. This article summarizes some current sensors for the determination of both abiotic and biotic mercury. A wide array of sensors for monitoring mercury is described, including biosensors and chemical sensors, while piezoelectric and microcantilever sensors are also described. Additionally, newly developed nanomaterials offer great potential for fabricating novel mercury sensors. Some of the functional fluorescent nanosensors for the determination of mercury are covered. Afterwards, the in vivo determination of mercury and the characterization of different forms of mercury are discussed. Finally, the future direction for mercury detection is outlined, suggesting that nanomaterials may provide revolutionary tools in biomedical and environmental monitoring of mercury.

  4. Adsorptive Transfer Stripping for Quick Electrochemical Determination of microRNAs in Total RNA Samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartošík, M.; Hrstka, R.; Paleček, Emil; Vojtešek, B.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 12 (2014), s. 2558-2562. ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00956S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Adsorptive transfer stripping * Cancer * Mercury electrode Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.138, year: 2014

  5. Quaternized dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate strong base anion exchange fibers for As(V) adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N,N-Dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) grafted polyethylene/polypropylene (PE/PP) nonwoven fibers (DMAEMA-g-PE/PP) was prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization. DMAEMA graft chains on nonwoven fibers were quaternized with dimethyl sulfate solution for the preparation of strong base anion exchange fibers (QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP). Fiber structures were characterized by FTIR, XPS and SEM techniques. The effect of solution pH, contact time, initial As(V) ion concentration and coexisting ions on the As(V) adsorption capacity of the QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP fibers were investigated by performing batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption of As(V) by QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP fibers was found to be independent on solution pH in the range 4.00–10.00. Kinetic experiments show that the As(V) adsorption rate was rapid and As(V) adsorption follows pseudo second-order kinetic model. As(V) adsorption equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm model equations. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models fitted the experimental data well. The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) calculated from Langmuir isotherm was found to be 83.33 mg As(V)/g polymer at pH 7.00. The adsorbent was used for three cycles without significant loss of adsorption capacity. The adsorbed As(V) ions were desorbed effectively by a 0.1 M NaOH solution. - Highlights: • QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP fibers have high adsorption capacity for As(V) ions. • Adsorption of As(V) is independent on the solution pH over a wide range (4−10). • As(V) adsorption rate of QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP fibers is considerably fast. • The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) was found to be 83.33 mg As(V)/g polymer

  6. Sensing Mercury for Biomedical and Environmental Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Xiaojun Zhao; E. Michael Collins; Hanying Xu; Selid, Paul D.; Marla Striped Face-Collins

    2009-01-01

    Mercury is a very toxic element that is widely spread in the atmosphere, lithosphere, and surface water. Concentrated mercury poses serious problems to human health, as bioaccumulation of mercury within the brain and kidneys ultimately leads to neurological diseases. To control mercury pollution and reduce mercury damage to human health, sensitive determination of mercury is important. This article summarizes some current sensors for the determination of both abiotic and biotic mercury. A wid...

  7. Impact of salinity and dispersed oil on adsorption of dissolved aromatic hydrocarbons by activated carbon and organoclay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younker, Jessica M; Walsh, Margaret E

    2015-12-15

    Adsorption capacity of phenol and naphthalene by powdered activated carbon (PAC), a commercial organoclay (OC) and a lab synthesized organoclay (BTMA) was studied using batch adsorption experiments under variable feed water quality conditions including single- and multi- solute conditions, fresh water, saline water and oily-and-saline water. Increasing salinity levels was found to reduce adsorption capacity of OC, likely due to destabilization, aggregation and subsequent removal of organoclay from the water column, but did not negatively impact adsorption capacity of PAC or BTMA. Increased dispersed oil concentrations were found to reduce the surface area of all adsorbents. This decreased the adsorption capacity of PAC for both phenol and naphthalene, and reduced BTMA adsorption of phenol, but did not negatively affect naphthalene removals by either organoclay. The presence of naphthalene as a co-solute significantly reduced phenol adsorption by PAC, but had no impact on organoclay adsorption. These results indicated that adsorption by PAC occurred via a surface adsorption mechanism, while organoclay adsorption occurred by hydrophobic or pi electron interactions. In general, PAC was more sensitive to changes in water quality than either of the organoclays evaluated in this study. However, PAC exhibited a higher adsorption capacity for phenol and naphthalene compared to both organoclays even in adverse water quality conditions. PMID:26259095

  8. Mercury radar speckle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holin, Igor V.

    2010-06-01

    Current data reveal that Mercury is a dynamic system with a core which has not yet solidified completely and is at least partially decoupled from the mantle. Radar speckle displacement experiments have demonstrated that the accuracy in spin-dynamics determination for Earth-like planets can approach 10 -5. The extended analysis of space-time correlation properties of radar echoes shows that the behavior of speckles does not prevent estimation of Mercury's instantaneous spin-vector components to accuracy of a few parts in 10 7. This limit can be reached with more powerful radar facilities and leads to constraining the interior in more detail from effects of spin dynamics, e.g., from observation of the core-mantle interplay through high precision monitoring of the 88-day spin-variation of Mercury's crust.

  9. Mordanting of mercury on styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer beads from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption of mercury ions from aqueous solutions on styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer beads (St-DVB) has been investigated for the decontamination of mercury from aqueous media. Various physico-chemical parameters, such as selection of appropriate electrolyte, contact time, amount of adsorbent, concentration of adsorbate, effect of diverse ions and temperature were optimized to simulate the best conditions which can be used to decontaminate mercury from aqueous media using St-DVB beads as an adsorbent. The radiotracer technique was used to determine the distribution of mercury. The highest adsorption was observed at 0.001 mol L-1 acid solutions (HNO3, H2SO4 and HClO4) using 0.2 g of adsorbent for 5.14 x 10-5mol L-1 mercury concentration in five minutes equilibration time. Studies show that the adsorption decreases with the increase in the concentrations of all the acids. The adsorption data follows the Freundlich isotherm over the mercury concentration range of 2.19 x 10-4 to 5.90 x 10-3mol L-1. The characteristic Freundlich constants, i.e. 1/n = 0.42±0.01 and A (1.54±0.03) x 10-3mol g-1 have been computed for the sorption system. The sorption mean free energy from Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm is 11.9±0.1 kJ mol-1 indicating ion-exchange mechanism of chemisorption. The uptake of mercury increases with the rise in temperature. Thermodynamic parameters, i.e. ΔG, ΔS and ΔH have also been calculated for the system. (orig.)

  10. N-doped mesoporous alumina for adsorption of carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jayshri A.Thote; Ravikrishna V.Chatti; Kartik S.Iyer; Vivek Kumar; Arti N.Valechha; Nitin K.Labhsetwar; Rajesh B.Biniwale; M.K.N.Yenkie; Sadhana S.Rayalu

    2012-01-01

    N-doped mesoporous alumina has been synthesized using chitosan as the biopolymer template.The adsorbent has been thoroughly investigated for the adsorption of CO2 from a simulated flue gas stream (15% CO2 balanced with N2) and compared with commercially available mesoporous alumina procured from SASOL,Germany.CO2 adsorption was studied under different conditions of pretreatment and adsorption temperature,inlet CO2 concentration and in the presence of oxygen and moisture.The adsorption capacity was determined to be 29.4 mg CO2/g of adsorbent at 55℃.This value was observed to be 4 times higher in comparison to that of commercial mesoporous alumina at a temperature of 55℃.Basicity of alumina surface coupled with the presence of nitrogen in template in synthesized sample is responsible for this enhanced CO2 adsorption.Adsorption capacity for CO2 was retained in the presence of oxygen; however moisture had a deteriorating effect on the adsorption capacity reducing it to nearly half the value.

  11. Influence of organobentonite structure on toluene adsorption from water solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Vidal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to increase water pollution by organic compound derived from hydrocarbons such as toluene, several alternative technologies for remediation of polluted water have been originated. In this work natural bentonites were modified with cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA+ for obtaining organophilic bentonites. The obtained CTMA-bentonites would be suitable for use as adsorbents of toluene present in water. The influence of structural characteristics of CTMA-bentonites on their adsorption capacity was studied. It was shown that adsorption of toluene depended on homogeneous interlayer space associated with arrangements of CTMA+ paraffin-monolayer and bilayer models, accompanied by a high degree ordering of the carbon chain of organic cation in both arrangements. However, packing density would not have an evident influence on the retention capacity of these materials. The solids obtained were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffractions and infrared spectroscopy. Toluene adsorption was measured by UV-visible spectrophotometer. Adsorption capacity was studied by determining adsorption isotherms and adsorption coefficient calculation. The adsorption isotherms were straight-line indicating a partition phenomenon of toluene between the aqueous and organic phase present in organophilic bentonites.

  12. Effect of DOM Size on Organic Micropollutant Adsorption by GAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Anthony M; Summers, R Scott

    2015-06-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption of the micropollutants 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and warfarin (WFN) at ng/L levels was investigated in five waters with isolated natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) held at a constant dissolved organic carbon concentration. Each water was evaluated for competitive adsorption effects based on the pretreatment of ultrafiltration, coagulation, and additional background micropollutants. Using the breakthrough with unfractionated DOM as a baseline, on average, the water with lower molecular weight (MW) DOM decreased MIB and WFN adsorption capacity by 59%, whereas the water with higher MW DOM increased MIB and WFN adsorption capacity by 64%. All waters showed similar decreasing MIB and WFN adsorption capacity with increasing empty bed contact time (EBCT), with more dramatic effects seen for the more strongly adsorbing WFN. On average, MIB and WFN adsorption kinetics were two times slower in the water with higher MW DOM compared to the water with lower MW DOM, as described by the intraparticle pore diffusion tortuosity. Increased adsorption competition from 27 micropollutants other than MIB and WFN at environmentally relevant concentrations had little to no effect on MIB and WFN breakthrough behavior. Any competitive effect from background micropollutants became indiscernible at longer EBCTs. PMID:25955134

  13. STUDY ON THE PROPERTIES OF DIFFERENT ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS AND THEIR ADSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS FOR FORMALDEHYDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Q. Rong; Z.Y. Ryu; J.T. Zheng

    2001-01-01

    Porous structure and surface chemistry of activated carbon fibers obtained by differ-ent precursors and activation methods were investigated. Adsorption isotherms werecharacterized by nitrogen adsorption at 77K over a relative pressure range from 10 6to 1. The regularization method according to Density Functional Theory (DFT) wasemployed to calculate the pore size distribution in the samples. Their specific surfaceareas were calculated by BET method, micropore volume and microporous specificsurface area calculated by t-plot method and MPD by Horvath-Kawazoe equation. Mi-cropore volume of rayon-based ACF was higher than that of other samples. The staticand dynamic adsorption capacity for formaldehyde on different ACFs was determined.The results show that steam activated Rayon-based A CFs had higher adsorption capac-ity than that of steam and KOH activated PAN-A CFs. Breakthrough curves illustratedthat Rayon-ACFs had longer breakthrough time, thus they possessed higher adsorp-tion capacity for formaldehyde than that of PAN-ACFs. The entire sample had smalladsorption capacity and short breakthrough time for water. Rayon-A CFs had exccl-lent adsorption selectivity for formaldehyde than PAN-ACFs. And the samples withhigh surface areas had relatively high adsorption capacity for formaldehyde. Elementaicontent of different A CFs were performed. Rayon-based A CFs contained more oxygenthan PAN-ACFs, which may be attributed to their excellent adsorption capacity forformaldehyde.

  14. Synthesis of magnetic wheat straw for arsenic adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → This work provides a way for fabricating low-cost arsenic adsorbents using agro- or plant-residues. → The introduction of wheat straw template highly enhances the arsenic adsorption of Fe3O4. → This magnetic adsorbent can be separated and collected by magnetic control easily and rapidly. → This adsorbent can be regenerated. → - Abstract: Magnetic wheat straw (MWS) with different Fe3O4 content was synthesized by using in-situ co-precipitation method. It was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). This material can be used for arsenic adsorption from water, and can be easily separated by applied magnetic field. The introduction of wheat straw template highly enhanced the arsenic adsorption of Fe3O4. Among three adsorption isotherm models examined, the data fitted Langmuir model better. Fe3O4 content and initial pH value influenced its adsorption behavior. Higher Fe3O4 content corresponded to a higher adsorption capacity. In the pH range of 3-11, As(V) adsorption was decreased with increasing of pH; As(III) adsorption had the highest capacity at pH 7-9. Moreover, by using 0.1 mol L-1 NaOH aqueous solution, it could be regenerated. This work provided an efficient way for making use of agricultural waste.

  15. Behavior of phenol adsorption on thermal modified activated carbon☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dengfeng Zhang; Peili Huo; Wei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption process is acknowledged as an effective option for phenolic wastewater treatment. In this work, the activated carbon (AC) samples after thermal modification were prepared by using muffle furnace. The phenol ad-sorption kinetics and equilibrium measurements were carried out under static conditions at temperature ranging from 25 to 55 °C. The test results show that the thermal modification can enhance phenol adsorption on AC samples. The porous structure and surface chemistry analyses indicate that the decay in pore morphology and decrease of total oxygen-containing functional groups are found for the thermal modified AC samples. Thus, it can be further inferred that the decrease of total oxygen-containing functional groups on the modified AC sam-ples is the main reason for the enhanced phenol adsorption capacity. For both the raw sample and the optimum modified AC sample at 900 °C, the pseudo-second order kinetics and Langmuir models are found to fit the exper-imental data very well. The maximum phenol adsorption capacity of the optimum modified AC sample can reach 144.93 mg·g−1 which is higher than that of the raw sample, i.e. 119.53 mg·g−1. Adsorption thermodynamics analysis confirms that the phenol adsorption on the optimum modified AC sample is an exothermic process and mainly via physical adsorption.

