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Sample records for cannulated screw fixation

  1. Transpedicular screw fixation in the thoracic and lumbar spine with a novel cannulated polyaxial screw system

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    Lutz Weise

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lutz Weise, Olaf Suess, Thomas Picht, Theodoros KombosNeurochirurgische Klinik, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, GermanyObjective: Transpedicular screws are commonly and successfully used for posterior fixation in spinal instability, but their insertion remains challenging. Even using navigation techniques, there is a misplacement rate of up to 11%. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of a novel pedicle screw system.Methods: Thoracic and lumbar fusions were performed on 67 consecutive patients for tumor, trauma, degenerative disease or infection. A total of 326 pedicular screws were placed using a novel wire-guided, cannulated, polyaxial screw system (XIA Precision®, Stryker. The accuracy of placement was assessed post operatively by CT scan, and the patients were followed-up clinically for a mean of 16 months.Results: The total medio-caudal pedicle wall perforation rate was 9.2% (30/326. In 19 of these 30 cases a cortical breakthrough of less than 2 mm occurred. The misplacement rate (defined as a perforation of 2 mm or more was 3.37% (11/326. Three of these 11 screws needed surgical revision due to neurological symptoms or CSF leakage. There have been no screw breakages or dislocations over the follow up-period.Conclusion: We conclude that the use of this cannulated screw system for the placement of pedicle screws in the thoracic and lumbar spine is accurate and safe. The advantages of this technique include easy handling without a time-consuming set up. Considering the incidence of long-term screw breakage, further investigation with a longer follow-up period is necessary.Keywords: spinal instrumentation, pedicle screws, misplacement, pedicle wall perforation

  2. Open reduction and internal fixation of patellar fractures with tension band wiring through cannulated screws.

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    Malik, Mudasir; Halwai, Manzoor Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate effectiveness and safety of a relatively new technique of open reduction and internal fixation of displaced transverse patellar fractures with tension band wiring (TBW) through parallel cannulated compression screws. A total of 30 patients with displaced transverse patellar fracture were enrolled in this prospective study. Of the 30 patients, 20 patients had trauma due to fall, 5 due to road traffic accident, 2 due to fall of heavy object on the knee, 2 due to forced flexion of knee, and 1 had fracture due to being beaten. All 30 patients were treated with vertical skin exposure, fracture open reduction, and internal fixation by anterior TBW through 4.0 mm cannulated screws. The postoperative rehabilitation protocol was standardized. The patients were followed postsurgery to evaluate time required for radiographic bone union, knee joint range of motion (ROM), loss of fracture reduction, material failure, and the overall functional result of knee using Bostman scoring. All the fractures healed radiologically, at an average time of 10.7 weeks (range, 8-12 weeks). The average ROM arc was 129.7 degrees (range, 115-140 degrees). No patient had loss of fracture reduction, implant migration, or material failure. The average Bostman score was 28.6 out of 30. Anterior TBW through cannulated screws for displaced transverse fractures is safe and effective alternative treatment. Good functional results and recovery can be expected. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Internal Fixation of Transverse Patella Fractures Using Cannulated Cancellous Screws with Anterior Tension Band Wiring

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    Khan I

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of anterior tension band wiring technique using two cannulated cancellous screws in patients with transverse (AO34-C1 or transverse with mildly comminuted (AO34-C2 patellar fractures. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study of 25 patients with transverse fracture or transverse fracture with mildly comminuted patella fractures. All the patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using two parallel cannulated screws and 18G stainless steel wire as per the tension band principle. Results: There were eighteen males (72% and seven females (28%. The age group ranged from 24 to 58 years, with mean age of 38 years. The most common mode of injury was fall (72% followed by road traffic accident (20% and violent quadriceps contraction (8%. Transverse fracture was present in 60% and transverse fracture with mild comminution in 40% of patients. Mean time to achieve union was 10.7 weeks (range 8-12 weeks. Mean ROM at three months was 113.8 degree (90-130 and at final follow up this improved to 125.4 degrees (range 100-140. There was one case of knee stiffness and no case of implant failure was observed. Patients were evaluated using Bostman scoring, the mean score at three months being 26.04 which improved to 27.36 at the end of final follow up at one year. Conclusion: Cannulated cancellous screws with anterior tension band wiring is a safe, reliable and reproducible method in management of transverse patellar fractures, with less chances of implant failure and soft tissue irritation.

  4. Fixation of femoral capital physeal fractures with 7.0 mm cannulated screws in five bulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.G.; Crawford, W.H.; Stone, W.C.; Frampton, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Salter-Harris type I fractures of the femoral capital physis were repaired in five Holstein bulls with three 7.0 mm cannulated screws placed in lag fashion. Radiographically at months 7 to 10, the fractures were healed and there was periarticular bone production on the femoral necks and the dorsal acetabular rims. Four bulls had normal gaits, and one bull had muscle atrophy and barely detectable lameness

  5. Ordinary Cannulated Compression Screws or Headless Cannulated Compression Screws? A Synthetic Bone Biomechanical Research in the Internal Fixation of Vertical Femoral Neck Fracture

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    Baokun Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study is to verify whether the headless cannulated compression screw (HCCS has higher biomechanical stability than the ordinary cannulated compression screw (OCCS in the treatment of vertical femoral neck fractures. Materials and Methods. 30 synthetic femur models were equally divided into 2 groups, with 50°, 60°, and 70° Pauwels angle of femoral neck fracture, under 3D printed guiding plates and C-arm fluoroscopic guidance. The femur molds were fixed with three parallel OCCSs as OCCS group and three parallel HCCSs as HCCS group. All specimens were tested for compressive strength and maximum load to failure with a loading rate of 2 mm/min. Results. The result showed that there was no significant difference with the compressive strength in the Pauwels angle of 50° and 60°. However, we observed that the maximum load to failure with the Pauwels angle of 50°, 60°, and 70° and the compressive strength with 70° of HCCS group showed better performance than the OCCS group. Conclusion. HCCS performs with better biomechanical stability than OCCS in the treatment of vertical femoral neck fracture, especially with the Pauwels angle of 70°.

  6. Percutaneous cannulated screw fixation of sacral fractures and sacroiliac joint disruptions with CT-controlled guidewires performed by interventionalists: Single center experience in treating posterior pelvic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Sebastian; Vogl, Thomas J.; Marzi, Ingo; Zangos, Stephan; Wichmann, Julian L.; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Mack, Martin G.; Schmidt, Sven; Eichler, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Minimally invasive sacroiliac screw fixation can be performed under CT-imaging. • Guidewires help in precise placement of cannulated sacroiliac screw. • Only a diminishing rate of misplacements can be seen. • The method appears to be a safe and very accurate procedure. - Abstract: Objective: The purpose of our study was to evaluate minimally invasive sacroiliac screw fixation for treatment of posterior pelvic instability with the help of CT controlled guidewires, assess its accuracy, safety and effectiveness, and discuss potential pitfalls. Methods: 100 guidewires and hollow titan screws were inserted in 38 patients (49.6 ± 19.5 years) suffering from 35 sacral fractures and/or 16 sacroiliac joint disruptions due to 33 (poly-)traumatic, 2 osteoporotic and 1 post-infectious conditions. The guidewire and screw positions were analyzed in multiplanar reconstructions. Results: The mean minimal distance between guidewire and adjacent neural foramina was 4.5 ± 2.01 mm, with a distinctly higher precision in S1 than S2. Eight guidewires showed cortical contacts, resulting in a total of 2% mismatched screws with subsequent wall violation. The fracture gaps were reduced from 3.6 ± 0.53 mm to 1.2 ± 0.54 mm. During follow-up 3 cases of minor iatrogenic sacral impaction (<5 mm) due to the bolting and 2 cases of screw loosening were observed. Interventional time was 84.0 min with a mean of 2.63 screws per patient whilst acquiring a mean of 93.7 interventional CT-images (DLP 336.7 mGy cm). Conclusions: The treatment of posterior pelvic instability with a guidewire-based screw insertion technique under CT-imaging results in a very high accuracy and efficacy with a low complication rate. Careful attention should be drawn to radiation levels

  7. Percutaneous cannulated screw fixation of sacral fractures and sacroiliac joint disruptions with CT-controlled guidewires performed by interventionalists: Single center experience in treating posterior pelvic instability

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    Fischer, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.fischer@kgu.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Marzi, Ingo [Department of Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, University Hospital Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Zangos, Stephan; Wichmann, Julian L.; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Mack, Martin G. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Schmidt, Sven [Orthopaedic University Hospital Friedrichsheim, Marienburgstraße, 260528 Frankfurt (Germany); Eichler, Katrin [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Minimally invasive sacroiliac screw fixation can be performed under CT-imaging. • Guidewires help in precise placement of cannulated sacroiliac screw. • Only a diminishing rate of misplacements can be seen. • The method appears to be a safe and very accurate procedure. - Abstract: Objective: The purpose of our study was to evaluate minimally invasive sacroiliac screw fixation for treatment of posterior pelvic instability with the help of CT controlled guidewires, assess its accuracy, safety and effectiveness, and discuss potential pitfalls. Methods: 100 guidewires and hollow titan screws were inserted in 38 patients (49.6 ± 19.5 years) suffering from 35 sacral fractures and/or 16 sacroiliac joint disruptions due to 33 (poly-)traumatic, 2 osteoporotic and 1 post-infectious conditions. The guidewire and screw positions were analyzed in multiplanar reconstructions. Results: The mean minimal distance between guidewire and adjacent neural foramina was 4.5 ± 2.01 mm, with a distinctly higher precision in S1 than S2. Eight guidewires showed cortical contacts, resulting in a total of 2% mismatched screws with subsequent wall violation. The fracture gaps were reduced from 3.6 ± 0.53 mm to 1.2 ± 0.54 mm. During follow-up 3 cases of minor iatrogenic sacral impaction (<5 mm) due to the bolting and 2 cases of screw loosening were observed. Interventional time was 84.0 min with a mean of 2.63 screws per patient whilst acquiring a mean of 93.7 interventional CT-images (DLP 336.7 mGy cm). Conclusions: The treatment of posterior pelvic instability with a guidewire-based screw insertion technique under CT-imaging results in a very high accuracy and efficacy with a low complication rate. Careful attention should be drawn to radiation levels.

  8. A new angle and its relationship with early fixation failure of femoral neck fractures treated with three cannulated compression screws.

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    Zhang, Y L; Zhang, W; Zhang, C Q

    2017-04-01

    The Pauwels angle has been used widely, however an accurate evaluation of this angle is difficult because of deformity of the affected lower extremity. Therefore we designed a new measurement of the orientation of femoral neck fracture and applied this in a retrospective study to assess: (1) its reproducibility, (2) its advantages compared with the Pauwels angle, (3) its relationship with the short-term prognosis treated with three cannulated compression screws. This new measurement is reproducible and has some reference meaning for the treatment of femoral neck fractures. Two hundred and twenty-eight patients with femoral neck fractures treated with three cannulated compression screws were retrospectively analyzed. The VN angle, which was the angle between the fracture line and the vertical of the neck axis, and the Pauwels angle were measured respectively. The method of ICC was performed to assess the reproducibility of the two angles, and the absolute value of difference in pre-operative and post-operative radiographs was used to evaluate the uniformity of the two angles. These fractures were divided into four groups according to VN angle (VN50°) were respectively 0%, 1.46% (95% CI: 1.42-1.50) and 36.24% (95% CI: 34.93-37.54). The VN angle has a good inter-rater reproducibility, a higher reliability than the Pauwels angle and is closely related to the short-term prognosis of femoral neck fractures treated with cannulated compression screws. Level IV, retrospective diagnostic study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of reconstruction plate screw fixation and percutaneous cannulated screw fixation in treatment of Tile B1 type pubic symphysis diastasis: a finite element analysis and 10-year clinical experience.

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    Yu, Ke-He; Hong, Jian-Jun; Guo, Xiao-Shan; Zhou, Dong-Sheng

    2015-09-22

    The objective of this study is to compare the biomechanical properties and clinical outcomes of Tile B1 type pubic symphysis diastasis (PSD) treated by percutaneous cannulated screw fixation (PCSF) and reconstruction plate screw fixation (RPSF). Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to compare the biomechanical properties between PCSF and RPSF. CT scan data of one PSD patient were used for three-dimensional reconstructions. After a validated pelvic finite element model was established, both PCSF and RPSF were simulated, and a vertical downward load of 600 N was loaded. The distance of pubic symphysis and stress were tested. Then, 51 Tile type B1 PSD patients (24 in the PCSF group; 27 in the RPSF group) were reviewed. Intra-operative blood loss, operative time, and the length of the skin scar were recorded. The distance of pubic symphysis was measured, and complications of infection, implant failure, and revision surgery were recorded. The Majeed scoring system was also evaluated. The maximum displacement of the pubic symphysis was 0.408 and 0.643 mm in the RPSF and PCSF models, respectively. The maximum stress of the plate in RPSF was 1846 MPa and that of the cannulated screw in PCSF was 30.92 MPa. All 51 patients received follow-up at least 18 months post-surgery (range 18-54 months). Intra-operative blood loss, operative time, and the length of the skin scar in the PCSF group were significantly different than those in the RPSF group. No significant differences were found in wound infection, implant failure, rate of revision surgery, distance of pubic symphysis, and Majeed score. PCSF can provide comparable biomechanical properties to RPSF in the treatment of Tile B1 type PSD. Meanwhile, PCSF and RPSF have similar clinical and radiographic outcomes. Furthermore, PCSF also has the advantages of being minimally invasive, has less blood loss, and has shorter operative time and skin scar.

  10. Scaphoid Fracture Fixation with an Acutrak? Screw

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    Loving, Vilert A.; Richardson, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of fixation of a scaphoid fracture using an Acutrak? screw. This screw is cannulated and headless, which allows it to be implanted below the surface of the bone. It uses the same concept of variable thread pitch as the Herbert screw, but unlike the Herbert screw, is fully threaded, with continuously varying pitch along its length. This variable pitch creates constant compression across a fracture as the screw is advanced, and gives the screw its unique appearance. This featur...

  11. Evaluation of femoral head vascularization in slipped capital femoral epiphysis before and after cannulated screw fixation with use of contrast-enhanced MRI: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staatz, G.; Honnef, D.; Hohl, C.; Schmidt, T.; Guenther, R.W.; Kochs, A.; Roehrig, H.

    2007-01-01

    In this study we used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the vascularization of the femoral head in children with slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) before and after cannulated screw fixation. Eleven consecutive children with SCFE, seven boys and four girls, aged 10-15 years were included in the study. There were no preslips; four children had acute, three acute-on-chronic, and four chronic SCFE. The MRI examinations were performed in a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner with use of a coronal STIR sequence, a coronal contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo sequence, and a sagittal three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence. Morphology, signal intensities, and contrast-enhancement of the femoral head were assessed by two radiologists in consensus. Morphologic distortion of the physis, bone marrow edema within the metaphysis and epiphysis, and joint effusion were the preoperative MRI findings of SCFE in each child. In nine children, the vascularization of the femoral head before and after surgery was normal. In one child, a preoperative avascular zone in the superolateral aspect of the epiphysis revascularized completely after surgery. One child with severe SCFE developed avascular necrosis of the femoral head after open reduction of the slip. We conclude that MRI allows for accurate evaluation of the femoral head vascularization before and after surgery in children with SCFE. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of femoral head vascularization in slipped capital femoral epiphysis before and after cannulated screw fixation with use of contrast-enhanced MRI: initial results

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    Staatz, G. [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Honnef, D.; Hohl, C.; Schmidt, T.; Guenther, R.W. [University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Kochs, A.; Roehrig, H. [University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Aachen (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    In this study we used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the vascularization of the femoral head in children with slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) before and after cannulated screw fixation. Eleven consecutive children with SCFE, seven boys and four girls, aged 10-15 years were included in the study. There were no preslips; four children had acute, three acute-on-chronic, and four chronic SCFE. The MRI examinations were performed in a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner with use of a coronal STIR sequence, a coronal contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo sequence, and a sagittal three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence. Morphology, signal intensities, and contrast-enhancement of the femoral head were assessed by two radiologists in consensus. Morphologic distortion of the physis, bone marrow edema within the metaphysis and epiphysis, and joint effusion were the preoperative MRI findings of SCFE in each child. In nine children, the vascularization of the femoral head before and after surgery was normal. In one child, a preoperative avascular zone in the superolateral aspect of the epiphysis revascularized completely after surgery. One child with severe SCFE developed avascular necrosis of the femoral head after open reduction of the slip. We conclude that MRI allows for accurate evaluation of the femoral head vascularization before and after surgery in children with SCFE. (orig.)

  13. Sacroiliac Screw Fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W. van den Bosch

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this thesis is to evaluate three major aspects of the use of sacroiliac screws in patients with unstable pelvic ring fractures: the optimal technique for sacroiliac screw fixation, the reliability of peroperative fluoroscopy and the late results. We focused on the questions

  14. Percutaneous cannulated screw fixation of sacral fractures and sacroiliac joint disruptions with CT-controlled guidewires performed by interventionalists: single center experience in treating posterior pelvic instability.

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    Fischer, Sebastian; Vogl, Thomas J; Marzi, Ingo; Zangos, Stephan; Wichmann, Julian L; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Mack, Martin G; Schmidt, Sven; Eichler, Katrin

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate minimally invasive sacroiliac screw fixation for treatment of posterior pelvic instability with the help of CT controlled guidewires, assess its accuracy, safety and effectiveness, and discuss potential pitfalls. 100 guidewires and hollow titan screws were inserted in 38 patients (49.6±19.5 years) suffering from 35 sacral fractures and/or 16 sacroiliac joint disruptions due to 33 (poly-)traumatic, 2 osteoporotic and 1 post-infectious conditions. The guidewire and screw positions were analyzed in multiplanar reconstructions. The mean minimal distance between guidewire and adjacent neural foramina was 4.5±2.01mm, with a distinctly higher precision in S1 than S2. Eight guidewires showed cortical contacts, resulting in a total of 2% mismatched screws with subsequent wall violation. The fracture gaps were reduced from 3.6±0.53mm to 1.2±0.54mm. During follow-up 3 cases of minor iatrogenic sacral impaction (<5mm) due to the bolting and 2 cases of screw loosening were observed. Interventional time was 84.0min with a mean of 2.63 screws per patient whilst acquiring a mean of 93.7 interventional CT-images (DLP 336.7mGycm). The treatment of posterior pelvic instability with a guidewire-based screw insertion technique under CT-imaging results in a very high accuracy and efficacy with a low complication rate. Careful attention should be drawn to radiation levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Four quadrant parallel peripheral screw fixation for displaced femoral neck fractures in elderly patients

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    Bhava RJ Satish

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Closed reduction and cannulated cancellous screw fixation gives satisfactory functional results in large group of elderly patients. The four quadrant parallel peripheral (FQPP screw fixation technique gives good stability, allows controlled collapse, avoids fixation failure and achieves predictable bone healing in displaced femoral neck fracture in patients ≥50 years of age.

  16. Fixation of fractures of the condylar head of the mandible with a new magnesium-alloy biodegradable cannulated headless bone screw.

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    Leonhardt, H; Franke, A; McLeod, N M H; Lauer, G; Nowak, A

    2017-07-01

    It is difficult to fix fractures of the condylar head of the mandible. Several techniques have been described which show satisfactory outcomes, but stability can be questionable, and some can cause irritation of the soft tissues. We describe a technique and first results of treating such fractures with resorbable magnesium-based headless bone screws (Magnezix ® 2.7mm CS; Syntellix AG, Hanover, Germany). Copyright © 2017 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Intramedullary nailing combined with cannulated screw in treating femoral condyles fractures].

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    Shen, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Hao; Long, Da-Fu; Li, Zheng-Wen; Tan, Ying-Dong

    2017-07-25

    To observe the clinical effects of retrograde intramedullary nailing and cannulated screws in the treatment of femoral condylar fracture. From June 2009 to June 2015, 13 patients with femoral condyles fracture were treated by retrograde intramedullary nailing and cannulated screws including 6 males and 7 females with an average age of 46.1 years old ranging from 16 to 76 years old. There were 10 cases of closed fractures, 3 cases of open fraetures. According to AO classification criteriam, 4 cases were type C1, 7 cases were type C2, 2 cases were type C3. Postoperative reduction of fracture and the knee joint function recovery were observed. All patients were followed up for 12 to 36 months with a mean of 24 months. X-ray examination showed that the union time of fracture was 18 to 24 weeks, 21 weeks on average. There were no cases of loosening, breakage of internal fixators and re-fracture. Hospital for Special Surgery(HSS) knee score was 90.07±4.99 at 1 year after the operation. The clinical efficacy for retrograde intramedullary nailing and cannulated screw for the treatment of femoral condyles fracture was excellent. It can improve the anatomical reattachment rate and reduce the complications and promote the knee functional recovery.

  18. Effects on Subtalar Joint Stress Distribution After Cannulated Screw Insertion at Different Positions and Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cheng-song; Chen, Wan; Chen, Chen; Yang, Guang-hua; Hu, Chao; Tang, Kang-lai

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects on subtalar joint stress distribution after cannulated screw insertion at different positions and directions. After establishing a 3-dimensional geometric model of a normal subtalar joint, we analyzed the most ideal cannulated screw insertion position and approach for subtalar joint stress distribution and compared the differences in loading stress, antirotary strength, and anti-inversion/eversion strength among lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion, traditional screw insertion, and ideal cannulated screw insertion. The screw insertion approach allowing the most uniform subtalar joint loading stress distribution was lateral screw insertion near the border of the talar neck plus medial screw insertion close to the ankle joint. For stress distribution uniformity, antirotary strength, and anti-inversion/eversion strength, lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion was superior to traditional double-screw insertion. Compared with ideal cannulated screw insertion, slightly poorer stress distribution uniformity and better antirotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength were observed for lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion. Traditional single-screw insertion was better than double-screw insertion for stress distribution uniformity but worse for anti-rotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength. Lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion was slightly worse for stress distribution uniformity than was ideal cannulated screw insertion but superior to traditional screw insertion. It was better than both ideal cannulated screw insertion and traditional screw insertion for anti-rotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength. Lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion is an approach with simple localization, convenient operation, and good safety. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 3D printing-based minimally invasive cannulated screw treatment of unstable pelvic fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Leyi; Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Chunhui; Lou, Yiting; Guo, Xiaoshan; Wang, Jianshun

    2018-04-04

    Open reduction and internal fixation of pelvic fractures could restore the stability of the pelvic ring, but there were several problems. Minimally invasive closed reduction cannulated screw treatment of pelvic fractures has lots advantages. However, how to insert the cannulated screw safely and effectively to achieve a reliable fixation were still hard for orthopedist. Our aim was to explore the significance of 3D printing technology as a new method for minimally invasive cannulated screw treatment of unstable pelvic fracture. One hundred thirty-seven patients with unstable pelvic fractures from 2014 to 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. Based on the usage of 3D printing technology for preoperative simulation surgery, they were assigned to 3D printing group (n = 65) and control group (n = 72), respectively. These two groups were assessed in terms of operative time, intraoperative fluoroscopy, postoperative reduction effect, fracture healing time, and follow-up function. The effect of 3D printing technology was evaluated through minimally invasive cannulated screw treatment. There was no significant difference in these two groups with respect to general conditions, such as age, gender, fracture type, time from injury to operation, injury cause, and combined injury. Length of surgery and average number of fluoroscopies were statistically different for 3D printing group and the control group (p 3D printing group, versus 22/72 cases (30.6%) scored as excellent and 36/72 cases (50%) as good for the control group. On the other hand, using the Majeed functional scoring criteria, there were 27/65 (41.5%) excellent and 26/65 (40%) good cases for the 3D printing group in comparison to 30/72 (41.7%) and 28/72 (38.9%) cases for the control group, respectively. This suggests no significant difference between these two groups about the function outcomes. Full reduction and proper fixation of the pelvic ring and reconstruction of anatomical morphology are of great

  20. Comparison of cannulated screw and dynamic hip screw for the treatment of femoral neck fractures

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    Mehmet Gem

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to compare the results of surgeries for intracapsular femoral neck fractures with cannulated screws(CS and dynamic hip screw(DHS, due to lack of evidence which implant for internal fixation of femoral neck fractures is better . Methods: In our clinic between September 2005 and November 2009, 38 patients were operated with intracapsular transcervical fracture of collum femoris between17 to 65 years of age. Eighteen were operated with DHS(47.4% and 20 were operated with CS fixation(52.6%. Results: 16 patients (42.1% were female and 22 (57.9% were male and the mean age was 37.13 (17-65 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 18.05 (2-57 months. 26 patients were operated in 1st -3rd day (68.4%, 9 patients were operated in 4 to 7 day (23.7%, 3 patients were operated in after 7th day (7.9%. In the DHS group, 9 (50% patients had avascular necrosis (AVN, 6 (33.3% patients had implant failure, 3 (16.7% patients had delayed union, 5 (27.8% patients had nonunion, 1 (5.6% patient had infection, and 1 (5.6% patient had myositis ossificans. According to the criteria of Salvati Wilson hip joint assessment, in the DHS group 8 patients (44.4% were very good, 5 patients (27.8% were good, 5 patients (27.8% were moderate. Salvati score was evaluated as average of 28 points (16-40. İn the CS group, 8 (40% patients had AVN, 1 (5% had delayed union, 3 (15% of the cases had nonunion and 1 (5% patients infection was detected. According to the criteria of the Salvati-Wilson, in the CS group13 (65% of them are very good, 5 (25% were good, 2 (10% were assessed as moderate. Salvati score was evaluated as average of 33 points (18-40. In the CS group none of the patients had implant failure, in the DHS group 6 patients had implant failure (33.3% (p<0,05. Conclusion: Except for the high rate of implant failure detection in the DHS group method, no significant difference between complications and functional results between two groups. J Clin Exp Invest

  1. Cannulated screw and cable are superior to modified tension band in the treatment of transverse patella fractures.

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    Tian, Yun; Zhou, Fang; Ji, Hongquan; Zhang, Zhishan; Guo, Yan

    2011-12-01

    Although the modified tension band technique (eg, tension band supplemented by longitudinal Kirschner wires) has long been the mainstay for fixation of transverse fractures of the patella, it has shortcomings, such as bad reduction, loosening of implants, and skin irritation. We conducted a retrospective comparison of the modified tension band technique and the titanium cable-cannulated screw tension band technique. We retrospectively reviewed 101 patients aged 22 to 85 years (mean, 56.6 years) with AO/OTA 34-C1 fractures (n = 68) and 34-C2 fractures (n = 33). Fifty-two patients were in the modified tension band group and 49 were in the titanium cable-cannulated screw tension band group. Followup was at least 1 year (range, 1-3 years). Comparison criteria were fracture reduction, fracture healing time, and the Iowa score for knee function. The titanium cable-cannulated screw tension band group showed improved fracture reduction, reduced healing time, and better Iowa score, compared with the modified tension band group. In the modified tension band group, eight patients experienced wire migration, three of these requiring a second operation. There were no complications in the titanium cable-cannulated screw tension band group. The titanium cable-cannulated screw tension band technique showed superior results and should be considered as an alternative method for treatment of transverse patellar fractures. Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  2. Tricortical cervical inter-body screw fixation.

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    Goel A

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A new tricortical method of screw implantation for anterior cervical interbody plate fixation is described. The screws are placed obliquely such that they engage the anterior cortex of the body and traverse through the cortices adjoining the disc space. By this method the screws not only hold the plate firmly with a tricortical purchase, but by virtue of their course stabilize the two adjoining vertebral bodies by themselves. Sixteen patients were treated by this method. In three of these cases only tricortical screws without the metal plate were used for fixation. The advantages of the technique are discussed.

  3. Arthroscopy-assisted reduction of posteromedial tibial plateau fractures with buttress plate and cannulated screw construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chih-Hao; Cheng, Chun-Ying; Tsai, Min-Chain; Chang, Shih-Sheng; Chen, Alvin Chao-Yu; Chen, Yeung-Jen; Chan, Yi-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    To present the radiologic and clinical results of posteromedial fractures treated with arthroscopy-assisted reduction and buttress plate and cannulated screw fixation. Twenty-five patients with posteromedial tibial plateau fractures treated by the described technique were included in this study. According to the Schatzker classification, there were 5 type IV fractures (20%), 2 type V fractures (8%), and 18 type VI fractures (72%). The mean age at operation was 46 years (range, 21 to 79 years). The mean follow-up period was 86 months (range, 60 to 108 months). Clinical and radiologic outcomes were scored by the Rasmussen system. Subjective data were collected to assess swelling, difficulty climbing stairs, joint stability, ability to work and participate in sports, and overall patient satisfaction with recovery. Secondary osteoarthritis was diagnosed when radiographs showed a narrowed joint space in the injured knee at follow-up in comparison with the films taken at the time of injury. The mean postoperative Rasmussen clinical score was 25.9 (range, 18 to 29), and the mean radiologic score was 15.8 (range, 10 to 18). All 25 fractures achieved successful union, and 92% had good or excellent clinical and radiologic results. The 3 fracture types did not significantly differ in Rasmussen scores or rates of satisfactory results (P > .05). Secondary osteoarthritis was noted in 6 injured knees (24%). Arthroscopy-assisted reduction with buttress plate and cannulated screw fixation can restore posteromedial tibial plateau fractures of the knee with well-documented radiographic healing, good clinical outcomes, and low complication rates. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sacroiliac screw fixation for tile B fractures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, E.W. van den; Zwienen, C.M. van; Hoek van Dijke, G.A.; Snijders, C.J.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this comparative cadaveric study was to investigate whether the stability of partially unstable pelvic fractures can be improved by combining plate fixation of the symphysis with a posterior sacroiliac screw. METHODS: In six specimens, a Tile B1 (open-book) pelvic fracture

  5. Translaminar screw fixation in the lumbar spine: technique, indications, results

    OpenAIRE

    Grob, D.; Humke, T.

    1998-01-01

    Translaminar screw fixation of the lumbar spine represents a simple and effective technique for short segment fusion in the degenerative spine. Clinical experience with 173 patients who underwent translaminar screw fixation revealed a fusion rate of 94%. The indications for translaminar screw fixation as a primary fixation procedure are: segmental dysfunction, lumbar spinal stenosis with painful degenerative changes, segmental revision surgery after discectomies, and painful disc-related synd...

  6. Percutaneous anterior C1/2 transarticular screw fixation: salvage of failed percutaneous odontoid screw fixation for odontoid fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ai-Min; Jin, Hai-Ming; Lin, Zhong-Ke; Chi, Yong-Long; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to investigate the outcomes and safety of using percutaneous anterior C1/2 transarticular screw fixation as a salvage technique for odontoid fracture if percutaneous odontoid screw fixation fails. Methods Fifteen in 108 odontoid fracture patients (planned to be treated by percutaneous anterior odontoid screw fixation) were failed to introduce satisfactory odontoid screw trajectory. To salvage this problem, we chose the percutaneous anterior C1/2 trans...

  7. The Effect of Polymethyl Methacrylate Augmentation on the Primary Stability of Cannulated Bone Screws in an Anterolateral Plate in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: A Human Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüger, Matthias; Sellei, Richard M; Stoffel, Marcus; von Rüden, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Objective Expandable anterolateral plates facilitate the reduction of posttraumatic deformities of thoracolumbar spine injuries and are commonly used in cases of unstable injuries or compromised bone quality. In this in vitro study, the craniocaudal yield load of the osseous fixation of an anterior angular stable plate fixation system and the effect of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) screw augmentation on the primary stability of the screw-bone interface during kyphosis reduction was evaluated in 12 osteoporotic human thoracolumbar vertebrae. Methods The anterolateral stabilization device used for this study is comprised of two swiveling flanges and an expandable midsection. It facilitates the controlled reduction of kyphotic deformities in situ with a geared distractor. Single flanges were attached to 12 thoracolumbar vertebrae. Six specimens were augmented with PMMA by means of cannulated bone screws. The constructs were subjected to static, displacement-controlled craniocaudal loading to failure in a servohydraulic testing machine. Results The uncemented screws cut out at a mean 393 ± 66 N, whereas the cemented screws showed significantly higher yield load of 966 ± 166 N (p augmentation is an effective method to increase two- to threefold the primary stability of the screw-bone interface of an anterolateral spine stabilization system in osteoporotic bone. We recommend it in cases of severely compromised bone quality to reduce the risk of screw loosening during initial kyphosis correction and to increase long-term construct stability.

  8. Medial pelvic migration of the lag screw in a short gamma nail after hip fracture fixation: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xinning

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hip fractures are a common injury among the elderly. Internal fixation with an intramedullary (IM system has gained popularity for the treatment of intertrochanteric femur fractures. Multiple complications associated with IM fracture fixation have been described, however, we report a rare complication of medial pelvic migration of the lag screw of a short IM nail in a stable construct ten weeks post surgery. The patient was subsequently treated with Lag Screw removal and revision surgery with a shorter Lag Screw and an accessory cannulated screw acting as a de-rotational device. The patient did well with the revision surgery and was able to return to full activities.

  9. Internal bone transport using a cannulated screw as a mounting device in the treatment of a post-infective ulnar defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Havard, Heledd; Bijlsma, Paulien; Hill, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Bone transport techniques can be used to address the segmental bone loss occurring after debridement for infection. Secure fixation of the bone transport construct to the bone transport segment can be challenging, particularly if the bone is small and osteopenic. We report a case of a segmental ulnar bone defect in a young child treated with internal bone transport using a cannulated screw as the mounting device. We found this technique particularly useful in the treatment of bone loss secondary to infection, where previous treatment and prolonged immobilisation had led to osteopenia. This technique has not been previously reported.

  10. Continuous decompression of unicameral bone cyst with cannulated screws: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecelj, Janez; Suhodolcan, Lovro

    2007-09-01

    We determined the role of mechanical decompression in the resolution of unicameral bone cyst. A total of 69 children with unicameral bone cysts were treated either by (i) open curettage and bone grafting, (ii) steroid injection or (iii) cannulated screw insertion. During a mean follow-up of 69 months (range, 12-58), the cysts were evaluated by radiological criteria. The healing rates in the three groups were 25, 12 and 29% after the first treatment, and a further 50, 19 and 65% after the second. The study has demonstrated the advantages of the decompression technique for unicameral bone cysts over other treatment modalities studied.

  11. Biomechanical analysis of titanium fixation plates and screws in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hole Y plates with monocortical screws. 150 N incisal occlusal loads were simulated on the models. The commercial ANSYS software was utilized to calculate the Von Mises stresses on fixative appliances. Results: The highest Von Mises stress ...

  12. Sacroiliac screw fixation: A mini review of surgical technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Raphael Alvis-Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sacral percutaneous fixation has many advantages but can be associated with a significant exposure to X-ray radiation. Currently, sacroiliac screw fixation represents the only minimally invasive technique to stabilize the posterior pelvic ring. It is a technique that should be used by experienced surgeons. We present a practical review of important aspects of this technique.

  13. Biomechanical analysis of titanium fixation plates and screws in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: It was concluded that the use of double 4-hole straight plates provided the sufficient stability on the osteotomy site when compared with the other rigid fixation methods used in this study. Key words: Bone plates, bone screws, finite element analysis, jaw fixation techniques, mandible, mandibular osteotomy ...

  14. Adjacent-segment disease after thoracic pedicle screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Heary, Robert F; Agarwal, Prateek

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle screw fixation is a technique widely used to treat conditions ranging from spine deformity to fracture stabilization. Pedicle screws have been used traditionally in the lumbar spine; however, they are now being used with increasing frequency in the thoracic spine as a more favorable alternative to hooks, wires, or cables. Although safety concerns, such as the incidence of adjacent-segment disease (ASD) after cervical and lumbar fusions, have been reported, such issues in the thoracic spine have yet to be addressed thoroughly. Here, the authors review the literature on ASD after thoracic pedicle screw fixation and report their own experience specifically involving the use of pedicle screws in the thoracic spine. METHODS Select references from online databases, such as PubMed (provided by the US National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health), were used to survey the literature concerning ASD after thoracic pedicle screw fixation. To include the authors' experience at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was performed to determine the incidence of complications over a 13-year period in 123 consecutive adult patients who underwent thoracic pedicle screw fixation. Children, pregnant or lactating women, and prisoners were excluded from the review. By comparing preoperative and postoperative radiographic images, the occurrence of thoracic ASD and disease within the surgical construct was determined. RESULTS Definitive radiographic fusion was detected in 115 (93.5%) patients. Seven incidences of instrumentation failure and 8 lucencies surrounding the screws were observed. One patient was observed to have ASD of the thoracic spine. The mean follow-up duration was 50 months. CONCLUSIONS This long-term radiographic evaluation revealed the use of pedicle screws for thoracic fixation to be an effective stabilization modality. In particular, ASD seems to be less of a problem in the

  15. [Polymethylmethacrylate augmentation of bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screws for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H L; Li, C D; Yang, Z C; Yi, X D; Liu, H; Lu, H L; Li, H; Wang, Y

    2016-12-18

    To describe the application of polymethylmethacrylate augmentation of bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screws for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis. Observation group included 14 cases of degenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis received polymethylmethacrylate augmentation of bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screws from November 2014 to July 2015, control group included 12 cases of degenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis received polymethylmethacrylate augmentation with traditional pedicle screws.The operation time, blood loss, number of pedicle screws and number of augmented pedicle screws in the two groups were compared. The bone cement leakage and pulmonary bone cement embolism in the two groups were also compared. The fusion rate and pedicle screws loosening by lumbar X ray and dynamic X ray were evaluated. The clinical results were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) of pain on lumbar and lower limbers, lumbar Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores (JOA), Prolo functional scores and Oswestry disability (ODI) scores. Differences of operation time and blood loss in the two groups were not statistically significant. The average number of pedicle screws was 9.9±4.7 and the average number of augmented pedicle screws was 5.9±2.6 in observation group while the average number of pedicle screws was 7.1±2.8 and the average number of augmented pedicle screws was 3.0±1.9 in control group. The ratio of augmented pedicle screws was higher in observation group than in control group (0.69±0.30 vs.0.47±0.30,Pdegenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis was effective, with simple working processes and lower risk of bone cement leakage. The short-term clinical result was good.

  16. Computed tomography- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults: a new technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Browaeys, Patrick; Nouri, Yasir; Ibba, Caroline [Hopital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology, Nice (France); Hauger, Olivier [Hopital Pellegrin, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Bordeaux, Department of Radiology, Bordeaux (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Research Institute, Department of Radiology, Nice (France); Boileau, Pascal [Hopital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nice (France)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of computed tomography (CT)- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation for the treatment of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults. Ten consecutive adult patients (four men and six women; mean age: 57.1 [range, 44-78 years]) were prospectively treated by percutaneous screw fixation for low-grade (six grade 1 and four grade 2) isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5. For each patient, two 4.0-mm Asnis III cannulated screws were placed to fix the pars interarticularis defects. All procedures were performed under local anaesthesia by using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. Post-operative outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. The procedure time ranged from 45 to 60 min. The mean screw length was 27 mm (range, 24-32 mm). The VAS and ODI measurements {+-} SD decreased from 7.8 {+-} 0.9 preoperatively to 1.5 {+-} 1.1 at the last 2-year follow-up, and from 62.3 {+-} 17.2 to 15.1 {+-} 6.0, respectively (P < 0.001 in both cases). Neither slip progression nor screw failure was noted. This feasibility study showed that CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation could be a rapid, safe and effective method of treating low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. (orig.)

  17. Computed tomography- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults: a new technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Browaeys, Patrick; Nouri, Yasir; Ibba, Caroline; Hauger, Olivier; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Boileau, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of computed tomography (CT)- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation for the treatment of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults. Ten consecutive adult patients (four men and six women; mean age: 57.1 [range, 44-78 years]) were prospectively treated by percutaneous screw fixation for low-grade (six grade 1 and four grade 2) isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5. For each patient, two 4.0-mm Asnis III cannulated screws were placed to fix the pars interarticularis defects. All procedures were performed under local anaesthesia by using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. Post-operative outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. The procedure time ranged from 45 to 60 min. The mean screw length was 27 mm (range, 24-32 mm). The VAS and ODI measurements ± SD decreased from 7.8 ± 0.9 preoperatively to 1.5 ± 1.1 at the last 2-year follow-up, and from 62.3 ± 17.2 to 15.1 ± 6.0, respectively (P < 0.001 in both cases). Neither slip progression nor screw failure was noted. This feasibility study showed that CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation could be a rapid, safe and effective method of treating low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. (orig.)

  18. Stress and stability of plate-screw fixation and screw fixation in the treatment of Schatzker type IV medial tibial plateau fracture: a comparative finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaowei; Zhi, Zhongzheng; Yu, Baoqing; Chen, Fancheng

    2015-11-25

    The purpose of this study is to compare the stress and stability of plate-screw fixation and screw fixation in the treatment of Schatzker type IV medial tibial plateau fracture. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the medial tibial plateau fracture (Schatzker type IV fracture) was created. An axial force of 2500 N with a distribution of 60% to the medial compartment was applied to simulate the axial compressive load on an adult knee during single-limb stance. The equivalent von Mises stress, displacement of the model relative to the distal tibia, and displacement of the implants were used as the output measures. The mean stress value of the plate-screw fixation system was 18.78 MPa, which was significantly (P stress value of the triangular fragment in the plate-screw fixation system model was 42.04 MPa, which was higher than that in the screw fixation model (24.18 MPa). But the mean stress of the triangular fractured fragment in the screw fixation model was significantly higher in terms of equivalent von Mises stress (EVMS), x-axis, and z-axis (P < 0.001). This study demonstrated that the load transmission mechanism between plate-screw fixation system and screw fixation system was different and the stability provided by the plate-screw fixation system was superior to the screw fixation system.

  19. Closed reduction with CT-guided screw fixation for unstable sacroiliac joint fracture-dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskin, Kevin M.; Cahill, Ann Marie; Kaye, Robin D. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Born, Christopher T. [Temple University Hospital/Temple Children' s Hospital, Temple Sports Medicine, Marlton, NJ (United States); Grudziak, Jan S. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Towbin, Richard B.

    2004-12-01

    Unstable posterior pelvic ring fractures and dislocations are uncommon but potentially life-threatening injuries in children. Early definitive management reduces risk of immediate complications as well as chronic pain and gait dysfunction. Conventional operative therapy carries substantial risk of extensive blood loss and iatrogenic neurological and vascular injury. Minimally invasive image-guided intervention may further reduce immediate risk and improve long-term outcome. To describe CT-guided closed reduction and internal fixation (CRIF) and review outcomes of unstable fracture-dislocation of the sacroiliac (SI) joint in children. Between 2000 and 2003, three children (two girls, one boy) age 8-14 years were referred to interventional radiology for treatment of unstable SI joint fracture-dislocation not adequately treated with anterior external fixation alone. The three affected SI joints (two left, one right) were treated in a combined approach by pediatric interventional radiologists and orthopedic surgeons, using a percutaneous approach under CT guidance. Over a threaded guiding pin, 7.3 mm cannulated screws were used to achieve stable reduction of the affected SI joints. One screw was removed after slight (2 mm) migration. No neurovascular or other complications occurred. All patients had satisfactory healing with near-anatomic reduction, although recovery of the youngest was delayed by associated spinal injury. Compared to open surgical alternatives, CRIF under CT guidance reduces operating time, decreases blood loss, and allows early definitive fixation and immediate non-weight-bearing mobilization with a low rate of complication for unstable posterior pelvic ring fractures. In addition, CT-guided placement of the guide pin may allow safer screw positioning and may minimize the total number of screws needed to achieve pelvic stability. (orig.)

  20. Closed reduction with CT-guided screw fixation for unstable sacroiliac joint fracture-dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, Kevin M.; Cahill, Ann Marie; Kaye, Robin D.; Born, Christopher T.; Grudziak, Jan S.; Towbin, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Unstable posterior pelvic ring fractures and dislocations are uncommon but potentially life-threatening injuries in children. Early definitive management reduces risk of immediate complications as well as chronic pain and gait dysfunction. Conventional operative therapy carries substantial risk of extensive blood loss and iatrogenic neurological and vascular injury. Minimally invasive image-guided intervention may further reduce immediate risk and improve long-term outcome. To describe CT-guided closed reduction and internal fixation (CRIF) and review outcomes of unstable fracture-dislocation of the sacroiliac (SI) joint in children. Between 2000 and 2003, three children (two girls, one boy) age 8-14 years were referred to interventional radiology for treatment of unstable SI joint fracture-dislocation not adequately treated with anterior external fixation alone. The three affected SI joints (two left, one right) were treated in a combined approach by pediatric interventional radiologists and orthopedic surgeons, using a percutaneous approach under CT guidance. Over a threaded guiding pin, 7.3 mm cannulated screws were used to achieve stable reduction of the affected SI joints. One screw was removed after slight (2 mm) migration. No neurovascular or other complications occurred. All patients had satisfactory healing with near-anatomic reduction, although recovery of the youngest was delayed by associated spinal injury. Compared to open surgical alternatives, CRIF under CT guidance reduces operating time, decreases blood loss, and allows early definitive fixation and immediate non-weight-bearing mobilization with a low rate of complication for unstable posterior pelvic ring fractures. In addition, CT-guided placement of the guide pin may allow safer screw positioning and may minimize the total number of screws needed to achieve pelvic stability. (orig.)

  1. Mini-Fragment Fixation Is Equivalent to Bicortical Screw Fixation for Horizontal Medial Malleolus Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Adam M; Wolinsky, Philip R; Robbins, Michael A; Garcia, Tanya C; Amanatullah, Derek F

    2018-05-01

    Horizontal fractures of the medial malleolus occur through application of valgus or abduction force through the ankle that creates a tension failure of the medial malleolus. The authors hypothesize that mini-fragment T-plates may offer improved fixation, but the optimal fixation construct for these fractures remains unclear. Forty synthetic distal tibiae with identical osteotomies were randomized into 4 fixation constructs: (1) two parallel unicortical cancellous screws; (2) two parallel bicortical cortical screws; (3) a contoured mini-fragment T-plate with 2 unicortical screws in the fragment and 2 bicortical screws in the shaft; and (4) a contoured mini-fragment T-plate with 2 bicortical screws in the fragment and 2 unicortical screws in the shaft. Specimens were subjected to offset axial tension loading on a servohydraulic testing system and tracked using high-resolution video. Failure was defined as 2 mm of articular displacement. Analysis of variance followed by a Tukey-Kramer post hoc test was used to assess for differences between groups, with significance defined as Pfragment T-plate constructs (239±83 N/mm and 190±37 N/mm) and the bicortical screw construct (240±17 N/mm) were not statistically different. The mean stiffness values of both mini-fragment T-plate constructs and the bicortical screw construct were higher than that of a parallel unicortical screw construct (102±20 N/mm). Contoured T-plate constructs provide stiffer initial fixation than a unicortical cancellous screw construct. The T-plate is biomechanically equivalent to a bicortical screw construct, but may be superior in capturing small fragments of bone. [Orthopedics. 2018; 41(3):e395-e399.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Image Guidance to Aid Pedicle Screw Fixation of a Lumbar Fracture-Dislocation Injury in a Toddler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houten, John K; Nahkla, Jonathan; Ghandi, Shashank

    2017-09-01

    Pedicle screw fixation of the lumbar spine in children age <2 years is particularly challenging, as successful cannulation of the small pedicle dimensions requires a high level of precision and there are no implants specifically designed for the infant spine. Image-guided navigation is commonly used in adult spinal surgery and may be particularly helpful for the placement of spinal screws in areas where the bony anatomy is small and/or anatomically complex, as in the upper cervical area. A 19-month-old female presented with a fracture-dislocation injury of L1-2. Intraoperative imaging using the O-arm multidimensional imaging system was networked to a workstation, and neuronavigation was used to place pedicle instrumentation with 3.5-mm-diameter polyaxial screws designed for posterior cervical fixation. At a 48-month follow-up, the patient was neurologically intact, demonstrated normal physical development, and was engaging in normal physical activity for her age. Radiographs obtained approximately 4 years postsurgery showed no evidence of loss for fixation. Image-guided placement of pedicle screws may be a useful aid in achieving accurate and safe fixation in the small dimensions of the infant spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Resorbable screws for fixation of autologous bone grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar, GM; Liem, RSB; Bos, RRM; van der Wal, JE; Vissink, A

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of resorbable screws made of poly (D,L-lactide) acid (PDLLA) for fixation of autologous bone grafts related to graft regeneration and osseointegration of dental implants. In eight edentulous patients suffering from insufficient retention of their

  4. Biomechanics of lumbar cortical screw-rod fixation versus pedicle screw-rod fixation with and without interbody support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Orribo, Luis; Kalb, Samuel; Reyes, Phillip M; Chang, Steve W; Crawford, Neil R

    2013-04-15

    Seven different combinations of posterior screw fixation, with or without interbody support, were compared in vitro using nondestructive flexibility tests. To study the biomechanical behavior of a new cortical screw (CS) fixation construct relative to the traditional pedicle screw (PS) construct. The CS is an alternative to the PS for posterior fixation of the lumbar spine. The CS trajectory is more sagittally and cranially oriented than the PS, being anchored in the pars interarticularis. Like PS fixation, CS fixation uses interconnecting rods fastened with top-locking connectors. Stability after bilateral CS fixation was compared with stability after bilateral PS fixation in the setting of intact disc and with direct lateral interbody fixation (DLIF) or transforaminal lateral interbody fixation (TLIF) support. Standard nondestructive flexibility tests were performed in cadaveric lumbar specimens, allowing non-paired comparisons of specific conditions from 28 specimens (4 groups of 7) within a larger experiment of multiple hardware configurations. Condition tested and group from which results originated were as follows: (1) intact (all groups); (2) with L3-L4 bilateral PS-rods (group 1); (3) with bilateral CS-rods (group 2); (4) with DLIF (group 3); (5) with DLIF + CS-rods (group 4); (6) with DLIF + PS-rods (group 3); (7) with TLIF + CS-rods (group 2), and (8) with TLIF + PS-rods (group 2). To assess spinal stability, the mean range of motion, lax zone, and stiff zone at L3-L4 were compared during flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. With intact disc, stability was equivalent after PS-rod and CS-rod fixation, except that PS-rod fixation was stiffer during axial rotation. With DLIF support, there was no significant difference in stability between PS-rod and CS-rod fixation. With TLIF support, PS-rod fixation was stiffer than CS-rod fixation during lateral bending. Bilateral CS-rod fixation provided about the same stability in cadaveric specimens

  5. Percutaneous Facet Screw Fixation in the Treatment of Symptomatic Recurrent Lumbar Facet Joint Cyst: A New Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Gallo, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.gallo83@gmail.com; Bertrand, Anne-Sophie, E-mail: asbertrand3@hotmail.com [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice (France); Bard, Robert L., E-mail: rbard@cancerscan.com [New York Medical College (United States); Kelekis, Alexis, E-mail: akelekis@med.uoa.gr [University General Hospital “ATTIKON” (Greece)

    2016-01-15

    We present a case of percutaneous treatment of symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst resistant to all medical treatments including facet joint steroid injection. Percutaneous transfacet fixation was then performed at L4–L5 level with a cannulated screw using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. The procedure time was 30 min. Using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain decreased from 9.5, preoperatively, to 0 after the procedure. At 6-month follow-up, an asymptomatic cystic recurrence was observed, which further reduced at the 1-year follow-up. Pain remained stable (VAS at 0) during all follow-ups. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous cyst rupture associated with facet screw fixation could be an alternative to surgery in patients suffering from a symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst.

  6. Intermaxillary Fixation Screw Morbidity in Treatment of Mandibular Fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Florescu, Vlad-Andrei; Kofod, Thomas; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present retrospective study was to investigate the morbidity of screws used for intermaxillary fixation (IMF) in the treatment of mandibular fractures. A review of the published data was also performed for a comparison of outcomes. Our hypothesis was that the use of screws...... for IMF of mandibular fractures would result in minimal morbidity. Materials and Methods Patients treated for mandibular fractures from 2007 to 2013, using screws for IMF, using the international diagnosis code for mandibular fracture, DS026, were anonymously selected (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial...... Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark). The fracture type, radiographic findings, treatment modality, screw type and number, and root damage were recorded. For the outcome comparison, a review of the published data regarding iatrogenic dental root damage caused...

  7. Tapping insertional torque allows prediction for better pedicle screw fixation and optimal screw size selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Melvin D; Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A; Dmitriev, Anton E; Luhmann, Scott J

    2013-08-01

    There is currently no reliable technique for intraoperative assessment of pedicle screw fixation strength and optimal screw size. Several studies have evaluated pedicle screw insertional torque (IT) and its direct correlation with pullout strength. However, there is limited clinical application with pedicle screw IT as it must be measured during screw placement and rarely causes the spine surgeon to change screw size. To date, no study has evaluated tapping IT, which precedes screw insertion, and its ability to predict pedicle screw pullout strength. The objective of this study was to investigate tapping IT and its ability to predict pedicle screw pullout strength and optimal screw size. In vitro human cadaveric biomechanical analysis. Twenty fresh-frozen human cadaveric thoracic vertebral levels were prepared and dual-energy radiographic absorptiometry scanned for bone mineral density (BMD). All specimens were osteoporotic with a mean BMD of 0.60 ± 0.07 g/cm(2). Five specimens (n=10) were used to perform a pilot study, as there were no previously established values for optimal tapping IT. Each pedicle during the pilot study was measured using a digital caliper as well as computed tomography measurements, and the optimal screw size was determined to be equal to or the first size smaller than the pedicle diameter. The optimal tap size was then selected as the tap diameter 1 mm smaller than the optimal screw size. During optimal tap size insertion, all peak tapping IT values were found to be between 2 in-lbs and 3 in-lbs. Therefore, the threshold tapping IT value for optimal pedicle screw and tap size was determined to be 2.5 in-lbs, and a comparison tapping IT value of 1.5 in-lbs was selected. Next, 15 test specimens (n=30) were measured with digital calipers, probed, tapped, and instrumented using a paired comparison between the two threshold tapping IT values (Group 1: 1.5 in-lbs; Group 2: 2.5 in-lbs), randomly assigned to the left or right pedicle on each

  8. Fracture healing using degradable magnesium fixation plates and screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaya, Amy; Yoshizawa, Sayuri; Verdelis, Kostas; Noorani, Sabrina; Costello, Bernard J; Sfeir, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Internal bone fixation devices made with permanent metals are associated with numerous long-term complications and may require removal. We hypothesized that fixation devices made with degradable magnesium alloys could provide an ideal combination of strength and degradation, facilitating fracture fixation and healing while eliminating the need for implant removal surgery. Fixation plates and screws were machined from 99.9% pure magnesium and compared with titanium devices in a rabbit ulnar fracture model. Magnesium device degradation and the effect on fracture healing and bone formation were assessed after 4 weeks. Fracture healing with magnesium device fixation was compared with that of titanium devices using qualitative histologic analysis and quantitative histomorphometry. Micro-computed tomography showed device degradation after 4 weeks in vivo. In addition, 2-dimensional micro-computed tomography slices and histologic staining showed that magnesium degradation did not inhibit fracture healing or bone formation. Histomorphology showed no difference in bone-bridging fractures fixed with magnesium and titanium devices. Interestingly, abundant new bone was formed around magnesium devices, suggesting a connection between magnesium degradation and bone formation. Our results show potential for magnesium fixation devices in a loaded fracture environment. Furthermore, these results suggest that magnesium fixation devices may enhance fracture healing by encouraging localized new bone formation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. History of Retractor Technologies for Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin

    2016-02-01

    Minimally invasive techniques aimed at minimizing surgery-associated risk and morbidity of spinal surgery have increased in popularity in recent years. Their potential advantages include reduced length of hospital stay, blood loss, and requirement for post-operative analgesia and earlier return to work. One such minimally invasive technique is the use of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, which is paramount for promoting rigid and stable constructs and fusion in the context of trauma, tumors, deformity and degenerative disease. Percutaneous pedicle screw insertion can be an intimidating prospect for surgeons who have only been trained in open techniques. One of the ongoing challenges of this percutaneous system is to provide the surgeon with adequate access to the pedicle entry anatomy and adequate tactile or visual feedback concerning the position and anatomy of the rod and set-screw construct. This review article discusses the history and evolution of percutaneous pedicle screw retractor technologies and outlines the advances over the last decade in the rapidly expanding field of minimal access surgery for posterior pedicle screw based spinal stabilization. As indications for percutaneous pedicle screw techniques expand, the nuances of the minimally invasive surgery techniques and associated technologies will also multiply. It is important that experienced surgeons have access to tools that can improve access with a greater degree of ease, simplicity and safety. We here discuss the technical challenges of percutaneous pedicle screw retractor technologies and a variety of systems with a focus on the pros and cons of various retractor systems. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Mechanical comparison between lengthened and short sacroiliac screws in sacral fracture fixation: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Zhang, S; Sun, T; Wang, D; Lian, W; Tan, J; Zou, D; Zhao, Y

    2013-09-01

    To compare the stability of lengthened sacroiliac screw and standard sacroiliac screw for the treatment of unilateral vertical sacral fractures; to provide reference for clinical applications. A finite element model of Tile type C pelvic ring injury (unilateral Denis type II fracture of the sacrum) was produced. The unilateral sacral fractures were fixed with lengthened sacroiliac screw and sacroiliac screw in six different types of models respectively. The translation and angle displacement of the superior surface of the sacrum (in standing position on both feet) were measured and compared. The stability of one lengthened sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 or S2 segment is superior to that of one sacroiliac screw fixation in the same sacral segment. The stability of one lengthened sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 and S2 segments respectively is superior to that of one sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 and S2 segments respectively. The stability of one lengthened sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 and S2 segments respectively is superior to that of one lengthened sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 or S2 segment. The stability of one sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 and S2 segments respectively is markedly superior to that of one sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 or S2 segment. The vertical and rotational stability of lengthened sacroiliac screw fixation and sacroiliac screw fixation in S2 is superior to that of S1. In a finite element model of type C pelvic ring disruption, S1 and S2 lengthened sacroiliac screws should be utilized for the fixation as regularly as possible and the most stable fixation is the combination of the lengthened sacroiliac screws of S1 and S2 segments. Even if lengthened sacroiliac screws cannot be systematically used due to specific conditions, one sacroiliac screw fixation in S1 and S2 segments respectively is recommended. No matter which kind of sacroiliac screw is used, if only one screw can be implanted, the fixation in S2 segment is more recommended

  11. Fixation of displaced subcapital femoral fractures. Compression screw fixation versus double divergent pins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, J; Howie, C R; Armour, P C

    1988-03-01

    One hundred and twenty-seven consecutive patients with displaced subcapital fractures of the femoral neck (Garden Grade III or IV) all under 80 years of age and independently mobile, were randomly allocated to fixation with either double divergent pins or a single sliding screw-plate device. The incidence of non-union and infection in the sliding screw-plate group was significantly higher, and we believe that when internal fixation is considered appropriate multiple pinning should be used. Mobility after treatment was disappointing in about half of the patients, and we feel that internal fixation can only be justified in patients who are physiologically well preserved and who maintain a high level of activity.

  12. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using unilateral pedicle screw fixation plus contralateral translaminar facet screw fixation in lumbar degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fubing; Jiang, Chun; Cao, Yuanwu; Jiang, Xiaoxing; Feng, Zhenzhou

    2014-07-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) has been used in lumbar degenerative diseases. Some researchers have applied unilateral fixation in TLIF to reduce operational trauma without compromising the clinical outcome, but it is always suspected biomechanically unstable. The supplementary contralateral translaminar facet screw (cTLFS) seemed to be able to overcome the inherent drawbacks of unilateral pedicle screw (uPS) fixation theoretically. This study evaluates the safety, feasibility and efficacy of TLIF using uPS with cTLFS fixation in the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD). 50 patients (29 male) underwent the aforementioned surgical technique for their LDD between December 2009 and April 2012. The results were evaluated based on visual analogue scale (VAS) of the leg and back, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were recorded. The radiographic examinations in form of X-ray, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging was done preoperatively and 1 week, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months postoperatively. The student t-test was used for comparison between the preoperative values and postoperative counterparts. P degenerative diseases short termly.

  13. Comparison of screw fixation with elastic fixation methods in the treatment of syndesmosis injuries in ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, Mustafa; Donmez, Ferdi; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Cakmak, Selami; Mutlu, Serhat; Guler, Olcay

    2015-07-01

    17 patients with ankle syndesmosic injury were treated with a 4.5mm single cortical screw fixation (passage of screw 4 cortices) and 15 patients were treated with single-level elastic fixation material. All patients were evaluated according to the AOFAS ankle and posterior foot scale at the third, sixth and twelfth months after the fixation. The ankle range of movement was recorded together with the healthy side. The Student's t test was used for statistical comparisons. No statistical significant difference was observed between the AOFAS scores (p>0.05). The range of dorsiflexion and plantar flexion motion of the elastic fixation group at the 6th and 12th months were significantly better compared to the screw fixation group (pankle syndesmosis injuries. The unnecessary need of a second surgical intervention for removal of the fixation material is another advantageous aspect of this method of fixation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Biomechanical Comparison of External Fixation and Compression Screws for Transverse Tarsal Joint Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latt, L Daniel; Glisson, Richard R; Adams, Samuel B; Schuh, Reinhard; Narron, John A; Easley, Mark E

    2015-10-01

    Transverse tarsal joint arthrodesis is commonly performed in the operative treatment of hindfoot arthritis and acquired flatfoot deformity. While fixation is typically achieved using screws, failure to obtain and maintain joint compression sometimes occurs, potentially leading to nonunion. External fixation is an alternate method of achieving arthrodesis site compression and has the advantage of allowing postoperative compression adjustment when necessary. However, its performance relative to standard screw fixation has not been quantified in this application. We hypothesized that external fixation could provide transverse tarsal joint compression exceeding that possible with screw fixation. Transverse tarsal joint fixation was performed sequentially, first with a circular external fixator and then with compression screws, on 9 fresh-frozen cadaveric legs. The external fixator was attached in abutting rings fixed to the tibia and the hindfoot and a third anterior ring parallel to the hindfoot ring using transverse wires and half-pins in the tibial diaphysis, calcaneus, and metatarsals. Screw fixation comprised two 4.3 mm headless compression screws traversing the talonavicular joint and 1 across the calcaneocuboid joint. Compressive forces generated during incremental fixator foot ring displacement to 20 mm and incremental screw tightening were measured using a custom-fabricated instrumented miniature external fixator spanning the transverse tarsal joint. The maximum compressive force generated by the external fixator averaged 186% of that produced by the screws (range, 104%-391%). Fixator compression surpassed that obtainable with screws at 12 mm of ring displacement and decreased when the tibial ring was detached. No correlation was found between bone density and the compressive force achievable by either fusion method. The compression across the transverse tarsal joint that can be obtained with a circular external fixator including a tibial ring exceeds that

  15. Percutaneous Intramedullary Screw Fixation of Distal Fibula Fractures: A Case Series and Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loukachov, Vladimir V.; Birnie, Merel F. N.; Dingemans, Siem A.; de Jong, Vincent M.; Schepers, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The current reference standard for unstable ankle fractures is open reduction and internal fixation using a plate and lag screws. This approach requires extensive dissection and wound complications are not uncommon. The use of intramedullary screw fixation might overcome these issues. The aim of our

  16. Percutaneous CT and Fluoroscopy-Guided Screw Fixation of Pathological Fractures in the Shoulder Girdle: Technical Report of 3 Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juliengarnon@gmail.com; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: Guillaume.koch@gmail.com [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Ramamurthy, Nitin, E-mail: Nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: caudjean@yahoo.fr [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Rao, Pramod, E-mail: pramodrao@me.com [University of Strasbourg, ICube (France); Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: Georgia.tsoumakidou@chru-strasbourg.fr; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: Afshin.gangi@chru-strasbourg.fr [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

    2016-09-15

    ObjectiveTo review our initial experience with percutaneous CT and fluoroscopy-guided screw fixation of pathological shoulder-girdle fractures.Materials and MethodsBetween May 2014 and June 2015, three consecutive oncologic patients (mean age 65 years; range 57–75 years) with symptomatic pathological shoulder-girdle fractures unsuitable for surgery and radiotherapy underwent percutaneous image-guided screw fixation. Fractures occurred through metastases (n = 2) or a post-ablation cavity (n = 1). Mechanical properties of osteosynthesis were adjudged superior to stand-alone cementoplasty in each case. Cannulated screws were placed under combined CT and fluoroscopic guidance with complementary radiofrequency ablation or cementoplasty to optimise local palliation and secure screw fixation, respectively, in two cases. Follow-up was undertaken every few weeks until mortality or most recent appointment.ResultsFour pathological fractures were treated in three patients (2 acromion, 1 clavicular, 1 coracoid). Mean size of associated lesion was 2.6 cm (range 1–4.5 cm). Technical success was achieved in all cases (100 %), without complications. Good palliation and restoration of mobility were observed in two cases at 2–3 months; one case could not be followed due to early post-procedural oncologic mortality.ConclusionPercutaneous image-guided shoulder-girdle osteosynthesis appears technically feasible with good short-term efficacy in this complex patient subset. Further studies are warranted to confirm these promising initial results.

  17. Percutaneous CT and Fluoroscopy-Guided Screw Fixation of Pathological Fractures in the Shoulder Girdle: Technical Report of 3 Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnon, Julien; Koch, Guillaume; Ramamurthy, Nitin; Caudrelier, Jean; Rao, Pramod; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Gangi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo review our initial experience with percutaneous CT and fluoroscopy-guided screw fixation of pathological shoulder-girdle fractures.Materials and MethodsBetween May 2014 and June 2015, three consecutive oncologic patients (mean age 65 years; range 57–75 years) with symptomatic pathological shoulder-girdle fractures unsuitable for surgery and radiotherapy underwent percutaneous image-guided screw fixation. Fractures occurred through metastases (n = 2) or a post-ablation cavity (n = 1). Mechanical properties of osteosynthesis were adjudged superior to stand-alone cementoplasty in each case. Cannulated screws were placed under combined CT and fluoroscopic guidance with complementary radiofrequency ablation or cementoplasty to optimise local palliation and secure screw fixation, respectively, in two cases. Follow-up was undertaken every few weeks until mortality or most recent appointment.ResultsFour pathological fractures were treated in three patients (2 acromion, 1 clavicular, 1 coracoid). Mean size of associated lesion was 2.6 cm (range 1–4.5 cm). Technical success was achieved in all cases (100 %), without complications. Good palliation and restoration of mobility were observed in two cases at 2–3 months; one case could not be followed due to early post-procedural oncologic mortality.ConclusionPercutaneous image-guided shoulder-girdle osteosynthesis appears technically feasible with good short-term efficacy in this complex patient subset. Further studies are warranted to confirm these promising initial results.

