WorldWideScience

Sample records for candu nuclear fuel

  1. Inspection of Candu Nuclear Reactor Fuel Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Channel Inspection and Gauging Apparatus of Reactors (CIGAR) is a fully atomated, remotely operated inspection system designed to perform multi-channel, multi-task inspection of CANDU reactor fuel channels. Ultrasonic techniques are used for flaw detection, (with a sensitivity capable of detecting a 0.075 mm deep notch with a signal to noise ratio of 10 dB) and pressure tube wall thickness and diameter measurements. Eddy currrent systems are used to detect the presence of spacers between the coaxial pressure tube and calandria tube, as well as to measure their relative spacing. A servo-accelerometer is used to estimate the sag of the fuel channels. This advanced inspection system was commissioned and declared in service in September 1985. The paper describes the inspection systems themselves and discussed the results achieved to-date. (author)

  2. Utilization of spent PWR fuel-advanced nuclear fuel cycle of PWR/CANDU synergism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Xiao-Dong; XIE Zhong-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    High neutron economy, on line refueling and channel design result in the unsurpassed fuel cycle flexibility and variety for CANDU reactors. According to the Chinese national conditions that China has both PWR and CANDU reactors and the closed cycle policy of reprocessing the spent PWR fuel is adopted, one of the advanced nuclear fuel cycles of PWR/CANDU synergism using the reprocessed uranium of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactor is proposed, which will save the uranium resource (~22.5%), increase the energy output (~41%), decrease the quantity of spent fuels to be disposed (~2/3) and lower the cost of nuclear power. Because of the inherent flexibility of nuclear fuel cycle in CANDU reactor, and the low radiation level of recycled uranium(RU), which is acceptable for CANDU reactor fuel fabrication, the transition from the natural uranium to the RU can be completed without major modification of the reactor core structure and operation mode. It can be implemented in Qinshan Phase Ⅲ CANDU reactors with little or no requirement of big investment in new design. It can be expected that the reuse of recycled uranium of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactor is a feasible and desirable strategy in China.

  3. Public health risks associated with the CANDU nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report analyzes in a preliminary way the risks to the public posed by the CANDU nuclear fuel cycle. Part 1 considers radiological risks, while part 2 (published as INFO-0141-2) evaluates non-radiological risks. The report concludes that, for radiological risks, maximum individual risks to members of the public are less than 10-5 per year for postulated accidents, are less than 1 percent of regulatory limits for normal operation and that collective doses are small, less than 3 person-sieverts. It is also concluded that radiological risks are much smaller than the non-radiological risks posed by activities of the nuclear fuel cycle

  4. Development of nuclear fuel. Development of CANDU advanced fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop CANDU advanced fuel, the agreement of the joint research between KAERI and AECL was made on February 19, 1991. AECL conceptual design of CANFLEX bundle for Bruce reactors was analyzed and then the reference design and design drawing of the advanced fuel bundle with natural uranium fuel for CANDU-6 reactor were completed. The CANFLEX fuel cladding was preliminarily investigated. The fabricability of the advanced fuel bundle was investigated. The design and purchase of the machinery tools for the bundle fabrication for hydraulic scoping tests were performed. As a result of CANFLEX tube examination, the tubes were found to be meet the criteria proposed in the technical specification. The dummy bundles for hydraulic scoping tests have been fabricated by using the process and tools, where the process parameters and tools have been newly established. (Author)

  5. Modelling nuclear fuel vibrations in horizontal CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow-induced fuel vibrations in the pressure tubes of CANDU reactors are of vital interest to designers because fretting damage may result. Computer simulation is being used to study how bundles vibrate and to identify bundle design features which will reduce vibration and hence fretting. (author)

  6. The Study of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Based On PWR and CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of nuclear fuel cycle options based on PWR and CANDU type reactors have been carried out. There are 5 cycle options based on PWR and CANDU reactors, i.e.: PWR-OT, PWR-OT, PWR-MOX, CANDU-OT, DUPIC, and PWR-CANDU-OT options. While parameters which assessed in this study are fuel requirement, generating waste and plutonium from each cycle options. From the study found that the amount of fuel in the DUPIC option needs relatively small compared the other options. From the view of total radioactive waste generated from the cycles, PWR-MOX generate the smallest amount of waste, but produce twice of high level waste than DUPIC option. For total plutonium generated from the cycle, PWR-MOX option generates smallest quantity, but for fissile plutonium, DUPIC options produce the smallest one. It means that the DUPIC option has some benefits in plutonium consumption aspects. (author)

  7. Fuel for advanced CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU reactor system has proven itself to be a world leader in terms of station availability and low total unit energy cost. In 1985 for example, four of the top ten reactor units in the world were CANDU reactors operating in South Korea and Canada. This excellent operating record requires an equivalent performance record of the low-cost, natural uranium fuel. Future CANDU reactors will be an evolution of the present design. Engineering work is under way to refine the existing CANDU 600 and to incorporate state-of-the-art technology, reducing the capital cost and construction schedule. In addition, a smaller CANDU 300 plant has been designed using proven CANDU 600 technology and components but with an innovative new plant layout that makes it cost competitive with coal fired plants. For the long term, work on advanced fuel cycles and major system improvements is underway ensuring that CANDU plants will stay competitive well into the next century

  8. Second International Conference on CANDU Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-four papers were presented at this conference in sessions dealing with international experience and programs relating to CANDU fuel; fuel manufacture; fuel behaviour; fuel handling, storage and disposal; and advanced CANDU fuel cycles. (L.L.)

  9. Some aspects on security and safety in a potential transport of a CANDU spent nuclear fuel bundle, in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each Member States (MS) is responsible for the security and safety of radioactive material during transport, since radioactive material is most vulnerable during transport. The paper presents some aspects on security and safety related to the potential transport of a CANDU Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) bundle from NPP CANDU Cernavoda to INR Pitesti. The possible environmental impact and radiological consequences following a potential event during transportation is analyzed, since the protection of the people and the environment is the essential goal to be achieved. Some testing for the package to be used for transportation will be also given. (author)

  10. Exporting technology for CANDU fuel manufacturing to the People's Republic of China - a stimulating experience for the Romanian nuclear fuel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adopting CANDU type reactors to produce nuclear-generated electricity, Romania has also developed his capability to produce nuclear fuel. Since 1995, FCN Pitesti is the unique nuclear fuel supplier for Cernavoda CANDU Power Station. Fuel plant upgrading and qualification was achieved in co-operation with AECL and Zircatec Precision Industries Inc. The fuel bundles manufactured at FCN Pitesti proved to be of excellent quality, operating with a very low defect rate, all defected fuel being reported in the first period of the reactor operation. It is a fact now that FCN has the capability to solve a wide variety of aspects one of the most significant being the development of new equipment and the increase of the capacity in order to cover the future nuclear fuel needs. On this basis FCN was invited to contribute with his potential to a supplying contract with China National Nuclear Corporation - 202 Plant, for CANDU nuclear fuel technology. Following an offer including several categories of equipment and technology, the option was for beryllium coaters and coating technology and training for end cap manufacturing. The arrangements consider Romanian company as a sub-supplier, this option ensuring the consistence with the largest part of the supply for CANDU fuel technology, offered by Zircatec. Two pieces of beryllium coaters have been produced and tested in Romania and the operating demonstration was made in the presence of Zircatec staff and Chinese delegates. The Chinese delegated were trained for complete operating modes and their ability to handle the equipment was certified accordingly. They also have been trained in the end cap technology and related quality inspection. The paper includes a short presentation of the equipment and associated work to fit the specified needs. The involvement of the Romanian fuel plant in this contract could be considered as an extension of the previous co-operation with the Canadian partners on CANDU nuclear fuel and finally

  11. CANDU nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a summary of the components that make up a CANDU reactor. Major emphasis is placed on the CANDU 600 MW(e) design. The reasons for CANDU's performance and the inherent safety of the system are also discussed

  12. Thermochemical modelling of advanced CANDU reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Emily Catherine

    2009-04-01

    With an aging fleet of nuclear generating facilities, the imperative to limit the use of non-renewal fossil fuels and the inevitable need for additional electricity to power Canada's economy, a renaissance in the use of nuclear technology in Canada is at hand. The experience and knowledge of over 40 years of CANDU research, development and operation in Ontario and elsewhere has been applied to a new generation of CANDU, the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR). Improved fuel design allows for an extended burnup, which is a significant improvement, enhancing the safety and the economies of the ACR. The use of a Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) material and Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel has created a need to understand better these novel materials and fuel types. This thesis documents a work to advance the scientific and technological knowledge of the ACR fuel design with respect to thermodynamic phase stability and fuel oxidation modelling. For the BNA material, a new (BNA) model is created based on the fundamental first principles of Gibbs energy minimization applied to material phase stability. For LEU fuel, the methodology used for the BNA model is applied to the oxidation of irradiated fuel. The pertinent knowledge base for uranium, oxygen and the major fission products is reviewed, updated and integrated to create a model that is applicable to current and future CANDU fuel designs. As part of this thesis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Coulombic Titration (CT) experiments are compared to the BNA and LEU models, respectively. From the analysis of the CT results, a number of improvements are proposed to enhance the LEU model and provide confidence in its application to ACR fuel. A number of applications for the potential use of these models are proposed and discussed. Keywords: CANDU Fuel, Gibbs Energy Mimimization, Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel, Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) Material, Coulometric Titration, X-Ray Diffraction

  13. Candu reactors with thorium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade and a half AECL has established a strong record of delivering CANDU 6 nuclear power plants on time and at budget. Inherently flexible features of the CANDU type reactors, such as on-power fuelling, high neutron economy, fuel channel based heat transport system, simple fuel bundle configuration, two independent shut down systems, a cool moderator and a defence-in-depth based safety philosophy provides an evolutionary path to further improvements in design. The immediate milestone on this path is the Advanced CANDU ReactorTM** (ACRTM**), in the form of the ACR-1000TM**. This effort is being followed by the Super Critical Water Reactor (SCWR) design that will allow water-cooled reactors to attain high efficiencies by increasing the coolant temperature above 5500C. Adaptability of the CANDU design to different fuel cycles is another technology advantage that offers an additional avenue for design evolution. Thorium is one of the potential fuels for future reactors due to relative abundance, neutronics advantage as a fertile material in thermal reactors and proliferation resistance. The Thorium fuel cycle is also of interest to China, India, and Turkey due to local abundance that can ensure sustainable energy independence over the long term. AECL has performed an assessment of both CANDU 6 and ACR-1000 designs to identify systems, components, safety features and operational processes that may need to be modified to replace the NU or SEU fuel cycles with one based on Thorium. The paper reviews some of these requirements and the associated practical design solutions. These modifications can either be incorporated into the design prior to construction or, for currently operational reactors, during a refurbishment outage. In parallel with reactor modifications, various Thorium fuel cycles, either based on mixed bundles (homogeneous) or mixed channels (heterogeneous) have been assessed for technical and economic viability. Potential applications of a

  14. Using Advanced Fuel Bundles in CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improving the exit fuel burnup in CANDU reactors was a long-time challenge for both bundle designers and performance analysts. Therefore, the 43-element design together with several fuel compositions was studied, in the aim of assessing new reliable, economic and proliferation-resistant solutions. Recovered Uranium (RU) fuel is intended to be used in CANDU reactors, given the important amount of slightly enriched Uranium (~0.96% w/o U235) that might be provided by the spent LWR fuel recovery plants. Though this fuel has a far too small U235 enrichment to be used in LWR's, it can be still used to fuel CANDU reactors. Plutonium based mixtures are also considered, with both natural and depleted Uranium, either for peacefully using the military grade dispositioned Plutonium or for better using Plutonium from LWR reprocessing plants. The proposed Thorium-LEU mixtures are intended to reduce the Uranium consumption per produced MW. The positive void reactivity is a major concern of any CANDU safety assessment, therefore reducing it was also a task for the present analysis. Using the 43-element bundle with a certain amount of burnable poison (e.g. Dysprosium) dissolved in the 8 innermost elements may lead to significantly reducing the void reactivity. The expected outcomes of these design improvements are: higher exit burnup, smooth/uniform radial bundle power distribution and reduced void reactivity. Since the improved fuel bundles are intended to be loaded in existing CANDU reactors, we found interesting to estimate the local reactivity effects of a mechanical control absorber (MCA) on the surrounding fuel cells. Cell parameters and neutron flux distributions, as well as macroscopic cross-sections were estimated using the transport code DRAGON and a 172-group updated nuclear data library. (author)

  15. Development situation about the Canadian CANDU Nuclear Power Generating Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU reactor is the most versatile commercial power reactor in the world. The acronym 'CANDU', a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, stands for 'CANada Deuterium Uranium'. CANDU uses heavy water as moderator and uranium (originally, natural uranium) as fuel. All current power reactors in Canada are of the CANDU type. Canada exports CANDU type reactor in abroad. CANDU type is used as the nuclear power plants to produce electrical. Today, there are 41 CANDU reactors in use around the world, and the design has continuously evolved to maintain into unique technology and performance. The CANDU-6 power reactor offers a combination of proven, superior and state-of-the-art technology. CANDU-6 was designed specifically for electricity production, unlike other major reactor types. One of its characteristics is a very high operating and fuel efficiency. Canada Nuclear Power Generating Stations were succeeded in a commercial reactor of which the successful application of heavy water reactor, natural uranium method and that on-power fuelling could be achieved. It was achieved through the joint development of a major project by strong support of the federal government, public utilities and private enterprises. The potential for customization to any country's needs, with competitive development and within any level of domestic industrial infrastructure, gives CANDU technology strategic importance in the 21st century

  16. General overview of CANDU advanced fuel cycles program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The R and D program for CANDU advanced fuel cycles may be roughly divided into two components which have a near-and long-term focus, respectively. The near-term focus is on the technology to implement improved once-through cycles and mixed oxide (plutonium-uranium oxides) recycle in CANDU and on technologies to separate zirconium isotopes. Included is work on those technologies which would allow a CANDU-LWR strategy to be developed in a growing nuclear power system. For the longer-term, activities are focused on those technologies and fuel cycles which would be appropriate in a period when nuclear fuel demand significantly exceeds mined uranium supplies. Fuel cycles and systems under study are thorium recycle, CANDU fast breeder systems and electro-nuclear fissile breeders. The paper will discuss the rationale underlying these activities, together with a brief description of activities currently under way in each of the fuel cycle technology areas

  17. Ninth international conference on CANDU fuel, 'fuelling a clean future'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Society's 9th International Conference on CANDU fuel took place in Belleville, Ontario on September 18-21, 2005. The theme for this year's conference was 'Fuelling a Clean Future' bringing together over 80 delegates ranging from: designers, engineers, manufacturers, researchers, modellers, safety specialists and managers to share the wealth of their knowledge and experience. This international event took place at an important turning point of the CANDU technology when new fuel design is being developed for commercial application, the Advanced CANDU Reactor is being considered for projects and nuclear power is enjoying a renaissance as the source energy for our future. Most of the conference was devoted to the presentation of technical papers in four parallel sessions. The topics of these sessions were: Design and Development; Fuel Safety; Fuel Modelling; Fuel Performance; Fuel Manufacturing; Fuel Management; Thermalhydraulics; and, Spent Fuel Management and Criticalty

  18. Proceedings of the international conference on CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain full texts of all paper presented at the first International Conference on CANDU Fuel. The Conference was organized and hosted by the Chalk River Branch of the Canadian Nuclear Society and utilized Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's facilities at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. Previously, informal Fuel Information Meetings were used in Canada to allow the exchange of information and technology associated with CANDU. The Chalk River conference was the first open international forum devoted solely to CANDU and included representatives of overseas countries with current or potential CANDU programs, as well as Canadian participants. The keynote presentation was given by Dr. J.B. Slater, who noted the correlation between past successes in CANDU fuel cycle technology and the co-operation between researchers, fabricators and reactor owner/operators in all phases of the fuel cycle, and outlined the challenges facing the industry today. In the banquet address, Dr. R.E. Green described the newly restructured AECL Research Company and its mission which blends traditional R and D with commercial initiatives. Since this forum for fuel technology has proven to be valuable, a second International CANDU Fuel Conference is planned for the fall of 1989, again sponsored by the Canadian Nuclear Society

  19. Research and development for CANDU fuel channels and fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU nuclear reactor is distinctly different from BWR and PWR reactors in that it uses many small pressure tubes rather than one large pressure vessel to contain the fuel and coolant. To exploit the advantages of the natural uranium fuel, the pressure tubes, like other core components, are manufactured from zirconium alloys which have low neutron capture cross sections. Also, because natural uranium fuel only achieves a modest burnup, a simple and inexpensive fuel design has been developed. The present paper reviews the features and the research that have led to the very satisfactory performance of the pressure tubes and the fuel in CANDU reactors. Reference is made to current research and development that may lead to further economies in the design and operation of future power reactors. (author)

  20. Used CANDU fuel waste consumed and eliminated: environmentally responsible, economically sound, energetically enormous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 43,800 tonnes of currently stored CANDU nuclear fuel waste can all be consumed in fast-neutron reactors (FNRs) to reduce its long-term radioactive burden 100,000 times while extracting about 130 times more nuclear energy than the prodigious amounts that have already been gained from the fuel in CANDU reactors. The cost of processing CANDU fuel for use in FNRs plus the cost of recycling the FNR fuel is about 2.5 times less on a per kWh energy basis than the currently projected cost of disposal of 3.6 million used CANDU fuel bundles in a deep geological repository. (author)

  1. Future fuel cycle development for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU reactor has proven to be safe and economical and has demonstrated outstanding performance with natural uranium fuel. The use of on-power fuelling, coupled with excellent neutron economy, leads to a very flexible reactor system with can utilize a wide variety of fuels. The spectrum of fuel cycles ranges from natural uranium, through slightly enriched uranium, to plutonium and ultimately thorium fuels which offer many of the advantages of the fast breeder reactor system. CANDU can also burn the recycled uranium and/or the plutonium from fuel discharged from light water reactors. This synergistic relationship could obviate the need to re-enrich the reprocessed uranium and allow a simpler reprocessing scheme. Fule management strategies that will permit future fuel cycles to be used in existing CANDU reactors have been identified. Evolutionary design changes will lead to an even greater flexibility, which will guarantee the continued success of the CANDU system. (author)

  2. Basic research and industrialization of CANDU advanced fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolsong Unit 1 as the first heavy water reactor in Korea has been in service for 17 years since 1983. It would be about the time to prepare a plan for the solution of problems due to aging of the reactor. The aging of CANDU reactor could lead especially to the steam generator cruding and pressure tube sagging and creep and then decreases the operation margin to make some problems on reactor operations and safety. The counterplan could be made in two ways. One is to repair or modify reactor itself. The other is to develop new advanced fuel to increase of CANDU operation margin effectively, so as to compensate the reduced operation margin. Therefore, the first objectives in the present R and D is to develop the CANFLEX-NU (CANDU Flexible fuelling-Natural Uranium) fuel as a CANDU advanced fuel. The second objectives is to develop CANDU advanced fuel bundle to utilize advanced fuel cycles such as recovered uranium, slightly enriched uranium, etc. and so to raise adaptability for change in situation of uranium market. Also, it is to develop CANDU advanced fuel technology which improve uranium utilization to cope with a world-wide imbalance between uranium supply and demand, without significant modification of nuclear reactor design and refuelling strategies. As the implementations to achieve the above R and D goal, the work contents and scope of technology development of CANDU advanced fuel using natural uranium (CANFLEX-NU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the nuclear design and fuel management analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the safety analysis, fuel fabrication technologies, the out-pile thermalhydraulic test and in-pile irradiation tests performed. At the next, the work scopes and contents of feasibility study of CANDU advanced fuel using recycled uranium (CANFLEX-RU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the reactor physics analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the basic safety analysis of a CANDU-6 reactor with CANFLEX-RU fuel, the fabrication and

  3. Basic research and industrialization of CANDU advanced fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Suk Ho; Park, Joo Hwan; Jun, Ji Su [and others

    2000-04-01

    Wolsong Unit 1 as the first heavy water reactor in Korea has been in service for 17 years since 1983. It would be about the time to prepare a plan for the solution of problems due to aging of the reactor. The aging of CANDU reactor could lead especially to the steam generator cruding and pressure tube sagging and creep and then decreases the operation margin to make some problems on reactor operations and safety. The counterplan could be made in two ways. One is to repair or modify reactor itself. The other is to develop new advanced fuel to increase of CANDU operation margin effectively, so as to compensate the reduced operation margin. Therefore, the first objectives in the present R and D is to develop the CANFLEX-NU (CANDU Flexible fuelling-Natural Uranium) fuel as a CANDU advanced fuel. The second objectives is to develop CANDU advanced fuel bundle to utilize advanced fuel cycles such as recovered uranium, slightly enriched uranium, etc. and so to raise adaptability for change in situation of uranium market. Also, it is to develop CANDU advanced fuel technology which improve uranium utilization to cope with a world-wide imbalance between uranium supply and demand, without significant modification of nuclear reactor design and refuelling strategies. As the implementations to achieve the above R and D goal, the work contents and scope of technology development of CANDU advanced fuel using natural uranium (CANFLEX-NU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the nuclear design and fuel management analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the safety analysis, fuel fabrication technologies, the out-pile thermalhydraulic test and in-pile irradiation tests performed. At the next, the work scopes and contents of feasibility study of CANDU advanced fuel using recycled uranium (CANFLEX-RU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the reactor physics analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the basic safety analysis of a CANDU-6 reactor with CANFLEX-RU fuel, the fabrication and

  4. Candu advanced fuel cycles: key to energy sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary rationale for Indonesia to proceed with a nuclear power program is to diversity its energy sources and achieve freedom from future resource constraints. While other considerations, such as economy of power supply, hedging against potential future increases in the price of fossil fuels, fostering the technological development of the Indonesia economy and minimizing greenhouse and other gaseous are important, the strategic resource issue is key. In considering candidate nuclear power technologies upon which to base such a program, a major consideration will be the potential for those technologies to be economically sustained in the face of large future increases in demand for nuclear fuels. the technology or technologies selected should be amenable to evaluation in a rapidly changing technical, economic, resource and environmental policy environment. the world's proven uranium resources which can be economically recovered represent a fairly modest energy resource if utilization is based on the currently commercialized fuel cycles, even with the use of recovered plutonium in mixed oxide fuels. In the long term, fuel cycles relying solely on the use of light water reactors will encounter increasing fuel supply constraints. Because of its outstanding neutron economy and the flexibility of on-power refueling, Candu reactors are the most fuel resource efficient commercial reactors and offer the potential for accommodating an almost unlimited variety of advanced and even more fuel efficient cycles. Most of these cycles utilize nuclear fuel which are too low grade to be used in light water reactors, including many products now considered to be waste, such as spent light water reactor fuel and reprocessing products such as recovered uranium. The fuel-cycle flexibility of the Candu reactor provides a ready path to sustainable energy development in both the short and the long terms. Most of the potential Candu fuel cycle developments can be accommodated in existing

  5. Conceptual Study on Dismantling of CANDU Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woo-Tae; Lee, Sang-Guk [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we reviewed 3D design model of the CANDU type reactor and suggested feasible cutting scheme. The structure of CANDU nuclear reactor, the calandria assembly was reviewed using 3-D CAD model for future decommissioning. Through the schematic diagram of CANDU nuclear power plant, we identified the differences between PWR and CANDU reactor assembly. Method of dismantling the fuel channels from the calandria assembly was suggested. Custom made cutter is recommended to cut all the fuel channels. The calandria vessel is recommended to be cut by band saw or plasma torch. After removal of the fuel channels, it was assumed that radiation level near the calandria vessel is not very high. For cutting of the end shields, various methods such as band saw, plasma torch, CAMC could be used. The choice of a specific method is largely dependent on radiological environment. Finally, method of cutting the embedment rings is considered. As we assume that operators could cut the rings without much radiation exposure, various industrial cutting methods are suggested to be applied. From the above reviews, we could conclude that decommissioning of CANDU reactor is relatively easy compared to that of PWR reactor. Technologies developed from PWR reactor decommissioning could be applied to CANDU reactor dismantling.

  6. CANDU type fuel behavior evaluation - a probabilistic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to realistically assess the behavior of the fuel elements during in-reactor operation, probabilistic methods have recently been introduced in the analysis of fuel performance. The present paper summarizes the achievements in this field at the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), pointing out some advantages of the utilized method in the evaluation of CANDU type fuel behavior in steady state conditions. The Response Surface Method (RSM) has been selected for the investigation of the effects of the variability in fuel element computer code inputs on the code outputs (fuel element performance parameters). A new developed version of the probabilistic code APMESRA based on RSM is briefly presented. The examples of application include the analysis of the results of an in-reactor fuel element experiment and the investigation of the calculated performance parameter distribution for a new CANDU type extended burnup fuel element design. (author)

  7. An elasto-plastic model for mechanical contact between the pellets and sheath in CANDU nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During high-temperature transients, increased mechanical contact can occur between the fuel stack and the sheath in the axial and/or radial direction. As well, there is an axial linear power gradient and an axial gradient in mechanical properties of the sheath specific to a CANDU-type fuel element. This requires a code with the capability to treat multiple axial segments. This paper describes a contact model that allows the elasto-plastic mechanical contact in radial/axial direction for multiple axial segments. (14 figs., 5 refs.)

  8. Exporting apocalypse: CANDU reactors and nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author believes that the peaceful use of nuclear technology leads inevitably to the production of nuclear weapons, and that CANDU reactors are being bought by countries that are likely to build bombs. He states that exports of reactors and nuclear materials cannot be defended and must be stopped

  9. Fuel condition in Canadian CANDU 6 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, R.H.; Macici, N [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gibb, R. [New Brunswick Power, Lepreau, NB (Canada); Purdy, P.L.; Manzer, A.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Kohn, E. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    The cornerstone of the CANDU concept is its natural uranium fuel, and the success of its reactor operation hinges on the fuel condition in the reactor. Neutron economy, on power refuelling, and simple fuel design are among the unique characteristics of CANDU fuel. In Canadian CANDU 6 reactors (Gentilly 2 and Point Lepreau), the 37-element fuel has provided an enviable record of safe, economic and reliable plant operation for 29 reactor years to date. The fuelling cost is among the lowest in the world - a corollary of high neutron economy, simple fuel design, and judicial fuelling scheme. The reliability of fuel is high: only 21 of the 60000 bundles discharged from Gentilly 2 were confirmed defective and the five-year period from March 1992 to February 1997 saw no defect at all at Gentilly-2. Also, thanks to the inherent on-power refuelling capability and an effective defect detection and removal system, the primary coolant loops are kept extremely clean (very low activity level) - benefiting both maintenance and safety. Moreover, the inventories of fission products in the core and in the channel are maintained within the safety analysis envelope, due to on-power fuelling and sophisticated fuel management. In this paper, CANDU 6 fuel performance is reviewed against the feedback from post-irradiation examinations, and the findings from our ongoing R and D program. The results suggest that the fuel behavior m reactor are basically as originally anticipated, despite an evolutionary 3% increase in bundle uranium mass in the 1980's. For operating conditions within the CANDU 6 37-element experience, the average strains are typically 0.09%; and fission gas release, 2.7%. The UO{sub 2} fuel remains stoichiometric after irradiation. In-core measurements of pressure tube fitting are generally low. All these observations are consistent with the excellent fuel performance statistics coming out of the two Canadian CANDU 6 reactors. Additionally, this paper will briefly

  10. Fuel condition in Canadian CANDU 6 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cornerstone of the CANDU concept is its natural uranium fuel, and the success of its reactor operation hinges on the fuel condition in the reactor. Neutron economy, on power refuelling, and simple fuel design are among the unique characteristics of CANDU fuel. In Canadian CANDU 6 reactors (Gentilly 2 and Point Lepreau), the 37-element fuel has provided an enviable record of safe, economic and reliable plant operation for 29 reactor years to date. The fuelling cost is among the lowest in the world - a corollary of high neutron economy, simple fuel design, and judicial fuelling scheme. The reliability of fuel is high: only 21 of the 60000 bundles discharged from Gentilly 2 were confirmed defective and the five-year period from March 1992 to February 1997 saw no defect at all at Gentilly-2. Also, thanks to the inherent on-power refuelling capability and an effective defect detection and removal system, the primary coolant loops are kept extremely clean (very low activity level) - benefiting both maintenance and safety. Moreover, the inventories of fission products in the core and in the channel are maintained within the safety analysis envelope, due to on-power fuelling and sophisticated fuel management. In this paper, CANDU 6 fuel performance is reviewed against the feedback from post-irradiation examinations, and the findings from our ongoing R and D program. The results suggest that the fuel behavior m reactor are basically as originally anticipated, despite an evolutionary 3% increase in bundle uranium mass in the 1980's. For operating conditions within the CANDU 6 37-element experience, the average strains are typically 0.09%; and fission gas release, 2.7%. The UO2 fuel remains stoichiometric after irradiation. In-core measurements of pressure tube fitting are generally low. All these observations are consistent with the excellent fuel performance statistics coming out of the two Canadian CANDU 6 reactors. Additionally, this paper will briefly discuss our

  11. CANDU spent fuel dry storage interim technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU heavy water reactor is developed by Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) it has 40 years of design life. During operation, the reactor can discharge a lot of spent fuels by using natural uranium. The spent fuel interim storage should be considered because the spent fuel bay storage capacity is limited with 6 years inventory. Spent fuel wet interim storage technique was adopted by AECL before 1970s, but it is diseconomy and produced extra radiation waste. So based on CANDU smaller fuel bundle dimension, lighter weight, lower burn-up and no-critical risk, AECL developed spent fuel dry interim storage technique which was applied in many CANDU reactors. Spent fuel dry interim storage facility should be designed base on critical accident prevention, decay heat removal, radiation protection and fissionable material containment. According to this introduction, analysis spent fuel dry interim storage facility and equipment design feature, it can be concluded that spent fuel dry interim storage could be met with the design requirement. (author)

  12. Feasibility study of CANDU-9 fuel handling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU's combination of natural uranium, heavy water and on-power refuelling is unique in its design and remarkable for reliable power production. In order to offer more output, better site utilization, shorter construction time, improved station layout, safety enhancements and better control panel layout, CANDU-9 is now under development with design improvement added to all proven CANDU advantages or applicable technologies. One of its major improvement has been applied to fuel handling system. This system is very similar to that of CANDU-3, and some parts of the system are applied to those of the existing CANDU-6 or CANDU-9. Design concepts and design requirements of fuel handling system for CANDU-9 have been identified to compare with those of the existing CANDU and the design feasibilities have been evaluated. (author). 4 tabs., 13 figs., 9 refs

  13. CANDU fuel research and development in Korea: current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status and future prospect of CANDU fuel R and D in Korea is always subjected to the consideration of domestic and international environments concerning nuclear safety, nuclear waste, nonproliferation and economy in favor of the arguments from public acceptance, international environments, and utilities. Considering that, at the end of 2000, the procurement of additional CANDU units at the Shin Wolsong site was decided not to proceed, the current and future CANDU fuel R and D would be oriented to the safety and economy of fuel and reactor operations rather than the national strategy of nuclear fuel cycle and reactor programs in Korea. Therefore, the current CANDU advanced fuel R and D programs such as CANFLEX-NU fuel industrialization, CANFLEX-0.9% SEU/RU fuel R and D, and DUPIC fuel cycle development in a laboratory-scale will be continued for the time being as it was. But the R and D of CANDU innovative fuels such as CANFLEX-1.2% ∼ 1.5 % SEU fuel, thorium oxide fuel and DUPIC fuel would have some difficulties to continue in the mid- and long-term if they would not have the justifications in the points of the nonproliferation, economic and safety views of fuel, fuel cycle and reactor. (author)

  14. Current status and future prospect of Candu fuel research and development in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status and future prospect of CANDU fuel R and D in Korea is always subjected to the consideration of domestic and international environments concerning nuclear safety, nuclear waste, non-proliferation and economy in favor of the arguments from public acceptance, international environments, and utilities. Considering that, at the end of 2000, the procurement of additional CANDU units at the Shin Wolsong site was decided not to proceed, the current and future CANDU fuel R and D would be oriented to the safety and economy of fuel and reactor operations rather than the national strategy of nuclear fuel cycle and reactor programs in Korea. Therefore, the current CANDU advanced fuel R and D programs such as CANFLEX-NU fuel industrialization, CANFLEX-0.9% SEU/RU fuel R and D, and DUPIC fuel cycle development in a laboratory-scale will be continued for the time being as it was. But the R and D of CANDU innovative fuels such as CANFLEX- 1.2% ∼ 1.5 % SEU fuel, thorium oxide fuel and DUPIC fuel would have some difficulties to continue in the mid-and long-term if they would not have the justifications in the points of the non-proliferation, economic and safety views of fuel, fuel cycle and reactor. (author)

  15. Thorium-Based Fuels Preliminary Lattice Cell Studies for Candu Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The choice of nuclear power as a major contributor to the future global energy needs must take into account acceptable risks of nuclear weapon proliferation, in addition to economic competitiveness, acceptable safety standards, and acceptable waste disposal options. Candu reactors offer a proven technology, safe and reliable reactor technology, with an interesting evolutionary potential for proliferation resistance, their versatility for various fuel cycles creating premises for a better utilization of global fuel resources. Candu reactors impressive degree of fuel cycle flexibility is a consequence of its channel design, excellent neutron economy, on-power refueling, and simple fuel bundle. These features facilitate the introduction and exploitation of various fuel cycles in Candu reactors in an evolutionary fashion. The main reasons for our interest in Thorium-based fuel cycles have been, globally, to extend the energy obtainable from natural Uranium and, locally, to provide a greater degree of energy self-reliance. Applying the once through Thorium (OTT) cycle in existing and advanced Candu reactors might be seen as an evaluative concept for the sustainable development both from the economic and waste management points of view. Two Candu fuel bundles project will be used for the proposed analysis, namely the Candu standard fuel bundle with 37 fuel elements and the CANFLEX fuel bundle with 43 fuel elements. Using the Canadian proposed scheme - loading mixed ThO2-SEU CANFLEX bundles in Candu 6 reactors - simulated at lattice cell level led to promising conclusions on operation at higher fuel burnups, reduction of the fissile content to the end of the cycle, minor actinide content reduction in the spent fuel, reduction of the spent fuel radiotoxicity, presence of radionuclides emitting strong gamma radiation for proliferation resistance benefit. The calculations were performed using the lattice codes WIMS and Dragon (together with the corresponding nuclear data

  16. Development of CANDU Spent Fuel Disposal Concepts for the Improvement of Disposal Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two types of spent fuels generated from nuclear power plants, CANDU type and PWR type. PWR spent fuels which include a lot of reusable material can be considered to be recycled. CANDU spent fuels are considered to directly disposed in deep geological formation, since they have little reusable material. In this study, based on the Korean Reference spent fuel disposal System(KRS) which is to dispose both PWR and CANDU spent fuels, the more effective CANDU spent fuel disposal systems have been developed. To do this, the disposal canister has been modified to hold the storage basket which can load 60 spent fuel bundles. From these modified disposal canisters, the disposal systems to meet the thermal requirement for which the temperature of the buffer materials should not be over have been proposed. These new disposals have made it possible to introduce the concept of long term storage and retrievability and that of the two-layered disposal canister emplacement in one disposal hole. These disposal concepts have been compared and analyzed with the KRS CANDU spent fuel disposal system in terms of disposal effectiveness. New CANDU spent fuel disposal concepts obtained in this study seem to improve thermal effectiveness, U-density, disposal area, excavation volume, and closure material volume up to 30 - 40 %.