  16. The Sun, Mercury, and Venus

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    The Messenger mission to Mercury opened a new window into the inner solar system. In 2008, this mission began a number of years of flybys, culminating in an orbital insertion around Mercury and producing unparalleled observations about this mysterious innermost planet. Mercury orbits so close to the Sun, from the point of view of Earth, that seeing it from the Earth against the Sun's glare is a great challenge. At the same time, the huge gravitational force of the Sun makes it a challenge to put a mission on Mercury without losing it into the Sun. Now, with heightened understanding of Mercury,

  17. Mercury exposure in Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cullen, Elizabeth; Evans, David S; Davidson, Fred;

    2014-01-01

    of a study to Coordinate and Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (DEMOCOPHES) pilot biomonitoring study. METHODS: Hair mercury concentrations were determined from a convenience sample of 120 mother/child pairs. Mothers also completed a questionnaire. Rigorous quality assurance within...... DEMOCOPHES guaranteed the accuracy and international comparability of results. RESULTS: Mercury was detected in 79.2% of the samples from mothers, and 62.5% of children's samples. Arithmetic mean levels in mothers (0.262 µg/g hair) and children (0.149 µg /g hair) did not exceed the US EPA guidance value...

  18. Mercury analysis in hair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteban, Marta; Schindler, Birgit K; Jiménez-Guerrero, José A;

    2015-01-01

    procedures has often limited the comparison of data at national and international level. The European-funded projects COPHES and DEMOCOPHES developed and tested a harmonized European approach to Human Biomonitoring in response to the European Environment and Health Action Plan. Herein we describe the quality...... assurance program (QAP) for assessing mercury levels in hair samples from more than 1800 mother-child pairs recruited in 17 European countries. To ensure the comparability of the results, standard operating procedures (SOPs) for sampling and for mercury analysis were drafted and distributed to participating...

  19. P adsorption and desorption capacities of selected Andisols from the Azores, Portugal Capacidade de adsorção e de desorção de P em Andossolos dos Açores, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Auxtero

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorous adsorption maxima (P-ads max and the amounts of P desorbed (P-des using Langmuir equation and eight successive extractions with 0.01M CaCl2, were determined on sixteen horizons of Andisols from the Azores, Portugal. Results showed that the values of P-ads max and the proportions of P desorbed (P-des were highly influenced by allophane, Alo, Ald, and Fed contents, and by the values of Alo + ½ Feo and ferrihydrite + allophane. P-des were negatively correlated with these constituents, but not with allophane. Vitrandic Haplustepts and Typic Udivitrands, and Typic Hapludands containing low amounts of allophane, Alo, Ald, and Fed showed low values of P-ads max, but high P-des values. Phosphate ions applied as fertilizer on these soils are highly available for plant use, but maybe easily lost through surface runoff, subsurface drainage and soil erosion. They may require restricted amounts of P fertilizer, and P losses should be controlled to minimize eutrophication of nearby water bodies. Conversely, Typic Placudands containing large amounts of allophane, and Acrudoxic Hydrudands and Typic Hapludands containing large amounts of organic C showed high values of P-ads max, but low P-des, indicating unavailability of P when retained by these soils. Large amounts of slow P-releasing fertilizer may be required for better crop use.A adsorção máxima de P (P-ads max e a quantidade de P desorvido no solo (P-des, foram determinadas em 16 horizontes superficiais e subsuperficiais de Andossolos dos Açores, Portugal, usando equação de Langmuir e oito extracções sucessivas com cloreto do cálcio. Os valores de P-ads max mostraram uma correlação positiva com os teores de Alo, Ald, Fed, alofana, ferihidrite + + alofana, e com valores de Alo + ½ Feo. Por outro lado, os resultados de P-des, mostraram uma correlação negativa com os mesmos constituintes, excepto com alofana. Vitrandic Haplustepts, Typic Udivitrands e Typic Hapludands mostraram um

  20. Novel nano bearings constructed by physical adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-09-01

    The paper proposes a novel nano bearing formed by the physical adsorption of the confined fluid to the solid wall. The bearing is formed between two parallel smooth solid plane walls sliding against one another, where conventional hydrodynamic lubrication theory predicted no lubricating effect. In this bearing, the stationary solid wall is divided into two subzones which respectively have different interaction strengths with the lubricating fluid. It leads to different physical adsorption and slip properties of the lubricating fluid at the stationary solid wall respectively in these two subzones. It was found that a significant load-carrying capacity of the bearing can be generated for low lubricating film thicknesses, because of the strong physical adsorption and non-continuum effects of the lubricating film.

  1. Hydrophobic nano-carrier for lysozyme adsorption

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CANAN ALTUNBAS; FULDEN ZEYNEP URAL; MURAT UYGUN; NESIBE AVCIBASI; UGUR AVCIBASI; DENIZ AKTAS UYGUN; SINAN AKGÖL

    2016-04-01

    In this work, poly(HEMA–APH) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization technique.Magnetic behaviour was introduced by simple addition of Fe$_3$O$_4$ into the polymerization medium.Characterization of the nanoparticle was carried out by FTIR, ESR, SEM, AFM and EDX analyses. These synthesized magnetic nanoparticles were used for adsorption of lysozyme. For this purpose, adsorption conditions wereoptimized and maximum lysozyme binding capacity was found to be 278.8 mg g$^{−1}$ polymer in pH 7.0 phosphate buffer at 25$^{\\circ}$C. Desorption and reusability properties of the nanoparticles were investigated and lysozyme adsorption efficiency did not change significantly at the end of the 10 successive reuses.

  2. Adsoption Model of Mercury in the Water-Sediment Systems in Riam Kanan Dam, South Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utami Irawati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Riam Kanan  Dam reservoir is one of living source for the people of South Kalimantan and has a strategic value for their prosperity. Traditional and illegal mining activities nearby the area of this dam may cause heavy metals pollution, such as mercury (Hg in the water and sediment. This research was conducted to predict  the adsorption model of mercury (Hg in water and sediment system in Riam Kanan reservoir  Banjar regency.  The modeling was carried out by analyzing the content of mercury (Hg in the water  and sediments. The result was then plotted into Freundlich and Langmuir models. The determination coefficient for each of the models were 0.947 and 0.388 respectively. It can be concluded that the transport of mercury (Hg from water bodies  onto the sediment complies with Freundlich model.

  3. CO2 adsorption on chemically modified activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, Burcu Selen; Aksoylu, A Erhan

    2013-05-15

    CO2 adsorption capacity of a commercial activated carbon was improved by using HNO3 oxidation, air oxidation, alkali impregnation and heat treatment under helium gas atmosphere. The surface functional groups produced were investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (DRIFTS). CO2 adsorption capacities of the samples were determined by gravimetric analyses for 25-200°C temperature range. DRIFTS studies revealed the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the HNO3 oxidized adsorbents. Increased aromatization and uniform distribution of the Na particles were observed on the samples prepared by Na2CO3 impregnation onto HNO3 oxidized AC support. The adsorption capacities of the nonimpregnated samples were increased by high temperature helium treatments or by increasing the adsorption temperature; both leading to decomposition of surface oxygen groups, forming sites that can easily adsorb CO2. The adsorption capacity loss due to cyclic adsorption/desorption procedures was overcome with further surface stabilization of Na2CO3 modified samples with high temperature He treatments. With Na2CO3 impregnation the mass uptakes of the adsorbents at 20 bars and 25 °C were improved by 8 and 7 folds and at 1 bar were increased 15 and 16 folds, on the average, compared to their air oxidized and nitric acid oxidized supports, respectively. PMID:23500788

  4. Compressibility of Mercury's dayside magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, J.; Wan, W. X.; Wei, Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Rong, Z. J.; Chai, L. H.; Han, X. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Mercury is experiencing significant variations of solar wind forcing along its large eccentric orbit. With 12 Mercury years of data from Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging, we demonstrate that Mercury's distance from the Sun has a great effect on the size of the dayside magnetosphere that is much larger than the temporal variations. The mean solar wind standoff distance was found to be about 0.27 Mercury radii (RM) closer to the Mercury at perihelion than at aphelion. At perihelion the subsolar magnetopause can be compressed below 1.2 RM of ~2.5% of the time. The relationship between the average magnetopause standoff distance and heliocentric distance suggests that on average the effects of the erosion process appears to counter balance those of induction in Mercury's interior at perihelion. However, at aphelion, where solar wind pressure is lower and Alfvénic Mach number is higher, the effects of induction appear dominant.

  5. Plane Mercury librations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction. In 1988 I. Kholin [1] has developed a precision method of determination of parameters of rotation of planets on complex radar-tracking observations on two radio telescopes making base and definitely carried on surface of the Earth. His American colleagues for the period approximately in 4 with small year have executed a series of radar-tracking measurements on a method and I. Kholin's program [2] and have obtained for the specified period 21 values of angular velocity of rotation of this planet [3]. With the help of numerical integration of the equations of rotary motion on the found values they managed to determine with high accuracy the basic dynamic parameter in the theory of Mercury librations (B - A)•Cm = (2.03± 0.12) × 10-4 and the corresponding to it the value of amplitude of the basic librations35"8 ± 2"1. These results have served as convincing arguments for the benefit of the Peale's assumption, that a core of Mercury is liquid, or in partially molten [4]. Authors also managed to obtain for the first time parameters of resonant librations in a longitude which opening from radar observations was predicted earlier [5]. Its amplitude makes about 300", the period is equal approximately to 12 years. In the paper [6] parameters of the perturbed rotational motion have been determined with the help of the analytical theory and with formal using of results of mentioned work [3] on determination of 21 values of angular velocity of Mercury. In result the estimations of amplitudes of forced librations of first five harmonics with the periods: 87.97 d, 43.99 d, 29.33 d, 21.99 d and 17.59 d have been obtained. The appropriate amplitudes make values:34"05 ± 1"27, 3"59 ± 0"13, 0"354 ± 0"013, 0"072 ± 0"003 and 0"016 ± 0"001. The amplitude and the period of free librations of Mercury in a longitude are determined: 290"9 ± 67"0 and 12.37 ± 0.23 yr, consequently. The phase of this variation has made28401 ± 1402. In the paper we construct the similar

  6. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  7. ADSORPTION OF PHENOL IN NON—AQUEOUS SYSTEM BASED ON HYDROGEN—BONDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUMancai; SHIZuoqing; 等

    2000-01-01

    Two hydrogen-bonding adsorbents-macroporous crosslinked poly(P-nitrostyrene)and poly(p-vinylbenzyl amide)-were synthesized,and the adsorption property of phenol from cyclohexane solution onto the adsorbents was studied,The differential adsorption heasts for varied adsorption capacities calculated from the adsorption isotherms according to the Claperyron-Clausius equation lay in the range of hydrogen bond energy (8-50kJ/mol),The adsorption capaccity of o-nitrophenol in cyclohexane was moch less than that of phenol under the same condition.The adsorption capacity of phenol from cyclohexane onto polyacrylonitrile was much less than that onto poly(p-nitrostyrene)or poly(p-vinylbenzyl amide),All these results revealed that adsorption of phenol from cyclohexane by poly(p-nitrostyrene) or poly(p-vinylbenzyl amide)is based on hydrogen-bonding.

  8. Kinetic studies of uranyl ion adsorption on acrylonitrile (AN) / polyethylene glycol (PEG) interpenetrating networks (IPN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of the adsorption of uranyl ions on amidoximated acrylonitrile (AN)/ polyethylene glycol (PEG) interpenetrating network (IPNs) from aqueous solutions was studied as a function of time and temperature. Adsorption analyses were performed for definite uranyl ion concentrations of 1x10-2M and at four different temperatures as 290K, 298K, 308K and 318K. Adsorption time was increased from zero to 48 hours. Adsorption capacities of uranyl ions by PEG/AN IPNS were determined by gamma spectrometer. The results indicate that adsorption capacity increases linearly with increasing temperature. The max adsorption capacity was found as 602 mgu/g IPN at 308K. Adsorption rate was evaluated from the curve plotted of adsorption capacity versus time, for each temperature. Rate constants for uranyl ions adsorption on amidoximated ipns were calculated for 290K, 298K, 308K and 318K at the solution concentration of 1x10-2M . The results showed that as the temperature increases the rate constant increases exponentially too. The mean activation energy of uranyl ions adsorption was found as 34.6 kJ/mole by using arrhenius equation. (author)

  9. 利用DMO-M离子交换树脂除去稀溶液中的汞%Removal of Mercury from Dilute Aqueous Solution Using Mercaptoacetimide of Aminophenol Resin Duolite A-7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.S.Zhu(朱长生); Z.K.Duan(段正康); Z.S.Liu; G.L.Rempel

    2004-01-01

    A mercaptan - containing resin, DMO- M, with high redox capacity- 6.00 mequiv / g, prepared by reacting mercaptoacetyl chloride with the aminophenol resin Duolite A-7 in free-base form has been used to remove mercury in dilute aqueous solution. The resin has high mercury removal capacity; 1200mg/g. Sodium chloride affects the equilibrium sorption of mercury on the resin. At lower pH values, below 1.76, mercury sorption of the resin was greatly reduced. The sorbed mercury is partially removed by 2 mol/L HCl solution containing 5 % thiourea.