  18. The Improvement of Bone-Tendon Fixation by Porous Titanium Interference Screw: A Rabbit Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-I; Chen, Chih-Yu; Huang, Shu-Wei; Yang, Kuo-Yi; Lin, Tzu-Hung; Chen, San-Yuan; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2018-05-04

    The interference screw is a widely used fixation device in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgeries. Despite the generally satisfactory results, problems of using interference screws were reported. By using additive manufacturing (AM) technology, we developed an innovative titanium alloy (Ti 6 Al 4 V) interference screw with rough surface and inter-connected porous structure designs to improve the bone-tendon fixation. An innovative Ti 6 Al 4 V interference screws were manufactured by AM technology. In vitro mechanical tests were performed to validate its mechanical properties. Twenty-seven New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into control and AM screw groups for biomechanical analyses and histological analysis at 4, 8 and 12 weeks postoperatively; while micro-CT analysis was performed at 12 weeks postoperatively. The biomechanical tests showed that the ultimate failure load in the AM interference screw group was significantly higher than that in the control group at all tested periods. These results were also compatible with the findings of micro-CT and histological analyses. In micro-CT analysis, the bone-screw gap was larger in the control group; while for the additive manufactured screw, the screw and bone growth was in close contact. In histological study, the bone-screw gaps were wider in the control group and were almost invisible in the AM screw group. The innovative AM interference screws with surface roughness and inter-connected porous architectures demonstrated better bone-tendon-implant integration, and resulted in stronger biomechanical characteristics when compared to traditional screws. These advantages can be transferred to future interference screw designs to improve their clinical performance. The AM interference screw could improve graft fixation and eventually result in better biomechanical performance of the bone-tendon-screw construct. The innovative AM interference screws can be transferred to future

  19. Open reduction and internal fixation: Screw injury - Retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF is a standard surgical procedure in jaw trauma and in orthognathic surgery. Insertion of screws is a significant risk for accidental tooth root injury with varying outcomes. Contrary evidences are found in literature due to a variety of study designs. This study was undertaken to address the lacunae and possibly estimate the difference in occurrence of tooth damage during or after ORIF between trauma and planned osteotomies. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the data of ORIF in either trauma or orthognathic surgery fulfilling inclusion and exclusion criteria were collected and analyzed. Results: There were 1632 patients fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria and formed the study group, of which 663 were in orthognathic surgery, of whom 210 had bimaxillary orthognathic surgery. In the trauma group, 358 patients had fractures involving both jaws whereas 272 had maxilla alone and 339 had mandibular fractures alone. On comparing the outcome, of the 9073 screws studied, 93.40% were not involved in any contact with the teeth, 6.3% were in category of potential hits (near apices or the root surfaces, and only 0.28% had evidence of root damage with the screws. It is observed that molar and premolar had a significant difference in terms of the type of surgery (P ≤ 0.05 whereas canine (P = 0.75 and incisor (P = 0.67 showed no statistical difference. Conclusion: ORIF when used as mentioned is a safe way for the management of fractures. The incidence of root injury is not uncommon but can be avoided with careful planning and execution.

  20. 2D and 3D assessment of sustentaculum tali screw fixation with or without Screw Targeting Clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, A Siebe; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Vellekoop, Leonie; Knops, Simon P; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Verhofstad, Michael H J

    2017-12-01

    Precise placement of sustentaculum tali screw(s) is essential for restoring anatomy and biomechanical stability of the calcaneus. This can be challenging due to the small target area and presence of neurovascular structures on the medial side. The aim was to evaluate the precision of positioning of the subchondral posterior facet screw and processus anterior calcanei screw with or without a Screw Targeting Clamp. The secondary aim was to evaluate the added value of peroperative 3D imaging over 2D radiographs alone. Twenty Anubifix™ embalmed, human anatomic lower limb specimens were used. A subchondral posterior facet screw and a processus anterior calcanei screw were placed using an extended lateral approach. A senior orthopedic trauma surgeon experienced in calcaneal fracture surgery and a senior resident with limited experience in calcaneal surgery performed screw fixation in five specimens with and in five specimens without the clamp. 2D lateral and axial radiographs and a 3D recording were obtained postoperatively. Anatomical dissection was performed postoperatively as a diagnostic golden standard in order to obtain the factual screw positions. Blinded assessment of quality of fixation was performed by two surgeons. In 2D, eight screws were considered malpositioned when placed with the targeting device versus nine placed freehand. In 3D recordings, two additional screws were malpositioned in each group as compared to the golden standard. As opposed to the senior surgeon, the senior resident seemed to get the best results using the Screw Targeting Clamp (number of malpositioned screws using freehand was eight, and using the targeting clamp five). In nine out of 20 specimens 3D images provided additional information concerning target area and intra-articular placement. Based on the 3D assessment, five additional screws would have required repositioning. Except for one, all screw positions were rated equally after dissection when compared with 3D examinations

  1. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing.

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    Sophie Le Cann

    Full Text Available The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level, the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout.

  2. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cann, Sophie; Cachon, Thibaut; Viguier, Eric; Miladi, Lotfi; Odent, Thierry; Rossi, Jean-Marie; Chabrand, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age) of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic) and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical) on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old) tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level), the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout.

  3. [Clinical efficacy of unilateral percutaneous transfacet screws combined with contralateral pedicle screw versus bilateral pedicle screws fixation in the treatment of the degenerative lumbar disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Rong-Xue; Zhou, Hui; Pan, Hao; Yue, Jun; Chen, Hui-Guo; Yang, He-Jie; Jia, Gao-Yong; Wang, Dong; Lin, Yan; Xu, Hua-Zi

    2017-09-25

    To investigate the surgical outcome of unilateral pedicle screw(UPS) after TLIF technique combined with contralateral percutaneous transfacet screw(PTS) fixation vs bilateral pedicle screws(BPS) fixation in treatment of degenerative lumbar disease. From January 2009 to June 2012, 46 patients with degenerative lumbar diseases, including 30 males and 16 females with an average age of 51.5 years old, who were divided into two groups according to different fixation methods. Twenty-two cases underwent UPS after TLIF technique combined with contralateral PTS fixation (group A), while the others underwent BPS fixation(group B). The relative data were analyzed, such as blood loss volume, operative time, fusion rate, ODI score, JOA score and so on. All the patients were followed up for 1 to 3 years with an average of 22 months. Except one case of each group was uncertainty fusion, the rest have obtained bony fusion, and the fusion rates in group A and B were 95.5% and 95.8%, respectively. No displacement and breakage of screw were found during follow-up. Operative time and blood loss volume in group A were better than of group B( P 0.05). Two approaches had similar clinical outcomes for degenerative lumbar disease with no severe instability. Compared with BPS fixation, the UPS after TLIF technique and contralateral PTS fixation has the advantages of less trauma, shorter operative time and less blood loss, and it is a safe and feasible surgical technique.

  4. Comparison of open reduction versus minimally invasive surgical approaches on screw position in canine sacroiliac lag-screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déjardin, Loïc M; Marturello, Danielle M; Guiot, Laurent P; Guillou, Reunan P; DeCamp, Charles E

    2016-07-19

    To compare accuracy and consistency of sacral screw placement in canine pelves treated for sacroiliac luxation with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) or minimally invasive osteosynthesis (MIO) techniques. Unilateral sacroiliac luxations created experimentally in canine cadavers were stabilized with an iliosacral lag screw applied via ORIF or MIO techniques (n = 10/group). Dorsoventral and craniocaudal screw angles were measured using computed tomography multiplanar reconstructions in transverse and dorsal planes, respectively. Ratios between pilot hole length and sacral width (PL/SW-R) were obtained. Data between groups were compared statistically (p sacroiliac luxations provides more accurate and consistent sacral screw placement than ORIF. With proper techniques, iatrogenic neurological damage can be avoided with both techniques. The PL /SW-R, which relates to safe screw fixation, also demonstrates that screw penetration of at least 60% of the sacral width is achievable regardless of surgical approach. These findings, along with the limited dissection needed for accurate sacral screw placement, suggest that MIO of sacroiliac luxations is a valid alternative to ORIF.

  5. Intramedullary screw fixation with bone autografting to treat proximal fifth metatarsal metaphyseal-diaphyseal fracture in athletes: a case series

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    Tsukada Sachiyuki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed unions or refractures are not rare following surgical treatment for proximal fifth metatarsal metaphyseal-diaphyseal fractures. Intramedullary screw fixation with bone autografting has the potential to resolve the issue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the result of the procedure. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed 15 athletes who underwent surgical treatment for proximal fifth metatarsal metaphyseal-diaphyseal fracture. Surgery involved intramedullary cannulated cancellous screw fixation after curettage of the fracture site, followed by bone autografting. Postoperatively, patients remain non weight-bearing in a splint or cast for two weeks and without immobilization for an additional two weeks. Full weight-bearing was allowed six weeks postoperatively. Running was permitted after radiographic bone union, and return-to-play was approved after gradually increasing the intensity. Results All patients returned to their previous level of athletic competition. Mean times to bone union, initiation of running, and return-to-play were 8.4, 8.8, and 12.1 weeks, respectively. Although no delayed unions or refractures was observed, distal diaphyseal stress fractures at the distal tip of the screw occurred in two patients and a thermal necrosis of skin occurred in one patient. Conclusions There were no delayed unions or refractures among patients after carrying out a procedure in which bone grafts were routinely performed, combined with adequate periods of immobilization and non weight-bearing. These findings suggest that this procedure may be useful option for athletes to assuring return to competition level.

  6. Cortical bone trajectory screw fixation versus traditional pedicle screw fixation for 2-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion: comparison of surgical outcomes for 2-level degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw technique is a new nontraditional pedicle screw (PS) insertion method. However, the biomechanical behavior of multilevel CBT screw/rod fixation remains unclear, and surgical outcomes in patients after 2-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using CBT screw fixation have not been reported. Thus, the purposes of this study were to examine the clinical and radiological outcomes after 2-level PLIF using CBT screw fixation for 2-level degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DS) and to compare these outcomes with those after 2-level PLIF using traditional PS fixation. METHODS The study included 22 consecutively treated patients who underwent 2-level PLIF with CBT screw fixation for 2-level DS (CBT group, mean follow-up 39 months) and a historical control group of 20 consecutively treated patients who underwent 2-level PLIF using traditional PS fixation for 2-level DS (PS group, mean follow-up 35 months). Clinical symptoms were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system. Bony union was assessed by dynamic plain radiographs and CT images. Surgery-related complications, including symptomatic adjacent-segment disease (ASD), were examined. RESULTS The mean operative duration and intraoperative blood loss were 192 minutes and 495 ml in the CBT group and 218 minutes and 612 ml in the PS group, respectively (p 0.05, respectively). The mean JOA score improved significantly from 12.3 points before surgery to 21.1 points (mean recovery rate 54.4%) at the latest follow-up in the CBT group and from 12.8 points before surgery to 20.4 points (mean recovery rate 51.8%) at the latest follow-up in the PS group (p > 0.05). Solid bony union was achieved at 90.9% of segments in the CBT group and 95.0% of segments in the PS group (p > 0.05). Symptomatic ASD developed in 2 patients in the CBT group (9.1%) and 4 patients in the PS group (20.0%, p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Two-level PLIF with CBT screw fixation

  7. Individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in upper cervical spine.

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    Fei Guo

    Full Text Available Pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine is a difficult and high-risk procedure. The screw is difficult to place rapidly and accurately, and can lead to serious injury of spinal cord or vertebral artery. The aim of this study was to design an individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine.Using CT thin slices data, we employed computer software to design the navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine (atlas and axis. The upper cervical spine models and navigation templates were produced by 3D printer with equal proportion, two sets for each case. In one set (Test group, pedicle screws fixation were guided by the navigation template; in the second set (Control group, the screws were fixed under fluoroscopy. According to the degree of pedicle cortex perforation and whether the screw needed to be refitted, the fixation effects were divided into 3 types: Type I, screw is fully located within the vertebral pedicle; Type II, degree of pedicle cortex perforation is 1 mm or with the poor internal fixation stability and in need of renovation. Type I and Type II were acceptable placements; Type III placements were unacceptable.A total of 19 upper cervical spine and 19 navigation templates were printed, and 37 pedicle screws were fixed in each group. Type I screw-placements in the test group totaled 32; Type II totaled 3; and Type III totaled 2; with an acceptable rate of 94.60%. Type I screw placements in the control group totaled 23; Type II totaled 3; and Type III totaled 11, with an acceptable rate of 70.27%. The acceptability rate in test group was higher than the rate in control group. The operation time and fluoroscopic frequency for each screw were decreased, compared with control group.The individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation is easy and safe, with a high success rate in the upper cervical spine surgery.

  8. Individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in upper cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei; Dai, Jianhao; Zhang, Junxiang; Ma, Yichuan; Zhu, Guanghui; Shen, Junjie; Niu, Guoqi

    2017-01-01

    Pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine is a difficult and high-risk procedure. The screw is difficult to place rapidly and accurately, and can lead to serious injury of spinal cord or vertebral artery. The aim of this study was to design an individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine. Using CT thin slices data, we employed computer software to design the navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine (atlas and axis). The upper cervical spine models and navigation templates were produced by 3D printer with equal proportion, two sets for each case. In one set (Test group), pedicle screws fixation were guided by the navigation template; in the second set (Control group), the screws were fixed under fluoroscopy. According to the degree of pedicle cortex perforation and whether the screw needed to be refitted, the fixation effects were divided into 3 types: Type I, screw is fully located within the vertebral pedicle; Type II, degree of pedicle cortex perforation is stability and no need to renovate; Type III, degree of pedicle cortex perforation is >1 mm or with the poor internal fixation stability and in need of renovation. Type I and Type II were acceptable placements; Type III placements were unacceptable. A total of 19 upper cervical spine and 19 navigation templates were printed, and 37 pedicle screws were fixed in each group. Type I screw-placements in the test group totaled 32; Type II totaled 3; and Type III totaled 2; with an acceptable rate of 94.60%. Type I screw placements in the control group totaled 23; Type II totaled 3; and Type III totaled 11, with an acceptable rate of 70.27%. The acceptability rate in test group was higher than the rate in control group. The operation time and fluoroscopic frequency for each screw were decreased, compared with control group. The individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation is easy and safe

  9. Fixation strength of biocomposite wedge interference screw in ACL reconstruction: effect of screw length and tunnel/screw ratio. A controlled laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary stability of the graft is essential in anterior cruciate ligament surgery. An optimal method of fixation should be easy to insert and provide great resistance against pull-out forces. A controlled laboratory study was designed to test the primary stability of ACL tendinous grafts in the tibial tunnel. The correlation between resistance to traction forces and the cross-section and length of the screw was studied. Methods The tibial phase of ACL reconstruction was performed in forty porcine tibias using digital flexor tendons of the same animal. An 8 mm tunnel was drilled in each specimen and two looped tendons placed as graft. Specimens were divided in five groups according to the diameter and length of the screw used for fixation. Wedge interference screws were used. Longitudinal traction was applied to the graft with a Servohydraulic Fatigue System. Load and displacement were controlled and analyzed. Results The mean loads to failure for each group were 295,44 N (Group 1; 9 × 23 screw, 564,05 N (Group 2; 9 × 28, 614,95 N (Group 3; 9 × 35, 651,14 N (Group 4; 10 × 28 and 664,99 (Group 5; 10 × 35. No slippage of the graft was observed in groups 3, 4 and 5. There were significant differences in the load to failure among groups (ANOVA/P Conclusions Longer and wider interference screws provide better fixation in tibial ACL graft fixation. Short screws (23 mm do not achieve optimal fixation and should be implanted only with special requirements.

  10. Treatment of unicameral calcaneal bone cysts in children: review of literature and results using a cannulated screw for continuous decompression of the cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraph, Vinay; Zwick, Ernst-Bernhard; Maizen, Claudia; Schneider, Frank; Linhart, Wolfgang E

    2004-01-01

    Nine unicameral bone cysts of the calcaneus in children were managed surgically using the technique of continuous decompression with titanium cannulated cancellous screws. The average age of the patients at surgery was 12.8 years. At follow-up a minimum of 2 years after surgery, eight cysts showed complete healing; one patient showed healing with residuals. Irritation at the screw insertion site necessitated early removal of the screw in one patient; implant-related problems were not observed in the other patients. Patients were allowed to bear weight after surgery. Implant extraction was performed after full consolidation of the cyst and was uneventful in all patients. A review of the literature and the different treatment modalities used for managing calcaneal cysts is also presented.

  11. Axial loading screw fixation for chevron type osteotomies of the distal first metatarsal: a retrospective outcomes analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan M; Fallat, Lawrence M; Kish, John P

    2014-01-01

    The distal chevron osteotomy is a widely accepted technique for the treatment of hallux abductovalgus deformity. Although the osteotomy is considered to be stable, displacements of the capital fragment has been described. We propose a new method for fixation of the osteotomy involving the axial loading screw (ALS) used in addition to single screw fixation. We believe this method will provide a more mechanically stable construct. We reviewed the charts of 46 patients in whom 52 feet underwent a distal chevron osteotomy that was fixated with either 1 screw or 2 screws that included the ALS. We hypothesized that the ALS group would have fewer displacements and would heal more quickly than the single screw fixation group. We found that the group with ALS fixation had healed at a mean of 6.5 weeks and that the group with single screw fixation had healed at 9.53 weeks (p = .001). Also, 8 cases occurred of displacement of the capital fragment in the single screw, control group compared with 2 cases of displacement in the ALS group. However, this finding was not statistically significant. The addition of the ALS to single screw fixation allowed the patients to heal approximately 3 weeks earlier than single screw fixation alone. The ALS is a fixation option for the surgeon to consider when osseous correction of hallux abducto valgus is performed. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stress analysis in a pedicle screw fixation system with flexible rods in the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungsoo; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Lee, SuKyoung

    2010-01-01

    Breakage of screws has been one of the most common complications in spinal fixation systems. However, no studies have examined the breakage risk of pedicle screw fixation systems that use flexible rods, even though flexible rods are currently being used for dynamic stabilization. In this study, the risk of breakage of screws for the rods with various flexibilities in pedicle screw fixation systems is investigated by calculating the von Mises stress as a breakage risk factor using finite element analysis. Three-dimensional finite element models of the lumbar spine with posterior one-level spinal fixations at L4-L5 using four types of rod (a straight rod, a 4 mm spring rod, a 3 mm spring rod, and a 2 mm spring rod) were developed. The von Mises stresses in both the pedicle screws and the rods were analysed under flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsion moments of 10 Nm with a follower load of 400 N. The maximum von Mises stress, which was concentrated on the neck region of the pedicle screw, decreased as the flexibility of the rod increased. However, the ratio of the maximum stress in the rod to the yield stress increased substantially when a highly flexible rod was used. Thus, the level of rod flexibility should be considered carefully when using flexible rods for dynamic stabilization because the intersegmental motion facilitated by the flexible rod results in rod breakage.

  13. [Clinical application of atlas translaminar screws fixation in treatment of atlatoaxial instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoyou; Fu, Shijie; Shen, Huarui; Guan, Taiyuan; Xu, Ping

    2013-10-01

    To explore the effectiveness of fixation of atlas translaminar screws in the treatment of atlatoaxial instability. A retrospective analysis was made on the clinical data of 32 patients with atlatoaxial instability treated with atlantoaxial trans-pedicle screws between March 2007 and August 2009. Of them, 7 patients underwent atlas translaminar screws combined with axis transpedicle screws fixation because of fracture types, anatomic variation, and intraoperative reason, including 5 males and 2 females with an average age of 48.2 years (range, 35-69 years). A total of 9 translaminar screws were inserted. Injury was caused by traffic accident in 4 cases, falling from height in 2 cases, and crushing in 1 case. Two cases had simple odontoid fracture (Anderson type II), and 5 cases had odontoid fracture combined with other injuries (massa lateralis atlantis fracture in 2, atlantoaxial dislocation in 1, and Hangman fracture in 2). The interval between injury and operation was 4-9 days (mean, 6 days). The preoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was 8.29 +/- 1.60. The X-ray films showed good position of the screws. Healing of incision by first intention was obtained, and no patient had injuries of the spinal cord injury, nerve root, and vertebral artery. Seven cases were followed up 9-26 months (mean, 14 months). Good bone fusion was observed at 8 months on average (range, 6-11 months). No loosening, displacement, and breakage of internal fixation, re-dislocation and instability of atlantoaxial joint, or penetrating of pedicle screw into the spinal canal and the spinal cord occurred. The JOA score was significantly improved to 15.29 +/- 1.38 at 6 months after operation (t = 32.078, P = 0.000). Atlas translaminar screws fixation has the advantages of firm fixation, simple operating techniques, and relative safety, so it may be a remedial measure of atlatoaxial instability.

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Posterior C1 and C2 Screw-Rod Fixation for Atlantoaxial Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işik, Hasan Serdar; Sandal, Evren; Çağli, Sedat

    2017-06-14

    In this study, we aimed at sharing our experiences and contributing to the literature by making a retrospective analysis of the patients we operated with screw-rod system for atlantoaxial instability in our clinic. Archive files of adult patients, who were operated for posterior C1-C2 stabilization with screw and rod in our clinic between January 2006 and January 2016, were analyzed. 28 patients, who had pre and post-operative images, follow-up forms and who were followed for at least one year, were analyzed. Preoperative clinical and radiological records, preoperative observations, postoperative complications, and clinical responses were evaluated. The average age of 28 patients (F:13 M:19) was 44.7 (21-73). Fixation was performed with C1-C2 screw-rod system on the basis of the following diagnoses; type 2 odontoid fracture (16), basilar invagination (5), C1-C2 instability (5), and atlantoaxial subluxation secondary to rheumatoid arthritis (2). Lateral mass screws were inserted at C1 segment. C2 screws inserted were bilateral pedicle in 12 cases, bilateral pars in 4, bilateral laminar in 8 and one side pars, one side laminar in 4 cases. There was no screw malposition. Neither implant failure nor recurrent instability was observed during follow-up. Significant clinical improvement was reported according to the assessments done with JOA and VAS scores. C1-C2 screw fixation is regarded as a more successful and safe method than other fixation methods in surgical treatment of atlantoaxial instability considering complications, success in reduction, fusion and fixation strength. C2 laminar screw technique is as successful as the other alternatives in fixation and fusion.

  15. Pedicle screw-rod fixation: a feasible treatment for dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellegen, Anna R; Willems, Nicole; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Meij, Björn P

    2015-12-07

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis is a common problem in large breed dogs. For severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis, conservative treatment is often not effective and surgical intervention remains as the last treatment option. The objective of this retrospective study was to assess the middle to long term outcome of treatment of severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis with pedicle screw-rod fixation with or without evidence of radiological discospondylitis. Twelve client-owned dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis underwent pedicle screw-rod fixation of the lumbosacral junction. During long term follow-up, dogs were monitored by clinical evaluation, diagnostic imaging, force plate analysis, and by using questionnaires to owners. Clinical evaluation, force plate data, and responses to questionnaires completed by the owners showed resolution (n = 8) or improvement (n = 4) of clinical signs after pedicle screw-rod fixation in 12 dogs. There were no implant failures, however, no interbody vertebral bone fusion of the lumbosacral junction was observed in the follow-up period. Four dogs developed mild recurrent low back pain that could easily be controlled by pain medication and an altered exercise regime. Pedicle screw-rod fixation offers a surgical treatment option for large breed dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis with or without evidence of radiological discospondylitis in which no other treatment is available. Pedicle screw-rod fixation alone does not result in interbody vertebral bone fusion between L7 and S1.

  16. Radiofrequency-activated PMMA-augmentation through cannulated pedicle screws: A cadaver study to determine the biomechanical benefits in the osteoporotic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karius, T; Deborre, C; Wirtz, D C; Burger, C; Prescher, A; Fölsch, A; Kabir, K; Pflugmacher, R; Goost, H

    2017-01-01

    PMMA-augmentation of pedicle screws strengthens the bone-screw-interface reducing cut-out risk. Injection of fluid cement bears a higher risk of extravasation, with difficulty of application because of inconsistent viscosity and limited injection time. To test a new method of cement augmentation of pedicle screws using radiofrequency-activated PMMA, which is suspected to be easier to apply and have less extravasations. Twenty-seven fresh-frozen human cadaver lumbar spines were divided into 18 osteoporotic (BMD ≤ 0.8 g/cm2) and 9 non-osteoporotic (BMD > 0.8 g/cm2) vertebral bodies. Bipedicular cannulated pedicle screws were implanted into the vertebral bodies; right screws were augmented with ultra-high viscosity PMMA, whereas un-cemented left pedicle screws served as negative controls. Cement distribution was controlled with fluoroscopy and CT scans. Axial pullout forces of the screws were measured with a material testing machine, and results were analyzed statistically. Fluoroscopy and CT scans showed that in all cases an adequately big cement depot with homogenous form and no signs of extravasation was injected. Pullout forces showed significant differences (p < 0.001) between the augmented and non-augmented pedicle screws for bone densities below 0.8 g/cm2 (661.9 N ± 439) and over 0.8 g/cm2 (744.9 N ± 415). Pullout-forces were significantly increased in osteoporotic as well as in non-osteoporotic vertebral bodies without a significant difference between these groups using this standardized, simple procedure with increased control and less complications like extravasation.

  17. Measurement of Tip Apex Distance and Migration of Lag Screws and Novel Blade Screw Used for the Fixation of Intertrochanteric Fractures.

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    Jesse Chieh-Szu Yang

    Full Text Available Fixation with a dynamic hip screw (DHS is one of the most common methods for stabilizing intertrochanteric fractures, except for unstable and reverse oblique fracture types. However, failure is often observed in osteoporotic patients whereby the lag screw effectively 'cuts out' through the weak bone. Novel anti-migration blades have been developed to be used in combination with a lag screw ('Blade Screw' to improve the fixation strength in osteoporotic intertrochanteric fractures. An in-vitro biomechanical study and a retrospective clinical study were performed to evaluate lag screw migration when using the novel Blade Screw and a traditional threaded DHS. The biomechanical study showed both the Blade Screw and DHS displayed excessive migration (≥10 mm before reaching 20,000 loading cycles in mild osteoporotic bone, but overall migration of the Blade Screw was significantly less (p ≤ 0.03. Among the patients implanted with a Blade Screw in the clinical study, there was no significant variation in screw migration at 3-months follow-up (P = 0.12. However, the patient's implanted with a DHS did display significantly greater migration (P<0.001 than those implanted with the Blade Screw. In conclusion, the Blade Screw stabilizes the bone fragments during dynamic loading so as to provide significantly greater resistance to screw migration in patients with mild osteoporosis.

  18. Cervical pedicle screw fixation at C6 and C7 A cadaveric study

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    Ye Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The intersection of the horizontal line through the midpoint of the transverse process root and vertical line through the intersection of the posterolateral and posterior planes of the isthmus can be used as an entry point for C6 and C7 pedicle screw fixation. The screws should be inserted at 60 or 90° with the posterolateral isthmus in the horizontal plane and at 75° with the posterior isthmus in the sagittal plane. The LSC should not exceed 30 mm.

  19. Chitosan-coated Stainless Steel Screws for Fixation in Contaminated Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Alex H.; Bumgardner, Joel D.; Yang, Yunzhi; Moseley, Jon; Haggard, Warren O.

    2008-01-01

    Stainless steel screws and other internal fixation devices are used routinely to stabilize bacteria-contaminated bone fractures from multiple injury mechanisms. In this preliminary study, we hypothesize that a chitosan coating either unloaded or loaded with an antibiotic, gentamicin, could lessen or prevent these devices from becoming an initial nidus for infection. The questions investigated for this hypothesis were: (1) how much of the sterilized coating remains on the screw with simulated ...

  20. Cement Augmentation in Sacroiliac Screw Fixation Offers Modest Biomechanical Advantages in a Cadaver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, Georg; Dodd, Andrew E; Unno, Florence; Wong, Angus; Amiri, Shahram; Lefaivre, Kelly A; Guy, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    Sacroiliac screw fixation in elderly patients with pelvic fractures is prone to failure owing to impaired bone quality. Cement augmentation has been proposed as a possible solution, because in other anatomic areas this has been shown to reduce screw loosening. However, to our knowledge, this has not been evaluated for sacroiliac screws. We investigated the potential biomechanical benefit of cement augmentation of sacroiliac screw fixation in a cadaver model of osteoporotic bone, specifically with respect to screw loosening, construct survival, and fracture-site motion. Standardized complete sacral ala fractures with intact posterior ligaments in combination with ipsilateral upper and lower pubic rami fractures were created in osteoporotic cadaver pelves and stabilized by three fixation techniques: sacroiliac (n = 5) with sacroiliac screws in S1 and S2, cemented (n = 5) with addition of cement augmentation, and transsacral (n = 5) with a single transsacral screw in S1. A cyclic loading protocol was applied with torque (1.5 Nm) and increasing axial force (250-750 N). Screw loosening, construct survival, and sacral fracture-site motion were measured by optoelectric motion tracking. A sample-size calculation revealed five samples per group to be required to achieve a power of 0.80 to detect 50% reduction in screw loosening. Screw motion in relation to the sacrum during loading with 250 N/1.5 Nm was not different among the three groups (sacroiliac: 1.2 mm, range, 0.6-1.9; cemented: 0.7 mm, range, 0.5-1.3; transsacral: 1.1 mm, range, 0.6-2.3) (p = 0.940). Screw subsidence was less in the cemented group (3.0 mm, range, 1.2-3.7) compared with the sacroiliac (5.7 mm, range, 4.7-10.4) or transsacral group (5.6 mm, range, 3.8-10.5) (p = 0.031). There was no difference with the numbers available in the median number of cycles needed until failure; this was 2921 cycles (range, 2586-5450) in the cemented group, 2570 cycles (range, 2500-5107) for the sacroiliac specimens, and

  1. Posterior pelvic ring fractures: Closed reduction and percutaneous CT-guided sacroiliac screw fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Messmer, Peter; Stock, Klaus-Wilhelm; Suhm, Norbert; Baumann, Bernard; Regazzoni, Pietro; Steinbrich, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the midterm results of closed reduction and percutaneous fixation (CRPF) with computed tomography (CT)-guided sacroiliac screw fixation in longitudinal posterior pelvic ring fractures. Methods. Thirteen patients with 15 fractures were treated. Eleven patients received a unilateral, two a bilateral, screw fixation. Twenty-seven screws were implanted. Continuous on-table traction was used in six cases. Mean radiological follow-up was 13 months. Results. Twenty-five (93%) screws were placed correctly. There was no impingement of screws on neurovascular structures. Union occurred in 12 (80%), delayed union in 2 (13%), and nonunion in 1 of 15 (7%) fractures. There was one screw breakage and two axial dislocations. Conclusion. Sacroiliac CRPF of longitudinal fractures of the posterior pelvic ring is technically simple, minimally invasive, well localized, and stable. It should be done by an interventional/surgical team. CT is an excellent guiding modality. Closed reduction may be a problem and succeeds best when performed as early as possible

  2. Comparison of migration behavior between single and dual lag screw implants for intertrochanteric fracture fixation

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    Katonis Pavlos G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lag screw cut-out failure following fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in osteoporotic bone remains an unsolved challenge. This study tested if resistance to cut-out failure can be improved by using a dual lag screw implant in place of a single lag screw implant. Migration behavior and cut-out resistance of a single and a dual lag screw implant were comparatively evaluated in surrogate specimens using an established laboratory model of hip screw cut-out failure. Methods Five dual lag screw implants (Endovis, Citieffe and five single lag screw implants (DHS, Synthes were tested in the Hip Implant Performance Simulator (HIPS of the Legacy Biomechanics Laboratory. This model simulated osteoporotic bone, an unstable fracture, and biaxial rocking motion representative of hip loading during normal gait. All constructs were loaded up to 20,000 cycles of 1.45 kN peak magnitude under biaxial rocking motion. The migration kinematics was continuously monitored with 6-degrees of freedom motion tracking system and the number of cycles to implant cut-out was recorded. Results The dual lag screw implant exhibited significantly less migration and sustained more loading cycles in comparison to the DHS single lag screw. All DHS constructs failed before 20,000 cycles, on average at 6,638 ± 2,837 cycles either by cut-out or permanent screw bending. At failure, DHS constructs exhibited 10.8 ± 2.3° varus collapse and 15.5 ± 9.5° rotation around the lag screw axis. Four out of five dual screws constructs sustained 20,000 loading cycles. One dual screw specimens sustained cut-out by medial migration of the distal screw after 10,054 cycles. At test end, varus collapse and neck rotation in dual screws implants advanced to 3.7 ± 1.7° and 1.6 ± 1.0°, respectively. Conclusion The single and double lag screw implants demonstrated a significantly different migration resistance in surrogate specimens under gait loading simulation with

  3. Comparison of skeletal stability after sagittal split ramus osteotomy among mono-cortical plate fixation, bi-cortical plate fixation, and hybrid fixation using absorbable plates and screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Koichiro; Moroi, Akinori; Yoshizawa, Kunio; Hotta, Asami; Tsutsui, Takamitsu; Fukaya, Kenichi; Hiraide, Ryota; Takayama, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuta; Saito, Yuki

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine skeletal stability and plate breakage after sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) with the mono-cortical plate fixation, bi-cortical plate fixation, and hybrid fixation techniques using absorbable plates and screws. A total of 76 Japanese patients diagnosed with mandibular prognathism with and without maxillary deformity were divided into 3 groups randomly. A total of 28 patients underwent SSRO with mono-cortical plate fixation, 23 underwent SSRO with bi-cortical plate fixation, and 25 underwent SSRO with hybrid fixation. Skeletal stability and horizontal condylar angle were analyzed by axial, frontal, and lateral cephalograms from before the operation to 1 year postoperatively. Breakage of the plate and screws was observed by 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) immediately after surgery and after 1 year. Although there was a significant difference between the mono-cortical plate fixation group and hybrid fixation group regarding right MeAg in T1 (P = 0.0488) and occlusal plane in T1 (P = 0.0346), there were no significant differences between the groups for the other measurements in each time interval. In 2 cases, namely, 6 sides in the mono-cortical plate fixation group, breakage of the absorbable plate was found by 3DCT. However, there was no breakage in the bi-cortical plate fixation group and hybrid fixation group. This study results suggested that there were no significant differences in the postoperative skeletal stability among the 3 groups, and bi-cortical fixation as well as hybrid fixation was a reliable and useful method to prevent plate breakage even if an absorbable material was used. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Percutaneous Intramedullary Screw Fixation of Distal Fibula Fractures: A Case Series and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukachov, Vladimir V; Birnie, Merel F N; Dingemans, Siem A; de Jong, Vincent M; Schepers, Tim

    The current reference standard for unstable ankle fractures is open reduction and internal fixation using a plate and lag screws. This approach requires extensive dissection and wound complications are not uncommon. The use of intramedullary screw fixation might overcome these issues. The aim of our study was to provide an overview of the published data regarding intramedullary screw fixation of fibula fractures combined with a small consecutive case series. We performed a search of published studies to identify the studies in which fibula fractures were treated with percutaneous intramedullary screw fixation. Additionally, all consecutive patients treated for an unstable ankle fracture in a level 1 trauma center using an intramedullary screw were retrospectively included. The literature search identified 6 studies with a total of 180 patients. Wound infection was seen in 1 patient (0.6%), anatomic reduction was achieved in 168 patients (93.3%), and a loss of reduction was seen in 2 patients (1.1%). Implant removal was deemed necessary in 3 patients (1.7%) and nonunion was seen is 2 patients (1.1%). A total of 11 patients, in whom no wound complications occurred, were included in our study. The follow-up duration was a minimum of 12 months. A secondary dislocation was seen in 1 patient, and delayed union was observed after 7.5 months in 1 other patient. In conclusion, intramedullary screw fixation is a safe and adequate method to use for fibula fractures, with a low risk of wound complications. Additional research regarding functional outcome is warranted. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Design of three-dimensional visualization based on the posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai XU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish a three-dimensional visualization model of posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation.Methods A patient with lumbar intervertebral disc hernia and another patient with compression fracture of lumbar vertebra were involved in the present study.Both patients underwent multi-slice spiral CT scan before and after lumbar pedicle screw fixation.The degree of preoperative vertebral compression,vertebral morphology before and after surgery,postoperative pedicle screw position,and decompression effects were observed.The original data of the multi-slice spiral CT were inputted into the computer.The three-dimensional reconstructed images of the lumbar and implanted screws were obtained using the software Amira 4.1 to show the three-dimensional shape of the lumbar vertebrae before and after surgery and the location of the implanted screws.Results The morphology and structure of the lumbar vertebrae before and after surgery and of the implanted screws were reconstructed using the digital navigation platform.The reconstructed 3D images could be displayed in multicolor,transparent,or arbitrary combinations.In the 3D surface reconstruction images,the location and structure of the implanted screws could be clearly observed,and the decompression of the spinal cord or nerve roots and the severity of the fracture and the compression of lumbar vertebrae could be fully evaluated.The reconstructed images before operation revealed the position of the vertebral pedicles and provided reference for intraoperative localization.Conclusions The three-dimensional computerized reconstructions of lumbar pedicle screw fixation may be valuable in basic research,clinical experiment,and surgical planning.The software Amira is one of the bases of three-dimensional reconstruction.

  6. Radiographic study of the fifth metatarsal for optimal intramedullary screw fixation of Jones fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochenjele, George; Ho, Bryant; Switaj, Paul J; Fuchs, Daniel; Goyal, Nitin; Kadakia, Anish R

    2015-03-01

    Jones fractures occur in the relatively avascular metadiaphyseal junction of the fifth metatarsal (MT), which predisposes these fractures to delayed union and nonunion. Operative treatment with intramedullary (IM) screw fixation is recommended in certain cases. Incorrect screw selection can lead to refractures, nonunion, and cortical blowout fractures. A better understanding of the anatomy of the fifth MT could aid in preoperative planning, guide screw size selection, and minimize complications. We retrospectively identified foot computed tomographic (CT) scans of 119 patients that met inclusion criteria. Using interactive 3-dimensional (3-D) models, the following measurements were calculated: MT length, "straight segment length" (distance from the base of the MT to the shaft curvature), and canal diameter. The diaphysis had a lateroplantar curvature where the medullary canal began to taper. The average straight segment length was 52 mm, and corresponded to 68% of the overall length of the MT from its proximal end. The medullary canal cross-section was elliptical rather than circular, with widest width in the sagittal plane and narrowest in coronal plane. The average coronal canal diameter at the isthmus was 5.0 mm. A coronal diameter greater than 4.5 mm at the isthmus was present in 81% of males and 74% of females. To our knowledge, this is the first anatomic description of the fifth metatarsal based on 3-D imaging. Excessive screw length could be avoided by keeping screw length less than 68% of the length of the fifth metatarsal. A greater than 4.5 mm diameter screw might be needed to provide adequate fixation for most study patients since the isthmus of the medullary canal for most were greater than 4.5 mm. Our results provide an improved understanding of the fifth metatarsal anatomy to guide screw diameter and length selection to maximize screw fixation and minimize complications. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Surgical strategies to improve fixation in the osteoporotic spine: the effects of tapping, cement augmentation, and screw trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, Craig A; Reiter, Michael; Pfeiffer, Ferris; Choma, Theodore J

    2014-02-01

    Study Design Biomechanical study of pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic bone. Objective To investigate whether it is better to tap or not tap osteoporotic bone prior to placing a cement-augmented pedicle screw. Methods Initially, we evaluated load to failure of screws placed in cancellous bone blocks with or without prior tapping as well as after varying the depths of tapping prior to screw insertion. Then we evaluated load to failure of screws placed in bone block models with a straight-ahead screw trajectory as well as with screws having a 23-degree cephalad trajectory (toward the end plate). These techniques were tested with nonaugmented (NA) screws as well as with bioactive cement (BioC) augmentation prior to screw insertion. Results In the NA group, pretapping decreased fixation strength in a dose-dependent fashion. In the BioC group, the tapped screws had significantly greater loads to failure (p tapping prior to cement augmentation will substantially improve fixation when compared with not tapping. Angulating screws more cephalad also seems to enhance aging spine fixation.

  8. Evaluation of the Effect of Fixation Angle between Polyaxial Pedicle Screw Head and Rod on the Failure of Screw-Rod Connection

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    Engin Çetin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Polyaxial screws had been only tested according to the ASTM standards (when they were perpendicularly positioned to the rod. In this study, effects of the pedicle screws angled fixation to the rod on the mechanical properties of fixation were investigated. Materials and Method. 30 vertically fixed screws and 30 screws fixed with angle were used in the study. Screws were used in three different diameters which were 6.5 mm, 7.0 mm, and 7.5 mm, in equal numbers. Axial pull-out and flexion moment tests were performed. Test results compared with each other using appropriate statistical methods. Results. In pull-out test, vertically fixed screws, in 6.5 mm and 7.0 mm diameter, had significantly higher maximum load values than angled fixed screws with the same diameters (P<0.01. Additionally, vertically fixed screws, in all diameters, had significantly greater stiffness according to corresponding size fixed with angle (P<0.005. Conclusion. Fixing the pedicle screw to the rod with angle significantly decreased the pull-out stiffness in all diameters. Similarly, pedicle screw instrumentation fixed with angle decreased the minimum sagittal angle between the rod and the screw in all diameters for flexion moment test but the differences were not significant.

  9. Double Threaded Screw Fixation for Bilateral Stress Fracture of the Medial Malleolus

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    Ryo Kanto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year-old college basketball player presented with continued ankle pain. A radiographic examination showed bilateral medial malleolus stress fractures. Considering the prolonged history and refractory nature of this injury, surgery was adopted as a treatment option. At surgery, the fracture site was percutaneously fixed using two cannulated double threaded screws. Surgery for each side was sequentially performed two months apart. Prompt bony healing was attained after surgery, and the patient could return to his previous sports level six months after the first surgery without subsequent recurrence.

  10. Short Segment Fixation Versus Short Segment Fixation With Pedicle Screws at the Fracture Level for Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anghel S

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The most prevailing surgical procedure in the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures, Short Segment Fixation (SSF, is often followed by loss of correction or hardware failure which may be significant enough to require another surgical intervention. In order to take advantage of its benefits but to avoid or diminish the risk and impact of associated drawbacks, some other alternatives have been lately developed among which we refer to short segment fixation with intermediate screws (SSF+IS. This article provides a comparative picture over the effectiveness of the two above-mentioned surgical treatments, focusing on their potential to prevent the loss of correction.

  11. Collateral ligament reconstruction of the chronic thumb injury with bio-tenodesis screw fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gvozdenovic, Robert; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new technique for the reconstruction of chronic lesions of the collateral ligaments of the metacarpophalangeal ligaments of the thumb, using a Bio-Tenodesis screw for the fixation of a tendon graft in a triangular manner with proximal apex and allowing early mobilization, starting 2...

  12. Does a trochanteric lag screw improve fixation of vertically oriented femoral neck fractures? A biomechanical analysis in cadaveric bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawks, Michael A; Kim, Hyunchul; Strauss, Joseph E; Oliphant, Bryant W; Golden, Robert D; Hsieh, Adam H; Nascone, Jason W; O'Toole, Robert V

    2013-10-01

    We assessed the biomechanical performances of a trochanteric lag screw construct and a traditional inverted triangle construct in the treatment of simulated Pauwels type 3 femoral neck fractures. An inverted triangle construct (three 7.3-mm cannulated screws placed in inverted triangle orientation) and a trochanteric lag screw construct (two 7.3-mm cannulated screws placed across the superior portion of the femoral neck and one 4.5-mm lag screw placed perpendicular to the fracture in superolateral to inferomedial orientation) were tested in nine matched pairs of non-osteoporotic human cadaveric femora. We used a previously described vertically oriented femoral neck fracture model and testing protocol that incrementally loaded the constructs along the mechanical axis of the femur to 1400 N. Specimens that survived incremental loading underwent cyclic loading. Apparent construct stiffness, force at 3mm of displacement, and survival of incremental loading were recorded. The trochanteric lag screw group had a 70% increase in stiffness (261 N/mm [29 standard deviation] versus 153 N/mm [16 standard deviation]; P=0.026) and a 43% increase in force required for displacement (620 N versus 435 N; P=0.018) compared with the inverted triangle group. One trochanteric lag screw and no inverted triangle specimen survived incremental loading. A trochanteric lag screw construct applied to vertically oriented femoral neck fractures provides marked improvement in mechanical performance compared with the inverted triangle construct. © 2013.

  13. Role of Appositional Screw Fixation in Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis for Distal Tibial Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kyu-Hyun; Won, Yougun; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Oh, Jin-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2015-09-01

    To determine the effect of interfragmentary appositional (gap-closing) screw fixation in minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) for distal tibial fractures on the clinical and radiologic results. Prospective nonrandomized study. Level I trauma center. Sixty patients who were diagnosed as distal metadiaphyseal oblique or spiral tibial fracture without displaced articular fragment. Thirty patients (group A) of the 60 patients were treated with MIPO without appositional screw fixation, and the other 30 (group B) were treated with the screw. Radiologic union, clinical union, clinical functional score [American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score], and complications. The time for initial callus formation and radiologic union was significantly longer in group A than those in group B (76.8 vs. 58.0 days, P = 0.044; 409 vs. 258.7 days, P = 0.002, respectively). The rate of clinical union during 1 year was significantly higher in group B than in group A (P = 0.0063). Four nonunion patients in group A achieved bone union after placement of an additional bone graft. None of the patients in group B diagnosed with delayed union or nonunion (P fracture promoted callus formation and union rate compared with MIPO without appositional screw fixation. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  14. Lag screw fixation of dorsal cortical stress fractures of the third metacarpal bone in 116 racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalim, S L; McIlwraith, C W; Goodman, N L; Anderson, G A

    2010-10-01

    The effectiveness and best method to manage dorsal cortical stress fractures is not clear. This study was performed to evaluate the success of lag screw fixation of such fractures in a population of Thoroughbred racehorses. Lag screw fixation of dorsal cortical stress fractures is an effective surgical procedure allowing racehorses to return to their preoperative level of performance. The records of 116 racehorses (103 Thoroughbreds) admitted to Equine Medical Centre, California between 1986 and 2008 were assessed. Information obtained from medical records included subject details, limb(s) affected, fracture configuration, length of screw used in repair and presence of concurrent surgical procedures performed. Racing performance was evaluated relative to these factors using Fisher's exact test and nonparametric methods with a level of significance of Phorses, 83% raced preoperatively and 83% raced post operatively, with 63% having ≥5 starts. There was no statistically significant association between age, gender, limb affected, fracture configuration or presence of concurrent surgery and likelihood of racing post operatively or of having 5 or more starts. The mean earnings per start and the performance index for the 3 races following surgery were lower compared to the 3 races prior to surgery; however, 29 and 45% of horses either improved or did not change their earnings per start and performance index, respectively. Data show that lag screw fixation is successful at restoring ability to race in horses suffering from dorsal cortical stress fractures. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  15. Root contact with maxillomandibular fixation screws in orthognathic surgery: incidence and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, I B; Van Sickels, J E; Laureano Filho, J R; Cunningham, L L

    2016-08-01

    The use of maxillomandibular fixation (MMF) screws in orthognathic surgery has become common in recent years. The risk of injury to adjacent roots with their placement in this population has not been studied extensively. The aim of this study was to review the incidence and consequences of root contact/injury in patients undergoing orthognathic surgery. A retrospective analysis of the treatment and radiographic records of patients who underwent orthognathic surgery between January 2013 and September 2014 at a university in Kentucky, USA was performed. The mean number of screws used was correlated to the mean number of roots affected using Spearman's test, set to a level of significance of 5%. Of 125 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery, 15 (12%) had evidence of root contact. Subsequent radiographs showed resolution of the bone defects. There was no clinical evidence of pulpal necrosis or pain during follow-up. The average number of screws used was 3.14±0.35 per patient, with an average of 0.17±0.52 root contacts per patient. There was no correlation between the number of screws used and the number of roots injured (P=0.279). Based on these results, MMF screws can safely be used to establish interim fixation during orthognathic surgery. Caution should be taken during placement to avoid direct injury to the roots of teeth. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomechanical analysis of titanium fixation plates and screws in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-10

    Aug 10, 2015 ... values on fixative appliances were predicted by means of. 3D FEA. The highest ... such as poor resistance to torsional forces, poor rigidity, and poor stability in ... the adequacy of mathematical models to relate mechanical factors such as ... the risk of bacterial contamination, scarring, postoperative edema ...

  17. Acromioclavicular Joint Fixation Using an Acroplate Combined With a Coracoclavicular Screw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli Darestani, Reza; Ghaffari, Arash; Hosseinpour, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    Background Appropriate treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation is controversial. Acroplate fixation is one of the most common treatment methods of acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation. Based on the risk of re-dislocation after Acroplate fixation, we assumed that combined fixation with an Acroplate and a coracoclavicular screw helps improve the outcome. Objectives The main purpose of the current study was to compare the outcome of ACJ dislocation treated with an Acroplate alone and in combination with coracoclavicular screw. Patients and Methods This study was carried out on 40 patients with ACJ dislocation types III to VI who were divided randomly into two equal groups: Acroplate group (P) and Acroplate in combination with coracoclavicular screw group (P + S). The screws were extracted 3-6 months postoperatively. The patients were followed for 1 year and Imatani’s score was calculated. Finally, the data were compared between the groups. Results The mean Imatani’s score was significantly higher in P + S group (83.4 ± 14.1) than P group (81.2 ± 10.3) (P < 0.001). The mean duration of surgery was the same in the two groups (59.8 ± 9.4 minutes in group P V.s 64.3 ± 10.9 minutes in group P + S; P = 0.169). There were no cases of re-dislocation, degenerative changes and ossification and all patients returned to their previous jobs or sporting activities. Conclusions Using a coracoclavicular screw combined with an Acroplate can improve the patients’ function after ACJ disruption without any significant increase in surgical duration. Authors recommend this technique in the fixation of ACJ dislocation. PMID:24396788

  18. [Odontoid bending stiffness after anterior fixation with a single lag screw: biomechanical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchvald, P; Čapek, L; Barsa, P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The aim of the experiment was to compare the bending stiffness of an intact odontoid process with bending stiffness after its simulated type II fracture was fixed with a single lag screw. The experiment was done with a desire to answer the question of whether a single osteosynthetic screw is sufficient for good fixation of a type II odontoid fracture. MATERIAL AND METHODS The C2 vertebrae of six cadavers were used. With simultaneous measurement of odontoid bending stiffness, the occurrence of a fracture (type IIA, Grauer's modification of the Anderson- D'Alonzo classification) was simulated using action exerted by a tearing machine in the direction perpendicular to the odontoid axis. Each odontoid fracture was subsequently treated by direct osteosynthesis with a single lag screw inserted in the axial direction by a standard surgical procedure in order to provide conditions similar to those achieved by routine surgical management. The treated odontoid process was subsequently subjected to the same tearing machine loading as applied to it at the start of the experiment. The bending stiffness measured was then compared with that found before the fracture occurred. The results were statistically evaluated by the t-test for paired samples at the level of significance α = 0.05. RESULTS The average value of bending stiffness for odontoid processes of intact vertebrae at the moment of fracture occurrence was 318.3 N/mm. After single axial lag screw fixation of the fracture, the average bending stiffness for the odontoid processes treated was 331.3 N/mm. DISCUSSION Higher values of bending stiffness after screw fixation were found in all specimens and, in comparison with the values recorded before simulated fractures, the increase was statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The results of our measurements suggest that the single lag screw fixation of a type IIA odontoid fracture will provide better stability for the fracture fragment-C2 body complex on

  19. Endovascular Treatment of a Vertebral Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Posterior C1-C2 Transarticular Screw Fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez, Jose C.; Gonzalez-Llanos, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    We present a case of vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm after a posterior C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation procedure that was effectively treated with endovascular coil occlusion. Vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm complicating posterior C1-C2 transarticular fixation is extremely rare, with only one previous case having been reported previously. Endovascular occlusion is better achieved in the subacute phase of the pseudoaneurysm, when the wall of the pseudoaneurysm has matured and stabilized. Further follow-up angiographies are mandatory in order to confirm that there is no recurrence of the lesion

  20. Sliding-screw plate fixation of proximal femoral fractures: Radiographic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.; Kerr, R.; Goergen, T.

    1985-07-01

    The sliding compression screw-sideplate combination is currently the most widely employed device for internal fixation of stable and unstable intertrochanteric fractures of the femur. The normal and abnormal radiographic appearances of this device in the immediate post-operative period are discussed. Potential long-term complications including mal- or non-union, intra-articular penetration, metal failure, rotation of the proximal fracture fragment, disengagement, trochanteric bursitis, leg length discrepancy, delayed cervical stress fracture, and ischemic necrosis are reviewed.

  1. Sliding-screw plate fixation of proximal femoral fractures: Radiographic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla; Kerr, R.; Goergen, T.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding compression screw-sideplate combination is currently the most widely employed device for internal fixation of stable and unstable intertrochanteric fractures of the femur. The normal and abnormal radiogrpahic appearances of this device in the immediate post-operative period are discussed. Potential long-term complications including mal- or non-union, intra-articular penetration, metal failure, rotation of the proximal fracture fragment, disengagement, trochanteric bursitis, leg length discrepancy, delayed cervical stress fracture, and ischemic necrosis are reviewed. (orig.)

  2. Percutaneous Screw Fixation of Distal Tibia Fractures – Functional Results in Sixteen Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kaftandziev, Igor; Trpeski, Simon; Arsovski, Oliver; Spasov, Marko

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An important feature of distal tibia fractures is the relevance of the soft tissue coverage. In order to maintain good functional outcome, several operative techniques have been established. Among them, percutaneous screw fixation has the advantage of causing less biological damage of the soft tissues with lower rates of complications. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We reviewed 16 patients with distal tibia fracture. Operative treatment consisted of indirect reduction and percutaneou...

  3. C-2 anterior plate-screw fixation: a quantitative anatomical and morphometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoglu, M; Ozbag, D; Gumusalan, Y

    2010-01-01

    Discectomy and inter-vertebral body fusion combined with the anterior plate-screw fixa tion is the common procedure in cervical spine surgery. But the anterior plate-screw fixation of the C2 spine has been the uncommon surgical procedure. In this study, we analyze the anatomy of the C2 body relevant to C2 anterior plate-screw fixation. Eighty-six dried C2 spines were evaluated directly for this study. Measurements were made on the C2 body width and midsagittal anteroposterior (AP) depth and the anteroposterior parasagittal depth 5 mm lateral to midline on the inferior endplates, in addition to on the middle body. Measurements also were made of anteroposterior parasagittal vertebral depth with both medial and lateral inclination of 10 degrees, with respect to the parasagittal plane of the vertebral body. The ideal maximum screw length and trajectory was found to be AP medial parasagittal depth of inferior surface of the C2 body [Right: 13.7 +/- 1.4 mm (11.0-17.9), Left: 13.6 +/- 1.5 mm (10.7-17.8)]. We report the measurements of the vertebral body of the C2. We think these measurements provide guidelines for operating on the anterior C2 spine, and enhance the confidence interval for the surgeon (Tab. 3, Fig. 1, Ref. 24).

  4. Outcomes of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for spinal trauma and tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Park, Ashley; Maharaj, Monish; Phan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the clinical and radiological results of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation in the management of spinal trauma and metastatic tumours. A retrospective analysis was performed on a series of 14 patients who were operated on from March 2009 to November 2011 by a single surgeon (RJM). Following a radiological review (CT scan/MRI), six patients underwent short segment fixation, while the remaining underwent long segment fixation. All patients had routine follow-ups at 4, 6, 12months, and annually thereafter. Clinical examinations were conducted preoperatively and postoperatively, and the length of operation, blood loss, and postoperative pain relief were recorded. There was a single patient with an incision site complication. The mean blood loss was 269mL. All of the parameters demonstrated no significant differences between the trauma and the tumour groups (p=0.10). The neurological power scores improved for all patients, with the largest increase being from a score of 2 to 4. At follow-up, the majority of patients had returned to their previous activities and had reduced pain scores. One patient suffered high pain levels from other medical conditions that were not related to the operation. Minimally invasive pedicle screw fixation is a suitable option for patients with spinal tumours and fractures, with acceptable safety and efficacy in this small retrospective patient series. We have seen favourable results in our patients, who have experienced an increased quality of life following their surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, B.; Blankestijn, J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of

  6. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: Comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, B.; Blankestijn, J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of

  7. Radiostrontium clearance and bone formation in response to simulated internal screw fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daum, W.J.; Simmons, D.J.; Fenster, R.; Shively, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in radiostrontium clearance (SrC) and bone formation (tetracycline labeling) were observed in the femurs of skeletally mature dogs following the various operative steps involved in bone screw fixation. Drilling, but not periosteal stripping, produced a small but statistically significant increase in SrC and endosteal bone formation in the distal third of the bone. Strontium clearance values equivalent to those produced by drilling alone were recorded after screw fixation at low or high torque (5 versus 20 inch pounds), as well as by the insertion of loosely fitting stainless steel implants. Bone formation (equals the percentage tetracycline-labeled trabecular bone surfaces) was increased by 30% when SrC values exceeded 3.5 ml/100 g bone/min, and the relationship was linear when SrC values ranged between 1.0 and 7.0 ml/100 g bone/min. The changes in SrC and bone formation one-week after bone screw application are primarily those associated with a response to local trauma caused by drilling

  8. Minimally invasive mini open split-muscular percutaneous pedicle screw fixation of the thoracolumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Ulutaş

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We prospectively assessed the feasibility and safety of a new percutaneous pedicle screw (PPS fixation technique for instrumentation of the thoracic and lumbar spine in this study. All patients were operated in the prone position under general anesthesia. A 6 to 8 cm midline skin incision was made and wide sub-cutaneous dissection was performed. The paravertebral muscles were first dissected subperiosteally into the midline incision of the fascia for lumbar microdiscectomy with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cage implantation. After the secondary paramedian incisions on the fascia, the PPSs were inserted via cleavage of the multifidus muscles directly into the pedicles under fluoroscopy visualization. A total of 35 patients underwent surgery with this new surgical technique. The control group for operative time, blood loss and analgesic usage consisted of 35 randomly selected cases from our department. The control group underwent surgery via conventional pedicle screw instrumentation with paramedian fusion. All patients in the minimal invasive surgery series were ambulatory with minimal pain on the first postoperative day. The operation time and blood loss and the postoperative analgesic consumption were significantly less with this new technique. In conclusion, the minimal invasive mini open split-muscular percutaneous pedicle screw fixation technique is safe and feasible. It can be performed via a short midline skin incision and can also be combined with interbody fusion, causing minimal pain without severe muscle damage.

  9. Morphology study of thoracic transverse processes and its significance in pedicle-rib unit screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xin-gang; Cai, Jin-fang; Sun, Jian-min; Jiang, Zhen-song

    2015-03-01

    Thoracic transverse process is an important anatomic structure of the spine. Several anatomic studies have investigated the adjacent structures of the thoracic transverse process. But there is still a blank on the morphology of the thoracic transverse processes. The purpose of the cadaveric study is to investigate the morphology of thoracic transverse processes and to provide morphology basis for the pedicle-rib unit (extrapedicular) screw fixation method. Forty-five adult dehydrated skeletons (T1-T10) were included in this study. The length, width, thickness, and the tilt angle (upward and backward) of the thoracic transverse process were measured. The data were then analyzed statistically. On the basis of the morphometric study, 5 fresh cadavers were used to place screws from transverse processes to the vertebral body in the thoracic spine, and then observed by the naked eye and on computed tomography scans. The lengths of thoracic transverse processes were between 16.63±1.59 and 18.10±1.95 mm; the longest was at T7, and the shortest was at T10. The widths of thoracic transverse processes were between 11.68±0.80 and 12.87±1.48 mm; the widest was at T3, and the narrowest was at T7. The thicknesses of thoracic transverse processes were between 7.86±1.24 and 10.78±1.35 mm; the thickest was at T1, and the thinnest was at T7. The upward tilt angles of thoracic transverse processes were between 24.9±3.1 and 3.0±1.56 degrees; the maximal upward tilt angle was at T1, and the minimal upward tilt angle was at T7. The upward tilt angles of T1 and T2 were obviously different from the other thoracic transverse processes (Ptransverse processes gradually increased from 24.5±2.91 degrees at T1 to 64.5±5.12 degrees at T10. The backward tilt angles were significantly different between each other, except between T5 and T6. In the validation study, screws were all placed successfully from transverse processes to the vertebrae of thoracic spine. The length, width, and

  10. Magnesium-Based Absorbable Metal Screws for Intra-Articular Fracture Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Biber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MAGNEZIX® (Syntellix AG, Hanover, Germany is a biodegradable magnesium-based alloy (MgYREZr which is currently used to manufacture bioabsorbable compression screws. To date, there are very few studies reporting on a limited number of elective foot surgeries using this innovative implant. This case report describes the application of this screw for osteochondral fracture fixation at the humeral capitulum next to a loose radial head prosthesis, which was revised at the same time. The clinical course was uneventful. Degradation of the magnesium alloy did not interfere with fracture healing. Showing an excellent clinical result and free range-of-motion, the contour of the implant was still visible in a one-year follow-up.

  11. Risks to the Superior Gluteal Neurovascular Bundle During Iliosacral and Transsacral Screw Fixation: A Computed Tomogram Arteriography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Jed; Collinge, Cory A

    2017-12-01

    Iliosacral (IS) and transsacral (TS) screws are popular techniques to repair complicated injuries to the pelvis. The anatomy of the superior gluteal neurovasculature (SG NV bundle) is well described as running along the posterior ilium, providing innervation and perfusion to important abductor muscles. The method of pelvis fixation least likely to injure the SG NV bundle is unknown. Twenty uninjured patients with a contrasted computed tomogram of the pelvis and lower extremities (CTA) were evaluated. Starting points for an S1 IS screw and S1 and S2 TS screws were estimated on the "ghost" lateral CTA image for those pelvi with safe corridors (>9 mm diameter). The distance from the projected screw to the SG artery was measured. A distance of <3.65 mm (half of a 7.3-mm screw's diameter) was considered likely for NV bundle injury. Of 40 pelvi CTAs (single sides), 10 pelvi (25%) were determined to be inappropriate for an S1 TS screw. The average distances from the screw starting point and the artery were 25.3 mm (±9.2) for S1 IS, 12.4 mm (±9.0) for S1 TS, and 23.5 mm (±10.7) for S2 TS screws, respectively. Ten S1 TS screws (25%) and no S1 IS or S2 TS screws were projected to have caused injury to the SG NV bundle (P < 0.001). Inserting S1 IS and S2 TS screws put the SG NV anatomy at significantly less risk than S1 TS screws. This information may aid in choosing the "best" fixation option for patients with pelvic ring trauma requiring surgery.

  12. Anterior transarticular C1-C2 fixation with contralateral screw insertion: a report of two cases and technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lvov, Ivan; Grin, Andrey; Kaykov, Aleksandr; Smirnov, Vladimir; Krylov, Vladimir

    2017-08-08

    Anterior transarticular fixation of the C1-C2 vertebrae is a well-known technique that involves screw insertion through the body of the C2 vertebra into the lateral masses of the atlas through an anterior transcervical approach. Meanwhile, contralateral screw insertion has been previously described only in anatomical studies. We describe two case reports of the clinical application of this new technique. In Case 1, the patient was diagnosed with an unstable C1 fracture. The clinical features of the case did not allow for any type of posterior atlantoaxial fusion, Halo immobilization, or routine anterior fixation using the Reindl and Koller techniques. The possible manner of screw insertion into the anterior third of the right lateral mass was via a contralateral trajectory, which was performed in this case. Case 2 involved a patient with neglected posteriorly dislocated dens fracture who could not lie in the prone position due to concomitant cardiac pathology. Reduction of atlantoaxial dislocation was insufficient, even after scar tissue resection at the fracture, while transdental fusion was not possible. Considering the success of the previous case, atlantoaxial fixation was performed through the small approach, using the Reindl technique and contralateral screw insertion. These two cases demonstrate the potential of anterior transarticular fixation of C1-C2 vertebrae in cases where posterior atlantoaxial fusion is not achievable. This type of fixation can be performed through a single approach if one screw is inserted using the Reindl technique and another is inserted via a contralateral trajectory.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Screw Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizari, Mahmoud; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn; Barrett, Mel

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental and finite element analysis of tibial screw fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The mechanical properties of the bone and tendon graft are obtained from experiments using porcine bone and bovine tendon. The results of the numerical study are compared with those from mechanical testing. Analysis shows that the model may be used to establish the optimum placement of the tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by predicting mechanical parameters such as stress, strain and displacement at regions in the tunnel wall.

  14. Unconventional fixation Thoracolumbar fractures using round hole boneplates and transpedicular screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behairy, Yaser M.

    2001-01-01

    In an attempt to contain the high cost of commercially available pediclescrew systems, several authors have used unconventional alternatives such aslocally made plates or dynamic compression plates (DCP) along with cancellousscrews for transpedicular fixation of the thoracolumbar spine. These plates,however, allow for a wide range of motion at the plate-screw interphase andthe construct does not provide stability in the sagittal plane. Round holebone plates, on the other hand, allow much less mobility at the plate-screwinterphase and the final construct offers better stability in the sagittalplane. Our objective was to determine the clinical, radiologic and functionalstatus of patients who underwent posterior fracture fixation using round holebone plates and cancellous screws and evaluate the construct's ability tomaintain reduction of the fracture. This was a postoperative follow-up ofpatients with fractures around the thoracolumbar junction fixed using roundhole bone plates and cancellous transpedicular screws. Round hole bone platesalong with 6.5 mm transpedicular cancellous screws were used for posteriorspinal instrumentation in neurologically intact patients with isolatedunstable fractures of the last thoracic or first lumbar vertebra. Seventeenpatients were included in this study. There mean follow-up was 10 months(range 5 to 12). All had evidence of fusion at a mean of 5 months (range 4 to7). No patients had breakage or loosening of the screws and none had breakageof the plate. The mean kyphosis angle at the fracture site was 34 degreepreoperatively, -4 degree in the immediate postoperative period, and 3 degreeon final follow-up radiographs. The percentage loss of anterior vertebralbody height was 51% in the immediate postoperative period and 16% on finalfollow-up radiographs. The use of round hole bone plates along with 6.5 mmcancellous screws inserted into the pedicles provides an angle-stableconstruct that allows for better stability in the sagittal plane

  15. Dynamic locking screw improves fixation strength in osteoporotic bone: an in vitro study on an artificial bone model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlemann, Tim; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Agarwal, Yash; Wahl, Dieter; Sprecher, Christoph; Schwieger, Karsten; Lenz, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The novel dynamic locking screw (DLS) was developed to improve bone healing with locked-plate osteosynthesis by equalising construct stiffness at both cortices. Due to a theoretical damping effect, this modulated stiffness could be beneficial for fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone. Therefore, the mechanical behaviour of the DLS at the screw-bone interface was investigated in an artificial osteoporotic bone model and compared with conventional locking screws (LHS). Osteoporotic surrogate bones were plated with either a DLS or a LHS construct consisting of two screws and cyclically axially loaded (8,500 cycles, amplitude 420 N, increase 2 mN/cycle). Construct stiffness, relative movement, axial screw migration, proximal (P) and distal (D) screw pullout force and loosening at the bone interface were determined and statistically evaluated. DLS constructs exhibited a higher screw pullout force of P 85 N [standard deviation (SD) 21] and D 93 N (SD 12) compared with LHS (P 62 N, SD 28, p = 0.1; D 57 N, SD 25, p LHS (p = 0.01). DLS constructs showed significantly lower axial construct stiffness (403 N/mm, SD 21, p LHS (529 N/mm, SD 27; 0.8 mm, SD 0.04). Based on the model data, the DLS principle might also improve in vivo plate fixation in osteoporotic bone, providing enhanced residual holding strength and reducing screw cutout. The influence of pin-sleeve abutment still needs to be investigated.