  17. Shielding calculations for spent CANDU fuel transport cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU spent fuel discharged from the reactor core contains Pu, so, a special attention must be focussed into two directions: tracing for the fuel reactivity in order to prevent critical mass formation and personnel protection during the spent fuel manipulation. Shielding analyses, an essential component of the nuclear safety, take into account the difficulties occurred during the manipulation, transport and storage of spent fuel bundles, both for personnel protection and impact on the environment. The main objective here consists in estimations on radiation doses in order to reduce them under specified limit values. In order to perform the shielding calculations for the spent fuel transport cask three different codes were used: XSDOSE code and MORSE-SGC code, both incorporated in the SCALE4.4a system, and PELSHIE-3 code, respectively. As source of radiation one spent standard CANDU fuel bundle was used. All the geometrical and material data, related to the transport casks, were considered according to the shipping cask type B model, whose prototype has been realized and tested in the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti. The radial gamma dose rates estimated to the cask wall and in air, at different distances from the cask, are presented together with a comparison between the dose rates values obtained by all three recipes of shielding calculations. (authors)

  18. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR. PART 6 - PRESENTATION OF THE DECOMMISSIONING DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present a possible solution for the designing of a device for the decommissioning of the horizontal fuel channels in the CANDU 6 nuclear reactor. The decommissioning activities are dismantling, demolition, controlled removal of equipment, components, conventional or hazardous waste (radioactive, toxic in compliance with the international basic safety standards on radiation protection. One as the most important operation in the final phase of the nuclear reactor dismantling is the decommissioning of fuel channels. For the fuel channels decommissioning should be taken into account the detailed description of the fuel channel and its components, the installation documents history, adequate radiological criteria for decommissioning guidance, safety and environmental impact assessment, including radiological and non-radiological analysis of the risks that can occur for workers, public and environment, the description of the proposed program for decommissioning the fuel channel and its components, the description of the quality assurance program and of the monitoring program, the equipments and methods used to verify the compliance with the decommissioning criteria, the planning of performing the final radiological assessment at the end of the fuel channel decommissioning. These will include also, a description of the proposed radiation protection procedures to be used during decommissioning. The dismantling of the fuel channel is performed by one device which shall provide radiation protection during the stages of decommissioning, ensuring radiation protection of the workers. The device shall be designed according to the radiation protection procedures. The decommissioning device assembly of the fuel channel components is composed of the device itself and moving platform support for coupling of the selected channel to be dismantled. The fuel channel decommissioning device is an autonomous device designed for

  19. Photon dose rates estimation for CANDU spent fuel transport and intermediate dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear energy world wide development is accompanied by huge quantities of spent nuclear fuel accumulation. Shielding analyses are an essential component of the nuclear safety, the estimations of radiation doses in order to reduce them under specified limit values being the main task here. According to IAEA data, more than 10 millions packages containing radioactive materials are annually world wide transported. The radioactive material transport safety must be carefully settled. Last decade, both for operating reactors and future reactor projects, a general trend to raise the discharge fuel burnup has been world wide registered. For CANDU type reactors, one of the most attractive solutions seems to be SEU fuel utilization. In the paper there are estimated the CANDU spent fuel photon dose rates at the shipping cask/ storage basket wall for two different fuel projects after a defined cooling period in the NPP pools. The CANDU fuel projects considered were the CANDU standard 37 rod fuel bundle with natural UO2 and SEU fuels. In order to obtain radionuclide inventory and irradiated fuel characteristics, ORIGEN-S code has been used. The spent fuel characteristics are presented, comparatively, for both types of CANDU fuels. By means of the same code the photon source profiles have been calculated. The shielding calculations both for spent fuel transport and intermediate storage have been performed by using Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code. The ORIGEN-S and MORSE-SGC codes are both included in ORNL's SCALE 4.4a program package. A photon dose rates comparison between the two types of CANDU fuels has been also performed, both for spent fuel transport and intermediate dry storage. (authors)

  20. Third international conference on CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain full texts of all 49 papers from the ten sessions and the banquet address. The sessions were on the following subjects: International experience and programs; Fuel behaviour and operating experience; Fuel modelling; Fuel design; Advanced fuel and fuel cycle technology; AECL's concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  1. Estimation of radiation doses characterizing CANDU spent fuel transport and intermediate dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding analyses are an essential component of the nuclear safety. The estimations of radiation doses in order to reduce them under specified limitation values is the main task here. In the last decade, a general trend to raise the discharge fuel burnup has been world wide registered for both operating reactors and future reactor projects. For CANDU type reactors, one of the most attractive solutions seems to be SEU fuels utilization. The goal of this paper is to estimate CANDU spent fuel photon dose rates at the shipping cask/storage basket wall and in air, at different distances from the cask/ basket, for two different fuel projects, after a defined cooling period in the NPP pools. Spent fuel inventories and photon source profiles are obtained by means of ORIGEN-S code. The shielding calculations have been performed by using Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code. A comparison between the two types of CANDU fuels has been also performed. (authors)

  2. Thermalhydraulic characteristics for fuel channels using burnable poison in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power coefficient is one of the most important physics parameters governing nuclear reactor safety and operational stability, and its sign and magnitude have a significant effect on the safety and control characteristics of the power reactor. Recently, for an equilibrium CANDU core, the power coefficient was reported to be slightly positive when newly developed Industry Standard Tool set reactor physics codes were used. Therefore, it is required to find a new way to effectively decrease the positive power coefficient of CANDU reactor without seriously compromising the economy. In order to make the power coefficient of the CANDU reactor negative at the operating power, Roh et al. have evaluated the various burnable poison (BP) materials and its loading scheme in terms of the fuel performance and reactor safety characteristics. It was shown that reactor safety characteristics can be greatly improved by the use of the BP in the CANDU reactor. However, the previous study has mainly focused on the safety characteristics by evaluating the power coefficient for the fuel channel using BP in the CANDU reactor. Together with the safety characteristics, the economic performance is also important in order to apply the newly designed fuel channel to the power plant. In this study, the economic performance has been evaluated by analyzing the thermal hydraulic characteristics for the fuel channel using BP in the CANDU reactor

  3. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR. PART 9 - CUTTING AND EXTRACTING DEVICE FUNCTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin POPESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a constructive solution proposed by the authors in order to achieve of a cutting and extracting device for the decommissioning of the horizontal fuel channels in the CANDU 6 nuclear reactor. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED performs the dismantling, cutting and extraction of the fuel channel components. It's a flexible and modular device, which is designed to work inside the fuel channel and has the following functions: moving with variable speed, temperature monitoring and video surveillance inside the pipe, unblock and extract the channel closure plug (from End Fitting - EF, unblock and extract the channel shield plug (from Lattice Tube - LT, block and cut the middle of the pressure tube, block and cut the end of the pressure tube, block and extract the half of pressure tube. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED consists of following modules: guiding-fixing module, traction modules, cutting module, guiding-extracting module and flexible elements for modules connecting. The guiding-fixing module is equipped with elastic guiding rollers and fixing claws in working position, the traction modules are provided with variable pitch rollers for allowing variable travel speed through the fuel channel. The cutting module is positioned in the middle of the device and it is equipped with three knife rolls for pressure tube cutting, using a system for cutting place video surveillance and pyrometers for monitoring cutting place temperature. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED is fully automated, connected by wires to a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC and controlled from a Human Machine Interface (HMI. The design of the Cutting and Extraction Device (CED shall be achieved according to the particular features of the fuel channel components to be dismantled and to ensure radiation protection of workers.

  4. Feasible advanced fuel cycle options for CANDU reactors in the Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking into account the view points on nuclear safety, nuclear waste, non-proliferation and economics from the public, international environment, and utilities, the SEU/RU and DUPIC fuel cycles would be feasible options of advanced fuel cycles for CANDU-PHWRs in the Republic of Korea in the mid- and long-terms, respectively. Comparing with NU fuel, 0.9 % or 1.2 % SEU fuel would increase fuel burnup and hence reduce the spent fuel arisings by a factor of 2 or 3, and also could reduce CANDU fuel cycle costs by 20 to 30%. RU offers similar benefits as 0.9% SEU and is very attractive due to the significantly improved fuel cycle economics, substantially increased burnups, large reduction in fuel requirements as well as in spent fuel arisings. For RU use in a CANDU reactor, re-enrichment is not required. There are 25,000 tes RU produced from reprocessing operations in Europe and Japan, which would theoretically provide sufficient fuel for 500 CANDU 6 reactor-years of operation. According to the physics, thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical assessments of CANFLEX-0.9% RU fuel for a CANDU-6 reactor, the fuel could be introduced into the reactor in a straight-forward fashion. A series of assessments of CANFLEX-DUPIC physics on the compatibility of the fuel design in the existing CANDU 6 reactors has shown that the poisoning of the central element of DUPIC with, for example, natural dysprosium, reduces the void reactivity of the fuel, and that a 2 bundle shift refuelling scheme would be the most appropriate in-core fuel management scheme for a CANDU-6 reactor. The average discharge burnup is ∼15 MWd/kgHE. Although these results have shown promising results for the DUPIC fuel cycle, more in-depth studies are required in the areas of ROP system, large LOCA safety analyses, and so on. The recycling fuel cycles of RU and DUPIC for CANDU are expected to achieve the environmental 3R's (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle) as applied to global energy use in the short- and long

  5. Technology development for nuclear material safeguards -A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research contents of the passed one year were the conceptual design of nuclear material measurement points, of near real time accounting system and of unattended monitoring system for detection of nuclear material diversion. The passive neutron detection system was decided as a proper way of detection of plutonium in the spent fuels and the neutrons emitted by each isotopes were investigated. Also, material balance area and major measurement points were selected and related computer code was used for the near real time accounting in DUPIC facility. (Author)

  6. Destructive Examination of Experimental Candu Fuel Elements Irradiated in TRIGA-SSR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this work is the behaviour of CANDU fuel elements under power cycling conditions. The tests were run in the 14 MW(th) TRIGA-SSR (Steady State Reactor) reactor from Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti. zircaloy-4 is the material used for CANDU fuel sheath. The importance of studying its behaviour results from the fact that the mechanical properties of the CANDU fuel sheath suffer modifications during normal and abnormal operation. In the nuclear reactor the fuel elements endure dimensional and structural changes as well as cladding oxidation, hydriding and corrosion. These changes can lead to defects and even to the loss of integrity of the cladding. This paper presents the results of examinations performed in the Post- irradiation Examination Laboratory (PIEL) from INR Pitesti, on samples from a fuel element irradiated in TRIGA-SSR reactor: (i) Dimensional and macrostructural characterization; (ii) Microstructural characterization by metallographic analyses; (iii) Determination of mechanical properties; (iv) Fracture surface analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The obtained data could be used to evaluate the security, reliability and nuclear fuel performance, and for CANDU fuel improvement. (author)

  7. Post Irradiation Examination of Experomental CANDU Fuel Elements Irradiated in TRIGA-SSR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this work is the behaviour of CANDU fuel elements under power cycling conditions. The tests were run in the 14 MW (th) TRIGA-SSR (Steady State Reactor) reactor from Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti. Zircaloy-4 is the material used for CANDU fuel sheath. The importance of studying its behaviour results from the fact that the mechanical properties of the CANDU fuel sheath suffer modifications during normal and abnormal operation. In the nuclear reactor the fuel elements endure dimensional and structural changes as well as cladding oxidation, hydriding and corrosion. These changes can lead to defects and even to the loss of integrity of the cladding. This paper presents the results of examinations performed in the Post Irradiation Examination Laboratory (PIEL) from INR Pitesti, on samples from a fuel element irradiated in TRIGA-SSR reactor: (i) Dimensional and macrostructural characterization; (ii) Gamma scanning and tomography; (iii) Measurement of pressure, volume and isotopic composition of fission gas; (iv) Microstructural characterization by metallographic analyses; (v) Determination of mechanical properties; amd (vi) Fracture surface analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The obtained data could be used to evaluate the security, reliability and nuclear fuel performance, and for CANDU fuel improvement. (author)

  8. Simulation of CANDU Fuel Behaviour into In-Reactor LOCA Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to simulate the behaviour of an instrumented, unirradiated, zircaloy sheathed UO2 fuel element assembly of CANDU type, subjected to a coolant depressurization transient in the X-2 pressurized water loop of the NRX reactor at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in 1983. The high-temperature transient conditions are such as those associated with the onset of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). The data and the information related to the experiment are those included in the OECD/NEA-IFPE Database (IFPE/CANDU-FIO-131 NEA-1783/01). As tool for this simulation is used the TRANSURANUS fuel performance code, developed at ITU, Germany, along with the corresponding fabrication and in-reactor operating conditions specific of the CANDU PHWR fuel. The results, analyzed versus the experimental ones, are encouraging and perfectible. (author)

  9. Periodic inspection of CANDU nuclear power plant containment components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Standard is one in a series intended to provide uniform requirements for CANDU nuclear power plants. It provides requirements for the periodic inspection of containment components including the containment pressure suppression systems

  10. Conference proceedings of the 4. international conference on CANDU fuel. V. 1,2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain the full texts of all 65 papers presented at the 4th International Conference on CANDU fuel. As such, they represent an update on the state-of-the-art in such important CANDU fuel topics as International Development Programs and Operating Experience with CANDU fuel, Performance Assessments and Fuel Behavior Modeling, Fuel Properties, Licensing and Accident Analyses for CANDU fuel, Design, Testing and Manufacturing, and Advanced Fuel Designs. The large number of papers required the use of parallel sessions for the first time at a CANDU Fuel Conference

  11. Romania Monte Carlo Methods Application to CANDU Spent Fuel Comparative Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romania has a single NPP at Cernavoda with 5 PHWR reactors of CANDU6 type of 705 MW(e) each, with Cernavoda Unit1, operational starting from December 1996, Unit2 under construction while the remaining Unit3-5 is being conserved. The nuclear energy world wide development is accompanied by huge quantities of spent nuclear fuel accumulation. Having in view the possible impact upon population and environment, in all activities associated to nuclear fuel cycle, namely transportation, storage, reprocessing or disposal, the spent fuel characteristics must be well known. The paper aim is to apply Monte Carlo methods to CANDU spent fuel analysis, starting from the discharge moment, followed by spent fuel transport after a defined cooling period and finishing with the intermediate dry storage. As radiation source 3 CANDU fuels have been considered: standard 37 rods fuel bundle with natural UO2 and SEU fuels, and 43 rods fuel bundle with SEU fuel. After a criticality calculation using KENO-VI code, the criticality coefficient and the actinides and fission products concentrations are obtained. By using ORIGEN-S code, the photon source profiles are calculated and the spent fuel characteristics estimation is done. For the shielding calculations MORSE-SGC code has been used. Regarding to the spent fuel transport, the photon dose rates to the shipping cask wall and in air, at different distances from the cask, are estimated. The shielding calculation for the spent fuel intermediate dry storage is done and the photon dose rates at the storage basket wall (active element of the Cernavoda NPP intermediate dry storage) are obtained. A comparison between the 3 types of CANDU fuels is presented. (authors)

  12. CANDU advanced fuel R and D programs for 1997 - 2006 in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, H.C.; Yang, M.S.; Sim, K-S.; Yoo, K.J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Yusong, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    KAERI has a comprehensive product development program of CANFLEX and DUPIC fuels to introduce them into CANDU reactors in Korea and a clear vision of how the product will evolve over the next 10 years. CANDU reactors are not the majority of nuclear power plants in Korea, but they produce significant electricity to contribute Korea's economic growth as well as to satisfy the need for energy. The key targets of the development program are safety enhancement, reduction of spent fuel volume, and economic improvements, using the inherent characteristics and advantages of CANDU technology The CANFLEX and DUPIC R and D programs are conducted currently under the second stage of Korea's Nuclear Energy R and D Project as a national mid- and long-term program over the next 10 years from 1997 to 2006. The specific activities of the programs have taken account of the domestic and international environment concerning on non-proliferation in the Peninsula of Korea. As the first of the development products in the short-term, the CANFLEX-NU fuel will be completely developed jointly by KAERI/AECL and will be useful for the older CANDU-6 Wolsong unit 1. As the second product, the CANFLEX-0.9 % equivalent SEU fuel is expected to be completely developed within the next decade. It will be used in CANDU-6 reactors in Korea immediately after the development, if the existing RU in the world is price competitive with natural uranium. The DUPIC R and D program, as a long term program, is expected to demonstrate the possibility of use of used PWR fuel in CANDU reactors in Korea during the next 10 years. The pilot scale fabrication facility would be completed around 2010. (author)

  13. CANDU fuel quality and how it is achieved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this three part presentation CANDU fuel quality is reviewed from the point of view of a designer/operator and a fabricator. In Part 'A' fuel performance and quality considerations are discussed from the point of view of a designer-operator. In Parts 'B' and 'C' fuel quality is reviewed from the point of view of a fabricator. The presentation was divided in this way to convey the 'team effort' attitude which exists in the Canadian program; the team effort which is an essential part of the CANDU story. (auth)

  14. Fuel management simulation for CANFLEX-RU in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Fuel management simulations have been performed for CANFLEX-09% RU fuel in the CANDU 6 reactor. In this study, the bi-directional 4-bundle shift fuelling scheme was assumed. The lattice cell and time-average calculation were carried out. The refuelling simulation calculations were performed for 600 full power days. Time-averaged results show good axial power profile with the CANFLEX-RU fuel. During the simulation period, the maximum channel and bundle power were maintained below the licensing limit of CANDU 6 reactor. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  15. Future CANDU nuclear power plant design requirements document executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Duk Su; Chang, Woo Hyun; Lee, Nam Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daeduk (Korea, Republic of); Usmani, S.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Toronto (Canada)

    1996-03-01

    The future CANDU Requirements Document (FCRED) describes a clear and complete statement of utility requirements for the next generation of CANDU nuclear power plants including those in Korea. The requirements are based on proven technology of PHWR experience and are intended to be consistent with those specified in the current international requirement documents. Furthermore, these integrated set of design requirements, incorporate utility input to the extent currently available and assure a simple, robust and more forgiving design that enhances the performance and safety. The FCRED addresses the entire plant, including the nuclear steam supply system and the balance of the plant, up to the interface with the utility grid at the distribution side of the circuit breakers which connect the switchyard to the transmission lines. Requirements for processing of low level radioactive waste at the plant site and spent fuel storage requirements are included in the FCRED. Off-site waste disposal is beyond the scope of the FCRED. 2 tabs., 1 fig. (Author) .new.

  16. Economic analysis of alternative options in CANDU fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, fuel cycle options for CANDU reactor were studied. Three main options in a CANDU fuel cycle involve use of : (1) natural uranium (0.711 weight percent U-235) fuel, (2) slightly enriched uranium (1.2 weight percent U-235) fuel, and (3) recovered uranium (0.83 weight percent U-235) fuel from light water reactor spent fuel. ORIGEN-2 computer code was used to identify composition of the spent fuel for each option , including the standard LWR fuel (3.3 weight percent U-235). Uranium and plutonium credit calculations were performed by using ORIGEN-2 output. WIMSD-5 computer code was used to determine maximum discharge burnup values for each case. Cost estimations were carried out using specially-developed computer programs. Comparison of levelized costs for the fuel cycle options and sensitivity analysis for the cost components are also presented

  17. Automated refueling simulations of a CANDU for the exploitation of thorium fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Bradford

    CANDU nuclear reactors are in a unique circumstance where they are able to utilize and exploit a number of different fuel options to provide power as a utility. Thorium, a fertile isotope found naturally, is one option that should be explored. Thorium is more abundant than uranium, which is the typical fuel in the reactor and the availability of thorium makes nuclear energy desirable to more countries. This document contains the culmination of a project that explores, tests, and analyzes the feasibility of using thorium in a CANDU reactor. The project first develops a set of twodimensional lattice and three dimensional control rod simulations using the DRAGON Version 4 nuclear physics codes. This step is repeated for many concentrations of thorium. The data generated in these steps is then used to determine a functional enrichment of thorium. This is done via a procedural elimination and optimization of certain key parameters including but not limited to average exit burnup and reactivity evolution. For the purposes of this project, an enrichment of 1 % thorium was found viable. Full core calculations were done using the DONJON 4 code. CANFUEL, a program which simulates the refueling operations of a CANDU reactor for this fuel type was developed and ran for a simulation period of one hundred days. The program and the fuel selection met all selected requirements for the entirety of the simulation period. CANFUEL requires optimization for fuel selection before it can be used extensively. The fuel selection was further scrutinized when a reactivity insertion event was simulated. The adjuster rod 11 withdrawal from the core was analyzed and compared to classical CANDU results in order to ensure no significant deviations or unwanted evolutions were encountered. For this case, the simulation results were deemed acceptable with no significant deviations from the classical CANDU case.

  18. Dry storage of irradiated CANDU fuel at Pickering NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ontario Hydro generates about 86 million MW-h/year from its 20 nuclear CANDU reactors. The combination of a large generating capacity and relatively low fuel burn-up means that Ontario Hydro must manage very large volume of its used fuel. Irradiated fuel bays at Pickering NGS will be full by mid 1995. Additional storage capacity will be required by this date for the station to continue operation. Several long term storage options to supplement existing on-site facilities were studied. The dry storage system, based on the modular storage container, as an option, was found to be economical and operationally simple. The dry storage facility at Pickering NGS is planned to provide additional on-site storage capacity for fuel generated from 1994 to the end of the station's operating life (year 2025). This paper describes the design and operation of the Dry Storage System at Ontario Hydro's Pickering Nuclear Power Generating Station. The facility is planned as a two phased project. Phase I will provide a storage space for 700 dry storage containers (268,800 fuel bundles) or about 12 years of station's operation. Phase II will have the capacity for additional 800 containers (307,200 fuel bundles) and will provide storage until station decommissioning in 2025. Seventy containers will be required annually to meet storage requirements of the station's operation at 100% capacity factor. Staff of six persons will be required to operate the facility. Normal operation includes activities such as receiving and commissioning new containers, loading them with 4 modules of used fuel in the bays, draining and drying the cavity, decontaminating the container surface and lid welding. A helium leak test is performed before the container is placed in the storage. (author) 6 refs., 6 tabs., 7 figs

  19. Procurement and supply of CANDU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1955 a decision was made to proceed with construction of a Nuclear Power Demonstration Station (NPD) near Rolfton, Ontario. This project, headed by Atomic Energy of Canada with major involvement of private industry, was the genesis for the development of nuclear electric generation in Canada. This paper reviews one aspect of the Canadian program: the evolution of fuel procurement and supply, which in itself has been a remarkable Canadian achievement. (author)

  20. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU -The technology development for nuclear material safeguards-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research contents of the non-destructive assay real time accounting system and the preparation of DIQ. The quantity and neutron emission rate variation of curium and plutonium was investigated with respect to burnup. Also, the neutron detection probability was examined in the neutron slowing down medium and shielding calculation was carried out against the intense gamma rays emitted from the spent fuel. The investigation of the variation of plutonium and curium contents was very helpful to design of nondestructive assay system from the emitted neutrons in the spent fuel. 24 figs, 2 tabs, 20 refs. (Author)

  1. The Candu system - The way for nuclear autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience acquired by Canada during the development of Candu System is presented. Some basic foundations of technology transfer are defined and, the conditions of canadian nuclear industry to provide developing countries, technical assistence for acquisition of nuclear energy autonomy, are analysed. (M.C.K.)

  2. Temperature effect of DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel temperature coefficient (FTC) of DUPIC fuel was calculated by WIMS-AECL with ENDF/B-V cross-section library. Compared to natural uranium CANDU fuel, the FTC of DUPIC fuel is less negative when fresh and is positive after 10,000 MWD/T of irradiation. The effect of FTC on the DUPIC core performance was analyzed using the pace-time kinetics module in RFSP for the refueling transient which occurs daily during normal operation of CANDU reactors. In this study, the motion of zoen controller units (ZCU) was modeled externally to describe the reactivity control during the refueling transient. Refueling operation was modeled as a linear function of time by changing the fuel burnup incrementally and the average fuel temperature was calculated based on the bundle power during the transient. The analysis showed that the core-wide FTC is negative and local positive FTC of the DUPIC fuel can be accommodated in the CANDU reactor because the FTC is very small, the refueling operation occurs slowly, and the channel-front-peaked axial power profile weakens the contribution of the positive FTC. (author). 11 refs., 31 tabs., 10 figs

  3. ASSERT-PV 3.2: Advanced subchannel thermalhydraulics code for CANDU fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Introduction to a new version of the Canadian subchannel code, ASSERT-PV 3.2. • Enhanced models for flow-distribution, CHF and post-dryout heat transfer prediction. • Model changes focused on unique features of horizontal CANDU bundles. • Detailed description of model changes for all major thermalhydraulics models. • Discussion on rationale and limitation of the model changes. - Abstract: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the subchannel thermalhydraulics code ASSERT-PV for the Canadian nuclear industry. The most recent release version, ASSERT-PV 3.2 has enhanced phenomenon models for improved predictions of flow distribution, dryout power and CHF location, and post-dryout (PDO) sheath temperature in horizontal CANDU fuel bundles. The focus of the improvements is mainly on modeling considerations for the unique features of CANDU bundles such as horizontal flows, small pitch to diameter ratios, high mass fluxes, and mixed and irregular subchannel geometries, compared to PWR/BWR fuel assemblies. This paper provides a general introduction to ASSERT-PV 3.2, and describes the model changes or additions in the new version to improve predictions of flow distribution, dryout power and CHF location, and PDO sheath temperatures in CANDU fuel bundles

  4. ASSERT-PV 3.2: Advanced subchannel thermalhydraulics code for CANDU fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Y.F., E-mail: raoy@aecl.ca; Cheng, Z., E-mail: chengz@aecl.ca; Waddington, G.M., E-mail: waddingg@aecl.ca; Nava-Dominguez, A., E-mail: navadoma@aecl.ca

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Introduction to a new version of the Canadian subchannel code, ASSERT-PV 3.2. • Enhanced models for flow-distribution, CHF and post-dryout heat transfer prediction. • Model changes focused on unique features of horizontal CANDU bundles. • Detailed description of model changes for all major thermalhydraulics models. • Discussion on rationale and limitation of the model changes. - Abstract: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the subchannel thermalhydraulics code ASSERT-PV for the Canadian nuclear industry. The most recent release version, ASSERT-PV 3.2 has enhanced phenomenon models for improved predictions of flow distribution, dryout power and CHF location, and post-dryout (PDO) sheath temperature in horizontal CANDU fuel bundles. The focus of the improvements is mainly on modeling considerations for the unique features of CANDU bundles such as horizontal flows, small pitch to diameter ratios, high mass fluxes, and mixed and irregular subchannel geometries, compared to PWR/BWR fuel assemblies. This paper provides a general introduction to ASSERT-PV 3.2, and describes the model changes or additions in the new version to improve predictions of flow distribution, dryout power and CHF location, and PDO sheath temperatures in CANDU fuel bundles.

  5. Development of defueling device for CANDU fuel channel (modeling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. Y.; Yu, K. H.; Yang, J. S.; Lee, H. S.; Chang, K. J.; Kim, Y. J. [CNEC Technical Office, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S. K. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Commercial CANDU reactors use D{sub 2}O for moderator and heat transfer material and also have Fueling Machines(F/M) and related system equipment in order to assist on-power refueling operation. A Defuelling Device(DFD) is developed for the proper defuelling of all fuels in all fuel channels during shutdown condition of plant. This device is considered more efficient in defuelling compared to the existing Fuel Grapple System for its use of existing D{sub 2}O flow in the fuel channel. In this study, computational fluid dynamic software is used for optimize and evaluation of the design for its applicability.

  6. Performance evaluation of two CANDU fuel elements tested in the TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Research Institute at Pitesti has a set of facilities, which allow the testing, manipulation and examination of nuclear fuel and structure materials irradiated in CANDU reactors from Cernavoda NPP. These facilities consist of TRIGA materials testing reactor and Post-Irradiation Examination Laboratory (LEPI). The purpose of this work is to describe the post-irradiation examination, of two experimental CANDU fuel elements (EC1 and EC2). The fuel elements were mounted into a pattern port, one in extension of the other in a measuring test for the central temperature evolution. The results of post-irradiation examination are obtained from: Visual inspection and photography of the outer appearance of sheath; Profilometry (diameter, bending, ovalization) and length measuring; Determination of axial and radial distribution of the fission products activity by gamma scanning; Measurement of pressure, volume and isotopic composition of fission gas; Microstructural characterization by metallographic and ceramographic analyzes; Isotopic composition and burn-up determination. The post-irradiation examination results are used, on one hand, to confirm the security, reliability and performance of the irradiated fuel, and on the other hand, for further development of CANDU fuel. (authors)

  7. CANDU fuel attribution through the analysis of delayed neutron temporal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayed Neutron Counting (DNC) is an established technique in the Canadian nuclear industry as it is used for the detection of defective fuel in several CANDU reactors and the assay of uranium in geological samples. This paper describes the possible expansion of DNC to the discipline of nuclear forensics analysis. The temporal behaviour of experimentally measured delayed neutron spectra were used to determine the relative contributions of 233U and 235U to the overall fissile content present in mixtures with average absolute errors of ±4 %. The characterization of fissile content in current and proposed CANDU fuels (natural UO2, thoria and mixed oxide (MOX) based) by DNC analysis is evaluated through Monte Carlo simulations. (author)

  8. Safe, permanent disposal of used CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's assessment of nuclear fuel waste disposal deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Precambrian Shield is now well advanced. A comprehensive understanding has evolved of the chemical and physical processes controlling the containment of radionuclides in used fuel. The following conclusions have been reached: containers with outer shells of titanium and copper can be expected to isolate used fuel from contact with groundwater for at least 500 years, the period during which the hazard is greatest; uranium oxide fuel can be expected to dissolve at a rate less than 10-8 per day, resulting in uranium concentrations less that 1 μg/L, which is consistent with observations of uranium oxide deposits in the earth's crust; movement of dissolved radionuclides away from the containers can be delayed for thousands of years by placing a compacted bentonite-clay layer between the container and the rock mass; and, the granite plutons of interest consist of relatively large rock volumes of low permeability separated by relatively thin fracture zones, and the low permeability volumes are sufficiently large to accommodate a vault design that will ensure radionuclides do not reach the surface in unacceptable concentrations

  9. A short history of the CANDU nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a short historical summary of the evolution of the CANDU nuclear power system with emphasis on the roles played by Ontario Hydro and private sector companies in Ontario in collaboration with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). (author). 1 fig., 61 refs

  10. Proceedings of the fifth international conference on CANDU fuel. V.1,2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, J.H. [ed.