  10. Effect of agitation speed on adsorption of imidacloprid on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorptive characteristics of imidacloprid on powdered activated carbon were described. The adsorption experiments were carried out as function of time, initial concentration and agitation speed. The equilibrium data fits well to Langmuir adsorption isotherm, while the kinetic data fits well to Pseudo second order kinetic model. The kinetic experiments were carried out at 200, 250, 300 and 350 rpm and it was found that the equilibrium time increases with increase in initial concentration and decreases with increase in agitation speed. This is due to the increased turbulence and as a consequence, the decrease boundary layer thickness around the adsorbent particles as a result of increasing the degree of mixing. At 300 rpm the adsorption capacity was maximum and beyond this there was no significant increase in adsorption capacity. Weber intra particle diffusion model was used to describe the adsorption mechanism. It was found that both the boundary layer and intra particle diffusion for both adsorbents played important role in the adsorption mechanisms of the adsorbate. The effects of temperature and pH on adsorption were also studied. It was found that the adsorption capacity of the adsorbent decreases with increase in temperature. There was no significant change in adsorption from pH 2 to 8, however at high pH a decrease in adsorption of imidacloprid on activated carbon was observed. (author)

  11. Batch studies of adsorption of copper and lead on activated carbon from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn. Bark

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phussadee Patnukao; Apipreeya Kongsuwan; Prasert Pavasant

    2008-01-01

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) prepared from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn. bark was tested for its adsorption capacity for Cu(Ⅱ) and Pb(Ⅱ). The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of pH, contact time, initial metal concentration, and temperature. The best adsorption of both Cu(Ⅱ) and Pb(Ⅱ) occurred at pH 5, where the adsorption reached equilibrium within 45 min for the whole range of initial heavy metal concentrations (0.1-10 mmol/L). The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second order model where equilibrium adsorption capacities and adsorption rate constants increased with initial heavy metal concentrations. The adsorption isotherm followed Langmuir better than Freundlich models within the temperature range (25-60℃). The maximum adsorption capacities (qm) occurred at 60℃, where qm for Cu(Ⅱ) and Pb(Ⅱ) were 0.85 and 0.89 mmol/g, respectively. The enthalpies of Cu(Ⅱ) and Pb(Ⅱ) adsorption were 43.26 and 58.77 kJ/mol, respectively. The positive enthalpy of adsorption indicated an endothermic nature of the adsorption.

  12. The adsorption behavior of functional particles modified by polyvinylimidazole for Cu(II) ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruixin; Men, Jiying; Gao, Baojiao [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, North University of China, Taiyuan (China)

    2012-03-15

    In this paper, a novel composite material the silica grafted by poly(N-vinyl imidazole) (PVI), i.e., PVI/SiO{sub 2}, was prepared using 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (MPS) as intermedia through the ''grafting from'' method. The adsorption behavior of metal ions by PVI/SiO{sub 2} was researched by both static and dynamic methods. Experimental results showed that PVI/SiO{sub 2} possessed very strong adsorption ability for metal ions. For different metal ions, PVI/SiO{sub 2} exhibited different adsorption abilities with the following order of adsorption capacity: Cu{sup 2+}> Cd{sup 2+}> Zn{sup 2+}. The adsorption material PVI/SiO{sub 2} was especially good at adsorbing Cu(II) ion and the saturated adsorption capacity could reach up to 49.2 mg/g. The empirical Freundlich isotherm was found to describe well the equilibrium adsorption data. Higher temperatures facilitated the adsorption process and thus increased the adsorption capacity. The pH and grafting amount of PVI had great influence on the adsorption amount. In addition, PVI/SiO{sub 2} particles had excellent eluting and regenerating property using diluted hydrochloric acid solution as eluent. The adsorption ability trended to steady during 10 cycles. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. MERCURY SPECIATION AND CAPTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    In December 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) announced its intent to regulate mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utility steam generating plants. Maximum achievable control technology (MACT) requirements are to be proposed by December 2003 and finali...

  14. Adsorbent for p-phenylenediamine adsorption and removal based on graphene oxide functionalized with magnetic cyclodextrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Magnetic β-cyclodextrin-graphene oxide (MCG) show high adsorption capacity. • The maximum adsorption capacity was 1102.58 mg/g at 45 °C and pH 8. • MCG can be easily and fast extracted from water by magnetic attraction. • Removal rate of MCG could reach 98% after three times of adsorption. • Adsorption capacity of MCG remained at 81% after five cycles. - Abstract: Recently, graphene oxide (GO) based magnetic nanocomposites have been widely used in an adsorption-based process for the removal of organic pollutants from the water system. In this study, magnetic β-cyclodextrin-graphene oxide nanocomposites (MCG) were synthesized according to covalent binding of magnetic β-cyclodextrin nanoparticles onto the GO surface and the as-made nanocomposites were successfully applied as adsorbents for the adsorption and removal of p-phenylenediamines (PPD). The composition and morphology of prepared materials were characterized by Fourier infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Effects of pH, temperature, time and reusability on the adsorption of PPD were investigated, as well as the kinetics and isotherms parameters of the adsorbents were determined. The results indicated that the maximum adsorption capacity of MCG was 1102.58 mg/g at 45 °C and pH 8. The adsorption capacity remained at 81% after five cycles. Removal rate could reach 98% after three times of adsorption. The adsorption process with PPD was found that fitted pseudo-second-order kinetics equations and the Langmuir adsorption model. The results showed the MCG had a good adsorption ability to remove organic pollutants in wastewater

  15. Adsorbent for p-phenylenediamine adsorption and removal based on graphene oxide functionalized with magnetic cyclodextrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dongxue; Liu, Liangliang; Jiang, Xinyu; Yu, Jingang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chen, Xiaohong [Collaborative Innovation Center of Resource-conserving & Environment-friendly Society and Ecological Civilization, Changsha, 410083 (China); Chen, Xiaoqing, E-mail: xqchen@csu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Resource-conserving & Environment-friendly Society and Ecological Civilization, Changsha, 410083 (China)

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • Magnetic β-cyclodextrin-graphene oxide (MCG) show high adsorption capacity. • The maximum adsorption capacity was 1102.58 mg/g at 45 °C and pH 8. • MCG can be easily and fast extracted from water by magnetic attraction. • Removal rate of MCG could reach 98% after three times of adsorption. • Adsorption capacity of MCG remained at 81% after five cycles. - Abstract: Recently, graphene oxide (GO) based magnetic nanocomposites have been widely used in an adsorption-based process for the removal of organic pollutants from the water system. In this study, magnetic β-cyclodextrin-graphene oxide nanocomposites (MCG) were synthesized according to covalent binding of magnetic β-cyclodextrin nanoparticles onto the GO surface and the as-made nanocomposites were successfully applied as adsorbents for the adsorption and removal of p-phenylenediamines (PPD). The composition and morphology of prepared materials were characterized by Fourier infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Effects of pH, temperature, time and reusability on the adsorption of PPD were investigated, as well as the kinetics and isotherms parameters of the adsorbents were determined. The results indicated that the maximum adsorption capacity of MCG was 1102.58 mg/g at 45 °C and pH 8. The adsorption capacity remained at 81% after five cycles. Removal rate could reach 98% after three times of adsorption. The adsorption process with PPD was found that fitted pseudo-second-order kinetics equations and the Langmuir adsorption model. The results showed the MCG had a good adsorption ability to remove organic pollutants in wastewater.

  16. Studies on adsorption of carbon dioxide on alkaline paper mill waste using cyclic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • 9–12 h adsorption of CO2 in the 1st cycle increases cyclic CO2 adsorption of APMW. • Repeated prolonged adsorptions in cycles are feasible to capture CO2 using APMW. • Prolonged adsorption increases pores in 10–100 nm of APMW after desorption of CO2. - Abstract: The adsorption/desorption cycles of the alkaline paper mill waste (APMW) can be used to remove CO2 from coal-fired power plants. In this work, the prolonged adsorption duration treatment was used to modify CO2 capture behavior of the raw and the prewashed APMW in the multiple adsorption/desorption cycles. The effects of increased duration of adsorption and CO2 partial pressure in the first cycle on the fractional adsorption of CO2 and adsorption rate were investigated, when the raw and the prewashed APMW are employed as the sorbents. The cyclic CO2 capture behavior of APMW after the repeated prolonged adsorption in different cycles was also studied. For the raw and the prewashed APMW as the sorbents, 9–12 h adsorption of CO2 just in the 1st cycle enhances the cyclic fractional adsorption of CO2 and adsorption rate of CO2 in the 1st cycle and the subsequent cycles. The repeated prolonged adsorptions in the various cycles are more effective to increase the cyclic CO2 capture capacity of APMW than only in the 1st cycle. The longer adsorption duration results in larger area and volume of pores in 10–100 nm in diameter for CaO derived from APMW after the next cycles, which are helpful to cyclic CO2 capture of APMW. The raw and the prewashed APMW can retain high CO2 adsorption reactivity by the prolonged adsorption duration treatment in the multiple adsorption/desorption cycles

  17. 汞暴露对草鱼氧化损伤及抗氧化能力的影响%Effect of mercury on oxidative damage and antioxidant capacity of Ctenopharyngodon idellus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘占才; 牛景彦; 郭彦玲; 孔祥会

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of Hg 2+on oxidative damage and antioxidant capacity of grass carp ( Ctenopharyngodon idellus) .The experimental fish were divided into control and treatment groups .The control group fish was raised in cultivated water , while the treatment group fish was exposed to 0.5 mg· L-1 Hg2+for 24 hours first, and then transferred in cultivated water .Afterwards, they were sampled at 0 (24 h Hg2+exposure), 5, 12, 21 d to test the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathion and peroxidase (GPx) activities as well as glutathione ( GSH) and malondialdehyde ( MDA) contents in their gill , hepatopancreas , spleen and kid-ney.It was shown that compared with the control group , the SOD, GPx activities (0, 5 d), CAT activity (0, 5, 12 d) and GSH (5 d), MDA (5, 12, 21 d) contents in gill in treatment group increased significantly (P0.05).While, the GSH content (0 d) was lowered significantly(P<0.01),and the GSH (12 d) and MDA(0 d) contents were elevated remarkably (P<0.05).The SOD (0, 5,12 d), GPx(0 d) activities and GSH (12 d), MDA (0 d) contents in kidney in treatment group were increased significantly (P<0.05).Nevertheless,CAT (0,5,12 d) activity and GSH(0,5 d) content were decreased remarkably ( P<0.05 ) .This test indicated that for grass carp , the SOD and CAT activities of organ tissues were recovered to the normal level .In hepatopancreas , GSH content exceeded the control group level ( P<0.01 ) , and MDA content was significantly lower than that of control group ( P<0.05 ) , but the GPx activity and MDA content in gill seemed unable to recover to the level of control group in the experimental period .%将草鱼分为对照组和处理组,对照组试验期内置于正常养殖用水中饲养,处理组先暴露在Hg2+浓度为0.5 mg· L-1水体中,24 h后置于正常养殖用水中进行恢复饲养。各组分别于恢复饲养0(即Hg2+暴露24 h)、5、12、21 d取样,测定鳃、肝胰脏、

  18. Mercury Information Clearinghouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad A. Wocken; Michael J. Holmes; Dennis L. Laudal; Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; Greg F. Weber; Nicholas V. C. Ralston; Stanley J. Miller; Grant E. Dunham; Edwin S. Olson; Laura J. Raymond; John H. Pavlish; Everett A. Sondreal; Steven A. Benson

    2006-03-31

    The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) identified a need and contracted the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to create and maintain an information clearinghouse on global research and development activities related to mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. With the support of CEA, the Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the EERC developed comprehensive quarterly information updates that provide a detailed assessment of developments in the various areas of mercury monitoring, control, policy, and research. A total of eight topical reports were completed and are summarized and updated in this final CEA quarterly report. The original quarterly reports can be viewed at the CEA Web site (www.ceamercuryprogram.ca). In addition to a comprehensive update of previous mercury-related topics, a review of results from the CEA Mercury Program is provided. Members of Canada's coal-fired electricity generation sector (ATCO Power, EPCOR, Manitoba Hydro, New Brunswick Power, Nova Scotia Power Inc., Ontario Power Generation, SaskPower, and TransAlta) and CEA, have compiled an extensive database of information from stack-, coal-, and ash-sampling activities. Data from this effort are also available at the CEA Web site and have provided critical information for establishing and reviewing a mercury standard for Canada that is protective of environment and public health and is cost-effective. Specific goals outlined for the CEA mercury program included the following: (1) Improve emission inventories and develop management options through an intensive 2-year coal-, ash-, and stack-sampling program; (2) Promote effective stack testing through the development of guidance material and the support of on-site training on the Ontario Hydro method for employees, government representatives, and contractors on an as-needed basis; (3) Strengthen laboratory analytical capabilities through

  19. Adsorption of Cadmium By Silica Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moftah Ali

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption process depends on initial concentration of Cd2+ and ratio of  chitosan in adsorbent. The present study deals with the competitive adsorption of Cd2+ ion onto silica graft with chitosan. Batch adsorption experiments were performed at five different initial Cd2+ concentrations (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 ppm, on five different proportion from silica to chitosan (100%, 95%, 85%, 75% and 65% as adsorbent at pH 5. In the recovery process, the high recovery at 0.5 mg and observed the recovery decrease with increasing the initial concentration of Cd2+, and the low recovery at 0.25 mg from Cd2+. In this study, the adsorption capacity of Cd2+ in regard to the ratio of silica and chitosan hybrid adsorbents are examined in detail. The aim of this study to explore effects of initial concentrations of Cd2+, and the ratio of silica to chitosan on the adsorption and recovery of Cd2+.