  16. [Anterior odontoid screw fixation using intra-operative cone-beam computed tomography and navigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Castro, Julián

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to asses the value of intraoperative cone-beam CT (O-arm) and stereotactic navigation for the insertion of anterior odontoid screws. this was a retrospective review of patients receiving surgical treatment for traumatic odontoid fractures during a period of 18 months. Procedures were guided with O-arm assistance in all cases. The screw position was verified with an intraoperative CT scan. Intraoperative and clinical parameters were evaluated. Odontoid fracture fusion was assessed on postoperative CT scans obtained at 3 and 6 months' follow-up Five patients were included in this series; 4 patients (80%) were male. Mean age was 63.6 years (range 35-83 years). All fractures were acute type ii odontoid fractures. The mean operative time was 116minutes (range 60-160minutes). Successful screw placement, judged by intraoperative computed tomography, was attained in all 5 patients (100%). The average preoperative and postoperative times were 8.6 (range 2-22 days) and 4.2 days (range 3-7 days) respectively. No neurological deterioration occurred after surgery. The rate of bone fusion was 80% (4/5). Although this initial study evaluated a small number of patients, anterior odontoid screw fixation utilizing the O-arm appears to be safe and accurate. This system allows immediate CT imaging in the operating room to verify screw position. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Biomechanical stability of a supra-acetabular pedicle screw internal fixation device (INFIX) vs external fixation and plates for vertically unstable pelvic fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Esquivel, Amanda O; Jin, Xin; Yang, King H; Onwudiwe, Ndidi A; Vaidya, Rahul

    2012-09-27

    We have recently developed a subcutaneous anterior pelvic fixation technique (INFIX). This internal fixator permits patients to sit, roll over in bed and lie on their sides without the cumbersome external appliances or their complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability of this novel supraacetabular pedicle screw internal fixation construct (INFIX) and compare it to standard internal fixation and external fixation techniques in a single stance pelvic fracture model. Nine synthetic pelves with a simulated anterior posterior compression type III injury were placed into three groups (External Fixator, INFIX and Internal Fixation). Displacement, total axial stiffness, and the stiffness at the pubic symphysis and SI joint were calculated. Displacement and stiffness were compared by ANOVA with a Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons The mean displacement at the pubic symphysis was 20, 9 and 0.8 mm for external fixation, INFIX and internal fixation, respectively. Plate fixation was significantly stiffer than the INFIX and external Fixator (P = 0.01) at the symphysis pubis. The INFIX device was significantly stiffer than external fixation (P = 0.017) at the symphysis pubis. There was no significant difference in SI joint displacement between any of the groups. Anterior plate fixation is stiffer than both the INFIX and external fixation in single stance pelvic fracture model. The INFIX was stiffer than external fixation for both overall axial stiffness, and stiffness at the pubic symphysis. Combined with the presumed benefit of minimizing the complications associated with external fixation, the INFIX may be a more preferable option for temporary anterior pelvic fixation in situations where external fixation may have otherwise been used.

  18. The effect of infection and lag screw fixation on the union of membranous bone grafts in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, J A; Phillips, J H; Walmsley, S L

    1994-03-01

    Infection complicating craniofacial procedures contributes significantly to patient morbidity and health care costs. The role of fixation materials in this setting remains unclear. As foreign material, does fixation hardware increase patients' susceptibility to developing postoperative infection? Furthermore, once infection is established, should fixation hardware be removed? To answer these questions, we performed an onlay membranous bone grafting procedure to the mandible in 94 New Zealand White rabbits, applied lag-screw fixation in half the animals, and inoculated the wounds with different bacterial doses. We quantified the differential rates of infection and rates of graft union in the presence of infection. The infection rates for the rigidly fixated group were not significantly different from the rates for the nonfixated group for a range of bacterial inoculum doses. There was no significant difference in the rates of resolution of infection and sepsis between the two groups. Gross and histologic assessments revealed a significantly lower union rate for infected grafts when compared with uninfected grafts. Furthermore, grafts rigidly fixated with a lag screw showed a higher rate of union when compared with nonfixated grafts in the presence of infection. In the absence of infection, the union rates for fixated and nonfixated groups did not differ significantly. While fixation hardware has been cited as a risk factor for postoperative infection, we were unable to show that lag-screw fixation contributes to this risk. Although infection impaired the union of membranous bone grafts to the recipient mandible, fixation of the grafts with a lag screw significantly decreased this deleterious effect of infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filli, Lukas; Marcon, Magda; Scholz, Bernhard; Calcagni, Maurizio; Finkenstädt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was "almost perfect" (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. Flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) is a helpful imaging tool for scaphoid fixation. The correction algorithm significantly reduces artefacts in FDCT induced by scaphoid fixation screws. This may facilitate intra

  20. A retrospective review of bone tunnel enlargement after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendons fixed with a metal round cannulated interference screw in the femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masahiko; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Takashi; Okudaira, Shuzo; Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-10-01

    To assess bone tunnel enlargement after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with the use of hamstring tendons fixed with a round cannulated interference (RCI) screw in the femur. A consecutive series of 30 ACL reconstructions performed with hamstring tendons fixed with an RCI screw in the femur and with staples via Leeds-Keio ligament in the tibia was retrospectively reviewed. The clinical outcome was evaluated through the Lysholm score. Anterior instability was tested by Telos-SE (Telos Japan, Tokyo, Japan) measurement. The location and angle of each femoral and tibial tunnel were measured with the use of plain radiographs, and bone tunnel enlargement greater than 2 mm detected any time 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively was defined as positive. Each factor (location and angle of the tunnels, sex, affected side, age, Lysholm score, and Telos-SE measurement) was compared between enlarged and nonenlarged groups. Positive enlargement of the bone tunnel (>2.0 mm) was observed in 36.7% (11 of 30) on the femoral side and 33.3% (10 of 30) on the tibial side, and in 6 knees of both sides. Half of patients (15 of 30) had an enlarged tunnel on the femoral or the tibial side until 1 year postoperatively. In most cases, enlargement reached maximum at 6 months postoperatively. Female patients tended to have an enlarged tunnel, especially on the femoral side (P < .05). Tunnel enlargement was not correlated with location and angle of the tunnels. Moreover, no difference was found in Lysholm score and Telos-SE measurement between enlarged and nonenlarged groups, although the nonenlarged group tended to exhibit higher Lysholm score and lesser instability. Bone tunnel enlargement of the femoral or tibial side was observed in half of patients (6 in both sides, 5 only in the femur, and 4 only in the tibia) after ACL reconstruction was performed with a hamstring tendon fixed with an RCI screw. Female patients had a greater chance for enlargement of the femoral tunnel

  1. Internal fixation of proximal fractures of the 2nd and 4th metacarpal and metatarsal bones using bioabsorbable screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mageed, M; Steinberg, T; Drumm, N; Stubbs, N; Wegert, J; Koene, M

    2018-03-01

    Fractures involving the proximal one-third of the splint bone are relatively rare and are challenging to treat. A variety of management techniques have been reported in the literature. The aim of this retrospective case series was to describe the clinical presentation and evaluate the efficacy of bioabsorbable polylactic acid screws in internal fixation of proximal fractures of the 2nd and 4th metacarpal and metatarsal bones in horses. The medical records, diagnostic images and outcome of all horses diagnosed with a proximal fracture of the splint bones and treated with partial resection and internal fixation of the proximal stump using bioabsorbable polylactic acid screws between 2014 and 2015 were reviewed. Eight horses met the inclusion criteria. The results showed that there were no complications encountered during screw placement or postoperatively. Six horses returned to full work 3 months after the operation and two horses remained mildly lame. On follow-up radiographs 12 months postoperatively (n = 2) the screws were not completely absorbed. The screws resulted in a cone-shaped radiolucency, which was progressively replaced from the outer margins by bone sclerosis. The use of bioabsorbable screws for fixation of proximal fractures of the splint bone appears to be a safe and feasible technique and may offer several advantages over the use of traditional metallic implants. © 2018 Australian Veterinary Association.

  2. Use of tranexamic acid in dynamic hip screw plate fixation for trochanteric fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Ranjit Kumar; Borah, Pranab Jyoti; Haque, Russel

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate perioperative blood loss and blood transfusion requirement in patients who underwent dynamic hip screw plate fixation for a stable trochanteric fracture with or without preoperative intravenous tranexamic acid (TXA). 49 men and 11 women (mean age, 56.5 years) who underwent open reduction and internal fixation with a dynamic hip screw plate for a stable trochanteric fracture by a single surgeon were equally randomised to receive either a single dose of intravenous TXA (15 mg/kg) 15 minutes prior to surgery or an equal volume of normal saline by slow infusion. Intra- and post-operative blood loss and the need for blood transfusion were assessed, as was any thromboembolic adverse event. The TXA and control groups were comparable in terms of age, gender, body mass index, blood pressure, pulse rate, time from injury to surgery, operating time, and preoperative haematological data. Blood loss was lower in the TXA than control group intraoperatively (320.3 vs. 403.33 ml, ptrochanteric fractures.

  3. First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Arthrodesis: A Retrospective Comparison of Crossed-screws, Locking and Non-Locking Plate Fixation with Lag Screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Claassen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Locking plate fixation is increasingly used for first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP-I arthrodesis. Still there is few comparable clinical data regarding this procedure. Methods:We retrospectively evaluated 60 patients who received an arthrodesis of the MTP-I between January 2008 and June 2010. With 20 patients each we performed a locking plate fixation with lag screw, arthrodesis with crossed-screwsor with a nonlocking plate with lag screw. Results: There were four non-unions in crossed-screws patients and one nonunion in non-locked plate group. All the patients in locking plate group achieved union. 90% of the patients were completely or mildly satisfied in locking plate group, whereas this rate was 80% for patients in both crossed screws and non-locking plate groups. Conclusions: Use of dorsal plating for arthrodesis of MTP1 joint either locking or non-locking were associated with high union rate and acceptable and comparable functional outcome. Although nonunion rate was high using two crossed screws but functional outcome was not significantly different compare to dorsal plating. Level of evidence:Ш, retrospective comparative study

  4. [Application of anterior percutaneous screw fixation in treatment of odontoid process fractures in aged people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peng; Dou, Hai-cheng; Ni, Wen-fei; Huang, Qi-shan; Wang, Xiang-yang; Xu, Hua-zi; Chi, Yong-long

    2011-03-01

    To explore the efficacy of anterior percutaneous screw fixation in the treatment of odontoid process fractures in aged people. From February 2001 to April 2009, 15 elderly patients with odontoid fracture were treated with anterior percutaneous screw fixation,including 13 males and 2 females; the average age was 69.3 years (ranged, 60 to 86 years). According to Anderson classification, there were 10 patients with type II fractures (type II A in 7 cases, type II B in 3 cases, based on Eysel and Roosen classification), 4 patients with shallow type III fractures, 1 patient with deep type III fractures. Thirteen patients were fresh fractures, 2 patients were obsolete fractures. All patients had varying degrees of neck or shoulder pain, and limit activity of neck. There were 4 patients with neural symptoms including 2 grade D and 2 grade C according to Frankel classification. All the patients were followed up and were assessed by radiology. Clinical examination included neck activity, neurological function and the degree of neck pain. Radiology examinations including anteroposterior, lateral, open mouth position and flexion-extension radiographs of cervical vertebra were performed. After surgery, all patients were followed up,and the duration ranged from 6 to 60 months (averaged 31.3 months). Two patients died of other diseases during the follow-up period (18 and 22 months after surgery respectively). All patients got satisfactory results, and all screws were in good position. As the screw was too long, esophagus was compressed by screw tail in one case. One case showed fibrous union, 12 cases had achieved solid bony union, 2 cases showed nonunion without clinical symptoms. The rotation of neck in 3 cases was mildly limited,the neck function of the remaining patients were normal. Four patients with symptoms nerve injuries improved after operation (Frankel E in 3 cases, Frankel D in 1 case). The symptom of neck pain had a significant improvement after surgery (P process

  5. Comparison of Neck Screw and Conventional Fixation Techniques in Mandibular Condyle Fractures Using 3-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conci, Ricardo Augusto; Tomazi, Flavio Henrique Silveira; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito; da Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes; Fritscher, Guilherme Genehr; Heitz, Claiton

    2015-07-01

    To compare the mechanical stress on the mandibular condyle after the reduction and fixation of mandibular condylar fractures using the neck screw and 2 other conventional techniques according to 3-dimensional finite element analysis. A 3-dimensional finite element model of a mandible was created and graphically simulated on a computer screen. The model was fixed with 3 different techniques: a 2.0-mm plate with 4 screws, 2 plates (1 1.5-mm plate and 1 2.0-mm plate) with 4 screws, and a neck screw. Loads were applied that simulated muscular action, with restrictions of the upper movements of the mandible, differentiation of the cortical and medullary bone, and the virtual "folds" of the plates and screws so that they could adjust to the condylar surface. Afterward, the data were exported for graphic visualization of the results and quantitative analysis was performed. The 2-plate technique exhibited better stability in regard to displacement of fractures, deformity of the synthesis materials, and minimum and maximum tension values. The results with the neck screw were satisfactory and were similar to those found when a miniplate was used. Although the study shows that 2 isolated plates yielded better results compared with the other groups using other fixation systems and methods, the neck screw could be an option for condylar fracture reduction. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The risk of translaminar screw fixation to the transverse foramen of the lower cervical spine: a computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ganggang; Ji, Wei; Huang, Zucheng; Liu, Junhao; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan

    2017-04-21

    Translaminar screw fixation (TSF) of the axis is considered as an efficient, safe and simple surgical procedure, however the study of the potential risk of TSF to the transverse foramen in lower cervical spine is lacked. Head-neck CT images of 60 patients were included in this study. Maximum screw length, laminar thickness, the screw angle and the laminar height were measured. The feasibility of 3.5-mm diameter screw fixation and the potential risk of transverse foramen injury was analyzed. The TSF was safe at C3 and C4, but risky to the transverse foraman at a rate of 8.7% at C5 (0% on the left side and 20% on the right side), 33.3% at C6 (24.4% on the left side and 42.9% on the right side). C7 had the highest 77.8% rate (65.5% on the left side and 89.8% on the right side). The safe screw length was 27.7 mm at C3, 27.4 mm at C4, 28.0 mm at C5, 25.6 mm at C6 and 25.5 mm at C7, respectively. The present study showed that translaminar screw could place the transverse foramen of C5-C7 at risk. Preoperative CT scanning was necessary for safe screw placement.

  7. MIS Single-position Lateral and Oblique Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation: Feasibility and Perioperative Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blizzard, Daniel J; Thomas, J Alex

    2018-03-15

    Retrospective review of prospectively collected data of the first 72 consecutive patients treated with single-position one- or two-level lateral (LLIF) or oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLLIF) with bilateral percutaneous pedicle screw and rod fixation by a single spine surgeon. To evaluate the clinical feasibility, accuracy, and efficiency of a single-position technique for LLIF and OLLIF with bilateral pedicle screw and rod fixation. Minimally-invasive lateral interbody approaches are performed in the lateral decubitus position. Subsequent repositioning prone for bilateral pedicle screw and rod fixation requires significant time and resources and does not facilitate increased lumbar lordosis. The first 72 consecutive patients (300 screws) treated with single-position LLIF or OLLIF and bilateral pedicle screws by a single surgeon between December 2013 and August 2016 were included in the study. Screw accuracy and fusion were graded using computed tomography and several timing parameters were recorded including retractor, fluoroscopy, and screw placement time. Complications including reoperation, infection, and postoperative radicular pain and weakness were recorded. Average screw placement time was 5.9 min/screw (standard deviation, SD: 1.5 min; range: 3-9.5 min). Average total operative time (interbody cage and pedicle screw placement) was 87.9 minutes (SD: 25.1 min; range: 49-195 min). Average fluoroscopy time was 15.0 s/screw (SD: 4.7 s; range: 6-25 s). The pedicle screw breach rate was 5.1% with 10/13 breaches measured as < 2 mm in magnitude. Fusion rate at 6-months postoperative was 87.5%. Two (2.8%) patients underwent reoperation for malpositioned pedicle screws with subsequent resolution of symptoms. The single-position, all-lateral technique was found to be feasible with accuracy, fluoroscopy usage, and complication rates comparable with the published literature. This technique eliminates the time and staffing associated with

  8. Dual small fragment plating improves screw-to-screw load sharing for mid-diaphyseal humeral fracture fixation: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmopoulos, Victor; Luedke, Colten; Nana, Arvind D

    2015-01-01

    A smaller humerus in some patients makes the use of a large fragment fixation plate difficult. Dual small fragment plate constructs have been suggested as an alternative. This study compares the biomechanical performance of three single and one dual plate construct for mid-diaphyseal humeral fracture fixation. Five humeral shaft finite element models (1 intact and 4 fixation) were loaded in torsion, compression, posterior-anterior (PA) bending, and lateral-medial (LM) bending. A comminuted fracture was simulated by a 1-cm gap. Fracture fixation was modelled by: (A) 4.5-mm 9-hole large fragment plate (wide), (B) 4.5-mm 9-hole large fragment plate (narrow), (C) 3.5-mm 9-hole small fragment plate, and (D) one 3.5-mm 9-hole small fragment plate and one 3.5-mm 7-hole small fragment plate. Model A showed the best outcomes in torsion and PA bending, whereas Model D outperformed the others in compression and LM bending. Stress concentrations were located near and around the unused screw holes for each of the single plate models and at the neck of the screws just below the plates for all the models studied. Other than in PA bending, Model D showed the best overall screw-to-screw load sharing characteristics. The results support using a dual small fragment locking plate construct as an alternative in cases where crutch weight-bearing (compression) tolerance may be important and where anatomy limits the size of the humerus bone segment available for large fragment plate fixation.

  9. Morphologic Analysis of Occipital Sinuses for Occipital Screw Fixation Using Digital Subtraction Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Hong, Jae Taek; Sung, Jae Hoon; Jain, Ashish; Huh, Joon; Kim, Sang Uk; Kim, Joon Young; Kwon, Jae Yoel; Cho, Chul Bum; Kim, Il Sup; Lee, Sang Won

    2016-07-01

    Numerous methods to achieve occipitocervical stabilization have been described, including the use of occipital plate/screw constructs. Bicortical screws may increase the pullout strength, but intracranial injuries to venous sinuses have been reported. This study was performed to analyze the variations in occipital sinuses to prevent sinus injury caused by the bicortical screw. Occipital sinuses of 1720 patients were examined using digital subtraction angiography. The data collected included patient age and sex, occipital sinus type, distance between occipital sinus and midline, depth from inion to occipital sinus, and distance between occipital sinus and midline occiput at different levels. The mean age of patients was 57 years ± 13. There were 807 (46.9%) men and 913 (53.1%) women. The most common occipital sinus type was single occipital sinus off-midline (type B2). The least common occipital sinus type was absent occipital sinuses (type A; 8.7% of patients). There was no significant difference between age and occipital sinus type (P = 0.310). Also, the difference between sexes was not significant in regard to occipital sinus type in general. However, in subgroup analysis of type B1 and B2, there was a significant difference between sexes (P occipital sinus was 19.913 mm ± 7.437. The occipital sinus shows several variations, and many morphologic differences can be seen. Preoperative detailed examination by magnetic resonance venography or vertebral angiography may be required for cases in which bicortical occipital screw fixation is necessary to avoid occipital sinus-related complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Alternative technique of cervical spinal stabilization employing lateral mass plate and screw and intra-articular spacer fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Goel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The author discusses an alternative technique of segmental cervical spinal fixation. Material and Methods: The subtleties of the technique are discussed on the basis of experience with 3 cases with a follow-up of between 30 and 36 months. Technique: The technique involves debridement of facetal articular cartilage, distraction of facets, jamming of ′Goel spacer′ into the articular cavity and fortification of the fixation by lateral mass plate and screw fixation. The ′double-insurance′ method of fixation is safe for vertebral artery, nerve roots and spinal neural structures and the fixation is strong. Conclusions: The discussed technique is safe and provides a strong fixation and a ground for ultimate arthrodesis.

  11. Percutaneous Cement-Augmented Screws Fixation in the Fractures of the Aging Spine: Is It the Solution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Pesenti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Management of elderly patients with thoracolumbar fractures is still challenging due to frequent osteoporosis and risk of screws pull-out. The aim of this study was to evaluate results of a percutaneous-only procedure to treat these fragile patients using cement-augmented screws. Methods. 12 patients diagnosed with a thoracolumbar fracture associated with an important loss of bone stock were included in this prospective study. Surgical procedure included systematically a percutaneous osteosynthesis using cemented fenestrated screws. When necessary, additional anterior support was performed using a kyphoplasty procedure. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed using CT scan. Results. On the whole series, 15 fractures were diagnosed and 96 cemented screws were inserted. The difference between the pre- and postoperative vertebral kyphosis was statistically significant (12.9° versus 4.4°, P=0.0006. No extrapedicular screw was reported and one patient was diagnosed with a cement-related pulmonary embolism. During follow-up period, no infectious complications, implant failures, or pull-out screws were noticed. Discussion. Aging spine is becoming an increasing public health issue. Management of these patients requires specific attention due to the augmented risk of complications. Using percutaneous-only screws fixation with cemented screw provides satisfactory results. A rigorous technique is mandatory in order to achieve best outcomes.

  12. Ipsilateral proximal femur and shaft fractures treated with hip screws and a reamed retrograde intramedullary nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrum, Robert F; Tornetta, Paul; Watson, J Tracy; Christiano, Anthony; Vafek, Emily

    2014-09-01

    Although not common, proximal femoral fractures associated with ipsilateral shaft fractures present a difficult management problem. A variety of surgical options have been employed with varying results. We investigated the use of hip screws and a reamed retrograde intramedullary (IM) nail for the treatment of this combined fracture pattern in terms of postoperative alignment (malunion), nonunion, and complications. Between May 2002 and October 2011, a total of 95 proximal femoral fractures with associated shaft fractures were treated at three participating Level 1 trauma centers; all were treated with hip screw fixation (cannulated screws or sliding hip screws) and retrograde reamed IM nails. The medical records of these patients were reviewed retrospectively for alignment, malunion, nonunion, and complications. Followup was available on 92 of 95 (97%) of the patients treated with hip screws and a retrograde nail. Forty were treated with a sliding hip screw, and 52 were treated with cannulated screws. There were five proximal malunions in this series (5%). The union rate was 98% (90 of 92) for the femoral neck fractures and 91.3% (84 of 92) for the femoral shaft fractures after the initial surgery. There were two nonunions of comminuted femoral neck fractures after cannulated screw fixation. There was no difference in femoral neck union or alignment when comparing cannulated screws to a sliding hip screw. Four open comminuted femoral shaft fractures went on to nonunion and required secondary surgery to obtain union, and one patient developed symptomatic avascular necrosis. The treatment of ipsilateral proximal femoral neck and shaft fractures with hip screw fixation and a reamed retrograde nail demonstrated a high likelihood of union for the femoral neck fractures and a low risk of malunion. Comminution and initial displacement of the proximal femoral fracture may still lead to a small incidence of malunion or nonunion, and open comminuted femoral shaft fractures

  13. Post wall fixation by lag screw only in associated both column fractures with posterior wall involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Utku, Kandemir; Zhuang, Yan; Zhang, Kun; Fu, Ya-Hui; Wei, Xing; Wang, Peng-Fei; Cong, Yu-Xuan; Lei, Jin-Lai; Zhang, Bin-Fei

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the quality of reduction, clinical outcomes and complications of associated both column acetabular fractures with posterior wall involvement that are treated through single ilioinguinal approach and fixation of posterior wall by lag screws only. We conducted a retrospective review involving ninety-nine consecutive patients with associated both column fractures of acetabulum treated through single ilioinguinal approach. Patients were divided into two groups. The first group consisted of 35 patients presented with both column fractures with posterior wall involvement that fixation performed with lag screws. This group was compared to a second group of 64 patients with both column fractures without posterior wall involvement. The quality of reduction was assessed using criteria described by Matta. The size of posterior wall fragment was measured. Functional outcome was evaluated using Modified Postel Merle D'Aubigne score. Radiographs at the latest follow up were analyzed for arthritis (Kellgren-Lawrence classification), and femoral head avascular necrosis (Ficat/Arlet classification). The study showed no significant differences in all preoperative variables (P>0.05). While intraoperative blood loss and operative time in group 1 were increased compared to group 2, the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The height, relative depth and peripheral length of posterior wall respectively were 27.8±2.5mm (range: 24-35mm), 71.5±5.4% (range: 65-88%), 23.0±2.3mm (range: 17-28mm). The mean posterior wall fracture displacement is 5.0±3.2mm (range: 0-11mm). There was no difference regarding the quality of reduction between the two groups (P>0.05). The excellent to good clinical outcome was around 71.4% in the group 1 versus 73.4% in the group 2 at the final follow-up, this difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). There was no difference in rate of complications between the two groups (P>0.05). Lag screws fixation of posterior wall

  14. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: Comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergh, B; Blankestijn, J; van der Ploeg, T; Tuinzing, D B; Forouzanfar, T

    2015-06-01

    A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of IMFS with the use of arch bars in the treatment of mandibular condyle fractures. The study population consisted of 50 patients (mean age: 31.8 years). Twenty-four (48%) patients were allocated in the IMFS group. Twenty-six (52%) patients were assigned to the arch bars group. In total 188 IMF-screws were used (5-12 screws per patient, mean 7.83 screws per patient). All pain scores were lower in the IMFS group. Three patients developed a malocclusion (IFMS-group: one patient, arch bars-group: two patients). Mean surgical time was significantly shorter in the IMFS group (59 vs. 126 min; pfractured on insertion (0.53%), one (0.53%) screw was inserted into a root. Six (3.2%) screws loosened spontaneously in four patients. Mucosal disturbances were seen in 22 patients, equally divided over both groups. Considering the advantages and the disadvantages of IMFS, and observing the results of this study, the authors conclude that IMFS provide a superior method for IMF. IMFS are safer for the patients and surgeons. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CT-guided fixation of sacral fractures and sacrolilac joint disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.W.; Duwelius, P.

    1990-01-01

    Placement of sacral fixation screws at surgery is performed blindly (ie, by palpation). The authors of this paper employed CT to localize the screw between the neutral foramina and anterior sacral cortex and to decrease the morbidity associated with general anesthesia and surgery. Six patients underwent CT-guided sacral fixation performed by means of the 7.0 mm A0 cannulated screw system. All patients had reducible vertical sacral fractures or sacroiliac joint disruptions. Following placement of an epidural catheter for anesthesia, patients were scanned in the prone or decubitus position. Measurements for placement of the guide pin were made from the preliminary scans. Following CT confirmation of satisfactory guide pin placement across the fracture, the screw track was drilled, the screw length was determined, and the fixation screw was placed in position. A CT scan was obtained to evaluate the final position of the screw

  16. Radiological outcome of transpedicular screws fixation in the management of thoracolumbar spine injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, M.I.U.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic fracture of the spine is a serious neurosurgical condition that has serious impact on the patient's quality of life. Thoracolumbar junction is the most common site of spinal injuries. The aims of management of thoracolumbar spinal fractures are to restore vertebral column stability, and to obtain spinal canal decompression. This ultimately leads to early mobilization of the patients. This study was conducted to compare preoperative and post-operative vertebral height, kyphotic angle and sagittal index in patients treated with pedicle screws and rods in thoracolumbar spine fractures. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Neurosurgery, Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar from 1st February 2010 to 31st July 2011. A total 161 patients with unstable thoracolumber spine fracture were included in this study. In these patients fixation was done through transpedicle screws with rods. Anteroposterior and lateral views X-rays of thoraco-lumbar spine were done pre and post operatively. Results: Out of 161 patients, 109 (67.7%) were males and 52 (32.3%) females. The age of patients ranged from 20 to 70 years (mean 42.2 years) with 71 (44.1%) in the age range of 31-40 years. Preoperative average vertebral height was 9.4194 mm while postoperative average was 19.642 mm. The mean kyphosis was 23.06 degree preoperatively. Immediately after surgery the average correction of kyphosis was 9.45 degree. The pre-operative average sagittal index was 19.38 degree, which was reduced to an average 5.41 degree post operatively. Conclusions: Transpedicular fixation for unstable thoraco-lumbar spinal fractures achieves a stable fracture segment with improvement of vertebral height, kyphotic angle and sagittal index. Hence, preventing the secondary spinal deformities. (author)

  17. Study on pedicle screw fixation of cervical spine assisted CT-based navigation system compared with the individual cervical peddle screws placement technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xishun; Yang Huilin; Zhu Ruofu; Tan Xiangqi; Wang Genlin; Tang Tiansi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore a safe and effective method for placing the cervical pedicle screws. Methods: There were ten adult cadaver specimens of cervica spine (C 1 -C 7 ) with intact structures including ligament and perivertebral muscles. The spiral computed tomography scan (Elscint CT Twin flash) at the section of 1 mm and three-dimensional reconstruction of all 10 cervical specimens were taken. By CT scan, the parameters of the cervical pedicles were measure,Then taking randomly 5 cervical specimens, according to the CT measurements, an appropriate screw was inserted into pedicle individually. In the other 5 human cadaver cervical vertebraes, Φ3.5 mm screws were inserted into the C 2 -C 7 pedicles by assisted by CT-based navigation system. Cortical integrity of every sample was examined by anatomic dissection, the spiral computed tomography scan and arrows,and coronal reconstruction. Results: Sixty screws was inserted into pedicle individually, and the achievement ratio was 90%, the perfectness ratio was 75%, 60 screws was placed into pedicle assisted by CT-based navigation system, and the achievement ratio was 96.6%, the perfectness ratio was 90%. By chi-square test for statistical analysis, there were no statistical significance between the accuracy rate of two methods(P>0.05). However there was statistical significance between the perfectness ratio between two methods(P<0.05). Conclusion: Compared with the individual cervical peddle screws placement technique, the perfectness ratio of pedicle screw fixation of cervical spine assisted by CT-based navigation system is higher, but there are no significant difference in accuracy. (authors)

  18. Ununited fracture neck of femur treated with closed reduction and internal fixation with cancellous screw and fibular strut graft

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    Singh Daria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ununited fracture neck of femur in young adults has been tackled in various ways. Methods: Twenty five patients of ununited fracture neck of femur in age group 21-55 years were treated by closed reduction, cancellous screw fixation and fibular strut graft and followed up for 2-6 years. Time gap between injury and operation was 6 weeks to 58 weeks. Five cases were previously fixed with various fixation devices. Results: Osseous union was achieved in 24 cases with average time of 18.16 weeks. Main complication encountered in follow-up was avascular necrosis of femoral head, others were joint stiffness and shortening. Functional end results were good to excellent in 24 cases. Conclusion: Closed reduction with internal fixation by cancellous screw and fibular strut grafting is easy and useful procedure.

  19. Determination of the most appropriate stress distribution by Finite Element Analysis in fixation with resorbable screws after Bilateral Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy surgery

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    Sarkarat F.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Due to the complications associated with fixation by Titanium screws and plates in Bilateral Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy (BSSRO surgery, the use of resorbable polymers has been increasingly recommended. Since there are not enough studies on this issue, this study aimed to assess the most appropriate stress distribution in fixation with resorbable screws after BSSRO surgery by Fnite Element Analysis (FEA."nMaterials and Methods: This experimental study was performed on simulated human mandible using Ansys and Catia softwares. The osteotomy line was applied to the simulated model and experimental loads of 75, 135 and 600 N were respectively exerted according to the natural direction of occlusal force. The distribution pattern of stress was assessed and compared for fixation with one resorbable screw, two resorbable screws in vertical pattern, two resorbable screws in horizontal pattern, three resorbable screws in L pattern and three resorbable screws in inverted backward L pattern using Ansys software."nResults: Among the four simulated fixations, L pattern showed the highest primary stability. Two screws in vertical pattern were also associated with sufficient primary stability and less trauma and cost for patients. One screw did not provide enough stability under 600 N."nConclusion: Polymer-based resorbable screws (polyglycolic acid and D, L polylactide acid provided satisfactory primary stability in BSSRO surgery.

  20. Clinical comparative analysis on unstable pelvic fractures in the treatment with percutaneous sacroiliac screws and sacroiliac joint anterior plate fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C-L

    2014-01-01

    To investigate clinical efficacy of unstable pelvic fractures in the treatment with percutaneous sacroiliac screws and sacroiliac joint anterior plate fixation. 64 patients with unstable pelvic fractures were selected in the hospital from January 2008 to June 2011, and were randomly divided into two groups.(32 patients with sacroiliac anterior plate fixation as the control group, and another 32 patients with percutaneous sacroiliac screw internal fixation as the observation group). The perioperative period clinical indicators, postoperative Matta score, postoperative Majeed function score of all patients were compared and analyzed. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, wound total length, postoperative fever time, duration of hospitalization in the observation group were significantly less than those in the control group. The complication rate (3.1%) in the observation group was lower than that in the control group (21.9%). The rate of Matta score excellent (96.9%) in the observation group was higher than that in the control group (81.2%) after the treatment. The rate of Majeed function score excellent (93.8%) in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group (75%) after the treatment. Percutaneous sacroiliac screw internal fixation in the treatment of unstable pelvic fractures has less injury, less bleeding, less pain and rapid recovery which is a safe and effective minimally invasive operation method. The clinical curative effect of percutaneous sacroiliac screw internal fixation is better than anterior plate fixation for the treatment of sacroiliac joint. The full preparation before the surgery and patients with positive can substantially reduce the occurrence of complications rate.

  1. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws

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    Filli, Lukas; Finkenstaedt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Marcon, Magda [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Udine, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Udine (Italy); Scholz, Bernhard [Imaging and Therapy Division, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany); Calcagni, Maurizio [University Hospital of Zurich, Division of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was ''almost perfect'' (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filli, Lukas; Finkenstaedt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman; Marcon, Magda; Scholz, Bernhard; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was ''almost perfect'' (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. (orig.)

  3. Aspects of internal fixation of fractures in porotic bone. Principles, technologies and procedures using locked plate screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perren, S M; Linke, B; Schwieger, K; Wahl, D; Schneider, E

    2005-01-01

    Fractures of the bones of elderly people occur more often and have a more important effect because of a generally diminished ability to coordinate stance and walking. These fractures occur at a lower level of load because of lack of strength of the porotic bone. Prompt recovery of skeletal support function is essential to avoid respiratory and circulatory complications in the elderly. To prevent elderly people from the risks of being bedridden, demanding internal fixation of fractures is required. The weak porotic bone and the high level of uncontrolled loading after internal fixation pose complex problems. A combination of several technical elements of design, application and aftercare in internal fixation are proposed. Internal fixators with locked screws improve the biology and the mechanics of internal fixation. When such fixators are used as elevated splints they may stimulate early callus formation because of their flexibility, the limit of flexibility being set by the demands of resistance and function of the limb. Our own studies of triangulation of locked screws have demonstrated their beneficial effects and unexpected limitations.

  4. Advantages of Direct Insertion of a Straight Probe Without a Guide Tube During Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation of Odontoid Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kang, Dong-Ho; Lee, Moon Kyu; Yoo, Byoungwoo; Jung, Sang Ku; Hwang, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Jeoung Hee; Oh, Sunkyu; Lee, Eun Jung; Jeon, Sang Ryong; Roh, Sung Woo; Rhim, Seung Chul

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to compare the anterior odontoid screw fixation (AOSF) with a guide tube or with a straight probe. AOSF associates with several complications, including malpositioning, fixation loss, and screw breakage. Screw pull-out from the C2 body is the most common complication. All consecutive patients with type II or rostral shallow type III odontoid fractures who underwent AOSFs during the study period were enrolled retrospectively. The guide-tube AOSF method followed the standard published method except C3 body and C2-3 disc annulus rimming was omitted to prevent disc injury; instead, the guide tube was anchored at the anterior inferior C2 vertebra corner. After 2 screw pull-outs, the guide-tube cohort was analyzed to identify the cause of instrument failure. Thereafter, the straight-probe method was developed. A guide tube was not used. A small pilot hole was made on the most anterior side of the inferior endplate, followed by insertion of a 2.5 mm straight probe through the C2 body. Non-union and instrument failure rates and screw-direction angles of the guide-tube and straight-probe groups were recorded. The guide-tube group (n = 13) had 2 screw pull-outs and 1 non-union. The straight-probe group (n = 8) had no complications and significantly larger screw-direction angles than the guide-tube group (60.5 ± 4.63 vs. 54.8 ± 3.82 degrees; P = 0.047). Straight-probe AOSF yielded larger direction angles without injuring bone and disc. Complications were absent. The procedure was easier than guide-tube AOSF and assured sufficient engagement, even in horizontal fracture orientation cases. 3.

  5. Osteossíntese com parafuso intramedular nas fraturas proximais do quinto metatarsiano do atleta Intramedullary screw fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal fractures in athletes

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    Marta Maria Teixeira de Oliveira Massada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados clínicos e radiológicos da osteossíntese com parafuso de compressão intramedular nas fraturas proximais do quinto metatarsiano no atleta. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos no estudo 11 homens e seis mulheres com diagnóstico de fratura das zonas II e III do quinto metatarsiano. Quinze dos pacientes praticavam esporte a nível profissional ou de alto rendimento (futebol: n=11; basquetebol: n=1; atletismo: n=3 e dois praticavam atividade esportiva regular a nível recreacional. Foram submetidos a fixação cirúrgica com parafuso canulado de compressão (4.5mm de diâmetro. Todos os pacientes foram avaliados clinicamente e através da revisão do processo clínico e dos estudos imagiológicos. O tempo médio de seguimento após a cirurgia foi 54 meses (38-70. RESULTADOS: O tempo médio de consolidação (como demonstrado pelo estudo radiológico e de retorno à atividade esportiva foi 7.3 e 7.5 semanas, respectivamente. Todos os atletas retornaram aos níveis de atividade prévios. Não verificamos atrasos de consolidação, não-união ou refraturas à data do estudo. CONCLUSÃO: A osteossíntese com parafuso de compressão intramedular nas fraturas proximais do quinto metatarsiano demonstrou, nos nossos pacientes, ser um procedimento eficaz com taxas de morbilidade muito reduzidas e que permite ao atleta um retorno precoce à atividade esportiva. Nível de evidência I, Série de Casos.OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to review the short- and long-term clinical and radiological results of intramedullary compression screw fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal fractures in athletes. METHODS: Eleven male and six female active patients with fifth metatarsal zone II and zone III fractures fixed with a 4.5-mm cannulated compression screw were evaluated by chart review, review of radiographs, and clinical evaluation. Fifteen of the patients were high-level athletes (soccer: n=11; basketball: n=1; track and field: n

  6. Functional outcomes following syndesmotic fixation: A comparison of screws retained in situ versus routine removal - Is it really necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Adam; Street, Julia; Kealey, David; McDonald, Sinead; Stevenson, Mike

    2013-12-01

    Syndesmotic disruption can occur in up to 20% of ankle fractures and is more common in Weber Type C injuries. Syndesmotic repair aims to restore ankle stability. Routine removal of syndesmosis screws is advocated to avoid implant breakage and adverse functional outcome such as pain and stiffness, but conflicting evidence exists to support this. The aim of the current study is to determine whether functional outcome differs in patients who had syndesmosis screws routinely removed, compared to those who did not, and whether a cost benefit exists if removal of screws is not routinely necessary. A retrospective review of consecutive syndesmosis repairs was performed from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2010 in a single regional trauma centre. We identified 91 patients who had undergone open reduction internal fixation of an ankle fracture with placement of a syndesmosis screw at index procedure. As many as 69 patients were eligible for the study as defined by the inclusion criteria and they completed a validated functional outcome questionnaire. The functional outcomes of patients with 'retained screws' and 'removed screws' were analysed and compared using the Olerud Molander Ankle Score (OMAS). A total of 63 patients responded with a mean follow-up period of 31 months (range 10-43 months). Of those patients, 43 underwent routine screw removal whilst 20 had screws left in situ. The groups were comparable considering age, gender and follow-up time. The 'retained' group scored higher mean OMAS scores, 81.5±19.3 compared to 75±12.9 in the 'removed' group (p=0.107). The retained group achieved higher functional scores in each of the OMAS domains as well as experiencing less pain. When adjusted for gender, the findings were found to be statistically significant (p=0.046). Our study has shown that retained-screw fixation does not significantly impair functional capacity, with additional cost-effectiveness. We therefore advocate that syndesmosis screws be left in situ and

  7. Surgical outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation for lumbar spondylolisthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoda, Motoi; Kuno, Shigehiko; Inoue, Tatsushi

    2009-01-01

    Problems of lumbar spondylolisthesis treatment are many surgical tactics, elderly patient, osteoporosis, complications and recurrence of the symptoms. PLIF (posterior lumbar interbody fusion) and PS (pedicle screw) fixation technique for lumbar spondylolisthesis provide good patient satisfaction. Good outcome has been reported by only laminectomy alone, but patient satisfaction becomes worse year after year. The role of instrumentation for lumbar spondylolisthesis is decompression of the nerve root, correction of lumbar pathologies, bony fusion and early mobilization. We show our surgical technique and long term outcome of PLIF with PS for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Three hundred and fifty cases of lumbar spondylolisthesis were operated on in Department of Neurosurgery, Fujita Health University during the period of from December 1992 to August 2008. Patient background: age 16-84 years old (mean 62.5), Gender: male 153, female 197. Follow-up period 1-180 months (mean 61.2). Degenerative: 255, Isthmic: 63, Dysplastic: 10, Fracture: 5 and scoliosis 16 cases. Surgical procedure was PS with interbody fusion cage: 331, Hybrid cage (titanium cage with hydroxyapatite) 314, PS with Cerabone: 2 and PS with autograft: 17. CT was done to evaluate bony fusion postoperatively. Post operative improvements by JOA (Japan Orthopedic Association) score is 11.4 before surgery, 24.1 (post op. within 2 years), 25.4 (post op. 2-5 years), 25.0 (post op. 5-10 years) and 22.4 (post op. 10-15 years). Significant improvements were observed in %Slip and Slip angle but no remarkable change was observed in lumbar lordotic angle by postoperative X-ray evaluation. No root injury, and systemic complication except 4 cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during surgery. Two cases were reoperated in whom cage with autograft migration due to pseudoarthrosis. Two cases had to undergo screw and cage system removal due to infection. Two cases of adjacent level stenosis had to undergo operation 10

  8. Surgical technique of percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation in S3 level in unstable pelvic fracture with closed degloving injury and morrell lavallee lesion: Two case reports

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    Ismail H. Dilogo

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Percutaneous screw fixation at the level of S3 is feasible and can be inserted in S3 level by sacroiliac type and sacral type with minimal soft tissue intervention and good functional outcome.

  9. Clinical study on the application of minimally invasive percutaneous pedicle screw fixation in single segment thoracolumbar fracture without neurological symptoms

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    Jin-ping LIU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the clinical effects of minimally invasive percutaneous pedicle screw fixation in the treatment of single segment thoracolumbar fracture without neurological symptoms.  Methods From June 2012 to October 2014, 38 neurologically intact patients with thoracolumbar fracture underwent surgeries, including open pedicle screw fixation in 16 cases and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation in 22 cases. The incision length, operation time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative drainage and postoperative complication were recorded and compared between 2 groups. Thoracolumbar orthophoric, lateral and flexion-extension X-ray was used to measure sagittal Cobb angle and height of injured anterior vertebral body before and after operation. Modified Macnab evaluation was used to assess the curative effects 3 months after operation. Results The success rate of operations in 38 patients was 100%. There were a total of 114 vertebral bodies fused and 228 pedicle screws implanted. Patients in the percutaneous pedicle screw group had smaller incision length [(10.55 ± 1.23 cm vs (18.50 ± 2.50 cm, P = 0.000], less intraoperative blood loss [(32.55 ± 7.22 ml vs (320.50 ± 15.48 ml, P = 0.000], shorter hospital stay [(6.55 ± 1.50 d vs (13.50 ± 2.52 d, P = 0.000], and without postoperative drainage. The follow-up after operation ranged from 3 to 6 months, with the average time of (4.65 ± 1.24 months. Cobb angle was reduced (P = 0.000 and height of injured anterior vertebral body were improved signifcantly (P = 0.000 3 months after surgery in both groups. The total effective rate was 14/16 in open surgery group, and 86.36% (19/22 in percutaneous pedicle screw group, however, the difference between 2 groups was not significant (P = 1.000. Conclusions Minimally invasive percutaneous pedicle screw fixation is a surgical method with less iatrogenic injury, less intraoperative blood loss and quick recovery for patients with thoracolumbar fracture

  10. A Nearly Lethal Screw: An Unusual Cause of Recurrent Bradycardia and Asystole Episodes after Fixation of the Cervical Spine

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    Amit Frenkel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 51-year-old man who was injured in a bicycle accident. His main injury was an unstable fracture of the cervical and thoracic vertebral column. Several hours after his arrival to the hospital the patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF of the cervical and thoracic spine. The patient was hospitalized in our critical care unit for 99 days. During this time patient had several episodes of severe bradycardia and asystole; some were short with spontaneous return to sinus and some required pharmacological treatment and even Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR. Initially, these episodes were attributed to the high cervical spine injury, but, later on, CT scan suggested that a fixation screw abutted on the esophagus and activated the vagus nerve by direct pressure. After repositioning of the cervical fixation, the bradycardia and asystole episodes were no longer observed and the patient was released to a rehabilitation ward. This case is presented in order to alert practitioners to the possibility that, after operative fixation of cervical spine injuries, recurrent episodes of bradyarrhythmia can be caused by incorrect placement of the fixation screws and might be confused with the natural history of the high cervical cord injury.

  11. Unstable metacarpal and phalangeal fractures: treatment by internal fixation using AO mini-fragment plates and screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Mohammad Umar; Farooq, Muneer Ahmad; Rasool, Altaf Ahmad; Kawoosa, Altaf Ahmad; Badoo, Abdul Rashid; Dhar, Shabir Ahmad

    2010-07-01

    Accurate open reduction and internal fixation for metacarpal and phalangeal fractures of the hand is required in less than 5% of the patients; otherwise, closed treatment techniques offer satisfactory results in most of these cases as these fractures are stable either before or after closed reduction. AO mini-fragment screws and plates, when used in properly selected cases, can provide rigid fixation, allowing early mobilization of joints and hence good functional results while avoiding problems associated with protruding K-wires and immobilization. The advantages of such internal fixation urged us to undertake such a study in our state where such hand injuries are commonly seen. Forty patients with 42 unstable metacarpal and phalangeal fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using AO mini-fragment screws and plates over a period of three years in a prospective manner. The overall results were good in 78.5% of cases, fair in 19% of cases and poor in 2.5% of cases, as judged according to the criteria of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand. This technique is a reasonable option for treating unstable metacarpal and phalangeal fractures as it provides a highly rigid fixation, which is sufficient to allow early mobilization of the adjacent joints, thus helping to achieve good functional results.

  12. Anterior screw fixation of a dislocated type II odontoid fracture facilitated by transoral and posterior cervical manual reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedra, Mark P; Hunt, Matthew A; Nemecek, Andrew N

    2009-10-01

    Early fixation of type II odontoid fractures has been shown to provide high rates of long-term stabilization and osteosynthesis. In this report, the authors present the case of a patient with a locked type II odontoid fracture treated by anterior screw fixation facilitated by closed transoral and posterior cervical manual reduction. While transoral intraoperative reduction of a partially displaced odontoid fracture has previously been described, the authors present the first case utilizing this technique in the treatment of a completely dislocated type II odontoid fracture.

  13. Treatment of Displaced Sacroiliac Fracture Using the Lateral Window for Short Plate Buttress Reduction and Percutaneous Sacroiliac Screw Fixation.

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    Colin Murphy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fractures through the sacroiliac joint are very challenging to treat, technically difficult to reduce through closed methods on account of the multiaxial displacement of fractures fragments, frequently occur in very unwell patients, and have poor outcomes if malreduction is present. We describe a technique utilising the lateral window and a short buttress plate to reduce and stabilize the fragments prior to percutaneous fixation with sacroiliac screws.

  14. In vitro evaluation of allogeneic bone screws for use in internal fixation of transverse fractures created in proximal sesamoid bones obtained from equine cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Naoki; Takakuwa, Jun; Yamada, Haruo; Mori, Ryuji

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate effectiveness of allogeneic bone screws and pins for internal fixation of midbody transverse fractures of equine proximal sesamoid bones (PSBs) in vitro. 14 forelimbs from cadavers of 3-year-old Thoroughbreds. Allogeneic cortical bone fragments were collected from the limbs of a male Thoroughbred, and cortical bone screws were prepared from the tissue by use of a precision desktop microlathe programmed with the dimensions of a metal cortical bone screw. A midbody transverse osteotomy of each PSB was performed by use of a bone-shaping oscillating saw and repaired via 1 of 3 internal fixation techniques: 1 allogeneic bone screw with 1 allogeneic bone pin (type I; n = 6 PSBs), 2 allogeneic bone screws (type II; 8), or 1 stainless steel cortical bone screw (control repair; 6). Mechanical tension measurements were obtained by use of a commercially available materials testing system. Mean +/- SD tensile strength (TS) was 668.3 +/- 216.6 N for type I repairs, 854.4 +/- 253.2 N for type II repairs, and 1,150.0 +/- 451.7 N for control repairs. Internal fixation of PSB fractures by the use of allogeneic bone screws and bone pins was successful. Although mean TS of control repairs with stainless steel cortical bone screws was greater than the mean TS of type I and type II repairs, the difference between type II and control repairs was not significant. Allogeneic screws may advance healing and result in fewer complications in a clinical setting.

  15. [Surgical treatment for talar neck fracture of Hawkins III, IV type with compression hollow screws combined with external fixator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Xun; Wan, Chang-Tao; Yu, Li

    2017-05-25

    To investigate the clinical effects of compression hollow screws combined with external fixator in treating talar neck fracture of Hawkins III, IV type. From March 2010 to August 2014, 15 patients with talar neck fractures of Hawkins III, IV type were treated by open reduction and compression hollow screws fixation complicated with external fixator fixation. Including 9 males and 6 females, aged from 17 to 65 years old with an average of 37.5 years old. There were 9 cases of Hawkins III and 6 cases of Hawkins IV type. Postoperative radiographs and CT of ankle were used to evaluate the fracture healing and talar necrosis. The function of ankle and foot were evaluated by American Society of Ankle and Foot Surgery(AOFAS). All the patients were followed up for 8 to 55 months with an average of 23.5 months and all fractures got bone healing from 13 to 38 weeks with an average of (17.99±6.81) weeks. Traumatic arthritis occurred in 7 cases and talar necrosis in 6 cases (2 cases of type III and 4 cases of type IV) after operation. The average AOFAS score was 61.80±18.75, including excellent in 4 cases, good in 2 cases, fair in 4 cases and poor in 5 cases. Talar neck fracture with Hawkins III, IV type has large possibility to develop avascular necrosis. Hollow compression screw combined with external fixation may late weight-bearing for ankle and can sufficiently guarantee bone healing time, and achieve good results for the treatment of talar neck fracture.

  16. Combined circular external fixation and open reduction internal fixation with pro-syndesmotic screws for repair of a diabetic ankle fracture

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    Zacharia Facaros

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The surgical management of ankle fractures among the diabetic population is associated with higher complication rates compared to the general population. Efforts toward development of better methods in prevention and treatment are continuously evolving for these injuries. The presence of peripheral neuropathy and the possible development of Charcot neuroarthropathy in this high risk patient population have stimulated much surgical interest to create more stable osseous constructs when open reduction of an ankle fracture/dislocation is required. The utilization of multiple syndesmotic screws (pro-syndesmotic screws to further stabilize the ankle mortise has been reported by many foot and ankle surgeons. In addition, transarticular Steinmann pins have been described as an adjunct to traditional open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF of the ankle to better stabilize the talus, thus minimizing risk of further displacement, malunion, and Charcot neuroarthropathy. The authors present a unique technique of ORIF with pro-syndesmotic screws and the application of a multi-plane circular external fixator for management of a neglected diabetic ankle fracture that prevented further deformity while allowing a weight-bearing status. This technique may be utilized for the management of complex diabetic ankle fractures that are prone to future complications and possible limb loss.

  17. Feasibility of Modified Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation: Analysis of a New Trajectory Using 3-Dimensional Simulation Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Lian; Chen, Qi; Wang, Hao-Li; Xu, Hua-Zi; Tian, Nai-Feng

    2018-05-03

    Anterior odontoid screw fixation (AOSF) has been suggested as the optimal treatment for type II and some shallow type III odontoid fractures. However, only the classical surgical trajectory is available; no newer entry points or trajectories have been reported. We evaluated the anatomic feasibility of a new trajectory for AOSF using 3-dimensional (3D) screw insertion simulation software (Mimics). Computed tomography (CT) scans of patients (65 males and 59 females) with normal cervical structures were obtained consecutively, and the axes were reconstructed in 3 dimensions by Mimics software. Then simulated operations were performed using 2 new entry points below the superior articular process using bilateral screws of different diameters (group 1: 4 mm and 4 mm; group 2: 4 mm and 3.5 mm; group 3: 3.5 mm and 3.5 mm). The success rates and the required screw lengths were recorded and analyzed. The success rates were 79.03% for group 1, 95.16% for group 2, and 98.39% for group 3. The success rates for groups 2 and 3 did not differ significantly, and both were significantly better than the rate for group 1. The success rate was much higher in males than in females in group 1, but the success rate was similar in males and females in the other 2 groups. Screw lengths did not differ significantly among the 3 groups, but an effect of sex was apparent. Our modified trajectory is anatomically feasible for fixation of anterior odontoid fractures, but further anatomic experiments and clinical research are needed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving the trajectory of transpedicular transdiscal lumbar screw fixation with a computer-assisted 3D-printed custom drill guide

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    Zhen-Xuan Shao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Transpedicular transdiscal screw fixation is an alternative technique used in lumbar spine fixation; however, it requires an accurate screw trajectory. The aim of this study is to design a novel 3D-printed custom drill guide and investigate its accuracy to guide the trajectory of transpedicular transdiscal (TPTD lumbar screw fixation. Dicom images of thirty lumbar functional segment units (FSU, two segments of L1–L4 were acquired from the PACS system in our hospital (patients who underwent a CT scan for other abdomen diseases and had normal spine anatomy and imported into reverse design software for three-dimensional reconstructions. Images were used to print the 3D lumbar models and were imported into CAD software to design an optimal TPTD screw trajectory and a matched custom drill guide. After both the 3D printed FSU models and 3D-printed custom drill guide were prepared, the TPTD screws will be guided with a 3D-printed custom drill guide and introduced into the 3D printed FSU models. No significant statistical difference in screw trajectory angles was observed between the digital model and the 3D-printed model (P > 0.05. Our present study found that, with the help of CAD software, it is feasible to design a TPTD screw custom drill guide that could guide the accurate TPTD screw trajectory on 3D-printed lumbar models.

  19. [Effectiveness of U-shape titanium screw-rod fixation system with bone autografting for lumbar spondylolysis of young adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xiaobing; Yang, Shuangshi; Cao, Haiquan; Jing, Xingquan; Yin, Jun

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of U-shape titanium screw-rod fixation system with bone autografting for lumbar spondylolysis of young adults. Between January 2008 and December 2011, 32 patients with lumbar spondylolysis underwent U-shape titanium screw-rod fixation system with bone autografting. All patients were male with an average age of 22 years (range, 19-32 years). The disease duration ranged from 3 to 24 months (mean, 14 months). L3 was involved in spondylolysis in 2 cases, L4 in 10 cases, and L5 in 20 cases. The preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores were 8.0 +/- 1.1 and 75.3 +/- 11.2, respectively. The operation time was 80-120 minutes (mean, 85 minutes), and the blood loss was 150-250 mL (mean, 210 mL). Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients without complications of infection and nerve symptom. Thirty-two patients were followed up 12-24 months (mean, 14 months). Low back pain was significantly alleviated after operation. The VAS and ODI scores at 3 months after operation were 1.0 +/- 0.5 and 17.6 +/- 3.4, respectively, showing significant differences when compared with preoperative ones (t = 30.523, P = 0.000; t = 45.312, P = 0.000). X-ray films and CT showed bone fusion in the area of isthmus defects, with the bone fusion time of 6-12 months (mean, 9 months). During follow-up, no secondary lumbar spondyloly, adjacent segment degeneration, or loosening or breaking of internal fixator was found. The U-shape titanium screw-rod fixation system with bone autografting is a reliable treatment for lumbar spondylolysis of young adults because of a high fusion rate, minimal invasive, and maximum retention of lumbar range of motion.

  20. Interference screw versus Endoscrew fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A biomechanical comparative study in sawbones and porcine knees

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    Chu-Chih Hung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interference screw fixation is one of the most common methods for ligament reconstruction. Although the advantages and clinical outcomes of this procedure have been widely reported, post-surgical complications often arise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new femoral fixation device, the Endoscrew, for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. We performed a mechanical test in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standards and an in vitro biomechanical study. An axial pullout test was conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the new device and the interference screw when implanted in solid rigid polyurethane foam test blocks. The biomechanical test used porcine femora to evaluate the initial fixation strength between these two implants. The maximum pullout force of the interference screw group [722.05 ± 130.49 N (N] was significantly greater (p < 0.01 than the Endoscrew group (440.79 ± 26.54 N when implanted in polyurethane foam 320 kg/m3 density. With polyurethane foam 160 kg/m3 density, the maximum pullout forces were (242.61 ± 37.36 N (p < 0.001 and (99.33 ± 30.01 N for the interference screw group and Endoscrew group, respectively. In the in vitro mechanical study, the Endoscrew (646.39 ± 72.38 N required a significantly greater ultimate load prior to failure (p < 0.05 when compared with the interference screw (489.72 ± 138.64 N. With regard to pullout stiffness, there was no statistically significant difference (p < 0.13 between the Endoscrew group (99.15 ± 12.16 N/mm and the interference screw group (87.96 ± 11.12 N/mm. The cyclic stiffness was also not significantly different (p < 0.44 between the Endoscrew group (93.09 ± 16.07 N/mm and the interference screw group (85.78 ± 14.76 N/mm. The axial pullout test showed that the strength of the Endoscrew was close to the fixation strength required for daily activities, but it is

  1. The Use of Percutaneous Lumbar Fixation Screws for Bilateral Pedicle Fractures with an Associated Dislocation of a Lumbar Disc Prosthesis

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    William D. Harrison

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. Case report. Objective. To identify a safe technique for salvage surgery following complications of total disc replacement. Summary of Background Data. Lumbar total disc replacement (TDR is considered by some as the gold standard for discogenic back pain. Revision techniques for TDR and their complications are in their infancy. This case describes a successful method of fixation for this complex presentation. Methods and Results. A 48-year-old male with lumbar degenerative disc disease and no comorbidities. Approximately two weeks postoperatively for a TDR, the patient represented with acute severe back pain and the TDR polyethylene inlay was identified as dislocated anteriorly. Subsequent revision surgery failed immediately as the polyethylene inlay redislocated intraoperatively. Further radiology identified bilateral pedicle fractures, previously unseen on the plain films. The salvage fusion of L5/S1 reutilized the anterior approach with an interbody fusion cage and bone graft. The patient was then turned intraoperatively and redraped. The percutaneous pedicle screws were used to fix L5 to the sacral body via the paracoccygeal corridor. Conclusion. The robust locking screw in the percutaneous screw allowed a complete fixation of the pedicle fractures. At 3-year followup, the patient has an excellent result and has returned to playing golf.

  2. Changes in the syndesmotic reduction after syndesmotic screw fixation for ankle malleolar fractures: One-year longitudinal evaluations using computer tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Jun; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Saito, Masahiko; Morikawa, Tsuguo; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Sasho, Takahisa

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate time-dependent changes in the syndesmotic reduction after syndesmotic screw fixation and one year after screw removal for ankle malleolar fractures, and to assess whether the incidence of syndesmotic malreduction changes depending on the measurement method. We assessed twenty patients who underwent syndesmotic screw fixation for ankle fractures. The syndesmotic screws were removed after six weeks of the fracture surgery. Syndesmotic reduction was assessed within two weeks of the fracture surgery and one year after the screw removal using the axial computer tomographic images. Side-to-side differences in the anterior and posterior tibiofibular distances, anteroposterior fibular translation, and fibular rotation were measured. The mean anterior tibiofibular distance was 0.7mm after syndesmotic fixation. It increased to 1.9mm at one year after screw removal (p=0.002). After syndesmotic fixation, four ankles had malreduction of the anterior tibiofibular distance, including three ankles with widening and one with overtightening. At one year, eight ankles had malreduction, all of whom had widening. The other measurement values did not change over time (0.1mm vs. 0.6mm for the posterior tibiofibular distance, 0.2mm vs. 0.3mm for the anteroposterior fibular translation, and 0.7° vs. 0° for the fibular rotation). The incidences of malreduction were significantly different depending on the definition of malreduction, ranging from 10% to 50% after syndesmotic fixation (p=0.01) and from 20% to 60% at one year after screw removal (p=0.02). The anterior tibiofibular distance widened after one year of syndesmotic screw removal. The incidence of malreduction varied depending on the measurement method. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis by using minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation

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    Hao WU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss clinical therapeutic effects of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS.  Methods A total of 32 DLS patients treated by MIS-TLIF and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation from January 2013 to September 2015 in Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University were retrospectively reviewed. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 scores were assessed and compared between preoperation and one week, 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up. Lumbar lordosis angle, coronal Cobb angle, coronal and sagittal body shifting, complication, the degree of spondylolisthesis (Meyerding classification and the rate of spondylolisthesis were measured according to preoperative and postoperative spinal X-ray examination. Fusion rate was evaluated according to X-rays or CT in the last follow-up, and MRI was used to assess the degree of decompression.  Results Thirty-two patients were under test with mean operation time 160 min, intraoperative blood loss 120 ml, postoperative hospital stay 7.22 d and follow-up 10.83 months. Decompression and fusion levels ranged from L2-S1 and interbody fusion was performed in 32 patients and 41 levels were fused. Compared with preoperation, the VAS and ODI scores were significantly increased at one week, 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up (P = 0.000, for all, while SF-36 score (P = 0.002, 0.000, 0.000, lumbar lordotic angle (P = 0.000, for all, coronal Cobb angle (P = 0.000, for all and slippage rate (P = 0.000, for all were significantly decreased. The fusion rate was 92.22%, and the improvement rate of ODI was (80.51 ± 6.02% in the last follow-up. There were 3 cases appeared complications, including one case of infection and 2 cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF fistula, and were

  4. Cerclage wire and lag screw fixation of the lateral malleolus in supination and external rotation fractures of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Amarjit S; Gantz, D E

    2005-01-01

    Wound dehiscence and exposed lateral hardware can occur after open reduction internal fixation of lateral malleolus. The bulk of a lateral plate and the minimum soft tissue over the lateral malleolus may contribute to this situation. The objective of this study was to evaluate a series of patients with lateral malleolar fractures treated with operative reduction using minimal hardware. We wanted to observe whether there was any loss of reduction and whether there were any incidences of soft tissue disruption. Fifty-two patients with long spiral fracture of the lateral malleolus in a supination-external rotation injury were treated with two or three 3.5-mm lag screws inserted 1 cm apart and 1 or 2 circlage wires. Less rigid fixation was supplemented with a below-the-knee plaster cast. All patients were followed up until clinical and radiological evidence of fracture healing at 6, 10, and 14 weeks postoperatively. By 10 weeks, all patients were full weight bearing, although most patients still limped. At 14 weeks' follow-up, there were no infections or wound dehiscences. All patients were able to return to their activities of daily living. All the fractures had united without loss of original position. Two fractures of the posterior bone spikes seen during surgery united uneventfully. Long spiral fractures of the lateral malleolus of the ankle can be treated successfully with 2 or 3 lag screws and circlage wires without compromising the outcome of the fracture healing.

  5. [Effectiveness of posterior intrasegmental fixation with pedicle screw-lamina hook system in treatment of lumbar spondylolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongjie; Song, Yueming; Zeng, Jiancheng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Limin; Kong, Qingquan; Li, Tao; Gong, Quan

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of posterior intrasegmental fixation with pedicle screw-lamina hook system and bone grafting for lumbar spondylolysis. Between January 2005 and October 2009, 22 patients with lumbar spondylolysis underwent posterior intrasegmental fixation with pedicle screw-lamina hook system and bone grafting. There were 19 males and 3 females with an average age of 18.4 years (range, 12-26 years). The main symptom was low back pain with an average disease duration of 16 months (range, 8-56 months). The visual analogue scale (VAS) was 6.0 +/- 1.2 and Oswestry disability index (ODI) was 72.0% +/- 10.0% preoperatively. The X-ray films showed bilateral spondylolysis at L4 in 9 cases and at L5 in 13 cases. The range of motion (ROM) at upper and lower intervertebral spaces was (11.8 +/- 2.8) degrees and (14.1 +/- 1.9) degrees, respectively. All incisions healed by first intention. All patients were followed up 12-45 months (mean, 25 months). Low back pain was significantly alleviated after operation. The VAS score (0.3 +/- 0.5) and ODI (17.6% +/- 3.4%) were significantly decreased at last follow-up when compared with preoperative scores (P spondylolysis, having a high fusion rate, low complication rate, and maximum retention of lumbar ROM.

  6. Efficacy of open reduction and internal fixation with a miniplate and hollow screw in the treatment of Lisfranc injury

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    Li Baoliang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate efficacy of open reduction and internal fixation with the miniplate and hollow screw in the treatment of Lisfranc injury. Methods: Ten cases of Lisfranc injury treated by open reduction, miniplate and hollow screw in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. There were 6 males and 4 females with age ranging from 25 to 45 years (mean 32 years. Among them, one case was classified as Type A, six Type B and three Type C. Injury mechanism included road traffic accidents (3 cases, fall from height (5 cases and hit by heavy object (2 cases. All injuries were closed without cerebral trauma or other complicated injuries. The time interval between injury and operation was 6e10 days (average 6.6 days. Postoperatively, the foot function was assessed using Visual Analogue Scales (VAS and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS Scales. Healing time and complications were observed. Results: All patients were followed up for 18e24 months (average 20 months. Anatomic reduction was achieved in all patients on images. There was statistical significance between preoperative score (7.89 ± 0.34 and score at postoperative 8 weeks (0.67 ± 0.13. According to the AOFAS score, 5 cases were defined as excellent, 3 cases as good and 2 cases as fair. During follow-up, there was no wound infection or complications except for osteoarthritis in 2 cases. Healing time ranged from 3 to 6 months with an average of 3.6 months. Conclusion: Anatomical reduction of Lisfranc injury can be achieved by open reduction and internal fixation with the miniplate and hollow screw. Normal structure of Lisfranc joint is regained to a great extent; injured ligaments were also repaired. Therefore, this method offers excellent curative effect and can avoid postoperative complications and improve the patients' quality of life.