    1997-07-01

    The First International Conference on CANDU Fuel was held in Chalk River in 1986. The CANDU Fuel community has gathered every three years since. The papers presented include topics on international experience, CANFLEX fuel bundles, Fuel design, Fuel modelling, Manufacturing and Quality assurance, Fuel performance and Safety, Fuel cycles and Spent Fuel management. Volume One was published in advance of the conference and Volume Two was printed after the conference.

  11. Proceedings of the fifth international conference on CANDU fuel. V.1,2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The First International Conference on CANDU Fuel was held in Chalk River in 1986. The CANDU Fuel community has gathered every three years since. The papers presented include topics on international experience, CANFLEX fuel bundles, Fuel design, Fuel modelling, Manufacturing and Quality assurance, Fuel performance and Safety, Fuel cycles and Spent Fuel management. Volume One was published in advance of the conference and Volume Two was printed after the conference

  12. Development of the advanced CANDU technology -Development of CANDU advanced fuel fabrication technology-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Bum; Park, Choon Hoh; Park, Chul Joo; Kwon, Woo Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    This project is carrying out jointly with AECL to develop CANFLEX fuel which can enhance reactor safety, fuel economy and can be used with various fuel cycles (natural U, slightly enriched U, other advanced fuel). The final goal of this research is to load the CANFLEX fuel in commercial CANDU reactor for demonstration irradiation. The annual portion of research activities performed during this year are followings ; The detail design of CANFLEX-NU fuel was determined. Based on this design, various fabrication drawings and process specifications were revised. The seventeen CANFLEX-NU fuel bundles for reactivity test in ZED-2 and out-pile test, two CANFLEX-SEU fuel bundles for demo-irradiation in NRU were fabricated. Advanced tack welding machine was designed and sequence control software of automatic assembly welder was developed. The basic researches related to fabrication processes, such as weld evaluation by ECT, effect of additives in UO{sub 2}, thermal stabilities of Zr based metallic glasses, were curried out. 51 figs, 22 tabs, 42 refs. (Author).

  13. Assessment of Welding System Modification of The Candu and PWR Fuel Element Types end Plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To anticipate future possibility of a nuclear fuel element industry in Indonesia, research on other types of nuclear fuel element beside Cirene type has to be done. It can be accomplished, one of them, by modifying the already available equipment. Based on the sheath material, the sheath dimension and the welding process parameters such as welding current and welding cycles, the available Magnetic Force Welding can be used for welding end plug of Candu nuclear fuel element by modifying some of its components (tube clamp, plug clamp, etc). The available Pellet drying and element filling furnace with its supporting system with includes helium gas filling, welding chamber, argon gas supply, vacuum system, sheath clamp and sheath driving system can be used for welding end plug with sheath of PWR nuclear fuel element by adding og Tungsten inert Gas (TIG) welding machine in the welding chamber and modifying a few components (seal clamp, sheath clamp)

  14. CANDU 6 fuel channel stress analysis using ANSYS fatigue module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design reliability can be confirmed by the stress analysis, and its results become the basis of the structural integrity for components. The report presents the development of CANDU 6 fuel channel stress analysis methodology and procedure per ASME Code using the ANSYS fatigue module. Stress analysis was performed in accordance with the procedure developed on the basis of ASME Code Section III NB-3200. FORTRAN programs and ANSYS macros used in data processing were developed to systematized the analysis. Stresses were separately analyzed for mechanical and thermal load respectively, and then combined in the post-processing stage for the various conditions. Maximum stress intensity range was then calculated at selected nodes by using the ANSYS fatigue module for the sum of mechanical and thermal stress values. As a results, structural integrity of CANDU 6 fuel channel was proved in this report and analysis reliability for CANDU reactor was shown to be enhanced by the establishment of analysis procedure bases upon ASME Code. (Author) 11 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Core analysis during transition from 37-element fuel to CANFLEX-NU fuel in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    An 1200-day time-dependent fuel-management for the transition from 37-element fuel to CANFLEX-NU fuel in a CANDU 6 reactor has been simulated to show the compatibility of the CANFLEX-NU fuel with the reactor operation. The simulation calculations were carried out with the RFSP code, provided by cell averaged fuel properties obtained from the POWDERPUFS-V code. The refueling scheme for both fuels was an eight bundle shift at a time. The simulation results show that the maximum channel and bundle powers were maintained below the license limit of the CANDU 6. This indicates that the CANFLEX-NU fuel bundle is compatible with the CANDU 6 reactor operation during the transition period. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  16. Recent experience related to neutronic transients in Ontario Hydro CANDU nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ontario Hydro presently operates 18 CANDU reactors in the province of Ontario, Canada. All of these reactors are of the CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water design, although their design features differ somewhat reflecting the evolution that has taken place from 1971 when the first Pickering unit started operation to the present as the Darlington units are being placed in service. Over the last three years, two significant neutronic transients took place at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station 'A' (NGS A) one of which resulted in a number of fuel failures. Both events provided valuable lessons in the areas of operational safety, fuel performance And accident analysis. The events and the lessons learned are discussed in this paper

  17. ITER SAFETY TASK NID-10A:CANDU occupational exposure experience: ORE for ITER fuel cycle and cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains information on TRITIUM Occupational Exposure (Internal Dose) from typical CANDU Nuclear Generating Stations. In addition to dose, airborne tritium levels are provided, as these strongly influence operational exposure. The exposure dose data presented in this report cover a period of five years of operation and maintenance experience from four CANDU Reactors and are considered representative of other CANDU reactors. The data are broken down according to occupational function ( Operators, Maintenance and Support Service etc.). The referenced systems are mainly centered on CANDU Hear Transport System, Moderator System, Tritium Removal Facility and Heavy Water (D20) Upgrading System. These systems contain the bulk part of tritium contamination in the CANDU Reactor. Because of certain similarities between ITER and CANDU systems, this data can be used as the most relevant TRITIUM OCCUPATIONAL DOSE information for ITER COOLING and FUEL CYCLE systems dose assessment purpose, if similar design and operation principles as described in the report are adopted. (author). 16 refs., 8 tabs., 13 figs

  18. Fuel Temperature Characteristics for Fuel Channels using Burnable Poison in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the CANFLEX RU fuel bundle loaded 11.0 wt% Er2O3 are originally designed focused on the safety characteristics, the fuel temperature characteristics is revealed to be not deteriorated but rather is slightly enhanced by the decreased fuel temperature in the outer ring compared with that of standard 37 fuel bundle. Recently, for an equilibrium CANDU core, the power coefficient was reported to be slightly positive when newly developed Industry Standard Tool set reactor physics codes were used. Therefore, it is required to find a new way to effectively decrease the positive power coefficient of CANDU reactor without seriously compromising the economy. In order to make the power coefficient of the CANDU reactor negative at the operating power, Roh et al. have evaluated the various burnable poison (BP) materials and its loading scheme in terms of the fuel performance and reactor safety characteristics. It was shown that reactor safety characteristics can be greatly improved by the use of the BP in the CANDU reactor. In a view of safety, the fuel temperature coefficient (FTC) is an important safety parameter and it is dependent on the fuel temperature. For an accurate evaluation of the safety-related physics parameters including FTC, the fuel temperature distribution and its correlation with the coolant temperature should be accurately identified. Therefore, we have evaluated the fuel temperature distribution of a CANFLEX fuel bundle loaded with a burnable poison and compared the standard 37 element fuel bundle and CANFELX-NU fuel bundle

  19. Integrity Assessment of CANDU Spent Fuel During Interim Dry Storage in MACSTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an assessment of the integrity of CANDU spent fuel during dry storage in MACSTOR. Based on review of the safety requirements for sheath integrity during dry storage, a fuel temperature limit for spent CANDU fuel stored in MACSTOR is specified. The spent fuel conditions prior to, and during dry storage are assessed. The safety margin for spent CANDU fuel stored in MACSTOR is assessed against various failure mechanisms using the probabilistic estimation approach derived from US LWR fuel data set. (author)

  20. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR. PART 10 - PRESENTATION OF THE DECOMMISSIONING DEVICE OPERATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin D. STANESCU,

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a solution proposed by the authors in order to achieve of a cutting and extracting device operating panel for the decommissioning of the horizontal fuel channels in the CANDU 6 nuclear reactor. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED is fully automated, connected by wires to a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC and controlled from a Human Machine Interface (HMI. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED performs the dismantling, cutting and extraction of the fuel channel components, moving with variable speed, temperature monitoring and video surveillance inside the pipe, unblock and extract the channel closure plug (from End Fitting - EF, unblock and extract the channel shield plug (from Lattice Tube - LT, block and cut the middle of the pressure tube, block and cut the end of the pressure tube, block and extract the half of pressure tube. All operations can be monitored and controlled from a operating panel. The PLC fully command the device in automatic or manually mode, to control the internal sensors, transducers, electrical motors, video surveillance and pyrometers for monitoring cutting place temperature. The device controller has direct access to the measured values with these sensors, interprets and processes them, preparing the next actionafter confirming the action in progress. The design of the Cutting and Extraction Device (CED shall be achieved according to the particular features of the fuel channel components to be dismantled and to ensure radiation protection of workers.

  1. A model for fission product distribution in CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a model to estimate the distribution of active fission products among the UO2 grains, grain-boundaries, and the free void spaces in CANDU fuel elements during normal operation. This distribution is required for the calculation of the potential release of activity from failed fuel sheaths during a loss-of-coolant accident. The activity residing in the free spaces (''free'' inventory) is available for release upon sheath rupture, whereas relatively high fuel temperatures and/or thermal shock are required to release the activity in the grain boundaries or grains. A preliminary comparison of the model with the data from in-reactor sweep-gas experiments performed in Canada yields generally good agreement, with overprediction rather than under prediction of radiologically important isotopes, such as I131. The model also appears to generally agree with the ''free'' inventory release calculated using ANS-5.4. (author)

  2. Development of the CANDU high-burnup fuel design/analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains all the information related to the development of the CANDU advanced fuel, so-called CANFLEX-NU, which is composed of 43 elements with natural uranium fuel. Also, it contains the compatibility study of CANFLEX-RU which is considered as a CANDU high burnup fuel. This report describes the mechanical design, thermalhydraulic and safety evaluations of CANFLEX fuel bundle. (author). 38 refs., 24 tabs., 74 figs

  3. Quality control of CANDU6 fuel element in fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To enhance the fine control over all aspects of the production process, improve product quality, fuel element fabrication process for CANDU6 quality process control activities carried out by professional technical and management technology combined mode, the quality of the fuel elements formed around CANDU6 weak links - - end plug , and brazing processes and procedures associated with this aspect of strict control, in improving staff quality consciousness, strengthening equipment maintenance, improved tooling, fixtures, optimization process test, strengthen supervision, fine inspection operations, timely delivery carry out aspects of the quality of information and concerns the production environment, etc., to find the problem from the improvement of product quality and factors affecting the source, and resolved to form the active control, comprehensive and systematic analysis of the problem of the quality management concepts, effectively reducing the end plug weld microstructure after the failure times and number of defects zirconium alloys brazed, improved product quality, and created economic benefits expressly provided, while staff quality consciousness and attention to detail, collaboration department, communication has been greatly improved and achieved very good management effectiveness. (authors)

  4. Advancement of safeguards inspection technology for CANDU nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Park, W. S.; Cha, H. R.; Ham, Y. S.; Lee, Y. G.; Kim, K. P.; Hong, Y. D

    1999-04-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop both inspection technology and safeguards instruments, related to CANDU safeguards inspection, through international cooperation, so that those outcomes are to be applied in field inspections of national safeguards. Furthermore, those could contribute to the improvement of verification correctness of IAEA inspections. Considering the level of national inspection technology, it looked not possible to perform national inspections without the joint use of containment and surveillance equipment conjunction with the IAEA. In this connection, basic studies for the successful implementation of national inspections was performed, optimal structure of safeguards inspection was attained, and advancement of safeguards inspection technology was forwarded. The successful implementation of this project contributed to both the improvement of inspection technology on CANDU reactors and the implementation of national inspection to be performed according to the legal framework. In addition, it would be an opportunity to improve the ability of negotiating in equal shares in relation to the IAEA on the occasion of discussing or negotiating the safeguards issues concerned. Now that the national safeguards technology for CANDU reactors was developed, the safeguards criteria, procedure and instruments as to the other item facilities and fabrication facilities should be developed for the perfection of national inspections. It would be desirable that the recommendations proposed and concreted in this study, so as to both cope with the strengthened international safeguards and detect the undeclared nuclear activities, could be applied to national safeguards scheme. (author)

  5. Advancement of safeguards inspection technology for CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this project are to develop both inspection technology and safeguards instruments, related to CANDU safeguards inspection, through international cooperation, so that those outcomes are to be applied in field inspections of national safeguards. Furthermore, those could contribute to the improvement of verification correctness of IAEA inspections. Considering the level of national inspection technology, it looked not possible to perform national inspections without the joint use of containment and surveillance equipment conjunction with the IAEA. In this connection, basic studies for the successful implementation of national inspections was performed, optimal structure of safeguards inspection was attained, and advancement of safeguards inspection technology was forwarded. The successful implementation of this project contributed to both the improvement of inspection technology on CANDU reactors and the implementation of national inspection to be performed according to the legal framework. In addition, it would be an opportunity to improve the ability of negotiating in equal shares in relation to the IAEA on the occasion of discussing or negotiating the safeguards issues concerned. Now that the national safeguards technology for CANDU reactors was developed, the safeguards criteria, procedure and instruments as to the other item facilities and fabrication facilities should be developed for the perfection of national inspections. It would be desirable that the recommendations proposed and concreted in this study, so as to both cope with the strengthened international safeguards and detect the undeclared nuclear activities, could be applied to national safeguards scheme. (author)

  6. Enrichment effects on CANDU-SEU spent fuel Monte Carlo shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding analyses are an essential component of the nuclear safety, the estimations of radiation doses in order to reduce them under specified limitation values being the main task here. According to IAEA data, more than 10 millions packages containing radioactive materials are annually transported world wide. All the problems arisen from the safe radioactive materials transport assurance must be carefully settled. Last decade, both for operating reactors and future reactor projects, a general trend to raise the discharge fuel burnup has been recorded world wide. For CANDU type reactors, the most attractive solution seems to be SEU and RU fuels utilization. The basic tasks accomplished by the shielding calculations in a nuclear safety analysis consist in dose rates calculation, to prevent any risks both for personnel protection and impact on the environment during the spent fuel manipulation, transport and storage. The paper aims to study the effects induced by fuel enrichment variation on CANDU-SEU spent fuel photon dose rates for a Monte Carlo shielding analysis applied to spent fuel transport after a defined cooling period in the NPP pools. The fuel bundles projects considered here have 43 Zircaloy rods, filled with SEU fuel pellets, the fuel having different enrichment in U-235. All the geometrical and material data related on the cask were considered according to the shipping cask type B model. After a photon source profile calculation by using ORIGEN-S code, in order to perform the shielding calculations, Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code has been used, both codes being included in the ORNL's SCALE 5 system. The photon dose rates to the shipping cask wall and in air, at different distances from the cask, have been estimated. Finally, a photon dose rates comparison for different fuel enrichments has been performed. (author)

  7. The CANDU irradiated fuel safeguards sealing system at the threshold of implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a safeguards containment and surveillance system for the irradiated fuel discharged from CANDU nuclear generating stations has inspired the development of three different sealing technologies. Each seal type utilizes a random seal identity of different design. The AECL Random Coil (ARC) Seal combines the identity and integrity elements in the ultrasonic signature of a wire coil. Two variants of an optical seal have been developed which features identity elements of crystalline zirconium and aluminum. The sealed cap-seal uses a conventional IAEA 'Type X Seal' (wire seal). The essential features and relative merits of each seal design are described

  8. Thermal analysis model for the temperature distribution of the CANDU spent fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this technical is to introduce the methodology and experimental process for the experimental research work with the mock-up test performed to verify and validate the MAXROT code which is a thermal analysis method for Wolsong (CANDU) spent fuel dry storage canister. The experiment was conducted simulating the heat transfer characteristics of combinations of equilateral triangular and square pitch arrays of heater rods, similar to a CANDU spent fuel bundle. After assembly of the heater rod bundle into the containment vessel, the experimental apparatus was operated under the same operating and boundary conditions as an interim dry storage condition at the nuclear power plant site. The reduced data from this experiment has been utilized to verity a model developed to predict the maximum fuel rod surface temperature in a fuel bundle. These test procedures and the experiment can be utilized to establish the fine thermal analysis method applicable to dry storage system for the spent fuel. 12 figs., 5 tabs., 36 refs. (Author) .new

  9. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR PART 5 - FUEL CHANEL DECOMMISSIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As many nuclear power plants are reaching their end of lifecycle, the decommissioning of these installations has become one of the 21st century’s great challenges. Each project may be managed differently, depending on the country, development policies, financial considerations, and the availability of qualified engineers or specialized companies to handle such projects. The principle objective of decommissioning is to place a facility into such a condition that there is no unacceptable risk from the decommissioned facility to public health and safety of the environment. In order to ensure that at the end of its life the risk from a facility is within acceptable bounds, action is normally required. The overall decommissioning strategy is to deliver a timely, cost-effective program while maintaining high standards of safety, security and environmental protection. If facilities were not decommissioned, they could degrade and potentially present an environmental radiological hazard in the future. Simply abandoning or leaving a facility after ceasing operations is not considered to be an acceptable alternative to decommissioning. The final aim of decommissioning is to recover the geographic site to its original condition.

  10. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR PART 2 - FUEL CHANNEL PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As many nuclear power plants are reaching their end of lifecycle, the decommissioning of these installations has become one of the 21st century’s great challenges. Each project may be managed differently, depending on the country, development policies, financial considerations, and the availability of qualified engineers or specialized companies to handle such projects. The principle objective of decommissioning is to place a facility into such a condition that there is no unacceptable risk from the decommissioned facility to public health and safety of the environment. In order to ensure that at the end of its life the risk from a facility is within acceptable bounds, action is normally required. The overall decommissioning strategy is to deliver a timely, costeffective program while maintaining high standards of safety, security and environmental protection. If facilities were not decommissioned, they could degrade and potentially present an environmental radiological hazard in the future. Simply abandoning or leaving a facility after ceasing operations is not considered to be an acceptable alternative to decommissioning.The final aim of decommissioning is to recover the geographic site to its original condition.

  11. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR PART 4 - FUEL CHANNEL ASSEMBLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As many nuclear power plants are reaching their end of lifecycle, the decommissioning of these installations has become one of the 21st century’s great challenges. Each project may be managed differently, depending on the country, development policies, financial considerations, and the availability of qualified engineers or specialized companies to handle such projects. The principle objective of decommissioning is to place a facility into such a condition that there is no unacceptable risk from the decommissioned facility to public health and safety of the environment. In order to ensure that at the end of its life the risk from a facility is within acceptable bounds, action is normally required. The overall decommissioning strategy is to deliver a timely, costeffective program while maintaining high standards of safety, security and environmental protection. If facilities were not decommissioned, they could degrade and potentially present an environmental radiological hazard in the future. Simply abandoning or leaving a facility after ceasing operations is not considered to be an acceptable alternative to decommissioning. The final aim of decommissioning is to recover the geographic site to its original condition.

  12. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR PART 3 - FUEL CHANNEL REFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As many nuclear power plants are reaching their end of lifecycle, the decommissioning of these installations has become one of the 21st century’s great challenges. Each project may be managed differently, depending on the country, development policies, financial considerations, and the availability of qualified engineers or specialized companies to handle such projects. The principle objective of decommissioning is to place a facility into such a condition that there is no unacceptable risk from the decommissioned facility to public health and safety of the environment. In order to ensure that at the end of its life the risk from a facility is within acceptable bounds, action is normally required. The overall decommissioning strategy is to deliver a timely, cost-effective program while maintaining high standards of safety, security and environmental protection. If facilities were not decommissioned, they could degrade and potentially present an environmental radiological hazard in the future. Simply abandoning or leaving a facility after ceasing operations is not considered to be an acceptable alternative to decommissioning. The final aim of decommissioning is to recover the geographic site to its original condition.

  13. Release of 14C from the gap and grain-boundary regions of used CANDU fuels to aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP), to measure 14C inventories of used CANDU fuel. Other objectives were to measure the fraction of the total 14C inventory that would be instantly released to solution from used CANDU fuels upon sheath failure and to determine if the assumptions made in safety assessment calculations of used fuel waste disposal regarding instant release of 14C were correct. Results showed that the measured 14C inventories were a factor of 11.5 ± 3.9 lower than the estimated 14C inventory values used in safety assessment calculations. Measured instant release values for 14C ranged from 0.06 to 5.04% (of total 14C inventories) with an average of 2.7 ± 1.6%, indicating that instant release fractions for 14C used in safety assessment calculations (1.2--25%) were overestimated

  14. CANDU 9 design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has made significant design improvements in the latest CANDU nuclear power plant (NPP) - the CANDU 9. The CANDU 9 operates with the energy efficient heavy water moderated reactor and natural uranium fuel and utilizes proven technology. The CANDU 9 NPP design is similar to the world leading CANDU 6 but is based upon the single unit adaptation of the 900 MWe class reactors currently operating in Canada as in integrated four-unit configurations. The evolution of the CANDU family of heavy water reactors (HAIR) is based on a continuous product improvement approach. Proven equipment and systems from operating stations are standardized and used in new products. As a result of the flexibility of the technology, evolution of the current design will ensure that any new requirements can be met, and there is no need to change the basic concept. This paper will provide an overview for some of the key features of the CANDU 9 NPP such as nuclear systems and equipment, advanced control and computer systems, safety design and protection features, and plant layout. The safety enhancements and operability improvements implemented in this design are described and some of the advantages that can be expected by the operating utility are highlighted. (author)

  15. Advanced CANDU reactors fuel analysis through optimal fuel management at approach to refuelling equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of alternate CANDU fuels along with natural uranium-based fuel was carried out from the view point of optimal in-core fuel management at approach to refuelling equilibrium. The alternate fuels considered in the present work include thorium containing oxide mixtures (MOX), plutonium-based MOX, and Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel recycled in CANDU reactors (Direct Use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU (DUPIC)); these are compared with the usual natural UO2 fuel. The focus of the study is on the 'Approach to Refuelling Equilibrium' period which immediately follows the initial commissioning of the reactor. The in-core fuel management problem for this period is treated as an optimization problem in which the objective function is the refuelling frequency to be minimized by adjusting the following decision variables: the channel to be refuelled next, the time of the refuelling and the number of fresh fuel bundles to be inserted in the channel. Several constraints are also included in the optimisation problem which is solved using Perturbation Theory. Both the present 37-rod CANDU fuel bundle and the proposed CANFLEX bundle designs are part of this study. The results include the time to reach refuelling equilibrium from initial start-up of the reactor, the average discharge burnup, the average refuelling frequency and the average channel and bundle powers relative to natural UO2. The model was initially tested and the average discharge burnup for natural UO2 came within 2% of the industry accepted 199 MWh/kgHE. For this type of fuel, the optimization exercise predicted the savings of 43 bundles per full power year. In addition to producing average discharge burnups and other parameters for the advanced fuels investigated, the optimisation model also evidenced some problem areas like high power densities for fuels such as the DUPIC. Perturbation Theory has proven itself to be an accurate and valuable optimization tool in predicting the time between

  16. Subchannel analysis of CANDU 37-element fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subchannel analysis codes COBRA-IV and ASSERT-4 have been used to predict the mass and enthalpy imbalance within a CANDU 37-element fuel channel under various system conditions. The objective of this study was to assess the various capabilities of the ASSERT code and highlight areas where further validation or development may be needed. The investigation indicated that the ASSERT code has all the basic models required to accurately predict the flow and enthalpy imbalance for complex rod bundles. The study also showed that the code modelling of void drift and diffusion requires refinement to some coefficients and that further validation is needed at high flow rate and high void fraction conditions, where ASSERT and COBRA are shown to predict significantly different trends. The results of a recent refinement of ASSERT modelling are also discussed

  17. Joint studies on large CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU PHWRs have demonstrated generic benefits which will be continued in future designs. These include economic benefits due to low operating costs, business potential, strategic benefits due to fuel cycle flexibility and operational benefits. These benefits have been realized in Korea through the operation of Wolsong 1, resulting in further construction of PHWRs at the same site. The principal benefit, low electricity cost, is due to the high capacity factor and the low fuel cost for CANDU. The CANDU plant at Wolsong has proven to be a safe, reliable and economical electricity producer. The ability of PHWR to burn natural uranium ensures security of fuel supply. Following successful Technology Transfer via the Wolsong 2,3 and 4 project, future opportunity exists between Korea and Canada for continuing co-operation in research and development to improve the technology base, for product development partnerships, and business opportunities in marketing and building PHWR plants in third countries. High reliability, through excellent design, well-controlled operation, efficient maintenance and low operating costs is critical to the economic viability of nuclear plants. CANDU plants have an excellent performance record. The four operating CANDU 6 plants, operated by four utilities in three countries, are world performance leaders. The CANDU 9 design, with higher output capacity, will help to achieve better site utilization and lower electricity costs. Being an evolutionary design, CANDU 9 assures high performance by utilizing proven systems, and component designs adapted from operating CANDU plants (Bruce B, Darlington and CANDU 6). All system and operating parameters are within the operating proven range of current plants. KAERI and AECL have an agreement to perform joint studies on future PHWR development. The objective of the joint studies is to establish the requirements for the design of future advanced CANDU PHWR including the utility need for design improvements

  18. Safety of CANDU nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear plant contains a large amount of radioactive material which could be a potential threat to public health. The plant is therefore designed, built and operated so that the risk to the public is low. Careful design of the normal reactor systems is the first line of defense. These systems are highly resistant to an accident happening in the first place, and can also be effective in stopping it if it does happen. Independent and redundant safety sytems minimize the effects of an accident, or stop it completely. They include shutdown systems, emergency core cooling systems, and containment systems. Massive impairment of any one safety system together with an accident can be tolerated. This 'defence in depth' approach recognizes that men and machines are imperfect and that the unexpected happens. The nuclear power plant need not be perfect to be safe. To allow meaningful judgements we must know how safe the plant is. The Atomic Energy Control Board guidelines give one such measure, but they may overestimate the true risk. We interpret these guidelines as an upper limit to the total risk, and trace their evolution. (author)

  19. Fuel bundle geometry and composition influence on coolant void reactivity reduction in ACR and CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is very well known that the CANDU reactor has positive Coolant Void Reactivity (CVR), which is most important criticisms about CANDU. The most recent innovations based on using a thin absorbent Hafnium shell in the central bundle element were successfully been applied to the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) project. The paper's objective is to analyze elementary lattice cell effects in applying such methods to reduce the CVR. Three basic fuel designs in their corresponding geometries were chosen to be compared: the ACR-1000TM, the RU-43 (developed in INR Pitesti) and the standard CANDU fuel. The bundle geometry influence on void effect was also evaluated. The WIMS calculations proved the Hafnium absorber suitability (in the latest 'shell design') to achieve the negative CVR target with great accuracy for the ACR-1000 fuel bundle design than for the other two projects. (authors)

  20. Overview of the CANDU fuel handling system for advanced fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of its neutron economies and on-power re-fuelling capabilities the CANDU system is ideally suited for implementing advanced fuel cycles because it can be adapted to burn these alternative fuels without major changes to the reactor. The fuel handling system is adaptable to implement advanced fuel cycles with some minor changes. Each individual advanced fuel cycle imposes some new set of special requirements on the fuel handling system that is different from the requirements usually encountered in handling the traditional natural uranium fuel. These changes are minor from an overall plant point of view but will require some interesting design and operating changes to the fuel handling system. Some preliminary conceptual design has been done on the fuel handling system in support of these fuel cycles. Some fuel handling details were studies in depth for some of the advanced fuel cycles. This paper provides an overview of the concepts and design challenges. (author)

  1. LONGER: a computer program for longitudinal ridging and axial collapse assessment of CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU® fuel element sheath is designed to be thin and flexible for the benefit of enhanced heat transfer from the pellet to the coolant through the sheath. The flexibility of the sheath may allow the formation of longitudinal ridges on the sheath or collapse of the sheath into an axial gap under certain conditions. For both cases of deformations, the sheath may experience significant strains, and may result in sheath failure. To ensure the sheath mechanical integrity, the fuel element design needs to be assessed to preclude the conditions for longitudinal ridging and sheath collapse into the axial gap. The AECL developed LONGER computer program is used in fuel design analysis for such purpose. The LONGER code contains a number of models derived based on measurements (empirical models) and based on analytical equations, to predict the following parameters related to the deformations of CANDU nuclear fuel element sheaths. For longitudinal ridging: The critical diametral clearance for sheath longitudinal ridging, and The critical pressure for longitudinal ridging of the sheath. For axial collapse: The critical pressure for instantaneous sheath collapse into an axial gap. For circumferential collapse: The critical pressure for elastic collapse of the sheath, and The effective circumferential collapse pressure of the sheath by taking into account the axial and radial loads and the ovality of the sheath. The LONGER code has been qualified in accordance with the CSA standard N286.7-99 compliant AECL Software Quality Assurance (SQA) program. This paper describes the features and capabilities of the LONGER code that are used in CANDU fuel design analysis. (author)

  2. LONGER: a computer program for longitudinal ridging and axial collapse assessment of CANDU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, U.K.; Xu, Z.; Xu, S.; Wang, X.; Chakraborty, K. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    CANDU® fuel element sheath is designed to be thin and flexible for the benefit of enhanced heat transfer from the pellet to the coolant through the sheath. The flexibility of the sheath may allow the formation of longitudinal ridges on the sheath or collapse of the sheath into an axial gap under certain conditions. For both cases of deformations, the sheath may experience significant strains, and may result in sheath failure. To ensure the sheath mechanical integrity, the fuel element design needs to be assessed to preclude the conditions for longitudinal ridging and sheath collapse into the axial gap. The AECL developed LONGER computer program is used in fuel design analysis for such purpose. The LONGER code contains a number of models derived based on measurements (empirical models) and based on analytical equations, to predict the following parameters related to the deformations of CANDU nuclear fuel element sheaths. For longitudinal ridging: The critical diametral clearance for sheath longitudinal ridging, and The critical pressure for longitudinal ridging of the sheath. For axial collapse: The critical pressure for instantaneous sheath collapse into an axial gap. For circumferential collapse: The critical pressure for elastic collapse of the sheath, and The effective circumferential collapse pressure of the sheath by taking into account the axial and radial loads and the ovality of the sheath. The LONGER code has been qualified in accordance with the CSA standard N286.7-99 compliant AECL Software Quality Assurance (SQA) program. This paper describes the features and capabilities of the LONGER code that are used in CANDU fuel design analysis. (author)

  3. CANDU RU fuel manufacturing basic technology development and advanced fuel verification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A PHWR advanced fuel named the CANFLEX fuel has been developed through a KAERI/AECL joint Program. The KAERI made fuel bundle was tested at the KAERI Hot Test Loop for the performance verification of the bundle design. The major test activities were the fuel bundle cross-flow test, the endurance fretting/vibration test, the freon CHF test, and the fuel bundle heat-up test. KAERI also has developing a more advanced PHWR fuel, the CANFLEX-RU fuel, using recovered uranium to extend fuel burn-up in the CANDU reactors. For the purpose of proving safety of the RU handling techniques and appraising feasibility of the CANFLEX-RU fuel fabrication in near future, a physical, chemical and radiological characterization of the RU powder and pellets was performed. (author). 54 refs., 46 tabs., 62 figs

  4. CANDU RU fuel manufacturing basic technology development and advanced fuel verification tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chang Hwan; Chang, S.K.; Hong, S.D. [and others

    1999-04-01

    A PHWR advanced fuel named the CANFLEX fuel has been developed through a KAERI/AECL joint Program. The KAERI made fuel bundle was tested at the KAERI Hot Test Loop for the performance verification of the bundle design. The major test activities were the fuel bundle cross-flow test, the endurance fretting/vibration test, the freon CHF test, and the fuel bundle heat-up test. KAERI also has developing a more advanced PHWR fuel, the CANFLEX-RU fuel, using recovered uranium to extend fuel burn-up in the CANDU reactors. For the purpose of proving safety of the RU handling techniques and appraising feasibility of the CANFLEX-RU fuel fabrication in near future, a physical, chemical and radiological characterization of the RU powder and pellets was performed. (author). 54 refs., 46 tabs., 62 figs.