  20. Adsorption behavior of heavy metals on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamisawa, Mayumi; Minamisawa, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Shoichiro; Takai, Nobuharu

    2004-09-01

    We have investigated adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) at pH 2-6.7 onto the biomaterials chitosan, coffee, green tea, tea, yuzu, aloe, and Japanese coarse tea, and onto the inorganic adsorbents, activated carbon and zeolite. High adsorptive capabilities were observed for all of the biomaterials at pH 4 and 6.7. In the adsorption of Cd(II), blend coffee, tea, green tea, and coarse tea have comparable loading capacities to activated carbon and zeolite. Although activated carbon, zeolite, and chitosan are utilized in a variety of fields such as wastewater treatment, chemical and metallurgical engineering, and analytical chemistry, these adsorbents are costly. On the other hand, processing of the test biomaterials was inexpensive, and all the biomaterials except for chitosan were able to adsorb large amounts of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions after a convenient pretreatment of washing with water followed by drying. The high adsorption capability of the biomaterials prepared from plant materials is promising in the development of a novel, low-cost adsorbent. From these results, it is concluded that heavy metal removal using biomaterials would be an effective method for the economic treatment of wastewater. The proposed adsorption method was applied to the determination of amounts of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water samples. PMID:15373400

  1. Research of Porization and Adsorptions in High-Porous Adsorptive Layers of Vermiculite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Syrmanova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption capacity of the adsorbent is dependent on the concentration of the substance in the liquid or vapor phase, its partial pressure, temperature, and the initial state of the adsorbent. At the swelling a cellular porous structure is formed, total porosity that connects with the entered number and the content of the gaseous component masses. The rheological characteristics of porous masses have the decisive effect on the porous structure. Common state for all versions of swelling is a plastic-viscous porous mass condition during their porization. The interlayer structure and inter-packet intervals may be considered as vermiculite plate micropores with dimensions of 0.3 – 1.2 nm. Vermiculite cation exchange capacity is in the range of 100-150 mEq / 100 g, i.e. from clay minerals it is one of the most interchangeable. The research results of the internal structure of adsorption layers by the adsorption isotherms means indicative of the internal surface of the porous layer is characterized by an extremely complex and developed form and can be described by means of fractal geometry. A model of the geometric structure of mica materials formed in the process of blistering during heat treatment is developed. The presented model has sufficiently general form and can be used both in the organization of systematic experimental studies of porization and adsorption in the adsorption layers of highly porous, and for the porization vermiculite optimization.

  2. Selective adsorption mechanisms of antilipidemic and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug residues on functionalized silica-based porous materials in a mixed solute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyanon, Nakorn; Permrungruang, Jutima; Kaosaiphun, Jidanan; Wongrueng, Aunnop; Ngamcharussrivichai, Chawalit; Punyapalakul, Patiparn

    2015-10-01

    The selective adsorption mechanisms of naproxen (NAP), acetaminophen (ACT), and clofibric acid (CFA) on silica-based porous materials were examined by single and mixed-batch adsorption. Effects of the types and densities of surface functional groups on adsorption capacities were determined, including the role of hydrophobic and hydrophilic dissolved organic matters (DOMs). Hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS), superparamagnetic HMS (HMS-SP) and SBA-15 were functionalized and applied as adsorbents. Compared with powdered activated carbon (PAC), amine-functionalized HMS had a better adsorption capacity for CFA, but PAC possessed a higher adsorption capacity for the other pharmaceuticals than HMS and its two derivatives. In contrast to PAC, the adsorption capacity of the mesoporous silicas varied with the solution pH, being highest at pH 5. Electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding were found to be the main mechanisms. Increase in grafted amine group density on silica surfaces can enhance the CFA adsorption capacity. Further, hydrophilic DOM can decrease CFA adsorption capacities on amino-grafted adsorbents by adsorption site competition, while hydrophobic DOM can interfere with CFA adsorption by the interaction between hydrophobic DOM and CFA. Finally, in a competitive adsorption study, the adsorption capacity of hydrophilic adsorbents for acidic pharmaceuticals varied with their pKa values. PMID:26025186

  3. Efficient adsorption of phenanthrene by simply synthesized hydrophobic MCM-41 molecular sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Simply synthesized template-containing MCM-41 is used for phenanthrene adsorption. • Template-containing MCM-41 has much higher adsorption capacity than pure MCM-41. • The adsorption process follows the liquid/solid phase distribution mechanism. - Abstract: Hydrophobic molecular sieve MCM-41 including surfactant template was synthesized by a simple method. The adsorption properties of this material toward phenanthrene were studied. The effects of adsorbent dose and pH value on the adsorption process as well as the adsorption mechanism and reuse performance were investigated. The template-containing MCM-41 showed a significant adsorption for phenanthrene, due to its hydrophobicity created by the surfactant template in MCM-41. The solution pH had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The adsorption kinetic could be fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption equilibrium was fitted well by the linear model, and the adsorption process followed the liquid/solid phase distribution mechanism. The thermodynamic results indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process

  4. Efficient adsorption of phenanthrene by simply synthesized hydrophobic MCM-41 molecular sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yun, E-mail: huyun@scut.edu.cn; He, Yinyun; Wang, Xiaowen; Wei, Chaohai

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Simply synthesized template-containing MCM-41 is used for phenanthrene adsorption. • Template-containing MCM-41 has much higher adsorption capacity than pure MCM-41. • The adsorption process follows the liquid/solid phase distribution mechanism. - Abstract: Hydrophobic molecular sieve MCM-41 including surfactant template was synthesized by a simple method. The adsorption properties of this material toward phenanthrene were studied. The effects of adsorbent dose and pH value on the adsorption process as well as the adsorption mechanism and reuse performance were investigated. The template-containing MCM-41 showed a significant adsorption for phenanthrene, due to its hydrophobicity created by the surfactant template in MCM-41. The solution pH had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The adsorption kinetic could be fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption equilibrium was fitted well by the linear model, and the adsorption process followed the liquid/solid phase distribution mechanism. The thermodynamic results indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process.

  5. Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Peter L.; Vincent, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy of solar system tests of gravitational theory could be very much improved by range and Doppler measurements to a Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter. A nearly circular orbit at roughly 2400 km altitude is assumed in order to minimize problems with orbit determination and thermal radiation from the surface. The spacecraft is spin-stabilized and has a 30 cm diameter de-spun antenna. With K-band and X-band ranging systems using a 50 MHz offset sidetone at K-band, a range accuracy of 3 cm appears to be realistically achievable. The estimated spacecraft mass is 50 kg. A consider-covariance analysis was performed to determine how well the Earth-Mercury distance as a function of time could be determined with such a Relativity Orbiter. The minimum data set is assumed to be 40 independent 8-hour arcs of tracking data at selected times during a two year period. The gravity field of Mercury up through degree and order 10 is solved for, along with the initial conditions for each arc and the Earth-Mercury distance at the center of each arc. The considered parameters include the gravity field parameters of degree 11 and 12 plus the tracking station coordinates, the tropospheric delay, and two parameters in a crude radiation pressure model. The conclusion is that the Earth-Mercury distance can be determined to 6 cm accuracy or better. From a modified worst-case analysis, this would lead to roughly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in the knowledge of the precession of perihelion, the relativistic time delay, and the possible change in the gravitational constant with time.

  6. Adsorption of uranium from crude phosphoric acid using activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption of uranium from crude phosphoric acid has been investigated using conventional activated carbons. It was found that treatment with nitric acid oxidized the surface of activated carbon and significantly increased the adsorption capacity for uranium in acidic solutions. The parameters that affect the uranium(VI) adsorption, such as contact time, solution pH, initial uranium(VI) concentration, and temperature, have been investigated. Equilibrium data were fitted to a simplified Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms for the oxidized samples which indicate that the uranium adsorption onto the activated carbon fitted well with Langmuir isotherm than Freundlich isotherm. Equilibrium studies evaluate the theoretical capacity of activated carbon to be 45.24 g kg-1. (author)

  7. Adsorption study of copper (II) by chemically modified orange peel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adsorbent, the chemically modified orange peel, was prepared from hydrolysis of the grafted copolymer, which was synthesized by interaction of methyl acrylate with cross-linking orange peel. The presence of poly (acrylic acid) on the biomass surface was verified by infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG). Total negative charge in the biomass surface and the zeta potentials were determined. The modified biomass was found to present high adsorption capacity and fast adsorption rate for Cu (II). From Langmuir isotherm, the adsorption capacity for Cu (II) was 289.0 mg g-1, which is about 6.5 times higher than that of the unmodified biomass. The kinetics for Cu (II) adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. The adsorbent was used to remove Cu (II) from electroplating wastewater and was suitable for repeated use for more than four cycles.

  8. Optimization of salt adsorption rate in membrane capacitive deionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, R; Satpradit, O; Rijnaarts, H H M; Biesheuvel, P M; van der Wal, A

    2013-04-01

    Membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI) is a water desalination technique based on applying a cell voltage between two oppositely placed porous electrodes sandwiching a spacer channel that transports the water to be desalinated. In MCDI, ion-exchange membranes are positioned in front of each porous electrode to prevent co-ions from leaving the electrode region during ion adsorption, thereby enhancing the salt adsorption capacity. MCDI can be operated at constant cell voltage (CV), or at a constant electrical current (CC). In this paper, we present both experimental and theoretical results for desalination capacity and rate in MCDI (both in the CV- and the CC-mode) as function of adsorption/desorption time, salt feed concentration, electrical current, and cell voltage. We demonstrate how by varying each parameter individually, it is possible to systematically optimize the parameter settings of a given system to achieve the highest average salt adsorption rate and water recovery. PMID:23395310

  9. A review on chitosan-based adsorptive membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Ehsan; Daraei, Parisa; Arabi Shamsabadi, Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Membrane adsorbents have emerged as powerful and attractive tools for the removal of hazardous materials such as dyes and heavy metal ions, mainly in trace amounts, from water resources. Among membrane adsorbents, those prepared from or modified with chitosan biopolymer and its derivatives are cases of interest because of chitosan advantages including biocompatibility, biodegradability, nontoxicity, reactivity, film and fiber forming capacity and favorable hydrophilicity. This review is oriented to provide a framework for better insight into fabrication methods and applications of chitosan-based adsorptive membranes. Critical aspects including thermokinetic analyses of adsorption and regeneration capacity of the membrane adsorbents have been also overviewed. Future of chitosan-based adsorptive membranes might include efforts for the improvement of mechanical stability and reusability and also most targeted application of appropriate copolymers as well as nanostructures in preparing high performance adsorptive membranes. PMID:27516289

  10. A mercury transport and fate model (LM2-mercury) for mass budget assessment of mercury cycling in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    LM2-Mercury, a mercury mass balance model, was developed to simulate and evaluate the transport, fate, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. The model simulates total suspended solids (TSS), disolved organic carbon (DOC), and total, elemental, divalent, ...

  11. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-02-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%—samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems.

  12. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-01-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%—samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems. PMID:26832445

  13. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-01-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%--samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems. PMID:26832445

  14. Preparation and adsorption properties of macroporous tannin resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li-ping; Du Jie; Liu Jian

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new kind of adsorption resin with multi-phenolic hydroxyl was created by immobilizing black wattle bark tannins to chloromethyl polystyrene resin. Its adsorption capacity to cation dye was tested. With an orthogonal test the optimal conditions of synthesis were determined: the concentration of sodium hydroxide solution 1.0 mol·L-1; the reaction time is one hour and the mass concentration of tannins 5%. With single factorial experiment the optimal conditions of adsorption were confirmed: a solidified pH of 5.0; an adsorption temperature of 25℃ and a cation dye concentration of 100 mg·L-1. The adsorption for cation dye can be similar to Langmuir isotherms.

  15. Adsorption Cooling System Using Metal-Impregnated Zeolite-4A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsuk Trisupakitti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption cooling systems have been developed to replace vapor compression due to their benefits of being environmentally friendly and energy saving. We prepared zeolite-4A and experimental cooling performance test of zeolite-water adsorption system. The adsorption cooling test-rig includes adsorber, evaporator, and condenser which perform in vacuum atmosphere. The maximum and minimum water adsorption capacity of different zeolites and COP were used to assess the performance of the adsorption cooling system. We found that loading zeolite-4A with higher levels of silver and copper increased COP. The Cu6%/zeolite-4A had the highest COP at 0.56 while COP of zeolite-4A alone was 0.38. Calculating the acceleration rate of zeolite-4A when adding 6% of copper would accelerate the COP at 46%.

  16. Adsorption of basic dye from aqueous solution onto fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.X. Lin; S.L. Zhan; M.H. Fang; X.Q. Qian; H. Yang [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). College of Civil Engineering and Architecture

    2008-04-15

    The fly ash treated by H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was used as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of a typical dye, methylene blue, from aqueous solution. An increase in the specific surface area and dye-adsorption capacity was observed after the acid treatment. The adsorption isotherm and kinetics of the treated fly ash were studied. The experimental results were fitted using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. It shows that the Freundlich isotherm is better in describing the adsorption process. Two kinetic models, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order, were employed to analyze the kinetic data. It was found that the pseudo-second-order model is the better choice to describe the adsorption behavior. The thermodynamic study reveals that the enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup 0}) value is positive (5.63 kJ/mol), suggesting an endothermic nature of the adsorption.