  7. Anterior debridement and fusion followed by posterior pedicle screw fixation in pyogenic spondylodiscitis: autologous iliac bone strut versus cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pee, Yong Hun; Park, Jong Dae; Choi, Young-Geun; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2008-05-01

    An anterior approach for debridement and fusion with autologous bone graft has been recommended as the gold standard for surgical treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis. The use of anterior foreign body implants at the site of active infection is still a challenging procedure for spine surgeons. Several authors have recently introduced anterior grafting with titanium mesh cages instead of autologous bone strut in the treatment of spondylodiscitis. The authors present their experience of anterior fusion with 3 types of cages followed by posterior pedicle screw fixation. They also compare their results with the use of autologous iliac bone strut. The authors retrospectively reviewed the cases of 60 patients with pyogenic spondylodiscitis treated by anterior debridement between January 2003 and April 2005. Fusion using either cages or iliac bone struts was performed during the same course of anesthesia followed by posterior fixation. Twenty-three patients underwent fusion with autologous iliac bone strut, and 37 patients underwent fusion with 1 of the 3 types of cages. The infections resolved in all patients, as noted by normalization of their erythrocyte sedimentation rates and C-reactive protein levels. Patients in both groups were evaluated in terms of their preoperative and postoperative clinical and imaging findings. Single-stage anterior debridement and cage fusion followed by posterior pedicle screw fixation can be effective in the treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis. There was no difference in clinical and imaging outcomes between the strut group and cage group except for the subsidence rate. The subsidence rate was higher in the strut group than in the cage group. The duration until subsidence was also shorter in the strut group than in the cage group.

  8. A computed tomographic anatomical study of the upper sacrum. Application for a user guide of pelvic fixation with iliosacral screws in adult spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubory, Arnaud; Bouloussa, Houssam; Riouallon, Guillaume; Wolff, Stéphane

    2017-12-01

    Widely used in traumatic pelvic ring fractures, the iliosacral (IS) screw technique for spino-pelvic fixation remains anecdotal in adult spinal deformity. The objective of this study was to assess anatomical variability of the adult upper sacrum and to provide a user guide of spino-pelvic fixation with IS screws in adult spinal deformity. Anatomical variability of the upper sacrum according to age, gender, height and weight was sought on 30 consecutive pelvic CT-scans. Thus, a user guide of spino-pelvic fixation with IS screws was modeled and assessed on ten CT-scans as described below. Two invariable landmarks usable during the surgical procedure were defined: point A (corresponding to the connector binding the IS screw to the spinal rod), equidistant from the first posterior sacral hole and the base of the S1 articular facet and 10 mm-embedded into the sacrum; point B (corresponding to the tip of the IS screw) located at the junction of the anterior third and middle third of the sacral endplate in the sagittal plane and at the middle of the endplate in the coronal plane. Point C corresponded to the intersection between the A-B direction and the external facet of the iliac wing. Three-dimensional reconstructions modeling the IS screw optimal direction according to the A-B-C straight line were assessed. Age had no effect on the anatomy of the upper sacrum. The distance between the base of the S1 superior articular facet and the top of the first posterior sacral hole was correlated with weight (r = 0.6; 95% CI [0.6-0.9]); p guide of spinopelvic fixation with IS screws seems to be reliable and reproducible independently of age, gender and morphologic characteristics but needs clinical assessment. Level IV.

  9. Progressive slip after removal of screw fixation in slipped capital femoral epiphysis: two case reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsma, Y.; Morgenstern, P.; van der Sluijs, J.A.; Witbreuk, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In slipped capital femoral epiphysis the femoral neck displaces relative to the head due to weakening of the epiphysis. Early recognition and adequate surgical fixation is essential for a good functional outcome. The fixation should be secured until the closure of the epiphysis to

  10. Safety screw fixation technique in a case of coracoid base fracture with acromioclavicular dislocation and coracoid base cross-sectional size data from a computed axial tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yoshiteru; Hirano, Tetsuya; Miyatake, Katsutoshi; Fujii, Koji; Takeda, Yoshitsugu

    2014-07-01

    Coracoid base fracture accompanied by acromioclavicular joint dislocation with intact coracoclavicular ligaments is a rare injury. Generally, an open reduction with screw fixation is the first treatment choice, as it protects the important structures around the coracoid process. This report presents a new technique of screw fixation for coracoid base fracture and provides anatomic information on cross-sectional size of the coracoid base obtained by computed tomography (CT). An axial image of the coracoid base was visualized over the neck of the scapula, and a guidewire was inserted into this circle under fluoroscopic guidance. The wire was inserted easily into the neck of scapula across the coracoid base fracture with imaging in only 1 plane. In addition, 25 measurements of the coracoid base were made in 25 subjects on axial CT images. Average length of the long and short axes at the thinnest part of the coracoid base was 13.9 ± 2.0 mm (range 10.6-17.0) and 10.5 ± 2.2 mm (6.6-15.1), respectively. This new screw fixation technique and measurement data on the coracoid base may be beneficial for safety screw fixation of coracoid base fracture.

  11. Clinical study on minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar scoliosis

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    Hao WU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the operative essentials and therapeutic effects of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS.  Methods A total of 17 DLS patients without prior spinal diseases were treated by MIS-TLIF and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation from January 2013 to September 2015 in Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, hospital stay, and postoperative complication were recorded in each patient. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI were used to evaluate postoperative improvement of low back and leg pain, and clinical effects were assessed according to Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36. Coronal Cobb angle, sagittal lordosis angle and spinal deviation distances on coronal and sagittal plane were measured before operation, one week, 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up in spinal full-length X-ray examination. Fusion rate was calculated according to X-ray or CT scan, and the degree of decompression was evaluated by MRI.  Results Decompression and fusion levels ranged from T12-S1 vertebrae, and interbody fusion was performed in 17 patients and 56 levels were fused. Average operation time was 200 min (180-300 min, intraoperative blood loss was 320 ml (200-1000 ml and hospital stay was 8.21 d (5-12 d. All patients were followed-up for 12.13 months (5-24 months. Compared with preoperation, VAS (P = 0.000, for all and ODI scores (P = 0.000, for all decreased significantly, SF-36 score increased (P = 0.000, for all, coronal Cobb angle (P = 0.000, for all, sagittal lordosis angle (P = 0.000, for all, coronal and sagittal deviation (P = 0.000, for all decreased significantly one week and 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up. The improvement rate of ODI was (86.51 ± 6.02%, fusion rate of vertebral bodies

  12. Evaluation the treatment outcomes of intracapsular femoral neck fractures with closed or open reduction and internal fixation by screw in 18-50-year-old patients in Isfahan from Nov 2010 to Nov 2011

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    Mohammad Javdan

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that femoral neck fracture is associated with several complications, especially if open reduction was necessary. So, the surgical method and necessary equipments such as radiolucent bed, C-ARM machine, and implant cannulated screw set should be considered.

  13. Management of simple (types A and B) closed tibial shaft fractures using percutaneous lag-screw fixation and Ilizarov external fixation in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Mohamed; Atef, Ashraf

    2012-10-01

    Although intramedullary fixation of closed simple (type A or B) diaphyseal tibial fractures in adults is well tolerated by patients, providing lower morbidity rates and better mobility, it is associated with some complications. This study evaluated the results of managing these fractures using percutaneous minimal internal fixation using one or more lag screws, and Ilizarov external fixation. This method was tested to evaluate its efficacy in immediate weight bearing, fracture healing and prevention of any post-immobilisation stiffness of the ankle and knee joints. This randomised blinded study was performed at a referral, academically supervised, level III trauma centre. Three hundred and twenty-four of the initial 351 patients completed this study and were followed up for a minimum of 12 (12-88) months. Patient ages ranged from 20 to 51 years, with a mean of 39 years. Ankle and knee movements and full weight bearing were encouraged immediately postoperatively. Solid union was assessed clinically and radiographically. Active and passive ankle and knee ranges of motion were measured and compared with the normal side using the Wilcoxon signed rank test for matched pairs. Subjective Olerud and Molander Ankle Score was used to detect any ankle joint symptoms at the final follow-up. No patient showed delayed or nonunion. All fractures healed within 95-129 days. Based on final clinical and radiographic outcomes, this technique proves to be adequate for managing simple diaphyseal tibial fractures. On the other hand, it is relatively expensive, technically demanding, necessitates exposure to radiation and patients are expected to be frame friendly.

  14. A Biomechanical Study Comparing Helical Blade with Screw Design for Sliding Hip Fixations of Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractures

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    Qiang Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic hip screw (DHS is a well-established conventional implant for treating intertrochanteric fracture. However, revision surgery sometimes still occurs due to the cutting out of implants. A helical blade instead of threaded screw (DHS blade was designed to improve the fixation power of the osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. In this study, the biomechanical properties of DHS blade compared to the conventional DHS were evaluated using an unstable AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture model. Fifty synthetic proximal femoral bone models with such configuration were fixed with DHS and DHS blade in five different positions: centre-centre (CC, superior-centre (SC, inferior-center (IC, centre-anterior (CA, and centre-posterior (CP. All models had undergone mechanical compression test, and the vertical and rotational displacements were recorded. The results showed that DHS blade had less vertical or rotational displacement than the conventional DHS in CC, CA, and IC positions. The greatest vertical and rotational displacements were found at CP position in both groups. Overall speaking, DHS blade was superior in resisting vertical or rotational displacement in comparison to conventional DHS, and the centre-posterior position had the poorest performance in both groups.

  15. Three-dimensional navigation is more accurate than two-dimensional navigation or conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous sacroiliac screw fixation in the dysmorphic sacrum: a randomized multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matityahu, Amir; Kahler, David; Krettek, Christian; Stöckle, Ulrich; Grutzner, Paul Alfred; Messmer, Peter; Ljungqvist, Jan; Gebhard, Florian

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of computer-assisted sacral screw fixation compared with conventional techniques in the dysmorphic versus normal sacrum. Review of a previous study database. Database of a multinational study with 9 participating trauma centers. The reviewed group included 130 patients, 72 from the navigated group and 58 from the conventional group. Of these, 109 were in the nondysmorphic group and 21 in the dysmorphic group. Placement of sacroiliac (SI) screws was performed using standard fluoroscopy for the conventional group and BrainLAB navigation software with either 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional (3D) navigation for the navigated group. Accuracy of SI screw placement by 2-dimensional and 3D navigation versus conventional fluoroscopy in dysmorphic and nondysmorphic patients, as evaluated by 6 observers using postoperative computerized tomography imaging at least 1 year after initial surgery. Intraobserver agreement was also evaluated. There were 11.9% (13/109) of patients with misplaced screws in the nondysmorphic group and 28.6% (6/21) of patients with misplaced screws in the dysmorphic group, none of which were in the 3D navigation group. Raw agreement between the 6 observers regarding misplaced screws was 32%. However, the percent overall agreement was 69.0% (kappa = 0.38, P dysmorphic proximal sacral segment. We recommend the use of 3D navigation, where available, for insertion of SI screws in patients with normal and dysmorphic proximal sacral segments. Therapeutic level I.

  16. Feasibility study of patient-specific surgical templates for the fixation of pedicle screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salako, F; Aubin, C-E; Fortin, C; Labelle, H

    2002-01-01

    Surgery for scoliosis, as well as other posterior spinal surgeries, frequently uses pedicle screws to fix an instrumentation on the spine. Misplacement of a screw can lead to intra- and post-operative complications. The objective of this study is to design patient-specific surgical templates to guide the drilling operation. From the CT-scan of a vertebra, the optimal drilling direction and limit angles are computed from an inverse projection of the pedicle limits. The first template design uses a surface-to-surface registration method and was constructed in a CAD system by subtracting the vertebra from a rectangular prism and a cylinder with the optimal orientation. This template and the vertebra were built using rapid prototyping. The second design uses a point-to-surface registration method and has 6 adjustable screws to adjust the orientation and length of the drilling support device. A mechanism was designed to hold it in place on the spinal process. A virtual prototype was build with CATIA software. During the operation, the surgeon places either template on patient's vertebra until a perfect match is obtained before drilling. The second design seems better than the first one because it can be reused on different vertebra and is less sensible to registration errors. The next step is to build the second design and make experimental and simulations tests to evaluate the benefits of this template during a scoliosis operation.

  17. A comparison of two fixation methods for femoral trochanteric fractures: a new generation intramedullary system vs sliding hip screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carulli, Christian; Piacentini, Federico; Paoli, Tommaso; Civinini, Roberto; Innocenti, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Trochanteric fractures are frequent and generally associated with bone fragility. There is still debate on the best fixation device to treat stable or rather stable trochanteric fractures: we report our clinical and radiological results of fixation with Proximal Femoral Nail "antirotation" (PFNa) in a population of patients compared to a control group treated by Sliding Hip Screw (SHS). A prospective study was conducted in 71 consecutive patients treated by PFNa (group A), and 69 by a SHS (group B), with a mean age of 81.6 and 83.4 years respectively. Short Form 12 was administered to check postoperative results, and the following parameters were evaluated: range of motion, evaluation of pain, gait ability, X-rays, and Tip Apex Distance Index. A minimum follow-up was conducted in 128 patients: 66 subjects belonging to the PFNa group and 62 to the DHS group. All patients in the group A were able to reach partial or full weight-bearing on the operated leg before leaving the hospital. Forty-four patients (63.8%) of the group B were able to walk with partial weight-bearing before discharge. We recorded 17 complications with a final overall percentage of 17.2% on the overall study population with one single case of failure in both the two groups. A statistical significance (ptrochanteric fractures as well as DHS. The light superiority of PFNa may be principally related to its mechanical advantages.

  18. Surgical results of a one-stage combined anterior lumbosacral fusion and posterior percutaneous pedicle screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yuan Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lumbosacral fusion through either an anterior or a posterior approach to achieve good lordosis and stability is always a challenging surgical operation and is often accompanied by a higher rate of pseudarthrosis than when other lumbar segments are involved. This study evaluated the clinical and radiological results of lumbosacral fusions achieved through a combined anterior and posterior approach. Materials and Methods: From June 2008 to 2012, 20 patients who had L5–S1 instability and stenosis were consecutively treated, first by anterior interbody fusion using an allogenous strut bone graft through the pararectus approach and then by posterior pedicle screw fixation. A minimum of 1-year of clinical and radiological follow-up was conducted. Intraoperative blood loss, surgical time, and any surgery-related complications were recorded. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS and the patient's Oswestry Disability Index (ODI score. After 1 year, radiological outcomes were assessed by analyzing pelvic incidence, lumbar lordosis, and segmental lordosis using static plain films, while fusion stability was assessed using dynamic plain films. Results: The mean operative time and blood loss were 215 min and 325 cc, respectively. After 1 year, the VAS and ODI scores had significantly improved, and stable fusion with good lordotic curvature was obtained in all cases. Conclusion: The surgical results of the combined procedure are satisfactory in terms of the functional and radiological outcomes. Our method offers advantages regarding both anterior fusion and posterior fixation.

  19. A biomechanical comparison of headless tapered variable pitch and AO cortical bone screws for fixation of a simulated slab fracture in equine third carpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Aloisio C D; Galuppo, Larry D; Taylor, Kenneth T; Jensen, David G; Stover, Susan M

    2003-01-01

    shear mechanical testing variables were not statistically different among screw types. The 4/5 Acutrak insertion technique was accurate and safe, and the AT screw effectively stabilized simulated equine C3 frontal plane slab fractures. When tested in shear, this screw type was mechanically comparable to the 4.5-mm AO screw; however, AT constructs had greater initial shear stiffness. Initial shear stiffness was likely an indirect measure of interfragmentary compression, and thus may indicate that the AT screw provides a more rigid fixation for frontal plane C3 slab fractures in horses. Considering the comparable mechanical behavior, greater initial shear stiffness for AT screw stabilized C3 slab fracture fragments, the ability to accurately insert the screw with the aid of a guide pin, and the potential for less persistent soft tissue irritation with the headless screw design, the 4/5 tapered AT screw is an attractive alternative for repair of C3 slab fractures in horses. Copyright 2003 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons

  20. Results of screw fixation combined with cortical drilling for treatment of dorsal cortical stress fractures of the third metacarpal bone in 56 Thoroughbred racehorses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallap, B.L.; Bramlage, L.R.; Embertson, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate screw fixation with cortical drilling as a surgical treatment for dorsal cortical stress fractures of MCIII in the Thoroughbred racehorse. Details of age, sex, limb affected, fracture assessment, and post operative recommendations were obtained from medical records and radiographs. Fracture healing was assessed radiographically at the time of screw removal. Performance evaluation was determined from race records obtained from The Jockey Club Information System, Lexington, Kentucky. Fifty-six Thoroughbred racehorses were treated surgically for stress fracture of MCIII with screw fixation and cortical drilling. Stress fractures occurred primarily in the left front limb of the male 3-year-olds, in the dorsolateral cortex of the middle third of MCIII. Ninety-seven percent of the fractures travelled in a dorsodistal to palmaroproximal direction. Median period to screw removal was 2.0 months. Evaluation at time of screw removal revealed 98% of single stress fractures of the left front limb were healed radiographically. Median period to resume training was 2.75 months (single stress fractures); median period to race was 7.62 months. There was no statistically significant difference in earnings/start before and after surgical intervention. Of the 63 fractures treated, two recurred. There were no catastrophic failures, and no incisional infections

  1. Morphometric Evaluation of Occipital Condyles: Defining Optimal Trajectories and Safe Screw Lengths for Occipital Condyle-Based Occipitocervical Fixation in Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Aju; Venugopal, Prakash; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Shanmuganathan, Rajasekaran; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh

    2018-04-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) morphometric analysis. To assess the feasibility and safety of occipital condyle (OC)-based occipitocervical fixation (OCF) in Indians and to define anatomical zones and screw lengths for safe screw placement. Limitations of occipital squama-based OCF has led to development of two novel OC-based OCF techniques. Morphometric analysis was performed on the OCs of 70 Indian adults. The feasibility of placing a 3.5-mm-diameter screw into OCs was investigated. Safe trajectories and screw lengths for OC screws and C0-C1 transarticular screws without hypoglossal canal or atlantooccipital joint compromise were estimated. The average screw length and safe sagittal and medial angulations for OC screws were 19.9±2.3 mm, ≤6.4°±2.4° cranially, and 31.1°±3° medially, respectively. An OC screw could not be accommodated by 27% of the population. The safe sagittal angles and screw lengths for C0-C1 transarticular screw insertion (48.9°±5.7° cranial, 26.7±2.9 mm for junctional entry technique; 36.7°±4.6° cranial, 31.6±2.7 mm for caudal C1 arch entry technique, respectively) were significantly different than those in other populations. The risk of vertebral artery injury was high for the caudal C1 arch entry technique. Screw placement was uncertain in 48% of Indians due to the presence of aberrant anatomy. There were significant differences in the metrics of OC-based OCF between Indian and other populations. Because of the smaller occipital squama dimensions in Indians, OC-based OCF techniques may have a higher application rate and could be a viable alternative/salvage option in selected cases. Preoperative CT, including three-dimensional-CT-angiography (to delineate vertebral artery course), is imperative to avoid complications resulting from aberrant bony and vascular anatomy. Our data can serve as a valuable reference guide in placing these screws safely under fluoroscopic guidance.

  2. First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Arthrodesis in Hallux Valgus Versus Hallux Rigidus Using Cup and Cone Preparation Compression Screw and Dorsal Plate Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Calvin; Alfred, Terrence; Freihaut, Richard; Pit, Sabrina

    2017-10-19

    Various techniques have been described for first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint arthrodesis. The purpose of this study was to determine if cup and cone preparation by a single surgeon with an interfragmentary screw and dorsal plate fixation provides a comparable union rate in hallux valgus versus hallux rigidus. Our study included all patients who underwent first MTP joint fusions using cup and cone preparation with an interfragmentary compression screw and dorsal plate fixation from 2010 to 2015. We compared union rates in 65 patients with hallux rigidus with 47 who had hallux valgus. One of 65 hallux rigidus cases developed non-union and underwent revision surgery. One of 47 patients in the hallux valgus group developed a painless non-union. All other patients achieved union based on post operative radiographs. Our rate of painful non-union was 1.5% for hallux rigidus and 0% for hallux valgus, which is lower than recent published literature of 7% for hallux valgus and 3.7% for hallux rigidus. We found no difference between the two groups suggesting this method may provide stronger fixation and may be preferable when dealing with hallux valgus. First metatarsophalangeal joint fusion in patients with severe hallux valgus and hallux rigidus, using spherical reamers, compression screw and dorsal plate fixation is equally successful at achieving clinical and radiographic fusion in both hallux valgus and hallux rigidus.

  3. The Free-Hand Technique for S2-Alar-Iliac Screw Placement: A Safe and Effective Method for Sacropelvic Fixation in Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillingford, Jamal N; Laratta, Joseph L; Tan, Lee A; Sarpong, Nana O; Lin, James D; Fischer, Charla R; Lehman, Ronald A; Kim, Yongjung J; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2018-02-21

    Spinopelvic fixation is an integral part of achieving solid fusion across the lumbosacral junction, especially in deformity procedures requiring substantial correction or long-segment constructs. Traditional S2-alar-iliac (S2AI) screw-placement techniques utilize fluoroscopy, increasing operative time and radiation exposure to the patient and surgeon. We describe a novel free-hand technique for S2AI screw placement in patients with adult spinal deformity. We reviewed the records of 45 consecutive patients who underwent spinopelvic fixation performed with use of S2AI screws by the senior surgeon and various fellows or residents over a 12-month period (2015 to 2016). In each case, the S2AI screws were placed utilizing a free-hand technique without fluoroscopic or image guidance. Screw position and accuracy were assessed by intraoperative O-arm imaging and analyzed using 3-dimensional interactive manipulation of computed tomography images. A total of 100 screws were placed, 51 by the senior surgeon and 49 by trainees. The mean patient age was 57.4 ± 12.7 years at the time of surgery; 37 (82.2%) of the patients were female. Preoperative diagnoses included adult idiopathic scoliosis (n = 19), adult degenerative scoliosis (n = 15), flatback syndrome (n = 2), fixed sagittal imbalance (n = 6), and distal junctional kyphosis (n = 3). Five (5%) of the screws were placed with moderate to severe cortical breaches, all of which perforated the pelvis posteriorly, with no clinically notable neurovascular or visceral complications. The breach rate did not differ significantly between the senior surgeon and trainees. The free-hand technique for S2AI screw placement, when performed in a standardized manner, was demonstrated to be safe and reliable in constructs requiring spinopelvic fixation. The accuracy of screw placement relies on visible and palpable anatomic landmarks that obviate the need for intraoperative fluoroscopy or image guidance, potentially reducing operative time

  4. Comparison of accuracy of lag screw placement in cephalocondylic nails and sliding hip screw plate fixation for extracapsular fractures of the neck of femur

    OpenAIRE

    Shyam Kumar, A. J.; Parmar, V.; Bankart, J.; Williams, S. C.; Harper, W. M.

    2006-01-01

    This study compared the accuracy of lag screw placement between extracapsular femoral fractures fixed with sliding hip screw plate systems and those fixed with cephalocondylic nails. It involved 75 retrospective radiographs of fractures fixed with either a cephalocondylic nail (32) or a sliding hip screw plate system (43). Postoperative anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the hip were scanned using a digital X-ray scanner and measured using computer software. Measurements were conducte...

  5. A novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Min Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate a novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its potential use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation. Methods. We have used the reverse engineering software (image-processing software and computer-aided design software to create the approximate and optimal digital interarticular channel of atlas for 60 participants. Angles of channels, diameters of inscribed circles, long and short axes of ellipses were measured and recorded, and gender-specific analysis was also performed. Results. The channels provided sufficient space for one or two screws, and the parameters of channels are described. While the channels of females were smaller than that of males, no significant difference of angles between males and females were observed. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates the radiological features of approximate digital interarticular channels, optimal digital interarticular channels of atlas, and provides the reference trajectory of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws. Additionally, we provide a protocol that can help make a pre-operative plan for accurate placement of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws.

  6. Postoperative quality-of-life assessment in patients with spine metastases treated with long-segment pedicle-screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Florian; Lemée, Jean-Michel; Lucas, Olivier; Menei, Philippe

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In recent decades, progress in the medical management of cancer has been significant, resulting in considerable extension of survival for patients with metastatic disease. This has, in turn, led to increased attention to the optimal surgical management of bone lesions, including metastases to the spine. In addition, there has been a shift in focus toward improving quality of life and reducing hospital stay for these patients, and many minimally invasive techniques have been introduced with the aim of reducing the morbidity associated with more traditional open approaches. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy of long-segment percutaneous pedicle screw stabilization for the treatment of instability associated with thoracolumbar spine metastases in neurologically intact patients. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of data from a prospective database. The authors analyzed cases in which long-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation was performed for the palliative treatment of thoracolumbar spinal instability due to spinal metastases in neurologically intact patients. All of the patients included in the study underwent surgery between January 2014 and May 2015 at the authors' institution. Postoperative radiation therapy was planned within 10 days following the stabilization in all cases. Clinical and radiological follow-up assessments were planned for 3 days, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. Outcome was assessed by means of standard postoperative evaluation and oncological and spinal quality of life measures (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Version 3.0 [EORTC QLQ-C30] and Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], respectively). Moreover, 5 patients were given an activity monitoring device for recording the distance walked daily; preoperative and postoperative daily distances were compared. RESULTS Data from 17 cases were analyzed. There were no

  7. A Biomechanical Analysis of 2 Constructs for Metacarpal Spiral Fracture Fixation in a Cadaver Model: 2 Large Screws Versus 3 Small Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eu-Jin Cheah, Andre; Behn, Anthony W; Comer, Garet; Yao, Jeffrey

    2017-12-01

    Surgeons confronted with a long spiral metacarpal fracture may choose to fix it solely with lagged screws. A biomechanical analysis of a metacarpal spiral fracture model was performed to determine whether 3 1.5-mm screws or 2 2.0-mm screws provided more stability during bending and torsional loading. Second and third metacarpals were harvested from 12 matched pairs of fresh-frozen cadaveric hands and spiral fractures were created. One specimen from each matched pair was fixed with 2 2.0-mm lagged screws whereas the other was fixed with 3 1.5-mm lagged screws. Nine pairs underwent combined cyclic cantilever bending and axial compressive loading followed by loading to failure. Nine additional pairs were subjected to cyclic external rotation while under a constant axial compressive load and were subsequently externally rotated to failure under a constant axial compressive load. Paired t tests were used to compare cyclic creep, stiffness, displacement, rotation, and peak load levels. Average failure torque for all specimens was 7.2 ± 1.7 Nm. In cyclic torsional testing, the group with 2 screws exhibited significantly less rotational creep than the one with 3 screws. A single specimen in the group with 2 screws failed before cyclic bending tests were completed. No other significant differences were found between test groups during torsional or bending tests. Both constructs were biomechanically similar except that the construct with 2 screws displayed significantly less loosening during torsional cyclic loading, although the difference was small and may not be clinically meaningful. Because we found no obvious biomechanical advantage to using 3 1.5-mm lagged screws to fix long spiral metacarpal fractures, the time efficiency and decreased implant costs of using 2-2.0 mm lagged screws may be preferred. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of infection and lag screw fixation on revascularization and new bone deposition in membranous bone grafts in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, J A; Phillips, J H; Walmsley, S L; Morava-Protzner, I

    1996-08-01

    We have suggested that rigid fixation of membranous bone grafts in the presence of infection may improve graft-recipient bone union by facilitating graft revascularzation. To test this hypothesis, we grafted autogenous membranous bone grafts to the mandibles of 94 New Zealand White rabbits. Lag screw fixation was applied in half the animals. The wounds were inoculated with a range of Staphylococcus aureus doses. Infected and noninfected rabbits were injected weekly over a 5-week course with fluorescein bone markers and with a marker of vascular endothelium (procion red) just prior to sacrifice. Revascularization and new bone deposition in the grafts were then quantified histologically for the 75 rabbits available for data collection. Infection decreased the amount of graft revascularized and the amount of new bone deposited for both rigidly fixated and nonfixated grafts. Grafts fixated with a lag screw showed a greater amount of revascularization and new bone deposition in the presence and absence of infection when compared with nonfixated grafts, supporting the hypothesis that rigid fixation of membranous bone grafts in the presence of infection may promote graft survival and union by improving revascularization and osteogenesis within the graft.

  9. Functional Outcome With Percutaneous Ilio-sacral Screw Fixation For Posterior Pelvic Ring Injuries In Patients Involved In Heavy Manual Laboring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek SM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries are best treated with operative methods due to better post-op functional score. Our patient cohort was involved in heavy manual laboring frequently required ground level work in their activities of daily living. There are very few outcome studies dealing exclusively with such patients. Materials & Methods: Forty one patients who were treated with percutaneous sacroiliac screw fixation under fluoroscopic guidance and were followed-up for at least one year were analyzed retrospectively for functional outcome using the Majeed score. Results: Twenty one (51.22% and thirteen (31.70% patients were found to be in excellent and good categories respectively and majority of the patients (thirty/73.17% were able to return to their original occupation with or without minor adjustments. Conclusion: Percutaneous ilio-sacral screw fixation for posterior pelvic unstable injuries is an acceptable mode of treatment in patients involved in heavy manual laboring.

  10. Iliosacral screw fixations of posterior pelvic ring injuries guided by TAC scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olarte Salazar, Carlos Mario; Pasantez Hoyos, Rodrigo; Fonseca, Alejandra

    2004-01-01

    An observational and descriptive study of a series was conducted between February 2001 and November 2002 at the departments of orthopedics and traumatology of the hospital de San Jose, Clinica Palermo and Fundacion Santa Fe de Bogota. 10 patients (12 fractures) with unstable lesions of the pelvic ring, on whom TAC guided percutaneous fixation of the posterior portion of the pelvic ring was performed. Six of the patients were female (60%) and four were male (40%) and average age 33.4 years (16 to 54 years)

  11. Range of motion, sacral screw and rod strain in long posterior spinal constructs: a biomechanical comparison between S2 alar iliac screws with traditional fixation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutterlin, Chester E; Field, Antony; Ferrara, Lisa A; Freeman, Andrew L; Phan, Kevin

    2016-12-01

    S1 screw failure and L5/S1 non-union are issues with long fusions to S1. Improved construct stiffness and S1 screw offloading can help avoid this. S2AI screws have shown to provide similar stiffness to iliac screws when added to L3-S1 constructs. We sought to examine and compare the biomechanical effects on an L2-S1 pedicle screw construct of adding S2AI screws, AxiaLIF, L5-S1 interbody support via transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), and to examine the effect of the addition of cross connectors to each of these constructs. Two S1 screws and one rod with strain gauges (at L5/S1) were used in L2-S1 screw-rod constructs in 7 L1-pelvis specimens (two with low BMD). ROM, S1 screw and rod strain were assessed using a pure-moment flexibility testing protocol. Specimens were tested intact, and then in five instrumentation states consisting of: (I) Pedicle screws (PS) L2-S1; (II) PS + S2AI screws; (III) PS + TLIF L5/S1; (IV) PS + AxiaLIF L5/S1; (V) PS + S2AI + AxiaLIF L5/S1. The five instrumentation conditions were also tested with crosslinks at L2/3 and S1/2. Tests were conducted in flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial torsion with no compressive preload. S2A1 produces reduced S1 screw strain for flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial torsion, as well as reduced rod strain in lateral bending and axial torsion in comparison to AxiaLIF and interbody instrumentation, at the expense of increased rod flexion-extension strain. Cross-connectors may have a role in further reduction of S1 screw and rod strain. From a biomechanical standpoint, the use of the S2AI technique is at least equivalent to traditional iliac screws, but offers lower prominence and ease of assembly compared to conventional sacroiliac stabilization.

  12. Segmental correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis by all-screw fixation method in adolescents and young adults. minimum 5 years follow-up with SF-36 questionnaire

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    Yu Ching-Hsiao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our institution, the fixation technique in treating idiopathic scoliosis was shifted from hybrid fixation to the all-screw method beginning in 2000. We conducted this study to assess the intermediate -term outcome of all-screw method in treating adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Methods Forty-nine consecutive patients were retrospectively included with minimum of 5-year follow-up (mean, 6.1; range, 5.1-7.3 years. The average age of surgery was 18.5 ± 5.0 years. We assessed radiographic measurements at preoperative (Preop, postoperative (PO and final follow-up (FFU period. Curve correction rate, correction loss rate, complications, accuracy of pedicle screws and SF-36 scores were analyzed. Results The average major curve was corrected from 58.0 ± 13.0° Preop to 16.0 ± 9.0° PO(p p = 0.12 FFU. This revealed a 72.7% correction rate and a correction loss of 2.4° (3.92%. The thoracic kyphosis decreased little at FFU (22 ± 12° to 20 ± 6°, (p = 0.25. Apical vertebral rotation decreased from 2.1 ± 0.8 PreOP to 0.8 ± 0.8 at FFU (Nash-Moe grading, p Conclusion Follow-up more than 5 years, the authors suggest that all-screw method is an efficient and safe method.

  13. [Effect evaluation of over 5 year follow up of unilateral pedicle screw fixation with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar degenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Ying, Jin-He; Xie, Pan-Pan; Wu, Xiao-Guang

    2016-07-25

    To evaluate the clinical effects of over 5 year follow up of unilateral pedicle screw fixation with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion(TLIF) in treating lumbar degenerative diseases. The clinical data of 24 patients with lumbar degenerative disease underwent unilateral pedicle screw fixation with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion from March 2007 to October 2009, were retrospectively analyzed. There were 13 males and 11 females, aged from 34 to 68 years old with an average of 52 years. Postoperative pain and functional results were analyzed by the visual analogue scale(VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index(ODI). Radiological examination was obtained for each patient to assess the height of intervertebral space, postoperative intervertebral fusion conditions and general complications. All patients were followed up from 5 to 8 years with an average of 6.7 years. VAS scores of low back pain and leg pain decreased from preoperative 7.82±0.71, 8.42±1.24 to postoperative 1.87±0.81, 2.23±1.62, respectively( P degenerative diseases according to over 5 year follow up, however, its indications should be well considered. But the problems such as intervertebral space height of operated side loss and adjacent segment degeneration after unilateral pedicle screw fixation need further clinical study.

  14. Functional Recovery Following Pertrochanteric Hip Fractures Fixated with the Dynamic Hip Screw vs. the Percutaneous Compression Plate

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    Yocheved Laufer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS is currently the most frequently used implant for the treatment of pertrochanteric hip fractures. The Percutaneous Compression Plate (PCCP is a recently developed, alternative device that involves minimal invasive surgery. The objective of the present study was to compare functional recovery following these two surgical procedures. A total of 76 consecutive elderly subjects (mean age and standard deviation, 80.6 ± 5.5 following pertrochanteric hip fracture fixation were evaluated prospectively. Functional recovery was assessed 3 and 12 weeks and 2 years following surgery. Differences between groups 3 weeks postsurgery were found only in pain level during ambulation and in the weight-bearing capability of the operated extremity, which were both in favor of the PCCP. By 3 months, both groups had improved in all measures, but did not reach their preinjury level of independence. However, the PCCP group ambulated with fewer assistive devices and demonstrated better recovery of basic activities of daily living (BADL. While the majority of the subjects from both groups ambulated independently 2 years postsurgery, the PCCP group exhibited less pain during ambulation, was more independent in ADL, and required fewer assistive devices for ambulation. To summarize, the PCCP presents enhanced short- and long-term recovery of functional abilities in comparison to DHS. However, given the limited number of patients, further studies are necessary to substantiate these results.

  15. Biomechanical evaluation of a second generation headless compression screw for ankle arthrodesis in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somberg, Andrew Max; Whiteside, William K; Nilssen, Erik; Murawski, Daniel; Liu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Many types of screws, plates, and strut grafts have been utilized for ankle arthrodesis. Biomechanical testing has shown that these constructs can have variable stiffness. More recently, headless compression screws have emerged as an evolving method of achieving compression in various applications but there is limited literature regarding ankle arthrodesis. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical stability provided by a second generation fully threaded headless compression screw compared to a standard headed, partially threaded cancellous screw in a cadaveric ankle arthrodesis model. Twenty fresh frozen human cadaver specimens were subjected to simulated ankle arthrodesis with either three standard cancellous-bone screws (InFix 7.3mm) or with three headless compression screws (Acumed Acutrak 2 7.5mm). The specimens were subjected to cyclic loading and unloading at a rate of 1Hz, compression of 525 Newtons (N) and distraction of 20N for a total of 500 cycles using an electromechanical load frame (Instron). The amount of maximum distraction was recorded as well as the amount of motion that occurred through 1, 10, 50, 100, and 500 cycles. No significant difference (p=0.412) was seen in the amount of distraction that occurred across the fusion site for either screw. The average maximum distraction after 500 cycles was 201.9μm for the Acutrak 2 screw and 235.4μm for the InFix screw. No difference was seen throughout each cycle over time for the Acutrak 2 screw (p-value=0.988) or the InFix screw (p-value=0.991). Both the traditional InFix type screw and the second generation Acumed Acutrak headless compression screws provide adequate fixation during ankle arthrodesis under submaximal loads. There is no demonstrable difference between traditional cannulated partially threaded screws and headless compression screws studied in this model. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Percutaneous internal fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal jones fractures (Zones II and III) with Charlotte Carolina screw and bone marrow aspirate concentrate: an outcome study in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, Christopher D; Kennedy, John G

    2011-06-01

    Internal fixation is a popular first-line treatment method for proximal fifth metatarsal Jones fractures in athletes; however, nonunions and screw breakage can occur, in part because of nonspecific fixation hardware and poor blood supply. To report the results from 26 patients who underwent percutaneous internal fixation with a specialized screw system of a proximal fifth metatarsal Jones fracture (zones II and III) and bone marrow aspirate concentrate. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Percutaneous internal fixation for a proximal fifth metatarsal Jones fracture (zones II and III) was performed on 26 athletic patients (mean age, 27.47 years; range, 18-47). All patients were competing at some level of sport and were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score and SF-12 outcome scores. The mean follow-up time was 20.62 months (range, 12-28). Of the 26 fractures, 17 were traditional zone II Jones fractures, and the remaining 9 were zone III proximal diaphyseal fractures. The mean Foot and Ankle Outcome Score significantly increased, from 51.15 points preoperatively (range, 14-69) to 90.91 at final follow-up (range, 71-100; P fracture healing on standard radiographs was 5 weeks after surgery (range, 4-24). Two patients did not return to their previous levels of sporting activity. One patient experienced a delayed union, and 1 healed but later refractured. Percutaneous internal fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal Jones fractures, with a Charlotte Carolina screw and bone marrow aspirate concentrate, provides more predictable results while permitting athletes a return to sport at their previous levels of competition, with few complications.

  17. Bioresorbable pins and interference screws for fixation of hamstring tendon grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Dirk; Casper, Dirk; Bauwens, Kai; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Wich, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Biodegradable cross-pins have been shown to provide higher failure loads than do screws for fixation of hamstring tendons under laboratory conditions. To compare the clinical results of biodegradable pins (RigidFix) and interference screws (BioCryl) for fixation of hamstring grafts in arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Study Design Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. To test the hypothesis of a difference of 1.0 +/- 1.2 mm in anterior knee laxity between the two fixation options, 54 patients were randomly assigned to groups via a block randomization scheme and sealed envelopes. All patients underwent standardized hamstring graft reconstruction and had similar postoperative aftercare by an accelerated rehabilitation protocol. Measures assessed at baseline and after 1 and 2 years of follow-up included (1) the side-to-side difference in anterior laxity (KT-1000 arthrometer), (2) Short Form 36 physical and mental component scores, and (3) the International Knee Documentation Committee form scores. After 1 and 2 years, 26 and 21 patients in the BioCryl group and 28 and 24 patients in the RigidFix group were available for follow-up examination. No significant difference was noted in instrumented anterior translation between BioCryl and RigidFix fixation: 1 year, 0.11 (95% CI, -0.60 to 0.82; P = .7537); 2 years, 0.33 (95% CI, -0.43 to 1.08 mm; P = .3849). Also, there were no significant differences in the mean physical and mental component scores and International Knee Documentation Committee form scores and in overall complication and surgical revision rates. A pin dislocation was classified as the sole procedure-specific serious adverse event. Bioresorbable pins do not provide better clinical results than do resorbable interference screws for hamstring graft fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

  18. Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn Alloy Pedicle Screw Improves Internal Vertebral Fixation by Reducing Stress-Shielding Effects in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Zheng, Shuang; Dong, Rongpeng; Kang, Mingyang; Zhou, Haohan; Zhao, Dezhi; Zhao, Jianwu

    2018-01-01

    To ensure the biomechanical properties of Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn, stress-shielding effects were compared between Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn and Ti-6Al-4V fixation by using a porcine model. Twelve thoracolumbar spines (T12-L5) of 12-month-old male pigs were randomly divided into two groups: Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn (EG, n = 6) and Ti-6Al-4V (RG, n = 6) fixation. Pedicle screw was fixed at the outer edge of L4-5 vertebral holes. Fourteen measuring points were selected on the front of transverse process and middle and posterior of L4-5 vertebra. Electronic universal testing machine was used to measure the strain resistance of measuring points after forward and backward flexion loading of 150 N. Meanwhile, stress resistance was compared between both groups. The strain and stress resistance of measurement points 1, 2, 5, 6, 9, and 10-14 in Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn fixation was lower than that of Ti-6Al-4V fixation after forward and backward flexion loading ( P Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn fixation than that of Ti-6Al-4V fixation ( P Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn internal fixation were less than that of Ti-6Al-4V internal fixation. These results suggest that Ti-24Nb-4Zr-8Sn elastic fixation has more biomechanical goals than conventional Ti-6Al-4V internal fixation by reducing stress-shielding effects.

  19. CT morphometric analysis to determine the anatomical basis for the use of transpedicular screws during reconstruction and fixations of anterior cervical vertebrae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate placement of pedicle screw during Anterior Transpedicular Screw fixation (ATPS in cervical spine depends on accurate anatomical knowledge of the vertebrae. However, little is known of the morphometric characteristics of cervical vertebrae in Chinese population. METHODS: Three-dimensional reconstructions of CT images were performed for 80 cases. The anatomic data and screw fixation parameters for ATPS fixation were measured using the Mimics software. FINDINGS: The overall mean OPW, OPH and PAL ranged from 5.81 to 7.49 mm, 7.77 to 8.69 mm, and 33.40 to 31.13 mm separately, and SPA was 93.54 to 109.36 degrees from C3 to C6, 104.99 degrees at C7, whereas, 49.00 to 32.26 degrees from C4 to C7, 46.79 degrees at C3 (TPA. Dl/rSIP had an increasing trend away from upper endplate with mean value from 1.87 to 5.83 mm. Dl/rTIP was located at the lateral portion of the anterior cortex of vertebrae for C3 to C5 and ipsilateral for C6 to C7 with mean value from -2.70 to -3.00 mm, and 0.17 to 3.18 mm. The entrance points for pedicular screw insertion for C3 to C5 and C6 to C7 were recommended -2∼-3 mm and 0-4 mm from the median sagittal plane, respectively, 1-4 mm and 5-6 mm from the upper endplate, with TPA being 46.79-49.00 degrees and 40.89-32.26 degrees, respectively, and SPA being 93.54-106.69 degrees and 109.36-104.99 degrees, respectively. The pedicle screw insertion diameter was recommended 3.5 mm (C3 and C4, 4.0 mm (C5 to C7, and the pedicle axial length was 21-24 mm for C3 to C7 for both genders. However, the ATPS insertion in C3 should be individualized given its relatively small anatomical dimensions. CONCLUSIONS: The data provided a morphometric basis for the ATPS fixation technique in lower cervical fixation. It will help in preoperative planning and execution of this surgery.

  20. Metallic artifacts from internal scaphoid fracture fixation screws: comparison between C-arm flat-panel, cone-beam, and multidetector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenstaedt, Tim; Morsbach, Fabian; Calcagni, Maurizio; Vich, Magdalena; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Alkadhi, Hatem; Runge, Val M; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare image quality and extent of artifacts from scaphoid fracture fixation screws using different computed tomography (CT) modalities and radiation dose protocols. Imaging of 6 cadaveric wrists with artificial scaphoid fractures and different fixation screws was performed in 2 screw positions (45° and 90° orientation in relation to the x/y-axis) using multidetector CT (MDCT) and 2 flat-panel CT modalities, C-arm flat-panel CT (FPCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT), the latter 2 with low and standard radiation dose protocols. Mean cartilage attenuation and metal artifact-induced absolute Hounsfield unit changes (= artifact extent) were measured. Two independent radiologists evaluated different image quality criteria using a 5-point Likert-scale. Interreader agreements (Cohen κ) were calculated. Mean absolute Hounsfield unit changes and quality ratings were compared using Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Artifact extent was significantly smaller for MDCT and standard-dose FPCT compared with CBCT low- and standard-dose acquisitions (all P 0.05). Both MDCT and FPCT standard-dose protocols showed equal ratings for screw bone interface, fracture line, and trabecular bone evaluation (P = 0.06, 0.2, and 0.2, respectively) and performed significantly better than FPCT low- and CBCT low- and standard-dose acquisitions (all P < 0.05). Good interreader agreement was found for image quality comparisons (Cohen κ = 0.76-0.78). Both MDCT and FPCT standard-dose acquisition showed comparatively less metal-induced artifacts and better overall image quality compared with FPCT low-dose and both CBCT acquisitions. Flat-panel CT may provide sufficient image quality to serve as a versatile CT alternative for postoperative imaging of internally fixated wrist fractures.

  1. Two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. A minimum 3-year follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong-Yeob; Lee, Sang-Ho; Maeng, Dae-Hyeon

    2010-01-01

    The clinical and radiological outcomes of two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PSF) were evaluated in 24 consecutive patients who underwent two level ALIF with percutaneous PSF for segmental instability and were followed up for more than 3 years. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Sagittal alignment, bone union, and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) were assessed using radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. The mean age of the patients at the time of operation was 56.3 years (range 39-70 years). Minor complications occurred in 2 patients in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 39.4 months (range 36-42 months), VAS scores for back pain and leg pain, and ODI score decreased significantly (from 6.5, 6.8, and 46.9% to 3.0, 1.9, and 16.3%, respectively). Clinical success was achieved in 22 of the 24 patients. The mean segmental lordosis, whole lumbar lordosis, and sacral tilt significantly increased after surgery (from 25.1deg, 39.2deg, and 32.6deg to 32.9deg, 44.5deg, and 36.6deg, respectively). Solid fusion was achieved in 21 patients. ASD was found in 8 of the 24 patients. No patient underwent revision surgery due to nonunion or ASD. Two-level ALIF with percutaneous PSF yielded satisfactory clinical and radiological outcomes and could be a useful alternative to posterior fusion surgery. (author)

  2. Two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. A minimum 3-year follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong-Yeob; Lee, Sang-Ho; Maeng, Dae-Hyeon [Wooridul Spine Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    The clinical and radiological outcomes of two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PSF) were evaluated in 24 consecutive patients who underwent two level ALIF with percutaneous PSF for segmental instability and were followed up for more than 3 years. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Sagittal alignment, bone union, and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) were assessed using radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. The mean age of the patients at the time of operation was 56.3 years (range 39-70 years). Minor complications occurred in 2 patients in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 39.4 months (range 36-42 months), VAS scores for back pain and leg pain, and ODI score decreased significantly (from 6.5, 6.8, and 46.9% to 3.0, 1.9, and 16.3%, respectively). Clinical success was achieved in 22 of the 24 patients. The mean segmental lordosis, whole lumbar lordosis, and sacral tilt significantly increased after surgery (from 25.1deg, 39.2deg, and 32.6deg to 32.9deg, 44.5deg, and 36.6deg, respectively). Solid fusion was achieved in 21 patients. ASD was found in 8 of the 24 patients. No patient underwent revision surgery due to nonunion or ASD. Two-level ALIF with percutaneous PSF yielded satisfactory clinical and radiological outcomes and could be a useful alternative to posterior fusion surgery. (author)

  3. Safety and efficacy of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages in combination with posterior pedicel screw fixation in pyogenic spinal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiban, Ehab; Janssen, Insa; da Cunha, Pedro Ribeiro; Rainer, Jessica; Stoffel, Michael; Lehmberg, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    To date, there is growing consensus that PEEK material may be used for interbody fusion in spinal infections. Data supporting that claim are however restricted to a few very small clinical series. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcome of surgical treatment of pyogenic spinal infections with PEEK cages in combination with posterior pedicel screw fixation. Between 2006 and 2013, a total of 211 patients suffering from spondylodiscitis underwent surgical debridement and instrumentation. There were 52 cases where PEEK cages were used. Laboratory and physical examinations were assessed at a 3-month follow-up. Last follow-up was performed with at a minimum of 12 months after surgery via a telephone interview. Mean age at presentation was 67 years, with 19 (37 %) male patients and 33 (63 %) female. Distribution of the infection was lumbar in 29 (56 %%), thoracic in 3 (6 %) and cervical in 11 (21 %) cases. Nine patients (17 %) had concomitant non-contiguous spondylodiscitis. Epidural abscess was found in 17 patients (33 %); 48 (92 %%) had pain; neurological deficits were found in 20 patients (38 %). All patients in this series underwent surgical debridement with instrumentation of the spine. Postoperative intravenous antibiotics were administered for 15.4 ± 6.8 days followed by 2.9 ± 0.5 months of oral antibiotics. Complete resolution of the infection was achieved in all cases. Of the 28 patients with neurological deficits, 6 had full recovery and 10 had improved incompletely after surgery. One patient suffered from a pulmonary embolism postoperatively. There were no mortalities. Use of PEEK cages for interbody fusion is feasible and safe in patients suffering from a pyogenic spinal infection.

  4. Biomechanical considerations in slipped capital femoral epiphysis and insights into prophylactic fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, E; Bellemore, J M; Cheng, T; Little, D G; Birke, O

    2017-04-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a deformity of the proximal femur secondary to widened and unstable physis. In stabilising the slip, gold standard treatments stop growth and involve premature physeal closure, which prevents the remodelling of the acquired deformity and creates a leg length discrepancy that may be significant in younger patients. We measured the impact of placing threaded screws across the proximal femoral physis by measuring the centre-trochanteric distance (CTD) and articulo-trochanteric distance (ATD) in participants with or without prophylactic fixation. We then compared the mechanical performance of static (stainless and titanium cannulated Synthes screws) and potentially growing implants (Synthes SCFE screw and Pega Medical Free Gliding screw) in a validated synthetic bone model. In the review of 30 non-fixed and 60 fixated hips over a mean follow-up of 1.9 years, we have noted a significant difference in pre/post CTD and ATD, as well as the change in CTD and ATD over time. In the biomechanical study, the newer implants allowing growth (Synthes SCFE screw and Pega Medical Free Gliding screw) were both shown to be at least non-inferior. The primary deformity of a SCFE in itself alters hip mechanics. Also, as confirmed in this study, there is a secondary deformity that is created by static fixation and relative trochanteric overgrowth. To help remodel mild deformities and prevent secondary trochanteric overgrowth, growing implants seem to be non-inferior to the more standard means of fixation in static testing.

  5. Transarticular fixation with cortical screws combined with dorsal laminectomy and partial discectomy as surgical treatment of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in 17 dogs: clinical and computed tomography follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golini, Lorenzo; Kircher, Patrick R; Lewis, Fraser I; Steffen, Frank

    2014-05-01

    To describe clinical outcome and technical outcome assessed using computed tomography (CT) in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) treated by dorsal laminectomy, partial discectomy, and transarticular screw fixation. Retrospective observational case series. Dogs with DLSS (n = 17). Dogs with neurologic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings compatible with DLSS treated by dorsal laminectomy, partial discectomy and transarticular screw fixation were enrolled. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status was compared. Lumbosacral (LS) angle in extension and misalignment in preoperative MRI were compared with the postoperative CT. Residual mobility of the LS joint after fixation was also evaluated. Status of screws, presence of new bone formation over screw heads/articular facets and presence of adjacent segment disease (ASD) were assessed. Median CT follow-up was 12 months. Clinical improvement was seen in 13 dogs, 2 dogs had intermittent LS pain, and 2 dogs needed revision surgery. In 5 dogs, screws were either pulled out or broken. Reduction of LS angle in extension and misalignment was achieved. Residual mobility of the LS segment was present and ASD was not recognized. Transarticular screw fixation in dogs with DLSS is associated with a considerable number of technical failures and does not result in rigid stabilization; however, this did not significantly adversely influence clinical outcome. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation for atlantoaxial instability due to rheumatoid arthritis: a seven-year analysis of outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nagaria, Jabir

    2009-12-15

    STUDY DESIGN.: Observational study. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. OBJECTIVE.: The purpose of this article was to report long-term (minimum 7 years) clinical and radiologic outcome of our series of patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis who underwent transarticular screw fixation to treat atlantoaxial subluxation. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: The indications for intervention in patients with atlantoaxial instability are pain, myelopathy, and progressive neurologic deficit. The various treatment options available for these patients are isolated C1-C2 fusion, occipitocervical fusion with or without transoral surgery. Review of current literature suggests that C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation has significant functional benefits, although there is discrepancy in this literature regarding improvement in function following surgery. METHODS.: Myelopathy was assessed using Ranawat myelopathy score and Myelopathy Disability Index. Pain scores were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale. The radiologic imaging was assessed and the following data were extracted; atlanto-dens interval, space available for cord, presence of signal change on T2 weighted image, and fusion rates. RESULTS.: Thirty-seven patients, median age 56, were included in the study. Average duration of neck symptoms was 15.8 months. Average duration of rheumatoid arthritis before surgery was 20.6 years. Preoperative symptoms: suboccipital pain in 26 patients; neck pain, 32; myelopathy, 22; and 5 were asymptomatic. After surgery: suboccipital pain, 2; neck pain, 3; and myelopathy, 10. Ninety percent patients with neck and suboccipital pain improved after surgery in their Visual Analogue pain scores, with all of them having >50% improvement in VAS scores (6.94-2.12 [P < 0.05]).Preoperative Ranawat grade was as follows: grade 1 in 15 patients, grade 2 in 7, and grade 3a in 14, grade 3b in 1.After surgery: grade 1 in 27 patients, grade 2 in 7, grade 3a in 1, and grade 3b in 2. The mean

  7. A new adjustable parallel drill guide for internal fixation of femoral neck fracture: a developmental and experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Yuenyongviwat, Varah; Tuntarattanapong, Pakjai; Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin

    2016-01-01

    Background Internal fixation is one treatment for femoral neck fracture. Some devices and techniques reported improved accuracy and decreased fluoroscopic time. However, these are not widely used nowadays due to the lack of available special instruments and techniques. To improve the surgical procedure, the authors designed a new adjustable drill guide and tested the efficacy of the device. Methods The authors developed a new adjustable drill guide for cannulated screw guide wire insertion fo...

  8. Can the possibility of transverse iliosacral screw fixation for first sacral segment be predicted preoperatively? Results of a computational cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Hoon; Jin, Jin Woo; Kang, Byoung Youl; Jung, Gu-Hee

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict the possibility of transverse iliosacral (TIS) screw fixation into the first sacral segment (S 1 ) and introduce practical anatomical variables using conventional computed tomography (CT) scans. A total of 82 cadaveric sacra (42 males and 40 females) were used for continuous 1.0-mm slice CT scans, which were imported into Mimics ® software to produce a three-dimensional pelvis model. The anterior height (BH) and superior width (BW) of the elevated sacral segment was measured, followed by verification of the safe zone (SZ S1 and SZ S2 ) in a true lateral view. Their vertical (VD S1 and VD S2 ) and horizontal (HD S1 and HD S2 ) distances were measured. VD S1 less than 7mm was classified as impossible sacrum, since the transverse fixation of 7.0 mm-sized IS screw could not be done safely. Fourteen models (16.7%; six females, eight males) were assigned as the impossible sacrum. There was no statistical significance regarding gender (p=0.626) and height (p=0.419). The average values were as follows: BW, 31.4mm (SD 2.9); BH, 16.7mm (SD 6.8); VD S1 , 13.4mm (SD 6.1); HD S1 , 22.5mm (SD 4.5); SZ S1 , 239.5mm 2 (SD 137.1); VD S2 , 15.5mm (SD 3.0); HD S2 , 18.3mm (SD 2.9); and SZ S2 , 221.1mm 2 (SD 68.5). Logistic regression analysis identified BH (p=0.001) and HD S1 (p=0.02) as the only statistically significant variables to predict the possibility. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis established a cut-off value for BH and HD S1 of impossible sacrum of 20.6mm and 18.6mm, respectively. BH and HD S1 could be used to predict the possibility of TIS screw fixation. If the BH exceeds 20.6mm or HD S1 is less than 18.6mm, TIS screw fixation for S 1 should not be undertaken because of narrowed SZ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intertrochanteric fractures in elderly high risk patients treated with Ender nails and compression screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangadharan Sidhartha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ender and Simon Weidner popularized the concept of closed condylocephlic nailing for intertrochanteric fractures in 1970. The clinical experience of authors revealed that Ender nailing alone cannot provide secure fixation in elderly patients with osteoporosis. Hence we conducted a study to evaluate the efficacy of a combined fixation procedure using Ender nails and a cannulated compression screw for intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: 76 patients with intertrochanteric fractures were treated using intramedullary Ender nails and cannulated compression screw from January 2004 to December 2007. The mean age of the patients was 80 years (range 70-105 years.Using the Evan′s system of classification 49 were stable and 27 unstable fractures. Inclusion criteria was high risk elderly patients (age > 70 years with intertrochanteric fracture. The exclusion criteria included patients with pressure sores over the trochanteric region. Many patients had pre-existing co-morbidities like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, COPD, ischemic heart disease, CVA and coronary artery bypass surgery. The two Ender nails of 4.5mm each were passed across the fracture site into the proximal neck. This was reinforced with a 6.5 mm cannulated compression screw passed from the sub trochanteric region, across the fracture into the head. Results: The mean follow-up was 14 months (range 9-19 months Average time to fracture union was 10 weeks (range 6-16 weeks. The mean knee ROM was 130o (± 5o. There was no case of nail penetration into hip joint. In five cases with advanced osteoporosis there was minimal migration of Ender nails distally. Conclusions: The Ender nailing combined with compression screw fixation in cases of intertrochanteric fractures in high risk elderly patients could achieve reliable fracture stability with minimal complications.

  10. A STUDY OF POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION WITH LOCALLY HARVESTED SPINOLAMINECTOMY BONE GRAFT AND PEDICLE SCREW FIXATION IN SPONDYLOLISTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardhasaradhi M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF create intervertebral fusion by means of a posterior approach. Successful results have been reported with allograft, various cages (for interbody support, autograft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein‐2. Interbody fusion techniques facilitate reduction and enhance fusion. Corticocancellous laminectomy bone chips alone can be used as a means of spinal fusion in patients with single level instrumented PLIF. This has got a good fusion rate. PLIF with cage gives better fusion on radiology than PLIF with iliac bone graft, but no statistical difference in the clinical outcome. Cage use precludes complications associated with iliac bone harvesting. The reported adjacent segment degeneration was 40.5% and reoperation was 8.1% after 10 years of follow up. MATERIALS AND METHODS 30 cases of spondylolisthesis who attended the Orthopaedic Outpatient Department of Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam, from 2014 to 2016 were taken up for study. All the cases were examined clinically and confirmed radiologically. The patient’s age, sex, symptoms and duration were noted and were examined clinically for the status of the spine. Straight leg raising test was done and neurological examination of the lower limbs performed. All the patients were subjected to the radiological examination of the lumbosacral spine by taking anteroposterior, lateral (flexion and extension views, oblique views to demonstrate spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. MRI and x-rays studies were done in all the cases to facilitate evaluation of the root compression disk changes and spinal cord changes. RESULTS In our study, we followed all the 30 patients after the surgery following procedure of removal of loose lamina, spinous process and fibrocartilaginous mass, PLIF with only the laminectomy bone mass and CD screw system fixation up to 2 years. 12 patients (40% had excellent

  11. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Percutaneous Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation for Lumbosacral Spine Degenerative Diseases. A retrospective database of 40 consecutive treated cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millimaggi, Daniele Francesco; DI Norcia, Valerio; Luzzi, Sabino; Alfiero, Tommaso; Galzio, Renato Juan; Ricci, Alessandro

    2017-04-12

    To report our results about minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) with bilateral pedicle screw fixation, in patients with degenerative lumbosacral spine disease. To describe the indications, surgical technique and results of a consecutive series of 40 patients undergone MI-TLIF. Despite the limited number of clinical studies, published data suggest tremendous potential advantages of this technique. Forty patients with radiological findings of degenerative lumbosacral spine disease were undergone MI-TLIF between July 2012 and January 2015. Clinical outcomes were assessed by means of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Health Survey Scoring (SF36) before surgery and at first year follow-up. Furthermore, the following parameters were retrospectively reviewed: age, sex, working activity, body mass index (BMI), type of degenerative disease, number of levels of fusion, operative time, blood loss, length of hospital stay. Average operative time was of 230 minutes, mean estimated blood loss 170 mL, average length of hospital stay 5 days. The ODI improved from a score of 59, preoperatively, to post-operative score of 20 at first year follow-up. Average SF36 score increased from 36 to 54 (Physical Health) and from 29 to 50 (Mental Health) at first year outcome evaluation. MI-TLIF with bilateral pedicle screw fixation is an excellent choice for selected patients suffering from symptomatic degenerative lumbosacral spine disease, especially secondary to recurrent disk herniations.

  12. [The shor-term clinical outcomes and safety of extreme lateral interbody fusion combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xu-Dong; Ma, Wei-Hu; Jiang, Wei-Yu; Ruan, Chao-Yue; Chen, Yun-Lin

    2017-02-25

    To evaluate the early efficacy and safety of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for lumbar degenerative disease. From January 2013 to June 2014, 13 patients with degenerative lumbar disease were treated with XLIF combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, including 8 cases of lumbar instability, 5 cases of mild to moderate lumbar spondylolisthesis;there were 5 males and 8 females, aged from 56 to 73 years with an average of 62.1 years. All patients were single segment fusion. Operation time, perioperative bleeding and perioperative complications were recorded. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used to evaluate the clinical efficacy. Interbody fusion rate was observed and the intervertebral foramen area changes were compared preoperation and postoperation by X-rays and CT scanning. The mean operation time and perioperative bleeding in the patients respectively was(62.8±5.2) min and(82.5±22.6) ml. One case occurred in the numbness of femoribus internus and 1 case occurred in the muscle weakness of hip flexion after operation, both of them recovered within 2 weeks. All the patients were followed up from 12 to 19 months with an average of 15.6 months. VAS was decreased from preoperative 7.31±0.75 to 2.31±0.75 at final follow-up( P degenerative disease.

  13. Definition of a safe zone for antegrade lag screw fixation of fracture of posterior column of the acetabulum by 3D technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoreng; Zhang, Sheng; Luo, Qiang; Fang, Jintao; Lin, Chaowen; Leung, Frankie; Chen, Bin

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to define a safe zone for antegrade lag screw fixation of fracture of posterior column of the acetabulum using a novel 3D technology. Pelvic CT data of 59 human subjects were obtained to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) models. The transparency of 3D models was then downgraded along the axial perspective (the view perpendicular to the cross section of the posterior column axis) to find the largest translucent area. The outline of the largest translucent area was drawn on the iliac fossa. The line segments of OA, AB, OC, CD, the angles of OAB and OCD that delineate the safe zone (ABDC) were precisely measured. The resultant line segments OA, AB, OC, CD, and angles OAB and OCD were 28.46mm(13.15-44.97mm), 45.89mm (34.21-62.85mm), 36.34mm (18.68-55.56mm), 53.08mm (38.72-75.79mm), 37.44° (24.32-54.96°) and 55.78° (43.97-79.35°) respectively. This study demonstrates that computer-assisted 3D modelling techniques can aid in the precise definition of the safe zone for antegrade insertion of posterior column lag screws. A full-length lag screw can be inserted into the zone (ABDC), permitting a larger operational error. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CT-guided percutaneous screw fixation plus cementoplasty in the treatment of painful bone metastases with fractures or a high risk of pathological fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusceddu, Claudio; Ballicu, Nicola; Fele, Rosa Maria; Sotgia, Barbara; Melis, Luca [Oncological Hospital ' ' A. Businco' ' , Regional Referral Center for Oncologic Diseases, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Oncological Radiology, Cagliari (Italy); Fancellu, Alessandro [University of Sassari, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Sassari (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous screw fixation plus cementoplasty (PSFPC), for either treatment of painful metastatic fractures or prevention of pathological fractures, in patients who are not candidates for surgical stabilization. Twenty-seven patients with 34 metastatic bone lesions underwent CT-guided PSFPC. Bone metastases were located in the vertebral column, femur, and pelvis. The primary end point was the evaluation of feasibility and complications of the procedure, in addition to the length of hospital stay. Pain severity was estimated before treatment and 1 and 6 months after the procedure using the visual analog scale (VAS). Functional outcome was assessed by improved patient walking ability. All sessions were completed and well tolerated. There were no complications related to either incorrect positioning of the screws during bone fixation or leakage of cement. All patients were able to walk within 6 h after the procedure and the average length of hospital stay was 2 days. The mean VAS score decreased from 7.1 (range, 4-9) before treatment to 1.6 (range, 0-6), 1 month after treatment, and to 1.4 (range 0-6) 6 months after treatment. Neither loosening of the screws nor additional bone fractures occurred during a median follow-up of 6 months. Our results suggest that PSFPC might be a safe and effective procedure that allows the stabilization of the fracture and the prevention of pathological fractures with significant pain relief and good recovery of walking ability, although further studies are required to confirm this preliminary experience. (orig.)

  15. How to cannulate?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löhr, J-Matthias; Aabaken, Lars; Arnelo, Urban

    2012-01-01

    endoscopist are taking; especially, what makes a papilla difficult to cannulate and how to approach this. We devised a structured online questionnaire, sent to all endoscopists registered with SADE, the Scandinavian Association for Digestive Endoscopy. A total of 141 responded. Of those, 49 were experienced...... ERCP-endoscopists (>900 ERCPs). The first choice of cannulation is with a sphincterotome and a preinserted wire. Both less experienced and more experienced endoscopists agreed on the criteria to describe a papilla difficult to cannulate and both would choose the needle-knife sphincterotomy (NKS) to get...