  5. CANDU market prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 1994 survey of prospective markets for CANDU reactors discusses prospects in Turkey, Thailand, the Philippines, Korea, Indonesia, China and Egypt, and other opportunities, such as in fuel cycles and nuclear safety. It was concluded that foreign partners would be needed to help with financing

  6. Sensitivity of Candu-Scwr Reactor Physics Calculations to Nuclear Data Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozier, K. S.; Dyck, G. R.

    2006-04-01

    A simplified MCNP model of a CANDU-SCWR lattice was used to test the sensitivity of the calculated reactivity to various nuclear data files involving issues of current interest. These tests were performed for cooled and voided conditions, with and without axial neutron leakage, for a uniform lattice of mid-life fuel and a mixed lattice with high-burnup and low-burnup fuel in alternate channels. Results were compared using different room-temperature data files for deuterium, various thermal-scattering-law data files for hydrogen bound in light water and deuterium bound in heavy water, and for pre-ENDF/B-VII and ENDF/B-VI.8 data for uranium. The reactivity differences observed were small (typically <1 mk) and increased with axial neutron leakage.

  7. Pressure tube life management in CANDU-6 nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operating parameters of pressure tube in CANDU-6 reactor, the relation between pressure tube life and plant life improvement of pressure tube by AECL in past years were summarized, and the factors affecting pressure tube life, idea and main measures of pressure tube life management in QINSHAN CANDU-6 power plant introduced

  8. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR. PART 7 - FUNCTIONING OF THE DECOMMISSIONING DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this paper is to achieve the device functioning steps for the commissioning of the horizontal fuel channels of calandria vessel. The dismantling of the fuel channel is performed by one device which shall provide radiation protection during the stages of decommissioning, ensuring radiation protection of the workers. For the decommissioning operation design shall be taken to ensure all aspects of security, environmental protection during decommissioning operation steps and creating and implementing work procedures resulting from developed decommissioning plan. The fuel channel decommissioning device is designed for dismantling and extraction of the fuel channel and its components. The decommissioning operation consists of following major steps: platform with device positioning to the fuel channel to be dismantled; coupling and locking the device at the fuel channel; unblock, extract and store the channel closure plug; unblock, extract and store the channel shield plug; block and cut the middle and the end of the pressure tube; block, extract and store the end fitting; block, extract and store the half of pressure tube; mounting of the extended closing plug. The operations steps are performed by the Cutting and Extraction Device and by the extraction actuator from the device handling elements assembly. After each step of dismantling is necessary the confirmation its finalization in order to perform the next operation step. The dismantling operation steps of the fuel channel components are repeated for all the 380 channels of the reactor, from the front of calandria side (plane R as well as the rear side (plane R'.

  9. An analytical assessment of the longitudinal ridging of CANDU type fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are 380 fuel channels in a CANDU-6 reactor, and twelve fuel bundles are loaded into each fuel channel. High-pressure, heavy water coolant passes through the fuel bundle string to remove heat generated from the fuel. Fuel sheath collapses down around the uranium dioxide pellet due to the coolant pressure when the fuel is loaded into the reactor. Longitudinal ridges may form in CANDU fuel element sheaths as a result of sheath collapse onto the pellets. A static analysis, finite-element (FE) model was developed to simulate the longitudinal ridging of the fuel element with use of the structural analysis computer code ABAQUS. Collapse pressures were calculated for the fifty-one cases for which test results of WCL in 1973 and 1975 are available. Calculation results under-predicted the critical collapse pressure but it showed significant relationship against test results

  10. Proceedings of the 1. international conference on CANDU fuel handling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides information on fuel loading and handling systems for CANDU and PHWR reactors, the 25 papers in these proceedings also include some on dry storage, modification to fuel strings at Bruce A, and on the SLAR (spacer location and repositioning) system for finding and moving garter springs. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  11. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society CANDU maintenance conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference proceedings comprise 51 papers on the following aspects of maintenance of CANDU reactors: Major maintenance projects, maintenance planning and preparation, maintenance effectiveness, future maintenance issues, safety and radiation protection. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  12. Load following tests on CANDU-type fuel elements in TRIGA research reactor of INR Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two load following (LF) tests on CANDU-type fuel elements were performed in the TRIGA Research Reactor of INR Pitesti, where the tests were designed to represent fuel in a CANDU reactor operating in a load following regime. In the first LF test the designated '78R' fuel element successfully experienced 367 power cycles, mostly between 23 and 56 kW/m average linear power. In the second LF test, developed under INR-AECL co-operation, the fuel element designated as 'ME01' withstood 200 power cycles from 27 to 54 kW/m average linear power, as well as additional ramps due to reactor trips and restarts during the test period. This experimental program is ongoing at INR Pitesti. Both LF tests were simulated with finite element computer codes in order to evaluate Stress Corrosion Fatigue (SCF) of the cladding arising from expansion and contraction of the pellets. New LF tests are planned to be performed in order to establish the limits and capabilities for CANDU fuel in LF conditions. This paper presents the results of the LF tests performed in the INR TRIGA Research Reactor compared with the analytical assessment for SCF conditions and their relation to CANDU fuel performance in LF conditions. (author)

  13. Development of the advanced PHWR technology -Design and analysis of CANDU advanced fuel-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, Hoh Chun; Shim, Kee Sub; Byun, Taek Sang; Park, Kwang Suk; Kang, Heui Yung; Kim, Bong Kee; Jung, Chang Joon; Lee, Yung Wook; Bae, Chang Joon; Kwon, Oh Sun; Oh, Duk Joo; Im, Hong Sik; Ohn, Myung Ryong; Lee, Kang Moon; Park, Joo Hwan; Lee, Eui Joon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    This is the `94 annual report of the CANDU advanced fuel design and analysis project, and describes CANFLEX fuel design and mechanical integrity analysis, reactor physics analysis and safety analysis of the CANDU-6 with the CANFLEX-NU. The following is the R and D scope of this fiscal year : (1) Detail design of CANFLEX-NU and detail analysis on the fuel integrity, reactor physics and safety. (a) Detail design and mechanical integrity analysis of the bundle (b) CANDU-6 refueling simulation, and analysis on the Xe transients and adjuster system capability (c) Licensing strategy establishment and safety analysis for the CANFLEX-NU demonstration demonstration irradiation in a commercial CANDU-6. (2) Production and revision of CANFLEX-NU fuel design documents (a) Production and approval of CANFLEX-NU reference drawing, and revisions of fuel design manual and technical specifications (b) Production of draft physics design manual. (3) Basic research on CANFLEX-SEU fuel. 55 figs, 21 tabs, 45 refs. (Author).

  14. Licensing evaluation of CANDU-PHW nuclear power plants relative to U.S. regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences between the U.S. and Canadian approach to safety and licensing are discussed. U.S. regulatory requirements are evaluated as regards their applicability to CANDU-PHW reactors; vice-versa the CANDU-PHW reactor is evaluated with respect to current Regulatory Requirements and Guides. A number of design modifications are proposed to be incorporated into the CANDU-PHW reactor in order to facilitate its introduction into the U.S. These modifications are proposed solely for the purpose of maintaining consistency within the current U.S. regulatory system and not out of a need to improve the safety of current-design CANDU-PHW nuclear power plants. A number of issues are identified which still require resolution. Most of these issues are concerned with design areas not (yet) covered by the ASME code. (author)

  15. Evolution of procurement and supply conditions for CANDU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1955 a decision was made to proceed with construction of a Nuclear Power Demonstration Station (NPD) near Rolphton, Ontario. This project, headed by Atomic Energy of Canada with major involvement of private industry, was the genesis for the development of nuclear electric generation in Canada. This paper reviews one aspect of the Canadian program: the evolution of fuel procurement and supply, which in itself has been a remarkable Canadian achievement. (author)

  16. Optimization of thorium-uranium content in a 54-element fuel bundle for use in a CANDU-SCWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new 54-element fuel bundle design has been proposed for use in a pressure-tube supercritical water-cooled reactor, a pre-conceptual evolution of existing CANDU reactors. Pursuant to the goals of the Generation IV International Forum regarding advancement in nuclear fuel cycles, optimization of the thorium and uranium content in each ring of fuel elements has been studied with the objectives of maximizing the achievable fuel utilization (burnup) and total thorium content within the bundle, while simultaneously minimizing the linear element ratings and coolant void reactivity. The bundle was modeled within a reactor lattice cell using WIMS-AECL, and the uranium and thorium content in each ring of fuel elements was optimized using a weighted merit function of the aforementioned criteria and a metaheuristic search algorithm. (author)

  17. Thermal Analysis of CANDU Spent Fuel Bay Cooling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Mann; Jang, Ho Cheol; Jang, Jin A.; Kim, Eun Kee [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, WanGyu [KHNP, Uljingun (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The spent fuel bay cooling and purification system for Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Units 2, 3 and 4 was designed to remove heat from the spent fuel bay generated by 10 years accumulation of spent fuel at an 80% capacity factor refueling rate plus an emergency discharge of one-half the core fuel inventory over a 20-day period for 25.5 .deg. C of the cooling sea water temperature. The heat load in the spent fuel bay depends on the capacity factor refueling rate and the amount of spent fuel accumulated at the spent fuel bay. An 80% capacity factor refueling rate was considered as a design condition, but the highest capacity factor refueling rate of 93.75% for Wolsong NPPs was calculated based on nine (9) years of operating experience from 2000 to 2008. For the abnormal operating condition, the operating temperature of spent fuel bay does not meet with the acceptance criterion of 49 .deg. C for the conditions of the capacity factor refueling rate of 93.75%. These operating modes are not recommended for the abnormal operating condition.

  18. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This paper highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations both to the workers and the public

  19. A modal method for transient thermal analysis of CANDU fuel channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classical modal expansion technique has been applied to predict transient fuel and coolant temperatures under on-power conditions in a CANDU fuel channel. The temperature profile across the fuel pellet is assumed to be parabolic and fuel and coolant temperatures are expanded with Fourier series. The coefficient derivatives are written in state space form and solved by the Runge-Kutta method of fifth order. To validate the present model, the calculated fuel temperatures for several sample cases were compared with HOTSPOT-II, which employs a more rigorous finite-difference model. The agreement was found to be reasonable for the operational transients simulated. The advantage of the modal method is the fast computation speed for application to the real-time system such as the CANDU simulator which is being currently developed at the Institute for Advanced Engineering (IAE). (author)

  20. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is expected that nuclear power generation will reach 49 million kW in 1985 and 129 million kW in 1995, and the nuclear fuel having to be supplied and processed will increase in proportion to these values. The technical problems concerning nuclear fuel are presented on the basis of the balance between the benefit for human beings and the burden on the human beings. Recently, especially the downstream of nuclear fuel attracts public attention. Enriched uranium as the raw material for light water reactor fuel is almost monopolized by the U.S., and the technical information has not been published for fear of the diversion to nuclear weapons. In this paper, the present situations of uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, transportation, reprocessing and waste disposal and the future problems are described according to the path of nuclear fuel cycle. The demand and supply of enriched uranium in Japan will be balanced up to about 1988, but afterwards, the supply must rely upon the early establishment of the domestic technology by centrifugal separation method. No problem remains in the fabrication of light water reactor fuel, but for the fabrication of mixed oxide fuel, the mechanization of the production facility and labor saving are necessary. The solution of the capital risk for the construction of the second reprocessing plant is the main problem. Japan must develop waste disposal techniques with all-out efforts. (Kako, I.)

  1. Economics of CANDU-PHW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU-Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This paper discusses the cost of producing electricity from CANDU, presents actual cost experience of CANDU and coal in Ontario, presents projected CANDU and coal costs in Ontario and compares CANDU and Light Water Reactor cost estimates in Ontario

  2. Designing and calculating the pressure loses for different geometries of CANDU type fuel clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that circulation of the coolant through the pressure tube of a CANDU type reactor must ensure, through its flow rate values, the optimal conditions of heat transfer from the fuel clusters towards the heavy water. The flow rate through fuel channels differs from one another (up to 24 kg/s) depending on the fuel element sheath temperature, the latter depending in turn one the channels/clusters positions in the calandria vessel. In these conditions, one of the main problem of design in the CANDU type reactor plants is related to the hydraulic resistance represented by the fuel clusters loading the pressure tube or, in other words, the problem of pressure losses (pressure drops) over the length of the fuel cluster column. More precisely, this hydraulic resistance should not exceed a given value imposed by the performance calculations for the pumps used. A sustained activity of analysing comparatively the different geometry types of the fuel clusters was developed at INR Pitesti, a special attention being paid to their behavior as hydraulic resistances. The paper presents a set of computation programs devoted on one hand to the design of fuel clusters of different types and to an estimating computation of the pressure losses resulting from loading these clusters into a specific fuel channel of the CANDU type reactor, on the other hand. During the presentation of the work, different computing codes will be run for demonstration

  3. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All stages of nuclear fuel cycle are analysed with respect to the present situation and future perspectives of supply and demand of services; the prices and the unitary cost estimation of these stages for the international fuel market are also mentioned. From the world resources and projections of uranium consumption, medium-and long term analyses are made of fuel availability for several strategies of use of different reactor types. Finally, the cost of nuclear fuel in the generation of electric energy is calculated to be used in the energetic planning of the electric sector. (M.A.)

  4. Romanian-Canadian joint program for qualification of FCN as a CANDU fuel supplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RENEL (Romania Power Authority), the co-ordinator of Romanian Nuclear Program, have decided to improve, starting 1990 the existing capability to produce CANDU nuclear fuel at FCN Pitesti. The objective of the program was defined with AAC (AECL - ANSALDO Consortium) for the qualification of FCN fuel plant according to Canadian Z299.2 standard. The Qualification Program was performed under AAC Work Order C-003. The co-ordination was assumed by AECL, as overall Design Authority. ZPI (Zircatec Precision Industries Inc., Canada), were designated to supply technical assistance, equipments and know how where necessary. After a preliminary verification of the FCN fuel plant, including the processes and system investigation, performed under AECL and ZPI assistance, the Qualification Program was defined in all details. The upgrading of documentation on all aspects required by Z299.2 was performed. Few processes needed to be reconsidered and equipment was delivered by ZPI or other suppliers. This includes mainly welding equipments and special inspection equipments. Health Physics was practically fully reconsidered. New equipment and practice were adapted to provide adequate control on health conditions. Every manufacturing and inspection process was checked to determine their performance during a Qualification Run based on acceptance criteria which have been established in the Qualification Plan. Manufacturing Demonstration Run was an important step to prove that all plant functions have been accomplished during the fabrication of 200 fuel bundles. These bundles have been fully accepted and 66 of them have been loaded in the first charge of Unit 1 Cemavoda NPS. The surveillance and audit actions made by AECL and ZPI during this period confirmed the FCN capability to operate an adequate system meeting the to required quality assurance standard. The very open attitude of AECL, Zircatec and FCN staff have stimulated the progress of the project and a successful achievement of the

  5. Validation of the COBRA code for dry out power calculation in CANDU type advanced fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern Laboratories perform a full scale CHF testing of the CANFLEX bundle under AECL request. This experiment is modeled with the COBRA IV HW code to verify it's capacity for the dry out power calculation . Good results were obtained: errors below 10 % with respect to all data measured and 1 % for standard operating conditions in CANDU reactors range . This calculations were repeated for the CNEA advanced fuel CARA obtaining the same performance as the CANFLEX fuel. (author)

  6. Research on using depleted uranium as nuclear fuel for HWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our work is to find a way for application of depleted uranium in CANDU reactor by using MOX nuclear fuel of depleted U and Pu instead of natural uranium. From preliminary evaluation and calculation, it was shown that MOX nuclear fuel consisting of depleted uranium enrichment tailings (0.25% 235U) and plutonium (their ratio 99.5%:0.5%) could replace natural uranium in CANDU reactor to sustain chain reaction. The prospects of application of depleted uranium in nuclear energy field are also discussed

  7. Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - I: DUPIC Fuel Fabrication Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary conceptual design of a Direct Use of spent Pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel In Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel fabrication plant was studied, which annually converts spent PWR fuel of 400 tonnes heavy element (HE) into CANDU fuel. The capital and operating costs were estimated from the viewpoint of conceptual design. Assuming that the annual discount rate is 5% during the construction (5 yr) and operation period (40 yr) and contingency is 25% of the capital cost, the levelized unit cost (LUC) of DUPIC fuel fabrication was estimated to be 616 $/kg HE, which is mostly governed by annual operation and maintenance costs that correspond to 63% of LUC. Among the operation and maintenance cost components being considered, the waste disposal cost has the dominant effect on LUC (∼49%). From sensitivity analyses of production capacity, discount rate, and contingency, it was found that the production capacity of the plant is the major parameter that affects the LUC

  8. Aging effect on the fuel behaviors for CANDU fuel safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the aging of heat transport system components, the reactor thermalhydraulic conditions can vary, which may affect the safety response. In a recent safety analysis for the refurbished Wolsong 1 NPP, various aging effects were incorporated into the hydraulic models of the components in the primary heat transport system (PHTS) for conservatism. The aging data of the thermal-hydraulic components for an 11 EFPY of Wolsong 1 were derived based on the site operation data and were modified to the appropriate input data for the thermal-hydraulic code for a safety analysis of a postulated accident. This paper deals with the aging effect of the PHTS of the CANDU reactor on the fuel performance during normal operation and transient period following a postulated accident such as a feeder stagnation break. (author)

  9. Study of CANDU thorium-based fuel cycles by deterministic and Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the Generation IV forum, there is a renewal of interest in self-sustainable thorium fuel cycles applied to various concepts such as Molten Salt Reactors [1, 2] or High Temperature Reactors [3, 4]. Precise evaluations of the U-233 production potential relying on existing reactors such as PWRs [5] or CANDUs [6] are hence necessary. As a consequence of its design (online refueling and D2O moderator in a thermal spectrum), the CANDU reactor has moreover an excellent neutron economy and consequently a high fissile conversion ratio [7]. For these reasons, we try here, with a shorter term view, to re-evaluate the economic competitiveness of once-through thorium-based fuel cycles in CANDU [8]. Two simulation tools are used: the deterministic Canadian cell code DRAGON [9] and MURE [10], a C++ tool for reactor evolution calculations based on the Monte Carlo code MCNP [11]. (authors)

  10. Joint submission of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manufacturing company members of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries are proud to have played their part in the development of the peaceful application of nuclear technology in Ontario, and the achievement of the very real benefits discussed in this paper, which greatly outweigh the hypothetical risks

  11. CANDU safety under severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of the CANDU reactor relevant to severe accidents are set first by the inherent properties of the design, and second by the Canadian safety/licensing approach. Probabilistic safety assessment studies have been performed on operating CANDU plants, and on the 4 x 880 MW(e) Darlington station now under construction; furthermore a scoping risk assessment has been done for a CANDU 600 plant. They indicate that the summed severe core damage frequency is of the order of 5 x 10-6/year. CANDU nuclear plant designers and owner/operators share information and operational experience nationally and internationally through the CANDU Owners' Group (COG). The research program generally emphasizes the unique aspects of the CANDU concept, such as heat removal through the moderator, but it has also contributed significantly to areas generic to most power reactors such as hydrogen combustion, containment failure modes, fission product chemistry, and high temperature fuel behaviour. Abnormal plant operating procedures are aimed at first using event-specific emergency operating procedures, in cases where the event can be diagnosed. If this is not possible, generic procedures are followed to control Critical Safety Parameters and manage the accident. Similarly, the on-site contingency plans include a generic plan covering overall plant response strategy, and a specific plan covering each category of contingency

  12. A study of coolant thermal mixing within CANDU fuel bundles using ASSERT-PV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of a study of the thermal mixing of single-phase coolant in 28-element CANDU fuel bundles. The approach taken in the present work is to identify the physical mechanisms contributing to coolant mixing, and to systematically assess the importance of each mechanism. Coupled effects were also considered by flow simulation with mixing mechanisms modelled simultaneously. For the limited range of operating conditions considered and when all mixing mechanisms were modelled simultaneously, the flow was found to be very close to fully mixed. A preliminary model of coolant mixing, suitable for use in the fuel and fuel channel code FACTAR, is also presented. (author)

  13. Feasibility study of modeling a CANDU fuel element using a multiphysics object-oriented simulation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first phase of the feasibility study of using a Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) for modeling a CANDU fuel element is presented. A two-dimensional model of a fuel pellet sheath was created to examine the contact algorithm within MOOSE. The results obtained show the expected behaviour of contact pressure and penetration in 2D. Preliminary results for a 3D model of a quarter fuel pellet and sheath are provided but at present contain anomalies currently being investigated. The next steps in the feasibility study are outlined. (author)

  14. Feasibility study of modeling a CANDU fuel element using a multiphysics object-oriented simulation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, K., E-mail: Kyle.Gamble@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Williams, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Chan, P.K. [Royal Military College of Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The first phase of the feasibility study of using a Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) for modeling a CANDU fuel element is presented. A two-dimensional model of a fuel pellet sheath was created to examine the contact algorithm within MOOSE. The results obtained show the expected behaviour of contact pressure and penetration in 2D. Preliminary results for a 3D model of a quarter fuel pellet and sheath are provided but at present contain anomalies currently being investigated. The next steps in the feasibility study are outlined. (author)

  15. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors -Fuel management and safety analysis-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Boh Wook; Choi, Hang Bok; Lee, Yung Wook; Cho, Jae Sun; Huh, Chang Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    The reference DUPIC fuel composition was determined based on the reactor safety, thermal-hydraulics, economics, and refabrication aspects. The center pin of the reference DUPIC fuel bundle is poisoned with natural dysprosium. The worst LOCA analysis has shown that the transient power and heat deposition of the reference DUPIC core are the same as those of natural uranium CANDU core. The intra-code comparison has shown that the accuracy of DUPIC physics code system is comparable to the current CANDU core design code system. The sensitivity studies were performed for the refuelling schemes of DUPIC core and the 2-bundle shift refuelling scheme was selected as the standard refuelling scheme of the DUPIC core. The application of 4-bundle shift refuelling scheme will be studied in parallel as the auto-refuelling method is improved and the reference core parameters of the heterogeneous DUPIC core are defined. The heterogeneity effect was analyzed in a preliminary fashion using 33 fuel types and the random loading strategy. The refuelling simulation has shown that the DUPIC core satisfies the current CANDU 6 operating limits of channel and bundle power regardless of the fuel composition heterogeneity. The 33 fuel types used in the heterogeneity analysis was determined based on the initial enrichment and discharge burnup of the PWR fuel. 90 figs, 62 tabs, 63 refs. (Author).

  16. Silicon carbide TRIPLEX materials for CANDU fuel cladding and pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic Tubular Products has developed a superior silicon carbide (SiC) material TRIPLEX, which can be used for both fuel cladding and other zirconium alloy materials in light water reactor (LWR) and heavy water reactor (CANDU) systems. The fuel cladding can replace Zircaloy cladding and other zirconium based alloy materials in the reactor systems. It has the potential to provide higher fuel performance levels in currently operating natural UO2 (NEU) fuel design and in advanced fuel designs (UO2(SEU), MOX thoria) at higher burnups and power levels. In all the cases for fuel designs TRIPLEX has increased resistance to severe accident conditions. The interaction of SiC with steam and water does not produce an exothermic reaction to produce hydrogen as occurs with zirconium based alloys. In addition the absence of creep down eliminates clad ballooning during high temperature accidents which occurs with Zircaloy blocking water channels required to cool the fuel. (author)

  17. Study on the use of slightly enriched uranium fuel cycle in an existing CANDU 6 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Choong Sub; Kim, Hyun Dae [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    To test the viability of CANFLEX-SEU bundles in an existing CANDU 6 reactor, core follow-up simulation has been carried out using the reactor fueling simulation program of the CANDU 6, RFSP computer code, and a lattice physics code, WIMS-AECL. During the core follow-up, bundle and channel powers and zone levels have been checked against their operating limits at each simulation. It is observed from the simulation results that an equilibrium core loaded with 0.9 w/o CANFLEX-SEU bundles could be refueled and maintained for 550 FPD without any significant violations in the channel and bundle power limits and the permissible operating range of the liquid zone controllers. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  18. Build your own Candu reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the marketing of Candu reactors, particularly the export trade. Future sales will probably be of the nuclear side of a station only, thus striking a compromise between licensing and 'turnkey' sales. It is suggested that AECL might have made more money in the past had it not given the right to manufacture Candu fuel away to Canadian industry. Future sales to certain potential customers may be limited by the requirement of strict safeguards, which will almost certainly never be relaxed. (N.D.H.)

  19. DUPIC technology as an alternative for closing nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of DUPIC technology as an alternative for closing nuclear fuel cycle has been carried out. The goal of this study is to understand the DUPIC technology and its possibility as an alternative technology for closing nuclear fuel cycle. DUPIC (Direct Use of PWR spent fuel In CANDU) is a utilization of PWR spent fuel to reprocess and fabricate become DUPIC fuel as nuclear fuel of Candu reactor. The synergy utilization is based on the fact that fissile materials contained in the PWR spent fuel is about twice as much as that in Candu fuel. Result of the study indicates that DUPIC is an alternative promising technology for closing nuclear fuel cycle. The DUPIC fuel fabrication technology of which the major process is the OREOX dry processing, is better than the conventional reprocessing technology of PUREX. The OREOX dry processing has no capability to separate fissile plutonium, thus give the impact of high nuclear proliferation resistance. When compared to once through cycle, it gives advantages of uranium saving of about 20% and spent fuel accumulation reduction of about 65%. Economic analysis indicates that the levelized cost of DUPIC cycle is cheaper by 0.073 mill$/kwh than that of once through cycle. (author)

  20. Thermal-hydraulics performance optimization of Candu fuel using Assert subchannel code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optimization of fuel bundle geometry using the subchannel code ASSERT is performed in support of Candu fuel design to enhance the thermohydraulics performance. The new bundle design is based on a reference CANFLEX bundle with changes to the centre and inner-ring element diameters and pitch-circle diameters (PCDs) of various element rings. Different methods of varying the PCDs for reaching the optimized geometry are considered in an attempt to minimize the optimization effort. The optimized geometry in the present analysis is the one that maximizes the dryout power and that has simultaneous CHF (critical heat flux) initiation involving more than one subchannel rings. (authors)

  1. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Jae Sul; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    This report summarizes the second year progress of phase II of DUPIC program which aims to verify experimentally the feasibility of direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The project is to provide the experimental facilities and technologies that are required to perform the DUPIC experiment. As an early part of the project, engineering analysis of those facilities and construction of mock-up facility are described. Another scope of the project is to assess the DUPIC fuel cycle system and facilitate international cooperation. The progresses in this scope of work made during the fiscal year are also summarized in the report. 38 figs, 44 tabs, 8 refs. (Author).

  2. Power pulse tests on CANDU type fuel elements in TRIGA reactor of INR Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulse irradiation tests on short fuel elements have been carried out in TRIGA Annular Core Pulse Reactor (TRIGA ACPR) of INR Pitesti to investigate aspects related to the thermal and mechanical behavior of CANDU type fuel elements under short duration and large amplitude power pulse conditions. Short test fuel elements were instrumented with thermocouples for cladding surface temperature measurements and pressure sensor for element internal pressure measurement. Transient histories of reactor power, cooling water pressure, fuel element internal pressure and cladding temperature were recorded during tests. The fuel elements were subjected to total energy deposition from 70 to 280cal g-1 UO2. Rapid fuel pellet expansion due to a power excursion caused radial and longitudinal deformation of the cladding. Cladding failure mechanism and the failure threshold have been established. This paper presents some recent results obtained from these power pulse tests performed in TRIGA ACPR of INR Pitesti. (author)

  3. Behavior of CANDU fuel under power pulse conditions at the TRIGA reactor of INR Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulse irradiation tests on short fuel elements have been carried out in TRIGA Annular Core Pulse Reactor (TRIGA ACPR) of INR Pitesti to investigate aspects related to the thermal and mechanical behavior of CANDU type fuel elements under short duration and large amplitude power pulse conditions. Short test fuel elements were instrumented with thermocouples for cladding surface temperature measurements and pressure sensors for element internal pressure measurement. Transient histories of reactor power, cooling water pressure, fuel element internal pressure and cladding temperature were recorded during tests. The fuel elements were subjected to total energy deposition from 70 to 280 cal g-1 UO2. Rapid fuel pellet expansion due to a power excursion caused radial and longitudinal deformation of the cladding. Cladding failure mechanism and the failure threshold have been established. This paper presents some recent results obtained from these power pulse tests performed in TRIGA ACPR of INR Pitesti. (orig.)

  4. Investigations on flow induced vibration of simulated CANDU fuel bundles in a pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, vibration of a two-bundle string consisting of simulated CANDU fuel bundles subjected to turbulent liquid flow is investigated through numerical simulations and experiments. Large eddy simulation is used to solve the three-dimensional turbulent flow surrounding the fuel bundles for determining fluid excitations. The CFD model includes pipe flow, flow through the inlet fuel bundle along with its two endplates, half of the second bundle and its upstream endplate. The fluid excitation obtained from the fluid model is subsequently fed into a fuel bundle vibration code written in FORTRAN. Fluid structure interaction terms for the fuel elements are approximated using the slender body theory. Simulation results are compared to measurements conducted on the simulated fuel bundles in a testing hydraulic loop. (author)

  5. Subchannel Analysis for enhancing the fuel performance in CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the fuel rod geometry in a fuel bundle using the subchannel code ASSERT has been evaluated to design the fuel bundle having the advanced fuel performance. Based on the configuration of standard 37-element fuel bundle, the element diameter of fuel rods in each ring has been changed while that of fuel rods in other rings is kept as the original size. The dryout power of each element in a fuel bundle has been obtained for the modified fuel bundle and compared with that of a standard fuel bundle. From the calculated mixture enthalpy and void fraction of each subchannel, it was found that the modification of element diameter largely affects to the thermal characteristics of the subchannel on the upper region of a modified element by the buoyancy drift effect. The optimized geometry in a fuel bundle has been suggested from the consideration of the change of void reactivity as well as the dryout power of a bundle. The dependency of the transverse interchange model on the present results has been checked by examining the dryout power of a bundle for the different mixing coefficient and buoyancy drift model

  6. Validation of WIMS-CANDU using Pin-Cell Lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Young; Min, Byung Joo; Park, Joo Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The WIMS-CANDU is a lattice code which has a depletion capability for the analysis of reactor physics problems related to a design and safety. The WIMS-CANDU code has been developed from the WIMSD5B, a version of the WIMS code released from the OECD/NEA data bank in 1998. The lattice code POWDERPUFS-V (PPV) has been used for the physics design and analysis of a natural uranium fuel for the CANDU reactor. However since the application of PPV is limited to a fresh fuel due to its empirical correlations, the WIMS-AECL code has been developed by AECL to substitute the PPV. Also, the WIMS-CANDU code is being developed to perform the physics analysis of the present operating CANDU reactors as a replacement of PPV. As one of the developing work of WIMS-CANDU, the U{sup 238} absorption cross-section in the nuclear data library of WIMS-CANDU was updated and WIMS-CANDU was validated using the benchmark problems for pin-cell lattices such as TRX-1, TRX-2, Bapl-1, Bapl-2 and Bapl-3. The results by the WIMS-CANDU and the WIMS-AECL were compared with the experimental data.