  17. Adsorption of Fluoride Ion by Inorganic Cerium Based Adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao Zhongzhi(焦中志); Chen Zhonglin; Yang Min; Zhang Yu; Li Guibai

    2004-01-01

    Excess of fluoride in drinking water is harmful to human health, the concentration of F- ions must be maintained in the range of 0.5 to 1.5 mg/L. An inorganic cerium based adsorbent (CTA) is developed on the basis of research of adsorption of fluoride on cerium oxide hydrate. Some adsorption of fluoride by CTA adsorbent experiments were carried out, and results showed that CTA adsorbent has a quick adsorption speed and a large adsorption capacity. Adsorption follows Freundlich isotherm, and low pH value helps fluoride removal. Some physical-chemical characteristics of CTA adsorbent were experimented, fluoride removal mechanism was explored, and results showed that hydroxyl group of CTA adsorbent played an important role in the fluoride removal.

  18. Application of activated carbon derived from scrap tires for adsorption of Rhodamine B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Liu, Shuangxi; Zhu, Tan

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon derived from solid hazardous waste scrap tires was evaluated as a potential adsorbent for cationic dye removal. The adsorption process with respect to operating parameters was investigated to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of the activated pyrolytic tire char (APTC) for Rhodamine B (RhB). Systematic research including equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic studies was performed. The results showed that APTC was a potential adsorbent for RhB with a higher adsorption capacity than most adsorbents. Solution pH and temperature exert significant influence while ionic strength showed little effect on the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data obey Langmuir isotherm and the kinetic data were well described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process followed intra-particle diffusion model with more than one process affecting the adsorption process. Thermodynamic study confirmed that the adsorption was a physisorption process with spontaneous, endothermic and random characteristics. PMID:21179969

  19. Effects of xenobiotics on total antioxidant capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Carlos Kusano Bucalen

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article was to review the effects of xenobiotics on total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Measurement of TAC is appropriate for evaluation of the total antioxidant defenses of blood, cells, and different kinds of tissues and organs. TAC is reduced by alcoholism, smoking, and exposure to radiation, herbicides, carbon monoxide, carbon tetrachloride, lead, arsenic, mercury, cadmium, aluminum, and other toxic elements. The test is also an important tool in evaluating environment...

  20. Adsorption of ammonium dinitramide (ADN) from aqueous solutions. 1. Adsorption on powdered activated charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, G; Venkatachalam, S; Ninan, K N; Sadhana, R; Alwan, S; Abarna, V; Joseph, M A

    2003-03-17

    Investigations on the adsorption of ammonium dinitramide (NH(4)N(NO(2))(2)) (ADN) from aqueous solutions on powdered activated charcoal (PAC) were carried out in order to find out an effective and easier method of separating ADN from aqueous solutions. The effectiveness of PAC in the selective adsorption of ADN from aqueous solutions of ADN (ADN-F) and ADN in presence of sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) ions (ADN-PS) was examined and compared using batch and column methods. The adsorption process follows both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms and the isotherm parameters for the models were determined. The observed data favor the formation of monolayer adsorption. The adsorption capacities were found to be 63.3, 119, 105.3 and 82 mg of ADN per g of PAC for ADN-F (batch), ADN-PS (batch), ADN-F (column) and ADN-PS (column), respectively. Break-through curves for ADN-F and ADN-PS were obtained for the optimization of separation of ADN from aqueous solutions. Elution curves were generated for the desorption of ADN from PAC using hot water as eluent. PMID:12628781

  1. Incorporating functional groups on the structure of Acrylic fibers for adsorption of metal ionic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Common commercial acrylic fibers were modified by incorporating different suitable ion adsorbing functional groups into their structures. To study the ion adsorption ability of modified fibers against ionic compounds, the raw fibers were treated with hydroxylamine, hydrazine and urea. The new incorporated functional groups were characterized and appropriate formula for each reaction was suggested. In order to evaluate the ion adsorption capacity of the system, the modified fibers were immersed in separated metal salt solutions. The results show that the samples modified by hydroxylamine, have higher adsorption capacity than others, however, by pretreatment with hydrazine or urea not only the functional groups were increased but also the efficiency of the adsorption was improved

  2. Potential theory of adsorption for associating mixtures: possibilities and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Martin Gamel; Shapiro, Alexander; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    describe the solid-fluid interactions. The potential is extended to include adsorbate-absorbent specific capacities rather than an adsorbent specific capacity. Correlations of pure component isotherms are generally excellent with individual capacities, although adsorption on silicas at different...... the binary mixtures only contain associating compounds. Predictions are typically improved by about 3% when individual capacities are employed, but improvements can in some cases be as large as 45%. When individual capacities and the best performing EoS are used, average absolute deviations of the...

  3. Adsorption of phenol and chlorophenols on pure and modified sepiolite

    OpenAIRE

    Yildiz, A; A. GÜR

    2007-01-01

    In this work, pure sepiolite and sepiolite modified by nitric acid (HNO3), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium (HDTMA) were used ad adsorbents. The changes on the surface were studied by IR spectroscopy. The adsorption of solutions of phenol and phenol derivatives in pure ethanol on these adsorbents were examined by means of gas chromatography. It was found that the adsorption capacities of the clay–organic complexes (sepiolite–EDTA and sepiolite–HDTMA) were...

  4. The Adsorption Effect of Quaternized Chitosan Derivatives on Bile Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Xian MENG; Ya Qing FENG; Wen Jin LI; Cai Xia YIN; Jin Ping DENG

    2006-01-01

    Three quaternized chitosan derivatives were synthesized and their adsorption performance of bile acid from aqueous solution was studied. The adsorption capacities and rates of bile acid onto quaternized chitosan derivatives were evaluated. The kinetic experimental data properly correlated with the second-order kinetic model, which indicated that the chemical sorption is the rate-limiting step. The results showed that the quaternized chitosan derivatives are favorable adsorbents for bile acid.

  5. Removal of Textile Dyestufes From Wastewater by Adsorptive Biodegradation

    OpenAIRE

    KAPDAN, İlgi KARAPINAR; KARGI, Fikret

    2000-01-01

    Removal of dyestuffs from a synthetic wastewater by adsorptive biodegradation was investigated in this study. The dyestuff adsorption capacities of granular, powdered activated carbon (GAC and PAC) and low-cost adsorbents such as zeolite, wood chips and wood ash were evaluated in order to obtain a low-cost adsorbent for use in an activated sludge unit. Then various activated sludge cultures were tested for biodegradation of a selected dyestuff. An activated sludge unit with the selected activ...

  6. Novel modified pectin for heavy metal adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Ting Li; Hong Yang; Yan Zhao; Ran Xu

    2007-01-01

    Modified pectin cross-linked with adipic acid, was synthesized and used for heavy metal removal from wastewater. SEM and FrIR were used to investigate its structure and morphology. The modified pectin had a rough, porous phase covered with carboxy groups, resulting a high adsorption capacity. And at the room temperature, the saturated loading capacity for Pb2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ reached 1.82 mmol/g, 1.794 mmol/g and 0.964 mmol/g, respectively. The results proved its potential application to remove of the heavy metal.

  7. Mercury extrusion from linear-chain mercury compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence is present from differential thermal analysis to show that mercury is extruded from the linear-chain mercury compound Hg/sub 2.86/AsF6 and Hg/sub 1.91/SbF6 when cooled below 200 K. The anisotropic superconductivity observed recently in Hg/sub 2.86/AsF6 is shown to result from extruded mercury

  8. Mercury's exosphere: observations during MESSENGER's First Mercury flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, William E; Bradley, E Todd; Vervack, Ronald J; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Izenberg, Noam R; Solomon, Sean C

    2008-07-01

    During MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer measured Mercury's exospheric emissions, including those from the antisunward sodium tail, calcium and sodium close to the planet, and hydrogen at high altitudes on the dayside. Spatial variations indicate that multiple source and loss processes generate and maintain the exosphere. Energetic processes connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric interaction with the planet likely played an important role in determining the distributions of exospheric species during the flyby. PMID:18599778

  9. adsorption, eosin, humic, peat

    OpenAIRE

    Anshar, Andi Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Eosin is one of the dyes commonly used in the industry and has the potential to cause pollution of the water environment. The Eosin pollution treatment methods used in this study was the adsorption method using humin fraction obtained from the peat land comes from Kalimantan. From the research data showed that the adsorption of eosin in humin result of washing with HCl / HF optimum at pH 4 and a contact time of 60 minutes with the adsorption-order rate was 8,4 x 10-3 min-1

  10. Probing Capacity

    CERN Document Server

    Asnani, Himanshu; Weissman, Tsachy

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of optimal probing of states of a channel by transmitter and receiver for maximizing rate of reliable communication. The channel is discrete memoryless (DMC) with i.i.d. states. The encoder takes probing actions dependent on the message. It then uses the state information obtained from probing causally or non-causally to generate channel input symbols. The decoder may also take channel probing actions as a function of the observed channel output and use the channel state information thus acquired, along with the channel output, to estimate the message. We refer to the maximum achievable rate for reliable communication for such systems as the 'Probing Capacity'. We characterize this capacity when the encoder and decoder actions are cost constrained. To motivate the problem, we begin by characterizing the trade-off between the capacity and fraction of channel states the encoder is allowed to observe, while the decoder is aware of channel states. In this setting of 'to observe or not to o...

  11. Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products Share Tweet Linkedin ... situations, criminal prosecution. back to top Dangers of Mercury Exposure to mercury can have serious health consequences. ...

  12. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-01-01

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  13. Trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption using sustainable organic mulch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soluble substrates (electron donors) have been commonly injected into chlorinated solvent contaminated plume to stimulate reductive dechlorination. Recently, different types of organic mulches with economic advantages and sustainable benefits have received much attention as new supporting materials that can provide long term sources of electron donors for chlorinated solvent bioremediation in engineered biowall systems. However, sorption capacities of organic mulches for chlorinated solvents have not been studied yet. In this study, the physiochemical properties of organic mulches (pine, hardwood and cypress mulches) were measured and their adsorption capacity as a potential media was elucidated. Single, binary and quaternary isotherm tests were conducted with trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trans-dichloroethylene (trans-DCE) and cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE). Among the three tested mulches, pine mulch showed the highest sorption capacity for the majority of the tested chemicals in single isotherm test. In binary or quaternary isotherm tests, competition among chemicals appears to diminish the differences in Qe for tested mulches. However, pine mulch also showed higher adsorption capacity for most chemicals when compared to hardwood and cypress mulches in the two isotherm tests. Based upon physicochemical properties of the three mulches, higher sorption capacity of pine mulch over hardwood and cypress mulches appears to be attributed to a higher organic carbon content and the lower polarity.

  14. Effects of Humidity Swings on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization: Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Air purification systems are necessary to provide clean air in the closed environments aboard spacecraft. Trace contaminants are removed using adsorption. One major factor concerning the removal of trace contaminants is relative humidity. Water can reduce adsorption capacity and, due to constant fluctuations, its presence is difficult to incorporate into adsorption column designs. The purpose of the research was to allow for better design techniques in trace contaminant adsorption systems, especially for feeds with water present. Experiments and mathematical modeling research on effects of humidity swings on adsorption columns for air revitalization were carried out.

  15. Adsorption and regenerative oxidation of trichlorophenol with synthetic zeolite: Ozone dosage and its influence on adsorption performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongjun; Prigent, Bastien; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2016-07-01

    Regeneration of loaded adsorbents is a key step for the sustainability of an adsorption process. In this study, ozone was applied to regenerate a synthetic zeolite for the adsorption of trichlorophenol (TCP) as an organic model pollutant. Three initial concentrations of TCP in water phase were used in adsorption tests. After the equilibrium, zeolite loaded different amounts of TCP was dried and then regenerated with ozone gas. It was found that the adsorption capacity of zeolite was increased through three regeneration cycles. However, the adsorption kinetics was compromised after the regeneration with slightly declined 2nd order reaction constants. The ozone demand for the regeneration was highly dependent on the TCP mass loaded onto the zeolite. It was estimated that the mass ratio of ozone to TCP was 1.2 ± 0.3 g O3/g TCP. PMID:27043379

  16. Comment on "Selective adsorption of tannins onto hide collagen fibres"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuh-Shan; Ho

    2005-01-01

    In a recent publication by Liao et al.[1], the section 1.3 Modeling of adsorption kinetics, authors mentioned a pseudo- second-order model from eq. (3) to eq. (5). In fact, the second order kinetic expression for the adsorption systems of divalent metal ions using sphagnum moss peat has been reported by Ho[2]. In order to distinguish the kinetics equation based on adsorption capacity of solid from concentration of solution, Ho's second order rate expression has been named pseudo-second order[2-5]. The most frequently cited papers were published in Chemical Engineering Journal[3], Process Biochemistry[4] and Water Research[5].……

  17. Comment on "Selective adsorption of tannins onto hide collagen fibres"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuh-Shan Ho

    2005-01-01

    @@ In a recent publication by Liao et al.[1], the section 1.3 Modeling of adsorption kinetics, authors mentioned a pseudo- second-order model from eq. (3) to eq. (5). In fact, the second order kinetic expression for the adsorption systems of divalent metal ions using sphagnum moss peat has been reported by Ho[2]. In order to distinguish the kinetics equation based on adsorption capacity of solid from concentration of solution, Ho's second order rate expression has been named pseudo-second order[2-5]. The most frequently cited papers were published in Chemical Engineering Journal[3], Process Biochemistry[4] and Water Research[5].