  16. Intrasacral rod fixation for pediatric lumbopelvic fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilharreborde, Brice; Mazda, Keyvan

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports the authors' 19 years experience with pediatric intrasacral rod fixation. After insertion of two cannulated screws in S1 with and an original template guiding them into the anterior third of the endplate, two short fusion rods were inserted into the sacrum according to Jackson's technique distally to S3. In neuromuscular scoliosis, pelvic obliquity was reduced by connecting the proximal and distal constructs, distraction or compression, and in situ rod bending. In children with high-grade spondylolisthesis, lumbosacral kyphosis was reduced by rotation of the sacrum and in situ bending. There were no direct neurological or vascular injuries. The main complication was infection (7%). No pseudarthrosis or significant loss of correction at the lumbosacral junction was observed during follow-up. Intrasacral rod fixation appears to be safe and reliable for lumbopelvic fusion in pediatric patients.

  17. Anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament anatomical repair and augmentation versus trans-syndesmosis screw fixation for the syndesmotic instability in external-rotation type ankle fracture with posterior malleolus involvement: A prospective and comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yu; Yan, Xiaoyu; Xia, Ronggang; Cheng, Tao; Luo, Congfeng

    2016-07-01

    Syndesmosis injury is common in external-rotation type ankle fractures (ERAF). Trans-syndesmosis screw fixation, the gold-standard treatment, is currently controversial for its complications and biomechanical disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to introduce a new method of anatomically repairing the anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) and augmentation with anchor rope system to treat the syndesmotic instability in ERAF with posterior malleolus involvement and to compare its clinical outcomes with that of trans-syndesmosis screw fixation. 53 ERAFs with posterior malleolus involvement received surgery, and the syndesmosis was still unstable after fracture fixation. They were randomised into screw fixation group and AITFL anatomical repair with augmentation group. Reduction quality, syndesmosis diastasis recurrence, pain (VAS score), time back to work, Olerud-Molander ankle score and range of motion (ROM) of ankle were investigated. Olerud-Molander score in AITFL repair group and screw group was 90.4 and 85.8 at 12-month follow-up (P>0.05). Plantar flexion was 31.2° and 34.3° in repair and screw groups (P=0.04). Mal-reduction happened in 5 cases (19.2%) in screw group while 2 cases (7.4%) in repair group. Postoperative syndesmosis re-diastasis occurred in 3 cases in screw group while zero in repair group (P>0.05). Pain score was similar between the two groups (P>0.05). Overall complication rate and back to work time were 26.9% and 3.7% (P=0.04), 7.15 months and 5.26 months (P=0.02) in screw group and repair group, respectively. For syndesmotic instability in ERAF with posterior malleolus involvement, the method of AITFL anatomical repair and augmentation with anchor rope system had an equivalent functional outcome and reduction, earlier rehabilitation and less complication compared with screw fixation. It can be selected as an alternative. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Percutaneous Image-Guided Screw Fixation of Bone Lesions in Cancer Patients: Double-Centre Analysis of Outcomes including Local Evolution of the Treated Focus

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    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Buy, Xavier, E-mail: x.buy@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Ramamurthy, Nitin, E-mail: nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: georgia.tsoumakidou@chru-strasbourg.fr; Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Catena, Vittorio, E-mail: v.catena@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juleiengarnon@gmail.com [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: j.palussiere@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France)

    2016-10-15

    AimTo review outcomes and local evolution of treated lesions following percutaneous image-guided screw fixation (PIGSF) of pathological/insufficiency fractures (PF/InF) and impeding fractures (ImF) in cancer patients at two tertiary centres.Materials and methodsThirty-two consecutive patients (mean age 67.5 years; range 33–86 years) with a range of tumours and prognoses underwent PIGSF for non/minimally displaced PF/InF and ImF. Screws were placed under CT/fluoroscopy or cone-beam CT guidance, with or without cementoplasty. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a simple 4-point scale (1 = worse; 2 = stable; 3 = improved; 4 = significantly improved). Local evolution was reviewed on most recent follow-up imaging. Technical success, complications, and overall survival were evaluated.ResultsThirty-six lesions were treated with 74 screws mainly in the pelvis and femoral neck (58.2 %); including 47.2 % PF, 13.9 % InF, and 38.9 % ImF. Cementoplasty was performed in 63.9 % of the cases. Technical success was 91.6 %. Hospital stay was ≤3 days; 87.1 % of lesions were improved at 1-month follow-up; three major complications (early screw-impingement radiculopathy; accelerated coxarthrosis; late coxofemoral septic arthritis) and one minor complication were observed. Unfavourable local evolution at imaging occurred in 3/24 lesions (12.5 %) at mean 8.7-month follow-up, including poor consolidation (one case) and screw loosening (two cases, at least 1 symptomatic). There were no cases of secondary fractures.ConclusionsPIGSF is feasible for a wide range of oncologic patients, offering good short-term efficacy, acceptable complication rates, and rapid recovery. Unfavourable local evolution at imaging may be relatively frequent, and requires close clinico-radiological surveillance.

  19. Femoral Medialization, Fixation Failures, and Functional Outcome in Trochanteric Hip Fractures Treated With Either a Sliding Hip Screw or an Intramedullary Nail From Within a Randomized Trial.

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    Bretherton, Christopher P; Parker, Martyn J

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if femoral medialization influences residual pain and mobility and to determine if fixation method or fracture pattern influences the tendency to medialize. This study used data from within a randomized controlled trial. Peterborough City Hospital, UK. Eight hundred forty-four patients presenting with a trochanteric hip fracture were randomized. Five hundred thirty-eight were available for 1-year follow-up. Fractures were classified according to OTA/AO classification as 31 A1, A2, and A3. Randomized to fixation with a Targon proximal femoral nail or sliding hip screw (SHS). Femoral medialization was calculated from follow-up x-rays at a minimum of 28 days post-fixation. Pain and mobility scores were assessed at 1 year by an independent blinded observer. Fixation failure and revision procedures were assessed at a minimum of 1 year from injury. Patients with >50% medialization had worse pain (P = 0.012) and mobility scores (P = 0.013) at 1 year. They also had more fracture healing complications (P = 0.021) and required more revision procedures (P = 0.014). Fractures treated with SHS were more likely to medialize >50% compared with intramedullary nail (P fractures were more likely to medialize, and A3 fractures were more likely to undergo >50% medialization (P fractures treated with SHS to undergo femoral medialization and correlates this with worse functional outcomes. It supports the use of intramedullary nails for A3 fractures, which have a significant tendency to medialize. Prognostic level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  20. Central tarsal bone fractures in horses not used for racing: Computed tomographic configuration and long-term outcome of lag screw fixation.

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    Gunst, S; Del Chicca, F; Fürst, A E; Kuemmerle, J M

    2016-09-01

    There are no reports on the configuration of equine central tarsal bone fractures based on cross-sectional imaging and clinical and radiographic long-term outcome after internal fixation. To report clinical, radiographic and computed tomographic findings of equine central tarsal bone fractures and to evaluate the long-term outcome of internal fixation. Retrospective case series. All horses diagnosed with a central tarsal bone fracture at our institution in 2009-2013 were included. Computed tomography and internal fixation using lag screw technique was performed in all patients. Medical records and diagnostic images were reviewed retrospectively. A clinical and radiographic follow-up examination was performed at least 1 year post operatively. A central tarsal bone fracture was diagnosed in 6 horses. Five were Warmbloods used for showjumping and one was a Quarter Horse used for reining. All horses had sagittal slab fractures that began dorsally, ran in a plantar or plantaromedial direction and exited the plantar cortex at the plantar or plantaromedial indentation of the central tarsal bone. Marked sclerosis of the central tarsal bone was diagnosed in all patients. At long-term follow-up, 5/6 horses were sound and used as intended although mild osteophyte formation at the distal intertarsal joint was commonly observed. Central tarsal bone fractures in nonracehorses had a distinct configuration but radiographically subtle additional fracture lines can occur. A chronic stress related aetiology seems likely. Internal fixation of these fractures based on an accurate diagnosis of the individual fracture configuration resulted in a very good prognosis. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  1. Arterial Injury to the Profunda Femoris Artery following Internal Fixation of a Neck of Femur Fracture with a Compression Hip Screw

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    Simon Craxford

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of an 82-year-old woman who developed extensive proximal thigh swelling and persistent anaemia following internal fixation of an extracapsular neck of femur fracture with a dynamic hip screw (DHS. This was revealed to be a pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery on angiography. Her case was further complicated by a concurrent pulmonary embolism (PE. She underwent endovascular coil embolisation of the pseudoaneurysm. An IVC filter was inserted and the patient was fully anticoagulated once it had been ensured that there was no active bleeding. In this case, we review the potential for anatomical variations in the blood supply to this region and discuss treatment options for a complicated patient. We recommend that a pseudoaneurysm should be part of a differential diagnosis for postoperative patients with anaemia refractory to blood transfusion so as not to miss this rare but potentially serious complication.

  2. Biomechanical Strength of Retrograde Fixation in Proximal Third Scaphoid Fractures.

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    Daly, Charles A; Boden, Allison L; Hutton, William C; Gottschalk, Michael B

    2018-04-01

    Current techniques for fixation of proximal pole scaphoid fractures utilize antegrade fixation via a dorsal approach endangering the delicate vascular supply of the dorsal scaphoid. Volar and dorsal approaches demonstrate equivalent clinical outcomes in scaphoid wrist fractures, but no study has evaluated the biomechanical strength for fractures of the proximal pole. This study compares biomechanical strength of antegrade and retrograde fixation for fractures of the proximal pole of the scaphoid. A simulated proximal pole scaphoid fracture was produced in 22 matched cadaveric scaphoids, which were then assigned randomly to either antegrade or retrograde fixation with a cannulated headless compression screw. Cyclic loading and load to failure testing were performed and screw length, number of cycles, and maximum load sustained were recorded. There were no significant differences in average screw length (25.5 mm vs 25.6 mm, P = .934), average number of cyclic loading cycles (3738 vs 3847, P = .552), average load to failure (348 N vs 371 N, P = .357), and number of catastrophic failures observed between the antegrade and retrograde fixation groups (3 in each). Practical equivalence between the 2 groups was calculated and the 2 groups were demonstrated to be practically equivalent (upper threshold P = .010). For this model of proximal pole scaphoid wrist fractures, antegrade and retrograde screw configuration have been proven to be equivalent in terms of biomechanical strength. With further clinical study, we hope surgeons will be able to make their decision for fixation technique based on approaches to bone grafting, concern for tenuous blood supply, and surgeon preference without fear of poor biomechanical properties.

  3. Clinical effects of posterior pedicle screw fixation on spinal deformity in growing period: a report of 360 cases

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    Zheng-lei WANG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of a new kind of pedicle screw frame system with sliding terminus and locked middle segment on spinal deformity in growing period.Methods Three hundred and sixty patients in growing period were involved in the present study,and among them 82 were suffering from congenital scoliosis,218 idiopathic scoliosis and 60 kyphosis.All the patients were treated with the pedicle screw frame system with sliding terminus and locked middle segment.The treatment effects and postoperative complications were observed,and the Cobb angle before and after the operation was compared.Results The Cobb angle of 300 scoliosis patients was corrected from 53°±3° to 8°±2°,and the Cobb angle of 60 kyphosis patients was corrected from 60°±2° to 25°±3°,and the corrective effect was satisfactory.The correction rate of patients with Cobb angle ≤50° was 80%.Two hundred and ten patients were followed-up for 1 to 6 years,and the longitudinal growth of spine was 1.5-4.0cm.No severe complication,such as screw fracture,rod fracture or nerve injury,occurred.Conclusion The pedicle screw frame system with sliding terminus had a favorable three-dimensional correction effect,and the spine growth would not be restricted,and there was no stiffness,vertebral rotation,or distortion of shaft after operation.

  4. Relationship between screw sagittal angle and stress on endplate of adjacent segments after anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with internal fixation: a Chinese finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Yibo; Shen, Hongxing

    2017-12-01

    In order to reduce the incidence of adjacent segment disease (ASD), the current study was designed to establish Chinese finite element models of normal 3rd~7th cervical vertebrae (C3-C7) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) with internal fixation , and analyze the influence of screw sagittal angle (SSA) on stress on endplate of adjacent cervical segments. Mimics 8.1 and Abaqus/CAE 6.10 softwares were adopted to establish finite element models. For C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate, their anterior areas had the maximum stress in anteflexion position, and their posterior areas had the maximum stress in posterior extension position. As SSA increased, the stress reduced. With an increase of 10° in SSA, the stress on anterior areas of C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate reduced by 12.67% and 7.99% in anteflexion position, respectively. With an increase of 10° in SSA, the stress on posterior areas of C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate reduced by 9.68% and 10.22% in posterior extension position, respectively. The current study established Chinese finite element models of normal C3-C7 and ACCF with internal fixation , and demonstrated that as SSA increased, the stress on endplate of adjacent cervical segments decreased. In clinical surgery, increased SSA is able to play important role in protecting the adjacent cervical segments and reducing the incidence of ASD.

  5. A biomechanical comparison of headless tapered variable pitch compression and ao cortical bone screws for fixation of a simulated midbody transverse fracture of the proximal sesamoid bone in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Alison L; Galuppo, Larry D; Stover, Susan M; Taylor, Kenneth T; Jensen, David G

    2004-01-01

    To compare mechanical properties and failure characteristics of 2 methods of fixation for repair of a transverse, midbody fracture of the proximal sesamoid bone (PSB): 4.5-mm AO cortical bone screw (AO) placed in lag fashion and 4/5-mm Acutrak (AT) self-compressing screw. An in vitro biomechanical evaluation of intact forelimb preparations and forelimb preparations with a simulated midbody PSB fracture stabilized by a bone screw. Sixteen paired and 8 unilateral cadaveric equine forelimbs. A midbody transverse osteotomy was created in the medial PSB of bilateral forelimbs of 8 equine cadavers. The osteotomized PSB in 1 forelimb from each cadaver was repaired with an AO screw. The osteotomized PSB in each contralateral limb was repaired with an AT screw. Eight unilateral intact control limbs were also studied. Mechanical properties were determined from axial compression, single cycle to failure, load-deformation curves. Failure characteristics were determined by evaluation of video images and radiographs. No statistically significant differences were found between repair groups. Both AO and AT groups had significantly lower mechanical properties than intact limbs except for stiffness. AO and AT constructs were mechanically comparable when used to stabilize a simulated midbody fracture of the medial PSB. Both constructs were mechanically inferior to intact limbs. Clinical Relevance- The AT screw should be considered for clinical use because of the potential for less soft tissue impingement and superior biocompatibility compared with the stainless-steel AO screw. However, postoperative external coaptation is necessary to augment initial fracture stability for either fixation method, and to maintain a standing metacarpophalangeal joint dorsiflexion angle between 150 degrees and 155 degrees.

  6. Proximal Pole Scaphoid Nonunion Reconstruction With 1,2 Intercompartmental Supraretinacular Artery Vascularized Graft and Compression Screw Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Mark S; Zhu, Andy F; Ozer, Kagan; Lawton, Jeffrey N

    2018-02-06

    To review the incidence of union of patients with proximal pole scaphoid fracture nonunions treated using a 1,2 intercompartmental supraretinacular artery (1,2 ICSRA) vascularized graft and a small compression screw. This is a retrospective case series of 12 patients. Calculations of the size of the proximal pole fragment relative to the total scaphoid were performed using posteroanterior view scaphoid radiographs with the wrist in ulnar deviation and flat on the cassette. Analyses were repeated 3 times per subject, and the average ratio of proximal pole fragment relative to the entire scaphoid was calculated. We reviewed medical records, radiographs, and computed tomography (CT) scans of these 12 patients. The CT scans that were performed after an average of 12 weeks were ultimately used to confirm union of the scaphoid fractures. One patient was unable to have a CT so was excluded from the final calculation. All 11 (100%) scaphoid fractures that were assessed by CT were found to be healed at the 12-week assessment point. The mean proximal pole fragment size was 18% (range, 7%-27%) of the entire scaphoid. The 1,2 ICSRA vascularized graft and compression screw was an effective treatment for patients with proximal pole scaphoid fractures. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapeutic efficacy of pedicle screw-rod internal fixation after one-stage posterior transforaminal lesion debridement and non-structural bone grafting for tuberculosis of lumbar vertebra

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    Jia-ming LIU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pedicle screw-rod internal fixation after one-stage posterior transforaminal lesion debridement and non-structural bone grafting in the treatment of tuberculosis of mono-segmental lumbar vertebra. Methods From January 2010 to April 2013, 21 patients (9 males and 12 females with an average age of 49.1 years with mono-segmental tuberculosis of lumbar vertebra underwent surgery in our hospital were included. Eight patients had neurological deficit. The focus of tuberculosis was located on one side of the vertebral body, and all the patients had obvious signs of bone destruction on CT and MRI. All the patients were given anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy for 2-3 weeks before surgery. The local bone chips and autologous iliac cancellous bone were used as the intervertebral bone graft. Postoperative plain radiographs and CT were obtained to evaluate the fusion rate and degree of lumbar lordosis. The visual analogue scale score (VAS, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, and C-reactive protein (CRP before and after operation, and at final follow-up date were recorded. Results All the patients were followed up for 25.3±4.2 months. The mean operation time was 157±39 minutes, and the average blood loss was 470±143ml. The fusion rate of the interbody bone graft was 95.2%, with an average fusion period of 6.1±2.5 months. The neurological function was improved by 100%, and no severe complication or neurological injury occured. The preoperative and postoperative lordosis angles of the lumbar spine were 21.4°±5.7° and 33.6°±3.1°, respectively, and it was 31.3°±2.7° at the final follow up. The preoperative and postoperative VAS scores were 7.8±2.6 and 2.4±1.7 respectively, and it was 0.9±0.7 at the final follow up. The ESR and CRP were significantly decreased 3 months after surgery, and they became normal at 6 months. Conclusion Pedicle screw-rod internal fixation after one-stage posterior

  8. MINIMALLY INVASIVE SINGLE-DOOR PLATE LAMINOPLASTY WITH LATERAL MASS SCREW FIXATION FOR THE UNSTABLE SEGMENT. REPORT OF TWO CASES WITH LONG FOLLOW-UP

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    SERGIO SORIANO-SOLÍS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To report two cases of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy with monosegmental instability, in which we performed a minimally invasive microsurgical transmuscular approach with tubular retractors to create a single-door plate laminoplasty combined with fixation of the unstable segment with lateral mass screws. Methods: The surgical procedures were performed by the senior author. In both patients, the follow-up was performed using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, the Visual Analogue Scale for neck and radicular pain (radVAS, neckVAS, the Neck Disability Index (NDI and the Short Form 36 (SF-36, in the preoperative (preop and postoperative (postop periods, and at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. A radiological evaluation also was performed, which included AP, lateral and flexion-extension films at 6, 12 and 24 months and CT-scan at 12 months. Results: Case 1 - preop ODI: 40%, 24 months postop ODI: 4%; preop radVAS: 7, 24 months radVAS: 0; preop neckVAS: 8, postop 24 months neckVAS: 0; preopNDI: 43%, 24 months PostopNDI: 8%; SF-36 - preop Physical Functioning (PF: 40, preop Vitality (VT: 40, preop Emotional role functioning (RE: 33.3, Bodily pain (BP: 51, General Health (GH: 57, Social Functioning (SF: 75; postop PF: 95, VT: 95, RE: 100, BP: 74, GH: 87, SF: 100. Case 2 - preopODI: 46%, 24 months postopODI: 10%; preop radVAS: 7, 24m radVAS: 0; preop neckVAS: 9, postop 24 months neckVAS: 0; preopNDI: 56%, 24 months PostopNDI: 15%; SF-36 - preop PF: 39, VT: 45, RE: 33.3, BP: 50, GH: 49, SF: 70; postop PF: 90, VT: 100, RE: 100, BP: 82, GH: 87, SF: 100. No complications, cervical instability or signs of failed surgery were found trough and at final follow-up at 24 months. We found significant clinical improvement in both patients. Conclusions: Minimally invasive cervical laminoplasty combined with lateral mass screw fixation for the unstable segment is a useful technique in cases with multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy

  9. Pedicle screws with a thin hydroxyapatite coating for improving fixation at the bone-implant interface in the osteoporotic spine: experimental study in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohe, Makoto; Moridaira, Hiroshi; Inami, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Daisaku; Nohara, Yutaka; Taneichi, Hiroshi

    2018-03-30

    strengthens bonding at the BII, which might improve early implant fixation after spinal surgery for osteoporosis. However, the absence of increased bone mass around the screw remains a concern; prescribing osteoporosis treatment to improve bone quality might be necessary to prevent fractures around the screws.

  10. A new adjustable parallel drill guide for internal fixation of femoral neck fracture: a developmental and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuenyongviwat, Varah; Tuntarattanapong, Pakjai; Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin

    2016-01-11

    Internal fixation is one treatment for femoral neck fracture. Some devices and techniques reported improved accuracy and decreased fluoroscopic time. However, these are not widely used nowadays due to the lack of available special instruments and techniques. To improve the surgical procedure, the authors designed a new adjustable drill guide and tested the efficacy of the device. The authors developed a new adjustable drill guide for cannulated screw guide wire insertion for multiple screw fixation. Eight orthopaedic surgeons performed the experimental study to evaluate the efficacy of this device. Each surgeon performed guide wire insertion for multiple screw fixation in six synthetic femurs: three times with the new device and three times with the conventional technique. The fluoroscopic time, operative time and surgeon satisfaction were evaluated. In the operations with the new adjustable drill guide, the fluoroscopic and operative times were significantly lower than the operations with the conventional technique (p level of satisfaction of this device was also statistically significantly better (p = 0.02) than the conventional technique. The fluoroscopic and operative times with the new adjustable drill guide were reduced for multiple screw fixation of femoral neck fracture and the satisfaction of the surgeons was good.

  11. Results of ankle of arthrodesis for mini-artrotomy with percutaneous fixation with canulated screws. Series of cases

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    Mejia Mejia, Santiago; Kalib Heckel, Juan Pedro

    2001-01-01

    This is a observational descriptive study, type series of cases, where the authors pick up 10 patients with secondary ankle arthrosis to trauma (9 cases) and to hemophilia (1 case) without deformity of the committed articulation who they present pain and functional limitation that affect the activities of the daily life to the moment of the consults. One practices an tibiotalar arhtrodesis for miniartrotomy according to the Myerson technique, with some variations of the same one through 2 vertical incisions of 3 cms, an anterolateral and an antero-remedial on the articulation of the ankle and fixing with screws canulates of spongy of 6.5 crossed mms of medial and lateral from the tibia to the talus respecting the subtalar articulation. The period of immobilization with a plaster without support oscillated among six eight weeks, after which you verifies radiological the consolidation from the arthrodesis to the X rays. All the patients except one resumed the march without pain to the eight weeks. This is a coalition method that allows a quick consolidation of the arthrodesis tibiotalar in absence of deformity to the height of the arthrosic ankle, for the scarce desperiostization of periarticular soft tissues with scarce number of complications

  12. Pectoralis Major Tear with Retracted Tendon: How to Fill the Gap? Reconstruction with Hamstring Autograft and Fixation with an Interference Screw

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    L. Baverel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the pectoralis major tendon is considered an uncommon injury and a significant number of ruptures are missed or diagnosed late, leading to a chronic tear. We report an open reconstruction technique and its outcomes in a case of chronic and retracted PM tear. At the last follow-up (12 months, the patient was pain-free, with a visual analogic scale at 0 all the time. He was very satisfied concerning the cosmetic and clinical results. The constant score was 93%, the SST value 95%, and the Quick DASH score 4.5. MRI performed one year postoperatively confirmed the continuity between PM tendon and graft, even if the aspect of the distal tendon seemed to be thinner than normal PM tendon. The excellent clinical outcomes at one-year follow-up suggest that PM tear with major tendon retraction can be reliably reconstructed with hamstring autograft, using a bioabsorbable screw to optimize the fixation device. This technique has proven its simplicity and efficiency to fill the gap.

  13. Combined anterior C2-C3 fusion and C2 pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of unstable hangman's fracture: a contrast to anterior approach only.

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    Xie, Ning; Khoo, Larry T; Yuan, Wen; Ye, Xiao-Jian; Chen, De-Yu; Xiao, Jian-Ru; Ni, Bin

    2010-03-15

    A retrospective clinical study was used to evaluate the effect of a new surgical treatment of the hangman's fractures. To determine the treatment efficacy of combined anterior C2-C3 reduction and fusion and posterior compressive C2 pedicle screw fixation for the management of unstable hangman's fractures. The classification of hangman's fractures as proposed by Levine-Edwards was used to classify and guide the treatment of these injuries. Most of these fractures respond to a variety of conservative therapies, but recently, earlier surgery has been increasingly advocated by authors from several countries for the rapid stabilization of these fractures. If surgery is indicated, an anterior approach using a C2-C3 reduction and fusion is preferred usually. Another well-accepted surgical method is the direct transpedicular osteosynthesis by the dorsal approach. However, there was rare report of the combined use of these 2 techniques. A group of 45 surgical patients were all diagnosed with radiograph, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 3D CT scans. Initial and final radiographs were measured for anterior translation and angulation of the C2-C3 complex. Initial external skull traction with extension was used in all patients after admission to reduce the fracture. Then an anterior C2-C3 discectomy followed by an interbody fusion and locking plate fixation was performed. Intraoperative reduction was confirmed by fluoroscopic control. About 29 patients therefore received anterior surgeries only since satisfactory reduction was achieved during the procedure. For the 16 patients who had persistent large residual gaps after the anterior procedure, additional same stage posterior C2 compressive pedicle screws were placed. Clinical and radiologic comparisons were performed in these 2 groups. The follow-up ranged from 24 to 54 months, with an average 33.6 months. There was radiographic evidence of continuity of the fracture and the bone graft seen at 4.7 months on average. Neck

  14. Treatment of stress fracture of the olecranon in throwing athletes with internal fixation through a small incision

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    Fujioka Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study is a report of retrospective case series of stress fracture of the olecranon. Six patients presented posterior elbow pain in throwing in baseball and softball, but fracture was not diagnosed in radiographs. We detected stress fracture of the olecranon using computed tomographic (CT scan and treated the patient with internal fixation with a headless cannulated double threaded screw through a small skin incision. All patients returned to competitive level without elbow complaints after the operation. When throwing athletes present with unusual posterior elbow pain and no significant findings on radiographs, a CT scan examination should be performed. We recommend surgical treatment of internal fixation with a screw through a small skin incision, as a good option for stress fracture of the olecranon in order to allow early return to sports activity in competitive athletes.

  15. CT-guided screw fixation of vertical sacral fractures in local anaesthesia using a standard CT; CT-kontrollierte Schraubenosteosynthese von vertikalen Frakturen des hinteren Beckenringes in Lokalanaesthesie

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    Reuther, G.; Dehne, I. [Thueringen-Klinik, Saalfeld (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Roehner, U.; Will, T.; Petereit, U. [Thueringen-Klinik, Saalfeld (Germany). Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate time efficiency, radiation dose, precision and complications of percutaneous iliosacral screw placement under CT-guidance in local anaesthesia. Retrospective analysis of 143 interventions in 135 patients during a period of 42 months. Implant failures could be evaluated in 85/182 screws and bony healing or refracturing in 46/182 screws. A total of 182 iliosacral screw placements in 179 vertical sacral fractures (105 unilateral, 37 bilateral) took place in 135 patients. 166/179 of the sacral fractures were detected in Denis zone 1, 10 in Denis zone 2 and 3 in Denis zone 3. No screw misplacements including the simultaneous bilateral procedures were noted. The average time for a unilateral screw placement was 23 minutes (range: 14-52 minutes) and 35 minutes (range: 21-60 minutes) for simultaneous bilateral screwing. The dose length product was 365 mGy x cm (range: 162-1014 mGy x cm) for the unilateral and 470 mGy x cm (range: 270-1271 mGy x cm) for the bilateral procedure. 1 gluteal bleeding occurred as the only acute minor complication (0.7%). Fracture healing was verified with follow-up CTs in 42/46 sacral fractures after screw placement. Backing out occurred in 12/85 screws between 6 and 69 days after intervention. In 8 patients contralateral stress fractures were detected after unilateral screw placement between day 10 and 127 (average: 48 days). CT-guided iliosacral screw placement in sacral fractures is a safe tool providing a very high precision. The radiation dose is in the order of a diagnostic CT of the pelvis for both unilateral and bilateral screws. Contralateral stress fractures in unilateral screw placements have to be considered during the first weeks after intervention.

  16. [A clinical study on the relationship of the tail femur distance and the lag screw migration or cutting-out after the third generation of Gamma nail fixation of intertrochanteric fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yu; Yao, Qi; Zhang, Gen'ai; Ding, Lixiang

    2018-01-01

    To confirm the association between tail femur distance (TFD) and lag screw migration or cutting-out in the treatment of intertrochanteric fracture with the third generation of Gamma nail (TGN). The clinical data of 124 cases of intertrochanteric fracture treated with TGN internal fixation and followed up more than 18 months between January 2012 and December 2015 were reviewed and analyzed. There were 52 males and 72 females, with an age of 46-93 years (mean, 78.5 years). According to AO/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation (AO/ASIF) classification, 43 cases were type 31-A1, 69 cases were type 31-A2, and 12 cases were type 31-A3. The time from injury to operation was 1-10 days (mean, 2.9 days). According to the fracture healing of the patients, the patients were divided into the healing group and failure group. The age, gender, height, bone mineral density (BMD), fracture AO/ASIF classification, the time from injury to operation, and the TFD value at 1 day after operation were recorded and compared. The risk factors for the migration or cutting-out of lag screw were analyzed by logistic regression. There were 111 cases in healing group, the healing time was 80-110 days (mean, 95.5 days). There were 13 cases in failure group, including 2 cases of lag screw cutting-out and 11 cases of significant migration. Except for the TFD value at 1 day after operation in failure group was significantly higher than that in the healing group( t =5.14, P =0.00), there was no significant difference in gender, age, height, BMD, fracture of AO/ASIF classification, and the time from injury to operation ( P >0.05) between 2 groups. logistic regression analysis showed that TFD value was a risk factor for the migration or cutting-out of lag screw (B=1.22, standardized coefficient=0.32, Wald χ 2 =14.66, P =0.00, OR=3.37). The patients with higher TFD value had higher risk of postoperative lag screw migration or cutting-out. This result indicates that the appropriate length of the

  17. Direct repair of defects in lumbar spondylolysis with a new pedicle screw hook fixation: clinical, functional and Ct-assessed study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troussel, Serge

    2007-01-01

    Spondylolysis is a common entity, a minority of people affected by this disease need medical care, and only a few require surgery. Reconstruction of the pars interarticularis is an interesting alternative to segmental fusion; this technique has the advantage of preserving segmental motion. Most authors report good results for young patients without intervertebral disk or facet degenerative changes. Moreover Louis also showed good to excellent results with his technique carried out among people who presented a satisfactory disk height (equal to two thirds of normal height). This could extend the number of patients for whom pars interarticularis repair could be proposed. In this study, the limit of reconstruction was set at grade 3of the Pfirrmann’s classification. The fixation of the isthmus was done with a new kind of pedicle screw hook system. This stable and strong device is easy to use, allows an anatomic pars interarticularis reconstruction of spondylolysis and avoids a postoperative bracing. Twenty-three patients were assessed in this study, the mean age at operation was 34 (range 16–52 years) and the average follow-up was for 59 months (range 6–113 months). Eight patients showed moderate degenerative disk disease before the surgery and 12 patients had a grade 1 spondylolisthesis. The visual analogical scale, the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and the modified Prolo score were used for assessment of pain and clinical outcome before and after surgery. The results were from “excellent” to “good” for twenty patients (87%) and “fair” for three of them (13%). The consolidation of the isthmus was assessed at the end of the study (CT-scan); the fusion rate was observed in 91%. Among patients aged less than 30 years results are from “good”, to “excellent” in all cases and consolidation was always observed. All of them showed normal disc signal before the surgery. In the group aged more than 30 years, the results varied from

  18. Immediate percutaneous sacroiliac screw insertion for unstable pelvic fractures: is it safe enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, A; Perry, Z H; Blum, S; Shaked, G; Korngreen, A

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the results of immediate and delayed percutaneous sacroiliac screws surgery for unstable pelvic fractures, regarding technical results and complication rate. Retrospective study. The study was conducted at the Soroka University Medical center, Beer Sheva, Israel, which is a level 1 trauma Center. 108 patients with unstable pelvic injuries were operated by the orthopedic department at the Soroka University Medical Center between the years 1999-2010. A retrospective analysis found 50 patients with immediate surgery and 58 patients with delayed surgery. Preoperative and postoperative imaging were analyzed and data was collected regarding complications. All patients were operated on by using the same technique-percutaneous fixation of sacroiliac joint with cannulated screws. The study's primary outcome measure was the safety and quality of the early operation in comparison with the late operation. A total of 156 sacroiliac screws were inserted. No differences were found between the immediate and delayed treatment groups regarding technical outcome measures (P value = 0.44) and complication rate (P value = 0.42). The current study demonstrated that immediate percutaneous sacroiliac screw insertion for unstable pelvic fractures produced equally good technical results, in comparison with the conventional delayed operation, without additional complications.

  19. [The Postero-Lateral Approach--An Alternative to Closed Anterior-Posterior Screw Fixation of a Dislocated Postero-Lateral Fragment of the Distal Tibia in Complex Ankle Fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rüden, C; Hackl, S; Woltmann, A; Friederichs, J; Bühren, V; Hierholzer, C

    2015-06-01

    The dislocated posterolateral fragment of the distal tibia is considered as a key fragment for the successful reduction of comminuted ankle fractures. The reduction of this fragment can either be achieved indirectly by joint reduction using the technique of closed anterior-posterior screw fixation, or directly using the open posterolateral approach followed by plate fixation. The aim of this study was to compare the outcome after stabilization of the dislocated posterolateral tibia fragment using either closed reduction and screw fixation, or open reduction and plate fixation via the posterolateral approach in complex ankle fractures. In a prospective study between 01/2010 and 12/2012, all mono-injured patients with closed ankle fractures and dislocated posterolateral tibia fragments were assessed 12 months after osteosynthesis. Parameters included: size of the posterolateral tibia fragment relative to the tibial joint surface (CT scan, in %) as an indicator of injury severity, unreduced area of tibial joint surface postoperatively, treatment outcome assessed by using the "Ankle Fracture Scoring System" (AFSS), as well as epidemiological data and duration of the initial hospital treatment. In 11 patients (10 female, 1 male; age 51.6 ± 2.6 years [mean ± SEM], size of tibia fragment 42.1 ± 2.5 %) the fragment fixation was performed using a posterolateral approach. Impaired postoperative wound healing occurred in 2 patients of this group. In the comparison group, 12 patients were treated using the technique of closed anterior-posterior screw fixation (10 female, 2 male; age 59.5 ± 6.7 years, size of tibia fragment 45.9 ± 1.5 %). One patient of this group suffered an incomplete lesion of the superficial peroneal nerve. Radiological evaluation of the joint surface using CT scan imaging demonstrated significantly less dislocation of the tibial joint surface following the open posterolateral approach (0.60 ± 0.20 mm) compared to the closed

  20. Direct repair surgery with screw fixation for young patients with lumbar spondylolysis: patient-reported outcomes and fusion rate in a prospective interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gun Woo; Lee, Sun-Mi; Suh, Bo-Gun

    2015-02-15

    Prospective interventional study. To thoroughly investigate the therapeutic outcomes of direct repair (DR) for young patients with lumbar spondylolysis. DR surgery with screw fixation for a pars defect of lumbar spondylolysis is considered a notable surgical option. However, prior studies do not provide clear information on the significance of DR and its outcomes in young patients with lumbar spondylolysis because most previous studies in this area were conducted with spondylolysis patients of all ages and with low-quality study designs that were retrospective in design and had a small sample size and short follow-up time. A total of 47 young patients with lumbar spine spondylolysis who were surgically treated with DR surgery and followed up for 1 year after surgery were enrolled in this study. The primary outcome was degree of pain assessed by visual analogue scale, which separately recorded pain intensity and pain frequency. Secondary outcomes included (1) patient satisfaction, (2) clinical outcomes based on Oswestry Disability Index score and a 12-item short form health survey, (3) fusion rate of pars defect based on computed tomographic scans, and (4) surgery-related complications. The degree of lower back pain (intensity and frequency) significantly improved at final follow-up compared with preoperative level. However, 6 patients (13%) had no significant improvement, and pain frequency tended to worsen 6 months after the operation. Only 25 patients (53%) were satisfied with DR surgery. One-year postoperative clinical outcomes (Oswestry Disability Index and 12-item short form health survey) significantly improved compared with preoperative levels, but the 2 scores also tended to decrease after 6 months. The union rate of the pars defect was 55% (26/47). There was no significant difference in clinical outcomes between fusion group and nonunion group of the pars defect at the final follow-up. Two patients (4%) experienced surgery-related complications. The

  1. Simple New Screw Insertion Technique without Extraction for Broken Pedicle Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Jin-Sang; Park, Jong-Tae

    2018-05-01

    Spinal transpedicular screw fixation is widely performed. Broken pedicle screw rates range from 3%-7.1%. Several techniques have been described for extraction of broken pedicle screws. However, most of these techniques require special instruments. We describe a simple, modified technique for management of broken pedicle screws without extraction. No special instruments or drilling in an adjacent pedicle are required. We used a high-speed air drill with a round burr. With C-arm fluoroscopy guidance, the distal fragment of a broken pedicle screw was palpated using free-hand technique through the screw entry hole. A high-speed air drill with a round burr (not a diamond burr) was inserted through the hole. Drilling began slowly and continued until enough space was obtained for new screw insertion. Using this space, we performed new pedicle screw fixation medially alongside the distal fragment of the broken pedicle screw. We performed the insertion with a previously used entry hole and pathway in the pedicle. The same size pedicle screw was used. Three patients were treated with this modified technique. New screw insertion was successful in all cases after partial drilling of the distal broken pedicle screw fragment. There were no complications, such as screw loosening, dural tears, or root injury. We describe a simple, modified technique for management of broken pedicle screws without extraction. This technique is recommended in patients who require insertion of a new screw. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Geometric accuracy of 3D coordinates of the Leksell stereotactic skull frame in 1.5 Tesla- and 3.0 Tesla-magnetic resonance imaging: a comparison of three different fixation screw materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Yamamuro, Osamu; Komori, Masataka; Shibamoto, Yuta; Uchiyama, Yukio; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Hagiwara, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the geometric distortion of 1.5-Tesla (T) and 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) images with the Leksell skull frame system using three types of cranial quick fixation screws (QFSs) of different materials—aluminum, aluminum with tungsten tip, and titanium—for skull frame fixation. Two kinds of acrylic phantoms were placed on a Leksell skull frame using the three types of screws, and were scanned with computed tomography (CT), 1.5-T MR imaging and 3.0-T MR imaging. The 3D coordinates for both strengths of MR imaging were compared with those for CT. The deviations of the measured coordinates at selected points (x = 50, 100 and 150; y = 50, 100 and 150) were indicated on different axial planes (z = 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150). The errors of coordinates with QFSs of aluminum, tungsten-tipped aluminum, and titanium were 2.0 mm in most positions. The geometric accuracy of the Leksell skull frame system with 1.5-T MR imaging was high and valid for clinical use. However, the geometric errors with 3.0-T MR imaging were larger than those of 1.5-T MR imaging and were acceptable only with aluminum QFSs, and then only around the central region. PMID:25034732

  3. Minimally Invasive Technique for PMMA Augmentation of Fenestrated Screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Helge Klingler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the minimally invasive technique for cement augmentation of cannulated and fenestrated screws using an injection cannula as well as to report its safety and efficacy. Methods. A total of 157 cannulated and fenestrated pedicle screws had been cement-augmented during minimally invasive posterior screw-rod spondylodesis in 35 patients from January to December 2012. Retrospective evaluation of cement extravasation and screw loosening was carried out in postoperative plain radiographs and thin-sliced triplanar computed tomography scans. Results. Twenty-seven, largely prevertebral cement extravasations were detected in 157 screws (17.2%. None of the cement extravasations was causing a clinical sequela like a new neurological deficit. One screw loosening was noted (0.6% after a mean follow-up of 12.8 months. We observed no cementation-associated complication like pulmonary embolism or hemodynamic insufficiency. Conclusions. The presented minimally invasive cement augmentation technique using an injection cannula facilitates convenient and safe cement delivery through polyaxial cannulated and fenestrated screws during minimally invasive screw-rod spondylodesis. Nevertheless, the optimal injection technique and design of fenestrated screws have yet to be identified. This trial is registered with German Clinical Trials DRKS00006726.

  4. Central tarsal bone fractures in horses not used for racing: Computed tomographic configuration and long-term outcome of lag screw fixation

    OpenAIRE

    Gunst, S; Del Chicca, Francesca; Fürst, Anton; Kuemmerle, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: There are no reports on the configuration of equine central tarsal bone fractures based on cross-sectional imaging and clinical and radiographic long-term outcome after internal fixation. OBJECTIVES: To report clinical, radiographic and computed tomographic findings of equine central tarsal bone fractures and to evaluate the long-term outcome of internal fixation. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case series. METHODS: All horses diagnosed with a central tarsa...

  5. An in vitro biomechanical comparison of hydroxyapatite coated and uncoated ao cortical bone screws for a limited contact: dynamic compression plate fixation of osteotomized equine 3rd metacarpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Myra E; Sod, Gary A; Riggs, Laura M; Mitchell, Colin F

    2015-02-01

    To compare the monotonic biomechanical properties of a broad 4.5 mm limited contact-dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) fixation secured with hydroxyapatite (HA) coated cortical bone screws (HA-LC-DCP) versus uncoated cortical bone screws (AO-LC-DCP) to repair osteotomized equine 3rd metacarpal (MC3) bones. Experimental. Adult equine cadaveric MC3 bones (n = 12 pair). Twelve pairs of equine MC3 were divided into 3 test groups (4 pairs each) for: (1) 4 point bending single cycle to failure testing; (2) 4 point bending cyclic fatigue testing; and (3) torsional single cycle to failure testing. For the HA-LC-DCP-MC3 construct, an 8-hole broad LC-DCP (Synthes Ltd, Paoli, PA) was secured on the dorsal surface of each randomly selected MC3 bone with a combination of four 5.5 mm and four 4.5 mm HA-coated cortical screws. For the AO-LC-DCP-MC3 construct, an 8-hole 4.5 mm broad LC-DCP was secured on the dorsal surface of the contralateral MC3 bone with a combination of four 5.5 mm and four 4.5 mm uncoated cortical screws. All MC3 bones had mid-diaphyseal osteotomies. Mean test variable values for each method were compared using a paired t-test within each group. Significance was set at P < .05. Mean yield load, yield bending moment, composite rigidity, failure load, and failure bending moment, under 4 point bending, single cycle to failure, of the HA-LC-DCP fixation were significantly greater than those of the AO-LC-DCP fixation. Mean ± SD values for the HA-LC-DCP and the AO-LC-DCP fixation techniques, respectively, in single cycle to failure under 4 point bending were: yield load, 26.7 ± 2.15 and 16.3 ± 1.38 kN; yield bending moment, 527.4 ± 42.4 and 322.9 ± 27.2 N-m; composite rigidity, 5306 ± 399 and 3003 ± 300 N-m/rad; failure load, 40.6 ± 3.94 and 26.5 ± 2.52 kN; and failure bending moment, 801.9 ± 77.9 and 522.9 ± 52.2 N-m. Mean cycles to failure in 4 point bending of the HA

  6. Comparison Of Lateral Mass Screw Fixation Technique And Hartshill Rectangle Technique In The Treatment Of Sub-Axial Cervical Spine Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit KM

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cervical injury in a polytrauma patient is one of the most critical injuries. The aim of this study was to compare the lateral mass screw technique with the Hartshill rectangle technique for treatment of such cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective study consisted of 40 patients. Both groups were followed for three years clinically and radiologically. RESULTS: In the lateral mass technique, there were no cases of vertebral artery injury, radiculopathy, screw pullout, dural tears, residual kyphosis or persistent pain. In the Hartshill technique 3 patients experienced intra- operative dural tears, 1 case of wire breakage at the six months follow up, 6 patients with persistent neck pain and 1 with worsening neurological status. One hundred per cent fusion was achieved in both groups. There was significant radiation exposure in the lateral mass group. Post-operative immobilisation was required only in the Hartshill. CONCLUSION: Lateral mass screw technique is definitely a relatively better procedure. But Hartshill rectangle still stands out in certain practical situations.

  7. Comparação dos volumes ocupados pelos diferentes dispositivos de fixação interna para fraturas do colo femoral Comparison of volumes occupied by different internal fixation devices for femoral neck fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lauxen Junior

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Medir o volume ocupado pelos dispositivos de fixação interna mais difundidos para o tratamento das fraturas de colo femoral, usando como aproximação os primeiros 30, 40 e 50mm de cada parafuso. O estudo visa observar qual desses implantes causa menor agressão óssea. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados cinco modelos de parafusos canulados e quatro modelos de parafusos deslizantes (DHS encontrados no mercado nacional através de diferença de volume por deslocamento de água. RESULTADOS: A fixação com dois parafusos canulados apresentou volume significativamente menor do que com DHS nas inserções de 30, 40 e 50mm (p=0,01, 0,012 e 0,013, respectivamente, a fixação com três parafusos não apresentou significância estatística (p=0,123, 0,08 e 0,381, respectivamente e a fixação com quatro parafusos canulados apresenta volumes maiores que o DHS (p=0,072, 0,161 e 0,033. CONCLUSÕES: A fixação da cabeça femoral com dois parafusos canulados ocupa menor volume quando comparada ao DHS com diferença estatisticamente significativa. A maioria das outras combinações de parafusos não atingiram significância estatística, apesar de a fixação com quatro parafusos canulados apresentar, em média, volumes maiores que o ocupado pelo DHS.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper is to measure the volume occupied by the most widely used internal fixation devices for treating femoral neck fractures, using the first 30, 40 and 50 mm of insertion of each screw as an approximation. The study aimed to observe which of these implants caused least bone aggression. METHODS: Five types of cannulated screws and four types of dy namic hip screws (DHS available on the Brazilian market were evaluated in terms of volume differences through water displace ment. RESULTS: Fixation with two cannulated screws presented significantly less volume than shown by DHS, for insertions of 30, 40 and 50 mm (p=0.01, 0.012 and 0.013, respectively, fixa tion with three screws

  8. COMPUTER-AIDED OPTIMIZATION OF CHOICE AND POSITIONING OF BONE PLATES AND SCREWS USED FOR INTERNAL-FIXATION OF MANDIBULAR FRACTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROZEMA, FR; BOS, RRM; BOERING, G; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1992-01-01

    The present study describes a biomechanical integrated model of the mandibular system in which the maxilla and mandible, the masticatory muscles, and the temporomandibular joints are regarded as one system. In this model, strains in plate-osteosynthesis devices for internal fixation of mandibular

  9. Nurse cannulation: introducing an advanced clinical skill.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hoctor, Bridget

    2012-01-31

    Many patients admitted to emergency departments (EDs) require therapy delivered by cannula. Mid-Western Regional Hospital, Tipperary, used to run a system in which many patients had to endure two invasive procedures: on arrival their blood was taken by nurses and later they were cannulated by doctors. To reduce the number of procedures, ED nurses initiated a project to extend their skills to include cannulation. The new system of nurse cannulation at triage has also helped reduce waiting times.

  10. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME OF HUMERUS SHAFT FRACTURES TREATED WITH OPEN REDUCTION AND INTERNAL FIXATION WITH DYNAMIC COMPRESSION PLATE AND SCREWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyadhar S. Donimath

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Fracture of the humerus shaft accounts to 3% to 5% of all fractures. Majority of the fractures are unstable due to distraction force of the gravity in the upper limb and strong muscle contraction leading to displacement. Internal fixation and early mobilisation is more stressed on than splinting and prolonged immobilisation to allow earlier mobilisation and rapid return to work. The aim of the study was to study the union rates and the functional outcome and complications associated with shaft humerus fractures in KIMS Hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study which was carried out from October 2015 to September 2017 in Karnataka Institute of Medical Sciences, Hubballi, Karnataka State, India. In this study period, 25 cases of fracture shaft of the humerus were treated by open reduction and internal fixation using DCP. Skeletally mature patients with fresh humerus diaphysis fractures were included in the study. Pathological fractures and Tscherne grade 2 and above, Gustilo Anderson type2 and above were excluded from the study. RESULTS In our series of 25 cases, there were 21 men and 4 women with average age of 42.5 years. Sixteen (64% cases were due to RTA and with predominance of right side. Transverse fractures were most common that is 15 (60% patients. Eleven (31% cases were having associated injuries. 92% of the fractures united with good to excellent outcome. There were 2 (8% cases of non-union due to infection and comminution. CONCLUSION Open reduction and internal fixation with dynamic compression plate is still the standard treatment of choice for fracture shaft of humerus achieving excellent to good functional outcome.

  11. Passage of an Anterior Odontoid Screw through Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, L; Brückmann, C I; Gilg, M M; Bratschitsch, G; Sadoghi, P; Leithner, A; Radl, R

    2017-01-01

    Purpose . Anterior screw fixation has become a popular surgical treatment method for instable odontoid fractures. Screw loosening and migration are a rare, severe complication following anterior odontoid fixation, which can lead to esophagus perforation and requires revision operation. Methods . We report a case of screw loosening and migration after anterior odontoid fixation, which perforated the esophagus and was excreted without complications in a 78-year-old male patient. Results . A ventral dislocated anterior screw perforated through the esophagus after eight years after implantation and was excreted through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. At a 6-month follow-up after the event the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusion . Extrusion via the GI tract is not safe enough to be considered as a treatment option for loosened screws. Some improvements could be implemented to prevent such an incident. Furthermore, this case is a fine example that recent preoperative imaging is mandatory before revision surgery for screw loosening.

  12. Passage of an Anterior Odontoid Screw through Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Leitner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Anterior screw fixation has become a popular surgical treatment method for instable odontoid fractures. Screw loosening and migration are a rare, severe complication following anterior odontoid fixation, which can lead to esophagus perforation and requires revision operation. Methods. We report a case of screw loosening and migration after anterior odontoid fixation, which perforated the esophagus and was excreted without complications in a 78-year-old male patient. Results. A ventral dislocated anterior screw perforated through the esophagus after eight years after implantation and was excreted through the gastrointestinal (GI tract. At a 6-month follow-up after the event the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusion. Extrusion via the GI tract is not safe enough to be considered as a treatment option for loosened screws. Some improvements could be implemented to prevent such an incident. Furthermore, this case is a fine example that recent preoperative imaging is mandatory before revision surgery for screw loosening.

  13. Ultrasound Guidance as a Rescue Technique for Peripheral Intravenous Cannulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pappas, Nancy L; Michaud, Terese E; Wolbers, Russell M; Steward, James C; Fevurly, Thomas A; Samolitis, Timothy J; Shoneboom, Bruce A; Watts, Dorraine D

    2006-01-01

    .... Ultrasound guidance has shown efficacy in expediting the cannulation of central veins, but there is limited information on its utility in facilitating cannulation in peripheral veins, particularly...

  14. Misplaced Cervical Screws Requiring Reoperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeremy C; Arnold, Paul M; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Fehlings, Michael G; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Nassr, Ahmad; Rahman, Ra'Kerry K; Tannoury, Chadi A; Tannoury, Tony; Mroz, Thomas E; Currier, Bradford L; De Giacomo, Anthony F; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Jobse, Bruce C; Massicotte, Eric M; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter, retrospective case series. In the past several years, screw fixation of the cervical spine has become commonplace. For the most part, this is a safe, low-risk procedure. While rare, screw backout or misplaced screws can lead to morbidity and increased costs. We report our experiences with this uncommon complication. A multicenter, retrospective case series was undertaken at 23 institutions in the United States. Patients were included who underwent cervical spine surgery from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2011, and had misplacement of screws requiring reoperation. Institutional review board approval was obtained at all participating institutions, and detailed records were sent to a central data center. A total of 12 903 patients met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There were 11 instances of screw backout requiring reoperation, for an incidence of 0.085%. There were 7 posterior procedures. Importantly, there were no changes in the health-related quality-of-life metrics due to this complication. There were no new neurologic deficits; a patient most often presented with pain, and misplacement was diagnosed on plain X-ray or computed tomography scan. The most common location for screw backout was C6 (36%). This study represents the largest series to tabulate the incidence of misplacement of screws following cervical spine surgery, which led to revision procedures. The data suggest this is a rare event, despite the widespread use of cervical fixation. Patients suffering this complication can require revision, but do not usually suffer neurologic sequelae. These patients have increased cost of care. Meticulous technique and thorough knowledge of the relevant anatomy are the best means of preventing this complication.

  15. Loosening torque of Universal Abutment screws after cyclic loading: influence of tightening technique and screw coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Atais; Regalin, Alexandre; Bhering, Claudia Lopes Brilhante; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tightening technique and the screw coating on the loosening torque of screws used for Universal Abutment fixation after cyclic loading. Forty implants (Titamax Ti Cortical, HE, Neodent) (n=10) were submerged in acrylic resin and four tightening techniques for Universal Abutment fixation were evaluated: A - torque with 32 Ncm (control); B - torque with 32 Ncm holding the torque meter for 20 seconds; C - torque with 32 Ncm and retorque after 10 minutes; D - torque (32 Ncm) holding the torque meter for 20 seconds and retorque after 10 minutes as initially. Samples were divided into subgroups according to the screw used: conventional titanium screw or diamond like carbon-coated (DLC) screw. Metallic crowns were fabricated for each abutment. Samples were submitted to cyclic loading at 10(6) cycles and 130 N of force. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The tightening technique did not show significant influence on the loosening torque of screws (P=.509). Conventional titanium screws showed significant higher loosening torque values than DLC (P=.000). The use of conventional titanium screw is more important than the tightening techniques employed in this study to provide long-term stability to Universal Abutment screws.

  16. Comparison of the Pullout Strength of Different Pedicle Screw Designs and Augmentation Techniques in an Osteoporotic Bone Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyak, Gorkem; Balikci, Tevfik; Heydar, Ahmed Majid; Bezer, Murat

    2018-02-01

    Mechanical study. To compare the pullout strength of different screw designs and augmentation techniques in an osteoporotic bone model. Adequate bone screw pullout strength is a common problem among osteoporotic patients. Various screw designs and augmentation techniques have been developed to improve the biomechanical characteristics of the bone-screw interface. Polyurethane blocks were used to mimic human osteoporotic cancellous bone, and six different screw designs were tested. Five standard and expandable screws without augmentation, eight expandable screws with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or calcium phosphate augmentation, and distal cannulated screws with PMMA and calcium phosphate augmentation were tested. Mechanical tests were performed on 10 unused new screws of each group. Screws with or without augmentation were inserted in a block that was held in a fixture frame, and a longitudinal extraction force was applied to the screw head at a loading rate of 5 mm/min. Maximum load was recorded in a load displacement curve. The peak pullout force of all tested screws with or without augmentation was significantly greater than that of the standard pedicle screw. The greatest pullout force was observed with 40-mm expandable pedicle screws with four fins and PMMA augmentation. Augmented distal cannulated screws did not have a greater peak pullout force than nonaugmented expandable screws. PMMA augmentation provided a greater peak pullout force than calcium phosphate augmentation. Expandable pedicle screws had greater peak pullout forces than standard pedicle screws and had the advantage of augmentation with either PMMA or calcium phosphate cement. Although calcium phosphate cement is biodegradable, osteoconductive, and nonexothermic, PMMA provided a significantly greater peak pullout force. PMMA-augmented expandable 40-mm four-fin pedicle screws had the greatest peak pullout force.

  17. The concept and method of closed reduction and internal fixation: a new approach for the treatment of simple zygoma fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uda, Hirokazu; Kamochi, Hideaki; Sugawara, Yasushi; Sarukawa, Syunji; Sunaga, Ataru

    2013-11-01

    The authors have developed a new minimally invasive surgical procedure for simple zygoma fractures, a closed reduction and internal fixation method, that uses a cannulated cortical screw system. From 2007 to 2012, 42 selected patients with simple zygoma fractures without ocular problems or shear at the zygomatic frontal portion were treated with this method. The mean age of the patients was 33 years (range, 13 to 77 years). The authors achieved good repositioning, equivalent to results achieved with conventional procedures in all cases. No notable complication occurred except for minor infection in two cases. Mean operative time was 32 minutes (range, 19 to 58 minutes). Postoperative relapse was found only in the posterior direction (poperative time, less effect on soft tissue, maintenance of bone healing potential, and decreased postoperative pain and swelling. The authors concluded that this method has the potential to become a future surgical procedure for simple zygoma fractures. Therapeutic, IV.

  18. Titanium mesh as a low-profile alternative for tension-band augmentation in patella fracture fixation: A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Aaron J; Salas, Christina; Rise, LeRoy; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Taha, Mahmoud Reda; DeCoster, Thomas A; Gehlert, Rick J

    2015-01-01

    We performed a simple biomechanical study to compare the fixation strength of titanium mesh with traditional tension-band augmentation, which is a standard treatment for transverse patella fractures. We hypothesised that titanium mesh augmentation is not inferior in fixation strength to the standard treatment. Twenty-four synthetic patellae were tested. Twelve were fixed with stainless steel wire and parallel cannulated screws. Twelve were fixed with parallel cannulated screws, augmented with anterior titanium mesh and four screws. A custom test fixture was developed to simulate a knee flexed to 90°. A uniaxial force was applied to the simulated extensor mechanism at this angle. A non-inferiority study design was used to evaluate ultimate force required for failure of each construct as a measure of fixation strength. Stiffness of the bone/implant construct, fracture gap immediately prior to failure, and modes of failure are also reported. The mean difference in force at failure was -23.0 N (95% CI: -123.6 to 77.6N) between mesh and wire constructs, well within the pre-defined non-inferiority margin of -260 N. Mean stiffness of the mesh and wire constructs were 19.42 N/mm (95% CI: 18.57-20.27 N/mm) and 19.49 N/mm (95% CI: 18.64-20.35 N/mm), respectively. Mean gap distance for the mesh constructs immediately prior to failure was 2.11 mm (95% CI: 1.35-2.88 mm) and 3.87 mm (95% CI: 2.60-5.13 mm) for wire constructs. Titanium mesh augmentation is not inferior to tension-band wire augmentation when comparing ultimate force required for failure in this simplified biomechanical model. Results also indicate that stiffness of the two constructs is similar but that the mesh maintains a smaller fracture gap prior to failure. The results of this study indicate that the use of titanium mesh plating augmentation as a low-profile alternative to tension-band wiring for fixation of transverse patella fractures warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  19. Experimental study of pedicle screw stability on low BMD vertebrae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qi; Yang Huilin; Tang Tiansi; Wu Yiwei; Wang Yijin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To conduct biomechanical study of different pedicle screws stability on spinal specimen, discuss the relationship between design parameter of screw, insertion torgue and BMD, establish the theoretical foundation for application of pedicle screw on osteoporotic patients. Methods: Six fixed lumbar cadavers were collected, the effects of design parameter, insertion torque and etc on fixation stability were determined under various BMD by using biomechanical ways. Results: According to in vitro study: (1) There was a significant difference among pullout strength of all screws (P 2 >U 1 >SF 1 >SF 2 >RF. Conclusions: There is a close correlated between type of screw, BMD and stability. The U-type screw displays the best fixation effect on specimen of low BMD. (authors)

  20. Robot assisted navigated drilling for percutaneous pedicle screw placement: A preliminary animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The preliminary study supports the view that computer assisted pedicle screw fixation using spinal robot is feasible and the robot can decrease the intraoperative fluoroscopy time during the minimally invasive pedicle screw fixation surgery. As spine robotic surgery is still in its infancy, further research in this field is worthwhile especially the accuracy of spine robot system should be improved.

  1. Avaliação da resistência mecânica de três diferentes pinos de Schanz às forças de torção em montagens do fixador externo monolateral Mechanical resistance evaluation of three different Schanz screws to torsion forces in monolateral external fixation assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Mercadante

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar a resistência mecânica de três montagens de fixador externo linear utilizando pinos de 4,5 mm e de 5,5 mm com alma 3,2mm, e de 5,5 mm com alma de 4,5 mm no setor rosqueado dos pinos. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Foram montados fixadores externos lineares em tubos de polipropileno de 500 mm, com um corte obliquo a 45º no seu centro, com dois pinos de Schanz em cada segmento. Foram estudados 18 corpos de prova, divididos em três grupos de seis peças cada. No grupo 1 foram utilizados pinos de Schanz de 4,5 mm, no grupo 2 pinos de 5,5 mm ambos com alma de 3,2 mm e no grupo 3 pinos de 5,5 mm com alma de 4,5 mm de diâmetro. Os testes mecânicos foram realizadas em máquina de torção MT-100, e as medidas de resistência realizadas com 4,5º, 9,0º, 13,5º e 18,0º de torção. RESULTADOS: Os pinos de Schanz de 4,5 mm e alma de 3,2 mm mostraram como média de resistência para as torções de 4,5º, 9,0º, 13,5º e 18,0º, respectivamente: 12,0 N/mm, 21,0 N/mm, 33,0 N/mm e 46,0 N/mm. Os pinos de 5,5 com alma de 3,2 mm mostraram como resistência média: 13,2 N/mm, 25,3 N/mm, 40,0 N/mm e 51,2 N/mm, respectivamente. Os testes com os pinos de Schanz de 5,5 mm com alma de 4,5 mm mostraram resistência média de: 15,2 N/mm, 33,5 N/mm, 53,0 N/mm e 70,0 N/mm. Estudo estatístico com o teste da Análise de Variância e o teste de Bonferroni mostraram ausência de diferença estatisticamente significante entre os grupos com pinos com diâmetro da alma da parte roscada de 3,2mm (de 4,5 mm e 5,5 mm. Houve diferença estatisticamente significante (alfa OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanical force of three different assemblies of a linear external fixator using 4.5 mm and 5.5 mm Schanz screws with a 3.2 mm-diameter root, and another screw with 5.5 mm diameter with a 4,5mm root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The linear external fixator was assembled in a 500 mm-long polypropylene tube, with a 45

  2. Estudo da influência do modo de preparação do orifício piloto e do macheamento na ancoragem dos parafusos pediculares Study of the influence of the type of pilot hole preparation and tapping on pedicular screws fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helton Luiz Aparecido Defino

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Foram realizados ensaios mecânicos com parafusos do sistema de fixação vertebral USIS para o estudo da influência do tipo de preparo do orifício piloto com sonda ou brocas e o macheamento do trajeto do orifício piloto, na resistência ao arrancamento dos implantes. Os parafusos foram inseridos em corpos de prova de madeira, poliuretana e osso bovino. O preparo do orifício piloto foi realizado com sondas e brocas de 3,5mm. Foram formados três grupos experimentais: I-perfuração com sonda, II-perfuração com broca e III-perfuração com broca e macheamento. Após a sua inserção nos corpos de prova foram realizados ensaios de arrancamento em máquina universal de teste. Foi observado aumento da resistência ao arrancamento dos implantes com a realização do orifício piloto com sondas e a diferença estatística foi significativa em relação ao preparo com broca e broca associada ao macheamento. Não foi observada diferença na resistência ao arrancamento dos parafusos com o macheamento do trajeto do orifício piloto.Mechanical assays were performed with screws of the USIS vertebral fixation system for the study of the influence of type of pilot hole preparation with probe or burr and tapping of the pilot hole pathway on pedicular screw pullout. The screws were inserted into wood, polyurethane and bovine bone test bodies. The pilot hole was prepared with probes and burrs of 3.5 mm. Three experimental groups were formed: I -drilling with a probe, II - drilling with a burr, and III - drilling with burr and tapping. After screw insertion into the test bodies, pullout assays were performed with a universal test machine. Increased screw pullout resistance was observed when the pilot hole was drilled with a probe, with a statistically significant difference compared to preparation with a burr and with a burr in combination with tapping. No difference in screw pullout resistance was observed with tapping of the pilot hole pathway.

  3. Fusion Surgery Required for Recurrent Pediatric Atlantoaxial Rotatory Fixation after Failure of Temporary Fixation with Instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Matsuyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In cases of chronic irreducible and recurrent unstable atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF, closed reduction and its maintenance are often unsuccessful, requiring surgical treatment. The purpose of the present report is to describe a rare case of pediatric AARF that required multiple treatments. A 6-year-old boy was diagnosed as having type 2 AARF. After conservative treatment, the patient was treated with temporary fixation surgery (C1-C2 Magerl without a bone graft in consideration of motion preservation after screw removal. AARF recurred after the screw removal and required fusion surgery (Magerl–Brooks with an iliac bone graft. Ultimately, bone union was achieved and the screws were removed 11 months after the surgery. We recommend surgeons be cautious when choosing temporary fixation surgery for AARF in small children. Further investigation is needed to determine the optimal time before screw removal.

  4. Correção da cifose de Scheuermann: estudo comparativo da fixação híbrida com ganchos e parafusos versus fixação apenas com parafusos Corrección de la cifosis de Scheuermann: estudio comparativo de la fijación híbrida con ganchos y tornillos versus fijación solo con tornillos Correction of Scheuermann kyphosis: comparative study of hybrid fixation using hooks and screws versus screw-only fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enguer Beraldo Garcia

    2009-12-01

    fijación solo con tornillos.OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the degree of correction of Sheuermann kyphosis, in 6 patients who were submitted to surgery using hybrid instrumentation comprised of hooks and screws (H, and 17 patients undergoing screw-only fixation (P. METHODS: 23 patients with Scheuermann kyphosis were submitted to surgical treatment using anterior and posterior approach. In the present study, we indicated surgical treatment for rigid kyphosis, varying between 60º and 105º. All patients presented a Risser signal above 4. Liberation and Fusion were realized through anterior approach, followed by fixation, deformity correction, and arthrodesis through posterior approach. RESULTS: in Group H, a preoperative kyphosis of 84.17º and a postoperative of 47.5º were observed. In Group P, a preoperative kyphosis of 80.35º and postoperative of 33.53º were observed. CONCLUSION: it was concluded that both types of fixation presented very satisfactory results, with screw only fixation being superior.

  5. Routine versus on demand removal of the syndesmotic screw; a protocol for an international randomised controlled trial (RODEO-trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, S. A.; Birnie, M. F. N.; Sanders, F. R. K.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; Backes, M.; van Beeck, E.; Bloemers, F. W.; van Dijkman, B.; Flikweert, E.; Haverkamp, D.; Holtslag, H. R.; Hoogendoorn, J. M.; Joosse, P.; Parkkinen, M.; Roukema, G.; Sosef, N.; Twigt, B. A.; van Veen, R. N.; van der Veen, A. H.; Vermeulen, J.; Winkelhagen, J.; van der Zwaard, B. C.; van Dieren, S.; Goslings, J. C.; Schepers, T.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Syndesmotic injuries are common and their incidence is rising. In case of surgical fixation of the syndesmosis a metal syndesmotic screw is used most often. It is however unclear whether this screw needs to be removed routinely after the syndesmosis has healed. Traditionally the screw is

  6. Biomechanical and morphometric evaluation of occipital condyle for occipitocervical segmental fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jae-Taek; Takigaya, Tomoyuki; Sugisaki, Keizo; Orias, A.A.E.; Inoue, Nozomu; An, H.S.