  7. CFD analysis of the 37-element fuel channel for CANDU6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed the thermal-hydraulic behavior of coolant flow along fuel bundles with appendages of end support plate, spacer pad, and bearing pad, which are the CANDU6 characteristic design. The computer code used is a commercial CFD code, CFX-12. The present CFD analysis model calculates the conjugate heat transfer between the fuel and coolant. Using the same volumetric heat source as the O6 channel, the CFD predictions of the axial temperature distributions of the fuel element are compared with those by the CATHENA (one-dimensional safety analysis code for CANDU6 reactor). It is shown that CFX-12 predictions are in good agreement with those by the CATHENA code for the single liquid convection region (especially before the axial position of the first half of the channel length). However, the CFD analysis at the second half of the fuel channel, where the two-phase flow is expected to occur, over-predicts the fuel temperature, since the wall boiling model is not considered in the present CFD model. (author)

  8. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: a study of postclosure safety of in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel in copper containers in permeable plutonic rock. Volume 4: biosphere model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) has developed a disposal concept for Canada's nuclear fuel waste, which calls for a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The concept has been fully, documented in an environmental impact statement (EIS) for review by a panel under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency. The EIS includes the results of the EIS postclosure assessment case study to address the long term safety of the disposal concept. To more fully demonstrate the flexibility of the disposal concept and our assessment methodology, we are now carrying out another postclosure assessment study, which involves different assumptions and engineering options than those used in the EIS. In response to these changes, we have updated the BIOTRAC (BIOsphere Transport and Assessment Code) model developed for the EIS postclosure assessment case study. The main changes made to the BIOTRAC model are the inclusion of 36Cl, 137Cs, 239Np and 243Am; animals inhalation pathway; International Commission on Radiological Protection 60/61 human internal dose conversion factors; all the postclosure assessment nuclides in the dose calculations for non-human biota; and groundwater dose limits for 14C, 16C1 and 129I for non-human biota to parallel these limits for humans. We have also reviewed and changed several parameter values, including evasion rates of gaseous nuclides from soil and release fractions of various nuclides from domestic water, and indicated changes that affect the geosphere/biosphere interface model. These changes make the BIOTRAC model more flexible. As a result of all of these changes, the BIOTRAC model has been significantly expanded and improved, although the changes do not greatly affect model predictions. The modified model for the present study is called BIOTRAC2 (BIOTRAC - Version 2). The full documentation of the BIOTRAC2 model includes the report by Davis et al. (1993a) and this report. (author). 105 refs., 13 tabs., 8 figs

  9. Implementation of an on-line monitoring system for transmitters in a CANDU nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbe, A.; Abdul-Nour, G.; Vaillancourt, R.; Komljenovic, D.

    2012-05-01

    Many transmitters (pressure, level and flow) are used in a nuclear power plant. It is necessary to calibrate them periodically to ensure that their measurements are accurate. These calibration tasks are time consuming and often contribute to worker radiation exposure. Human errors can also sometimes degrade their performance since the calibration involves intrusive techniques. More importantly, experience has shown that the majority of current calibration efforts are not necessary. These facts motivated the nuclear industry to develop new technologies for identifying drifting instruments. These technologies, well known as on-line monitoring (OLM) techniques, are non-intrusive and allow focusing the maintenance efforts on the instruments that really need a calibration. Although few OLM systems have been implemented in some PWR and BWR plants, these technologies are not commonly used and have not been permanently implemented in a CANDU plant. This paper presents the results of a research project that has been performed in a CANDU plant in order to validate the implementation of an OLM system. An application project, based on the ICMP algorithm developed by EPRI, has been carried out in order to evaluate the performance of an OLM system. The results demonstrated that the OLM system was able to detect the drift of an instrument in the majority of the studied cases. A feasibility study has also been completed and has demonstrated that the implementation of an OLM system at a CANDU nuclear power plant could be advantageous under certain conditions.

  10. Understanding CANDU fuel bowing in dryout: an industry approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel element bow induced by dryout could potentially perturb the coolant flow distribution and heat transfer from the fuel element to the coolant. Some accident scenarios leading to dryout of the fuel element are: loss of power regulation pump trip, pump seizure, small and large break loss of coolant accidents. In these accidents, it is desirable to show with confidence that the fuel remains sufficiently cooled to maintain its geometry, even if it is in dryout. This can be demonstrated if fuel elements are separated from each other and from the pressure tube, with a sufficient (and stable) gap. Therefore, the prediction of the amount of bow, and its effect on heat transfer conditions is required for the assessments. The utilities have joined force in launching an experimental investigation at Stern Laboratories to characterize the bowing phenomena. This program will investigate the amount of deflection, transient and permanent, that results from accident conditions which cause a dry patch on one side of the sheath. This is expected to bound the consequences of fuel bowing due to dryout. Since the accident transients begin at full power and high coolant pressure (about 10 MPa) they generate sharp thermal gradients (dry patch) and it is necessary to develop a simulation with representative dry fuel sheath conditions initiated from a normal full power and coolant state. The amount of bow is driven by thermal gradients in both the fuel pellets and the sheath, therefore, the thermal gradients should be representative. This program is structured in a series of tests progressing from simple representation to complex simulation. It is divided into 3 experimental phases: Phase 1 - Thermalhydraulic simulation of fuel element bow by a heated tube; Phase 2 - Thermal and mechanical bow with a simulator which accounts for pellet / fuel sheath interaction with internal pellet temperature distributions; and Phase 3 - Fuel element bow with a simulator using Zircaloy-4 fuel sheath

  11. Data base for a CANDU-PHW operating on a once-through, natural uranium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, prepared for INFCE, describes a standard 600 MW(e) CANDU-PHW reactor operating on a once-through natural uranium fuel cycle. Subsequently, data are given for an extrapolated 1000 MW(e) design (the nominal capacity adopted for the INFCE study) operating on the same fuel cycle. (author)

  12. Investigation of techniques for the application of safeguards to the CANDU 600 MW(e) nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cooperative program with the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and the IAEA was established in 1975: to determine the diversion possibilities at the CANDU type reactors using a diversion path analysis; to detect the diversion of nuclear materials using material accountancy and surveillance/containment. Specific techniques and instrumentation, some of which are unique to the CANDU reactor, were developed. 10 appendices bring together the relevant reports and memoranda of results for the Douglas Point Program

  13. An experimental investigation of the temperature behavior of a CANDU 37-element spent fuel bundle with air backfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the thermal analysis of a CANDU spent fuel dry storage system, a series of experiment has been conducted using a thermal mock-up of a simulated CANDU spent fuel bundle in a dry storage basket. The experimental system was designed to obtain the maximum fuel rod temperature along with the radial and axial temperature distributions within the fuel bundle. The main purpose of these experiments was to characterize the relevant heat transfer mechanisms in a dry, vertically oriented CANDU spent fuel bundle, and to verify the MAXROT code developed for the thermal analysis of a CANDU spent fuel bundle in a dry storage basket. A total of 48 runs were made with 8 different power inputs to the 37-element heater rod bundle ranging from 5 to 40 W, while using 6 different band heaters power inputs from 0 to 250 W to maintain the basket wall at a desired boundary condition temperature at the steady state. The temperature distribution in a heater rod bundle was measured and recorded at the saturated condition for each set of heater rod power and band heaters power. To characterize the heat transfer mechanism involved, the experimental data were corrected analytically for radiation heat transfer and presented as a Nusselt number correlation in terms of the Rayleigh number of the heater rod bundle. The results show that the Nusselt number remains nearly constant and all the experimental dada fall within a conduction regime. The experimental data were compared with the predictions of the MAXROT code to examine the code's accuracy and validity of assumptions used in the code. The MAXROT code explicitly models each representative fuel rod in a CANDU fuel bundle and couples the conductive and radiative heat transfer of the internal gas between rods. Comparisons between the measured and predicted maximum fuel rod temperatures of the simulated CANDU 37-element spent fuel bundle for all 48 tests show that the MAXROT code slightly over-predicts and the agreement is within 2

  14. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations for the workers and the public

  15. Investigation of neutronic behavior in a CANDU reactor with different (Am, Th, 235U)O2 fuel matrixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently thorium-based fuel matrixes are taken into consideration for nuclear waste incineration because of thorium proliferation resistance feature moreover its breeding or convertor ability in both thermal and fast reactors. In this work, neutronic influences of adding Am to (Th-235U)O2 on effective delayed neutron fraction, reactivity coefficients and burn up of a fed CANDU core has been studied using MCNPX 2.6.0 computational code. Different atom fractions of Am have been introduced in the fuel matrix to evaluate its effects on neutronic parameters of the modeled core. The computational data show that adding 2% atom fraction of Am to thorium-based fuel matrix won't noticeably change reactivity coefficients in comparison with the fuel matrix containing 1% atom fraction of Am. The use of 2% atom fraction of Am resulted in a higher delayed neutron fraction. According to the obtained data, 32.85 GWd burn up of the higher Americium-containing fuel matrix resulted in 55.2%, 26.5%, 41.9% and 2.14% depletion of 241Am, 243Am, 235U and 232Th respectively. 132.8 kg of 233U fissile element is produced after the burn up time and the nuclear core multiplication factor increases in rate of 2390 pcm. The less americium-containing fuel matrix resulted in higher depletion of 241/243Am, 235U and 232Th while the nuclear core effective multiplication factor increases in rate of 5630 pcm after the burn up time with 9.8 kg additional 233U production.

  16. Cost comparison of 4x500 MW coal-fuelled and 4x850 MW CANDU nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lifetime costs for a 4x850 MW CANDU generating station are compared to those for 4x500 MW bituminous coal-fuelled generating stations. Two types of coal-fuelled stations are considered; one burning U.S. coal which includes flue gas desulfurization and one burning Western Canadian coal. Current estimates for the capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, fuel costs, decommissioning costs and irradiated fuel management costs are shown. The results show: (1) The accumulated discounted costs of nuclear generation, although initially higher, are lower than coal-fuelled generation after two or three years. (2) Fuel costs provide the major contribution to the total lifetime costs for coal-fuelled stations whereas capital costs are the major item for the nuclear station. (3) The break even lifetime capacity factor between nuclear and U.S. coal-fuelled generation is projected to be 5%; that for nuclear and Canadian coal-fuelled generation is projected to be 9%. (4) Large variations in the costs are required before the cost advantage of nuclear generation is lost. (5) Comparison with previous results shows that the nuclear alternative has a greater cost advantage in the current assessment. (6) The total unit energy cost remains approximately constant throughout the station life for nuclear generation while that for coal-fuelled generation increases significantly due to escalating fuel costs. The 1978 and 1979 actual total unit energy cost to the consumer for several Ontario Hydro stations are detailed, and projected total unit energy costs for several Ontario Hydro stations are shown in terms of escalated dollars and in 1980 constant dollars

  17. Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.S.; Gold, M.; Sills, H. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1997-07-01

    The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis.

  18. ASSERT/NUCIRC commissioning for CANDU 6 fuel channel CCP analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU PHWR fuel channel pressure tubes will expand or creep under long-term (aging process) influence of temperature, pressure, and neutron flux. This diametral pressure tube creep will influence the critical channel power (CCP), or conditions that lead to dryout. In order to provide safety analysis models to quantify the effect of diametral pressure tube creep on CCP, a COG (AECL/NBP/HQ) project is underway to commission the ASSERT and NUCIRC codes to establish reliable production tools for the assessment of CANDU6 CCP in nominal (uncrept) and crept pressure tube fuel channels. This paper gives an overview of the background and objectives of the project along with a brief introduction into the subchannel analysis code ASSERT and the 1-D thermalhydraulics code NUCIRC. This project is a multistage endeavour, for which the first stage results are presented. A detailed cross-comparison of the 1-D (NUCIRC) and subchannel (ASSERT) models of pressure drop (ΔP) and critical heat flux (CHF) has been undertaken and has led to several enhancements and refinements to the respective models. These results are presented in addition to results of ASSERT commissioning against NUCIRC for a matrix of ΔP and dryout cases in a nominal pressure tube, which are based upon Gentilly 2 and Point Lepreau site area. Additionally, the initial results of an assessment, using ASSERT, of the effects of creep on ΔP are presented. In concluding, the status and future directions for ASSERT/NUCIRC CANDU 6 CCP analysis project are summarized. (author). 2 refs., 12 figs

  19. Economics of CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cost of producing electricity from CANDU reactors is discussed. The total unit energy cost of base-load electricity from CANDU reactors is compared with that of coal-fired plants in Ontario. In 1980 nuclear power was 8.41 m$/kW.h less costly for plants of similar size and vintage. Comparison of CANDU with pressurized water reactors indicated that the latter would be about 26 percent more costly in Ontario

  20. The economics of advanced fuel cycles in CANDU (PHW) reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic assessments of advanced fuel cycles performed within Ontario Hydro are collated and summarized. The results of the analyses are presented in a manner designed to provide a broad perspective of the economic issues regarding the advanced cycles. The enriched uranium fuel cycle is shown to be close to competitive at today's uranium prices, and its relative position vis-a-vis the natural uranium cycle will improve as uranium prices continue to rise. In the longer term, the plutonium-topped thorium cycle is identified as being the most economically desirable. It is suggested that this cycle may not be commercially attractive until the second or third decade of the next century. (auth)

  1. Progress in developing an on-line fuel-failure monitoring tool for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the continued development of an on-line defected fuel diagnostic tool for CANDU reactors. One of the key capabilities of this tool is the ability to estimate the power and number of defects in the core based on the Gaseous Fission Product Monitoring System (GFP), and grab sample data. To perform this analysis, a clear understanding of the empirical diffusion coefficient D' [s-1] is required. This paper examines two existing models for D' and presents a new model based on 133Xe release data from commercial reactor experience. The new model is successfully applied to commercial data to demonstrate a novel technique for extracting defected fuel element power from GFP data during a reactor power change. The on-line defected fuel diagnostic tool is in a developmental stage, and this paper reports the latest enhancements. (author)

  2. Benchmark calculations of a radiation heat transfer for a CANDU fuel channel analysis using the CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To justify the use of a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code for a CANDU fuel channel analysis, especially for the radiation heat transfer dominant conditions, the CFX-10 code is tested against three benchmark problems which were used for the validation of a radiation heat transfer in the CANDU analysis code, a CATHENA. These three benchmark problems are representative of the CANDU fuel channel configurations from a simple geometry to a whole fuel channel geometry. For the solutions of the benchmark problems, the temperature or the net radiation heat flux boundary conditions are prescribed for each radiating surface to determine the radiation heat transfer rate or the surface temperature, respectively by using the network method. The Discrete Transfer Model (DTM) is used for the CFX-10 radiation model and its calculation results are compared with the solutions of the benchmark problems. The CFX-10 results for the three benchmark problems are in close agreement with those solutions, so it is concluded that the CFX-10 with a DTM radiation model can be applied to the CANDU fuel channel analysis where a surface radiation heat transfer is a dominant mode of the heat transfer. (author)

  3. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on worker and public safety, operating performance and costs, and reliability of system components

  4. Abundant thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has long been known that thorium-232 is a fertile radioactive material that can produce energy in nuclear reactors for conversion to electricity. Thorium-232 is well suited to a variety of reactor types including molten fluoride salt designs, heavy water CANDU configurations, and helium-cooled TRISO-fueled systems. Among contentious commercial nuclear power issues are the questions of what to do with long-lived radioactive waste and how to minimize weapon proliferation dangers. The substitution of thorium for uranium as fuel in nuclear reactors has significant potential for minimizing both problems. Thorium is three times more abundant in nature than uranium. Whereas uranium has to be imported, there is enough thorium in the United States alone to provide adequate grid power for many centuries. A well-designed thorium reactor could produce electricity less expensively than a next-generation coal-fired plant or a current-generation uranium-fueled nuclear reactor. Importantly, thorium reactors produce substantially less long-lived radioactive waste than uranium reactors. Thorium-fueled reactors with molten salt configurations and very high temperature thorium-based TRISO-fueled reactors are both recommended for priority Generation IV funding in the 2030 time frame. - Highlights: • Thorium is an abundant nuclear fuel that is well suited to three advanced reactor configurations. • Important thorium reactor configurations include molten salt, CANDU, and TRISO systems. • Thorium has important nuclear waste disposal advantages relative to pressurized water reactors. • Thorium as a nuclear fuel has important advantages relative to weapon non-proliferation

  5. Radiological assessment of 36Cl in the disposal of used CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the potential radiological impact of 36Cl in the disposal of used CANDU fuel has been performed. The assessment was based on new data on chlorine impurity levels in used fuel. Data bases for the vault, geosphere, and biosphere models used in the EIS postclosure assessment case study (Goodwin et al. 1994) were modified to include the necessary 36Cl data. The resulting safety analysis shows that estimated radiological risks from 36Cl are forty times lower than from 129I at 104 a; this, incorporation of 36Cl into the models does not change the overall conclusions of the study of Goodwin et al. (1994a). For human intrusion scenarios, an analysis using the methodology of Wuschke (1992) showed that the maximum risk is unaffected by the inclusion of 36Cl. (author). 51 refs., 5 tabs., 15 figs

  6. The Conflux Fuel bundle: An Economic and Pragmatic Route to the use of Advanced Fuel Cycles in CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANFLEX1 bundle is being developed jointly by AECL and KAERI as a vehicle for introducing the use of enrichment and advanced fuel cycles in CANDU2 reactors. The bundle design uses smaller diameter fuel elements in the outer ring of a 43-element bundle to reduce the maximum element ratings in a CANDU fuel bundle by 20% compared to the 37-element bundle currently in use. This facilitates burnups of greater than 21,000 MW d/TAU to optimize the economic benefit available from the use of enrichment and advanced fuel cycles. A combination of this lower fuel rating, plus development work underway at Aecl to enhance the thermalhydraulic characteristics of the bundle (including both CHF3 and bundle. This provides extra flexibility in the fuel management procedures required for fuel bundles with higher fissile contents. The different bundle geometry requires flow tests to demonstrate acceptable vibration and fretting behavior of the Conflux bundle. A program to undertake the necessary range of flow tests has started at KAERI, involving the fabrication of the required bundles, and setting up for the actual tests. A program to study the fuel management requirements for slightly enriched (0.9 wt % 235 in total U) Conflux fuel has been undertaken by both Aecl and KAERI staff, and further work has started for higher enrichments. Irradiation testing of the Conflux bundle started in the NUR reactor in 1989, and a second irradiation test is due to start shortly. This paper describes the program, and reviews the status of key parts of the program

  7. Intercomparison of safety evaluations for CANDU or LWR burned fuel disposed in a salt massive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A safety analysis of a generic vault, located into a salt massive, was carried out for for spent fuel from CANDU or LWR NPPs. Three scenarios were considered for the evolution of the system: - sub-erosion, as normal evolution, - a combined process of water intrusion through an anhydrous vein and from brine bags (remaining undetected in the vicinity of the repository areas), - human intrusion. As key parameter in evaluation of long-term repository's safety the biosphere exposure (dose) was chosen. For the first scenario considered the maximum dose, due mainly to U-234, was found below the German standard value of 3 x 10-4 Sv/y. The effects of sub-erosion rate and salt concentration in ground water on the maximum dose were calculated and found rather serious. Although, having in view the rather excessive conservative assumptions adopted (the barrier effect of the geosphere was neglected) more conclusive results should be based upon a more realistic approach of the issue. In the case of human intrusion scenario the maximum exposure would be 8 x 10-5 Sv/y for CANDU fuel and 1.3 x 10-4 Sv/y for LWR fuel, as due mainly to Np-237. The analyses of local sensitivity carried out to investigate the influence of input parameters upon the release in geosphere took into consideration four parameters: a. the solubility limits; b. the diffusion coefficients; c. reference convergence rate, Kr; d. the maximum brine pressure pmax. Due to the low probability of the human intrusion scenario the effects appear to be acceptable. For the case of combined scenario the maximum doses,were found to be 9 x 10-6 Sv/y and 1 x 10-7 Sv/y for CANDU and LWR, respectively, mainly due to I-129 and Ra-225, and to I-129 and Cs-135, respectively. The effects of brine bags upon the temperature in the repository and the radiological consequences are presented for the two types of spent fuels

  8. Requirements for the support power systems of CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Standard covers principal criteria and requirements for design, fabrication, installation, qualification, inspection, and documentation for assurance that support power will be available as required. The minimum requirements for support power are determined by the special safety systems and other safety-related systems that must function to ensure that the public health risk is acceptably low. Support power systems of a CANDU nuclear power plant include those parts of the electrical systems and instrument air systems that are necessary for the operation of safety-related systems

  9. Optimization of the self-sufficient thorium fuel cycle for CANDU power reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergelson Boris R.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of optimization calculations for CANDU reactors operating in the thorium cycle are presented in this paper. Calculations were performed to validate the feasibility of operating a heavy-water thermal neutron power reactor in a self-sufficient thorium cycle. Two modes of operation were considered in the paper: the mode of preliminary accumulation of 233U in the reactor itself and the mode of operation in a self-sufficient cycle. For the mode of accumulation of 233U, it was assumed that enriched uranium or plutonium was used as additional fissile material to provide neutrons for 233U production. In the self-sufficient mode of operation, the mass and isotopic composition of heavy nuclei unloaded from the reactor should provide (after the removal of fission products the value of the multiplication factor of the cell in the following cycle K>1. Additionally, the task was to determine the geometry and composition of the cell for an acceptable burn up of 233U. The results obtained demonstrate that the realization of a self-sufficient thorium mode for a CANDU reactor is possible without using new technologies. The main features of the reactor ensuring a self-sufficient mode of operation are a good neutron balance and moving of fuel through the active core.

  10. Nuclear fuel supply view in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirimello, R.O. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Conuar SA (Argentina)

    1997-07-01

    The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission promoted and participated in a unique achievement in the R and D system in Argentina: the integration of science technology and production based on a central core of knowledge for the control and management of the nuclear fuel cycle technology. CONUAR SA, as a fuel manufacturer, FAE SA, the manufacturer of Zircaloy tubes, CNEA and now DIOXITEC SA producer of Uranium Dioxide, have been supply, in the last ten years, the amount of products required for about 1300 Tn of equivalent U content in fuels. The most promising changes for the fuel cycle economy is the Slight Enriched Uranium project which begun in Atucha I reactor. In 1997 seventy five fuel assemblies, equivalent to 900 Candu fuel bundles, will complete its irradiation. (author)

  11. Key thrusts in next generation CANDU. Annex 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current electricity markets and the competitiveness of other generation options such as CCGT have influenced the directions of future nuclear generation. The next generation CANDU has used its key characteristics as the basis to leap frog into a new design featuring improved economics, enhanced passive safety, enhanced operability and demonstrated fuel cycle flexibility. Many enabling technologies spinning of current CANDU design features are used in the next generation design. Some of these technologies have been developed in support of existing plants and near term designs while others will need to be developed and tested. This paper will discuss the key principles driving the next generation CANDU design and the fuel cycle flexibility of the CANDU system which provide synergism with the PWR fuel cycle. (author)

  12. Selection of instruments used for vibration measurement of fuel bundles in a pressure tube under CANDU reactor operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibration characteristics of CANDU fuel bundle and fuel elements is a key parameter considered in the design of a fuel bundle. Out-reactor frequency and temperature sweep tests, under reactor operating conditions, are performed to verify vibration characteristics of CANDU fuel bundles. Several options have been considered in the selection of vibration instrumentation to perform out-reactor frequency and temperature sweep tests. This paper compares the benefits and disadvantages of various vibration instruments and summarizes the rationale behind the selection of instruments used for vibration measurements over a range of temperature and pressure pulsation frequencies. The conclusions are presented from the bench tests performed, which confirm the use of the selected instruments. (author)

  13. Assessment of the performance of used CANDU fuel under disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the work conducted since 1991 on determining gap and/or grain-boundary inventories for several important radionuclides such as 137Cs , 129I, 14C, 90Sr , 99Tc and 36Cl in used CANDU fuel and investigation of effect of parameters such as fuel power and burnup on their release rates is summarized in the report. Since the great majority of radionuclides are contained within the grains of the fuel pellets, the long-term release rate is governed by the dissolution rate of the uranium oxide matrix. Although UO2 is highly insoluble, the solubility of uranium increases by many orders of magnitude under oxidizing conditions. The rate of UO2 dissolution, and thus release of fission products from the fuel, is most sensitive to vault redox conditions, radiation field, groundwater composition and temperature and these factors have been investigated if justifiable assurances are to be given that radionuclide releases from a waste vault will be very limited. The redox conditions within a waste vault will evolve with time from initially oxidizing to eventually non-oxidizing as oxygen, trapped within the vault on sealing, is consumed and radiation fields, which can produce oxidants by the radiolysis of water, decay. Effective containment of the fuel should prevent its contact with groundwater until this redox evolution is complete. (author)

  14. Operation of CANDU power reactor in thorium self-sufficient fuel cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B R Bergelson; A S Gerasimov; G V Tikhomirov

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents the results of calculations for CANDU reactor operation in thorium fuel cycle. Calculations are performed to estimate the feasibility of operation of heavy-water thermal neutron power reactor in self-sufficient thorium cycle. Parameters of active core and scheme of fuel reloading were considered to be the same as for standard operation in uranium cycle. Two modes of operations are discussed in the paper: mode of preliminary accumulation of 233U and mode of operation in self-sufficient cycle. For the mode of accumulation of 233U it was assumed for calculations that plutonium can be used as additional fissile material to provide neutrons for 233U production. Plutonium was placed in fuel channels, while 232Th was located in target channels. Maximum content of 233U in target channels was estimated to be ∼ 13 kg/t of ThO2. This was achieved by irradiation for six years. The start of the reactor operation in the self-sufficient mode requires 233U content to be not less than 12 kg/t. For the mode of operation in self-sufficient cycle, it was assumed that all channels were loaded with identical fuel assemblies containing ThO2 and certain amount of 233U. It is shown that nonuniform distribution of 233U in fuel assembly is preferable.

  15. The mode of operation of CANDU power reactor in thorium self-sufficient fuel cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergelson Boris R.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of calculations for CANDU reactor operation in the thorium fuel cycle. The calculations were performed to estimate feasibility of operation of a heavy-water thermal neutron power reactor in the self-sufficient thorium cycle. The parameters of the active core and the scheme of fuel reloading were considered to be the same as for the standard operation in the uranium cycle. Two modes of operation are discussed in the paper: the mode of preliminary accumulation of 233U and the mode of operation in the self-sufficient cycle. For calculations for the mode of accumulation of 233U, it was assumed that plutonium was used as the additional fissile material to provide neutrons for 233U production. Plutonium was placed in fuel channels, while 232Th was located in target channels. The maximum content of 233U in the target channels was about 13 kg/t of ThO2. This was achieved by six year irradiation. The start of reactor operation in the self-sufficient mode requires content of 233U not less than 12 kg/t. For the mode of operation in the self-sufficient cycle, it was assumed that all the channels were loaded with the identical fuel assemblies containing ThO2 and a certain amount of 233U. It was shown that the non-uniform distribution of 233U in a fuel assembly is preferable.

  16. The evolution of the CANDU energy system - ready for Europe's energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As air quality and climate change issues receive increasing attention, the opportunity for nuclear to play a larger role in the coming decades also increases. The good performance of the current fleet of nuclear plants is crucial evidence of nuclear's potential. The excellent record of Cernavoda-1 is an important part of this, and demonstrates the maturity of the Romanian program and of the CANDU design approach. However, the emerging energy market also presents a stringent economic challenge. Current NPP designs, while established as reliable electricity producers, are seen as limited by high capital costs. In some cases, the response to the economic challenge is to consider radical changes to new design concepts, with attendant development risks from lack of provenness. Because of the flexibility of the CANDU system, it is possible to significantly extend the mid-size CANDU design, creating a Next Generation product, without sacrificing the extensive design, delivery and operations information base for CANDU. This enables a design with superior safety characteristics while at the same time meeting the economic challenge of emerging markets. The Romanian nuclear program has progressed successfully forward, leading to the successful operation of Cernavoda-1, and the project to bring Cernavoda-2 to commercial operation. The Romanian nuclear industry has become a full-fledged member of the CANDU community, with all areas of nuclear technology well established and benefiting from international cooperation with other CANDU organizations. AECL is an active partner with Romanian nuclear organizations, both through cooperative development programs, commercial contracts, and also through the activities of the CANDU owners' Group (COG). The Cernavoda project is part of the CANDU 6 family of nuclear power plants developed by AECL. The modular fuel channel reactor concept can be modified extensively, through a series of incremental changes, to improve economics, safety

  17. CAE advanced reactor demonstrators for CANDU, PWR and BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAE, a private Canadian company specializing in full scope flight, industrial, and nuclear plant simulators, will provide a license to IAEA for a suite of nuclear power plant demonstrators. This suite will consist of CANDU, PWR and BWR demonstrators, and will operate on a 486 or higher level PC. The suite of demonstrators will be provided to IAEA at no cost to IAEA. The IAEA has agreed to make the CAE suite of nuclear power plant demonstrators available to all member states at no charge under a sub-license agreement, and to sponsor training courses that will provide basic training on the reactor types covered, and on the operation of the demonstrator suite, to all those who obtain the demonstrator suite. The suite of demonstrators will be available to the IAEA by March 1997. (author)

  18. Depleting a CANDU-6 fuel assembly using detailed burnup data and reactionwise energy release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temporal behavior of reactor fuel assembly due to neutron exposure is an integral part of lattice analysis. It is important to estimate the production of actinides and fission products as a function of burnup so as to decide the quality of fuel for further energy production. It is also important from the point of view of post irradiation behavior of fuel. The information on heat production during and after irradiation helps in determining the amount of time a fuel assembly needs to be cooled before taking it up for storage or reprocessing. In the present study we have considered the CANDU-6 fuel assembly as reference. Lattice analysis has been performed using development version of code DRAGON. A total of 192 nuclides have been selected as part of the analysis, of which 19 are actinides, 151 are fission products and the rest are structural elements. The fission products have been treated explicitly. There is no pseudo fission product. Using DRAGR module, a multigroup microscopic cross section library in DRAGLIB format has been generated. An important aspect of this library is the explicit treatment of most neutron induced reactions. We have for the first time attempted to perform power normalization due to energy from various neutron induced reactions including (n, γ), (n, f), (n, 2n), (n, 3n), (n, 4n), (n, α), (n, p), (n, 2α), (n, np), (n, d), (n, t). Energy due to decay has also been considered explicitly. Even though the decay energy contributes very little relative to the neutron induced reactions, the information will be very useful for post irradiation behavior of fuel. It was observed that the maximum contributing reactions for the power normalization are (n, f), (n, γ) and (n, 2n). We have assessed the contribution of fission products and actinides towards power normalization as a function of burnup. We have also studied the pinwise contribution towards power normalization in each ring of CANDU-6 fuel. We have attempted to compare the effect of

  19. Optimizing in-bay fuel inspection capability to meet the needs of today's CANDU fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the recent return to service of many CANDU units, aging of all others, increasingly competitive energy market and aging hot cell infrastructure - there exists now a greater need for timely, cost-effective and reliable collection of irradiated fuel performance information from fuel bay inspections. The recent development of simple in-bay tools, used in combination with standardized technical specifications, inspection databases and assessment techniques, allows utilities to characterize the condition of irradiated fuel and any debris lodged in the bundle in a more timely fashion and more economically than ever. Use of these tools and 'advanced' techniques permits timely engineering review and disposition of emerging issues to support reliable operation of the CANDU fleet. (author)

  20. The development of emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR Candu type of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR-Candu type of nuclear power plant are reviewed. In PWR and BWR the emergency cooling can be catagorized as active high pressure, active low pressure, and a passive one. The PWR uses components of the shutdown cooling system: whereas the BWR uses components of pressure suppression contaiment. HWR Candu also uses the shutdown cooling system similar to the PWR except some details coming out from moderator coolant separation and expensive cost of heavy water. (author)