  18. Adsorption characteristics of water vapor on ferroaluminophosphate for desalination cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Youngdeuk

    2014-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of microporous ferroaluminophosphate adsorbent (FAM-Z01, Mitsubishi Plastics) are evaluated for possible application in adsorption desalination and cooling (AD) cycles. A particular interest is its water vapor uptake behavior at assorted adsorption temperatures and pressures whilst comparing them to the commercial silica gels of AD plants. The surface characteristics are first carried out using N2 gas adsorption followed by the water vapor uptake analysis for temperature ranging from 20°C to 80°C. We propose a hybrid isotherm model, composing of the Henry and the Sips isotherms, which can be integrated to satisfactorily fit the experimental data of water adsorption on the FAM-Z01. The hybrid model is selected to fit the unusual isotherm shapes, that is, a low adsorption in the initial section and followed by a rapid vapor uptake leading to a likely micropore volume filling by hydrogen bonding and cooperative interaction in micropores. It is shown that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of FAM-Z01 can be up to 5 folds higher than that of conventional silica gels. Owing to the quantum increase in the adsorbate uptake, the FAM-Z01 has the potential to significantly reduce the footprint of an existing AD plant for the same output capacity. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Adsorption Refrigeration Performance of Shaped MIL-101-Water Working Pair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芮征球; 李全国; 崔群; 王海燕; 陈海军; 姚虎卿

    2014-01-01

    A new metal-organic framework of MIL-101 was synthesized by hydrothermal method and the powder prepared was pressed into a desired shape. The effects of molding on specific surface area and pore structure were investigated using a nitrogen adsorption method. The water adsorption isotherms were obtained by high vacuum gravimetric method, the desorption temperature of water on shaped MIL-101 was measured by thermo gravimetric analyzer, and the adsorption refrigeration performance of shaped MIL-101-water working pair was studied on the simulation device of adsorption refrigeration cycle system. The results indicate that an apparent hysteresis loop ap-pears in the nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms when the forming pressure is 10 MPa. The equilibrium ad-sorption capacity of water is up to 0.95 kg·kg-1 at the forming pressure of 3 MPa (MIL-101-3). The desorption peak temperature of water on MIL-101-3 is 82 °C, which is 7 °C lower than that of silica gel, and the desorption temperature is no more than 100 °C. At the evaporation temperature of 10 °C, the refrigeration capacity of MIL-101-3-water is 1059 kJ·kg-1, which is 2.24 times higher than that of silica gel-water working pair. Thus MIL-101-water working pair presents an excellent adsorption refrigeration performance.

  20. Cu and Cd Adsorption on Carbon Aerogel and Xerogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotet L. C.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon aerogel (CA and xerogel (CX were proposed as new carbon adsorbent materials for Cu and Cd ions from contaminated water (synthetic water samples. These materials were prepared by a sol-gel process that involves a polycondensation of resorcinol and formaldehyde in Na2CO3 catalysis, followed by a drying step, either in supercritical conditions of CO2 to aerogel obtaining or in normal conditions to xerogel obtaining, and a pyrolytic step. Nitrogen adsorption, AFM, SEM, TEM and XRD were used for morpho-structural adsorbent investigation. Cu and Cd ions adsorption experiments were carried out in batch conditions under magnetic stirring. Adsorbent quantity and grain size influence over the adsorption efficiency were considered. Adsorption results expressed as adsorption capacities showed that prepared CA is a better adsorbent than CX. Adsorption capacities up to 14.2 mg g-1 and 8.5 mg g-1 were obtained for Cd2+ and Cu2+ adsorption on CA, respectively.

  1. Enhanced adsorption of quaternary amine using modified activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahas, Devarly; Wang, M J; Ismadji, Suryadi; Liu, J C

    2014-01-01

    This study examined different methodologies to modify activated carbon (AC) for the removal of quaternary amine, tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), from water. Commercial carbon (WAC) was treated by nitric acid oxidation (NA-WAC), silica impregnation (SM-WAC0.5), and oxygen plasma (P10-WAC), and their characteristics and adsorption capacity were compared. The Langmuir model fitted the equilibrium adsorption data well under different pH. The maximum adsorption capacity of WAC was 27.77 mg/g, while those of NA-WAC, SM-WAC 0.5, and P10-WAC were 37.46, 32.83 and 29.03 mg/g, respectively. Nitric acid oxidation was the most effective method for enhancing the adsorption capacity of TMAH. Higher pH was favorable for TMAH adsorption. Desorption study revealed that NA-WAC had no considerable reduction in performance even after five cycles of regeneration by 0.1 N hydrochloric acid. It was proposed that electrostatic interaction was the main mechanism of TMAH adsorption on activated carbon. PMID:24845325

  2. Adsorptive removal of cesium using bio fuel extraction microalgal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel biosorbent was prepared from the microalgal waste after biofuel extraction. • Higher selectivity and adsorption efficiency of the adsorbent for Cs+ over Na+ ions from aqueous solutions. • Potential candidate and eco-friendly alternative to the commercial resins such as zeolite. - Abstract: An adsorption gel was prepared from microalgal waste after extracting biodiesel oil by a simple chemical treatment of crosslinking using concentrated sulfuric acid. The adsorbent exhibited notably high selectivity and adsorption capacity towards Cs+ over Na+ from aqueous solutions, within the pH range of slightly acidic to neutral. The adsorption followed Langmuir isotherm and the maximum adsorption capacity of the gel for Cs+ calculated from Langmuir model was found to be 1.36 mol kg−1. Trace concentration of Cs+ ions present in aqueous streams was successfully separated from Na+ ions using a column packed with the adsorbent at pH 6.5. The adsorption capacity of the gel towards Cs+ in column operation was 0.13 mol kg−1. Although the adsorbed Cs+ ions were easily eluted using 1 M hydrochloric acid solution, simple incineration is proposed as an alternative for the treatment of adsorbent loaded with radioactive Cs+ ions due to the combustible characteristics of this adsorbent

  3. Crater chains on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, V.; Skobeleva, T.

    After discovery of disruption comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 into fragment train before it's collision with Jupiter there was proposed that linear crater chains on the large satellites of Jupiter and on the Moon are impact scars of past tidally disrupted comets.It's known that radar images have revealed the possible presence of water ice deposits in polar regions of Mercury. Impacts by a few large comets seem to provide the best explanation for both the amount and cleanliness of the ice deposits on Mercury because they have a larger volatile content that others external sources, for example, asteroid. A number of crater chains on the surface of Mercury are most likely the impact tracks of "fragment trains" of comets tidally disrupted by Sun or by Mercury and are not secondary craters. Mariner 10 image set (the three Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975) was used to recognize the crater chains these did not associate with secondary crater ejecta from observed impact structures. As example, it can be shown such crater chain located near crater Imhotep and crater Ibsen (The Kuiper Quadrangle of Mercury). Resolution of the Mariner 10 image is about 0.54 km/pixel. The crater chain is about 50 km long. It was found a similar crater chain inside large crater Sophocles (The Tolstoj Quadrangle of Mercury). The image resolution is about 1.46 km/pixel. The chain about 50 km long is located in northen part of the crater. Image resolution limits possibility to examine the form of craters strongly. It seems the craters in chains have roughly flat floor and smooth form. Most chain craters are approximately circular. It was examined many images from the Mariner 10 set and there were identified a total 15 crater chains and were unable to link any of these directly to any specific large crater associated with ejecta deposits. Chain craters are remarkably aligned. All distinguished crater chains are superposed on preexisting formations. A total of 127 craters were identified in the 15 recognized

  4. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessica Sanderson

    2007-12-31

    what variables impact the mercury loss percentages across the wallboard plants. One significant observation from this study was that higher purge rates of chlorides and fine solid particles from the wet FGD systems appear to produce gypsum with lower mercury concentrations. Any chemical interaction between mercury and chlorides is not well understood; however, based on the information available the lower mercury content in the gypsum product is likely due to the blow down of fine, mercury-rich particles as opposed to a decreased chloride concentration. One possible explanation is that a decrease of fine particles in the FGD slurry allows for less adsorption of mercury onto those particles, thus the mercury remains with the FGD liquor rather than the gypsum product. A more detailed discussion on synthetic gypsum sources and FGD chemistry data can be found in the Experimental section of this report and Table 4.

  5. Batch Sorption Experiments: Langmuir and Freundlich Isotherm Studies for the Adsorption of Textile Metal Ions onto Teff Straw (Eragrostis tef) Agricultural Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Mulu Berhe Desta

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption of heavy metals (Cr, Cd, Pb, Ni, and Cu) onto Activated Teff Straw (ATS) has been studied using batch-adsorption techniques. This study was carried out to examine the adsorption capacity of the low-cost adsorbent ATS for the removal of heavy metals from textile effluents. The influence of contact time, pH, Temperature, and adsorbent dose on the adsorption process was also studied. Results revealed that adsorption rate initially increased rapidly, and the optimal removal efficiency ...

  6. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  7. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  8. Mercury bioaccumulation in the Mediterranean

    OpenAIRE

    Cinnirella S.; Pirrone N.; Horvat M.; Kocman D.; Kotnik J.

    2013-01-01

    This study details mercury pollution within the food chain of the Mediterranean by analysing the most comprehensive mercury dataset available for biota and water measurements. In this study we computed a bioaccumulation factor (BAF) for datasets in the existing mercury-related scientific literature, in on-going programs, and in past measurement campaigns. Preliminary results indicate a major lack of information, making the outcome of any assessment very uncertain. Importantly, not all marine ...

  9. Treatment of Mercury Contaminated Oil from Sandia National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First Article Tests of a stabilization method for greater than 260 mg mercury/kg oil were performed under a treatability study. This alternative treatment technology will address treatment of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) organics (mainly used pump oil) contaminated with mercury and other heavy metals. Some of the oil is also co-contaminated with tritium, other radionuclides, and hazardous materials. The technology is based on contacting the oil with a sorbent powder (Self-Assembled Mercaptan on Mesoporous Support, SAMMS), proven to adsorb heavy metals, followed by stabilization of the oil/powder mixture using a stabilization agent (Nochar N990). Two variations of the treatment technology were included in the treatability study. The SAMMS (Self-Assembled Mercaptan on Mesoporous Silica) technology was developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for removal and stabilization of RCRA metals (i.e., lead, mercury, cadmium, silver, etc.) and for removal of mercury from organic solvents [1]. The SAMMS material is based on self-assembly of functionalized monolayers on mesoporous oxide surfaces. The unique mesoporous oxide supports provide a high surface area, thereby enhancing the metal-loading capacity. SAMMS material has high flexibility in that it binds with different forms of mercury, including metallic, inorganic, organic, charged, and neutral compounds [1] The material removes mercury from both organic wastes, such as pump oils, and from aqueous wastes. Mercury-loaded SAMMS not only passes TCLP tests, but also has good long-term durability as a waste form because: (1) the covalent binding between mercury and SAMMS has good resistance in ion-exchange, oxidation, and hydrolysis over a wide pH range and (2) the uniform and small pore size of the mesoporous silica prevents bacteria from solubilizing the bound mercury. Nochar's N990 Petrobond (Nochar, Inc., Indianapolis, IN) is an oil stabilization agent, specifically formulated for stabilizing vacuum pump

  10. Development of adsorbents from used tire rubber. Their use in the adsorption of organic and inorganic solutes in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troca-Torrado, Cesar; Alexandre-Franco, Maria; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Carmen; Gomez-Serrano, Vicente [Extremadura Univ., Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica; Alfaro-Dominguez, Manuel [Extremadura Univ., Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Mecanica, Energetica y de los Materiales

    2011-02-15

    Using used tire rubber (UTR), carbonaceous adsorbents (CAs) were prepared by chemical treatment of the material with HCl, HNO{sub 3} and NaOH aqueous solutions and by heat treatment at 900 C for 2 h in N{sub 2} atmosphere (H900). UTR and the UTR-derived products were first characterized in terms of texture by N{sub 2} adsorption at - 196 C and of oxygen surface groups by FT-IR spectroscopy and pH of the point of zero charge (pH{sub pzc}). Then, the products were tested as adsorbents of phenol, p-aminophenol, p-nitrophenol, and p-chlorophenol and of chromium, cadmium, mercury and lead in aqueous solution. The development of porosity is very poor in UTR and in the chemically treated products. H900 is the only CA with a better developed porosity, mainly in the regions of meso and macropores. pH{sub pzc} is close to 7.0 for most of the CAs. As an exception to the rule, pH{sub pzc} is 8.4 for H900. For this CA, the adsorption of all the adsorptives is greater. Usually, adsorption kinetics are fast. This is so in particular for p-nitrophenol and p-chlorophenol, on the one side, and for mercury and lead, on the other side. Adsorption is much higher for mercury and lead than for the remaining adsorptives. (author)

  11. Assessing the adsorption properties of shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Ronny

    2015-04-01

    Physical adsorption refers to the trapping of fluid molecules at near liquid-like densities in the pores of a given adsorbent material. Fine-grained rocks, such as shales, contain a significant amount of nanopores that can significantly contribute to their storage capacity. As a matter of fact, the current ability to extract natural gas that is adsorbed in the rock's matrix is limited, and current technology focuses primarily on the free gas in the fractures (either natural or stimulated), thus leading to recovery efficiencies that are very low. Shales constitute also a great portion of so-called cap-rocks above potential CO2 sequestration sites; hereby, the adsorption process may limit the CO2 mobility within the cap-rock, thus minimizing the impact of leakage on the whole operation. Whether it is an unconventional reservoir or a cap-rock, understanding and quantifying the mechanisms of adsorption in these natural materials is key to improve the engineering design of subsurface operations. Results will be presented from a laboratory study that combines conventional techniques for the measurement of adsorption isotherms with novel methods that allows for the imaging of adsorption using x-rays. Various nanoporous materials are considered, thus including rocks, such as shales and coals, pure clay minerals (a major component in mudrocks) and engineered adsorbents with well-defined nanopore structures, such as zeolites. Supercritical CO2 adsorption isotherms have been measured with a Rubotherm Magnetic Suspension balance by covering the pressure range 0.1-20~MPa. A medical x-ray CT scanner has been used to identify three-dimensional patterns of the adsorption properties of a packed-bed of adsorbent, thus enabling to assess the spatial variability of the adsorption isotherm in heterogeneous materials. The data are analyzed by using thermodynamically rigorous measures of adsorption, such as the net- and excess adsorbed amounts and a recently developed methodology is