    2011-01-01

    Two recent novel techniques of occipital fixation are the occipitoatlantal (C0-C1) transarticular screw technique and the direct occipital condyle screw technique. The present study evaluated and compared the biomechanical stability of the direct occipital condyle screw and C0-C1 transarticular screw with the established method for craniocervical spine fixation using the midline occipital keel screw and C1 lateral mass screw. Morphometric evaluation of the occipital condyle and the hypoglossal canal was performed to avoid hypoglossal nerve injury during the screw placement. Thirteen recently frozen cadaveric specimens were used. The occipital condyle anatomy and the hypoglossal canal dimension were measured using reconstructed computed tomography images. Insertion torque and pullout strength were evaluated to compare the midline occipital keel screw, C0-C1 transarticular screw, C1 lateral mass screw, and direct occipital condyle screw. The dimensions of the occipital condyle allow use of a 3.5 or 4.0-mm diameter screw. Mean pullout strength was 1619.6 N for the midline occipital keel screw, 870.7 N for the C0-C1 transarticular screw, 707.0 N for the C1 lateral mass screw, and 431.7 N for the direct occipital condyle screw. Mean insertion torque was 0.55 Nm for the midline occipital keel screw, 0.32 Nm for the C0-C1 transarticular screw, 0.14 Nm for the C1 lateral mass screw, and 0.11 Nm for the direct occipital condyle screw. The condylar anatomy allows direct insertion of the occipital condyle screw and C0-C1 transarticular screw. These techniques are suitable options for the treatment of craniovertebral junction instabilities in selected patients. (author)

  7. Correction Capability in the 3 Anatomic Planes of Different Pedicle Screw Designs in Scoliosis Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Aubin, Carl-Eric; Coleman, John; Rawlinson, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    Computer simulations to compare the correction capabilities of different pedicle screws in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) instrumentations. To compare the correction and resulting bone-screw forces associated with different pedicle screws in scoliosis instrumentations. Pedicle screw fixation is widely used in surgical instrumentation for spinal deformity treatment. Screw design, correction philosophies, and surgical techniques are constantly evolving to achieve better control of the vertebrae and correction of the spinal deformity. Yet, there remains a lack of biomechanical studies that quantify the effects and advantages of different screw designs in terms of correction kinematics. The correction capabilities of fixed-angle, multiaxial, uniaxial, and saddle axial screws were kinematically analyzed, simulated, and compared. These simulations were based on the screw patterns and correction techniques proposed by 2 experienced surgeons for 2 AIS cases. Additional instrumentations were assessed to compare the correction and resulting bone-screw forces associated with each type of screw. The fixed-angle, uniaxial and saddle axial screws had similar kinematic behavior and performed better than multiaxial screws in the coronal and transverse planes (8% and 30% greater simulated corrections, respectively). Uniaxial and multiaxial screws were less effective than fixed-angle and saddle axial screws in transmitting compression/distraction to the anterior spine because of their sagittal plane mobility between the screw head and shank. Only the saddle axial screws allow vertebra angle in the sagittal plane to be independently adjusted. Pedicle screws of different designs performed differently for deformity corrections or for compensating screw placement variations in different anatomic planes. For a given AIS case, screw types should be determined based on the particular instrumentation objectives, the deformity's stiffness and characteristics so as to make the best of

  8. Fixation strength analysis of cup to bone material using finite element simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anwar, Iwan Budiwan; Saputra, Eko; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.; Van Der Heide, Emile

    2016-01-01

    Fixation of acetabular cup to bone material is an important initial stability for artificial hip joint. In general, the fixation in cement less-type acetabular cup uses press-fit and screw methods. These methods can be applied alone or together. Based on literature survey, the additional screw

  9. Topical anesthetic versus lidocaine infiltration in arteriovenous fistula cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha George

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: End stage renal disease (ESRD patients on maintenance hemodialysis undergo arterio-venous fistula (AVF cannulation prior to each hemodialysis session for blood access. Prior to cannulation lidocaine infiltration is done, which is often perceived as painful. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA has been found to significantly reduce pain associated with radial artery cannulation compared with lidocaine infiltration. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of EMLA compared to infiltration of lidocaine in hemodialysis patients for AVF cannulation. Materials and Methods: A single-centre, crossover study of patients with an AVF on regular maintenance hemodialysis was performed in the dialysis unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. The site of AVF, number of attempts for AVF cannulation and cannula insertion time were recorded. The patients were asked about the acceptability of application of the anesthetic, delay between anesthetic and cannulation and to score the pain on cannulation. Results: Fifty patients were included in the study. With the visual analog scale, pain score on infiltration was 4.8. Pain score on cannulation after topical application was 2.9 and after infiltration, 2.0. The number of attempts for cannulation and the cannula insertion time were similar. Anesthesia was more stressful in the injectable group rather than the topical group (P < 0.001. Delay between anesthetic and cannulation was unacceptable in the topical group (P < 0.001. Patient compliance was better during infiltration compared to topical (P < 0.005. Mean pain score during infiltration of anesthetic was significantly higher than cannulation pain after either anesthetic, although pain on cannulation was higher in the topical group (P < 0.001. Conclusions: EMLA offers a suitable alternative to lidocaine infiltration for patients using AVF for blood access.

  10. Combined precut in difficult biliary cannulation

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    Jesús Espinel-Díez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: precut sphincterotomy refers to a variety of endoscopic techniques that are used in order to access the bile duct when conventional methods of cannulation have failed. There are not significant data (such as efficacy, safety about the use of different techniques of precutting at the same session. We have described our experience with combined precut sphincterotomy (CPS and we have compared our results to the use of an isolated precut. Patients and methods: we have performed 247 precuts of a total of 2.390 ERCPs. Patients were distributed according to the type of precut practiced: Needle-knife, transpancreatic and combined precut sphincterotomies. "Combined precut" consisted in performing first a transpancreatic sphincterotomy and, if the access was not achieved, then performing a needle-knife sphincterotomy in the same session. The data about safety and efficacy were prospectively collected. The complications were defined according to the consensus criteria. Results: we performed precutting techniques in 247 patients. Needle-knife, transpancreatic, and combined precuts were performed in 125 (6.9%, 74 (4.1% and 48 (2.6% patients, respectively. Bile duct cannulation was successful in 48 patients (100% in the group of combined precut, 121 patients (96.8% in the transpancreatic group, and 67 patients (90.5% in the needle-knife group (p = 0.03. There were not differences in complications rates between the three groups. There was no pancreatitis in the combined precut group. The complications were successfully managed with conservative treatment. Conclusions: combined precut sphincterotomy seems to be a safe and successful technique in those cases of difficult bile duct cannulation.

  11. Strain-stress analysis of lower limb with applied fixator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrázek M.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares physiological state of tibia before and after application of an external fixator. The fixator systems’ models but also model of tibia are loaded in the direction of body axis. The paper is focused on the examination of differences in stiffness before and after the application of fixation. Two types of axial external fixators are compared. Both fixators differ in their construction. The first fixator is two-frame and fixation rods are used for fixing the bone tissue (variant I. The second one is fixed into tibia with screws (variant II. We have found out that the two-frame external fixator has much bigger stiffness during limb fixation than the fixator with one body. Much higher deformations compared to physiological state of tibia occur in the variant II.

  12. Reconstruction of the lateral tibia plateau fracture with a third triangular support screw: A biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Moran

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Triangular support fixation enhanced interfragmentary stability at the ultimate stage of dynamic loading. However, the level of improvement seems to be limited and may not legitimate the intervention with an additional third screw.

  13. [Treatment of open tile type C pelvic fractures by open reduction and internal fixation through anterior and posterior approaches at early stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baichuan

    2014-05-01

    To explore the effectiveness of open reduction and internal fixation through anterior and posterior approaches in treatment of open Tile type C pelvic fractures at early stage. Between January 2009 and April 2012, 12 patients with open Tile C pelvic fractures were treated. There were 7 males and 5 females, aged 6-53 years (median, 31 years). Of 12 cases, 4 were classified as Tile type C1, 6 as Tile type C2, and 2 as Tile type C3; 5 were rated as Gustilo type II and 7 as Gustilo type III. The injury severity score was 18-57 (mean, 37.2). The interval of injury and admission ranged from 15 minutes to 3 days (median, 50 minutes). The debridement and external fixation were performed at first stage; then open reduction and internal fixation were used through anterior approach (reconstruction plate) and posterior approach (cannulated lag screws). The vacuum sealing drainage was performed during treatment until the wounds healed. Delayed healing of incison was obtained in 12 cases because of wound infection. Anatomical reduction or approximate anatomical reduction was achieved in all 12 cases. The patients were followed up 3-39 months (median, 18 months). No loosening of internal fixation or fracture displacement was observed during follow-up. The fracture healing time was 7-13 weeks (mean, 9.7 weeks). At last follow-up, according to the Matta standard, the outcome was excellent in 10 cases and good in 2 cases; according to Majeed score, the results were excellent in 9 cases, good in 1, and poor in 2. Early internal fixation operation of open Tile type C pelvic fractures can effectively restore the pelvic anatomical structure and stability, reduce the complication, and achieve satisfactory effectiveness.

  14. Technical note: Ruminal cannulation technique in young Holstein calves:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Bastian; Engbæk, Marie; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2010-01-01

    Ruminal cannulation techniques are frequently used to study fermentation in the ruminant forestomach. Unsatisfactory results with the traditionally applied procedure for cannulation of young calves stimulated the development of a simpler and more robust procedure; this procedure was tested for ef...... no major effect on apparent animal health and performance traits, and the cannula proved useful for multiple samplings of ruminal contents in young calves.......Ruminal cannulation techniques are frequently used to study fermentation in the ruminant forestomach. Unsatisfactory results with the traditionally applied procedure for cannulation of young calves stimulated the development of a simpler and more robust procedure; this procedure was tested...... for effects on performance traits and gross anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract compared with a control group not undergoing surgery. Five calves were ruminally cannulated at approximately 10 d of age and 5 matching calves were used as controls. All calves were fed milk replacer and a diet based on clover...

  15. Biomechanical comparison of 3.0 mm headless compression screw and 3.5 mm cortical bone screw in a canine humeral condylar fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Mishka N; Jankovits, Daniel A; Huber, Michael L; Strom, Adam M; Garcia, Tanya C; Stover, Susan M

    2016-09-20

    To compare the biomechanical properties of simulated humeral condylar fractures reduced with one of two screw fixation methods: 3.0 mm headless compression screw (HCS) or 3.5 mm cortical bone screw (CBS) placed in lag fashion. Bilateral humeri were collected from nine canine cadavers. Standardized osteotomies were stabilized with 3.0 mm HCS in one limb and 3.5 mm CBS in the contralateral limb. Condylar fragments were loaded to walk, trot, and failure loads while measuring construct properties and condylar fragment motion. The 3.5 mm CBS-stabilized constructs were 36% stiffer than 3.0 mm HCS-stabilized constructs, but differences were not apparent in quality of fracture reduction nor in yield loads, which exceeded expected physiological loads during rehabilitation. Small residual fragment displacements were not different between CBS and HCS screws. Small fragment rotation was not significantly different between screws, but was weakly correlated with moment arm length (R² = 0.25). A CBS screw placed in lag fashion provides stiffer fixation than an HCS screw, although both screws provide similar anatomical reduction and yield strength to condylar fracture fixation in adult canine humeri.

  16. Do screws and screw holes affect osteolysis in cementless cups using highly crosslinked polyethylene? A 7 to 10-year follow-up case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, N; Jinno, T; Takada, R; Koga, D; Ando, T; Okawa, A; Haro, H

    2018-05-01

    The use of screws and the presence of screw holes may cause acetabular osteolysis and implant loosening in cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) using conventional polyethylene. In contrast, this issue is not fully understood using highly crosslinked polyethylene (HXLPE), particularly in large comparative study. Therefore, we performed a case-control study to assess the influence of screw usage and screw holes on: (1) implant fixation and osteolysis and (2) polyethylene steady-state wear rate, using cases with HXLPE liners followed up for 7-10 years postoperatively. The screw usage and screw holes adversely affect the implant fixation and incidence of wear-related osteolysis in THA with HXLPE. We reviewed 209 primary cementless THAs performed with 26-mm cobalt-chromium heads on HXLPE liners. To compare the effects of the use of screws and the presence of screw holes, the following groups were established: (1) with-screw (n=140); (2) without-screw (n=69); (3) no-hole (n=27) and (4) group in which a cup with screw holes, but no screw was used (n=42). Two adjunct groups (no-hole cups excluded) were established to compare the differences in the two types of HXLPE: (5) remelted group (n=100) and (6) annealed group (n=82). Implant stability and osteolysis were evaluated by plain radiography and computed tomography. The wear rate from 1 year to the final evaluation was measured using plain X-rays and PolyWare Digital software. All cups and stems achieved bony fixation. On CT-scan, no acetabular osteolysis was found, but there were 3 cases with a small area of femoral osteolysis. The mean steady-state wear rate of each group was (1) 0.031±0.022, (2) 0.033±0.035, (3) 0.031±0.024, (4) 0.029±0.018, (5) 0.030±0.018 and (6) 0.034±0.023mm/year, respectively. A comparison of the effects of screw usage or screw holes found no significant between-group differences in the implant stability, prevalence of osteolysis [no acetabular osteolysis and 3/209 at femoral side (1

  17. Scapula fracture incidence in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty using screws above or below metaglene central cage: clinical and biomechanical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennon, Justin C; Lu, Caroline; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Crosby, Lynn A

    2017-06-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) is a viable treatment option for rotator cuff tear arthropathy but carries a complication risk of scapular fracture. We hypothesized that using screws above the central glenoid axis for metaglene fixation creates a stress riser contributing to increased scapula fracture incidence. Clinical type III scapular fracture incidence was determined with screw placement correlation: superior screw vs. screws placed exclusively below the glenoid midpoint. Cadaveric RTSA biomechanical modeling was employed to analyze scapular fractures. We reviewed 318 single-surgeon single-implant RTSAs with screw correlation to identify type III scapular fractures. Seventeen cadaveric scapula specimens were matched for bone mineral density, metaglenes implanted, and fixation with 2 screw configurations: inferior screws alone (group 1 INF ) vs. inferior screws with one additional superior screw (group 2 SUP ). Biomechanical load to failure was analyzed. Of 206 patients, 9 (4.4%) from the superior screw group experienced scapula fractures (type III); 0 fractures (0/112; 0%) were identified in the inferior screw group. Biomechanically, superior screw constructs (group 2 SUP ) demonstrated significantly (P < .05) lower load to failure (1077 N vs. 1970 N) compared with constructs with no superior screws (group 1 INF ). There was no significant age or bone mineral density discrepancy. Clinical scapular fracture incidence significantly decreased (P < .05) for patients with no screws placed above the central cage compared with patients with superior metaglene screws. Biomechanical modeling demonstrates significant construct compromise when screws are used above the central cage, fracturing at nearly half the ultimate load of the inferior screw constructs. We recommend use of inferior screws, all positioned below the central glenoid axis, unless necessary to stabilize the metaglene construct. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

  18. Bilateral Pneumothoraces Following Central Venous Cannulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, F.; Masterson, K.; Inan, C.; Robert, J.; Walder, B.

    2009-01-01

    We report the occurrence of a bilateral pneumothoraces after unilateral central venous catheterization of the right subclavian vein in a 70-year-old patient. The patient had no history of pulmonary or pleural disease and no history of cardiothoracic surgery. Two days earlier, she had a median laparotomy under general and epidural anaesthesia. Prior to the procedure, the patient was hemodynamically stable and her transcutaneous oxygen saturation was 97% in room air. We punctured the right pleural space before cannulation of the right subclavian vein. After the procedure, the patient slowly became hemodynamically instable with respiratory distress. A chest radiograph revealed a complete left-side pneumothorax and a mild right-side pneumothorax. The right-side pneumothorax became under tension after left chest tube insertion. The symptoms finally resolved after insertion of a right chest tube. After a diagnostic work-up, we suspect a congenital “Buffalo chests” explaining bilateral pneumothoraces and a secondary tension pneumothorax. PMID:19901997

  19. Early Experience with Biodegradable Fixation of Pediatric Mandibular Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Mazeed, Ahmed Salah; Shoeib, Mohammed Abdel-Raheem; Saied, Samia Mohammed Ahmed; Elsherbiny, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This clinical study aims to evaluate the stability and efficiency of biodegradable self-reinforced poly-l/dl-lactide (SR-PLDLA) plates and screws for fixation of pediatric mandibular fractures. The study included 12 patients (3–12 years old) with 14 mandibular fractures. They were treated by open reduction and internal fixation by SR-PLDLA plates and screws. Maxillomandibular fixation was maintained for 1 week postoperatively. Clinical follow-up was performed at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and...

  20. Fixation using alternative implants for the treatment of hip fractures (FAITH): Design and rationale for a multi-centre randomized trial comparing sliding hip screws and cancellous screws on revision surgery rates and quality of life in the treatment of femoral neck fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Hip fractures are a common type of fragility fracture that afflict 293,000 Americans (over 5,000 per week) and 35,000 Canadians (over 670 per week) annually. Despite the large population impact the optimal fixation technique for low energy femoral neck fractures remains

  1. Posterior cervical spine arthrodesis with laminar screws. A report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2007-01-01

    We performed fixation using laminar screws in 2 patients in whom lateral mass screws, pedicle screws or transarticular screws could not be inserted. One was a 56-year-old woman who had anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS). When a guide wire was inserted using an imaging guide, the hole bled massively. We thought the re-insertion of a guide wire or screw would thus increase the risk of vascular injury, so we used laminar screws. The other case was an 18-year-old man who had a hangman fracture. Preoperative magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the left vertebral artery. A laminar screw was inserted into the patent side (i.e., the right side of C2). Cervical pedicle screws are the most biomechanically stable screws. However, their use carries a high risk of neurovascular complications during screw insertion, because the cervical pedicle is small and is adjacent laterally to the vertebral artery, medially to the spinal cord, and vertically to the nerve roots. Lateral mass screws are also reported to involve a risk of neurovascular injuries. The laminar screw method was thus thought to be useful, since arterial injuries could thus be avoided and it could also be used as a salvage modality for the previous misinsertion. (author)

  2. Improving vascular access outcomes: attributes of arteriovenous fistula cannulation success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Lori E.; Wilson, Barbara M.; Oudshoorn, Abe

    2016-01-01

    Background Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are the preferred access for hemodialysis (HD) yet they are underutilized. Cannulation of the fistula is a procedure requiring significant skill development and refinement and if not done well can have negative consequences for patients. The nurses' approach, attitude and skill with cannulation impacts greatly on the patient experience. Complications from miscannulation or an inability to needle fistulas can result in the increased use of central venous catheters. Some nurses remain in a state of a ‘perpetual novice’ resulting in a viscous cycle of negative patient consequences (bruising, pain), further influencing patients' decisions not to pursue a fistula or abandon cannulation. Method This qualitative study used organizational development theory (appreciative inquiry) and research method to determine what attributes/activities contribute to successful cannulation. This can be applied to interventions to promote change and skill development in staff members who have not advanced their proficiency. Eighteen HD nurses who self-identified with performing successful cannulation participated in audio-recorded interviews. The recordings were transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed using content analysis. Results Four common themes, including patient-centered care, teamwork, opportunity and skill and nurse self-awareness, represented successful fistula cannulation. Successful cannulation is more than a learned technique to correctly insert a needle, but rather represents contextual influences and interplay between the practice environment and personal attributes. Conclusions Practice changes based on these results may improve cannulation, decrease complications and result in better outcomes for patients. Efforts to nurture positive patient experiences around cannulation may influence patient decision-making regarding fistula use. PMID:26985384

  3. REVISION ANKLE SYNDESMOSIS FIXATION - FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME AFTER TIGHTROPE ® FIXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendhilvelan Rajagopalan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Syndesmotic disruptions are often seen in ankle fractures. Malreduction of these fractures can result in arthritis and instability. A proportion of these patients with malreduction require revision fixation. This study presents the results of revision fixation in such patients, using the Ankle TightRope ® (Arthrex system. METHODS Between January 2000 to December 2009, 124 patients who underwent ankle fracture fixations with syndesmotic stabilisation were analysed. Out of 124 patients, 8 patients were diagnosed with failure of primary stabilisation (based on radiological and clinical criteria and subjected to revision fixation using the Ankle TightRope ® (Arthrex system. Followup was done at periodic time intervals of 3, 6 and 12 months. Both clinical and radiological assessment was performed. Complications and duration of hospital stay was recorded. Functional evaluation was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS scoring system. RESULTS Five patients had good results, one satisfactory and two had poor outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Ankle TightRope ® fixation is an alternative method of stabilisation in patients who require revision syndesmosis fixation. Further studies are required to evaluate this method of revision stabilisation as compared to screws.

  4. A modified transcondylar screw to accommodate anatomical skull base variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, R F; Lissounov, A

    2017-01-01

    Occipitocervical instability may be attributed to congenital, bony/ligamentous abnormalities, trauma, neoplasm, degenerative bone disease, and failed atlantoaxial fixation. Indications for occipitocervical fixation include the prevention of disabling pain, cranial nerve dysfunction, paralysis, or even sudden death. The screw trajectory for the modified transcondylar screw (mTCS) is optimally planned utilizing a three-dimensional skull reconstructed image. The modified mTCS technique is helpful where there is a loss of bone, such as after prior suboccipital craniotomy and/or an inadequate occipital condyle. The new proposed technique is similar to the classical transcondylar screw placement but follows a deeper course along the bony lip of foramen magnum toward clivus from a dorsolateral approach. The modified mTCS technique allows for direct visualization and, therefore, helps to avoid damage to the hypoglossal nerve and lateral aspect of brain stem.

  5. 不安定性骨盤骨折に対する各種 iliosacral screw の三点曲げ強度試験

    OpenAIRE

    野阪, 善雅; 稲田, 有史; 川西, 弘一; 前田, 裕仁; 三野, 浩也; 宮本, 誠司

    1999-01-01

    It is generally accepted that internal fixation using iliosacral screws for unstable pelvic fractures is effective. However, the placement of iliosacral screws is technically demanding and it has been reported that screws can be damaged by the load from the early part of the postoperative stage. We have reported that the dull insertion method of placement of iliosacral screws and combination of motor-evoked potential monitoring can reduce complications, whereas the strength of the iliosacral ...

  6. Salvage of tibial pilon fractures using fusion of the ankle with a 90 degrees cannulated blade-plate: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, S J; Thordarson, D B; Shepherd, L E

    1999-06-01

    Six patients with ankle joint destruction and delayed metaphyseal union after tibial plafond fracture were surgically treated with tibiotalar arthrodesis and metaphyseal reconstruction, using a fixed-angle cannulated blade-plate. The procedure was performed through a posterior approach in five cases and a lateral approach in one case. The subtalar joint was preserved in all cases. Metaphyseal union and a stable arthrodesis were obtained in all cases without loss of fixation and with no mechanical failure of the blade-plate. Union was obtained in an average of 26 weeks. No secondary procedures were required to obtain union. All six patients were ambulatory at last follow-up. Stable internal fixation for simultaneous tibiotalar fusion and metaphyseal reconstruction can be achieved with a cannulated blade-plate while preserving the subtalar joint in complex plafond fractures.

  7. Least possible fixation techniques of 4-part valgus impacted fractures of the proximal humerus: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Panagopoulos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The valgus-impacted (VI 4-part fractures are a subset of fractures of the proximal humerus with a unique anatomic configuration characterized by a relatively lower incidence of avascular necrosis after operative intervention. We systematically reviewed clinical studies assessing the benefits and harms of least possible fixation techniques (LPFT for this unique fracture type. Such information would be potentially helpful in developing an evidence-based approach in the management of these complex injuries. We performed analytic searches of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Library, restricting it to the years 1991-2014. Included studies had to describe outcomes and complications after primary osteosynthesis with any type of LPFT apart from plate-screws and intramedullary nailing. Eligibility criteria were also included English language, more than 5 cases, minimum follow up of one year and report of clinical outcome using at least one relevant score (Constant, Neer or ASES. Based on 292 database hits we identified 12 eligible studies including 190 four-part valgus impacted fractures in 188 patients. All eligible studies were case series composed of min 8 to max 45 patients per study. The gender distribution was 60% (112 female and 40% (76 male. The average age of the patients at the time of injury was 54.5 years. In 8/12 studies an open reduction was used for fracture fixation using different surgical techniques including KW, cerclage wires, cannulated screws and osteosutures. Closed reduction and percutaneous fixation was used in 4 studies. Mean follow-up time ranged from 24 to 69 months. A good functional outcome (constant score >80 was reported in 9/12 studies. The most common complication was avascular necrosis of the humeral head with an overall incidence of 11% (range, 0-26.3%. Total avascular necrosis (AVN was found in 15/188 patients (7.9% and was more common in percutaneous techniques and partial AVN in 6

  8. Ultrasound Guidance as a Rescue Technique for Peripheral Intravenous Cannulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pappas, Nancy L; Michaud, Terese E; Wolbers, Russell M; Steward, James C; Fevurly, Thomas A; Samolitis, Timothy J; Shoneboom, Bruce A; Watts, Dorraine D

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous (W) cannulation can be difficult to perform using the traditional landmark or visual/palpation technique in patients with access difficulties such as deep, sclerotic, small, or fragile veins...

  9. Bilateral Pneumothoraces Following Central Venous Cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pazos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the occurrence of a bilateral pneumothoraces after unilateral central venous catheterization of the right subclavian vein in a 70-year-old patient. The patient had no history of pulmonary or pleural disease and no history of cardiothoracic surgery. Two days earlier, she had a median laparotomy under general and epidural anaesthesia. Prior to the procedure, the patient was hemodynamically stable and her transcutaneous oxygen saturation was 97% in room air. We punctured the right pleural space before cannulation of the right subclavian vein. After the procedure, the patient slowly became hemodynamically instable with respiratory distress. A chest radiograph revealed a complete left-side pneumothorax and a mild right-side pneumothorax. The right-side pneumothorax became under tension after left chest tube insertion. The symptoms finally resolved after insertion of a right chest tube. After a diagnostic work-up, we suspect a congenital “Buffalo chests” explaining bilateral pneumothoraces and a secondary tension pneumothorax.

  10. Parafuso de massa lateral do atlas para fixação da coluna cervical superior: resultados cirúrgicos Tornillos de masa lateral del atlas para la fijación de la columna cervical superior: resultados quirúrgicos Lateral mass screws of the atlas for upper cervical spine fixation: surgical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Ghizoni

    2011-01-01

    alcanzar la fusión y la estabilidad de la columna cervical, y con el conocimiento de la anatomía y de la técnica quirúrgica es posible obtenerse excelentes resultados.OBJECTIVE: To present the surgical results of a case series of upper cervical spine stabilization with the use of lateral mass screws of the atlas. METHODS: Retrospective review of the surgical results of patients submitted to upper cervical spine stabilization with the use of lateral mass screws of the atlas. RESULTS: Six patients were operated in the period between January 2009 to April 2010, four men and two women. There was no permanent morbidity or mortality in the presented series. The main cause of atlanto-axial instability was trauma and there was just one case of odontoid pathologic fracture from a prostate metastasis. Axis fixation was achieved with the use of three different screw techniques (pars, pedicle and laminar, with equal distribution among the patients. CONCLUSIONS: The use of lateral mass screws of the atlas is an important technique to achieve fusion and stability of the upper cervical spine and with the knowledge of the anatomy and of the surgical technique good results can be achieved.

  11. Fractures of the proximal fifth metatarsal: percutaneous bicortical fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Vivek; Chung, Hyun Wook; Suh, Jin Soo

    2011-06-01

    Displaced intraarticular zone I and displaced zone II fractures of the proximal fifth metatarsal bone are frequently complicated by delayed nonunion due to a vascular watershed. Many complications have been reported with the commonly used intramedullary screw fixation for these fractures. The optimal surgical procedure for these fractures has not been determined. All these observations led us to evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous bicortical screw fixation for treating these fractures. Twenty-three fractures were operatively treated by bicortical screw fixation. All the fractures were evaluated both clinically and radiologically for the healing. All the patients were followed at 2 or 3 week intervals till fracture union. The patients were followed for an average of 22.5 months. Twenty-three fractures healed uneventfully following bicortical fixation, with a mean healing time of 6.3 weeks (range, 4 to 10 weeks). The average American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was 94 (range, 90 to 99). All the patients reported no pain at rest or during athletic activity. We removed the implant in all cases at a mean of 23.2 weeks (range, 18 to 32 weeks). There was no refracture in any of our cases. The current study shows the effectiveness of bicortical screw fixation for displaced intraarticular zone I fractures and displaced zone II fractures. We recommend it as one of the useful techniques for fixation of displaced zone I and II fractures.

  12. Routine versus on demand removal of the syndesmotic screw; A protocol for an international randomised controlled trial (RODEO-trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Dingemans (Siem); Birnie, M.F.N. (M. F.N.); Sanders, F.R.K. (F. R.K.); M.P.J. van den Bekerom (Michel); Backes, M. (M.); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); F.W. Bloemers (Frank); B.A. van Dijkman (Bart); E.R. Flikweert (Elvira); D.J. Haverkamp; H.R. Holtslag (Herman); Hoogendoorn, J.M. (J. M.); P. Joosse (Pieter); Parkkinen, M. (M.); G.R. Roukema (Gert); N.L. Sosef (Nico L.); B. Twigt (Bas); R.N. van Veen (Ruben); Van Der Veen, A.H. (A. H.); Vermeulen, J. (J.); Winkelhagen, J. (J.); Van Der Zwaard, B.C. (B. C.); S. Van Dieren (Susan); J.C. Goslings (Carel); T. Schepers (Tim)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Syndesmotic injuries are common and their incidence is rising. In case of surgical fixation of the syndesmosis a metal syndesmotic screw is used most often. It is however unclear whether this screw needs to be removed routinely after the syndesmosis has healed. Traditionally

  13. Dorsal bridge plating or transarticular screws for Lisfranc fracture dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirzner, N; Zotov, P; Goldbloom, D; Curry, H; Bedi, H

    2018-04-01

    Aims The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the functional and radiological outcomes of bridge plating, screw fixation, and a combination of both methods for the treatment of Lisfranc fracture dislocations. Patients and Methods A total of 108 patients were treated for a Lisfranc fracture dislocation over a period of nine years. Of these, 38 underwent transarticular screw fixation, 45 dorsal bridge plating, and 25 a combination technique. Injuries were assessed preoperatively according to the Myerson classification system. The outcome measures included the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, the validated Manchester Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) functional tool, and the radiological Wilppula classification of anatomical reduction. Results Significantly better functional outcomes were seen in the bridge plate group. These patients had a mean AOFAS score of 82.5 points, compared with 71.0 for the screw group and 63.3 for the combination group (p bridge plate group, 38.1 in the screw group, and 45.5 in the combination group (p bridge plating have better functional and radiological outcomes than those treated with transarticular screws or a combination technique. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:468-74.

  14. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  15. Locking plate fixation for proximal humerus fractures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Neil G

    2012-02-01

    Locking plates are increasingly used to surgically treat proximal humerus fractures. Knowledge of the bone quality of the proximal humerus is important. Studies have shown the medial and dorsal aspects of the proximal humeral head to have the highest bone strength, and this should be exploited by fixation techniques, particularly in elderly patients with osteoporosis. The goals of surgery for proximal humeral fractures should involve minimal soft tissue dissection and achieve anatomic reduction of the head complex with sufficient stability to allow for early shoulder mobilization. This article reviews various treatment options, in particular locking plate fixation. Locking plate fixation is associated with a high complication rate, such as avascular necrosis (7.9%), screw cutout (11.6%), and revision surgery (13.7%). These complications are frequently due to the varus deformation of the humeral head. Strategic screw placement in the humeral head would minimize the possibility of loss of fracture reduction and potential hardware complications. Locking plate fixation is a good surgical option for the management of proximal humerus fractures. Complications can be avoided by using better bone stock and by careful screw placement in the humeral head.

  16. Biomechanical Analysis of Suture Anchor vs Tenodesis Screw for FHL Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakos, Mark C; Gott, Michael; Karnovsky, Sydney C; Murphy, Conor I; DeSandis, Bridget A; Chinitz, Noah; Grande, Daniel; Chahine, Nadeen

    2017-07-01

    Chronic Achilles injury is often treated with flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon transfer to the calcaneus using 1 or 2 incisions. A single incision avoids the risks of extended dissections yet yields smaller grafts, which may limit fixation options. We investigated the required length of FHL autograft and biomechanical profiles for suture anchor and biotenodesis screw fixation. Single-incision FHL transfer with suture anchor or biotenodesis screw fixation to the calcaneus was performed on 20 fresh cadaveric specimens. Specimens were cyclically loaded until maximal load to failure. Length of FHL tendon harvest, ultimate load, stiffness, and mode of failure were recorded. Tendon harvest length needed for suture anchor fixation was 16.8 ± 2.1 mm vs 29.6 ± 2.4 mm for biotenodesis screw ( P = .002). Ultimate load to failure was not significantly different between groups. A significant inverse correlation existed between failure load and donor age when all specimens were pooled (ρ = -0.49, P Anchor failure occurred mostly by suture breakage (n = 8). Adequate FHL tendon length could be harvested through a single posterior incision for fixation to the calcaneus with either fixation option, but suture anchor required significantly less graft length. Stiffness, fixation strength, and load to failure were comparable between groups. An inverse correlation existed between failure load and donor age. Younger specimens with screw fixation demonstrated significantly greater failure loads. Adequate harvest length for FHL transfer could be achieved with a single posterior incision. There was no difference in strength of fixation between suture anchor and biotenodesis screw.

  17. [Extramedullary fixation combined with intramedullary fixation in the surgical reduction of sagittal mandibular condylar fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuanjun, Chen; Xiaoyang, Chen; Jing, Chen

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical effect of extramedullary fixation combined with intramedullary fixation during the surgical reduction of sagittal mandibular condylar fractures. Twenty-four sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle in18 patients were fixed by two appliances: intramedullary with one long-screw osteosynthesis or Kirschner wire and extramedullary with one micro-plate. The radiologically-recorded post-operative stability-associated com-plications included the screw/micro-plate loosening, micro-plate twisting, micro-plate fractures, and fragment rotation. The occluding relations, the maximalinter-incisal distances upon mouth opening, and the mandibular deflection upon mouth opening were evaluated based on follow-up clinical examination. Postoperative panoramic X-ray and CT scans showed good repositioning of the fragment, with no redislocation or rotation, no screw/plate loosening, and no plate-twisting or fracture. Clinical examination showed that all patients regained normal mandibular movements, ideal occlusion, and normal maximal inter-incisal distances upon mouth opening. Extramedullary fixation combined with intramedullary fixation is highly recommended for sagittal condylar fractures because of the anti-rotation effect of the fragment and the reasonable place-ment of the fixation appliances.

  18. Sacroiliac secure corridor: analysis for safe insertion of iliosacral screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Alves Cruz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Posterior pelvic lesions, especially of the sacral-iliac joint, have high mortality and morbidity risks. Definitive fixation is necessary for the joint stabilization, and one option is the sacral percutaneous pinning with screws. Proximity to important structures to this region brings risks to the fixation procedure; therefore, it is important to know the tridimensional anatomy of the pelvis posterior region. Deviations of the surgeon's hand of four degrees may target the screws to those structures; dimorphisms of the upper sacrum and a poor lesion reduction may redound in a screw malpositioning. This study is aimed to evaluate the dimensions of a safe surgical corridor for safe sacroiliac screw insertion and relations with age and sex of the patients. METHOD: One hundred randomly selected pelvis CTs of patients with no pelvic diseases, seen at a tertiary care teaching Hospital. Measurements were made by computer and the safest area for screw insertion was calculated by two methods. The results were expressed in mm (not in degrees, in order to be a further surgical reference. RESULTS: There was a significant size difference in the analyzed sacral vertebra, differing on a wider size in men than in women. There was no significant statistical difference between vertebral size and age. By both methods, a safe area for screw insertion could be defined. CONCLUSION: Age does not influence the width of the surgical corridor. The surgeon has a safe corridor considered narrower when inserting screws in a female pelvis than when in a male one. However, as the smallest vertebra found (feminine was considered for statics, it was concluded that this corridor is 20 mm wide in any direction, taking as a reference the centrum of the vertebra.

  19. BIOMECHANICAL EVALUATION OF THE INFLUENCE OF CERVICAL SCREWS TAPPING AND DESIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patricia; Rosa, Rodrigo César; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; Albuquerque de Paula, Francisco José; Volpon, José Batista; Aparecido Defino, Helton Luiz

    2009-01-01

    To assess if the screw design (self-drilling/self-tapping) and the pilot hole tapping could affect the insertion torque and screw pullout strength of the screw used in anterior fixation of the cervical spine. Forty self-tapping screws and 20 self-drilling screws were inserted into 10 models of artificial bone and 10 cervical vertebrae of sheep. The studied parameters were the insertion torque and pullout strength. The following groups were created: Group I-self-tapping screw insertion after pilot hole drilling and tapping; Group II-self-tapping screw insertion after pilot hole drilling without tapping; Group III-self-drilling screw insertion without drilling and tapping. In Groups I and II, the pilot hole had 14.0 mm in depth and was made with a 3mmn drill, while tapping was made with a 4mm tap. The insertion torque was measured and the pullout test was performed. The comparison between groups was made considering the mean insertion torque and the maximum mean pullout strength with the variance analysis (ANOVA; p≤ 0.05). Previous drilling and tapping of pilot hole significantly decreased the insertion torque and the pullout strength. The insertion torque and pullout strength of self-drilling screws were significantly higher when compared to self-tapping screws inserted after pilot hole tapping.

  20. ADOLESCENT IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS: EVALUATION ON THE EFFECT OF SCREW DENSITY IN THE CORRECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enguer Beraldo Garcia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The objective was to investigate implant density or the number of screws correlated with the correction of the main curve in patients undergoing surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Methods: We evaluated 112 medical records: 33 patients with screw density of up to 50%, and 79 patients with a density of 100%; all patients underwent surgical correction by posterior approach with transpedicular fixation. Results: In the group of patients with screw density of up to 50% the residual Cobb median was 10°; in the group with 100% density, the median was 7°. Conclusion: Biostatistical analysis showed that the group with up to 50% of screw density presented correction rate of 82.1% and the group with 100% density had correction of about 86.8%. It is therefore concluded that the difference is statistically significant in favor of the fixation with 100% density (p =0.010.

  1. Accuracy of S2 Alar-Iliac Screw Placement Under Robotic Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laratta, Joseph L; Shillingford, Jamal N; Lombardi, Joseph M; Alrabaa, Rami G; Benkli, Barlas; Fischer, Charla; Lenke, Lawrence G; Lehman, Ronald A

    Case series. To determine the safety and feasibility of S2 alar-iliac (S2AI) screw placement under robotic guidance. Similar to standard iliac fixation, S2AI screws aid in achieving fixation across the sacropelvic junction and decreasing S1 screw strain. Fortunately, the S2AI technique minimizes prominent instrumentation and the need for offset connectors to the fusion construct. Herein, we present an analysis of the largest series of robotic-guided S2AI screws in the literature without any significant author conflicts of interest with the robotics industry. Twenty-three consecutive patients who underwent spinopelvic fixation with 46 S2AI screws under robotic guidance were analyzed from 2015 to 2016. Screws were placed by two senior spine surgeons, along with various fellow or resident surgical assistants, using a proprietary robotic guidance system (Renaissance; Mazor Robotics Ltd., Caesara, Israel). Screw position and accuracy was assessed on intraoperative CT O-arm scans and analyzed using three-dimensional interactive viewing and manipulation of the images. The average caudal angle in the sagittal plane was 31.0° ± 10.0°. The average horizontal angle in the axial plane using the posterior superior iliac spine as a reference was 42.8° ± 6.6°. The average S1 screw to S2AI screw angle was 11.3° ± 9.9°. Two violations of the iliac cortex were noted, with an average breach distance of 7.9 ± 4.8 mm. One breach was posterior (2.2%) and one was anterior (2.2%). The overall robotic S2AI screw accuracy rate was 95.7%. There were no intraoperative neurologic, vascular, or visceral complications related to the placement of the S2AI screws. Spinopelvic fixation achieved using a bone-mounted miniature robotic-guided S2AI screw insertion technique is safe and reliable. Despite two breaches, no complications related to the placement of the S2AI screws occurred in this series. Level IV, therapeutic. Copyright © 2017 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier

  2. Intra-operative computer navigation guided cervical pedicle screw insertion in thirty-three complex cervical spine deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rajasekaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical pedicle screw fixation is challenging due to the small osseous morphometrics and the close proximity of neurovascular elements. Computer navigation has been reported to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement. There are very few studies assessing its efficacy in the presence of deformity. Also cervical pedicle screw insertion in children has not been described before. We evaluated the safety and accuracy of Iso-C 3D-navigated pedicle screws in the deformed cervical spine. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients including 15 children formed the study group. One hundred and forty-five cervical pedicle screws were inserted using Iso-C 3D-based computer navigation in patients undergoing cervical spine stabilization for craniovertebral junction anomalies, cervico-thoracic deformities and cervical instabilities due to trauma, post-surgery and degenerative disorders. The accuracy and containment of screw placement was assessed from postoperative computerized tomography scans. Results: One hundred and thirty (89.7% screws were well contained inside the pedicles. Nine (6.1% Type A and six (4.2% Type B pedicle breaches were observed. In 136 levels, the screws were inserted in the classical description of pedicle screw application and in nine deformed vertebra, the screws were inserted in a non-classical fashion, taking purchase of the best bone stock. None of them had a critical breach. No patient had any neurovascular complications. Conclusion: Iso-C navigation improves the safety and accuracy of pedicle screw insertion and is not only successful in achieving secure pedicle fixation but also in identifying the best available bone stock for three-column bone fixation in altered anatomy. The advantages conferred by cervical pedicle screws can be extended to the pediatric population also.

  3. Bioabsorbable metal screws in traumatology: A promising innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Biber

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available MAGNEZIX® CS (Syntellix AG, Hanover, Germany is a bioabsorbable compression screw made of a magnesium alloy (MgYREZr. Currently there are only two clinical studies reporting on a limited number of elective patients who received this screw in a hallux valgus operation. We applied MAGNEZIX® CS for fixation of distal fibular fracture in a trauma patient who had sustained a bimalleolar fracture type AO 44-B2.3. Clinical course was uneventful, fracture healing occurred within three months. Follow-up X-rays showed a radiolucent area around the implant for some months, yet this radiolucent area had disappeared in the 17-months follow-up X-ray. Keywords: Magnesium, Bioabsorbable, Compression screw, Osteosynthesis, Ankle fracture

  4. Removal of internal fixation--the effect on patients' complaints: a study of 66 cases of removal of internal fixation after malleolar fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S; Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Jensen, C M

    1994-01-01

    To estimate the effect of removal of internal fixation after treatment of malleolar fractures on postoperatively presented complaints, we retrospectively evaluated 66 patients by their records and by personal questionnaires. Of all the patients, 89.4% had one or more complaints. These were...... typically soreness over implant and cicatrix, reduced movement of the ankle joint, and strain-related pain. About 75% of these patients reported improvement after removal. The AO mode of fixation, i.e., typically by lateral semitubular plating and transsyndesmotic screw and a medial screw or pins...... period. We conclude that removal of internal fixation after malleolar fractures is indicated when common types of complaints are presented....

  5. Complications of syndesmotic screw removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Tim; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; de Vries, Mark R.; van der Elst, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the metallic syndesmotic screw is the gold standard in the treatment of syndesmotic disruption. Whether or not this screw needs to be removed remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to determine the complications which occur following routine removal of the syndesmotic screw

  6. The feasibility and radiological features of sacral alar iliac fixation in an adult population: a 3D imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Min Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical treatments for adult spinal deformities often include pelvic fixation, and the feasibility of sacral-2 alar iliac (S2AI screw fixation has been shown previously. However, sometimes S2AI screw fixation cannot be applied due to the presence of an osteolytic lesion or trauma or because the biomechanical properties of only an S2AI screw is insufficient. Therefore, we questioned the feasibility of using sacral AI screws in other segments and determined whether S3AI and S4AI screws have the potential to be used for sacral fractures. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and radiological features of sacral AI fixation in S1–S4 in an adult population using 3D imaging techniques. Methods: Computed tomography (CT scans were taken of 45 patients and were imported into Mimics (Version 10.01, Materialise, Belgium software to reconstruct the 3D digital images. Next, a cylinder (radius of 3.5 mm was drawn to imitate the screw trajectory of a S1–4 AI screw, and every imitated screw in each segment was adjusted to a maximum upward and downward angle to acquire the feasible region. The parameters of the S1–4AI screw trajectories were measured. Results: Sacral AI screws could be successfully imitated using 3D digital imaging. The S4AI screw trajectory could be obtained in 19 of 45 patient images (42.2%, while the feasibility rates of S1AI, S2AI, and S3AI screw fixation were 100%, 100%, and 91.1% (41/45, respectively. The feasible regions of S1AI, S2AI, and S3AI screw trajectories were wide enough, while the adjustable angle of S4AI screws was very small. Conclusion: It is feasible to place S1–2AI screws in the entire adult population and S3–4AI screws in some of the adult population. Furthermore, our study suggested that 3D digital images are suitable to study the feasibility of new screw fixation.

  7. Fate of the syndesmotic screw--Search for a prudent solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaftandziev, Igor; Spasov, Marko; Trpeski, Simon; Zafirova-Ivanovska, Beti; Bakota, Bore

    2015-11-01

    Ankle fractures are common injuries. Since the recognition of the importance of syndesmotic injury in ankle fractures, much of the scientific work has been focused on concomitant syndesmotic injury. Despite the invention of novel devices for restoration and maintenance of the congruent syndesmosis following syndesmotic injury, the metallic syndesmotic screw is still considered to be the "gold standard". The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results in patients who retained the syndesmosis screw with those in whom the screw was removed following open reduction and internal fixation of the malleolar fracture associated with syndesmosis disruption. This was a retrospective study of 82 patients. Minimum follow-up was 12 months. Clinical evaluation included American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for patient general satisfaction. The condition of the screw (removed, intact or broken), presence of radiolucency around the syndesmotic screw and the tibiofibular clear space were recorded using final follow-up radiographs. Three cortices were engaged in 66 patients (80%) and quadricortical fixation was performed in the remaining 16 patients (20%). The number of engaged cortices did not correlate with the clinical outcome and screw fracture. A single syndesmotic screw was used in 71 patients (86%. The mean AOFAS score in the group with intact screw (I) was 83; the scores in the group with broken screw (B) and removed screw (R) were 92.5 and 85.5, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the three groups: this was due to the difference between groups I and B; the difference between groups I and R and groups B and R were not statistically significant. There were no statistically significant differences in VAS results. There were no statistically significant differences in clinical outcome between the group with the screw retained and the group in which the screw was removed; however, the

  8. Percutaneous Iliac Screws for Minimally Invasive Spinal Deformity Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Y. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adult spinal deformity (ASD surgeries carry significant morbidity, and this has led many surgeons to apply minimally invasive surgery (MIS techniques to reduce the blood loss, infections, and other peri-operative complications. A spectrum of techniques for MIS correction of ASD has thus evolved, most recently the application of percutaneous iliac screws. Methods. Over an 18 months 10 patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis underwent MIS surgery. The mean age was 73 years (70% females. Patients were treated with multi-level facet osteotomies and interbody fusion using expandable cages followed by percutaneous screw fixation. Percutaneous iliac screws were placed bilaterally using the obturator outlet view to target the ischial body. Results. All patients were successfully instrumented without conversion to an open technique. Mean operative time was 302 minutes and the mean blood loss was 480 cc, with no intraoperative complications. A total of 20 screws were placed successfully as judged by CT scanning to confirm no bony violations. Complications included: two asymptomatic medial breaches at T10 and L5, and one patient requiring delayed epidural hematoma evacuation. Conclusions. Percutaneous iliac screws can be placed safely in patients with ASD. This MIS technique allows for successful caudal anchoring to stress-shield the sacrum and L5-S1 fusion site in long-segment constructs.

  9. Biplanar fixation of acromio-clavicular joint dislocation associated with coracoid process fracture: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radwan G. Metwaly

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acromioclavicular (AC joint injury associated with coracoid process (CP fracture is a rare injury and only case reports had been published in the literature. Although AC joint injury is not uncommon, there is controversy as regard the best stabilization method whether to use wires, hook plate, arthroscopic reconstruction or the recently described techniques of anatomic restoration of both the coracoclavicular (CC and acromioclavicular (AC ligaments to add stability in both the vertical as well as the horizontal plane for the AC joint. Isolated CP fracture rarely necessitates surgical intervention; but in association with AC joint injury; a controversy as regard best management, surgical approach, technique of stabilization and implant used is present due to paucity of literature. Patient and method: A 36 years old manual worker who sustained a combined injury of AC joint (grade III and CP comminuted base fracture had been treated surgically in our hospital using a biplanar fixation technique; blind 4 mm cannulated screw for the CP fracture and anatomic reconstruction of the AC ligament using FibreTape (Arthrex, Naples, FL; to add stability in both the vertical and horizontal plane. Follow up was done for one year. Results: After completion of rehabilitation program, patient could return to work with no shoulder pain in ten weeks postoperatively. Till the last follow up there was no evidence of loss of reduction or shoulder pain with a Constant score of 86. Conclusion: Our technique in combined AC joint and CP fracture, address both injuries to add biplanar AC joint stability allowing accelerated rehabilitation and avoids metal hardware complications. Keywords: Acromioclavicular, Coracoid process, Anatomic reconstruction, And horizontal stability

  10. Comparing fixation used for calcaneal displacement osteotomies: a look at removal rates and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Douglas E; Simpson, G Alex; Philbin, Terrence M

    2015-02-01

    The calcaneal displacement osteotomy is a procedure frequently used by foot and ankle surgeons for hindfoot angular deformity. Traditional techniques use compression screw fixation that can result in prominent hardware. While the results of the procedure are generally good, a common concern is the development of plantar heel pain related to prominent hardware. The primary purpose of this study is to retrospectively compare clinical outcomes of 2 fixation methods for the osteotomy. Secondarily a cost analysis will compare implant costs to hardware removal costs. Records were reviewed for patients who had undergone a calcaneal displacement osteotomy fixated with either lag screw or a locked lateral compression plate (LLCP). Neuropathy, previous ipsilateral calcaneus surgery, heel pad trauma, or incomplete radiographic follow-up were exclusionary. Thirty-two patients (19.4%) required hardware removal from the screw fixation group compared to 1 (1.6%) of the LLCP group, which is significant (P cost was remarkably different with screw fixation costing on average $247.12, compared to the LLCP costing $1175.59. Although the LLCP cost was significantly higher, cost savings were identified when the cost of removal and removal rates were included. This study demonstrates that this device provides adequate stabilization for healing in equivalent time to screw fixation. The LLCP required decreased rates of hardware removal with fewer postoperative visits over a shorter period of time. Significant savings were demonstrated in the LLCP group despite the higher implant cost. Therapeutic, Level III, Retrospective Comparative Study. © 2014 The Author(s).

  11. Biomechanical Comparison of 3 Inferiorly Directed Versus 3 Superiorly Directed Locking Screws on Stability in a 3-Part Proximal Humerus Fracture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, David M; Santoni, Brandon G; Stoops, T Kyle; Tanner, Gregory; Diaz, Miguel A; Mighell, Mark

    2018-06-01

    To quantify the stability of 3 points of inferiorly directed versus 3 points of superiorly directed locking screw fixation compared with the full contingent of 6 points of locked screw fixation in the treatment of a 3-part proximal humerus fracture. A standardized 3-part fracture was created in 10 matched pairs (experimental groups) and 10 nonmatched humeri (control group). Osteosynthesis was performed using 3 locking screws in the superior hemisphere of the humeral head (suspension), 3 locking screws in the inferior hemisphere (buttress), or the full complement of 6 locking screws (control). Specimens were tested in varus cantilever bending (7.5 Nm) to 10,000 cycles or failure. Construct survival (%) and the cycles to failure were compared. Seven of 10 controls survived the 10,000-cycle runout (70%: 8193 average cycles to failure). No experimental constructs survived the 10,000-cycle runout. Suspension and buttress screw groups failed an average of 331 and 516 cycles, respectively (P = 1.00). The average number of cycles to failure and the number of humeri surviving the 10,000-cycle runout were greater in the control group than in the experimental groups (P ≤ 0.006). Data support the use of a full contingent of 6 points of locking screw fixation over 3 superior or 3 inferior points of fixation in the treatment of a 3-part proximal humerus fracture with a locking construct. No biomechanical advantage to the 3 buttress or 3 suspension screws used in isolation was observed.

  12. Accuracy of percutaneous pedicle screws for thoracic and lumbar spine fractures compared with open technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Igor; Panero, Irene; Cepeda, Santiago; Castaño-Leon, Ana M; Jimenez-Roldan, Luis; Perez-Nuñez, Ángel; Alén, Jose A; Lagares, Alfonso

    2018-06-14

    This study aimed to compare the accuracy of screw placement between open pedicle screw fixation and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (MIS) for the treatment of thoracolumbar spine fractures (TSF). Forty-nine patients with acute TSF who were treated with transpedicular screw fixation from January 2013 to December 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into Open and MIS groups. Laminectomy was performed in either group if needed. The accuracy of the screw placement, the evolution of the Cobb sagital angle postoperatively and at 12-month follow up and the neurological status were recorded. AO type of fracture and TLICS score were also recorded. Mean age was 42 years old. Mean TLICS score was 6,29 and 5,96 for open and MIS groups respectively. Twenty five MIS and 24 open surgeries were performed, and 350 (175 in each group) screws were inserted (7,14 per patient). Twenty-four and 13 screws were considered ̈out ̈ in the open and MIS groups respectively (Odds ratio 1,98. 0,97-4,03 p=0,056). The Cobb sagittal angle went from 13,3o to 4,5o and from 14,9o to 8,2o in the Open and MIS groups respectively (both popen and MIS groups respectively. No neurological worsening was observed. For the treatment of acute thoracolumbar fractures, the MIS technique seems to achieve similar results to the open technique in relation to neurological improvement and deformity correction, while placing the screws more accurately.

  13. A novel cannulation technique for difficult urethral catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kaynar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To propose a novel cannulation technique for difficult urethral catheterization procedures. Technique: The sheath tip of an intravenous catheter is cut off, replaced to the needle tip and pushed through the distal drainage side hole to Foley catheter tip, and finally withdrawn for cannulation. In situations making urethral catheterization difficult, a guide wire is placed under direct vision. The modified Foley catheter is slid successfully over the guide wire from its distal end throughout the urethral passage into the bladder. Results: The modified Foley catheter was used successfully in our clinic in cases requiring difficult urethral catheterization. Conclusions: This easy and rapid modification of a Foley catheter may minimize the potential complications of blind catheter placement in standard catheterization.

  14. Should in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans biodegradable or metallic fixation devices be used? A comparative study in goat knees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Diederick B.; Bos, Rudolf R. M.; van Horn, Jim R.; van Luyn, Marja J. A.

    Most of the metallic devices have to be removed, treating osteochondritis dissecans lesions. This animal study describes the biological and mechanical behavior of screws and pins, made of commercially available PGA/PLA and PLA96 and metallic screws and pins, used for fragment fixation. A sham

  15. The use of blocking screws with internal lengthening nail and reverse rule of thumb for blocking screws in limb lengthening and deformity correction surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, Saravanaraja; Rozbruch, S Robert; Fragomen, Austin T

    2016-11-01

    Internal lengthening nail (ILN) is a recent development in limb lengthening and deformity correction specialty. The ILN has the distinct advantage of combining acute deformity correction with gradual lengthening of bone. While using ILN, the short metaphyseal bone fragment may develop a deformity at the time of osteotomy and nail insertion or during bone lengthening because of the wide medullary canal. These deformities are typically predictable, and blocking screws (Poller screws) are helpful in these situations. This manuscript describes the common deformities that occur in femur and tibia with osteotomies at different locations while using ILN in antegrade and retrograde nailing technique. Also, a systematic approach to the appropriate use of blocking screws in these deformities is described. In addition, the "reverse rule of thumb" is introduced as a quick reference to determine the ideal location(s) and number of blocking screws. These principles are applicable to limb lengthening and deformity correction as well as fracture fixation using intramedullary nails.

  16. [Development of polyaxial locking plate screw system of sacroiliac joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weijie; Xie, Xuesong; Zhou, Shuping; Zhang, Yonghu

    2014-09-01

    To develop an instrument for sacroiliac joint fixation with less injury and less complications. Firstly, 18 adult pelvic specimens (8 males and 10 females) were used to measure the anatomical data related to the locking plates and locking screws on the sacrum and ilium, and the polyaxial locking plate screw system of the sacroiliac joint was designed according to the anatomic data. This system was made of medical titanium alloy. Then 4 adult male plevic specimens were harvested and the experiment was divided into 3 groups: group A (normal pelvic), group B (the dislocated sacroiliac joint fixed with sacroiliac screws), and group C (the dislocated sacroiliac joint fixed with polyaxial locking plate screw system). The vertical displacement of sacroiliac joint under the condition of 0-700 N vertical load and the horizontal displacement on angle under the condition of 0-12 N·m torsional load were compared among the 3 groups by using the biological material test system. Finally, the simulated application test was performed on 1 adult male cadaveric specimen to observe soft tissue injury and the position of the locking plate and screw by X-ray films. According to the anatomic data of the sacrum and ilium, the polyaxial locking plate screw system of the sacroiliac joint was designed. The biomechanical results showed that the vertical displacement of the sacroiliac joint under the condition of 0-700 N vertical load in group A was significantly bigger than that in group B and group C (P 0.05). The horizontal displacement on angle under the condition of 0-12 N·m torsional load in group A was significantly less than that in group B and group C (P 0.05). The test of simulating application showed that the specimen suffered less soft tissue injury, and this instrument could be implanted precisely and safely. The polyaxial locking plate screw system of the sacroiliac joint has the advantages of smaller volume and less injury; polyaxial fixation enables flexible adjustment screw

  17. Surgical treatment of degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases with expandable screws in patients with osteoporosis: 2-year follow-up clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Roperto, Raffaelino; Fiore, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle screw instrumentation of the osteoporotic spine carries an increased risk of screw loosening, pullout, and fixation failure. A variety of techniques have been used clinically to improve pedicle screw fixation in the presence of compromised bone. Pedicle screws may be augmented with cement, but this may lead to cement leakage and result in disastrous consequences. To avoid these complications, a multiaxial expandable pedicle screw has been developed. This was a prospective, single-center study designed to evaluate the clinical results of patients with osteoporosis with traumatic and degenerative spinal diseases treated with expandable pedicle screws. METHODS Thirty-three patients (mean age 61.4 years) with osteoporosis and traumatic or degenerative spinal diseases underwent spinal posterior fixation with expandable screws. Preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire scores were obtained. The immediate postoperative screw position was measured and compared with the final position on lateral plain radiographs and axial CT scans at the 1- and 2-year follow-up examinations. RESULTS A total of 182 pedicle screws were used, including 174 expandable and 8 regular screws. The mean preoperative patient VAS score improved from 8.2 to 3.6 after surgery. The mean ODI score improved from 83.7% before surgery to 29.7% after the operation and to 36.1% at the final follow-up. No screw migration had occurred at the 1-year follow-up, but 1 screw breakage/migration was visualized on spinal radiography at the 2-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study show that the multiaxial expandable pedicle screw is a safe and practical technique for patients with osteoporosis and various spinal diseases and adds a valuable tool to the armamentarium of spinal instrumentation.

  18. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with rendezvous cannulation reduces pancreatic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swahn, Fredrik; Regnér, Sara; Enochsson, Lars; Lundell, Lars; Permert, Johan; Nilsson, Magnus; Thorlacius, Henrik; Arnelo, Urban

    2013-09-28

    To examine whether rendezvous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is associated with less pancreatic damage, measured as leakage of proenzymes, than conventional ERCP. Patients (n = 122) with symptomatic gallstone disease, intact papilla and no ongoing inflammation, were prospectively enrolled in this case-control designed study. Eighty-one patients were subjected to laparoscopic cholecystectomy and if intraoperative cholangiography suggested common bile duct stones (CBDS), rendezvous ERCP was performed intraoperatively (n = 40). Patients with a negative cholangiogram constituted the control group (n = 41). Another 41 patients with CBDS, not subjected to surgery, underwent conventional ERCP. Pancreatic proenzymes, procarboxypeptidase B and trypsinogen-2 levels in plasma, were analysed at 0, 4, 8 and 24 h. The proenzymes were determined in-house with a double-antibody enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Pancreatic amylase was measured by an enzymatic colourimetric modular analyser with the manufacturer's reagents. All samples were blinded at analysis. Post ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) occurred in 3/41 (7%) of the patients cannulated with conventional ERCP and none in the rendezvous group. Increased serum levels indicating pancreatic leakage were significantly higher in the conventional ERCP group compared with the rendezvous ERCP group regarding pancreatic amylase levels in the 4- and 8-h samples (P = 0.0015; P = 0.03), procarboxypeptidase B in the 4- and 8-h samples (P rendezvous cannulation technique compared with patients that underwent cholecystectomy alone (control group). Post procedural concentrations of pancreatic amylase and procarboxypeptidase B were significantly correlated with pancreatic duct cannulation and opacification. Rendezvous ERCP reduces pancreatic enzyme leakage compared with conventional ERCP cannulation technique. Thus, laparo-endoscopic technique can be recommended with the ambition to minimise the risk for post ERCP

  19. When do anterior external or internal fixators provide additional stability in an unstable (Tile C) pelvic fracture? A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, E; Theologis, A A; Horst, P; Kandemir, U; Pekmezci, M

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the additional stability that is provided by anterior external and internal fixators in an unstable pelvic fracture model (OTA 61-C). An unstable pelvic fracture (OTA 61-C) was created in 27 synthetic pelves by making a 5-mm gap through the sacral foramina (posterior injury) and an ipsilateral pubic rami fracture (anterior injury). The posterior injury was fixed with either a single iliosacral (IS) screw, a single trans-iliac, trans-sacral (TS) screw, or two iliosacral screws (S1S2). Two anterior fixation techniques were utilized: external fixation (Ex-Fix) and supra-acetabular external fixation and internal fixation (In-Fix); supra-acetabular pedicle screws connected with a single subcutaneous spinal rod. The specimens were tested using a nondestructive single-leg stance model. Peak-to-peak (P2P) displacement and rotation and conditioning displacement (CD) were calculated. The Ex-Fix group failed in 83.3 % of specimens with concomitant single-level posterior fixation (Total: 15/18-7 of 9 IS fixation, 8 of 9 TS fixation), and 0 % (0/9) of specimens with concomitant two-level (S1S2) posterior fixation. All specimens with the In-Fix survived testing except for two specimens treated with In-Fix combined with IS fixation. Trans-sacral fixation had higher pubic rotation and greater sacral and pubic displacement than S1S2 (p < 0.05). Rotation of the pubis and sacrum was not different between In-Fix constructs combined with single-level IS and TS fixation. In this model of an unstable pelvic fracture (OTA 61-C), anterior fixation with an In-Fix was biomechanically superior to an anterior Ex-Fix in the setting of single-level posterior fixation. There was no biomechanical difference between the In-Fix and Ex-Fix when each was combined with two levels of posterior sacral fixation.

  20. Developing renal nurses' buttonhole cannulation skills using e-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Ian R; Mannix, Trudi; Sinclair, Peter M

    2014-03-01

    It has previously been shown that nurses can learn clinical nursing skills by e-learning (online), and that many variables will influence how well nurses adopt learned clinical skills using distance education. This study aimed to identify and measure the strength of those factors which would simultaneously influence registered nurses' (RNs') beliefs about their own learning about buttonhole cannulation, using e-learning. An online Likert style survey consisting of a list of statements related to knowledge and skill domains considered crucial in the area of buttonhole cannulation was distributed to 101 RNs before and after completing an e-learning programme. Participants were required to identify their current level of self-confidence in relationship to each of the statements. Measures of RNs' self-rated abilities to assess and implement buttonhole cannulation after completing a related e-learning program were tested using a Partial Least Squares Analysis (PLS-PATH) programme. The study's results strongly identify that the nurses' ability to meet both clinical and educational outcomes of the renal e-learning module can be predicted by six variables, none of which are directly related to the participants' demographic or clinical backgrounds. These findings support the use of e-learning to teach clinical skills to RNs, and demonstrate the value of Partial Least Squares Analysis in determining influential learning factors. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  1. Biomechanical analysis of titanium fixation plates and screws in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    maxillofacial surgery for the treatment of certain mandibular discrepancies. .... model is built up, in similar way to building block construction, from a number of finite .... torsion on the condyle, and less risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury.