  1. Thermal analysis of dry concrete canister storage system for CANDU spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of a thermal analysis of the concrete canisters for interim dry storage of spent, irradiated Canadian Deuterium Uranium(CANDU) fuel. The canisters are designed to contain 6-year-old fuel safely for periods of 50 years in stainless steel baskets sealed inside a steel-lined concrete shield. In order to assure fuel integrity during the storage, fuel rod temperature shall not exceed the temperature limit. The contents of thermal analysis include the following : 1) Steady state temperature distributions under the conservative ambient temperature and insolation load. 2) Transient temperature distributions under the changes in ambient temperature and insolation load. Accounting for the coupled heat transfer modes of conduction, convection, and radiation, the computer code HEATING5 was used to predict the thermal response of the canister storage system. As HEATING5 does not have the modeling capability to compute radiation heat transfer on a rod-to-rod basis, a separate calculating routine was developed and applied to predict temperature distribution in a fuel bundle. Thermal behavior of the canister is characterized by the large thermal mass of the concrete and radiative heat transfer within the basket. The calculated results for the worst case (steady state with maximum ambient temperature and design insolation load) indicated that the maximum temperature of the 6 year cooled fuel reached to 182.4 .deg. C, slightly above the temperature limit of 180 .deg. C. However,the thermal inertia of the thick concrete wall moderates the internal changes and prevents a rise in fuel temperature in response to ambient changes. The maximum extent of the transient zone was less than 75% of the concrete wall thickness for cyclic insolation changes. When transient nature of ambient temperature and insolation load are considered, the fuel temperature will be a function of the long term ambient temperature as opposed to daily extremes. The worst design

  2. Cost analysis and economic comparison for alternative fuel cycles in the heavy water cooled canadian reactor (CANDU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three main options in a CANDU fuel cycle involve use of: (1) natural uranium (0.711 weight percent U-235) fuel, (2) slightly enriched uranium (1.2 weight percent U-235) fuel, and (3) recovered uranium (0.83 weight percent U-235) fuel from light water reactor spent fuel. ORIGEN-2 computer code was used to identify composition of the spent fuel for each option, including the standard LWR fuel (3.3 weight percent U-235). Uranium and plutonium credit calculations were performed using ORIGEN-2 output. WIMSD-5 computer code was used to determine maximum discharge burnup values for each case. For the 3 cycles selected (natural uranium, slightly enriched uranium, recovered uranium), levelized fuel cycle cost calculations are performed over the reactor lifetime of 40 years, using unit process costs obtained from literature. Components of the fuel cycle costs are U purchase, conversion, enrichment, fabrication, SF storage, SF disposal, and reprocessing where applicable. Cost parameters whose effects on the fuel cycle cost are to be investigated are escalation ratio, discount rate and SF storage time. Cost estimations were carried out using specially developed computer programs. Share of each cost component on the total cost was determined and sensitivity analysis was performed in order to show how a change in a main cost component affects the fuel cycle cost. The main objective of this study has been to find out the most economical option for CANDU fuel cycle by changing unit prices and cost parameters

  3. Investigation of the grain-boundary chemistry in used CANDU fuel by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The grain-boundary chemistry of used CANDU fuel is being systematically investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using a McPherson ESCA-36 instrument that has been adapted for routine studies of highly radioactive materials. Initial stages of fuel corrosion under various storage and disposal conditions can be identified from chemical-shift effects for uranium. For example, pervasive but highly selective grain-boundary oxidation has been revealed in CANDU fuels exposed to moist air at 150 deg. C for extended periods, suggesting aggressive radiolytic processes operating in a thin film of adsorbed water. Pronounced segregation of a number of fission products to cracks and grain boundaries in used CANDU fuels has been explicitly demonstrated by XPS as well. Model calculations and composition depth profiles are indicative of near monolayer films. Some correlations between fuel power history and fission-product distributions have been established and possible evidence of migration during moist-air exposure has been obtained. The key advantages and limitations of XPS in this context are discussed and illustrated with selected results. (author). 23 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  4. A foundation for allocating control functions to humans and machines in future CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the control room for the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited CANDU 6 plant was designed in the 1970s, requirements for control rooms have changed dramatically as a result of new licensing requirements, evolution of major new standards for control centre design and technological advances. The role of the human operator has become prominent in the design and operation of industrial and, in particular, nuclear plants. Major industrial accidents in the last decade have highlighted the need for paying significantly more attention to the requirements of the human as an integral part of the plant control system. A Functional Design Methodology has been defined that addresses the issues related to maximizing the strengths of the human and the machine in the next generation of CANDU plants. This method is based, in part, on the recently issued international standard IEC 964. The application of this method will lead to the definition of the requirements for detailed design of the control room, including man-machine interfaces, preliminary operating procedures, staffing and training. Further, it provides a basis for the verification and validation of the allocation of functions to the operator and the machine

  5. Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis of a Consolidated Dry Storage Module for CANDU Spent Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Gon; Yoon, Jeong Hyoun; Cho, Chun Hyung; Lee, Heung Young [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu Sup; Jeong, In Su; Kim, Jong Soo [KONES Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The MACSTOR/KN-400 module has been developed as an effective alternative to the existing stand alone concrete canister for dry storage of CANDU spent fuel. The structure is a concrete monolith of 21.67 m long and 12.66 m wide and has a height equal to 7.518 m including the bottom slab. Inside of the concrete module are built 40 storage cylinders accommodating ten 60- bundle dry storage baskets, which are suspended from the top slab and eventually constrained at 10 cm above the bottom slab with horizontal seismic restraints. The main cooling process of the MACSTOR/KN-400 module is by air convection through air inlets and outlets. The civil design parameters, with respect to meteorological and seismic loads applied to the module are identical to those specified for the Wolsung CANDU 3 and 4 plants except for local geologic characteristics. As per USNRC SRP Section 3.7.2 and current US practices, Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) effect shall be considered for all structures not supported by a rock or rock-like soil foundation materials. An SSI is a very complicated phenomenon of the structure coupled with the soil medium that is usually semi-infinite in extent and highly nonlinear in its behavior. And the effect of the SSI is noticeable especially for stiff and massive structures resting on relatively soft ground. Thus the SSI effect has to be considered in the seismic design of MACSTOR/KN-400 module resting on soil medium. The scope of the this paper is to carry out a seismic SSI analysis of the MACSTOR/KN-400 module, in order to show how much the SSI gives an effect on the structural responses by comparing with the fixed-base analysis.

  6. Current Status and Characterization of CANDU Spent Fuel for Geological Disposal System Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Dong Keun; Lee, Seung Woo; Cha, Jeong Hun; Choi, Jong Won; Choi, Heui Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yang [SK Engineering and Construction, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Inventories to be disposed of, reference turn up, and source terms for CANDU spent fuel were evaluated for geological disposal system design. The historical and projected inventory by 2040 is expected to be 14,600 MtU under the condition of 30-year lifetime for unit 1 and 40-year lifetime for other units in Wolsong site. As a result of statistical analysis for discharge burnup of the spent fuels generated by 2007, average and stand deviation revealed 6,987 MWD/MtU and 1,167, respectively. From this result, the reference burnup was determined as 8,100 MWD/MtU which covers 84% of spent fuels in total. Source terms such as nuclide concentration for a long-term safety analysis, decay heat, thermo-mechanical analysis, and radiation intensity and spectrum was characterized by using ORIGEN-ARP containing conservativeness in the aspect of decay heat up to several thousand years. The results from this study will be useful for the design of storage and disposal facilities.

  7. Micro-focus x-ray inspection of the bearing pad welded by laser for CANDU fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To attach the bearing pads on the surface of CANDU fuel element, laser welding technique has been reviewed to replace brazing technology which is complicate process and makes use of the toxic beryllium. In this study, to evaluate the soundness of the weld of the bearing pad of CANDU fuel element, a precise X-ray inspection system was developed using a micro-focus X-ray generator with an image intensifier and a real time camera system. The weld of the bearing pad welded by Nd:YAG laser has been inspected by the developed inspection system. Image processing technique has been applied to reduce random noise and to enhance the contrast of the X-ray image. A few defects on the weld of the bearing pads have been detected by the X-ray inspection process

  8. The CANDU contribution to environmentally friendly energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National prosperity is based on the availability of affordable, energy supply. However, this need is tempered by a complementary desire that the energy production and utilization will not have a major impact on the environment. The CANDU energy system, including a next generation of CANDU designs, is a major primary energy supply option that can be an important part of an energy mix to meet Canadian needs. CANDU nuclear power plants produce energy in the form of medium pressure steam. The advanced version of the CANDU design can be delivered in unit modules ranging from 400 to 1200 MWe. This Next Generation of CANDU designs features lower cost, coupled with robust safety margins. Normally this steam is used to drive a turbine and produce electricity. However, a fraction of this steam (large or small) may alternatively be used as process steam for industrial consumption. Options for such steam utilization include seawater desalination, oil sands extraction and heating. The electricity may be delivered to an electrical grid or alternatively used to produce quantities of hydrogen. Hydrogen is an ideal clean transportation fuel because its use only produces water. Thus, a combination of CANDU generated electricity and hydrogen distribution for vehicles is an available, cost-effective route to dramatically reduce emissions from the transportation sector. The CANDU energy system contributes to environmental protection and the prevention of climate change because of its very low emission. The CANDU energy system does not produce any NOx, SOx or greenhouse gas (notably CO2) emissions during operation. In addition, the CANDU system operates on a fully closed cycle with all wastes and emissions fully monitored, controlled and managed throughout the entire life cycle of the plant. The CANDU energy system is an environmentally friendly and flexible energy source. It can be an effective component of a total energy supply package, consistent with Canadian and global climate

  9. Investigation of coolant thermal mixing within 28-element CANDU fuel bundles using the ASSERT-PV thermal hydraulics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of a study of the thermal mixing of single-phase coolant in 28-element CANDU fuel bundles under steady-state conditions. The study, which is based on simulations performed using the ASSERT-PV thermal hydraulic code, consists of two main parts. In the first part the various physical mechanisms that contribute to coolant mixing are identified and their impact is isolated via ASSERT-PV simulations. The second part is concerned with development of a preliminary model suitable for use in the fuel and fuel channel code FACTAR to predict the thermal mixing that occurs between flow annuli. (author)

  10. Investigation of the CANLUB/sheath interface in CANDU fuel at extended burnup by XPS and SEM/WDX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocking, W.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Behnke, R.; Duclos, A.M.; Gerwing, A.F. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada); Chan, P.K. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    A systematic investigation of the fuel-sheath interface in CANDU fuel as a function of extended burnup has been undertaken by XPS and SEM/WDX analysis. Adherent deposits of UO{sub 2} and fission products, including Cs, Ba, Rb, I, Te, Cd and possibly Ru, have been routinely identified on CANLUB coated and bare Zircaloy surfaces. Some trends in the distribution and chemistry of key fission products have begun to emerge. Several potential mechanisms for degradation of the CANLUB graphite layer at high burnup have been practically excluded. New evidence of carbon relocation within the fuel element and limited reaction with excess oxygen has also been obtained. (author)

  11. Preliminary evaluation of licensing issues associated with U. S. -sited CANDU-PHW nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Erp, J B

    1977-12-01

    The principal safety-related characteristics of current CANDU-PHW power plants are described, and a distinction between those characteristics which are intrinsic to the CANDU-PHW system and those that are not is presented. An outline is given of the main features of the Canadian safety and licensing approach. Differences between the U.S. and Canadian approach to safety and licensing are discussed. Some of the main results of the safety analyses, routinely performed for CANDU-PHW reactors, are presented. U.S.-NRC General Design Criteria are evaluated as regards their applicability to CANDU-PHW reactors; vice-versa the CANDU-PHW reactor is evaluated with respect to its conformance to the U.S.-NRC General Design Criteria. A number of design modifications are proposed to be incorporated into the CANDU-PHW reactor in order to facilitate its introduction into the U.S.

  12. Seismic Structure-Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis of a Consolidated Dry Storage Module for CANDU Spent Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Gon; Yoon, Jeong Hyoun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Yang, Ke Hyung; Lee, Heung Young; Cho, Chun Hyung [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu Sup; Jeong, In Su [KONES Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The MACSTOR/KN-400 module has been developed as an effective alternative to the existing stand alone concrete canister for dry storage of CANDU spent fuel. The structure is a concrete monolith of 21.67 m long and 12.66 m wide and has a height equal to 7.518 m including the bottom slab. Inside the concrete module consists of 40 storage cylinders accommodating ten 60-bundle dry storage baskets, which are suspended from the top slab and eventually restrained at 10 cm above the bottom slab with horizontal seismic restraints. The main cooling process of the MACSTOR/KN-400 module shall be by air convection through air inlets and outlets. The civil design parameters, with respect to meteorological and seismic loads applied to the module are identical to those specified for the Wolsung CANDU 3 and 4 plants, except for local site characteristics required for soilstructure interaction (SSI) analysis. It is required for the structural integrity to fulfill the licensing requirements. As per USNRC SRP Section 3.7.2, it shall be reviewed how to consider the phenomenon of coupling of the dynamic response of adjacent structures through the soil, which is referred to as structure-soil-structure interaction (SSSI). The presence of closely spaced multiple structural foundations creates coupling between the foundations of individual structures . Some observations of the actual seismic response of structures have indicated that SSSI effects do exist, but they are generally secondary for the overall structural response motions. SSSI effects, however, may be important for a relatively small structure which is to be close to a relatively large structure, while they may be generally neglected for overall structural response of a large massive structure, such as nuclear power plant. As such the scope of the present paper is to carry out a seismic SSSI analysis in case of the MACSTOR/KN- 400 module, in order to investigate whether or not SSSI effect shall be included in the overall seismic

  13. Comparison of MCNP4B and WIMS-AECL calculations of coolant-void-reactivity effects for uniform lattices of CANDU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, K.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    This paper compares the results of coolant-void reactivity (CVR) reactor-physics calculations performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, MCNP version 4B, with those obtained using Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) latest version of the Winfrith improved multigroup scheme (WIMS) code, WIMS-AECL version 2-5c. Cross sections derived from the evaluated nuclear data file version B-VT (ENDF/B-VI) are used for both the WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B calculations. The comparison is made for uniform lattices at room temperature containing either fresh natural uranium or mixed oxide (MOX) 37-element CANDU fuel. The MOX fuel composition corresponds roughly to that of irradiated CANDU fuel at a burnup of about 4500 MWd/tU. The level of agreement between the CVR predictions of WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is studied as a function of lattice buckling (a measure of the curvature of the neutron-flux distribution) over the range from 0.0 to 4.1 m{sup -2}. For the cases studied, it is found that the absolute keff values calculated by WIMS-AECL are higher than those of MCNP4B by several mk (1 mk is a change of 0.001 in keff), amounts that depend on the fuel type being modelled and the particular cross-section data used. However, the agreement between WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is much better for the CVR (i.e., the {delta}keff on coolant voiding), and is relatively insensitive to the fuel type. (author)

  14. Comparison of MCNP4B and WIMS-AECL calculations of coolant-void-reactivity effects for uniform lattices of CANDU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, K.S

    1999-05-01

    This paper compares the results of coolant-void reactivity (CVR) reactor-physics calculations performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, MCNP version 4B, with those obtained using Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) latest version of the Winfrith improved multigroup scheme (WIMS) code, WIMS-AECL version 2-5c. Cross sections derived from the evaluated nuclear data file version B-VI (ENDF/B-VI) are used for both the WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B calculations. The comparison is made for uniform lattices at room temperature containing either fresh natural uranium or mixed oxide (MOX) 37-element CANDU fuel. The MOX fuel composition corresponds roughly to that of irradiated CANDU fuel at a burnup of about 4500 MWd/tU. The level of agreement between the CVR predictions of WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is studied as a function of lattice buckling (a measure of the curvature of the neutron-flux distribution) over the range from 0.0 to 4.1 m{sup -2} . For the cases studied, it is found that the absolute k values calculated by WIMS-AECL are higher than those of MCNP4B by several mk (1 mk is a change of 0.001 in k), amounts that depend on the fuel type being modelled and the particular cross-section data used. However, the agreement between WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is much better for the CVR (i.e., the {delta}k on coolant voiding), and is relatively insensitive to the fuel type. (author)

  15. Marketing CANDU internationally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The market for CANDU reactor sales, both international and domestic, is reviewed. It is reasonable to expect that between five and ten reactors can be sold outside Canada before the end of the centry, and new domestic orders should be forthcoming as well. AECL International has been created to market CANDU, and is working together with the Canadian nuclear industry to promote the reactor and to assemble an attractive package that can be offered abroad. (L.L.)

  16. Safety management on nuclear fuel cycle installations and nuclear material control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1998, the NNSA conducted some inspections on the YIBIN Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Plant that was under normal operation and the Pilot plant of NPP spent fuel Reprocessing that was construction at the Lanzhou Nuclear Fuel Complex. The NNSA also issued the OP to Tsinghua University for its Fuel Fabrication Laboratory of HTR-10 after safety review. The NNSA conducted the safety review on the CP application for the Fabrication Facility of Fuel Element for Heavy Water Reactor (CANDU-6) at the Baotou Nuclear Fuel Plant of CNNC in Baotou. The NNSA finished the safety review on the Beilong intermediate-level and low-level Radioactive Waste Repository in Guangdong. The NNSA conducted some inspections on the nuclear material control, and completed the verification of the Nuclear Material License of China Corporation of Atomic Energy Industry and other two organizations

  17. Overview of methods to increase dryout power in CANDU fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, D.C., E-mail: degroeneveld@gmail.com [Chalk River Laboratories, AECL, Chalk River (Canada); University of Ottawa, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ottawa (Canada); Leung, L.K.H. [Chalk River Laboratories, AECL, Chalk River (Canada); Park, J.H. [Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Small changes in bundle geometry can have noticeable effects on the bundle CHF. • Rod spacing devices can results in increases of over 200% in CHF. • CHF enhancement decays exponentially downstream from spacers. • CHF-enhancing bundle appendages also increase the post-CHF heat transfer. - Abstract: In CANDU reactors some degradation in the CCP (critical channel power, or power corresponding to the first occurrence of CHF in any fuel channel) will occur with time because of ageing effects such as pressure-tube diametral creep, increase in reactor inlet-header temperature, increased hydraulic resistance of feeders. To compensate for the ageing effects, various options for recovering the loss in CCP are described in this paper. They include: (i) increasing the bundle heated perimeter, (ii) optimizing the bundle configuration, (iii) optimizing core flow and flux distribution, (iv) reducing the bundle hydraulic resistance, (v) use of CHF-enhancing bundle appendages, (vi) more precise experimentation, and (vii) redefining CHF. The increase in CHF power has been quantified based on experiments on full-scale bundles and subchannel code predictions. The application of several of these CHF enhancement principles has been used in the development of the 43-rod CANFLEX bundle.

  18. The analysis of failed nuclear fuel rods by gamma computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrin, Relu; Craciunescu, Teddy; Tuturici, Ioan Liviu

    1997-07-01

    The failure of the cladding of an irradiated nuclear fuel rod can lead to the loss of some γ-radioactive fission products. Consequently the distribution of these fission products is altered in the cross-section of the fuel rod. The modification of the distribution, obtained by gamma computed tomography, is used to determine the integrity of the fuel cladding. The paper reports an experimental result, obtained for a CANDU-type fuel rod, irradiated in a TRIGA 14 MWth reactor.

  19. Nuclear fuel lease accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of nuclear fuel lease accounting is a controversial one that has received much attention over the years. This has occurred during a period when increasing numbers of utilities, seeking alternatives to traditional financing methods, have turned to leasing their nuclear fuel inventories. The purpose of this paper is to examine the current accounting treatment of nuclear fuel leases as prescribed by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC's) Uniform System of Accounts. Cost accounting for leased nuclear fuel during the fuel cycle is also discussed

  20. Report of the COG/IAEA international workshop on managing nuclear safety at CANDU (PHWR) plants. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop, hosted by COG and co-sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, Vienna) was held in Toronto, April 28 - May 1st, 1997. The 40 participants included senior managers from IAEA member countries operating or constructing CANDU (PHWR) stations. All the offshore utilities with PHWR stations in Korea, Romania, India, Argentina, Pakistan, and China were present with their domestic counterparts from Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Hydro Quebec, New Brunswick Power, and AECL. The objectives of the workshop were to: provide a forum for exchange of ideas among nuclear safety managers operating CANDU (PHWR) stations and to learn from each other's experiences; to foster sharing of information on different operating approaches to managing safety and, in particular, to highlight the strategies for controlling the overall plant risk to a low level; to identify and discuss issues of mutual interest pertinent to PHWR stations and to define future follow-up activities. Refs, figs

  1. Incentives for improvement of CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU is a relatively young technology which has demonstrated many achievements as an electrical power generation system. These achievements include an unsurpassed safety record, high annual and lifetime capacity factors, low electricity cost and a broad range of other performance strengths which together indicate that the CANDU technology is fundamentally sound. Known capabilities not yet fully exploited, such as advanced fuel cycle options, indicate that CANDU technology will continue to pay strong dividends on research, development and design investment. This provides a strong incentive for the improvement of CANDU on a continuing basis

  2. Direct reuse of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Nader M.A., E-mail: mnader73@yahoo.com

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new design for the PWR assemblies for direct use of spent fuel was proposed. • The PWR spent fuel will be transferred directly (after a certain cooling time) to CANDU reactors. • The proposed assembly has four zircaloy-4 tubes contains a number of CANDU fuel bundles (7 or 8 bundles per tube) stacked end to end. • MCNPX is used for the calculations that showed that the burnup can be increased by about 25%. • Acceptable linear heat generation rate in hot rods and improved Pu proliferation resistance. - Abstract: In this paper we proposed a new design for the PWR fuel assembly for direct use of the PWR spent fuel without processing. The PWR spent fuel will be transferred directly (after a certain cooling time) to CANDU reactors which preferably built in the same site to avoid the problem of transportations. The proposed assembly has four zircaloy-4 tubes contains a number of CANDU fuel bundles (7 or 8 bundles per tube) stacked end to end. Each tube has the same inner diameter of that of CANDU pressure tube. The spaces between the tubes contain low enriched UO{sub 2} fuel rods and guide tubes. MCNPX code is used for the simulation and calculation of the burnup of the proposed assembly. The bundles after the discharge from the PWR with their materials inventories are burned in a CANDU cell after a certain decay time. The results were compared with reference results and the impact of this new design on the uranium utilization improvement and on the proliferation resistance of plutonium is discussed. The effect of this new design on the power peaking, moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity and CANDU coolant void reactivity are discussed as well.

  3. Analysis of Fuel Temperature Reactivity Coefficients According to Burn-up and Pu-239 Production in CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonances for some kinds of nuclides such as U-238 and Pu-239 are not easy to be accurately processed. In addition, the Pu-239 productions from burnup are also significant in CANDU, where the natural uranium is used as a fuel. In this study, the FTCs were analyzed from the viewpoints of the resonance self-shielding methodology and Pu-239 build-up. The lattice burnup calculations were performed using the TRITON module in the SCALE6 code system, and the BONAMI module was executed to obtain self-shielded cross sections using the Bondarenko approach. Two libraries, ENDF/B-VI.8 and ENDF/B-VII.0, were used to compare the Pu-239 effect on FTC, since the ENDF/B-VII has updated the Pu-239 cross section data. The FTCs of the CANDU reactor were newly analyzed using the TRITON module in the SCALE6 code system, and the BONAMI module was executed to apply the Bondarenko approach for self-shielded cross sections. When compared with some reactor physics codes resulting in slightly positive FTC in the specific region, the FTCs evaluated in this study showed a clear negativity over the entire fuel temperature range on fresh/equilibrium fuel. In addition, the FTCs at 960.15 K were slightly negative during the entire burnup. The effects on FTCs from the library difference between ENDF/B-VI.8 and ENDF/B-VII.0 are recognized to not be large; however, they appear more positive when more Pu-239 productions with burnup are considered. This feasibility study needs an additional benchmark evaluation for FTC calculations, but it can be used as a reference for a new FTC analysis in CANDU reactors

  4. An integrated CANDU system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty years of experience have shown that the early choices of heavy water as moderator and natural uranium as fuel imposed a discipline on CANDU design that has led to outstanding performance. The integrated structure of the industry in Canada, incorporating development, design, supply, manufacturing, and operation functions, has reinforced this performance and has provided a basis on which to continue development in the future. These same fundamental characteristics of the CANDU program open up propsects for further improvements in economy and resource utilization through increased reactor size and the development of the thorium fuel cycle

  5. Requirements for class 1C, 2C, and 3C pressure-retaining components and supports in CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Standard applies to pressure-retaining components of CANDU nuclear power plants that have a code classification of Class 1C, 2C or 3C. These are pressure-retaining components where, because of the design concept, the rules of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code do not exist, are not applicable, or are not sufficient. The Standard provides rules for the design, fabrication, installation, examination and inspection of these components and supports. It provides rules intended to ensure the pressure-retaining integrity of components, not the operability. It also provides rules for the support of fueling machines. The Standard applies only to new construction prior to the plant being declared in service

  6. The clearance potential index and hazard factors of CANDU fuel bundle and a comparison of experimental-calculated inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of radioactive waste management, the radiotoxicity can be characterized by two different approaches: 1) IAEA, 2004 RS-G-1.7 clearance concept and 2) US, 10CFR20 radioactivity concentration guides in terms of ingestion / inhalation hazard expressed in m3 of water/air. A comparison between the two existing safety concepts was made in the paper. The modeled case was a CANDU natural uranium, 37 elements fuel bundle with a reference burnup of 685 GJ/kgU (7928.24 MWd/tU). The radiotoxicity of the light nuclide inventories, actinide, and fission-products was calculated in the paper. The calculation was made using the ORIGEN-S from ORIGEN4.4a in conjunction with the activation-burnup library and an updated decay data library with clearance levels data in ORIGEN format produced by WIMS-AECL/SCALENEA-1 code system. Both the radioactivity concentration expressed in Curie and Becquerel, and the clearance index and ingestion / inhalation hazard were calculated for the radionuclides contained in 1 kg of irradiated fuel element at shutdown and for 1, 50, 1500 years cooling time. This study required a complex activity that consisted of various phases such us: the acquisition, setting up, validation and application of procedures, codes and libraries. For the validation phase of the study, the objective was to compare the measured inventories of selected actinide and fission products radionuclides in an element from a Pickering CANDU reactor with inventories predicted using a recent version of the ORIGEN-ARP from SCALE 5 coupled with the time dependent cross sections library, CANDU 28.lib, produced by the sequence SAS2H of SCALE 4.4a. In this way, the procedures, codes and libraries for the characterization of radioactive material in terms of radioactive inventories, clearance, and biological hazard factors are being qualified and validated, in support for the safety management of the radioactive wastes

  7. Evolution of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel is the primary energy source for sustaining the nuclear fission chain reactions in a reactor. The fuels in the reactor cores are exposed to highly aggressive environment and varieties of advanced fuel materials with improved nuclear properties are continuously being developed to have optimum performance in the existing core conditions. Fabrications of varieties of nuclear fuels used in diverse forms of reactors are mainly based on two naturally occurring nuclear source elements, uranium as fissile 235U and fertile 238U, and thorium as fertile 232Th species. The two metals in the forms of alloys with specific elements, ceramic oxides like MOX and ceramic non-oxide as mixed carbide and nitride with suitable nuclear properties like higher metal density, thermal conductivity, etc. are used as fuels in different reactor designs. In addition, efficiency of various advanced fuels in the forms of dispersion, molten salt and other types are also under investigations. The countries which have large deposits of thorium but limited reserves of uranium, are trying to give special impetus on the development of thorium-based fuels for both thermal and fast reactors in harnessing nuclear energy for peaceful uses of atomic energy. (author)

  8. Machine learning techniques for the verification of refueling activities in CANDU-type nuclear power plants (NPPs) with direct applications in nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation deals with the problem of automated classification of the signals obtained from certain radiation monitoring systems, specifically from the Core Discharge Monitor (CDM) systems, that are successfully operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at various CANDU-type nuclear power plants around the world. In order to significantly reduce the costly and error-prone manual evaluation of the large amounts of the collected CDM signals, a reliable and efficient algorithm for the automated data evaluation is necessary, which might ensure real-time performance with maximum of 0.01 % misclassification ratio. This thesis describes the research behind finding a successful prototype implementation of such automated analysis software. The finally adopted methodology assumes a nonstationary data-generating process that has a finite number of states or basic fueling activities, each of which can emit observable data patterns having particular stationary characteristics. To find out the underlying state sequences, a unified probabilistic approach known as the hidden Markov model (HMM) is used. Each possible fueling sequence is modeled by a distinct HMM having a left-right profile topology with explicit insert and delete states. Given an unknown fueling sequence, a dynamic programming algorithm akin to the Viterbi search is used to find the maximum likelihood state path through each model and eventually the overall best-scoring path is picked up as the recognition hypothesis. Machine learning techniques are applied to estimate the observation densities of the states, because the densities are not simply parameterizable. Unlike most present applications of continuous monitoring systems that rely on heuristic approaches to the recognition of possibly risky events, this research focuses on finding techniques that make optimal use of prior knowledge and computer simulation in the recognition task. Thus, a suitably modified, approximate n-best variant of

  9. Influence of the flux axial form on the conversion rate and duration of cycle between recharging for ThPu and U{sub nat} fuels in CANDU reactors; Influence de la forme axiale du flux sur le taux de conversion et la duree du cycle entre rechargements pour du combustible ThPu et U{sub nat} dans les reacteurs CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambon, Richard [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier / CNRS-IN2P3, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France)

    2007-01-15

    To face the increasing world power demand the world nuclear sector must be continuously updated and developed as well. Thus reactors of new types are introduced and advanced fuel cycles are proposed. The technological and economic feasibility and the transition of the present power park to a renewed park require thorough studies and scenarios, which are highly dependent on the reactor performances. The conversion rate and cycle span between recharging are important parameters in the scenarios studies. In this frame, we have studied the utilisation of thorium in the CANDU type reactors and particularly the influence of axial form of the flux, i.e. of the recharging mode, on the conversion rate and duration of the cycle between recharging. The results show that up to a first approximation the axial form of the flux resulting from the neutron transport calculations for assessing the conversion rate is not necessary to be taken into account. However the time span between recharging differs up to several percents if the axial form of the flux is taken into consideration in transport calculations. Thus if the burnup or the recharging frequency are parameters which influence significantly the deployment scenarios of a nuclear park an approach more refined than a simple transport evolution in a typical cell/assembly is recommended. Finally, the results of this study are not more general than for the assumed conditions but they give a thorough calculation method valid for any recharging/fuel combination in a CANDU type reactor.

  10. A general computing code devoted to the analysis of bending vibrations specific to the CANDU type fuel channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that circulation of the coolant through the pressure tube of a CANDU type reactor initiates and maintains bending vibrations in: individual fuel elements, fuel cluster, cluster column and in the pressure tube. The driving forces are either aleatory, due to turbulent flow, or harmonical due to the pressure pulsations from the circulation pumps. The vibrations induced by laminar flow in case of excessive intensities may induce both a acceleration of the fretting wear phenomena in the fuel elements and pressure tubes and a premature aging of the latter. In these conditions an important problem in the cluster design is that of obtaining, based on knowledge of laminar flow frequency structure, the eigenfrequencies for the four categories of oscillatory systems mentioned above and thus to avoid by construction the resonance phenomenon or at least to diminish its impairing effects. An activity of comparative analysis in different fuel cluster types is underway at INR Pitesti, a special attention being of course directed toward their vibrational behavior. The paper presents a general computational code devoted to characterization of bending vibration for: individual fuel elements, fuel element cluster, pressure tube loaded or not with fuel clusters and filled or not with coolant; fuel channel. During the presentation of the work the computing code will be run for demonstration

  11. A proposed structural, risk-informed approach to the periodicity of CANDU-6 nuclear containment integrated leak rate testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliba, N. [McGill Univ., Dept. of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Komljenovic, D. [Hydro-Quebec, Gentilly-2 Nuclear Power Plant, Becancour, Quebec (Canada); Chouinard, L. [McGill Univ., Dept. of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Vaillancourt, R.; Chretien, G. [Hydro-Quebec, Gentilly-2 Nuclear Power Plant, Becancour, Quebec (Canada); Gocevski, V. [Hydro-Quebec Equipements, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    As ultimate lines of defense against leakage of large amounts of radioactive material to the environment in case of major reactor accidents, containments have been monitored through well designed periodic tests to ensure their proper performance. Regulatory organizations have imposed types and frequencies of containment tests based on highly-conservative deterministic approaches, and judgments of knowledgeable experts. Recent developments in the perception and methods of risk evaluation have been applied to rationalize the leakage-rate testing frequencies while maintaining risks within acceptable levels, preserving the integrity of containments, and respecting the defense-in-depth philosophy. The objective of this paper is to introduce a proposed risk-informed decision making framework on the periodicity of nuclear containment ILRTs for CANDU-6 nuclear power plants based on five main decision criteria, namely: 1) the containment structural integrity; 2) inputs from PSA Level-2; 3) the requirements of deterministic safety analyses and defense-in-depth concepts; 4- the obligations under regulatory and standard requirements; and 5) the return of experience from nuclear containments historic performance. The concepts of dormant reliability and structural fragility will guide the assessment of the containment structural integrity, within the general context of a global containment life cycle management program. This study is oriented towards the requirements of CANDU-6 reactors, in general, and Hydro-Quebec's Gentilly-2 nuclear power plant, in particular. The present article is the first part in a series of papers that will comprehensively detail the proposed research. (author)

  12. Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a submission for the Encyclopedia of Sustainable Technology on the subject of Reprocessing Spent Nuclear Fuel. Nuclear reprocessing is the chemical treatment of spent fuel involving separation of its various constituents. Principally, it is used to recover useful actinides from the spent fuel. Radioactive waste that cannot be re-used is separated into streams for consolidation into waste forms. The first known application of nuclear reprocessing was within the Manhattan Project to recover material for nuclear weapons. Currently, reprocessing has a peaceful application in the nuclear fuel cycle. A variety of chemical methods have been proposed and demonstrated for reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The two most widely investigated and implemented methods are generally referred to as aqueous reprocessing and pyroprocessing. Each of these technologies is described in detail in Section 3 with numerous references to published articles. Reprocessing of nuclear fuel as part of a fuel cycle can be used both to recover fissionable actinides and to stabilize radioactive fission products into durable waste forms. It can also be used as part of a breeder reactor fuel cycle that could result in a 14-fold or higher increase in energy utilization per unit of natural uranium. Reprocessing can also impact the need for geologic repositories for spent fuel. The volume of waste that needs to be sent to such a repository can be reduced by first subjecting the spent fuel to reprocessing. The extent to which volume reduction can occur is currently under study by the United States Department of Energy via research at various national laboratories and universities. Reprocessing can also separate fissile and non-fissile radioactive elements for transmutation.