  12. Effect of effluent organic matter on the adsorption of perfluorinated compounds onto activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Yangzhou University, 196 West Huayang Road, Yangzhou 225127 (China); Lv, Lu, E-mail: esellu@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Lan, Pei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Yangzhou University, 196 West Huayang Road, Yangzhou 225127 (China); Zhang, Shujuan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Pan, Bingcai, E-mail: bcpan@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Zhang, Weiming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of EfOM significantly reduced the adsorption capacities and rates of PFCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-molecular-weight EfOM compounds (<1 kDa) compete for adsorption sites of PFSs directly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large-molecular-weight EfOM compounds (>30 kDa) affect the adsorption through pore blockage or restriction effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changes in surface properties of PAC caused by preloaded EfOM could affect PFCs adsorption. - Abstract: Effect of effluent organic matter (EfOM) on the adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was quantitatively investigated at environmentally relevant concentration levels. The adsorption of both perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) onto PAC followed pseudo-second order kinetics and fitted the Freundlich model well under the given conditions. Intraparticle diffusion was found to be the rate-controlling step in the PFC adsorption process onto PAC in the absence and presence of EfOM. The presence of EfOM, either in PFC-EfOM simultaneous adsorption onto fresh PAC or in PFC adsorption onto EfOM-preloaded PAC, significantly reduced the adsorption capacities and sorption rates of PFCs. The pH of zero point of charge was found to be 7.5 for fresh PAC and 4.2 for EfOM-preloaded PAC, suggesting that the adsorbed EfOM imparted a negative charge on PAC surface. The effect of molecular weight distribution of EfOM on the adsorption of PFCs was investigated with two EfOM fractions obtained by ultrafiltration. The low-molecular-weight compounds (<1 kDa) were found to be the major contributors to the significant reduction in PFC adsorption capacity, while large-molecular-weight compounds (>30 kDa) had much less effect on PFC adsorption capacity.

  13. Adsorption behaviour of bulgur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaş, Mustafa; Aykın, Elif; Arslan, Sultan; Durak, Atike N

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this research was to determine the adsorption behaviour of bulgur. Three different particle sizes (2dry matter and 4.96-16.57, respectively. Constant k was between 0.85 and 0.93, and GAB equation was determined to fit very well for bulgur adsorption, because of %E values lower than 10%. Bulgur must be stored below 70% relative humidity and with less than 10 g water per 100 g of dry mater. PMID:26575716

  14. Structure sensitivity in adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Bjørk; Nielsen, Ole Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    The structure sensitivity of CO adsorption on different flat, stepped, kinked and reconstructed Pt surfaces is studied using large-scale density-functional calculations. We find an extremely strong structure sensitivity in the adsorption energy with variations up to 1 eV (or 100%) from one...... structure to the next. We propose a model to explain this behavior, and use it to discuss more generally the origin of structure sensitivity in heterogeneous catalysis....

  15. AgII doped MIL-101 and its adsorption of iodine with high speed in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ping; Qi, Bingbing; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Lei; Jiao, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Zheng; Li, Qiang; Wang, Jinfeng; Chen, Shouwen; Yang, Yi

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve the adsorption speed of iodine from water, MIL-101 with extra-large specific surface area (3054 m2/g) was chosen as a base material, and then, Ag was doped into MIL-101 to enhance its adsorption capacity through an incipient-wetness impregnation method. With the characterization of SEM-EDS, TEM, XRD, XPS, TGA, IR, and BET techniques, the resulting Ag was identified to be stay in the framework of MIL-101 stably in the form of AgII (generally, AgII cation is not stable). However, after the adsorption of I- anions, AgII stay in the cages of MIL-101 in the form of AgI/AgI3. It is important to note that, all adsorbents show high adsorption speed of iodine in solution. The equilibrium adsorption time of the adsorbents were acquired by only a few minutes, which can be attributed to its large BET surface area. An interesting note is that, when the doping amount of Ag is less than 9%, the iodine anions adsorption capacity of Ag@MIL-101 is greater than its theoretical adsorption capacity. It shows that both physical adsorption and chemical adsorption are existed in the adsorption process. This study hopefully leads to a new and highly efficient Ag-based adsorbent for iodide adsorb from solutions.

  16. Adsorption of tetracycline from aqueous solutions onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes with different oxygen contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Ma, Jie; Han, Sheng

    2014-06-01

    Oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different oxygen contents were investigated for the adsorption of tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solutions. As the surface oxygen content of the MWCNTs increased, the maximum adsorption capacity and adsorption coefficient of TC increased to the largest values and then decreased. The relation can be attributed to the interplay between the nanotubes' dispersibility and the water cluster formation upon TC adsorption. The overall adsorption kinetics of TC onto CNTs-3.2%O might be dependent on both intra-particle diffusion and boundary layer diffusion. The maximum adsorption capacity of TC on CNTs-3.2%O was achieved in the pH range of 3.3-8.0 due to formation of water clusters or H-bonds. Furthermore, the presence of Cu2+ could significantly enhanced TC adsorption at pH of 5.0. However, the solution ionic strength did not exhibit remarkable effect on TC adsorption. In addition, when pH is beyond the range (3.3-8.0), the electrostatic interactions caused the decrease of TC adsorption capacity. Our results indicate that surface properties and aqueous solution chemistry play important roles in TC adsorption on MWCNTs.

  17. Adsorption characteristics of haloacetonitriles on functionalized silica-based porous materials in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prarat, Panida; Ngamcharussrivichai, Chawalit; Khaodhiar, Sutha; Punyapalakul, Patiparn

    2011-09-15

    The effect of the surface functional group on the removal and mechanism of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) adsorption over silica-based porous materials was evaluated in comparison with powdered activated carbon (PAC). Hexagonal mesoporous silicate (HMS) was synthesized and functionalized by three different types of organosilanes (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane and n-octyldimethysilane). Adsorption kinetics and isotherm models were used to determine the adsorption mechanism. The selective adsorption of five haloacetonitriles (HANs) in the single and mixed solute systems was also studied. The experiments revealed that the surface functional groups of the adsorbents largely affected the DCAN adsorption capacities. 3-Mercaptopropyl-grafted HMS had a high DCAN adsorption capacity compared to PAC. The adsorption mechanism is believed to occur via an ion-dipole electrostatic interaction in which water interference is inevitable at low concentrations of DCAN. In addition, the adsorption of DCAN strongly depended on the pH of the solution as this related to the charge density of the adsorbents. The selective adsorption of the five HANs over PAC was not observed, while the molecular structure of different HANs obviously influenced the adsorption capacity and selectivity over 3-mercaptopropyl-grafted HMS. PMID:21752539

  18. Adsorption of Cd(II and Pb(II Ions from Aqueous Solution byActivated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayder Mohammed Abdul-Hameed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal consider as major environmental pollutants. Many of industrial wastewater effluents contain a wide range of these heavy metals. The adsorption of Cd2+ and Pb2+ metal ions from aqueous solution by activated carbon was studied. The results showed that maximum adsorption capacity occurred at 486.9×10-3 mg/kg for Pb2+ ion and 548.8×10-3 mg/kg for Cd2+ ion. The adsorption in a mixture of the metal ions had a balancing effect on the adsorption capacity of the activated carbon. The adsorption capacity of each metal ion was affected by the presence of other metal ions rather than its presence individually. The study showed the presence of other heavy metals attribute to the reduction in the activated carbon capacity, and the adsorption process was found to obeys the Freundlich isotherm for both ions.

  19. Collisional stripping of Mercury's mantle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional smoothed-particle hydrocode is the basis of the present numerical simulations of conditions under which a giant collision between a proto-Mercury and a planet one-sixth its size would lead to the loss of most of the silicate mantle of Mercury and thereby account for its anomalously high density. A head-on collision at 20 km/sec, and an off-axis impact parameter of half the radius of the proto-Mercury at 35 km/sec, are approximately equal in damage yielded; both will yield a remnant whose characteristics are those of the present Mercury. 18 references

  20. Mercury in Canadian crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates for average mercury concentrations in crude oil range widely from 10 ng/g of oil to 3,500 ng/g of oil. With such a broad range of estimates, it is difficult to determine the contributions of the petroleum sector to the total budget of mercury emissions. In response to concerns that the combustion of petroleum products may be a major source of air-borne mercury pollution, Environment Canada and the Canadian Petroleum Products Institute has undertaken a survey of the average total mercury concentration in crude oil processed in Canadian refineries. In order to calculate the potential upper limit of total mercury in all refined products, samples of more than 30 different types of crude oil collected from refineries were measured for their concentration of mercury as it enters into a refinery before processing. High temperature combustion, cold vapour atomic absorption and cold vapour atomic fluorescence were the techniques used to quantify mercury in the samples. The results of the study provide information on the total mass of mercury present in crude oil processed in Canada each year. Results can be used to determine the impact of vehicle exhaust emissions to the overall Canadian mercury emission budget. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  1. Integrated criteria document mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains a systematic review and a critical evaluation of the most relevant data on the priority substance mercury for the purpose of effect-oriented environmental policy. Chapter headings are: properties and existing standards; production, application, sources and emissions (natural sources, industry, energy, households, agriculture, dental use, waste); distribution and transformation (cinnabar; Hg2+, Hg22+, elemental mercury, methylmercury, behavior in soil, water, air, biota); concentrations and fluxes in the environment and exposure levels (sampling and measuring methods, occurrence in soil, water, air etc.); effects (toxicity to humans and aquatic and terrestrial systems); emissions reduction (from industrial sources, energy, waste processing etc.); and evaluation (risks, standards, emission reduction objectives, measuring strategies). 395 refs

  2. Capacity Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outcomes & Recommendations: • Significant increase needed in the nuclear workforce both to replace soon-to-retire current generation and to staff large numbers of new units planned • Key message, was the importance of an integrated approach to workforce development. • IAEA and other International Organisations were asked to continue to work on Knowledge Management, Networks and E&T activities • IAEA requested to conduct Global Survey of HR needs – survey initiated but only 50% of operating countries (30% of capacity) took part, so results inconclusive

  3. Development of passive samplers for the simultaneous measurement of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in surface waters

    OpenAIRE

    Magnier, A. (collab.); Dabrin, A.; Grisot, G.; Coquery, M.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is a metal naturally and widely present in the environment but human activities have greatly increased its amount in all environmental compartments. This element, under its organic form methylmercury, became a global environmental concern due to its high toxicity, its capacity to bioaccumulate in biota and to biomagnify in the food chain. In aquatic systems, mercury is present at low concentration which involves the development of “ultra-clean” sampling techniques and the ...

  4. Mercury separation from aqueous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project is providing an assessment of new sorbents for removing mercury from wastes at US Department of Energy sites. Four aqueous wastes were chosen for lab-scale testing; a high-salt, acidic waste currently stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); a high-salt, alkaline waste stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS); a dilute lithium hydroxide solution stored at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; and a low-salt, neutral groundwater generated at the Y-12 Plant. Eight adsorbents have been identified for testing, covering a wide range of cost and capability. Screening tests have been completed, which identified the most promising adsorbents for each waste stream. Batch isotherm tests have been completed using the most promising adsorbents, and column tests are in progress. Because of the wide range of waste compositions tested, no one adsorbent is effective in all of these waste streams. Based on loading capacity and compatibility with the waste solutions. the most effective adsorbents identified to date are SuperLig 618 for the INEL tank waste stimulant; Mersorb followed by lonac SR-3 for the SRS tank waste stimulant; Durasil 70 and Ionac SR-3) for the LIOH solution; and lonac SR-3 followed by lonac SR-4 and Mersorb for the Y-12 groundwater

  5. Mercury concentration in hair samples from Chinese people in coastal cities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaojie; CHENG Jinping; Song Yuling; HONDA Shun'ichi; WANG Li; LIU Zheng; SAKAMOTO Mineshi; LIU Yuanyuan

    2008-01-01

    This investigation was made to estimate current normal concentrations of total mercury in the hair of Chinese coastal people. Hairsamples were collected from 659 healthy inhabitants in the areas along the coast and the rivers (such as Shanghai, Ningbo, Dalian,Xiamen, and Zhoushan) of China from Feb. 2005 to June 2006. Total mercury concentrations in the samples were analyzed by the coldvapor atomic adsorption spectrometry method (CVAAS). The results showed the geometric mean concentration of total mercury in thehair of the total population (N=659) was 0.83 μg/g, and the geometric mean of the concentrations of total mercury in the hair of themale (0.94 μg/g, 338 inhabitants with an average age of 35.2, age 2-93) was higher than that of the female (0.72 μg/g, 321 inhabitantswith an average age of 39.1, age 1-90). In both the male and female, the mean concentrations of total mercury in hair increased withage, and then gradually decreased. There was a significant correlation between the total hair mercury and the place of residence (p<0.01), and total hair mercury was the highest in volunteers who lived in Zhoushan. Over half of all sample concentrations were belowthe USEPA-recommended 1 μg/g. In Zhoushan (males, 2.44 μg/g; females, 1.94 [μg/g) and Ningbo (males, 1.06 μg/g; females, 1.02μg/g), it exceeded the recommended level. Very little females (0.3%) of reproductive age showed hair mercury levels close to 10 μg/g.It was thus concluded that fish consumption was a major current route for mercury exposure in China.