  2. Relative strength of tailor's bunion osteotomies and fixation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddon, Todd B; LaPointe, Stephan J

    2013-01-01

    A paucity of data is available on the mechanical strength of fifth metatarsal osteotomies. The present study was designed to provide that information. Five osteotomies were mechanically tested to failure using a materials testing machine and compared with an intact fifth metatarsal using a hollow saw bone model with a sample size of 10 for each construct. The osteotomies tested were the distal reverse chevron fixated with a Kirschner wire, the long plantar reverse chevron osteotomy fixated with 2 screws, a mid-diaphyseal sagittal plane osteotomy fixated with 2 screws, the mid-diaphyseal sagittal plane osteotomy fixated with 2 screws, and an additional cerclage wire and a transverse closing wedge osteotomy fixated with a box wire technique. Analysis of variance was performed, resulting in a statistically significant difference among the data at p chevron was statistically the strongest construct at 130 N, followed by the long plantar osteotomy at 78 N. The chevron compared well with the control at 114 N, and they both fractured at the proximal model to fixture interface. The other osteotomies were statistically and significantly weaker than both the chevron and the long plantar constructs, with no statistically significant difference among them at 36, 39, and 48 N. In conclusion, the chevron osteotomy was superior in strength to the sagittal and transverse plane osteotomies and similar in strength and failure to the intact model. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The biomechanical consequences of rod reduction on pedicle screws: should it be avoided?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Haines; Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A; Gaume, Rachel E; Ambati, Divya V; Dmitriev, Anton E

    2013-11-01

    Rod contouring is frequently required to allow for appropriate alignment of pedicle screw-rod constructs. When residual mismatch is still present, a rod persuasion device is often used to achieve further rod reduction. Despite its popularity and widespread use, the biomechanical consequences of this technique have not been evaluated. To evaluate the biomechanical fixation strength of pedicle screws after attempted reduction of a rod-pedicle screw mismatch using a rod persuasion device. Fifteen 3-level, human cadaveric thoracic specimens were prepared and scanned for bone mineral density. Osteoporotic (n=6) and normal (n=9) specimens were instrumented with 5.0-mm-diameter pedicle screws; for each pair of comparison level tested, the bilateral screws were equal in length, and the screw length was determined by the thoracic level and size of the vertebra (35 to 45 mm). Titanium 5.5-mm rods were contoured and secured to the pedicle screws at the proximal and distal levels. For the middle segment, the rod on the right side was intentionally contoured to create a 5-mm residual gap between the inner bushing of the pedicle screw and the rod. A rod persuasion device was then used to engage the setscrew. The left side served as a control with perfect screw/rod alignment. After 30 minutes, constructs were disassembled and vertebrae individually potted. The implants were pulled in-line with the screw axis with peak pullout strength (POS) measured in Newton (N). For the proximal and distal segments, pedicle screws on the right side were taken out and reinserted through the same trajectory to simulate screw depth adjustment as an alternative to rod reduction. Pedicle screws reduced to the rod generated a 48% lower mean POS (495±379 N) relative to the controls (954±237 N) (p.05). In circumstances where a rod is not fully seated within the pedicle screw, the use of a rod persuasion device decreases the overall POS and work energy to failure of the screw or results in outright

  4. Clinical results and functional outcomes after direct intralaminar screw repair of spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menga, Emmanuel N; Kebaish, Khaled M; Jain, Amit; Carrino, John A; Sponseller, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Prospective analysis. Our objective was to analyze clinical and functional results of patients with spondylolysis treated via direct intralaminar screw fixation and autograft, a minimally invasive and motion-preserving surgery. Spondylolysis is usually treated nonoperatively; multiple surgical techniques are available when nonoperative measures fail. No studies evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes and their correlation with pars defect size and disc morphology on magnetic resonance imaging. We reviewed patients with spondylolysis treated with intralaminar screw fixation and bone grafting from 2000 through 2010. Of the 31 patients (mean age, 16 yr; range, 10-37 yr), 25 (81%) were competitive athletes. Preoperative computed tomographic scans were used to measure the pars defect size, and preoperative magnetic resonance images were graded using Pfirrmann classification for correlation with postoperative outcomes. Student t test was used for analysis (significance, P spondylolysis repair for persistent pain starting 18 months after intralaminar screw fixation, 2 patients sustained unilateral intralaminar screw fractures at L5, and 1 patient required irrigation and debridement for a superficial postoperative infection. There was no correlation among preoperative magnetic resonance imaging disc morphology, defect size on computed tomography, patient age, and clinical outcomes. Direct repair of spondylolysis with intralaminar screws offers a low profile, reliable treatment with good functional outcome and a low complication rate in active patients. 4.

  5. Endoscopic treatment for pancreatic diseases: Needle-knife-guided cannulation via the minor papilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Gong, Biao; Jiang, Wei-Song; Liu, Lei; Bielike, Kouken; Xv, Bin; Wu, Yun-Lin

    2015-05-21

    To determine the efficacy and safety of meticulous cannulation by needle-knife. Three needle-knife procedures were used to facilitate cannulation in cases when standard cannulation techniques failed. A total of 104 cannulations via the minor papilla attempted in 74 patients at our center between January 2008 and June 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Standard methods were successful in 79 cannulations. Of the 25 cannulations that could not be performed by standard methods, 19 were performed by needle-knife, while 17 (89.5%) were successful. Needle-knife use improved the success rate of cannulation [76.0%, 79/104 vs 92.3%, (79 + 17)/104; P = 0.001]. When the 6 cases not appropriate for needle-knife cannulation were excluded, the success rate was improved further (80.6%, 79/98 vs 98.0%, 96/98; P = 0.000). There were no significant differences in the rates of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography adverse events between the group using standard methods alone and the group using needle-knife after failure of standard methods (4.7% vs 10.5%, P = 0.301). The needle-knife procedure may be an alternative method for improving the success rate of cannulation via the minor papilla, particularly when standard cannulation has failed.

  6. Point-of-Care Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Cannulation of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Make it Simple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hong Joon; Lee, Jun Wan; Joo, Ki Hyuk; You, Yeon Ho; Ryu, Seung; Lee, Jin Woong; Kim, Seung Whan

    2017-12-30

    Cannulation of the great vessels is required for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Currently, there is no guideline for optimal imaging modalities during percutaneous cannulation of ECMO. The purpose of this study was to describe percutaneous cannulation guided by point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) for ECMO and compare it with fluoroscopy and landmark guidance. Three groups (POCUS-, fluoroscopy-, and landmark-guided) of percutaneous cannulation for ECMO were analyzed retrospectively in a tertiary academic hospital. In the POCUS-guided group, visual confirmation of guidewire and cannula by ultrasound in both the access and return cannula were essential for successful cannulation. Fluoroscopy- and landmark-guided groups were cannulated with the conventional technique. A total of 128 patients were treated by ECMO during the study period, of which 94 (73.4%) cases were venoarterial ECMO. This included 56 cases of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Also, there were 30 (23.4%) cases of venovenous ECMO and 4 (3.1%) cases of venoarteriovenous ECMO. A total of 71 (55.5%) patients were cannulated under POCUS guidance, and 43 (33.6%) patients were cannulated under fluoroscopy guidance and 14 (10.9%) patients were cannulated by landmark guidance. No surgical cut downs were required. Misplacement of cannula occurred in 3 (2.3%) cases. All three occurred in the landmark-guided group. POCUS-guided cannulation is comparable to fluoroscopy-guided cannulation in terms of avoiding cannula misplacement. In our experience, POCUS-guided cannulation is a useful strategy over fluoroscopy- and landmark-guided cannulation during peripheral ECMO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Management and follow up of tibial plateau fractures by ′T′ clamp external fixator and limited internal fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimmegowda M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tibial plateau fractures are difficult to treat especially when soft tissue is compromised by open reduction and internal fixation. Many methods have be1en tried in the past to manage these cases of which external fixation were shown to be effective as they limit the soft tissue and wound complications. Methods: Complex tibial plateau fractures of sixteen patients were treated by closed reduction, fixation of articular fragments by screws and application of unilateral external fixator. The external fixator was kept in place till fracture united clinically and radiologically. The patients were followed up for at least one year to assess the function of the knee joint Results: The average duration of external fixation was 13 weeks. All the fractures healed. Pin track infection (five patients and instability (six patients of the knee were encountered with this procedure. The average duration of follow up was 62 weeks. The mean range of motion was 1250 arc. The IOWA knee score averaged 90.3 points. Conclusions: External fixation with limited internal fixation may be effective in the management of complex tibial plateau fractures which requires further support from studies with large sample size. ′T′ clamp external fixation with limited Internal fixation is the procedure of choice when alignment, stability, early mobilisation is required in a soft tissue compromised tibial plateau fractures.

  8. Positioning device for screwing or unscrewing screw nut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevelinge, G.

    1987-01-01

    This automatic positioning device for screwing or unscrewing a screw nut on a closure stud has a drawed socket and means for axially centre and angularly by wedge the socket on the closure stud and generate a continuous spiral between the socket and the closure stud [fr

  9. A Pitfall in Fixation of Distal Humeral Fractures with Pre-Contoured Locking Compression Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Jayakumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anatomically precontoured locking plates are intended to facilitate the fixation of articular fractures and particularly those associated with osteoporosis. Fractures of the distal humerus are relatively uncommon injuries where operative intervention can be exceptionally challenging. The distal humeral trochlea provides a very narrow anatomical window through which to pass a fixed-angle locking screw, which must also avoid the olecranon, coronoid, and radial fossae. We describe 3 patients (ages 27, 49, and 73 years with a bicolumnar fracture of the distal humerus where very short distal locking screws were used. Intra-articular screw placement was avoided but loss of fixation occurred in two patients and a third was treated with a prolonged period of immobilization. We postulate that fixed-angle screw trajectories may make it difficult for the surgeon to place screws of adequate length in this anatomically confined region, and may lead to insufficient distal fixation. Surgical tactics should include placement of as many screws as possible into the distal fragment, as long as possible, and that each screw pass through a plate without necessarily locking in.

  10. Anterior fixation of the axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynelis, Vincent C; Fontes, Ricardo B V

    2010-09-01

    Although anterior fixation of the axis is not commonly performed, plate fixation of C2 is an important technique for treating select upper cervical traumatic injuries and is also useful in the surgical management of spondylosis. To report the technique and outcomes of C2 anterior plate fixation for a series of patients in which the majority presented with symptomatic degenerative spondylosis. Forty-six consecutive patients underwent single or multilevel fusions over a 7-year period; 30 of these had advanced degenerative disease manifested by myelopathy or deformity. Exposure was achieved with rostral extension of the standard anterior cervical exposure via careful soft tissue dissection, mobilization of the superior thyroid artery, and the use of a table-mounted retractor. It was not necessary to remove the submandibular gland, section the digastric muscle, or make additional skin incisions. Screws were placed an average of 4.6 mm (+/- 2.3 mm) from the inferior C2 endplate with a mean sagittal trajectory of 15.7 degrees (+/- 7.6 degrees). Short- and long-term procedure-related mortality was 4.4%, and perioperative morbidity was 8.9%. Patients remained intubated an average of 2.5 days following surgery. Dysphagia was initially reported by 15.2% of patients but resolved by the 8th postoperative week in all patients. Arthrodesis was achieved in all patients available for long-term follow-up. Multilevel fusions were not associated with longer hospitalization or morbidity. Anterior plate fixation of the axis for degenerative disease can be accomplished with acceptable morbidity employing an extension of the standard anterolateral route.

  11. A clinical evaluation of alternative fixation techniques for medial malleolus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Hayley; Cannada, Lisa K; Watson, J Tracy

    2014-09-01

    Medial malleolus fractures have traditionally been managed using partially threaded screws and/or Kirschner wire fixation. Using these conventional techniques, a non-union rate of as high as 20% has been reported. In addition too many patients complaining of prominent hardware as a source of pain post-fixation. This study was designed to assess the outcomes of medial malleolar fixation using a headless compression screw in terms of union rate, the need for hardware removal, and pain over the hardware site. Saint Louis University and Mercy Medical Center, Level 1 Trauma Centers, St. Louis, MO. After IRB approval, we used billing records to identify all patients with ankle fractures involving the medial malleolus. Medical records and radiographs were reviewed to identify patients with medial malleolar fractures treated with headless compression screw fixation. Our inclusion criteria included follow-up until full weight bearing and a healed fracture. Follow-up clinical records and radiographs were reviewed to determine union, complication rate and perception of pain over the site of medial malleolus fixation. Sixty-four ankles were fixed via headless compression screws and 44 had adequate follow-up for additional evaluation. Seven patients had isolated medial malleolar fractures, 23 patients had bimalleolar fractures, and 14 patients had trimalleolar fractures. One patient (2%) required hardware removal due to cellulitis. One patient (2%) had a delayed union, which healed without additional intervention. Ten patients (23%) reported mild discomfort to palpation over the medial malleolus. The median follow-up was 35 weeks (range: 12-208 weeks). There were no screw removals for painful hardware and no cases of non-union. Headless compression screws provide effective compression of medial malleolus fractures and result in good clinical outcomes. The headless compression screw is a beneficial alternative to the conventional methods of medial malleolus fixation. Copyright

  12. Complications of syndesmotic screw removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Schepers (Tim); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); M.R. de Vries (Mark); M. van der Elst (Maarten)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Currently, the metallic syndesmotic screw is the gold standard in the treatment of syndesmotic disruption. Whether or not this screw needs to be removed remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to determine the complications which occur following routine removal of

  13. Frictional performance of ball screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Katuhiro; Takafuji, Kazuki

    1985-01-01

    As feed screws, ball screws have become to be adopted in place of trapezoidal threads. The structure of ball screws is complex, but those are the indispensable component of NC machine tools and machining centers, and are frequently used for industrial robots. As the problems in the operation of ball screws, there are damage, life and the performance related to friction. As to the damage and life, though there is the problem of the load distribution on balls, the results of the research on rolling bearings are applied. The friction of ball screws consists of the friction of balls and a spiral groove, the friction of a ball and a ball, the friction in a ball-circulating mechanism and the viscous friction of lubricating oil. It was decided to synthetically examine the frictional performance of ball screws, such as driving torque, the variation of driving torque, efficiency, the formation of oil film and so on, under the working condition of wide range, using the screws with different accuracy and the nuts of various circuit number. The experimental setup and the processing of the experimental data, the driving performance of ball screws and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. Application of an expandable pedicle screw in the severe osteoporotic spine: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zi-xiang; Cui, Geng; Lei, Wei; Fan, Yong; Wan, Shi-yong; Ma, Zhen-sheng; Sang, Hong-xun

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the clinical abstract and radiographic outcome of multi-axial expandable pedicle screws (MEPS) in patients with osteoporosis. One hundred and twenty-five consecutive patients received MEPS from the UPASS spinal fixation system to obtain thoracolumbar or lumbosacral stabilization. All patients underwent bone mineral density (BMD) scans. The indications for use of the MEPS were spinal diseases with severe osteoporosis (degenerative diseases 46 cases, compression fractures 28 cases, lumbar tuberculosis 27 cases and revision spine surgery 24 cases). The pre-operative and three months post-operative functional evaluations were graded with JOA and VAS scoring system. One week, six months and 12 months after surgery, plain film and three-dimensional CT scans were obtained to evaluate the spinal fusion and fixation effectiveness of MEPS. The mean follow-up period was 18 months (ranged from 6 to 33 months). All patients suffered from severely osteoporosis with a decrease of 25.3% in BMD. The pre-operative JOA and VAS scores were 11.3±3.0 and 6.7±1.8 mm, respectively. Three months after operation, the JOA and VAS scores were 25.2±2.0 and 2.3±1.7 mm. The recovery rate was 78.1±11.5% and the clinical results were satisfying. There were no instances of screw loosening or pullout of the MEPS and the screw-bone interface was excellent. The radiographic results showed that bone healing, both around the screws and inter-vertebral, was achieved. In osteoporosis spine surgery, excellent bone-screw interface and fixation strength can be achieved by using MEPS. MEPS are a novel approach to increase the pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic and revision spine surgeries.

  15. Closed External Fixation for Failing or Failed Femoral Shaft Plating in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbar, Adil; Witwit, Ibrahim; Al-Algawy, Alaa A Hussein

    2017-08-01

    Femoral shaft fractures are one of the common injuries that is treated by open reduction, with internal fixation by plate and screws or intramedullary nailing, which can achieve a high union rate. To evaluate the outcome of using closed external fixation to augment a failing plate; with signs of screw loosening and increasing bone/plate gap; a failed plate; broken plate; screws completely out of bone with redisplacement of fracture. A retrospective study on 18 patients, aged between 17-42 years, who presented between 6-18 weeks after initial surgical fixation, with pain, difficulty in limb function, deformity and abnormal movement at fracture site, was done. X-Rays showed plating failure with acceptable amount of callus, which unfortunately had refractured. Cases associated with infection and no radiological evidence of callus formation were excluded from this study. Closed reduction was done by manipulation, then fracture fixation by AO external fixator. The patients were encouraged for full weight bearing as early as possible with dynamization later on. Of the 18 patients who underwent external fixation after close reduction, 15 cases showed bone healing in a period between 11-18 weeks (mean of 14.27 weeks) with good alignment (Radiologically). Removal of external fixator was done followed by physical therapy thereafter. Closed external fixation for treatment of failing or failed femoral plating, achieves good success rate and has less complications, is a short time procedure, especially in a hospital with limited resources.

  16. Topical amethocaine (Ametop) is superior to EMLA for intravenous cannulation. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: A eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) is commonly used to provide topical anesthesia for intravenous (i.v.) cannulation. One of its side effects is vasoconstriction, which may render cannulation more difficult. A gel formulation of amethocaine (Ametop) is now commercially available. The aim of this study was to compare EMLA and Ametop with regard to the degree of topical anesthesia afforded, the incidence of vasoconstriction and the ease of i.v. cannulation. METHODS: Thirty two ASA I adult volunteers had a #16 gauge i.v. cannula inserted on two separate occasions using EMLA and Ametop applied in a double blind fashion for topical anesthesia. Parameters that were recorded after each cannulation included visual analogue pain scores (VAPS), the presence of vasoconstriction and the ease of cannulation, graded as: 1 = easy, 2 = moderately difficult, 3 = difficult and 4 = failed. RESULTS: The mean VAPS +\\/- SD after cannulation with Ametop M was 12+\\/-9.9 and with EMLA was 25.3+\\/-16.6 (P = 0.002). Vasoconstriction occurred after EMLA application on 17 occasions and twice after Ametop (P = 0.001). The grade of difficulty of cannulation was 1.44+\\/-0.88 following EMLA and 1.06+\\/-0.25 with Ametop (P = 0.023). CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous cannulation was less painful following application of Ametop than EMLA. In addition, Ametop caused less vasoconstriction and facilitated easier cannulation. Its use as a topical anesthetic agent is recommended, especially when i.v. access may be problematic.

  17. What influences pre-hospital cannulation intentions in paramedics? An application of the theory of reasoned action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Smita C; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Iqbal, Mohammad

    2011-02-01

    Intravenous cannulation is a common and important intervention undertaken by paramedics for administration of fluids and drugs in the pre-hospital setting. This study was a partial application of the theory of reasoned action to the prediction of pre-hospital cannulation intentions as part of an evaluation of an educational intervention to change cannulation behaviour in paramedics in line with national guidance. In 2008 a self-completion questionnaire was sent to paramedics from Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire divisions of East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust, UK. This included measures of prior behaviour related to cannulation, attitude towards cannulation, normative influence related to cannulation and intention to cannulate as well as demographic information. Of the 323 paramedics sent questionnaires 137 (42.2%) responded. Attitude towards cannulation (but not normative or peer influence) was a necessary factor for prediction of intention to cannulate in respondents. Past cannulation behaviour was indirectly related to intention to cannulate through the mediation of attitude towards cannulation. The theory of reasoned action provides a parsimonious way to predict intentions to cannulate. This study suggests that design and evaluation of interventions to reduce inappropriate cannulation should be targeted towards changing attitudes of paramedics, rather than towards addressing behavioural norms. Future research could utilize social-psychological theories to better understand clinical behaviour prior to implementation of complex educational or organizational interventions. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. The feasibility of inserting a C1 pedicle screw in patients with ponticulus posticus: a retrospective analysis of eleven patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Liang; Huang, Da-Geng; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhu, Jin-Wen; Li, Yi-Bing; He, Bao-Rong; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Ponticulus posticus is a common anatomic variation that can be mistaken for a broad posterior arch during C1 pedicle screw placement. When the atlas lateral mass screws are placed via the posterior arch, injury to the vertebral artery may result. To our knowledge, there are few clinical studies that have analyzed the feasibility of C1 pedicle screw fixation in patients with ponticulus posticus, in clinical practice. To evaluate the feasibility of inserting a C1 pedicle screw in patients with ponticulus posticus. Between January 2008 and January 2012, 11 consecutive patients with atlantoaxial instability, and with a ponticulus posticus at C1, underwent posterior fusion surgery in our institution. According to preoperative computed tomography (CT) reconstruction, a complete ponticulus posticus was found unilaterally in nine patients and bilaterally in two. Postoperative CT reconstructive imaging was performed to assess whether C1 pedicle screw placement was successful. Patients were followed up at regular intervals and evaluated for symptoms of ponticulus posticus syndrome. Thirteen C1 pedicles (atlas vertebral artery groove), each with a complete ponticulus posticus, were successfully inserted with thirteen 3.5- or 4.0-mm diameter pedicle screws, without resection of the bony anomaly. No intraoperative complications (venous plexus, vertebral artery, or spinal cord injury) occurred. The mean follow-up period was 21 (range 14-30) months. Postoperative CT reconstructive images showed that all 13 pedicle screws were inserted in the C1 pedicles without destruction of the atlas pedicle cortical bone. In the follow-up period, none of the patients demonstrated clinical symptoms of ponticulus posticus syndrome or developed bone fusion. Three-dimensional CT imaging should be considered prior to C1 pedicle screw fixation in patients with ponticulus posticus, to avoid mistaking the ponticulus posticus for a widened dorsal arch of the atlas. If there is no ponticulus posticus

  19. Comparative study of two materials for dynamic hip screw during fall and gait loading: titanium alloy and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Nooshin S; Blicblau, Aaron S; Singh, Manmohan

    2011-11-01

    Internal fixation with dynamic hip screw is a choice of treatment for hip fractures to stabilize a femoral fracture. Choosing the proper implant and its material has a great effect on the healing process and failure prevention. The purpose of this analysis was to assess biomechanical behavior of dynamic hip screw with two different materials implanted in the femur during fall and gait. A 3D finite element model of an intact femur and a 3D implant within the same femur were developed. A finite element analysis was carried out to establish the effect of load conditions and implant material properties on biomechanical behavior of the dynamic hip screw after internal fixation. Two load configurations are chosen: one simulating the stance phase of the normal gait cycle, and the other replicating a low-energy fall. The implanted femur was investigated with two different materials for the dynamic hip screw: stainless steel and titanium alloy. During stance, more stress is placed on the implanted femur compared with the intact femur. During a fall, the implanted femur is in a greater state of stress, which mostly occurs inside the dynamic hip screw. Titanium alloy decreases stress levels by an average of 40% compared with stainless steel. However, deformation is slightly reduced with a stainless steel dynamic hip screw during both load cases. After internal fixation, dynamic hip screw generates greater stresses within the implanted femur compared with the intact femur under the same loading conditions. A titanium alloy implant appears to undergo less stress from a low-energy fall compared with stainless steel and can be considered the preferred implant material. The critical parts of the dynamic hip screw are the forth distal screw and the plate.

  20. In elective arch surgery with circulatory arrest, does the arterial cannulation site really matter? A propensity score analysis of right axillary and innominate artery cannulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preventza, Ourania; Price, Matt D; Spiliotopoulos, Konstantinos; Amarasekara, Hiruni S; Cornwell, Lorraine D; Omer, Shuab; de la Cruz, Kim I; Zhang, Qianzi; Green, Susan Y; LeMaire, Scott A; Rosengart, Todd K; Coselli, Joseph S

    2018-05-01

    The preferred arterial cannulation site for elective proximal aortic procedures requiring circulatory arrest varies, and different sites have been tried. We evaluated the relationships between arterial cannulation site and adverse outcomes, including stroke, in patients undergoing elective aortic arch surgery. We reviewed the records of 938 patients who underwent elective hemiarch or total arch surgery with circulatory arrest between 2006 and 2016. Five cannulation sites were used: the right axillary (n = 515; 54.9%), innominate (n = 376; 40.1%), and right common carotid arteries (n = 15; 1.6%), each with a side graft; the ascending aorta (n = 19; 2.0%); and the femoral artery (n = 13; 1.4%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to model the effects of cannulation site on adverse outcomes for the entire cohort and for a subcohort of 891 patients who underwent innominate or axillary artery cannulation. Propensity-matching yielded 564 patients (282 pairs) from the right axillary and innominate artery groups. For the entire cohort, mortality, stroke, and composite adverse outcome (operative death or persistent stroke or renal failure at hospital discharge) rates were 7.0%, 4.1%, and 9.8%. In the multivariable analysis of the axillary/innominate subcohort, cannulation site did not independently predict operative mortality, persistent stroke, or composite adverse event. These results were confirmed with the propensity-matched analysis, where both axillary and innominate artery cannulation provided equivalent composite adverse event rates, operative death rates, and overall stroke rates. During elective arch surgery, right axillary artery cannulation and innominate artery cannulation (both via a side graft) produce excellent results and can be used interchangeably. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel free-hand T1 pedicle screw method: Review of 44 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Rivkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary of Background Data: Multilevel posterior cervical instrumented fusions are becoming more prevalent in current practice. Biomechanical characteristics of the cervicothoracic junction may necessitate extending the construct to upper thoracic segments. However, fixation in upper thoracic spine can be technically demanding owing to transitional anatomy while suboptimal placement facilitates vascular and neurologic complications. Thoracic instrumentation methods include free-hand, fluoroscopic guidance, and CT-based image guidance. However, fluoroscopy of upper thoracic spine is challenging secondary to vertebral geometry and patient positioning, while image-guided systems present substantial financial commitment and are not readily available at most centers. Additionally, imaging modalities increase radiation exposure to the patient and surgeon while potentially lengthening surgical time. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of 44 consecutive patients undergoing a cervicothoracic fusion by a single surgeon using the novel free-hand T1 pedicle screw technique between June 2009 and November 2012. A starting point medial and cephalad to classic entry as well as new trajectory were utilized. No imaging modalities were employed during screw insertion. Postoperative CT scans were obtained on day 1. Screw accuracy was independently evaluated according to the Heary classification. Results: In total, 87 pedicle screws placed were at T1. Grade 1 placement occurred in 72 (82.8% screws, Grade 2 in 4 (4.6% screws and Grade 3 in 9 (10.3% screws. All Grade 2 and 3 breaches were <2 mm except one Grade 3 screw breaching 2-4 mm laterally. Only two screws (2.3% were noted to be Grade 4, both breaching medially by less than 2 mm. No new neurological deficits or returns to operating room took place postoperatively. Conclusions: This modification of the traditional starting point and trajectory at T1 is safe and effective. It attenuates additional bone

  2. [Effectiveness comparison of flexible fixation and rigid fixation in treatment of ankle pronation-external rotation fractures with distal tibiofibular syndesmosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuewei; Zhang, Minghui; Li, Xiaorong; Chen, Xiaoyong; Deng, Jianlong

    2017-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of flexible fixation and rigid fixation in the treatment of ankle pronation-external rotation fractures with distal tibiofibular syndesmosis. A retrospective analysis was made on the clinical data of 50 patients with ankle pronation-external rotation fractures and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis treated between January 2013 and December 2015. Suture-button fixation was used in 23 patients (flexible fixation group) and cortical screw fixation in 27 patients (rigid fixation group). There was no significant difference in age, gender, weight, side, fracture type, and time from trauma to surgery between 2 groups ( P >0.05). The operation time, medial clear space (MCS), tibiofibular clear space (TFCS), tibiofibular overlap (TFO), American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, and Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) score were compared between 2 groups. The operation time was (83.0±9.1) minutes in the flexible fixation group and was (79.6±13.1) minutes in the rigid fixation group, showing no significant difference ( t =1.052, P =0.265). All patients achieved healing of incision by first intention. The patients were followed up 12-20 months (mean, 14 months). The X-ray films showed good healing of fracture in 2 groups. There was no screw fracture, delayed union or nounion. The fracture healing time was (12.1±2.5) months in the flexible fixation group and was (11.3±3.2) months in the rigid fixation group, showing no significant difference between 2 groups ( t =1.024, P =0.192). Reduction loss occurred after removal of screw in 2 cases of the rigid fixation group. At last follow-up, there was no significant difference in MCS, TFCS, TFO, AOFAS score and FADI score between 2 groups ( P >0.05). Suture-button fixation has similar effectiveness to screw fixation in ankle function and imaging findings, and flexible fixation has lower risk of reduction loss of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis than rigid fixation.

  3. Biomechanical properties of a novel biodegradable magnesium-based interference screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ezechieli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-based interference screws may be an alternative in anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The well-known osteoconductive effects of biodegradable magnesium alloys may be useful. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a magnesium based interference screw and compare it to a standard implant. A MgYREZr-alloy interference screw and a standard implant (Milagro®; De Puy Mitek, Raynham, MA, USA were used for graft fixation. Specimens were placed into a tensile loading fixation of a servohydraulic testing machine. Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning of the constructs at 20 N for 1 min following cyclic pretensioning of 20 cycles between 20 and 60 N. Biomechanical elongation was evaluated with cyclic loading of 1000 cycles between 50 and 200 N at 0.5 Hz. Maximum load to failure was 511.3±66.5 N for the Milagro® screw and 529.0±63.3 N for magnesium-based screw (ns, P=0.57. Elongations after preload, during cyclical loading and during failure load were not different between the groups (ns, P>0.05. Stiffness was 121.1±13.8 N/mm for the magnesiumbased screw and 144.1±18.4 for the Milagro® screw (ns, P=0.32. MgYREZr alloy interference screws show comparable results in biomechanical testing to standard implants and may be an alternative for anterior cruciate reconstruction in the future.

  4. MORPHOMETRY OF THE PEDICLE OF FIRST SACRAL VERTEBRAE AND ITS APPLICATION IN POSTERIOR TRANSPEDICULAR SCREW FIXATION. Morfometría del pedículo de la primera vértebra sacra y su aplicación en la fijación posterior con tornillo transpedicular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangala M Pai

    2016-03-01

    were 27.2±4.0 mms and 23.9±3.7 mms for the male and female respectively. The anteroposterior width of S1 pedicle was 7.5± 1.3 mms, 7.5± 1.7 mms in males and females respectively. The anteroposterior distances of S1, from the sacral promontory to the spinous process of S1 were 52.9± 5.2 mms and 50.4± 6.8 mms respectively for the male and female genders. The present study observed that the mean S1 pedicle length and the cephalocaudal height were higher (p<0.05 for the males than that of females. The data (male vs female were not found statistically different (p>0.05, with respect to the anteroposterior width of the S1 pedicle and the anteroposterior distances of S1 from the sacral promontory to the spinous process of S1. The present study has provided important morphometric data onto the pedicle of the first sacral vertebrae, from the anatomical samples of the South Indian population. The knowledge of pedicle diameters of S1 is crucial to the safe placement of screws in the posterior transpedicular screw fixation.

  5. Factors influencing success of cement versus screw-retained implant restorations: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Manawar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: As more and more dental practitioners are focusing on implant-supported fixed restorations, some clinicians favor the use of cement retained restorations while others consider screw retained prosthesis to be the best choice. Discussion: In screw-retained restorations, the fastening screw provides a solid joint between the restoration and the implant abutment, while in cement-retained prostheses the restorative screw is eliminated to enhance esthetics, occlusal stability, and passive fit of the restorations. The factors that influence the type of fixation of the prostheses to the implants like passivity of the framework, ease of fabrication, occlusion, esthetics, accessibility, retention and retrievability are discussed in this article with scientific studies demonstrating superior outcomes of one technique over another. Screwretained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention, retrievability and lack of potentially retained subgingival cement. However, a few disadvantages exist such as precise placement of the implant for optimal and esthetic location of the screw access hole and obtaining passive fit. On the other hand, cement retained restorations eliminate unesthetic screw access holes, have passive fit of castings, reduced complexity of clinical and lab procedures, enhanced esthetics, reduced cost factors and non disrupted morphology of the occlusal table. Conclusion: This article compares the advantages, potential disadvantages and limitations of screw and cement retained restorations and their specific implications in the most common clinical situation.

  6. The screw propeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1980-07-01

    Marine and air screw propellers are considered in terms of theoretical hydrodynamics as developed by Joukowsky, Prandtl, and Betz. Attention is given to the flow around wings of finite span where spanwise flow exists and where lift and the bound vorticity must all go smoothly to zero at the wing tips. The concept of a trailing vortex sheet made up of infinitesimal line vortexes roughly aligned with the direction of flight is discussed in this regard. Also considered is induced velocity, which tends to convect the sheet downward at every stage in the roll-up process, the vortex theory of propellers and the Betz-Prandtl circulation distribution. The performance of the Gossamer Albatross and of a pedal-driven biplane called the Chrysalis are also discussed.

  7. Chronic intrathecal cannulation enhances nociceptive responses in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida F.R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of a chronically implanted spinal cannula on the nociceptive response induced by mechanical, chemical or thermal stimuli was evaluated. The hyperalgesia in response to mechanical stimulation induced by carrageenin or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 was significantly increased in cannulated (Cn rats, compared with naive (Nv or sham-operated (Sh rats. Only Cn animals presented an enhanced nociceptive response in the first phase of the formalin test when low doses were used (0.3 and 1%. The withdrawal latency to thermal stimulation of a paw inflamed by carrageenin was significantly reduced in Cn rats but not in Nv or Sh rats. In contrast to Nv and Sh rats, injection in Cn animals of a standard non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin, either intraperitoneally or into the spinal cord via an implanted cannula or by direct puncture of the intrathecal space significantly blocked the intensity of the hyperalgesia induced by PGE2. Cannulated animals treated with indomethacin also showed a significant inhibition of second phase formalin-induced paw flinches. Histopathological analysis of the spinal cord showed an increased frequency of mononuclear inflammatory cells in the Cn groups. Thus, the presence of a chronically implanted cannula seems to cause nociceptive spinal sensitization to mechanical, chemical and thermal stimulation, which can be blocked by indomethacin, thus suggesting that it may result from the spinal release of prostaglandins due to an ongoing mild inflammation.

  8. Intraoperative CT navigation for glenoid component fixation in reverse shoulder arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok S Gavaskar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CT navigation has been shown to improve component positioning in total shoulder arthroplasty. The technique can be useful in achieving strong initial fixation of the metal backed glenoid in reverse shoulder arthroplasty. We report a 61 years male patient who underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty for rotator cuff arthropathy. CT navigation was used intraoperatively to identify best possible glenoid bone and to maximize the depth of the fixation screws that anchor the metaglene portion of the metal backed glenoid component. Satisfactory positioning of screws and component was achieved without any perforation or iatrogenic fracture in the scapula. CT navigation can help in maximizing the purchase of the fixation screws that dictate the initial stability of the glenoid component in reverse shoulder arthroplasty. The technique can be extended to improve glenoid component position [version and tilt] with the availability of appropriate software.

  9. Biomechanical optimization of different fixation modes for a proximal femoral L-osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hsih-Hao

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous proposed surgical techniques have had minimal success in managing greater trochanter overgrowth secondary to retarded growth of the femoral capital epiphysis. For reconstruction of residual hip deformities, a novel type of proximal femur L-osteotomy was performed with satisfactory results. Although the clinical outcome was good, the biomechanical characteristics of the femur after such an osteotomy have not been clearly elucidated. Therefore, this study presents a three dimensional finite element analysis designed to understand the mechanical characteristics of the femur after the L-osteotomy. Methods A patient with left hip dysplasia was recruited as the study model for L-osteotomy. The normal right hip was used as a reference for performing the corrective surgery. Four FEA models were constructed using different numbers of fixation screws but the same osteotomy lengths together with four FEA models with the same number of fixation screws but different osteotomy lengths. The von Mises stress distributions and femoral head displacements were analyzed and compared. Results The results revealed the following: 1. The fixation devices (plate and screws sustained most of the external loading, and the peak value of von Mises stress on the fixation screws decreased with an increasing number of screws. 2. Additional screws are more beneficial on the proximal segment than on the distal segment for improving the stability of the postoperative femur. 3. The extent of osteotomy should be limited because local stress might be concentrated in the femoral neck region with increasing length of the L-osteotomy. Conclusion Additional screw placement on the proximal segment improves stability in the postoperative femur. The cobra-type plate with additional screw holes in the proximal area might improve the effectiveness of L-osteotomies.

  10. Fracture fixation in the operative management of hip fractures (FAITH): an international, multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Nauth, A. (Aaron); Creek, A.T. (Aaron T.); Zellar, A. (Abby); Lawendy, A.-R. (Abdel-Rahman); Dowrick, A. (Adam); Gupta, A. (Ajay); Dadi, A. (Akhil); Kampen, A.; Yee, A. (Albert); Vries, Alexander; de Mol van Otterloo, A. (Alexander); Garibaldi, A. (Alisha); Liew, A. (Allen); McIntyre, A.W. (Allison W.); Prasad, A.S. (Amal Shankar)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground Reoperation rates are high after surgery for hip fractures. We investigated the effect of a sliding hip screw versus cancellous screws on the risk of reoperation and other key outcomes. Methods For this international, multicentre, allocation concealed randomised controlled trial, we enrolled patients aged 50 years or older with a low-energy hip fracture requiring fracture fixation from 81 clinical centres in eight countries. Patients were assigned by minimisation with a...

  11. The pullout performance of pedicle screws

    CERN Document Server

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-01-01

    This brief book systematically discusses all subjects that affect the pullout strength of pedicle screws. These screws are used in spinal surgeries to stabilize the spine. The holding strength of the pedicle screw is vital since loosening of the pedicle screws can cause revision surgeries. Once the pedicle screw is pulled out, it is harder to obtain same stabilization for the fused vertebrae. The book reviews the effect of screw designs, application techniques, cement augmentation, coating of the screw and test conditions on the pullout strength. The studies with finite element analysis were also included.

  12. Usefulness and radiological evaluation of accuracy of innovative "Smart" hand technique for pedicle screw placement: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comert, Ayhan; Dogan, İhsan; Çaglar, Y Sukru

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study is to use a smartphone application during pedicle screw placement navigation and examine the accuracy of this application on anatomical dry vertebrae model. 76 dry vertebrae were used for this study and pedicle entry points, projections of pedicle screw trajectory lines in lateral and superior aspect of vertebral body were identified and drawn for each vertebra bilaterally. In each position, all angulations were measured directly before the procedure manually. 152 pedicle screws were inserted as a simulation of screw placement with the guidance of angle-meter smart app. Accuracy of the method was tested according to the occurrence of bone penetration and angular deviation of the inserted screws was evaluated in computed tomography images. Mean deviation of pedicle screws of 76 pedicle screws in right side in horizontal plane was measured 2.30°±1.78°; in sagittal plane 2.17°±1.57° and in left side in horizontal plane 3.01°±1.83°; in sagittal plane 2.38°±1.68°. No bone penetration was occurred during 152 pedicle screw placements. According to the t-test results, there were significant differences between two groups in craniocaudal direction of the right side pedicle screws and in craniocaudal direction of left side pedicle screws. The free smartphone application presented here as angle-meter can be interpreted as a safe digital device for spinal instrumentation procedures. As a prototype of future pedicle screw fixation systems, it should be improved in terms of its feasibility and compatibility with screw probes. This may lead to apply mobile digital angle meter in spinal procedure.

  13. Pullout characteristics of percutaneous pedicle screws with different cement augmentation methods in elderly spines: An in vitro biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Y P; Pelletier, H; Hydier, P; Schuller, S; Garnon, J; Sauleau, E A; Steib, J-P; Clavert, P

    2015-05-01

    Vertebroplasty prefilling or fenestrated pedicle screw augmentation can be used to enhance pullout resistance in elderly patients. It is not clear which method offers the most reliable fixation strength if axial pullout and a bending moment is applied. The purpose of this study is to validate a new in vitro model aimed to reproduce a cut out mechanism of lumbar pedicle screws, to compare fixation strength in elderly spines with different cement augmentation techniques and to analyze factors that might influence the failure pattern. Six human specimens (82-100 years) were instrumented percutaneously at L2, L3 and L4 by non-augmented screws, vertebroplasty augmentation and fenestrated screws. Cement distribution (2 ml PMMA) was analyzed on CT. Vertebral endplates and the rod were oriented at 45° to the horizontal plane. The vertebral body was held by resin in a cylinder, linked to an unconstrained pivot, on which traction (10 N/s) was applied until rupture. Load-displacement curves were compared to simultaneous video recordings. Median pullout forces were 488.5 N (195-500) for non-augmented screws, 643.5 N (270-1050) for vertebroplasty augmentation and 943.5 N (750-1084) for fenestrated screws. Cement augmentation through fenestrated screws led to significantly higher rupture forces compared to non-augmented screws (P=0.0039). The pullout force after vertebroplasty was variable and linked to cement distribution. A cement bolus around the distal screw tip led to pullout forces similar to non-augmented screws. A proximal cement bolus, as it was observed in fenestrated screws, led to higher pullout resistance. This cement distribution led to vertebral body fractures prior to screw pullout. The experimental setup tended to reproduce a pullout mechanism observed on radiographs, combining axial pullout and a bending moment. Cement augmentation with fenestrated screws increased pullout resistance significantly, whereas the fixation strength with the vertebroplasty

  14. Geothermal ORC Systems Using Large Screw Expanders

    OpenAIRE

    Biederman, Tim R.; Brasz, Joost J.

    2014-01-01

    Geothermal ORC Systems using Large Screw Expanders Tim Biederman Cyrq Energy Abstract This paper describes a low-temperature Organic Rankine Cycle Power Recovery system with a screw expander a derivative of developed of Kaishan's line of screw compressors, as its power unit. The screw expander design is a modified version of its existing refrigeration compressor used on water-cooled chillers. Starting the ORC development program with existing refrigeration screw compre...

  15. Stress analysis of implant-bone fixation at different fracture angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzawati, B.; Daud, R.; Afendi, M.; Majid, MS Abdul; Zain, N. A. M.; Bajuri, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Internal fixation is a mechanism purposed to maintain and protect the reduction of a fracture. Understanding of the fixation stability is necessary to determine parameters influence the mechanical stability and the risk of implant failure. A static structural analysis on a bone fracture fixation was developed to simulate and analyse the biomechanics of a diaphysis shaft fracture with a compression plate and conventional screws. This study aims to determine a critical area of the implant to be fractured based on different implant material and angle of fracture (i.e. 0°, 30° and 45°). Several factors were shown to influence stability to implant after surgical. The stainless steel, (S. S) and Titanium, (Ti) screws experienced the highest stress at 30° fracture angle. The fracture angle had a most significant effect on the conventional screw as compared to the compression plate. The stress was significantly higher in S.S material as compared to Ti material, with concentrated on the 4th screw for all range of fracture angle. It was also noted that the screws closest to the intense concentration stress areas on the compression plate experienced increasing amounts of stress. The highest was observed at the screw thread-head junction.

  16. Pelvic Fixation in Adult and Pediatric Spine Surgery: Historical Perspective, Indications, and Techniques: AAOS Exhibit Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Strike, Sophia A; Menga, Emmanuel N; Sponseller, Paul D; Kebaish, Khaled M

    2015-09-16

    Achieving solid osseous fusion across the lumbosacral junction has historically been, and continues to be, a challenge in spine surgery. Robust pelvic fixation plays an integral role in achieving this goal. The goals of this review are to describe the history of and indications for spinopelvic fixation, examine conventional spinopelvic fixation techniques, and review the newer S2-alar-iliac technique and its outcomes in adult and pediatric patients with spinal deformity. Since the introduction of Harrington rods in the 1960s, spinal instrumentation has evolved substantially. Indications for spinopelvic fixation as a means to achieve lumbosacral arthrodesis include a long arthrodesis (five or more vertebral levels) or use of three-column osteotomies in the lower thoracic or lumbar spine, surgical treatment of high-grade spondylolisthesis, and correction of lumbar deformity and pelvic obliquity. A variety of techniques have been described over the years, including Galveston iliac rods, Jackson intrasacral rods, the Kostuik transiliac bar, iliac screws, and S2-alar-iliac screws. Modern iliac screws and S2-alar-iliac screws are associated with relatively low rates of pseudarthrosis. S2-alar-iliac screws have the advantages of less implant prominence and inline placement with proximal spinal anchors. Collectively, these techniques provide powerful methods for obtaining control of the pelvis in facilitating lumbosacral arthrodesis. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  17. The flying buttress construct for posterior spinopelvic fixation: a technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ooij Bas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Posterior fusion of the spine to the pelvis in paediatric and adult spinal deformity is still challenging. Especially assembling of the posterior rod construct to the iliac screw is considered technically difficult. A variety of spinopelvic fixation techniques have been developed. However, extreme bending of the longitudinal rods or the use of 90-degree lateral offset connectors proved to be difficult, because the angle between the rod and the iliac screw varies from patient to patient. Methods We adopted a new spinopelvic fixation system, in which iliac screws are side-to-side connected to the posterior thoracolumbar rod construct, independent of the angle between the rod and the iliac screw. Open angled parallel connectors are used to connect short iliac rods from the posterior rod construct to the iliac screws at both sides. The construct resembles in form and function an architectural Flying Buttress, or lateral support arches, used in Gothic cathedrals. Results and discussion Three different cases that illustrate the Flying Buttress construct for spinopelvic fixation are reported here with the clinical details, radiographic findings and surgical technique used. Conclusion The Flying Buttress construct may offer an alternative surgical option for spinopelvic fixation in circumstances wherein coronal or sagittal balance cannot be achieved, for example in cases with significant residual pelvic obliquity, or in revision spinal surgery for failed lumbosacral fusion.

  18. The flying buttress construct for posterior spinopelvic fixation: a technical note

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Posterior fusion of the spine to the pelvis in paediatric and adult spinal deformity is still challenging. Especially assembling of the posterior rod construct to the iliac screw is considered technically difficult. A variety of spinopelvic fixation techniques have been developed. However, extreme bending of the longitudinal rods or the use of 90-degree lateral offset connectors proved to be difficult, because the angle between the rod and the iliac screw varies from patient to patient. Methods We adopted a new spinopelvic fixation system, in which iliac screws are side-to-side connected to the posterior thoracolumbar rod construct, independent of the angle between the rod and the iliac screw. Open angled parallel connectors are used to connect short iliac rods from the posterior rod construct to the iliac screws at both sides. The construct resembles in form and function an architectural Flying Buttress, or lateral support arches, used in Gothic cathedrals. Results and discussion Three different cases that illustrate the Flying Buttress construct for spinopelvic fixation are reported here with the clinical details, radiographic findings and surgical technique used. Conclusion The Flying Buttress construct may offer an alternative surgical option for spinopelvic fixation in circumstances wherein coronal or sagittal balance cannot be achieved, for example in cases with significant residual pelvic obliquity, or in revision spinal surgery for failed lumbosacral fusion. PMID:21489256

  19. An in vitro biomechanical comparison of equine proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis techniques: an axial positioned dynamic compression plate and two abaxial transarticular cortical screws inserted in lag fashion versus three parallel transarticular cortical screws inserted in lag fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sod, Gary A; Riggs, Laura M; Mitchell, Colin F; Hubert, Jeremy D; Martin, George S

    2010-01-01

    To compare in vitro monotonic biomechanical properties of an axial 3-hole, 4.5 mm narrow dynamic compression plate (DCP) using 5.5 mm cortical screws in conjunction with 2 abaxial transarticular 5.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion (DCP-TLS) with 3 parallel transarticular 5.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion (3-TLS) for the equine proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint arthrodesis. Paired in vitro biomechanical testing of 2 methods of stabilizing cadaveric adult equine forelimb PIP joints. Cadaveric adult equine forelimbs (n=15 pairs). For each forelimb pair, 1 PIP joint was stabilized with an axial 3-hole narrow DCP (4.5 mm) using 5.5 mm cortical screws in conjunction with 2 abaxial transarticular 5.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion and 1 with 3 parallel transarticular 5.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion. Five matching pairs of constructs were tested in single cycle to failure under axial compression, 5 construct pairs were tested for cyclic fatigue under axial compression, and 5 construct pairs were tested in single cycle to failure under torsional loading. Mean values for each fixation method were compared using a paired t-test within each group with statistical significance set at Pcycle to failure, of the DCP-TLS fixation were significantly greater than those of the 3-TLS fixation. Mean cycles to failure in axial compression of the DCP-TLS fixation was significantly greater than that of the 3-TLS fixation. The DCP-TLS was superior to the 3-TLS in resisting the static overload forces and in resisting cyclic fatigue. The results of this in vitro study may provide information to aid in the selection of a treatment modality for arthrodesis of the equine PIP joint.

  20. Technical note: ruminal cannulation technique in young Holstein calves: effects of cannulation on feed intake, body weight gain, and ruminal development at six weeks of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, N B; Engbaek, M; Vestergaard, M; Harmon, D L

    2010-02-01

    Ruminal cannulation techniques are frequently used to study fermentation in the ruminant forestomach. Unsatisfactory results with the traditionally applied procedure for cannulation of young calves stimulated the development of a simpler and more robust procedure; this procedure was tested for effects on performance traits and gross anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract compared with a control group not undergoing surgery. Five calves were ruminally cannulated at approximately 10 d of age and 5 matching calves were used as controls. All calves were fed milk replacer and a diet based on clover grass silage and sodium hydroxide-treated wheat. Ruminal fluid was collected from cannulated calves once weekly for 3 consecutive weeks. All calves were euthanized at 43+/-3 d of age. No apparent adverse effects of cannulation were observed. Feed intake, BW gain, and gross anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract were not affected by cannulation. Minimum ruminal pH increased with sampling week, but average ruminal pH, total volatile fatty acids concentration, and volatile fatty acids proportions were not affected by sampling week. In conclusion, the implemented surgical technique was found to have no major effect on apparent animal health and performance traits, and the cannula proved useful for multiple samplings of ruminal contents in young calves. Copyright 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. In vitro validation of a novel mechanical model for testing the anchorage capacity of pedicle screws using physiological load application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Christian; Zimmermann, Julia; Graf, Nicolas; Schilling, Christoph; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Kienle, Annette

    2018-01-01

    Biomechanical in vitro tests analysing screw loosening often include high standard deviations caused by high variabilities in bone mineral density and pedicle geometry, whereas standardized mechanical models made of PU foam often do not integrate anatomical or physiological boundary conditions. The purpose of this study was to develop a most realistic mechanical model for the standardized and reproducible testing of pedicle screws regarding the resistance against screw loosening and the holding force as well as to validate this model by in vitro experiments. The novel mechanical testing model represents all anatomical structures of a human vertebra and is consisting of PU foam to simulate cancellous bone, as well as a novel pedicle model made of short carbon fibre filled epoxy. Six monoaxial cannulated pedicle screws (Ø6.5 × 45mm) were tested using the mechanical testing model as well as human vertebra specimens by applying complex physiological cyclic loading (shear, tension, and bending; 5Hz testing frequency; sinusoidal pulsating forces) in a dynamic materials testing machine with stepwise increasing load after each 50.000 cycles (100.0N shear force + 20.0N per step, 51.0N tension force + 10.2N per step, 4.2Nm bending moment + 0.8Nm per step) until screw loosening was detected. The pedicle screw head was fixed on a firmly clamped rod while the load was applied in the vertebral body. For the in vitro experiments, six human lumbar vertebrae (L1-3, BMD 75.4 ± 4.0mg/cc HA, pedicle width 9.8 ± 0.6mm) were tested after implanting pedicle screws under X-ray control. Relative motions of pedicle screw, specimen fixture, and rod fixture were detected using an optical motion tracking system. Translational motions of the mechanical testing model experiments in the point of load introduction (0.9-2.2mm at 240N shear force) were reproducible within the variation range of the in vitro experiments (0.6-3.5mm at 240N shear force). Screw loosening occurred continuously in

  2. Modified rendezvous intrahepatic bile duct cannulation technique to pass a PTBD catheter in ERCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Park, Sang-Heum; Lee, Sae Hwan; Lee, Chang-Kyun; Lee, Suck-Ho; Chung, Il-Kwun; Kim, Hong Soo; Kim, Sun-Joo

    2010-11-14

    The rendezvous procedure combines an endoscopic technique with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). When a selective common bile duct cannulation fails, PTBD allows successful drainage and retrograde access for subsequent rendezvous techniques. Traditionally, rendezvous procedures such as the PTBD-assisted over-the-wire cannulation method, or the parallel cannulation technique, may be available when a bile duct cannot be selectively cannulated. When selective intrahepatic bile duct (IHD) cannulation fails, this modified rendezvous technique may be a feasible alternative. We report the case of a modified rendezvous technique, in which the guidewire was retrogradely passed into the IHD through the C2 catheter after end-to-end contact between the tips of the sphincterotome and the C2 catheter at the ampulla's orifice, in a 39-year-old man who had been diagnosed with gallbladder carcinoma with a metastatic right IHD obstruction. Clinically this procedure may be a feasible and timesaving technique.

  3. Investigating uterine disease in the bitch: uterine cannulation for cytology, microbiology and hysteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, J R; Wright, P J

    1995-05-01

    A technique for transcervical cannulation of the uterus of the bitch for the collection of samples for cytology and microbiology was developed. This technique involved passing a cannula into the uterus with the aid of an endoscope. The uterus was cannulated successfully in mature bitches (over 10 kg) 110 times in 144 attempts. Success of cannulation was influenced by the experience of the operator and ease of cannulation by the stage of the reproductive cycle, the size of the bitch and the type of cannula. Complications associated with the procedure were endometritis, vaginitis and vaginal tears. Uterine cannulation was generally possible in all bitches studied at all stages of the reproductive cycle. Techniques for the collection of samples from the uterus for cytology and microbiology and for the processing of samples for uterine cytology are outlined. Hysteroscopy was performed on seven occasions in post partum bitches and was found to be possible at least until day 17 after whelping.

  4. Difficult cannulation as defined by a prospective study of the Scandinavian Association for Digestive Endoscopy (SADE) in 907 ERCPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halttunen, Jorma; Meisner, Søren; Aabakken, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The definition of a "difficult" cannulation varies considerably in reports of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). AIMS: To define a difficult cannulation, which translates into higher risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Prospective consecutive reco...

  5. Internal fixation of mandibular angle fractures: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Eran; Shiff, Jacob S; Kiss, Alex; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    The degree of rigidity of internal fixation required for the treatment of mandibular angle fractures has long been at the center of debate in the literature. A statistical comparison between rigid fixation and monocortical fixation has been difficult because of multiple terms, definitions, and technical variations. The purpose of this study was to use the meta-analysis tool to combine information from multiple studies and to compare complication rates for different fixation methods. An English language literature search was conducted for articles on mandibular angle fractures. Information was collected on four variables of interest: compression/noncompression technique, monocortical/bicortical screws, number of plates, and location of plates. Five outcome rates were analyzed: infection, reoperation, hardware removal, malunion, and nonunion. Meta-analyses were run using Comprehensive Meta Analysis, version 2.2.03. Twenty-four studies with relevant data on the variables and outcomes of interest met the inclusion criteria. Significantly higher rates of infection, reoperation, and hardware removal were found for compression compared with noncompression, two plates compared with one plate, and for plates located on both the inferior and superior borders as compared with superior or inferior only. There were also significantly higher infection rates for bicortical screws compared with monocortical screws and higher malunion rates for compression compared with noncompression plating techniques. The results of this meta-analysis found lower complication rates with the use of noncompression, monocortical, and single-plate fixation, supporting the trend toward a single, superiorly placed, monocortical miniplate for fixation of mandibular angle fractures.

  6. Current trends in pedicle screw stimulation techniques: lumbosacral, thoracic, and cervical levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isley, Michael R; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Leppanen, Ronald E

    2012-06-01

    Unequivocally, pedicle screw instrumentation has evolved as a primary construct for the treatment of both common and complex spinal disorders. However an inevitable and potentially major complication associated with this type of surgery is misplacement of a pedicle screw(s) which may result in neural and vascular complications, as well as impair the biomechanical stability of the spinal instrumentation resulting in loss of fixation. In light of these potential surgical complications, critical reviews of outcome data for treatment of chronic, low-back pain using pedicle screw instrumentation concluded that "pedicle screw fixation improves radiographically demonstrated fusion rates;" however the expense and complication rates for such constructs are considerable in light of the clinical benefit (Resnick et al. 2005a). Currently, neuromonitoring using free-run and evoked (triggered) electromyography (EMG) is widely used and advocated for safer and more accurate placement of pedicle screws during open instrumentation procedures, and more recently, guiding percutaneous placement (minimally invasive) where the pedicle cannot be easily inspected visually. The latter technique, evoked or triggered EMG when applied to pedicle screw instrumentation surgeries, has been referred to as the pedicle screw stimulation technique. As concluded in the Position Statement by the American Society of Neurophysiological Monitoring (ASNM), multimodality neuromonitoring using free-run EMG and the pedicle screw stimulation technique was considered a practice option and not yet a standard of care (Leppanen 2005). Subsequently, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons (AANS/CNS) Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves published their "Guidelines for the Performance of Fusion Procedures for Degenerative Disease of the Lumbar Spine" (Heary 2005, Resnick et al. 2005a, Resnick et al. 2005b). It was concluded that the "primary

  7. Evaluation of the syndesmotic-only fixation for Weber-C ankle fractures with syndesmotic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, R; Syed, S; Metikala, S; Ali, Sa

    2011-09-01

    With the length of the fibula restored and the syndesmosis reduced anatomically, internal fixation using a plating device may not be necessary for supra-syndesmotic fibular fractures combined with diastasis of inferior tibio-fibular joint. A retrospective observational study was performed in patients who had this injury pattern treated with syndesmosis-only fixation. 12 patients who had Weber type-C injury pattern were treated with syndesmosis only fixation. The treatment plan was followed only if the fibular length could be restored and if the syndesmosis could be anatomically reduced. Through a percutaneous or mini-open reduction and clamp stabilization of the syndesmosis, all but one patient had a single tricortical screw fixation across the syndesmosis. Patients were kept non-weight-bearing for 6 weeks, followed by screw removal at an average of 8 weeks. Outcomes were assessed using an objective ankle scoring system (Olerud and Molander scale) and by radiographic assessment of the ankle mortise. At a mean follow-up of 13 months, the functional outcome score was 75. Excellent to good outcomes were noted in 83% of the patients. Ankle mortise was reduced in all cases, and all but one fibular fracture united without loss of fixation. Six patients had more than one malleolar injury, needing either screw or anchor fixations. One patient had late diastasis after removal of the syndesmotic screw and underwent revision surgery with bone grafting of the fibula. This was probably due to early screw removal, before union of the fibular fracture had occurred. We recommend syndesmosis-only fixation as an effective treatment option for a combination of syndesmosis disruption and Weber type-C lateral malleolar fractures.

  8. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Bo Kyun; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Min Jeong; Jeong, Guk Hyun; Ju, Kyung Won; Shin, Yoo Jin; Kim, Man Yong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access ...

  9. Removal torque of nail interlocking screws is related to screw proximity to the fracture and screw breakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Alexander A; Kubacki, Meghan R; Samona, Jason; Telehowski, Paul; Atkinson, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    Studies have shown that titanium implants can be challenging to explant due to the material's excellent biocompatibility and resulting osseointegration. Clinically, titanium alloy nail interlocking screws may require removal to dynamize a construct or revise the nail due to nonunion, infection, pain, or periprosthetic fracture. This study was designed to determine what variables influence the removal torque for titanium alloy interlocking screws. An intramedullary nail with four interlocking screws was used to stabilize a 1-cm segmental femoral defect in a canine model for 16 weeks. The animals were observed to be active following a several-day recovery after surgery. In six animals, the femora and implanted nail/screws were first tested to failure in torsion to simulate periprosthetic fracture of an implant after which the screws were then removed. In four additional animals, the screws were removed without mechanical testing. Both intraoperative insertional and extraction torques were recorded for all screws. Mechanical testing to failure broke 10/24 screws. On average, the intact screws required 70% of the insertional torque during removal while broken screws only required 16% of the insertional torque (p torque than the outboard distal screw (p torque was ∼80°. The peak axial load did not significantly correlate with the torque required to remove the screws. On average, the removal torque was lower than at the time of insertion, and less torque was required to remove broken screws and screws remote to the fracture. However, broken screws will require additional time to retrieve the remaining screw fragment. This study suggests that broken screws and screws in prematurely active patients will require less torque to remove. © IMechE 2016.

  10. CSF coccidioides complement fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003526.htm CSF coccidioides complement fixation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. CSF coccidioides complement fixation is a test that checks ...

  11. Fixation of zygomatic and mandibular fractures with biodegradable plates

    OpenAIRE

    Degala, Saikrishna; Shetty, Sujeeth; Ramya, S

    2013-01-01

    Context: In this prospective study, 13 randomly selected patients underwent treatment for zygomatic?complex fractures (2 site fractures) and mandibular fractures using 1.5 / 2 / 2.5-mm INION CPS biodegradable plates and screws. Aims: To assess the fixation of zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures with biodegradable copolymer osteosynthesis system. Materials and Methods: In randomly selected 13 patients, zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures were plated using resorbable plates and sc...

  12. Intrascleral IOL Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Soosan

    2017-01-01

    Intrascleral sutureless intraocular lens (IOL) fixation utilizes direct haptic fixation within the sclera in eyes with deficient capsular support. This has advantages of long-term stability, good control of tilt and decentration, and lesser pseudophakodonesis. This review summarizes various techniques for intrascleral haptic fixation, results, complications, adaptations in special situations, modifications of the technique, combination surgeries, and intrascleral capsular bag fixation techniques (glued capsular hook). Copyright 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  13. Stability of biodegradable metal (Mg-Ca-Zn alloy) screws compared with absorbable polymer and titanium screws for sagittal split ramus osteotomy of the mandible using the finite element analysis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Ho; Han, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Yu-Chan; Lee, Jin-Yong; Lee, Bu-Kyu

    2017-10-01

    Mg-Ca-Zn alloy has been suggested for the application of fixation materials during maxillofacial surgery. We investigated the stability of Mg-Ca-Zn alloy for clinical application during orthognathic surgery. The finite element model for the fixation of sagittal split ramus osteotomy was constructed. In the bicortical screw fixation of the mandible setback condition, the stress distributions of Mg-Ca-Za alloy, polylactic acid polymer, and titanium were evaluated using the virtual model with occlusal loading of 132 N. The deformations of the three different materials of fixation screw were observed according to masticatory force ranging from 132 to 1,000 N. When comparing the stress distribution placed on cortical bone between the polymer and magnesium alloy groups, the magnesium alloy screws could bear more stress, thereby decreasing the stress, which might be distributed to other biologic components, such as the condyle and cortical ramus of the mandible. Deformations of the screws according to functional load were minimal, and the deformation remained stability of sagittal split ramus osteotomy setback surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. To evaluate the efficacy of biodegradable plating system for fixation of maxillofacial fractures: A prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Bali, Rishi K.; Sharma, Parveen; Jindal, Shalu; Gaba, Shivani

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of biodegradable plating system for fixation of maxillofacial fractures and to study the morbidity associated with the use of biodegradable plates and screws. Materials and Methods: This prospective study consisted of 10 patients with maxillofacial fractures requiring open reduction and internal fixation. Fractures with infection, comminuted and pathological fractures were excluded. All were plated with biodegradable system (Inio...

  15. Biomechanical properties of patellar and hamstring graft tibial fixation techniques in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: experimental study with roentgen stereometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Frank; Pape, Dietrich; Schiel, Karin; Steimer, Oliver; Kohn, Dieter; Rupp, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Reliable fixation of the soft hamstring grafts in ACL reconstruction has been reported as problematic. The biomechanical properties of patellar tendon (PT) grafts fixed with biodegradable screws (PTBS) are superior compared to quadrupled hamstring grafts fixed with BioScrew (HBS) or Suture-Disc fixation (HSD). Controlled laboratory study with roentgen stereometric analysis (RSA). Ten porcine specimens were prepared for each group. In the PT group, the bone plugs were fixed with a 7 x 25 mm BioScrew. In the hamstring group, four-stranded tendon grafts were anchored within a tibial tunnel of 8 mm diameter either with a 7 x 25 mm BioScrew or eight polyester sutures knotted over a Suture-Disc. The grafts were loaded stepwise, and micromotion of the graft inside the tibial tunnel was measured with RSA. Hamstring grafts failed at lower loads (HBS: 536 N, HSD 445 N) than the PTBS grafts (658 N). Stiffness in the PTBS group was much greater compared to the hamstring groups (3500 N/mm versus HBS = 517 N/mm and HSD = 111 N/mm). Irreversible graft motion after graft loading with 200 N was measured at 0.03 mm (PTBS), 0.38mm (HBS), and 1.85mm (HSD). Elasticity for the HSD fixation was measured at 0.67 mm at 100 N and 1.32 mm at 200 N load. Hamstring graft fixation with BioScrew and Suture-Disc displayed less stiffness and early graft motion compared to PTBS fixation. Screw fixation of tendon grafts is superior to Suture-Disc fixation with linkage material since it offers greater stiffness and less graft motion inside the tibial tunnel. Our results revealed graft motion for hamstring fixation with screw or linkage material at loads that occur during rehabilitation. This, in turn, may lead to graft laxity.

  16. IMF-screws or arch bars as conservative treatment for mandibular condyle fractures: Quality of life aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, B.; van Otterloo, J.J.D.M.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Arch bars as treatment for a fractured mandibular condyle are inconvenient to patients and lead to lowered quality of life (QOL). To overcome these inconveniences, IMF-screws (IMFS) to facilitate intermaxillary fixation during surgery have been developed. The purpose of the present study

  17. IMF-screws or arch bars as conservative treatment for mandibular condyle fractures: quality of life aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, B.; de Mol van Otterloo, J.J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Arch bars as treatment for a fractured mandibular condyle are inconvenient to patients and lead to lowered quality of life (QOL). To overcome these inconveniences, IMF-screws (IMFS) to facilitate intermaxillary fixation during surgery have been developed. The purpose of the present study

  18. Free flap reconstructions of tibial fractures complicated after internal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, H; Kuokkanen, H; Tukiainen, E; Asko-Seljavaara, S

    1995-04-01

    The cases of 15 patients are presented where microvascular soft-tissue reconstructions became necessary after internal fixation of tibial fractures. Primarily, seven of the fractures were closed. Eleven fractures had originally been treated by open reduction and internal fixation using plates and screws, and four by intramedullary nailing. All of the patients suffered from postoperative complications leading to exposure of the bone or fixation material. The internal fixation material was removed and radical revision of dead and infected tissue was carried out in all cases. Soft tissue reconstruction was performed using a free microvascular muscle flap (11 latissimus dorsi, three rectus abdominis, and one gracilis). In eight cases the nonunion of the fracture indicated external fixation. The microvascular reconstruction was successful in all 15 patients. In one case the recurrence of deep infection finally indicated a below-knee amputation. In another case, chronic infection with fistulation recurred postoperatively. After a mean follow-up of 26 months the soft tissue coverage was good in all the remaining 13 cases. All the fractures united. Microvascular free muscle flap reconstruction of the leg is regarded as a reliable method for salvaging legs with large soft-tissue defects or defects in the distal leg. If after internal fixation of the tibial fracture the osteosynthesis material or fracture is exposed, reconstruction of the soft-tissue can successfully be performed by free flap transfer. By radical revision, external fixation, bone grafting, and a free flap the healing of the fracture can be achieved.