  13. Spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a country becomes self-sufficient in part of the nuclear cycle, as production of fuel that will be used in nuclear power plants for energy generation, it is necessary to pay attention for the best method of storing the spent fuel. Temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel is a necessary practice and is applied nowadays all over the world, so much in countries that have not been defined their plan for a definitive repository, as well for those that already put in practice such storage form. There are two main aspects that involve the spent fuels: one regarding the spent nuclear fuel storage intended to reprocessing and the other in which the spent fuel will be sent for final deposition when the definitive place is defined, correctly located, appropriately characterized as to several technical aspects, and licentiate. This last aspect can involve decades of studies because of the technical and normative definitions at a given country. In Brazil, the interest is linked with the storage of spent fuels that will not be reprocessed. This work analyses possible types of storage, the international panorama and a proposal for future construction of a spent nuclear fuel temporary storage place in the country. (author)

  14. Nuclear Waste Imaging and Spent Fuel Verification by Muon Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Jonkmans, G; Jewett, C; Thompson, M

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the use of cosmic ray muons to image the contents of shielded containers and detect high-Z special nuclear materials inside them. Cosmic ray muons are a naturally occurring form of radiation, are highly penetrating and exhibit large scattering angles on high Z materials. Specifically, we investigated how radiographic and tomographic techniques can be effective for non-invasive nuclear waste characterization and for nuclear material accountancy of spent fuel inside dry storage containers. We show that the tracking of individual muons, as they enter and exit a structure, can potentially improve the accuracy and availability of data on nuclear waste and the contents of Dry Storage Containers (DSC) used for spent fuel storage at CANDU plants. This could be achieved in near real time, with the potential for unattended and remotely monitored operations. We show that the expected sensitivity, in the case of the DSC, exceeds the IAEA detection target for nuclear material accountancy.

  15. Fission product release assessment for end fitting failure in Candu reactor loaded with CANFLEX-NU fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dirk Joo; Jeong, Chang Joon; Lee, Kang Moon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Fission product release (FPR) assessment for End Fitting Failure (EFF) in CANDU reactor loaded with CANFLEX-natural uranium (NU) fuel bundles has been performed. The predicted results are compared with those for the reactor loaded with standard 37-element bundles. The total channel I-131 release at the end of transient for EFF accident is calculated to be 380.8 TBq and 602.9 TBq for the CANFLEX bundle and standard bundle channel cases, respectively. They are 4.9% and 7.9% of total inventory, respectively. The lower total releases of the CANFLEX bundle O6 channel are attributed to the lower initial fuel temperatures caused by the lower linear element power of the CANFLEX bundle compared with the standard bundle. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs. (Author)

  16. Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael F. Simpson; Jack D. Law

    2010-02-01

    This is an a submission for the Encyclopedia of Sustainable Technology on the subject of Reprocessing Spent Nuclear Fuel. No formal abstract was required for the article. The full article will be attached.

  17. Nuclear fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadowcroft, Ronald Ross; Bain, Alastair Stewart

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element wherein a tubular cladding of zirconium or a zirconium alloy has a fission gas plenum chamber which is held against collapse by the loops of a spacer in the form of a tube which has been deformed inwardly at three equally spaced, circumferential positions to provide three loops. A heat resistant disc of, say, graphite separates nuclear fuel pellets within the cladding from the plenum chamber. The spacer is of zirconium or a zirconium alloy.

  18. Nuclear fuel manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technologies used to manufacture nuclear fuel from uranium ore are outlined, with particular reference to the light water reactor fuel cycle. Capital and operating cost estimates for the processing stages are given, and the relevance to a developing uranium industry in Australia is discussed

  19. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  20. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides data and assessments of the status and prospects of nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle. The report discusses the economic competitiveness of nuclear electricity generation, the extent of world uranium resources, production and requirements, uranium conversion and enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel treatment and radioactive waste management. A review is given of the status of nuclear fusion research

  1. A study on the environmental friendliness of nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. J.; Lee, B. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Lim, C. Y.; Choi, Y. S.; Lee, Y. E.; Hong, D. S.; Cheong, J. H; Park, J. B.; Kim, K. K.; Cheong, H. Y; Song, M. C; Lee, H. J. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop methodologies for quantifying environmental and socio-political factors involved with nuclear fuel cycle and finally to evaluate nuclear fuel cycle options with special emphasis given to the factors. Moreover, methodologies for developing practical radiological health risk assessment code system will be developed by which the assessment could be achieved for the recycling and reuse of scrap materials containing residual radioactive contamination. Selected scenarios are direct disposal, DUPIC(Direct use of PWR spent fuel in CANDU), and MOX recycle, land use, radiological effect, and non-radiological effect were chosen for environmental criteria and public acceptance and non-proliferation of nuclear material for socio-political ones. As a result of this study, potential scenarios to be chosen in Korea were selected and methodologies were developed to quantify the environmental and socio-political criteria. 24 refs., 27 tabs., 29 figs. (author)

  2. CANDU, building the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, F. [Stern Laboratories (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    The CEO of Stern Laboratories delivered a speech on the problems and challenges facing the nuclear industry. The CANDU system is looked at as the practical choice for the future of our energy source. The people of the industry must be utilized and respected to deliver to the best of their ability.

  3. Scenarios for the transmutation of actinides in CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyland, Bronwyn, E-mail: hylandb@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada); Gihm, Brian, E-mail: gihmb@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    With world stockpiles of used nuclear fuel increasing, the need to address the long-term utilization of this resource is being studied. Many of the transuranic (TRU) actinides in nuclear spent fuel produce decay heat for long durations, resulting in significant nuclear waste management challenges. These actinides can be transmuted to shorter-lived isotopes to reduce the decay heat period or consumed as fuel in a CANDU(R) reactor. Many of the design features of the CANDU reactor make it uniquely adaptable to actinide transmutation. The small, simple fuel bundle simplifies the fabrication and handling of active fuels. Online refuelling allows precise management of core reactivity and separate insertion of the actinides and fuel bundles into the core. The high neutron economy of the CANDU reactor results in high TRU destruction to fissile-loading ratio. This paper provides a summary of actinide transmutation schemes that have been studied in CANDU reactors at AECL, including the works performed in the past. The schemes studied include homogeneous scenarios in which actinides are uniformly distributed in all fuel bundles in the reactor, as well as heterogeneous scenarios in which dedicated channels in the reactor are loaded with actinide targets and the rest of the reactor is loaded with fuel. The transmutation schemes that are presented reflect several different partitioning schemes. Separation of americium, often with curium, from the other actinides enables targeted destruction of americium, which is a main contributor to the decay heat 100-1000 years after discharge from the reactor. Another scheme is group-extracted transuranic elements, in which all of the transuranic elements, plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) are extracted together and then transmuted. This paper also addresses ways of utilizing the recycled uranium, another stream from the separation of spent nuclear fuel, in order to drive the transmutation of other actinides.

  4. Modelling of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in CANDU fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.; Kleczek, M. R.; Shaheen, K.; Juhas, M.; Iglesias, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) is a recognized factor for fuel-element failure in the operation of nuclear reactors requiring the implementation of mitigation measures. I-SCC is believed to depend on certain factors such as iodine concentration, oxide layer type and thickness on the fuel sheath, irradiation history, metallurgical parameters related to sheath like texture and microstructure, and the mechanical properties of zirconium alloys. This work details the development of a thermodynamics and mechanistic treatment accounting for the iodine chemistry and kinetics in the fuel-to-sheath gap and its influence on I-SCC phenomena. The governing transport equations for the model are solved with a finite-element technique using the COMSOL Multiphysics® commercial software platform. Based on this analysis, this study also proposes potential remedies for I-SCC.

  5. Control and instrumentation systems for the 600 MWe CANDU PHW nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control and instrumentation systems for CANDU power plants are designed for high reliability and availabilty to meet stringent safety and operational requirements. To achieve these goals a 'defence-in-depth' design philosophy is employed. The diversely functioning systems designed to satisfy these requirements are described, along with the extensive use of computers for important plant control and man-machine functions

  6. Disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1978, the governments of Canada and Ontario established the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management program. As of the time of the conference, the research performed by AECL was jointly funded by AECL and Ontario Hydro through the CANDU owners' group. Ontario Hydro have also done some of the research on disposal containers and vault seals. From 1978 to 1992, AECL's research and development on disposal cost about C$413 million, of which C$305 was from funds provided to AECL by the federal government, and C$77 million was from Ontario Hydro. The concept involves the construction of a waste vault 500 to 1000 metres deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Precambrian Shield. Used fuel (or possibly solidified reprocessing waste) would be sealed into containers (of copper, titanium or special steel) and emplaced (probably in boreholes) in the vault floor, surrounded by sealing material (buffer). Disposal rooms might be excavated on more than one level. Eventually all excavated openings in the rock would be backfilled and sealed. Research is organized under the following headings: disposal container, waste form, vault seals, geosphere, surface environment, total system, assessment of environmental effects. A federal Environmental Assessment Panel is assessing the concept (holding public hearings for the purpose) and will eventually make recommendations to assist the governments of Canada and Ontario in deciding whether to accept the concept, and how to manage nuclear fuel waste. 16 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  7. Test facility and instrumentation techniques for the irradiation of nuclear fuel in the INR Pitesti TRIGA Reactor to sustain the Nuclear Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extended program for irradiation testing of CANDU nuclear fuel in the TRIGA-SSR and ACPR reactors at INR Pitesti were performed from 1981 to 1994. The irradiation devices designed to operate mainly in the 14 MWt SSR core allow the irradiation of nuclear fuel elements and structure materials. By means of these irradiation devices there are simulated the normal operation conditions in a NPP as well as the abnormal ones. The paper describes some representative tests which yielded interesting results due to the nuclear instrumentation of irradiated samples and an outlook on future development of nuclear safety program specific for CANDU fuel testing. An appropriate analysis of the experimental results allow the evaluation of fuel behaviour, its performances and the verification of correct modelling of specific phenomena by computer codes (both in normal and accident conditions). (author). 4 figs., 5 refs

  8. Mechanistic modeling of bearing pad to pressure tube contact under localized high temperature conditions in a CANDU fuel channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a postulated critical break LOCA (loss of coolant accident) in a CANDU reactor the coolant flow rates in the fuel channels of the flow pass of the reactor core downstream of the pipe break can rapidly reduce to very low values and remain very low for a period of tens of seconds following the break. Under the sustained low flow conditions, the fuel sheath (cladding) temperature in the affected channels rapidly increases and the coolant in the channels becomes significantly voided. The pressure tubes in the affected pass heat up under a combination of convection heat transfer from the low flows of superheated seam and thermal radiation heat transfer from the hot fuel. Additionally, hot spots may develop on the inner surface of pressure tubes at locations where the fuel bearing pads are in direct contact with the pressure tube. Localized thermal creep strain deformation at the hot spots is a potential pressure tube failure mechanism which could challenge fuel channel integrity. This paper evaluates the local thermal-mechanical deformation of a pressure tube in a CANDU reactor under critical break LOCA conditions tube using a coupled thermal-mechanical finite element COMSOL multi-physics model and investigates the conditions resulting in fuel channel failure due to localized contact between bearing pad and pressure. The mechanistic models are validated against data obtained from COG funded experiments performed at WRL (Whiteshell Research Laboratory). Multiphysics calculations are performed in which the heat transfer, thermal-mechanical and creep strain equations are solved, simultaneously. Heat conduction from bearing pads to the inner surface of the pressure tube is modeled with appropriate convective and radiation heat transfer boundary conditions. Thermal creep strain deformation of the Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube is modeled using correlations derived from separate uniaxial tests that are reported in the literature. Contact conductance models based on

  9. PARTICULARITIES REGARDING THE OPERATING PROCESS OF THE CUTTING AND EXTRACTION DEVICE IN THE CANDU HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS PRESSURE TUBE DECOMMISSIONING PART II: CUTTING AND EXTRACTING PRESSURE TUBE PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin POPESCU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some details of operation process for a Cutting and Extraction Device (CED in order to achieve the decommissioning of the horizontal fuel channels pressure tube in the CANDU 6 nuclear reactor. The most important characteristic of the Cutting and Extraction Device (CED is his capability of totally operator’s protection against the nuclear radiation during pressure tube decommissioning. The cutting and extracting pressure tube processes present few particularities due to special adopted technical solutions: a special module with three cutting rollers (system driven by an actuator, a guiding-extracting and connecting module (three fixing claws which are piloted by an actuator and block the device in the connecting position with extracting plugs. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED is a train of modules equipped with special systems to be fully automated, connected with a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC and controlled by an operator panel type Human Machine Interface (HMI. All processes are monitored by video cameras. In case of error, the process is automatically stopped, the operator receiving an error message and the last sequence could be reinitialized or aborted due to safety reasons.

  10. The development of a remote gauging and inspection capability for fuel channels in Candu reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equipment under development for the inspection and gauging of pressure tubes in CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium) type reactors is described. A brief overview of the mechanical scanning system is presented followed by a detailed description of the measurement and data processing systems for the gauging of diameter and wall thickness, volumetric inspection of the tube wall and gauging of the annular gap between the pressure tube and the calandria tube. Experience of testing ultrasonic transducers in very high (106 Roentgens/hour)(R/h) radiation fields is reviewed. (author)

  11. Safety Evaluation Report for CANDU Spent Fuel Dry Storage Basket Drop Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is technical report about the safety demonstration test for the CANDU S/F storage basket. Two demonstration tests were performed such as one case of dropping a basket into the bottom of the cylinder from 7.5 m height and another case of dropping a basket onto the other basket loaded in a cylinder. The existing basket was improved to satisfy the performance requirement. The leak test showed that the enhanced basket had no leak after all the drop tests. The dropped basket was able to be withdrawn through top of the cylinder by a handling tool, which proved the maintenance of retrievability after drop accident

  12. A study on the radioactive waste management for DUPIC fuel cycle - A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyeon Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Kim, Jong Ho; Cho, Yeong Hyeon; Paek, Seung Uh; Kang, Hee Seok; Na, Jeong Won; Choi, Jong Won; Lee, Hu Keun; Park, Keun Il; Yang, Seung Yeong [Korea Atomic Energy Res. Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    The characteristics of the radioactive wastes coming from the DUPIC fuel manufacturing process were analyzed and evaluated. The release amounts of nuclides were estimated, and the characteristics of the oxides of semi-volatile nuclides such as Ru and Cs were analyzed and also these trapping and fixation technologies were assessed. The conceptual methods of experiment including apparatus and procedure were completed to define the vaporization behavior of nuclides. The gross {alpha}-activity and {alpha}-, {gamma}-spectrum of irradiated zircaloy specimens from KORI unit 1 were analyzed and the press to test the compaction of hulls was manufactured. Ingestion hazard index for the disposal of spent DUPIC fuel were calculated using ORIGEN 2 code and compared with the disposal of once-through spent PWR and CANDU fuels, and then the index per kwh for DUPIC cycle was 1/8 {approx} 1/4 lower than that for once-through cycle. (Author).

  13. The nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented at the International Conference on The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, held at Stockholm, 28 to 31 October 1975, are reviewed. The meeting, organised by the U.S. Atomic Industrial Forum, and the Swedish Nuclear Forum, was concerned more particularly with economic, political, social and commercial aspects than with tecnology. The papers discussed were considered under the subject heading of current status, uranium resources, enrichment, and reprocessing. (U.K.)

  14. Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Deborah J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-28

    These slides will be presented at the training course “International Training Course on Implementing State Systems of Accounting for and Control (SSAC) of Nuclear Material for States with Small Quantity Protocols (SQP),” on November 3-7, 2014 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The slides provide a basic overview of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. This is a joint training course provided by NNSA and IAEA.

  15. The small (or large) modular CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneley, D.; Harvel, G. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This presentation outlines the design for small (or large) modular CANDU. The origins of this work go back many years to a comment by John Foster, then President of AECL CANDU. Foster noted that the CANDU reactor, with its many small fuel channels, was like a wood campfire. To make a bigger fire, just throw on some more logs (channels). If you want a smaller fire, just use fewer logs. The design process is greatly simplified.

  16. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To increase the fuel assembly rigidity while making balance in view of the dimension thereby improving the earthquake proofness. Constitution: In a nuclear fuel assembly having a control rod guide thimble tube, the gap between the thimble tube and fuel insert (inner diameter of the guiding thimble tube-outer diameter of the fuel insert) is made greater than 1.0 mm. Further, the wall thickness of the thimble tube is made to about 4 - 5 % of the outer diameter, while the flowing fluid pore cross section S in the thimble tube is set as: S = S0 x A0/A where S0: cross section of the present flowing fluid pore, A: effective cross section after improvement, = Π/4(d2 - D2) in which d is the thimble tube inner diameter and the D is the fuel insert outer diameter. A0: present effective cross section. (Seki, T.)

  17. Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold F. McFarlane; Terry Todd

    2013-11-01

    Reprocessing is essential to closing nuclear fuel cycle. Natural uranium contains only 0.7 percent 235U, the fissile (see glossary for technical terms) isotope that produces most of the fission energy in a nuclear power plant. Prior to being used in commercial nuclear fuel, uranium is typically enriched to 3–5% in 235U. If the enrichment process discards depleted uranium at 0.2 percent 235U, it takes more than seven tonnes of uranium feed to produce one tonne of 4%-enriched uranium. Nuclear fuel discharged at the end of its economic lifetime contains less one percent 235U, but still more than the natural ore. Less than one percent of the uranium that enters the fuel cycle is actually used in a single pass through the reactor. The other naturally occurring isotope, 238U, directly contributes in a minor way to power generation. However, its main role is to transmute into plutoniumby neutron capture and subsequent radioactive decay of unstable uraniumand neptuniumisotopes. 239Pu and 241Pu are fissile isotopes that produce more than 40% of the fission energy in commercially deployed reactors. It is recovery of the plutonium (and to a lesser extent the uranium) for use in recycled nuclear fuel that has been the primary focus of commercial reprocessing. Uraniumtargets irradiated in special purpose reactors are also reprocessed to obtain the fission product 99Mo, the parent isotope of technetium, which is widely used inmedical procedures. Among the fission products, recovery of such expensive metals as platinum and rhodium is technically achievable, but not economically viable in current market and regulatory conditions. During the past 60 years, many different techniques for reprocessing used nuclear fuel have been proposed and tested in the laboratory. However, commercial reprocessing has been implemented along a single line of aqueous solvent extraction technology called plutonium uranium reduction extraction process (PUREX). Similarly, hundreds of types of reactor

  18. Technology transfer in CANDU marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses how the CANDU system lends itself to technology transfer, the scope of CANDU technology transfer, and the benefits and problems associated with technology transfer. The establishment of joint ventures between supplier and client nations offers benefits to both parties. Canada can offer varying technology transfer packages, each tailored to a client nation's needs and capabilities. Such a package could include all the hardware and software necessary to develop a self-sufficient nuclear infrastructure in the client nation

  19. Proceedings of the 1994 nuclear simulation symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This symposium on nuclear simulation included sessions on reactor physics, on thermalhydraulics, and on fuel and fuel channels of CANDU type reactors. The individual papers have all been abstracted separately

  20. Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US

  1. The Canadian approach to nuclear codes and standards. A CSA forum for development of standards for CANDU: radioactive waste management and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Together with the Canadian Standards Association (CSA), industry stakeholders, governments, and the public have developed a suite of standards for CANDU nuclear power plants that generate electricity in Canada and abroad. In this paper, we will describe: CSA's role in national and international nuclear standards development; the key issues and priority projects that the nuclear standards program has addressed; the new CSA nuclear committees and projects being established, particularly those related to waste management and decommissioning; the hierarchy of nuclear regulations, nuclear, and other standards in Canada, and how they are applied by AECL; the standards management activities; and the future trends and challenges for CSA and the nuclear community. CSA is an accredited Standards Development Organization (SDO) and part of the international standards system. CSA's Nuclear Strategic Steering Committee (NSSC) provides leadership, direction, and support for a standards committee hierarchy comprised of members from a balanced matrix of interests. The NSSC strategically focuses on industry challenges; a new nuclear regulatory system, deregulated energy markets, and industry restructuring. As the first phase of priority projects is nearing completion, the next phase of priorities is being identified. These priorities address radioactive waste management, environmental radiation management, decommissioning, structural, and seismic issues. As the CSA committees get established in the coming year, members and input will be solicited for the technical committees, subcommittees, and task forces for the following related subjects: Radioactive Waste Management; a) Dry Storage of Irradiated Fuel; b) Short-Term Radioactive Waste Management; c) Long-Term Storage and Disposal of Radioactive Waste. 2. Decommissioning Nuclear Power is highly regulated, and public scrutiny has focused Codes and Standards on public and worker safety. Licensing and regulation serves to control

  2. Alternative fuel cycle options: performance characteristics and impact on nuclear power growth potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y. I.; Till, C. E.; Rudolph, R. R.; Deen, J. R.; King, M. J.

    1977-09-01

    The fuel utilization characteristics for LWR, SSCR, CANDU and LMFBR reactor concepts are quantified for various fuel cycle options, including once-through cycles, thorium cycles, and denatured cycles. The implications of various alternative reactor deployment strategies on the long-term nuclear power growth potential are then quantified in terms of the maximum nuclear capacity that can be achieved and the growth pattern over time, subject to the constraint of a fixed uranium-resource base. The overall objective of this study is to shed light on any large differences in the long-term potential that exist between various alternative reactor/fuel cycle deployment strategies.

  3. Implementation of an integrated safeguards approach for transfers of spent fuel to dry storage at multi-unit CANDU generating stations in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) in 2002 undertook an IAEA Support Program task to develop and test an Integrated Safeguards (IS) approach for transfers of spent fuel to dry storage at multi-unit CANDU stations. The IS approach that Canada proposed in 2003 was successfully field tested in Canada by the IAEA in 2004. Since then the IAEA has drawn a positive conclusion for Canada and is preparing to implement IS in Canada based on the State-level Integrated Safeguards Approach (SLA) for Canada that was concluded in November 2005. Implementation of an IS approach for transfers to dry storage, similar to the one proposed by Canada, will be part of the initial phase of the implementation of the SLA. This paper briefly reviews the IS approach for transfers proposed by Canada and explains how the approach may be modified for implementation as part of the SLA to take into account lessons learned from the field test, operator and IAEA concerns, and developments in technology. (author)

  4. Installation of an irradiated fuel bundle discharge counter at Bruce NGS-B 3 000 MW(e) CANDU power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design, manufacture and installation of an irradiated fuel bundle discharge counter for the multi-unit CANDU Bruce NGS-B Generating Station involved contributions from the International Atomic Energy Agency (Agency), designers (AECL), contractors, manufacturers, utility and the regulatory agency. The installation at Bruce NGS-B was the first made by the Agency as a retrofit to a multi-unit CANDU reactor approaching its fist critical operation, where the whole project was the responsibility of the Agency and where the original design of the reactor had not had provision for the Agency equipment. The scheduling and integration of the installation into the normal activities involved in starting up a 3 000 MW(e) multi-unit generating station were successfully achieved. The Agency has demonstrated the capability and performance of the fuel discharge counter

  5. Experience teaching CD-ROM-based course on CANDU nuclear-power-plant systems and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents personal experience garnered from teaching a CD-ROM-based course on CANDU Power-Plant Systems and Operation. This course was originally developed by Prof. G.T. Bereznai as research in distance-learning techniques when he was directing the Thai-Canadian Human Resources Development Project at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok. The course has been offered in a number of universities, including McMaster University and the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. All the course material, including lectures, assignments, and a simulator, is provided on a CD-ROM. Lectures include a spoken soundtrack covering the material. The class often includes both undergraduate and graduate students. I found that most students appreciate having the material on electronic format, which they can view and review at will and on their own time. Students find this course quite intensive - it covers all major systems in the CANDU reactor and power plant in detail. A very important component of the course is the simulator, which teaches students how systems operate in normal operation, in power manoeuvres, and during process-system malfunctions. Effort in absorbing the material and performing assignments can often exceed 10 hours per week. Some of the simulator assignments involve tricky manoeuvres, requiring several tries to achieve the expected result. Some assignments may take several hours, especially if the manoeuvres requiring repetition take 30 minutes or more in real time. I found that some instruction in the basic theory of reactor physics and systems is appreciated by students. A few possible enhancements to the simulator model were identified. Graduate students taking the course are required to do an additional project; I assigned an investigation of the effects of xenon-concentration changes during 1 week of load cycling. In summary, this course provides to students the opportunity to learn a great deal about the workings of CANDU-plant systems. (author)

  6. Development of a CANDU fuel channel model to assess the effect of a pressure tube creep on the safety related parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently the effect of pressure tube creep on the reactor safety in CANDUs emerges as an important issue of safety analysis due to a need for an extended operation. The accident analysis for the aged plants needs to incorporate major degradations of the plant performance in the safety analysis. In this paper, a CATHENA fuel channel model for studying the effects of the vertical offset of the fuel bundles in a crept pressure tube on the fuel and pressure tube cooling is developed. The current practice of the CANDU safety analysis assumes that the fuel bundles stay in a manner concentric to the pressure tube centerline even in the crept pressure tubes, whereas in reality the bundles sit at the bottom of the pressure tube. With this point in mind, 37-pin models with and without vertical offset of the bundle in the crept fuel channel are developed and tested for Reactor Outlet Header (ROH) 100% break LOCA accident, and results compared. As a result, it was found that the difference between the uncrept fuel channel model and the two crept fuel channel models, a concentric one and another vertically offset one, is quite significant, whereas the difference between the two crept fuel channel models is insignificant. Therefore it is concluded that the use of the concentric crept fuel channel model for the aged CANDU-6 safety analysis is justifiable for the first 200 sec into an accident. (author)

  7. Preliminary evaluation of licensing issues associated with U.S.-sited CANDU-PHW nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal safety-related characteristics of current CANDU-PHW power plants are described, and a distinction between those characteristics which are intrinsic to the CANDU-PHW system and those that are not is presented. An outline is given of the main features of the Canadian safety and licensing approach. Differences between the U.S. and Canadian approach to safety and licensing are discussed. Some of the main results of the safety analyses, routinely performed for CANDU-PHW reactors, are presented. U.S.-NRC General Design Criteria are evaluated as regards their applicability to CANDU-PHW reactors; vice-versa the CANDU-PHW reactor is evaluated with respect to its conformance to the U.S.-NRC General Design Criteria. A number of design modifications are proposed to be incorporated into the CANDU-PHW reactor in order to facilitate its introduction into the U.S

  8. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society ninth annual conference, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 74 papers presented at this conference covered the following topics: operational enhancements of existing nuclear power plants; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in CANDU reactor fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning and decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation of CANDU reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and, medical and industrial radiation applications

  9. nuclear fuel design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel design is strictly dependent on reactor type and experiences obtained from performance of nuclear fuels. The objectives of the design are reliability, and economy. Nuclear fuel design requires an interdisciplinary work which has to cover, at least nuclear design, thermalhydraulic design, mechanical design, and material properties.The procedure of design, as describe in the quality assurance, consist of a number of steps. The most important parts are: Design description or inputs, preliminary design, detailed design and design output, and design verification. The first step covers objectives and requirements, as defined by the customer and by the regulatory authority for product performance,environmental factors, safety, etc. The second describes assumptions and alternatives, safety, economy and engineering analyses. The third covers technical specifications, design drawings, selection of QA program category, etc. The most important form of design verification is design review by qualified independent internal or external reviewers. The scope of the review depends on the specific character of the design work. Personnel involved in verification and review do not assume prime responsibility for detecting errors. Responsibility for the design remains with the personnel involved in the design work

  10. A theoretical model of the mean grain size evolution during the liquid phase sintering in CANDU advanced fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to enhance the fuel burnup in CANDU reactors, the microstructure of the fuel pellet must by modified, in order to accommodate the fission gas released during irradiation. A large grain size structure is able to retain a large fraction of the released gases. The addition of some oxides to the UO2 powder leads to the liquid phase ocarina during sintering. Starting from the basic theory of the grain growth in solid and liquid phase sintering and from the experimental microstructure characterization, a model of the mean size evolution in the presence of very small liquid fraction is proposed. As a function of dopant concentration, solubility limits and liquid phase composition, this model explicitly takes account of the continuous distribution of the additive into the matrix during grain growth process of the wetting properties of the liquid phase and of all transfer processes governing the microstructure evolution: grain boundary diffusion, surface reaction and diffusion through the liquid phase. The model validation was done for UO2-Nb2O3 and UO2-TiO2 systems, in isothermal treatment at 1700 deg. C. The model predictions are confirmed by the qualitative and quantitative experimental results, given by SEM, X-ray diffraction investigations. (authors)

  11. Radiation effects in glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of CANDU UO2 fuel reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has investigated three waste forms for the immobilization of high-level liquid wastes that would arise if used CANDU fuels were reprocessed at some time in the future to remove fissile materials for the fabrication of new power reactor fuel. These waste forms are borosilicate glasses, aluminosilicate glasses and titanosilicate glass-ceramics. This report discusses the potential effects of alpha, beta and gamma radiation on the releases of radionuclides from these waste forms as a result of aqueous corrosion by groundwaters that would be present in an underground waste disposal vault. The report discusses solid-state damage caused by radiation-induced atomic displacements in the waste forms as well as irradiation of groundwater solutions (radiolysis), and their potential effects on waste-form corrosion and radionuclide release. The current literature on radiation effects on borosilicate glasses and in ceramics is briefly reviewed, as are potential radiation effects on specialized waste forms for the immobilization of 129I, 85Kr and 14C. (author). 104 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs

  12. Systems analysis of the CANDU 3 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a systems failure analysis study of the CANDU 3 reactor design; the study was performed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. As part of the study a review of the CANDU 3 design documentation was performed, a plant assessment methodology was developed, representative plant initiating events were identified for detailed analysis, and a plant assessment was performed. The results of the plant assessment included classification of the CANDU 3 event sequences that were analyzed, determination of CANDU 3 systems that are ''significant to safety,'' and identification of key operator actions for the analyzed events

  13. Nuclear reactor fuel element splitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for removing nuclear fuel from a clad fuel element. The fuel element is power driven past laser beams which simultaneously cut the cladding lengthwise into at least two longitudinal pieces. The axially cut lengths of cladding are then separated, causing the nuclear fuel contained therein to drop into a receptacle for later disposition. The cut lengths of cladding comprise nuclear waste which is disposed of in a suitable manner. 6 claims, 10 drawing figures