  6. Magnetic field of Mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geomagnetic field, suitably scaled down and parameterized, is shown to give a very good fit to the magnetic field measurements taken on the first and third passes of the Mariner 10 space probe past Mercury. The excellence of the fit to a reliable planetary magnetospheric model is good evidence that the Mercury magnetosphere is formed by a simple, permanent, intrinsic planetary magnetic field distorted by the effects of the solar wind. The parameters used for a best fit to all the data are (depending slightly on the choice of data) 2.44--2.55 for the ratio of Mercury's magnetic field strength at the subsolar point to that of the earth's subsolar point field (this results in a dipole moment of 170 γR/sub M/3 (R/sub M/ is Mercury Radius), i.e., 2.41 x 1022G cm3 in the same direction as the earth's dipole), approx.-113 γR/sub M/4 for the planetary quadrupole moment parallel to the dipole moment, 10degree--17degree for the tilt of the planet dipole toward the sun, 4.5degree for the tilt of the dipole toward dawn, and 2.5degree--7.6degree aberration angle for the shift in the tail axis from the planet-sun direction because of the planet's orbital velocity. The rms deviation overall for the entire data set compared with the theoretical fitted model for the magnetic field strength was 17 γ (approx.4% of the maximum field measured). If the data from the first pass that show presumed strong time variations are excluded, the overall rms deviation for the field magnitude is only 10 γ

  7. Method for scavenging mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-ger; Liu, Shou-heng; Liu, Zhao-rong; Yan, Naiqiang

    2009-01-20

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  8. Method for scavenging mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-ger; Liu, Shou-heng; Liu, Zhao-rong; Yan, Naiqiang

    2010-07-13

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  9. The planet Mercury (1971)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The physical properties of the planet Mercury, its surface, and atmosphere are presented for space vehicle design criteria. The mass, dimensions, mean density, and orbital and rotational motions are described. The gravity field, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and charged particles in the planet's orbit are discussed. Atmospheric pressure, temperature, and composition data are given along with the surface composition, soil mechanical properties, and topography, and the surface electromagnetic and temperature properties.

  10. A structural study of mercury adsorbed on single crystal metal surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Bastow, Sarah Louise

    1997-01-01

    The Normal Incidence X-Ray Standing Wavefield technique has been used to study the adsorption of mercury on two single crystal metal surfaces, Ni(111) and Cu(100). The three Hg/Ni(111) structures studied were (√3x√3)R30°-0.33ML, p(2x2)-0.SML and "c(2√3x2√3)R30°"-0.64ML. A well-ordered, commensurate mercury adlayer is postulated, which has a low frequency (or soft) phonon mode parallel to the surface. Such a surface is well ordered and will give good LEED patterns, but the large distribution o...

  11. Adsoption Model of Mercury in the Water-Sediment Systems in Riam Kanan Dam, South Kalimantan

    OpenAIRE

    Utami Irawati; Sunardi Sunardi; Rinne Nintasari

    2014-01-01

    The Riam Kanan  Dam reservoir is one of living source for the people of South Kalimantan and has a strategic value for their prosperity. Traditional and illegal mining activities nearby the area of this dam may cause heavy metals pollution, such as mercury (Hg) in the water and sediment. This research was conducted to predict  the adsorption model of mercury (Hg) in water and sediment system in Riam Kanan reservoir  Banjar regency.  The modeling was carried out by analyzing the content of mer...

  12. Electroreduction mechanism of 8-quinolinecarboxylic acid and the herbicide quinmerac on mercury electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electroreductions of 8-quinolinecarboxylic acid and his derivative quinmerac (a quinolinic herbicide) are studied by cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry on mercury electrodes. The use of surfactants was found essential to avoid the adsorption of reactants on the mercury surface. In both cases the electroreduction processes corresponded to electrodimerization reactions in competition with ECE processes, depending on the experimental conditions. The oxidation of the radicals formed after the first electron transfers differ from 8-quinolinecarboxylic acid to quinmerac, being more complicated in this last case.

  13. Changing patterns in the use, recycling, and material substitution of mercury in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental concerns have led to numerous regulations that have dramatically decreased the reported production and use of mercury in the United States since the 1980s. Government legislation and subsequent industry actions have led to increased collection of mercury-containing materials and the recovery of mercury through recycling. Mercury emissions have been reduced and effective alternatives to mercury products have been developed for many applications. This study updates and quantifies the changes in demand, supply, use, and material flow for mercury in various sectors in the United States that have taken place since 1996. Nearly all primary mercury produced in the United States is derived as a byproduct of processing of gold and silver ore in Nevada. Since 2001, annual production of mercury from gold and silver mining in Nevada has decreased by 22 percent overall because ore from greater depths containing low grade mercury is recovered, and mercury emissions from this source have decreased by 95 percent as a result of increased regulation and improved collection and suppression technology. The distribution of consumption of mercury in the United States has changed as a result of regulation (elimination of large-scale mercury use in the paint and battery sectors), reduction by consumers (decommissioning of mercury-cell chloralkali manufacturing capacity), and technological advances (improvements in dental, lighting, and wiring sectors). Mercury use in the chloralkali sector, the leading end-use sector in the United States in 1996, has declined by 98 percent from 136 metric tons (t) in 1996 to about 0.3 t in 2010 because of increased processing and recycling efficiencies and plant closures or conversion to other technologies. As plants were closed, mercury recovered from the infrastructure of decommissioned plants has been exported, making the United States a net exporter of mercury, even though no mercury has been produced as the primary product from mines in

  14. Adsorption of fluoride to UiO-66-NH2 in water: Stability, kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Liu, Yu-Ting; Chen, Shen-Yi

    2016-01-01

    To provide safe drinking water, fluoride in water must be removed and adsorption processes appear to be the most widely used method. Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) represent a new class of adsorbents that have been used in various adsorption applications. To study the adsorption mechanism of fluoride to MOFs in water and obtain related adsorption parameters, we synthesized a zirconium-based MOF with a primary amine group on its ligand, named UiO-66-NH2. The kinetics, adsorption isotherm and thermodynamics of fluoride adsorption to UiO-66-NH2 were investigated. The crystalline structure of UiO-66-NH2 remained intact and the local structure of zirconium in UiO-66-NH2 did not change significantly after being exposed to fluoride. The kinetics of the fluoride adsorption in UiO-66-NH2 could be well represented by the pseudo second order rate law. The enthalpy of the adsorption indicates that the F(-) adsorption to UiO-66-NH2 was classified as a physical adsorption. However, the comparison between the adsorption capacities of UiO-66-NH2 and UiO-66 suggests that the fluoride adsorption to UiO-66-NH2 might primarily involve a strong interaction between F(-) and the metal site. The fluoride adsorption capacity of UiO-66-NH2 was found to decrease when pH>7. While the presence of chloride/bromide ions did not noticeably change the adsorption capacity of UiO-66-NH2, the ionic surfactants slightly affected the adsorption capacity of UiO-66-NH2. These findings provide insights to further optimize the adsorption process for removal of fluoride using zirconium-based MOFs. PMID:26397913

  15. Mercury removal sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  16. Behavior and analysis of Cesium adsorption on montmorillonite mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption of Cs by montmorillonite and the effects of experimental conditions on adsorption were investigated by using 134Cs as a radioactive tracer. Additionally, the Cs-adsorbed and the modified montmorillonite were analyzed by X-ray Diffractometer System (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the adsorption of Cs by montmorillonite was efficient in the initial concentration (C0) of 30 μg/L Cs nitrate solution with 20 g/L montmorillonite at room temperature. In this condition, more than 98% Cs+ ions could be adsorbed at pH ∼8. The adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 5 min and the relationship between the concentration of Cs+ in aqueous solutions and adsorption capacities of Cs+ can be described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The adsorption rate would decrease when temperature increase from 0 deg. C to 50 deg. C or in presence of coexistent K+, Na+ and Ca2+, while modification by (NH4)2SO4, [Ag(NH3)2]+, [Cu(NH3)4]2+ or 450 deg. C could improve the adsorption abilities of montmorillonite for Cs+. However, more than 89% of adsorbed Cs+ on montmorillonite could be desorbed by 2 mol/L HNO3 solutions. The XRD and SEM analysis further showed that the structure of the Cs-adsorbed or modified montmorillonite were different from that of the original one.

  17. Adsorption behavior of some radionuclides on the Chinese weathered coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equilibrium and kinetic properties of Am(III), Eu(III) and Cs(I) ions adsorption by three weathered coals (WCs) from China, have been investigated in batch stirred-tank experiments. The effects of contact time, solution acidity and initial sorbate concentration on the adsorption of Am(III), Eu(III) and Cs(I) by Yuxian(YX) Tongchuan (TC) and Pingxiang (PX) WC were evaluated. The radionuclide ions are able to form complex compounds with carboxylic and phenolic groups of WCs and they are also bounded with phenolic groups even at high acidity reaction solution (>0.1 mol/L). Mechanisms including ion exchange, complexation and adsorption to the coal surface are possible in the sorption process. The acidity of the solution played an important role in the adsorption. Even acidity as high as 0.1 mol/L, 60% of Am(III) or Eu(III), 40% of Cs(I) were found to be sorbed on the YX WC, which had the best adsorption capacity for Am(III) and Eu(III). Our batch adsorption studies showed the equilibrium adsorption data fit the linear Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The maximum equilibrium uptake of Eu(III) were 0.412, 3.701, 5.446 mmol/g for JXWC, TCWC and YXWC, respectively

  18. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of arsenic onto ceria nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qinzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ma, Yuhui; He, Xiao; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2012-01-01

    The rapid increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles [ENPs] has resulted in an increasing concern over the potential impacts of ENPs on the environmental and human health. ENPs tend to adsorb a large variety of toxic chemicals when they are emitted into the environment, which may enhance the toxicity of ENPs and/or adsorbed chemicals. The study was aimed to investigate the adsorption and desorption behaviors of arsenic on ceria NPs in aqueous solution using batch technique. Results show that the adsorption behavior of arsenic on ceria NPs was strongly dependent on pH and independent of ionic strength, indicating that the electrostatic effect on the adsorption of these elements was relatively not important compared to surface chemical reactions. The adsorption isotherms fitted very well to both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The thermodynamic parameters (Δ H 0 , Δ S 0 , and Δ G 0 ) for the adsorption of arsenic were determined at three different temperatures of 283, 303, and 323 K. The adsorption reaction was endothermic, and the process of adsorption was favored at high temperature. The desorption data showed that desorption hysteresis occurred at the initial concentration studied. High adsorption capacity of arsenic on ceria NPs suggests that the synergistic effects of ceria NPs and arsenic on the environmental systems may exist when they are released into the environment.

  19. Adsorption selectivity of salicylic acid and 5-sulfosalicylic acid onto hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fuqiang; XIA Mingfang; FEI Zhenghao; CHEN Jinlong; LI Aimin

    2007-01-01

    Both bottle-point and column-feeding experiments involving different solutes and sorbents were carried out to investigate the adsorption selectivity and separation performance of salicylic acid and 5-sulfosalicylic acid.Their adsorption isotherms onto such hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbents as NDA-100 and NDA-99 could be well described by the Freundlich equations whose characteristics describe extrathermic and favorable adsorption processes.The adsorption towards NDA-100 mainly depended on the π-π interaction,while that towards NDA-99 was extremely influenced by the static-electric interaction.Additionally,the adsorptive capacity of salicylic acid on NDA-99 decreased while it increased on NDA-100 with the presence of 5-sulfosalicylic acid in the adsorptive environment as the competitive component.Comparatively,the adsorption capacity of 5-sulfosalicylic acid decreased on both resins with salicylic acid as the competitive component.In fact,the difference in the interaction between adsorbent and adsorbate resulted in the straight antagonism on the effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent.In conclusion,the adsorption selectivity of salicylic acid onto NDA-100 was obviously larger than that onto NDA-99 with the existence of 5-sulfosalicylic acid in the adsorptive environment.A satisfactory separation and recovery of tested solutes in aqueous phase could be foreseeably achieved by the sequencing adsorption technique involving NDA-100 as well as NDA-99.

  20. Application of ferric sludge to immobilize leachable mercury in soils and concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, J Ming; Walsh, T; Lam, T; Boulter, D

    2003-11-01

    A Hg-contaminated site in B.C. Province, Canada was caused by the previous operation of Hg-cell in chlor-alkali process for over 25 years. The soils and groundwater at the site are highly contaminated with mercury. An analysis of groundwater at the site has shown that most of the mercury is bonded with humic and fulvic acids (HFA) in colloidal form. The Hg-HFA colloids can be completely removed from the groundwater with ferric chloride treatment under optimized process conditions to form ferric sludge (FS), which is rendered non-leachable by standard TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) test. The effluent discharged from a clarifier has achieved mercury levels of mercury adsorption characteristics of FS show it has low mercury leachability by TCLP, and great mercury adsorption capability. This feature is the basis for the application of FS to immobilization of leachable Hg-contaminants in solid wastes. Full-scale stabilization tests of Hg-contaminated soil have been carried out, and the time-based stability of the treated soil has been monitored by TCLP over a period of 60 days. All the results have shown a small variation in TCLP mercury levels within a range of 10-40 microg l(-1). Based on these results and with the approval of the B.C. Ministry of the Environment, 1850 tons of Hg-contaminated soils and 260 tons of Hg-contaminated concrete fines have been treated, stabilized with FS, and disposed in a non-hazardous waste disposal site. PMID:14733397