  19. Degradation behaviour of LAE442-based plate–screw-systems in an in vitro bone model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, Leonie; Besdo, Silke; Angrisani, Nina; Wriggers, Peter; Hering, Britta; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Reifenrath, Janin

    2015-01-01

    The use of absorbable implant materials for fixation after bone fracture helps to avoid a second surgery for implant removal and the risks and costs involved. Magnesium (Mg) is well known as a potential metallic material for degradable implants. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate if degradable LAE442-based magnesium plate–screw-systems are suitable candidates for osteosynthesis implants in load-bearing bones. The corrosion behaviour was tested concerning the influence of different surface treatments, coatings and screw torques. Steel plates and screws of the same size served as control. Plates without special treatment screwed on up to a specified torque of 15 cNm or 7 cNm, NaOH treated plates (15 cNm), magnesium fluoride coated plates (15 cNm) and steel plates as control (15 cNm) were examined in pH-buffered, temperature-controlled SBF solution for two weeks. The experimental results indicate that the LAE442 plates and screws coated with magnesium fluoride revealed a lower hydrogen evolution in SBF solution as well as a lower weight loss and volume decrease in μ-computed tomography (μCT). The nanoindentation and SEM/EDX measurements at several plate areas showed no significant differences. Summarized, the different screw torques did not affect the corrosion behaviour differently. Also the NaOH treatment seemed to have no essential influence on the degradation kinetics. The plates coated with magnesium fluoride showed a decreased corrosion rate. Hence, it is recommended to consider this coating for the next in vivo study. - Highlights: • Mg-based plate screw systems were examined in an in vitro corrosion setup. • Different screw torques did not affect the corrosion behaviour. • Pretreatment with NaOH showed no increase in corrosion resistance. • Fluoride coating slowed down the corrosion rate of plates. • Fluoride coating might be an alternative for decrease of corrosion rate in vivo

  20. Degradation behaviour of LAE442-based plate–screw-systems in an in vitro bone model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, Leonie [Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany); Besdo, Silke [Institute of Continuum Mechanics, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstraße 11, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Angrisani, Nina [Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany); Wriggers, Peter [Institute of Continuum Mechanics, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstraße 11, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Hering, Britta [Institute of Production Engineering and Machine Tools, Leibniz Universität Hannover, An der Universität 2, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Seitz, Jan-Marten [Institute of Materials Science, Leibniz Universität Hannover, An der Universität 2, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Reifenrath, Janin, E-mail: janin.reifenrath@tiho-hannover.de [Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    The use of absorbable implant materials for fixation after bone fracture helps to avoid a second surgery for implant removal and the risks and costs involved. Magnesium (Mg) is well known as a potential metallic material for degradable implants. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate if degradable LAE442-based magnesium plate–screw-systems are suitable candidates for osteosynthesis implants in load-bearing bones. The corrosion behaviour was tested concerning the influence of different surface treatments, coatings and screw torques. Steel plates and screws of the same size served as control. Plates without special treatment screwed on up to a specified torque of 15 cNm or 7 cNm, NaOH treated plates (15 cNm), magnesium fluoride coated plates (15 cNm) and steel plates as control (15 cNm) were examined in pH-buffered, temperature-controlled SBF solution for two weeks. The experimental results indicate that the LAE442 plates and screws coated with magnesium fluoride revealed a lower hydrogen evolution in SBF solution as well as a lower weight loss and volume decrease in μ-computed tomography (μCT). The nanoindentation and SEM/EDX measurements at several plate areas showed no significant differences. Summarized, the different screw torques did not affect the corrosion behaviour differently. Also the NaOH treatment seemed to have no essential influence on the degradation kinetics. The plates coated with magnesium fluoride showed a decreased corrosion rate. Hence, it is recommended to consider this coating for the next in vivo study. - Highlights: • Mg-based plate screw systems were examined in an in vitro corrosion setup. • Different screw torques did not affect the corrosion behaviour. • Pretreatment with NaOH showed no increase in corrosion resistance. • Fluoride coating slowed down the corrosion rate of plates. • Fluoride coating might be an alternative for decrease of corrosion rate in vivo.

  1. Effectiveness of the Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement Using the Virtual Surgical Training System: A Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yang; Lin, Yanping; Shi, Jiangang; Chen, Huajiang; Yuan, Wen

    2018-03-14

    The virtual simulation surgery has initially exhibited its promising potentials in neurosurgery training. To evaluate effectiveness of the Virtual Surgical Training System (VSTS) on novice residents placing thoracic pedicle screws in a cadaver study. A total of 10 inexperienced residents participated in this study and were randomly assigned to 2 groups. The group using VSTS to learn thoracic pedicle screw fixation was the simulation training (ST) group and the group receiving an introductory teaching session was the control group. Ten fresh adult spine specimens including 6 males and 4 females with a mean age of 58.5 yr (range: 33-72) were collected and randomly allocated to the 2 groups. After exposing anatomic structures of thoracic spine, the bilateral pedicle screw placement of T6-T12 was performed on each cadaver specimen. The postoperative computed tomography scan was performed on each spine specimen, and experienced observers independently reviewed the placement of the pedicle screws to assess the incidence of pedicle breach. The screw penetration rates of the ST group (7.14%) was significantly lower in comparison to the control group (30%, P < .05). Statistically significant difference in acceptable rates of screws also occurred between the ST (100%) and control (92.86%) group (P < .05). In addition, the average screw penetration distance in control group (2.37 mm ± 0.23 mm) was significantly greater than ST group (1.23 mm ± 0.56 mm, P < .05). The virtual reality surgical training of thoracic pedicle screw instrumentation effectively improves surgical performance of novice residents compared to those with traditional teaching method, and can help new beginners to master the surgical technique within shortest period of time.

  2. Graft tendon slippage with metallic and bioabsorbable interference screws under cyclic load: a biomechanical study in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Digiácomo Ocampo Moré

    Full Text Available Introduction The rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is the most common type of knee injury. Reconstructive surgery is the ‘gold standard’ treatment. During the immediate post-operative period, the fixation of the graft is entirely dependent on the ability of the grafted implant to be secured inside the bone tunnel under the cyclical loads associated with daily tasks. Poor fixation can lead to graft slippage, thus impairing the healing and integration of the graft. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical performance of tendon graft fixation devices with metallic and bioabsorbable interference screws. Methods Twenty ACL reconstructions were carried out in porcine tibias using deep flexor tendons to fix 9 × 20 mm metallic (n=10 and PLLA 70/30 bioabsorbable screws (n=10. To verify the ability of a construct to resist immediate postoperative (PO rehabilitation protocols for immediate load bearing, a cyclic loading test was applied with 50-250 N of tensile force at 1 Hz for 1000 cycles, and the displacement was measured at 10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 load cycles to quantify the slippage of the graft during the test. After the cyclic loading test, a single-cycle load-to-failure test was applied. Results The slippage of the graft using metallic screws did not differ (P = 0.616 from that observed when using bioabsorbable screws. Conclusion The results obtained in this experiment indicate that metallic screws may promote a similar amount of graft slippage during low cyclic loading as bioabsorbable screws. Additionally, there was no difference in the biomechanical performance of these two types of screws during high failure loads.

  3. Replacement screws valve operating under Trunnion; Substituicao de parafusos de valvulas Trunnion em regime de operacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Netto, Charles de; Santos, Rogerio Andre Zolin dos; Arnhold, Diego [Companhia de Gas do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul (SULGAS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Jacques, Rodrigo das Neves [Guidotti e Vieira Manutencao Industrial Ltda., Canoas, RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The report shows the process created for the substitution and extraction of bearing screws of the Trunnion valves, in operation. The methodology was developed at the 'Companhia de Gas do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul - SULGAS', with the objective of avoiding failure emergency situations, and or sudden breaking of the screws of fixation of the lid of the inferior bearing of the Trunnion valves. it is a preventive process of substitution of these screws, that after a great period of use in atmospheres with high potential of oxidation present structural failure. The breaking of these components creates a leaking process by the inferior lid of the valves, fact that is intended to be avoided with the application of the technical procedure of this report, guaranteeing the integrity of the valves that are vital components for the continuous operation of the gas pipe line. (author)

  4. [Results of femoral lengthening over an intramedullary nail and external fixator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiewicz, Barbara; Kacki, Wojciech; Tesiorowski, Maciej; Potaczek, Tomasz

    2008-01-01

    Current techniques of operative limb lengthening usually are based on distraction osteogenesis. One of the techniques is limb lengthening over an intramedullary nail. The goal of this study is to evaluate the results of femoral lengthening over an intramedullary nail. Between 1999 and 200619 femoral "over nail" lengthenings were performed. There were 7 males and 12 females. Mean patients' age at surgery was 15.8 years, and mean initial femoral shortening was 5.1 cm. Operative technique consisted of one-stage implantation of intramedullary nail and external fixator. Ilizarov apparatus was used in 9 patients, monolateral fixator in 10 cases--ORTHOFIX in 9 patients, Wagner fixator--in 1 patient. Intramedullary nail was locked proximally with screws or Schanz pins from external fixator. After distraction phase, external fixator was removed and distal locking screws were applied. Evaluation criteria: obtained lengthening, time of external fixator, treatment time, healing index, external fixation index, range of motion in hip and knee joints and complications according to Paley. The mean lengthening was 4.6 cm, and mean distraction time was 66.6 days. Mean time of external fixation was 115.5 days, and external fixation index was 26.2 days for centimeter. Healing index was 36.9 days for centimeter. In cases with monolateral fixator, healing index did not differ with the whole group. During treatment 18 complications occurred, for a rate of 0.9 complication per segment. Lengthening over an intramedullary nail reduces the time of external fixator. Over nail femoral lengthening can prevent axis deviation following regenerate bending. Complication rate is similar to lengthenings with the classic Ilizarov technique. There are no differences in the treatment time in relation to the type of external fixator.

  5. Outcomes of Distal Femur Fracture Treated with Dynamic Condylar Screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razaq, M. N. U.; Muhammad, T.; Ahmed, A.; Adeel, M.; Ahmad, S.; Ahmad, S.; Sultan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Implants for open reduction and internal fixation of distal femoral fracture includes angle blade plate, rush nails, enders nail and interlocking nails. But all these devices are technically demanding and less effective in providing inter-fragmentary compression in osteoporotic bones. These problems can be solved with dynamic condylar screw (DCS).The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of different outcomes of distal femoral fracture treated with dynamic condylar screw Methods: This case series study was carried out in the Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from 1st October 2014 to August 2015, after approval of the ethical committee of the institution. Data of all patients with distal femoral fractures aged 20-70 years, recruited through emergency, OPD or consultant clinic collected on a proforma. Standard treatment of trauma was given to the patients. Detailed history was taken including the past medical and surgical history. Detailed examination including air-way, breathing and circulation, general physical examination and abdomino-pelvic examination was done in each patient. Investigations including urinalysis, haemoglobin percent, full blood count, X-ray (both AP and lateral view) of the involved femur (including hip and knee) was done. Results: Mean age of the patients was 43.18±14.647 ranging from 20 to 70 years. Mean duration of hospital stay in days was 2.21±1.111 ranging from 1 to 6 days. Patients follow-up assessment after 4 months of surgery for union of femoral fracture treated with dynamic condylar screw was found in 96 (94.1 percent), wound infection was found in 7 (6.9 percent), knee stiffness was found in 21 (20.6 percent) and limb shortening was found in 7 (6.9 percent). Conclusion: Dynamic condylar screw is an easy, scientifically less difficult and satisfying method of treatment for fractures of femur. (author)

  6. Enteral fluid therapy through nasogastric tube in rumen cannulated goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Atoji-Henrique

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effects of fluid therapy in goats through nasogastric route with an electrolyte solution composed by concentrations of sodium, potassium and chloride similar to goat plasma (140mmol/L of Na+, 4.5mmol/L of K+, 110mmol/L of Cl-. Four Alpine Chamoisee goats, two of them with evident leakage of the rumen cannulas, were used in a crossover experimental design of two periods and two groups. In one group the two goats were submitted to a treatment protocol to induce dehydration before the fluid therapy, whereas the other group was not. Fluid therapy consisted supplying 10mL/kg/h of the electrolyte solution during 8 hours. No signs of discomfort or stress were observed. The dehydration model employed caused a mild dehydration indicated by decrease in feces humidity, body weight and abdominal circumference, and increase in plasma total solids concentration. During fluid therapy globular volume and plasma total solids decreased, whereas % body weight and abdominal circumference increased. No signs of hyperhydration were observed and serum electrolytes (Na+, Cl-, K+ presented no significant alterations in both groups. Fluid therapy proposed in this study was efficient to treat dehydration, even for rumen cannulated animals with evident leakage, and can be administrated safely with no electrolyte imbalance.

  7. [Growth and deformity after in situ fixation of slipped capital femoral epiphysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druschel, C; Placzek, R; Funk, J F

    2013-08-01

    For mild to moderate slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) in situ fixation is the current treatment standard. However, concerning the implant selection (screw versus k-wires) as well as the prophylactic stabilisation of the non-affected hip, controversies still exist. The aim of this study was to analyse femoral residual growth and femoral deformities after in situ fixation of SCFE either with k-wires or screws. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the radiographs of adolescents treated for SCFE in our department between 01/2003 and 02/2011. To evaluate femoral growth the articulo-trochanteric distance, centro-trochanteric distance, caput-collum-diaphyseal angle, pin-joint ratio and pin-physis ratio were determined. The femoral deformity was assessed by measuring the sphericity of the femoral head. Degenerative changes were evaluated in the final radiographs. Statistical analysis was performed concerning differences between therapeutically and prophylactically treated hips as well as stabilisations with k-wires and screws. A total of 22 patients (female : male = 14 : 8, mean age girls: 11 ± 1 years, boys: 13 ± 2 years) with 26 slipped capital femoral epiphyses was analysed. K-wires were used for fixation in 4 hips each therapeutically and prophylactically, 22 hips with SCFE and 14 non-affected hips were stabilised with screws. Treatment with screws did not lead to significantly earlier physeal closure than k-wire pinning. Regarding the femoral growth parameters a significant decrease in the articulo-trochanteric distance and CCD angle was detectable in all groups. The pin-joint ratio revealed an adequate residual growth in 58 % of the therapeutically and in 72 % of the prophylactically treated hips without significant difference between k-wires and screws. The pin-physis ratio demonstrated similar values. Regarding the femoral deformity the SCFE hips resulted in a significantly reduced sphericity, which remained unchanged during follow-up. The

  8. Effects of a transmitted light device for pediatric peripheral venipuncture and intravenous cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamazaki S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Shinya Yamazaki1, Shu Tomita1, Masahiro Watanabe1, Hiroyoshi Kawaai1, Kazuhiro Shimamura2 1Department of Dental Anesthesiology; 2Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Ohu University Dental Hospital, Koriyama City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan Abstract: Pediatric peripheral venipuncture and intravenous cannulation are difficult. However, successful venipuncture and intravenous cannulation are absolutely required for pediatric clinical risk management. This study assessed the success rate of venipuncture and intravenous cannulation when transmitted light was applied to the pediatric dorsum manus. The subjects included 100 young children who were scheduled for dental treatment or oral surgery under general anesthesia. Anesthesia was induced, and insertion of an intravenous catheter into the dorsum manus was attempted with or without using transmitted light. The patients were evaluated to determine whether the venipuncture was successful, and whether the intravenous cannulation of the external catheter was successful. The success rate of venipuncture was 100% when transmitted light was used, and 83% when the transmitted light was not used (P = 0.000016. In addition, the success rate of intravenous cannulation was 88% when transmitted light was used, and 55% when the transmitted light was not used (P = 0.0000002. The shape of the vein in the dorsum manus can be clearly recognized when transmitted light is used. The use of light significantly increased the success rate of intravenous cannulation, because it allowed direct confirmation of the direction to push the intravenous catheter forward. The use of transmitted light allows for more successful venipuncture and intravenous cannulation in young children. Keywords: transmitted light, pediatric peripheral venipuncture, pediatric peripheral intravenous cannulation

  9. Successful fifth metatarsal bulk autograft reconstruction of thermal necrosis post intramedullary fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veljkovic, Andrea; Le, Vu; Escudero, Mario; Salat, Peter; Wing, Kevin; Penner, Murray; Younger, Alastair

    2018-03-21

    Reamed intramedullary (IM) screw fixation for proximal fifth metatarsal fractures is technically challenging with potentially devastating complications if basic principles are not followed. A case of an iatrogenic fourth-degree burn after elective reamed IM screw fixation of a proximal fifth metatarsal fracture in a high-level athlete is reported. The case was complicated by postoperative osteomyelitis with third-degree soft-tissue defect. This was successfully treated with staged autologous bone graft reconstruction, tendon reconstruction, and local bi-pedicle flap coverage. The patient returned to competitive-level sports, avoiding the need for fifth ray amputation. Critical points of the IM screw technique and definitive reconstruction are discussed. Bulk autograft reconstruction is a safe and effective alternative to ray amputation in segmental defects of the fifth metatarsal.Level of evidence V.

  10. 3D printing-assisted preoperative plan of pedicle screw placement for middle-upper thoracic trauma: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Zhang, Xuming; Ke, Tie; Cai, Hongru; Gao, Xiang

    2017-08-11

    This study aimed to evaluate the application of 3D printing in assisting preoperative plan of pedicle screw placement for treating middle-upper thoracic trauma. A preoperative plan was implemented in seven patients suffering from middle-upper thoracic (T3-T7) trauma between March 2013 and February 2016. In the 3D printing models, entry points of 56 pedicle screws (Magerl method) and 4 important parameters of the pedicle screws were measured, including optimal diameter (ϕ, mm), length (L, mm), inclined angle (α), head-tilting angle (+β), and tail-tilting angle (-β). In the surgery, bare-hands fixation of pedicle screws was performed using 3D printing models and the measured parameters as guidance. A total of seven patients were enrolled, including five men and two women, with the age of 21-62 years (mean age of 37.7 years). The position of the pedicle screw was evaluated postoperatively using a computerized tomography scan. Totally, 56 pedicle screws were placed, including 33 pieces of level 0, 18 pieces of level 1, 4 pieces of level 2 (pierced lateral wall), and 1 piece of level 3 (pierced lateral wall, no adverse consequences), with a fine rate of 91.0%. 3D printing technique is an intuitive and effective assistive technology to pedicle screw fixation for treating middle-upper thoracic vertebrae, which improve the accuracy of bare-hands screw placement and reduce empirical errors. The trial was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Fujian Provincial Hospital. It was registered on March 1st, 2013, and the registration number was K2013-03-001.

  11. In vitro and in vivo evaluations of nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66/glass fibre (n-HA/PA66/GF as a novel bioactive bone screw.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Su

    Full Text Available In this study, we prepared nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66/glass fibre (n-HA/PA66/GF bioactive bone screws. The microstructure, morphology and coating of the screws were characterised, and the adhesion, proliferation and viability of MC3T3-E1 cells on n-HA/PA66/GF scaffolds were determined using scanning electron microscope, CCK-8 assays and cellular immunofluorescence analysis. The results confirmed that n-HA/PA66/GF scaffolds were biocompatible and had no negative effect on MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro. To investigate the in vivo biocompatibility, internal fixation properties and osteogenesis of the bioactive screws, both n-HA/PA66/GF screws and metallic screws were used to repair intercondylar femur fractures in dogs. General photography, CT examination, micro-CT examination, histological staining and biomechanical assays were performed at 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks after operation. The n-HA/PA66/GF screws exhibited good biocompatibility, high mechanical strength and extensive osteogenesis in the host bone. Moreover, 24 weeks after implantation, the maximum push-out load of the bioactive screws was greater than that of the metallic screws. As shown by their good cytocompatibility, excellent biomechanical strength and fast formation and ingrowth of new bone, n-HA/PA66/GF screws are thus suitable for orthopaedic clinical applications.

  12. Biomechanical in vitro assessment of screw augmentation in locked plating of proximal humerus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röderer, Götz; Scola, Alexander; Schmölz, Werner; Gebhard, Florian; Windolf, Markus; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina

    2013-10-01

    Proximal humerus fracture fixation can be difficult because of osteoporosis making it difficult to achieve stable implant anchorage in the weak bone stock even when using locking plates. This may cause implant failure requiring revision surgery. Cement augmentation has, in principle, been shown to improve stability. The aim of this study was to investigate whether augmentation of particular screws of a locking plate aimed at a region of low bone quality is effective in improving stability in a proximal humerus fracture model. Twelve paired human humerus specimens were included. Quantitative computed tomography was performed to determine bone mineral density (BMD). Local bone quality in the direction of the six proximal screws of a standard locking plate (PHILOS, Synthes) was assessed using mechanical means (DensiProbe™). A three-part fracture model with a metaphyseal defect was simulated and fixed with the plate. Within each pair of humeri the two screws aimed at the region of the lowest bone quality according to the DensiProbe™ were augmented in a randomised manner. For augmentation, 0.5 ml of bone cement was injected in a screw with multiple outlets at its tip under fluoroscopic control. A cyclic varus-bending test with increasing upper load magnitude was performed until failure of the screw-bone fixation. The augmented group withstood significantly more load cycles. The correlation of BMD with load cycles until failure and BMD with paired difference in load cycles to failure showed that augmentation could compensate for a low BMD. The results demonstrate that augmentation of screws in locked plating in a proximal humerus fracture model is effective in improving primary stability in a cyclic varus-bending test. The augmentation of two particular screws aimed at a region of low bone quality within the humeral head was almost as effective as four screws with twice the amount of bone cement. Screw augmentation combined with a knowledge of the local bone quality

  13. An Overview of Internal and External Fixation Methods for the Diabetic Charcot Foot and Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy (DCN) of the foot and ankle is a challenging disease with regard to clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and prognosis. Its surgical management is equally difficult to interpret based on the wide array of options available. In the presence of an ulceration or concomitant osteomyelitis, internal fixation by means of screws, plates, or intramedullary nailing needs to be avoided when feasible. External fixation becomes a great surgical tool when managing DCN with concomitant osteomyelitis. This article describes internal and external fixation methods along with available literature to enlighten surgeons faced with treating this complex condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pediatric mandibular fractures treated by rigid internal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, G B

    1993-09-01

    Mandibular fractures in the pediatric patient population are relatively uncommon. These patients present with their own unique treatment requirements. Most fractures have been treated conservatively by dental splints. Closed reduction techniques with maxillomandibular fixation (MMF) in very young children can pose several concerns, including cooperation, compliance and adequate nutritional intake. Rigid internal fixation of unstable mandibular fractures using miniplates and screws circumvents the need for MMF and allows immediate jaw mobilization. At major pediatric trauma institutions, there has been an increasing trend toward the use of this treatment when open reduction is necessary. This article presents a report of a five-year-old child who presented with bilateral mandibular fractures and was treated by rigid internal fixation and immediate mandibular mobilization.

  15. Single absorbable polydioxanone pin fixation for distal chevron bunion osteotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deorio, J K; Ware, A W

    2001-10-01

    The distal chevron osteotomy is a well-established technique for correction of symptomatic mild to moderate metatarsus primus varus with hallux valgus deformity. Fixation of the osteotomy ranges from none to bone pegs, Kirschner wires, screws, or absorbable pins. We evaluated one surgeon's (J.K.D.) results of distal chevron osteotomy fixation with a single, nonpredrilled, 1.3-mm poly-p-dioxanone pin and analyzed any differences in patients with unilateral or bilateral symptomatic metatarsus primus varus with hallux valgus deformities. All osteotomies healed without evidence of infection, osteolysis, nonunion, or necrosis. Equal correction was achieved in unilateral and bilateral procedures. The technique is quick and easy, and adequate fixation is achieved.

  16. In vivo degradation of a new concept of magnesium-based rivet-screws in the minipig mandibular bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, Benoit; Saulacic, Nikola; Beck, Stefan; Imwinkelried, Thomas; Goh, Bee Tin; Nakahara, Ken; Hofstetter, Willy; Iizuka, Tateyuki

    2016-01-01

    Self-tapping of magnesium screws in hard bone may be a challenge due to the limited torsional strength of magnesium alloys in comparison with titanium. To avoid screw failure upon implantation, the new concept of a rivet-screw was applied to a WE43 magnesium alloy. Hollow cylinders with threads on the outside were expanded inside drill holes of minipig mandibles. During the expansion with a hexagonal mandrel, the threads engaged the surrounding bone and the inside of the screw transformed into a hexagonal screw drive to allow further screwing in or out of the implant. The in vivo degradation of the magnesium implants and the performance of the used coating were studied in a human standard-sized animal model. Four magnesium alloy rivet-screws were implanted in each mandible of 12 minipigs. Six animals received the plasmaelectrolytically coated magnesium alloy implants; another six received the uncoated magnesium alloy rivet-screws. Two further animals received one titanium rivet-screw each as control. In vivo radiologic examination was performed at one, four, and eight weeks. Euthanasia was performed for one group of seven animals (three animals with coated, three with uncoated magnesium alloy implants and one with titanium implant) at 12 weeks and for the remaining seven animals at 24 weeks. After euthanasia, micro-computed tomography and histological examination with histomorphometry were performed. Significantly less void formation as well as higher bone volume density (BV/TV) and bone-implant contact area (BIC) were measured around the coated implants compared to the uncoated ones. The surface coating was effective in delaying degradation despite plastic deformation. The results showed potential for further development of magnesium hollow coated screws for bone fixation. - Highlights: • A new concept of rivet screws as an alternative to classical screws is presented • The rivet screw concept was tested in vivo in a mini-pig pilot study • Un-coated and

  17. In vivo degradation of a new concept of magnesium-based rivet-screws in the minipig mandibular bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaller, Benoit [Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); National Dental Centre Singapore, 168938 (Singapore); Saulacic, Nikola [Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Beck, Stefan, E-mail: SBECK2@its.jnj.com [Synthes Biomaterials, Eimattstr. 3, CH-4436 Oberdorf (Switzerland); Imwinkelried, Thomas [RMS Foundation, Bischmattstr. 12, CH-2544 Bettlach (Switzerland); Goh, Bee Tin [National Dental Centre Singapore, 168938 (Singapore); Nakahara, Ken [Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Hofstetter, Willy [Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Iizuka, Tateyuki [Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland)

    2016-12-01

    Self-tapping of magnesium screws in hard bone may be a challenge due to the limited torsional strength of magnesium alloys in comparison with titanium. To avoid screw failure upon implantation, the new concept of a rivet-screw was applied to a WE43 magnesium alloy. Hollow cylinders with threads on the outside were expanded inside drill holes of minipig mandibles. During the expansion with a hexagonal mandrel, the threads engaged the surrounding bone and the inside of the screw transformed into a hexagonal screw drive to allow further screwing in or out of the implant. The in vivo degradation of the magnesium implants and the performance of the used coating were studied in a human standard-sized animal model. Four magnesium alloy rivet-screws were implanted in each mandible of 12 minipigs. Six animals received the plasmaelectrolytically coated magnesium alloy implants; another six received the uncoated magnesium alloy rivet-screws. Two further animals received one titanium rivet-screw each as control. In vivo radiologic examination was performed at one, four, and eight weeks. Euthanasia was performed for one group of seven animals (three animals with coated, three with uncoated magnesium alloy implants and one with titanium implant) at 12 weeks and for the remaining seven animals at 24 weeks. After euthanasia, micro-computed tomography and histological examination with histomorphometry were performed. Significantly less void formation as well as higher bone volume density (BV/TV) and bone-implant contact area (BIC) were measured around the coated implants compared to the uncoated ones. The surface coating was effective in delaying degradation despite plastic deformation. The results showed potential for further development of magnesium hollow coated screws for bone fixation. - Highlights: • A new concept of rivet screws as an alternative to classical screws is presented • The rivet screw concept was tested in vivo in a mini-pig pilot study • Un-coated and

  18. The role of bone SPECT/CT in the evaluation of lumbar spinal fusion with metallic fixation devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Morten; Nimb, Lars; Madsen, Jan L

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is difficult to evaluate the stability of the lumbar spondylodesis with metallic fixation devices by conventional imaging methods such as radiography or magnetic resonance imaging. It is unknown whether single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) may......, whereas in 1 case loose pedicle screws were detected at a wrong vertebral level. CONCLUSION: SPECT/CT may be useful to detect a lack of fixation of the metallic implants, and hence instability of the spondylodesis by evaluating the focal bone mineralization activity in relation to the pedicle screws....

  19. Recurrent Laryngeal Edema Imitating Angioedema Caused by Dislocated Screw after Anterior Spine Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Wójtowicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cervical spine surgery is a common procedure to stabilize vertebrae damaged by various diseases. The plates and screws are usually used in the spine fixation. This kind of instrumentation may detach from the bones which is a rare but well-known complication. A 77-year-old male presented to the otorhinolaryngology department with throat pain, choking, and dysphagia. At first the angioedema was diagnosed and he was treated conservatively. The endoscopy revealed laryngeal edema, being more defined on the right side with right vocal fold paresis. CT scans showed the stabilizing plate with two screws attached tightly and the back-out of the third screw toward soft tissue of the neck. In the meantime, his condition deteriorated and he needed tracheotomy. In few days the surgical removal of the dislocated screw was performed successfully. Although two-month follow-up reported no obstruction of the larynx, the vocal folds paresis with gradual functional improvement was observed. Long-term complication of anterior spine surgery sometimes may suggest laryngeal angioedema at first. If the conservative treatment is ineffective and there is a history of anterior spine surgery, the clinicians should consider the displacement of the plate or screws in differential diagnosis.

  20. Fixation of zygomatic and mandibular fractures with biodegradable plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degala, Saikrishna; Shetty, Sujeeth; Ramya, S

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective study, 13 randomly selected patients underwent treatment for zygomatic-complex fractures (2 site fractures) and mandibular fractures using 1.5 / 2 / 2.5-mm INION CPS biodegradable plates and screws. To assess the fixation of zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures with biodegradable copolymer osteosynthesis system. In randomly selected 13 patients, zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures were plated using resorbable plates and screws using Champy's principle. All the cases were evaluated clinically and radiologically for the type of fracture, need for the intermaxillary fixation (IMF) and its duration, duration of surgery, fixation at operation, state of reduction at operation, state of bone union after operation, anatomic reduction, paresthesia, occlusal discrepancies, soft tissue infection, immediate and late inflammatory reactions related to biodegradation process, and any need for the removal of the plates. Descriptives, Frequencies, and Chi-square test were used. In our study, the age group range was 5 to 55 years. Road traffic accidents accounted for the majority of patients six, (46.2%). Postoperative occlusal discrepancies were found in seven patients as mild to moderate, which resolved with IMF for 1-8 weeks. There were minimal complications seen and only as soft tissue infection. Use of biodegradable osteosynthesis system is a reliable alternative method for the fixation of zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures. The biodegradable system still needs to be refined in material quality and handling to match the stability achieved with metal system. Biodegradable plates and screws is an ideal system for pediatric fractures with favorable outcome.

  1. Alternative Techniques for Cannulation of Biliary Strictures Resistant to the 0.035 System Following Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hee Mang; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Ko, Gi Young; Song, Ho Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo

    2012-01-01

    To assess the clinical efficacy of alternative techniques for biliary stricture cannulation in patients undergoing living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), after cannulation failure with a conventional (0.035-inch guidewire) technique. Of 293 patients with biliary strictures after LDLT, 19 (6%) patients, 11 men and 8 women of mean age 48.5 years, had the failed cannulation of the stricture by conventional techniques. Recannulation was attempted by using two alternative methods, namely a micro-catheter set via percutaneous access and a snare (rendezvous) technique using percutaneous and endoscopic approaches. Strictures were successfully cannulated in 16 (84%) of the 19 patients. A microcatheter set was used in 12 and a snare technique in four patients. Stricture cannulation failed in the remaining three patients, who finally underwent surgical revision. Most technical failures using a conventional technique for biliary stricture cannulation after LDLT can be overcome by using a microcatheter set or a snare (rendezvous) technique.

  2. Alternative Techniques for Cannulation of Biliary Strictures Resistant to the 0.035 System Following Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hee Mang; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Ko, Gi Young; Song, Ho Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To assess the clinical efficacy of alternative techniques for biliary stricture cannulation in patients undergoing living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), after cannulation failure with a conventional (0.035-inch guidewire) technique. Of 293 patients with biliary strictures after LDLT, 19 (6%) patients, 11 men and 8 women of mean age 48.5 years, had the failed cannulation of the stricture by conventional techniques. Recannulation was attempted by using two alternative methods, namely a micro-catheter set via percutaneous access and a snare (rendezvous) technique using percutaneous and endoscopic approaches. Strictures were successfully cannulated in 16 (84%) of the 19 patients. A microcatheter set was used in 12 and a snare technique in four patients. Stricture cannulation failed in the remaining three patients, who finally underwent surgical revision. Most technical failures using a conventional technique for biliary stricture cannulation after LDLT can be overcome by using a microcatheter set or a snare (rendezvous) technique.

  3. Additional Tension Screws Improve Stability in Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing: Biomechanical Analysis of a Femur Spiral Fracture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachert, Gregor; Rapp, Marion; Eggert, Rebecca; Schulze-Hessing, Maaike; Gros, Nina; Stratmann, Christina; Wendlandt, Robert; Kaiser, Martin M

    2015-08-01

    For pediatric femoral shaft fractures, elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) is an accepted method of treatment. But problems regarding stability with shortening or axial deviation are well known in complex fracture types and heavier children. Biomechanical in vitro testing was performed to determine whether two modified osteosyntheses with an additional tension screw fixation or screw fixation alone without nails could significantly improve the stability in comparison to classical ESIN. A total of 24 synthetic adolescent-sized femoral bone models (Sawbones, 4th generation; Vashon, Washington, United States) with an identical spiral fracture (length 100 mm) were used. All grafts underwent retrograde fixation with two C-shaped steel nails (2C). Of the 24, 8 osteosyntheses were supported by one additional tension screw (2C1S) and another 8 by two screws (2S) in which the intramedullary nails were removed before testing. Each configuration underwent biomechanical testing in 4-point bending, external rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR). Furthermore, the modifications were tested in axial physiological 9 degrees position for shifting and dynamic compression as well as dynamic load. Both screw configurations (2C1S and 2S) demonstrated a significantly higher stability in comparison to the 2C configuration in 4-point bending (anterior-posterior, 0.95 Nm/mm [2C] spiral fracture model, the stability of ESIN could be significantly improved by two modifications with additional tension screws. If transferred in clinical practice, these modifications might offer earlier weight bearing and less problems of shortening or axial deviation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Guide to radiation fixatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Bold, F.C.

    1983-11-01

    This report identifies and then characterizes a variety of substances available in the market place for potential effectiveness as a fixative on radiologically contaminated surfaces. The substances include both generic chemicals and proprietary products. In selecting a fixative for a particular application, several attributes of the fixative may be relevant to the choice. These attributes include: toxicity, durability, and cleanliness and removability. In addition to the attributes of the fixative, one should also take into account certain characteristics of the site to be treated. These characteristics relate to climate, nature of the surface, use to which the treated surface will be put, subsequent cleanup operations, and type of neighboring surfaces. Finally, costs and potential environmental effects may influence the decision. A variety of fixatives are evaluated with respect to these various attributes and summarized in a reference table

  5. Isolated olecranon fractures in children affected by osteogenesis imperfecta type I treated with single screw or tension band wiring system: Outcomes and pitfalls in relation to bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persiani, Pietro; Ranaldi, Filippo M; Graci, Jole; De Cristo, Claudia; Zambrano, Anna; D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Martini, Lorena; Villani, Ciro

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the results of 2 techniques, tension band wiring (TBW) and fixation with screws, in olecranon fractures in children affected with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. Between 2010 and 2014, 21 olecranon fractures in 18 children with OI (average age: 12 years old) were treated surgically. Ten patients were treated with the screw fixation and 11 with TBW. A total of 65% of olecranon fractures occurred as a result of a spontaneous avulsion of the olecranon during the contraction of the triceps muscle. The average follow-up was 36 months. Among the children treated with 1 screw, 5 patients needed a surgical revision with TBW due to a mobilization of the screw. In this group, the satisfactory results were 50%. In patients treated with TBW, the satisfactory results were 100% of the cases. The average Z-score, the last one recorded in the patients before the trauma, was -2.53 in patients treated with screw fixation and -2.04 in those treated with TBW. TBW represents the safest surgical treatment for patients suffering from OI type I, as it helps to prevent the rigidity of the elbow through an earlier recovery of the range of motion, and there was no loosening of the implant. In analyzing the average Z-score before any fracture, the fixation with screws has an increased risk of failure in combination with low bone mineral density.

  6. Osteosynthesis of ununited femoral neck fracture by internal fixation combined with iliac crest bone chips and muscle pedicle bone grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D D Baksi

    2016-01-01

    , cannulated hip screw fixation, iliac crest bone chips and quadratus femoris MPBG. Results: The mean followup is 12.5 years (range 3-35. The union of fractures occurred in 202 (82.8%, delayed union in 18 (7.3%, and established nonunion in 24 (9.8% patients. Full weight bearing was permitted at 16-22 weeks after union of fractures. Mean Harris hip score at the longest followup was 85.5. Among the complications, superficial wound infection occurred in 20 (8.2%, deep infection in seven (2.9%, and coxa vara in 39 (16% patients. Preoperative radiodensity of femoral head disappeared mostly after the union of fracture whereas fresh radiodensity of femoral head appeared in 20 (8% patients; nine (45% of them developed segmental collapse. Conclusion: Ununited femoral neck fractureis characterized by absorption of femoral neck, posterior cortical defect, smoothening and overriding of fracture surfaces with intervening fibrous tissues associated with or without AVN of femoral head. The above method of osteosynthesis rectified the above pathology and provided satisfactory results with union of fractures in 90.1% patients at long term followup.

  7. The use of blocking screws with internal lengthening nail and reverse rule of thumb for blocking screws in limb lengthening and deformity correction surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanaraja Muthusamy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Internal lengthening nail (ILN is a recent development in limb lengthening and deformity correction specialty. The ILN has the distinct advantage of combining acute deformity correction with gradual lengthening of bone. While using ILN, the short metaphyseal bone fragment may develop a deformity at the time of osteotomy and nail insertion or during bone lengthening because of the wide medullary canal. These deformities are typically predictable, and blocking screws (Poller screws are helpful in these situations. This manuscript describes the common deformities that occur in femur and tibia with osteotomies at different locations while using ILN in antegrade and retrograde nailing technique. Also, a systematic approach to the appropriate use of blocking screws in these deformities is described. In addition, the “reverse rule of thumb” is introduced as a quick reference to determine the ideal location(s and number of blocking screws. These principles are applicable to limb lengthening and deformity correction as well as fracture fixation using intramedullary nails.

  8. Inexpensive homemade models for ultrasound-guided vein cannulation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Stefano; Santori, Gregorio; Porcile, Elisa; Licausi, Martina; Centanaro, Monica; Valente, Umberto

    2007-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that low-cost homemade models may be used to acquire the basic skills for ultrasound-guided central vein puncture. Training study. University transplantation department. Training was performed using three different homemade models (A, B, and C). Segments of a common rubber tourniquet (V1) and Silastic tube (V2) were used to simulate vessels within agar-based models. Overall cost for each model was less than 5 euro (US$7). For each test (test I, A-V1; II, A-V2; III, B-V1; IV, C-V2), the number of punctures and attempts needed to locate the needle inside the lumen were recorded. Each test was considered completed when participants punctured the vessels at the first attempt for three consecutive times. In test I, the mean number of punctures and attempts were 3.85 +/- 1.26 and 4.95 +/- 3.05; in test II, 4.60 +/- 1.14 and 6.30 +/- 2.51; in test III, 4.80 +/- 1.06 and 4.65 +/- 2.21; and in test IV, 4.45 +/- 1.23 and 6.05 +/- 2.92, respectively. For each test, no statistical difference was found by comparison of number of punctures and attempts for anesthesiologists versus nonanesthesiologists, men versus women, or previous experience versus no experience with central vein cannulation (CVC). Video game users obtained better results than did nonusers in test I (punctures, P = 0.033; attempts, P = 0.038), test II (punctures, P = 0.052; attempts, P = 0.011), and test IV (punctures, P = 0.001; attempts, P = 0.003). A posttraining questionnaire showed favorable opinions about the clarity of the instructions, aptness of the models, and adequacy of the training. In our operative unit, the use of ultrasound guidance for CVC increased from 2% to 23% in the first month after training. Low-cost homemade models are useful in acquiring basic coordination skills for ultrasound-guided CVC.

  9. HEADPLAY Personal Cinema System Facilitates Intravenous Cannulation in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangeline Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available HEADPLAY personal cinema system (PCS is a portable visual headset/visor through which movie clips may be viewed. We studied the use of HEADPLAY PCS as a distraction tool in facilitating intravenous cannulation in children undergoing anaesthesia. 60 children were enrolled into the study and randomized into 2 groups. EMLA local anaesthetic cream was used to reduce the pain associated with intravenous cannulation. Children in group 1 wore the HEADPLAY visor whereas children in group 2 were subject to conventional distraction therapy. Children were asked to rate their anxiety, pain, and satisfaction scores after intravenous cannulation. Periprocedural anxiety was also determined using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of pain and anxiety scores between the 2 groups. Although the satisfaction score of the children in the HEADPLAY PCS group was marginally higher compared to the conventional group, this did not hit statistical significance. 86.6% of children in group 1 reported that they would want to use the visor again for their next intravenous cannulation. We conclude that HEADPLAY PCS is a distraction tool that is acceptable to most children and can contribute towards satisfaction of the intravenous cannulation process in children.

  10. Biomechanical effect of interspinous process distraction height after lumbar fixation surgery: An in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lin; Ma, Jianxiong; Lu, Bin; Jia, Haobo; Zhao, Jie; Kuang, Mingjie; Feng, Rui; Xu, Liyan; Bai, Haohao; Sun, Lei; Wang, Ying; Ma, Xinlong

    2017-07-01

    Pedicle screw fixation may induce abnormal activity at adjacent segment and accelerate the degeneration of lumbar vertebrae. Dynamic stabilizers could provide an intermediate solution between conservative treatment and fusion surgery. Lumbar vertebral segment cephalad to instrumented fixation was the most common localization of adjacent segment degeneration. The aim of this study is to explore the use of interspinous process devices in the lumbar vertebral segment cephalad to fixation segment in changing the mechanical distribution and limiting abnormal activity of the spine. Eight specimens were tested in the following groups: intact group, instability group (bilateral facetectomy at L3-L4), fixation group (bilateral facetectomy and pedicle screw fixation at L3-L4), and hybrid fixation group (fixation at L3-L4 and simulating interspinous device implantation of 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18 mm at L2-L3). Range of motion, motion of vertebral body, and strain distribution change were recorded. The range of motion in extension with 16- and 18-mm hybrid constructs was significantly lower than intact, instability, and fixation groups. In flexion and lateral bending, the strain values of L4 inferior articular process with 18-mm hybrid construct have a significant difference compared with other groups. In axial rotation, under the condition of a contralateral state, the strain values of L2 superior articular process with 18-mm hybrid construct have a significant difference compared with intact and fixation groups. The strain value of the L4 inferior articular process had negative correlation with height distraction in three dimensions, except extension. A negative correlation between the strain value of the L2 superior articular process and distraction height was found in contralateral bending and contralateral axial rotation. Interspinous process devices above the fixation segment can change the mechanical distribution of the spine and limit activity in some of the

  11. Surgical treatment of sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle using long-screw osteosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shufang; Li, Bo; Long, Xing; Deng, Mohong; Cai, Hengxing; Cheng, Yong

    2011-07-01

    The retrospective study evaluated long-screw (bicortical screw) osteosynthesis used in the surgical treatment of sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle and compared it with titanium plates and removal of the condylar fragment. Ninety-five patients with sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle received open surgical treatment from 1997 to 2008. Among these patients, the condylar fragments were fixed with long screws in 56 cases (group A), were fixed with titanium plates in 12 cases (group B), and were completely removed in 24 cases (group C). Follow-up was carried out clinically and radiologically. The clinical features included limitation of mandibular mobility, occlusion disturbance, lateral deviation on mouth opening, joint pain, clicking, facial asymmetry, and patient's subjective evaluation. The radiologic parameters consisted of degree of bony resorption, bony change, change of osteosynthesis material, and shortening of mandibular ramus height. Anatomic reduction and functional restoration were obtained and no severe complication was detected in group A. However, 3 of 14 patients had severe osteoarthrosis and 2 of 14 patients had ankylosis in group B. In group C 3 of 24 patients had mandibular retrusion, 4 of 24 patients had front teeth open bite, 4 of 24 patients had severe osteoarthrosis, and 1 of 24 patients had ankylosis. The long-screw fixation group had a more favorable prognosis than the titanium plate group and the group in which removal of the condylar fragment was performed. The long-screw fixation technique might be suitable for use in the surgical treatment of sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Finite element analysis of stress changes of posterior spinal pedicle screw infixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jia-Zhi; Wu, Zhi-Hong; Xu, Ri-Xin; Wang, Xue-Song; Xing, Ze-Jun; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Shen, Jian-Xiong; Wang, Yi-Peng; Qiu, Gui-Xing

    2009-01-06

    To evaluate the mechanical response of L3-L4 segment after posterior interfixation with a transpedicle screw system. Spiral CT machine was used to conduct continuous parallel scan on the L3-L4 section of a 40-year-old healthy male Chinese. The image data thus obtained were introduced into MIMICS software to reconstruct the 2-D data into volume data and obtain 3-D models of every element.. Pro/3-D model construction software system was used to simulate the 3-D entity of L3-L4 fixed by screw robs through spinal pedicle via posterior approach that was introduced into the finite element software ABAQUS to construct a 3-D finite element model. The stress changes on the vertebrae and screw under the axial pressure of 0.5 mPa was analyzed. Under the evenly distributed pressure the displacement of the L4 model was 0.00125815 mm, with an error of only 0.8167% from the datum displacement. The convergence of the model was good. The stress of the fixed vertebral body, intervertebral disc, and internal fixators changed significantly. The stress concentration zone of the intervertebral disc turned from the posterolateral side to anterolateral side. The stress produced by the fixed vertebral bodies decreased significantly. Obvious stress concentration existed in the upper and lower sides of the base of screw and the fixed screw at the upper vertebral body bore greater stress than the lower vertebral body. Integration of computer aided device and finite element analysis can successfully stimulate the internal fixation of L3-IA visa posterior approach and observe the mechanic changes in the vertebral column more directly.

  13. Biomechanical analysis of the fixation systems for anterior column and posterior hemi-transverse acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jianyin; Dong, Pengfei; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Zhihua; Cai, Xianhua

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of common fixation systems for complex acetabular fractures. A finite element (FE) pelvic model with anterior column and posterior hemi-transverse acetabular fractures was created. Three common fixation systems were used to fix the posterior wall acetabular fractures: 1. Anterior column plate combined with posterior column screws (group I), 2. Anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws (group II) and 3. Double-column plates (group III). And 600 N, representing the body weight, was loaded on the upper surface of the sacrum to simulate the double-limb stance. The amounts of total and relative displacements were compared between the groups. The total amount of displacement was 2.76 mm in group II, 2.81 mm in group III, and 2.83 mm in group I. The amount of relative displacement was 0.0078 mm in group II, 0.0093 mm in group III and 0.014 mm in group I. Our results suggested that all fixation systems enhance biomechanical stability significantly. Anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws has quite comparable results to double column plates, they were superior to anterior column plate combined with posterior screws. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Early Experience with Biodegradable Fixation of Pediatric Mandibular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeed, Ahmed Salah; Shoeib, Mohammed Abdel-Raheem; Saied, Samia Mohammed Ahmed; Elsherbiny, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    This clinical study aims to evaluate the stability and efficiency of biodegradable self-reinforced poly-l/dl-lactide (SR-PLDLA) plates and screws for fixation of pediatric mandibular fractures. The study included 12 patients (3-12 years old) with 14 mandibular fractures. They were treated by open reduction and internal fixation by SR-PLDLA plates and screws. Maxillomandibular fixation was maintained for 1 week postoperatively. Clinical follow-up was performed at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months postoperatively. Radiographs were done at 1 week, 3 months, and 12 months postoperatively to observe any displacement and fracture healing. All fractures healed both clinically and radiologically. No serious complications were reported in the patients. Normal occlusion was achieved in all cases. Biodegradable osteofixation of mandibular fractures offers a valuable clinical solution for pediatric patients getting the benefit of avoiding secondary surgery to remove plates, decreasing the hospital stay, further painful procedures, and psychological impact.

  15. Posterior Surgery for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis With Pedicle Screws and Ultrahigh-Molecular Weight Polyethylene Tape: Achieving the Ideal Thoracic Kyphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Wakao, Norimitsu; Ando, Kei; Hirano, Kenichi; Tauchi, Ryoji; Muramoto, Akio; Matsui, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Sakai, Yoshihito; Katayama, Yoshito; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Prospective clinical case series. To describe our surgical procedure and results for posterior correction and fusion with a hybrid approach using pedicle screws, hooks, and ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene tape with direct vertebral rotation (DVR) (the PSTH-DVR procedure) for treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) with satisfactory correction in the coronal and sagittal planes. Introduction of segmental pedicle screws in posterior surgery for AIS has facilitated good correction and fusion. However, procedures using only pedicle screws have risks during screw insertion, higher costs, and decreased postoperative thoracic kyphosis. We have obtained good outcomes compared with segmental pedicle screw fixation in surgery for AIS using a relatively simple operative procedure (PSTH-DVR) that uses fewer pedicle screws. The subjects were 30 consecutive patients with AIS who underwent the PSTH-DVR procedure and were followed for a minimum of 2 years. Preoperative flexibility, preoperative and postoperative Cobb angles, correction rates, loss of correction, thoracic kyphotic angles (T5-T12), coronal balance, sagittal balance, and shoulder balance were measured on plain radiographs. Rib hump, operation time, estimated blood loss, spinal cord monitoring findings, complications, and scoliosis research society (SRS)-22 scores were also examined. The mean preoperative curve of 58.0 degrees (range, 40-96 degrees) was corrected to a mean of 9.9 degrees postoperatively, and the correction rate was 83.6%. Fusion was obtained in all patients without loss of correction. In 10 cases with preoperative kyphosis angles (T5-T12) correction of deformity with PSTH-DVR is equivalent to that of all-pedicle screw constructs. The procedure gives favorable correction, is advantageous for kyphosis compared with segmental screw fixation, and uses the minimum number of pedicle screws. Therefore, the PSTH-DVR procedure may be useful for treatment of idiopathic scoliosis.

  16. To evaluate the efficacy of biodegradable plating system for fixation of maxillofacial fractures: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Rishi K; Sharma, Parveen; Jindal, Shalu; Gaba, Shivani

    2013-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of biodegradable plating system for fixation of maxillofacial fractures and to study the morbidity associated with the use of biodegradable plates and screws. This prospective study consisted of 10 patients with maxillofacial fractures requiring open reduction and internal fixation. Fractures with infection, comminuted and pathological fractures were excluded. All were plated with biodegradable system (Inion CPS) using standard plating principles and observed for a total period of 24 weeks. Characteristics of the fractures, ease of use of bioresorbable plate/screw system and post operative complications were assessed. Of total 10 patients, eight patients were of midface fracture and two pediatric patients with mandibular fracture, with nine male and one female. The mean age was 32.8 years. Out of 20 plates and 68 screws applied to the 10 fractures sites; there were three incidences of screw breakage with no other intraoperative difficulties. Paresthesia of the infraorbital nerve was present in two patients, and recovered completely in four weeks after surgery. Fracture reduction was considered to be satisfactory in all cases. One patient developed postsurgical infection and was managed with oral antibiotics and analgesics. Favorable healing can be observed through the use of biodegradable plates and screws to stabilize selected midface fractures in patients of all ages, as well as mandible fractures in early childhood, however further studies with more sample size are required.

  17. Development of load calculation techniques on screw and screw press energy consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Татарьянц, Максим Сергеевич; Завинский, Сергей Иванович; Трошин, Алексей Георгиевич

    2015-01-01

    The process of pressing of wood chips in screw machines is researched. It is defined processes taking place in different parts of the screw, formulas allowing to calculate the loads acting on the screw flights, as well as to determine the power required for compression. The unit costs of energy consumption and raw materials in the degree of heat pressing are determined

  18. [Fracture of implant abutment screws and removal of a remaining screw piece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, S.M. van den; Baat, C. de

    2008-01-01

    Fracture of the implant abutment screws is a complication which can render an implant useless. The prevalence of abutment screw fracture does not exceed 2.5% after 10 years. Causes are loosening of implant abutment screw, too few, too short or too narrow implants, implants not inserted perpendicular

  19. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Bo Kyun; Kim, Bongju; Kim, Min Jeong; Jeong, Guk Hyun; Ju, Kyung Won; Shin, Yoo Jin; Kim, Man Yong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA) and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA.

  20. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Kyun Sim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA.

  1. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bongju; Shin, Yoo Jin

    2017-01-01

    The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA) and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA. PMID:29065610

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Cannulation: Time to Bring Subclavian Central Lines Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talayeh Rezayat, DO, MPH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite multiple advantages, subclavian vein (SCV cannulation via the traditional landmark approach has become less used in comparison to ultrasound (US guided internal jugular catheterization due to a higher rate of mechanical complications. A growing body of evidence indicates that SCV catheterization with real-time US guidance can be accomplished safely and efficiently. While several cannulation approaches with real-time US guidance have been described, available literature suggests that the infraclavicular, longitudinal “in-plane” technique may be preferred. This approach allows for direct visualization of needle advancement, which reduces risk of complications and improves successful placement. Infraclavicular SCV cannulation requires simultaneous use of US during needle advancement, but for an inexperienced operator, it is more easily learned compared to the traditional landmark approach. In this article, we review the evidence supporting the use of US guidance for SCV catheterization and discuss technical aspects of the procedure itself.

  3. Analysis of plastic deformation in cortical bone after insertion of coated and non-coated self-tapping orthopaedic screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koistinen, A P; Korhonen, H; Kiviranta, I; Kröger, H; Lappalainen, R

    2011-07-01

    Insertion of internal fracture fixation devices, such as screws, mechanically weakens the bone. Diamond-like carbon has outstanding tribology properties which may decrease the amount of damage in tissue. The purpose of this study was to investigate methods for quantification of cortical bone damage after orthopaedic bone screw insertion and to evaluate the effect of surface modification on tissue damage. In total, 48 stainless steel screws were inserted into cadaver bones. Half of the screws were coated with a smooth amorphous diamond coating. Geometrical data of the bones was determined by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Thin sections of the bone samples were prepared after screw insertion, and histomorphometric evaluation of damage was performed on images obtained using light microscopy. Micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy were also used to examine tissue damage. A positive correlation was found between tissue damage and the geometric properties of the bone. The age of the cadaver significantly affected the bone mineral density, as well as the damage perimeter and diameter of the screw hole. However, the expected positive effect of surface modification was probably obscured by large variations in the results and, thus, statistically significant differences were not found in this study. This can be explained by natural variability in bone tissue, which also made automated image analysis difficult.

  4. Is clinical performance adversely affected by wearing gloves during paediatric peripheral intravenous cannulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Michael; Lee, Mark; Knott, Susan

    2014-10-01

    To investigate if wearing protective gloves during paediatric intravenous cannulation affects performance of the procedure. This was a prospective observational study. Peripheral intravenous cannulation (PIVC) performed within the Paediatric ED was observed and recorded over a 12 month period. Data were compared between those clinicians wearing gloves and those not wearing gloves during PIVC. One thousand and twenty paediatric cannulations were recorded during the observed period. The mean age of the children was 5.79 years. The overall success rate of cannulation was 86.18% and first attempt success rate 76.08%. Overall, gloves were used by 54.31% of clinicians to establish vascular access; glove use was lowest in the registrar group (41.11% compliance rate). The glove-wearing group had comparable overall success rate of 85.74% (475/554) to the no-gloves group of 86.70% (404/466). The difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Higher incidence of significant blood spillage during the procedure was observed among clinicians wearing no gloves (16.74%) in comparison with their glove-wearing counterparts (9.03%, P glove-wearing group and no-gloves group (3.94% vs 3.76%, P > 0.05). The present study shows that the use of protective gloves was not associated with adverse outcomes of clinical performance during paediatric cannulation. The low compliance rate of gloves use is alarming, and many clinicians might be exposed to potential blood-borne infections. Clinicians should be encouraged and supported to use gloves for paediatric cannulation. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  5. [Staple fixation for the treatment of hamate metacarpal joint injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yang-Hua; Zeng, Lin-Ru; Huang, Zhong-Ming; Yue, Zhen-Shuang; Xin, Da-Wei; Xu, Can-Da

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the effcacy of the staple fixation for the treatment of hamate metacarpal joint injury. From May 2009 to November 2012,16 patients with hamate metacarpal joint injury were treated with staple fixation including 10 males and 6 females with an average age of 33.6 years old ranging from 21 to 57 years. Among them, 11 cases were on the fourth or fifth metacarpal base dislocation without fractures, 5 cases were the fourth or fifth metacarpal base dislocation with avulsion fractures of the back of hamatum. Regular X-ray review was used to observe the fracture healing, joint replacement and position of staple fixation. The function of carpometacarpal joint and metacarpophalangeal joint were evaluated according to ASIA (TAM) system evaluation method. All incision were healed well with no infection. All patients were followed up from 16 to 24 months with an average of (10.0 +/- 2.7) months. No dislocation recurred, the position of internal fixator was good,no broken nail and screw withdrawal were occurred. Five patients with avulsion fracture of the back of hamatum achieved bone healing. The function of carpometacarpal joint and metacarpophalangeal was excellent in 10 cases,good in 5 cases, moderate in 1 case. The application of the staple for the treatment of hamatometacarpal joint injury has the advantages of simple operation, small trauma, reliable fixation, early postoperative function exercise and other advantages, which is the ideal operation mode for hamatometacarpal joint injury.

  6. Clinical and radiological results 6 years after treatment of traumatic thoracolumbar burst fractures with pedicle screw instrumentation and balloon assisted endplate reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, Jorrit Jan; Somers, Inne; Dhert, Wouter J A; Oner, F. Cumhur

    2015-01-01

    Background context  When used to fixate traumatic thoracolumbar burst fractures, pedicle screw constructs may fail in the presence of severe vertebral body comminution as the intervertebral disc can creep through the fractured endplates leading to insufficient anterior column support.

  7. Alteration of gastrointestinal transit time in the rat after bile duct cannulation surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, P.H.; Medinsky, M.A.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Bond, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Alteration of gastrointestinal (GI) transit time could affect the bioavailability of a toxicant if the toxicant is absorbed in the GI tract. The effect of surgery on GI transit time was investigated using radiographic imaging of barium during passage through the GI tract of the rat. Bile duct cannulation surgery delayed transit of barium to over 18 h, whereas in the normal animal, transit required approximately 6 h. GI transit time was only moderately affected by laparotomy after an 18-h postsurgery recovery period. These results suggest that the gastrointestinal absorption of orally administered toxicants could be affected by bile duct cannulation. 3 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  8. Negative pressure wound therapy and external fixation device: a simple way to seal the dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Antonio; Farace, Francesco; Uzel, André-Pierre; Casoli, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Negative pressure therapy is widely applied to treat lower limb trauma. However, sealing a negative pressure dressing in the presence of an external fixation device may be difficult and time consuming. Therefore, screws, pins, wires, etc, may preclude the vacuum, preventing the plastic drape to perfectly adhere to the foam. To maintain the vacuum, we tried to prevent air leaking around the screws putting bone wax at the junction between the pins and the plastic drape. This solution, in our hands, avoids air leakage and helps maintain vacuum in a fast and inexpensive way.

  9. Pedicle screw anchorage of carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws under cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindtner, Richard A; Schmid, Rene; Nydegger, Thomas; Konschake, Marko; Schmoelz, Werner

    2018-03-01

    Pedicle screw loosening is a common and significant complication after posterior spinal instrumentation, particularly in osteoporosis. Radiolucent carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF/PEEK) pedicle screws have been developed recently to overcome drawbacks of conventional metallic screws, such as metal-induced imaging artifacts and interference with postoperative radiotherapy. Beyond radiolucency, CF/PEEK may also be advantageous over standard titanium in terms of pedicle screw loosening due to its unique material properties. However, screw anchorage and loosening of CF/PEEK pedicle screws have not been evaluated yet. The aim of this biomechanical study therefore was to evaluate whether the use of this alternative nonmetallic pedicle screw material affects screw loosening. The hypotheses tested were that (1) nonmetallic CF/PEEK pedicle screws resist an equal or higher number of load cycles until loosening than standard titanium screws and that (2) PMMA cement augmentation further increases the number of load cycles until loosening of CF/PEEK screws. In the first part of the study, left and right pedicles of ten cadaveric lumbar vertebrae (BMD 70.8 mg/cm 3  ± 14.5) were randomly instrumented with either CF/PEEK or standard titanium pedicle screws. In the second part, left and right pedicles of ten vertebrae (BMD 56.3 mg/cm 3  ± 15.8) were randomly instrumented with either PMMA-augmented or nonaugmented CF/PEEK pedicle screws. Each pedicle screw was subjected to cyclic cranio-caudal loading (initial load ranging from - 50 N to + 50 N) with stepwise increasing compressive loads (5 N every 100 cycles) until loosening or a maximum of 10,000 cycles. Angular screw motion ("screw toggling") within the vertebra was measured with a 3D motion analysis system every 100 cycles and by stress fluoroscopy every 500 cycles. The nonmetallic CF/PEEK pedicle screws resisted a similar number of load cycles until loosening as the contralateral standard

  10. Degradation behaviour of LAE442-based plate-screw-systems in an in vitro bone model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Leonie; Besdo, Silke; Angrisani, Nina; Wriggers, Peter; Hering, Britta; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Reifenrath, Janin

    2015-04-01

    The use of absorbable implant materials for fixation after bone fracture helps to avoid a second surgery for implant removal and the risks and costs involved. Magnesium (Mg) is well known as a potential metallic material for degradable implants. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate if degradable LAE442-based magnesium plate-screw-systems are suitable candidates for osteosynthesis implants in load-bearing bones. The corrosion behaviour was tested concerning the influence of different surface treatments, coatings and screw torques. Steel plates and screws of the same size served as control. Plates without special treatment screwed on up to a specified torque of 15cNm or 7cNm, NaOH treated plates (15cNm), magnesium fluoride coated plates (15cNm) and steel plates as control (15cNm) were examined in pH-buffered, temperature-controlled SBF solution for two weeks. The experimental results indicate that the LAE442 plates and screws coated with magnesium fluoride revealed a lower hydrogen evolution in SBF solution as well as a lower weight loss and volume decrease in μ-computed tomography (μCT). The nanoindentation and SEM/EDX measurements at several plate areas showed no significant differences. Summarized, the different screw torques did not affect the corrosion behaviour differently. Also the NaOH treatment seemed to have no essential influence on the degradation kinetics. The plates coated with magnesium fluoride showed a decreased corrosion rate. Hence, it is recommended to consider this coating for the next in vivo study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Screw Configuration on the Preload Force of Implant-Abutment Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipprich, Holger; Rathe, Florian; Pinz, Sören; Schlotmann, Luca; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Ratka, Christoph

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of tightening torque, screw head angle, and thread number on the preload force of abutment screws. The test specimens consisted of three self-manufactured components (ie, a thread sleeve serving as an implant analog, an abutment analog, and an abutment screw). The abutment screws were fabricated with metric M1.6 external threads. The thread number varied between one and seven threads. The screw head angles were produced in eight varying angles (30 to 180 degrees). A sensor unit simultaneously measured the preload force of the screw and the torsion moment inside the screw shank. The tightening of the screw with the torque wrench was performed in five steps (15 to 35 Ncm). The torque wrench was calibrated before each step. Only the tightening torque and screw head angle affected the resulting preload force of the implant-abutment connection. The thread number had no effect. There was an approximately linear correlation between tightening torque and preload force. The tightening torque and screw head angle were the only study parameters that affected the resulting preload force of the abutment screw. The results obtained from this experiment are valid only for a single torque condition. Further investigations are needed that analyze other parameters that affect preload force. Once these parameters are known, it will add value for a strong, but detachable connection between the implant and abutment. Short implants and flat-to-flat connections especially will benefit significantly from this knowledge.

  12. The effects of implant surface roughness and surgical technique on implant fixation in an in vitro model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shalabi, M.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between implant surface parameters, surgical approach and initial implant fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty tapered, conical, screw-shaped implants with machined or etched surface topography were implanted into the

  13. Simple Technique for Removing Broken Pedicular Screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Agrawal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The procedure for removing a broken pedicle screw should ideally be technically easy and minimally invasive, as any damage to the pedicle, during removal of the broken screw, may weaken the pedicle, thus compromising on the success of re-instrumentation. We describe the case of a 32-year old man who had undergone surgery for traumatic third lumbar vertebral body fracture three years prior to current admission and had developed the complication of pedicle screw breakage within the vertebral body. The patient underwent re-exploration and removal of the distal screws. Through a paravertebral incision and muscle separation, the screws and rods were exposed and the implants were removed.

  14. Condylar Joint Fusion and Stabilization (by Screws and Plates) in Nontraumatic Atlanto-Occipital Dislocation: Technical Report of 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Forhad H; Haque, Mohammod Raziul; Alam, Sarwar Murshed; Khaled Chowdhury, S M Noman; Khan, Shamsul Islam; Goel, Atul

    2017-11-01

    Nontraumatic spontaneous atlanto-occipital dislocation (AOD) is rare. In this report, we discuss the technical steps of condylar joint fusion and stabilization (by screws and plates) in nontraumatic AOD. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report of such techniques. A young girl and a young man with progressive quadriparesis due to nontraumatic spontaneous atlanto-occipital dislocation were managed by microsurgical reduction, fusion, and stabilization of the joint by occipital condylar and C1 lateral mass screw and plate fixation after mobilization of vertebral artery. In both cases, condylar joints fixation and fusion were done successfully. Condylar joint stabilization and fusion may be a good or alternative option for AOD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Implant Material, Type of Fixation at the Shaft, and Position of Plate Modify Biomechanics of Distal Femur Plate Osteosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemir, Utku; Augat, Peter; Konowalczyk, Stefanie; Wipf, Felix; von Oldenburg, Geert; Schmidt, Ulf

    2017-08-01

    To investigate whether (1) the type of fixation at the shaft (hybrid vs. locking), (2) the position of the plate (offset vs. contact) and (3) the implant material has a significant effect on (a) construct stiffness and (b) fatigue life in a distal femur extraarticular comminuted fracture model using the same design of distal femur periarticular locking plate. An extraarticular severely comminuted distal femoral fracture pattern (OTA/AO 33-A3) was simulated using artificial bone substitutes. Ten-hole distal lateral femur locking plates were used for fixation per the recommended surgical technique. At the distal metaphyseal fragment, all possible locking screws were placed. For the proximal diaphyseal fragment, different types of screws were used to create 4 different fixation constructs: (1) stainless steel hybrid (SSH), (2) stainless steel locked (SSL), (3) titanium locked (TiL), and (4) stainless steel locked with 5-mm offset at the diaphysis (SSLO). Six specimens of each construct configuration were tested. First, each specimen was nondestructively loaded axially to determine the stiffness. Then, each specimen was cyclically loaded with increasing load levels until failure. Construct Stiffness: The fixation construct with a stainless steel plate and hybrid fixation (SSH) had the highest stiffness followed by the construct with a stainless steel plate and locking screws (SSL) and were not statistically different from each other. Offset placement (SSLO) and using a titanium implant (TiL) significantly reduced construct stiffness. Fatigue Failure: The stainless steel with hybrid fixation group (SSH) withstood the most number of cycles to failure and higher loads, followed by the stainless steel plate and locking screw group (SSL), stainless steel plate with locking screws and offset group (SSLO), and the titanium plate and locking screws group (TiL) consecutively. Offset placement (SSLO) as well as using a titanium implant (TiL) reduced cycles to failure. Using the

  16. Optimum time for intravenous cannulation after induction with sevoflurane, oxygen, and nitrous oxide in children without any premedication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Abm Kamrul; Sivasankar, Raman; Nair, Salil G; Hasan, Wamia U; Latif, Zulaidi

    2018-02-01

    Intravenous cannulation is usually done in children after inhalational induction with volatile anesthetic agents. The optimum time for safe intravenous cannulation after induction with sevoflurane, oxygen, and nitrous oxide has been studie