  14. Life Assurance Strategy for CANDU NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Plants have a nominal 'design life' that forms the basis of equipment specification, economic evaluations and licensing for some jurisdictions. Some component in the plant may require replacement, refurbishing and or rehabilitation during the plant 'design life'. Components which are extremely difficult or economically impossible to replace will place a limit on plant life. Rehabilitation programs completed to date on older CANDU plants to improve reliability of plant components, coupled with R and D programs, experimental data and advanced analytical methods form the basis for CANDU plant component life assurance. Life assurance is verified during plant operation by comprehensive in-service inspection programs and laboratory examinations. The paper provides an overview of the experiences to date on Refurbishment and Rehabilitation programs and some Canadian approaches on the main activities involved in scoping and managing nuclear plant life assurance. A number of proactive programs are underway to anticipate, detect and mitigate potential aging degradation at an early stage to ensure plant safety and reliability. Some of these programs include; systematic plant condition assessment, refurbishment and upgrading programs, environmental qualification programs and a program of examination of components from decommissioned reactors. These programs are part of an overall nuclear power plant maintenance strategy. Beyond life assurance, a longer term approach would be geared towards life extension as a viable option for the future. Recent CANDU designs have benefited from the early CANDU experience and are expected to require less rehabilitation. Examples of changes in CANDU 6 include fuel channel design and adopting a closed component cooling water system. New designs are based on 'design life' longer than that used for economic evaluations. The approach is to design for easy replace ability for components that can be economically replaced. Specific examples

  15. CANDU development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evolution of the 950 MW(e) CANDU reactor is summarized. The design was specifically aimed at the export market. Factors considered in the design were that 900-1000 MW is the maximum practical size for most countries; many countries have warmer condenser cooling water than Canada; the plant may be located on coastal sites; seismic requirements may be more stringent; and the requirements of international, as well as Canadian, standards must be satisfied. These considerations resulted in a 600-channel reactor capable of accepting condenser cooling water at 320C. To satisfy the requirement for a proven design, the 950 MW CANDU draws upon the basic features of the Bruce and Pickering plants which have demonstrated high capacity factors

  16. ELESTRES 2.1 computer code for high burnup CANDU fuel performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ELESTRES (ELEment Simulation and sTRESses) computer code models the thermal, mechanical and micro structural behaviours of CANDU® fuel element under normal operating conditions. The main purpose of the code is to calculate fuel temperatures, fission gas release, internal gas pressure, fuel pellet deformation, and fuel sheath strains in fuel element design analysis and assessments. It is also used to provide initial conditions for evaluating fuel behaviour during high temperature transients. ELESTRES 2.1 was developed for high burnup fuel application, based on an industry standard tool version of the code, through the implementation or modification to code models such as fission gas release, fuel pellet densification, flux depression (radial power distribution in the fuel pellet), fuel pellet thermal conductivity, fuel sheath creep, fuel sheath yield strength, fuel sheath oxidation, two dimensional heat transfer between the fuel pellet and the fuel sheath; and an automatic finite element meshing capability to handle various fuel pellet shapes. The ELESTRES 2.1 code design and development was planned, implemented, verified, validated, and documented in accordance with the AECL software quality assurance program, which meets the requirements of the Canadian Standards Association standard for software quality assurance CSA N286.7-99. This paper presents an overview of the ELESTRES 2.1 code with descriptions of the code's theoretical background, solution methodologies, application range, input data, and interface with other analytical tools. Code verification and validation results, which are also discussed in the paper, have confirmed that ELESTRES 2.1 is capable of modelling important fuel phenomena and the code can be used in the design assessment and the verification of high burnup fuels. (author)

  17. The CANDU experience in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU program in Romania is now well established. The Cernavoda Nuclear Station presently under construction will consist of 5-CANDU 600 MWE Units and another similar size station is planned to be in operation in the next decade. Progress on the multi-unit station at Cernavoda was stalled for 18 months in 1982/83 as the Canadian Export Development Corporation had suspended their loan disbursements while the Romanian National debt was being rescheduled. Since resumption of the financing in August 1983 contracts worth almost 200M dollars have been placed with Canadian Companies for the supply of major equipment for the first two units. The Canadian design is that which was used in the latest 600 MWE CANDU station at Wolsong, Korea. The vast construction site is now well developed with the cooling water systems/channels and service buildings at an advanced stage of completion. The perimeter walls of the first two reactor buildings are already complete and slip-forming for the 3rd Unit is imminent. Many Romanian organizations are involved in the infrastructure which has been established to handle the design, manufacture, construction and operation of the CANDU stations. The Romanian manufacturing industry has made extensive preparations for the supply of CANDU equipment and components, and although a major portion of the first two units will come from Canada their intentions are to become largely self-supporting for the ensuing CANDU program. Quality assurance programs have been prepared already for many of the facilities

  18. Thermal stability of chloroform in the steam condensate cycle of CANDU-PHW nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of samples taken at the Gentilly 2 (Quebec) CANDU-PHW (CANadian Deuterium Uranium - Pressurized Heavy Water) plant after chlorination and demineralization revealed the presence of all four trihalomethanes (THMs) (CHCl3, CHBrCl2, CHBr2Cl and CHBr3) and other unidentified halogenated volatile compounds. Among the THMs, chloroform was the major contaminant. A study of its thermal stability in water at different temperatures confirmed the degradation of the CHCl3 molecule according to the equation CHCl3 + H2O → CO + 3 HCl. The reaction follows first order kinetics and has an activation energy of 100 kJ/mol. The estimated half-life is six seconds at 260 deg C, the maximum temperature of the steam condensate cycle

  19. Demonstration Drop Test and Design Enhancement of the CANDU Spent Fuel Storage Basket in MACSTOR/KN-40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dry interim storage facility named MACSTOR/KN-400 has been constructed at the Wolsung power plant in Korea. The MACSTOR/KN-400 has the separated 7 modules. There are 400 long slender cylinders in one module. In one cylinder, ten baskets where CANDU spent fuels are loaded are stacked and stored. For this MACSTOR/KN-400 facility, analyses and tests for the hypothetical accident conditions that might happen during moving and storing baskets into a cylinder were performed. In a demonstration test, one of test basket models did not satisfy one of the safety-related requirements. So, the revised basket designs were generated by the structural evaluation based on the finite element analyses and specimen tests. Among these revised designs, one design was chosen as the final revised design of the basket. The final revised design is the one that makes the largest reduction of plastic strain in the upper welding region. And it also is the one that makes the smallest design change from the previous basket design and the one easy to adopt the design change. Drop tests and leak tests of the final revised basket were performed and it satisfied all the performance requirements. (author)

  20. Measurements of instant-release source terms for 137Cs, 90Sr, 99Tc, 129I and 14C in used CANDU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined gap and grain-boundary inventories of 137Cs, 129I, 90Sr, 99Tc and 14C were measured in 15 used CANDU fuel elements by leaching crushed fuel samples. A good correlation between the combined gap and grain-boundary inventories of 137Cs and 129I was found, suggesting that these fission products exhibit similar behavior in CANDU fuel. The expected correlation between combined gap and grain-boundary inventories of 137Cs and 129I with calculated fission-gas release to the gap and grain boundaries could only be confirmed for lower power fuels (90Sr were higher than expected and showed no correlation with calculated fission-gas release. No values for the combined gap and grain-boundary inventories of 99Tc were obtained because 99Tc in used fuel samples is very insoluble and appears to require oxidation prior to dissolution. Combined gap and grain-boundary inventories of 14C appeared to be independent of fuel power or burnup. (orig.)

  1. Enhanced candu 6 reactor: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    operating plants. The EC6 will utilize modern computers and control systems housed in an Advanced Control Room which, along with automated testing, will make the plants easier to operate, with minimal operator intervention. Improvements to the fire protection system and enhanced security features will further protect the assets. The CANDU 6s inherent ability to utilize different fuel cycles and the Advanced MACSTOR module to store spent dry fuel further add to the attractiveness of the EC6 product. This paper describes the various enhancements that are being made to the EC6 and explains these features in more detail

  2. CANDU at the crossroads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-11-01

    ''Ready for the challenge of the 90s'' was the theme of this year's gathering of the Canadian Nuclear Association held in Toronto, 3-6 June. What that challenge really entails is whether the CANDU system will survive as the last remaining alternative to the light water reactor in the world reactor market, or whether it will decline into oblivion along with the Advanced Gas Cooled reactor and so many other technically excellent systems which have fallen along the way. The fate of the CANDU system will not be determined by its technical merits, nor by its impeccable safety record. It will be determined by public perceptions and by the deliberations of an Environmental Assessment Panel established by the Government of Ontario. The debate at the Association meeting is reported. (author).

  3. Optimization of the Korean nuclear fuel cycle using linear programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Korean optimal nuclear fuel cycle strategy from the year 2000 to 2030 is searched using linear programming. Three criteria are considered: fuel cycle cost, economic risk, and natural uranium consumption. The three objectives are compromised by fuzzy decision technique which maximizes the minimum degree of satisfaction of the three objectives. The options of the back-end nuclear fuel cycle of Korea are direct disposal, reprocessing, and DUPIC. The annual maximum capacities of reprocessing and DUPIC are limited to 800 tons per year as a reference case and 400 tons per year as a lower case and 1,200 tons per year as a upper case. The optimal strategy of reference case is to start operation in 2010 and reach the maximum capacity in 2024. The transportation of spent fuel to interim storage starts in 2003. Considering the economic risk and natural uranium consumption as well as fuel cycle cost, the economic risk and natural uranium consumption of Korean nuclear fuel cycle strategy are reduced to 7.1% and 6.1% respectively at a cost penalty of 5.4%. In all cases the recovered uranium is recycled in CANDU

  4. Absorber materials in CANDU PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a CANDU reactor the fuel channels are arranged on a square lattice in a calandria filled with heavy water moderator. This arrangement allows five types of tubular neutron absorber devices to be located in the relatively benign environment of low pressure, low temperature heavy water between neighbouring rows or columns of fuel channels. This paper will describe the roles of the devices and outline the design requirements of the absorber component from a reactor physics viewpoint. Nuclear heating and activation problems associated with the different absorbers will be briefly discussed. The design and manufacture of the devices will be also discussed. The control rod absorbers and shut off materials are cadmium and stainless steel. In the tubular arrangement, the cadmium is sandwiched between stainless steel tubes. This type of device has functioned well, but there is now concern over the availability and expense of cadmium which is used in two types of CANDU control devices. There are also concerns about the toxicity of cadmium during the fabrication of the absorbers. These concerns are prompting AECL to study alternatives. To minimize design changes, pure boron-10 alloyed in stainless steel is a favoured option. Work is underway to confirm the suitability of the boron-loaded steel and identify other encapsulated absorber materials for practical application. Because the reactivity devices or their guide tubes span the calandria vessel, the long slender components must be sufficiently rigid to resist operational vibration and also be seismically stable. Some of these components are made of Zircaloy to minimize neutron absorption. Slow irradiation growth and creep can reduce the spring tension, and periodic adjustments to the springs are required. Experience with the control absorber devices has generally been good. In one instance liquid zone controllers had a problem of vibration induced fretting but a redesigned back-fit resolved the problem. (author). 3 refs, 8

  5. Swelling-resistant nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenlis, Athanasios; Satcher, Jr., Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei O.

    2011-12-27

    A nuclear fuel according to one embodiment includes an assembly of nuclear fuel particles; and continuous open channels defined between at least some of the nuclear fuel particles, wherein the channels are characterized as allowing fission gasses produced in an interior of the assembly to escape from the interior of the assembly to an exterior thereof without causing significant swelling of the assembly. Additional embodiments, including methods, are also presented.

  6. Post-irradiation examination of CANDU fuel bundles fuelled with (Th, Pu)O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has extensive experience with thoria-based fuel irradiations as part of an ongoing R&D program on thorium within the Advanced Fuel Cycles Program. The BDL-422 experiment was one component of the thorium program that involved the fabrication and irradiation testing of six Bruce-type bundles fuelled with (Th, Pu)O2 pellets. The fuel was manufactured in the Recycle Fuel Fabrication Laboratories (RFFL) at Chalk River allowing AECL to gain valuable experience in fabrication and handling of thoria fuel. The fuel pellets contained 86.05 wt. % Th and 1.53 wt. % Pu in (Th, Pu)O2. The objectives of the BDL-422 experiment were to demonstrate the ability of 37-element geometry (Th, Pu)O2 fuel bundles to operate to high burnups up to 1000 MWh/kgHE (42 MWd/kgHE), and to examine the (Th, Pu)O2 fuel performance. This paper describes the post-irradiation examination (PIE) results of BDL-422 fuel bundles irradiated to burnups up to 856 MWh/kgHE (36 MWd/kgHE), with power ratings ranging from 52 to 67 kW/m. PIE results for the high burnup bundles (>1000 MWh/kgHE) are being analyzed and will be reported at a later date. The (Th, Pu)O2 fuel performance characteristics were superior to UO2 fuel irradiated under similar conditions. Minimal grain growth was observed and was accompanied by benign fission gas release and sheath strain. Other fuel performance parameters, such as sheath oxidation and hydrogen distribution, are also discussed. (author)

  7. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU-PHW program is based upon 38 years of heavy water reactor experience with 35 years of operating experience. Canada has had 72 reactor years of nuclear-electric operations experience with 10 nuclear units in 4 generating stations during a period of 18 years. All objectives have been met with outstanding performance: worker safety, public safety, environmental emissions, reliable electricity production, and low electricity cost. The achievement has been realized through total teamwork involving all scientific disciplines and all project functions (research, design, manufacturing, construction, and operation). (auth)

  8. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization maintains an ongoing assessment of the world's nuclear technology developments, as a core activity of its Strategic Plan. This publication reviews the current status of the nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle in Australia and around the world. Main issues discussed include: performances and economics of various types of nuclear reactors, uranium resources and requirements, fuel fabrication and technology, radioactive waste management. A brief account of the large international effort to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion power is also given. 11 tabs., ills

  9. Development of analysis system and analysis on reactor physics for CANDU advanced fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Gi; Bae, Chang Joon; Kwon, Oh Sun [Korea Power Electric Corporation, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    characteristics of reactor physics for CANFLEX-NU fuel core were calculated using final fuel design data. The results of analysis showed that there was no impact on reactor operations and safety. The above results of calculations and analysis were described in the physics design for CANFLEX-NU= fuel core. Various fuel models were evaluated for selecting high burnup fuel using recovered uranium. It is judged to be worse effects for reactor safety Hence, the use of graphite within fuel was proposed and its results showed to be better. The analysis system of reactor physics for design and analysis of high burnup fuel was evaluated. Lattice codes and core code were reviewed. From the results, the probability of WIMS-AECL and HELIOS is known to be high for analysis of high burnup fuel. For the core code, RFSP, it was evaluated that the simplified 2 group equation should be replaced by explicit 2 group equation. (Author) 32 refs., 25 tabs., 79 figs.

  10. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: public involvement and social aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activities undertaken to provide information to the public about the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program as well as the opportunities for public involvement in the direction and development of the disposal concept through government inquiries and commissions and specific initiatives undertaken by AECL. Public viewpoints and the major issues identified by the public to be of particular concern and importance in evaluating the acceptability of the concept are described. In addition, how the issues have been addressed during the development of the disposal concept or how they could be addressed during implementation of the disposal concept are presented. There is also discussion of public perspectives of risk, the ethical aspects of nuclear fuel waste disposal, and public involvement in siting a nuclear fuel waste disposal facility. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is funded jointly by AECL and Ontario Hydro under the auspices of the CANDU Owners Group. (author)

  11. Domestic nuclear fuels supply: possibility of an independent technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After considering the different energy sources, their consumption and their respective periods of exploitation, technological considerations in the nuclear fuel field are made. The main subject is the Domestic Supply Project of Embalse Fuel (CANDU type). The different aspects which had to be developed during the realization of this project still under progress, and which are fundamental for the command of the technology, are described: 1) Qualification of the produced fuel elements: fuel elements' characteristics; the reactors' operating parameters, and the prototype fuel elements' characteristics; 2) Development of materials and/or suppliers: the obtainment of UO2 and its physical properties are considered, as well as those of Zircaloy-4, the development of suppliers and the respective developments for the obtainment of materials such as beryllium, helium and colloidal graphite; 3) Processes development; the following processes are studied and defined: UO2 pellets fabrication with UO2 granulated powder; beryllium coating under vaccum; and induction brazing of bearing pads and spacers, end cap and end plate resistance welding and stamping of Zircaloy components, graphite-coating of cladding's internal face; 4) Development of special production equipments; automatic equipment for end cap-to-cladding resistance welding among others. The need for a specific program of quality assurance for nuclear fuels supply is emphasized and the basic criteria are established. The IAEA's quality asssurance requirements are also analyzed. (M.E.L.)

  12. Fuel alternatives for oil sands development - the nuclear option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently natural gas is the fuel of choice in all oil sand developments. Alberta sources of hydrocarbon based fuels are large but limited. Canadian nuclear technology was studied as a possible alternative for providing steam for the deep commercial in situ oil sand projects which were initiated over ten years ago. Because the in situ technology of that time required steam at pressures in excess of 10 MPa, the nuclear option required the development of new reactor technology, or the use of steam compressors, which was not economical. The current SAGD (steam assisted gravity drainage) technology requires steam at pressures of less than 5 MPa, which is in the reach of existing Canadian nuclear technology. The cost of supplying steam for a SAGD in situ project using a CANDU 3 nuclear reactor was developed. The study indicates that for gas prices in excess of $2.50 per gigajoule, replacing natural gas fuel with a nuclear reactor is economically feasible for in situ projects in excess of 123 thousand barrels per day. (author). 9 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs

  13. Measurement of the composition of noble-metal particles in high-burnup CANDU fuel by wavelength dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocking, W.H.; Szostak, F.J

    1999-09-01

    An investigation of the composition of the metallic inclusions in CANDU fuel, which contain Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh and Pd, has been conducted as a function of burnup by wavelength dispersive X-ray (WDX) microanalysis. Quantitative measurements were performed on micrometer sized particles embedded in thin sections of fuel using elemental standards and the ZAF method. Because the fission yields of the noble metals change with burnup, as a consequence of a shift from almost entirely {sup 235}U fission to mainly {sup 239}Pu fission, their inventories were calculated from the fuel power histories using the WIMS-Origin code for comparison with experiment. Contrary to expectations that the oxygen potential would be buffered by progressive Mo oxidation, little evidence was obtained for reduced incorporation of Mo in the noble-metal particles at high burnup. These surprising results are discussed with respect to the oxygen balance in irradiated CANDU fuels and the likely intrinsic and extrinsic sinks for excess oxygen. (author)

  14. Quality Products - The CANDU Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prime focus of the CANDU concept (natural uranium fuelled-heavy water moderated reactor) from the beginning has economy, heavy water losses and radiation exposures also were strong incentives for ensuring good design and reliable equipment. It was necessary to depart from previously accepted commercial standards and to adopt those now accepted in industries providing quality products. Also, through feedback from operating experience and specific design and development programs to eliminate problems and improve performance, CANDU has evolved into today's successful product and one from which future products will readily evolve. Many lessons have been learned along the way. On the one hand, short cuts of failures to understand basic requirements have been costly. On the other hand, sound engineering and quality equipment have yielded impressive economic advantages through superior performance and the avoidance of failures and their consequential costs. The achievement of lifetime economical performance demands quality products, good operation and good maintenance. This paper describes some of the basic approaches leading to high CANDU station reliability and overall excellent performance, particularly where difficulties have had to be overcome. Specific improvements in CANDU design and in such CANDU equipment as heat transport pumps, steam generators, valves, the reactor, fuelling machines and station computers, are described. The need for close collaboration among designers, nuclear laboratories, constructors, operators and industry is discussed. This paper has reviewed some of the key components in the CANDU system as a means of indicating the overall effort that is required to provide good designs and highly reliable equipment. This has required a significant investment in people and funding which has handsomely paid off in the excellent performance of CANDU stations. The close collaboration between Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Canadian industry and the

  15. Extrapolating power-ramp performance criteria for current and advanced CANDU fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayal, M.; Chassie, G.G

    2000-06-01

    To improve the precision and accuracy of power-ramp performance criteria for high-burnup fuel, we have examined in-reactor fuel performance data as well as out-reactor test data. The data are consistent with some of the concepts used in the current formulations for defining fuel failure thresholds, such as size of power-ramp and extent of burnup. Our review indicates that there is a need to modify some other aspects of the current formulations; therefore, a modified formulation is presented in this paper. The improvements mainly concern corrodent concentration and its relationships with threshold stress for failure. The new formulation is consistent with known and expected trends such as strength of Zircaloy in corrosive environment, timing of the release of fission products to the pellet-to-sheath gap, CANLUB coating, and fuel burnup. Because of the increased precision and accuracy, the new formulation is better able to identify operational regimes that are at risk of power-ramp failures; this predictive ability provides enhanced protection to fuel against power-ramp defects. At die same time, by removing unnecessary conservatisms in other areas, the new formulation permits a greater range of defect-free operational envelope as well as larger operating margins in regions that are, in fact, not prone to power-ramp failures. (author)

  16. Nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns an improvement for corrosion resistance of the welded portion of materials which constitutes a reprocessing plant of spent nuclear fuels. That is, Mo-added austenite stainless steel is used for a plant member at the portion in contact with a nitric acid solution. Then, laser beams are irradiated to the welded portion of the plant member and the surface layer is heated to higher than 1,000degC. If such a heat treatment is applied, the degradation of corrosion resistance of the welded portion can be eliminated at the surface. Further, since laser beams are utilized, heating can be limited only to the surface. Accordingly, undesired thermal deformation of the plant members can be prevented. As a result, the plant member having high pit corrosion resistance against a dissolution solution for spent fuels containing sludges comprising insoluble residue and having resistance to nitric acid solution also in the welded portion substantially equal to that of the matrix can be attained. (I.S.)

  17. ACR technology for CANDU enhancements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ACR-1000 design retains many essential features of the original CANDU plant design. As well as further-enhanced safety, the design also focuses on operability and maintainability, drawing on valuable customer input and OPEX. The engineering development of the ACR-1000 design has been accompanied by a research and confirmatory testing program. This program has extended the database of knowledge on the CANDU design. The ACR-1000 design has been reviewed by the Canadian regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) which concluded that there are no fundamental barriers to licensing the ACR-1000 design in Canada after completing three phases of the pre-project design review. The generic PSAR for the ACR-1000 design was completed in September 2009. The PSAR contains the ACR-1000 design details, the safety and design methodology, and the safety analysis that demonstrate the ACR-1000 safety case and compliance with Canadian and international regulatory requirements and expectations. The ACR technology developed during the ACR-1000 Engineering Program and the supporting development testing has had a major impact beyond the ACR program itself: Improved CANDU components and systems; Enhanced engineering processes and engineering tools, which lead to better product quality, and better project efficiency; and Improved operational performance. This paper provides a summary of technology arising from the ACR program that has been incorporated into new CANDU designs such as the EC6, or can be applied for servicing operating CANDU reactors. (author)

  18. Development of a best estimate auditing code for CANDU thermal hydraulic safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, M. K.; Lee, W. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop a thermal hydraulic auditing code for the CANDU reactor, modifying the model of existing PWR auditing tool , i.e. RELAP5/MOD3. This scope of project is a fourth step of the whole project, applying the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU+ version for the real CANDU plant LOCA Analysis and D2O leakage incident. There are three main models under investigation, i.e. Moody critical flow model, flow regime model of horizontal CANDU bundle, and fuel element heatup model when the stratification occurs, especially when CANDU LOCA is tested. Also, for Wolsung unit 1 D2O leakage incident analysis, the plant behavior is predicted with the newly developed version for the first 1000 seconds after onset of the incident, with the main interest aiming for system pressure, level control system, and thermal hydraulic transient behavior of the secondary system. The model applied for this particular application includes heat transfer model of nuclear fuel assembly, decay heat model, and MOV (Motor Operated Valve) model. Finally, the code maintenance work, mainly correcting the known errors, is presented. 12 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  19. Development of best estimate auditing code for CANDU thermal hydraulic safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwnag, M

    2001-04-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop a thermal hydraulic auditing code for the CANDU reactor, modifying the model of existing PWR auditing tool , i.e. RELAP5/MOD3. This scope of project is a fourth step of the whole project, applying the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU+ version for the real CANDU plant LOCA Analysis and D2O leakage incident. There are three main models under investigation, i.e. Moody critical flow model, flow regime model of horizontal CANDU bundle, and fuel element heatup model when the stratification occurs, especially when CANDU LOCA is tested. Also, for Wolsung unit 1 D2O leakage incident analysis, the plant behavior is predicited with the newly developed version for the first 1000 seconds after onset of the incident, with the main interest aiming for system pressure, level control system, and thermal hydraulic transient behavior of the secondary system. The model applided for this particular application includes heat transfer model of nuclear fuel assembly, decay heat model, and MOV (Motor Operated Valve) model. Finally, the code maintenance work, mainly correcting the known errors, is presented.

  20. PHWR advanced fuel R and D for the 21st Century in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the first CANDU-PHWR nuclear power plant in Korea, Wolsong Unit 1 has been successfully operated since 1983. The CANDU installed electric-generation capacity was about 50 % of the installed electric-generation capacity of nuclear power plants in Korea in 1983 but then decreased to less than 10 % of the total installed nuclear electric-generation capacity by 1996. This CANDU installed electric-generation capacity has recovered to about 20 % of the total installed nuclear electric-generation capacity in 1999, because Wolsong Units 2, 3 and 4 have been placed into commercial operation in 1997, 1998 and 1999, respectively. This indicates that CANDU reactors are not the majority of nuclear power plants in Korea. Since the period of the late 1970s, nuclear fuel design and fabrication technologies have been engaged as one of the important R and D activities in Korea. As one of the early R and D activities leading to nuclear power industrialization in Korea, the project to develop the design and fabrication technology of CANDU-6 37-element fuel had been successfully carried out from 1981 to 1987 by KAERI. Just after the successful completion of the 37-element fuel R and D, KAERI has developed a CANDU-6 advanced fuel. The key targets of the development program are safety enhancement, reduction of spent fuel volume, and economic improvements, using the inherent characteristics and advantages of CANDU technology. The CANFLEX and DUPIC R and D programs have been conducted under Korea's Nuclear Energy R and D Project as national mid- and long-term programs since 1992. As the second of the CANDU R and D products in Korea, the CANFLEX-NU fuel has been jointly developed by KAERI and AECL.The fuel has demonstrated its irradiation performance in a Canadian commercial power reactor, Pt. Lepreau Generating Station since 1998 September. The RU(SEU) and DUPIC fuels are expected to be developed continuously until about the year 2010 for their use in CANDU reactors. Beside these fuel

  1. CANDU refurbishment - managing the life cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All utilities that operate a nuclear power plant have an integrated plan for managing the condition of the plant systems, structures and components. With a sound plant life management program, after about 25 years of operation, replacement of certain reactor core components can give an additional 25 to 30 years of operation. This demonstrates the long-term economic strength of CANDU technology and justifies a long-term commitment to nuclear power. Indeed, replacement of pressure tubes and feeders with the most recent technology will also lead to increased capacity factors - due to reduced requirements for feeder inspections and repair, and eliminating the need for fuel channel spacer relocation which have caused additional and longer maintenance outages. Continuing the operation of CANDU units parallels the successful life extensions of reactors in other countries and provides the benefits of ongoing reliable operation, at an existing plant location, with the continued support of the host community. The key factors for successful, optimum management of the life cycle are: ongoing, effective plant life management programs; careful development of refurbishment scope, taking into account system condition assessments and a systematic safety review; and, a well-planned and well-executed retubing and refurbishment outage, where safety and risk management is paramount to ensure a successful project The paper will describe: the benefits of extended plant life; the outlook for refurbishment; the life management and refurbishment program; preparations for retubing of the reactor core; and, enhanced performance post-retubing. Given the potential magnitude of the program over the next 10 years, AECL will maintain a lead role providing overall support for retubing and plant Life Cycle Management programs and the CANDU Owners Group will provide a framework for collaboration among its Members. (author)

  2. Nuclear criticality safety at global nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear criticality safety is the art and science of preventing or terminating an inadvertent nuclear chain reaction in non-reactor environment. Nuclear criticality safety as part of integrated safety program in the nuclear industry is the responsibility of regulators, management and operators. Over the past 36 years, Global Nuclear Fuel (GNF) has successfully developed an integrated nuclear criticality safety program for its BWR fuel manufacturing business. Implementation of this NRC-approved program includes three fundamental elements: administrative practices, controls and training. These elements establish nuclear criticality safety function responsibilities and nuclear criticality safety design criteria in accordance with double contingency principle. At GNF, a criticality safety computational system has been integrated into nuclear criticality safety program as an incredibly valuable tool for nuclear criticality safety design and control applications. This paper describes select elements of GNF nuclear criticality safety program with emphasis being placed on need for clear criticality safety function responsibilities, nuclear safety design criteria and associated double contingency implementation, as well as advanced Monte Carlo neutron transport codes used to derive subcritical safety limits. (authors)

  3. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) of IPEN produces nuclear fuel for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN. The serial production started in 1988, when the first nuclear fuel element was delivered for IEA-R1. In 2011, CCN proudly presents the 100{sup th} nuclear fuel element produced. Besides routine production, development of new technologies is also a permanent concern at CCN. In 2005, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} were replaced by U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-based fuels, and the research of U Mo is currently under investigation. Additionally, the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), whose project will rely on the CCN for supplying fuel and uranium targets. Evolving from an annual production from 10 to 70 nuclear fuel elements, plus a thousand uranium targets, is a huge and challenging task. To accomplish it, a new and modern Nuclear Fuel Factory is being concluded, and it will provide not only structure for scaling up, but also a safer and greener production. The Nuclear Engineering Center has shown, along several years, expertise in the field of nuclear, energy systems and correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained during decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program, personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. Along the last two decades, numerous specialized services of engineering for the Brazilian nuclear power plants Angra 1 and Angra 2 have been carried out. The contribution in service, research, training, and teaching in addition to the development of many related technologies applied to nuclear engineering and correlated areas enable the institution to

  4. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) of IPEN produces nuclear fuel for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN. The serial production started in 1988, when the first nuclear fuel element was delivered for IEA-R1. In 2011, CCN proudly presents the 100th nuclear fuel element produced. Besides routine production, development of new technologies is also a permanent concern at CCN. In 2005, U3O8 were replaced by U3Si2-based fuels, and the research of U Mo is currently under investigation. Additionally, the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), whose project will rely on the CCN for supplying fuel and uranium targets. Evolving from an annual production from 10 to 70 nuclear fuel elements, plus a thousand uranium targets, is a huge and challenging task. To accomplish it, a new and modern Nuclear Fuel Factory is being concluded, and it will provide not only structure for scaling up, but also a safer and greener production. The Nuclear Engineering Center has shown, along several years, expertise in the field of nuclear, energy systems and correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained during decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program, personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. Along the last two decades, numerous specialized services of engineering for the Brazilian nuclear power plants Angra 1 and Angra 2 have been carried out. The contribution in service, research, training, and teaching in addition to the development of many related technologies applied to nuclear engineering and correlated areas enable the institution to fulfill its mission that is to

  5. Canada's nuclear fuel industry: An overview. Background paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada was among the first countries to mine and process uranium-bearing ores. Such ores contain trace amounts of radium, which was in great demand for medical treatment and for use by research laboratories in the early part of the century. For the last half century, the same basic processes have been used to extract uranium from its ores and convert it to a form suitable for use in nuclear reactors. The process described here is that currently in use in Canada. Mining can take a variety of forms, from open-pit to deep, hard-rock. Mining is typically the most costly step in the process, particularly for lower-grade ores. The ore is crushed and ground in the mill to the consistency of fine sand from which the uranium is extracted chemically to produce the impure concentrate known as yellowcake. In the next step, the impure uranium concentrate is chemically refined into highly purified, nuclear-grade, uranium trioxide (UO3). Uranium trioxide is then converted, in two separate chemical processes, into uranium dioxide (UO2) which is destined for domestic consumption and uranium hexafluoride (UF6) which is exported. In Canada, fabrication is the final step of the fuel production process. Uranium dioxide powder is compressed and sintered into very dense ceramic pellets which are then sealed in zirconium tubes and assembled into fuel bundles for Candu reactors. This background paper will review the Canadian nuclear fuels industry. 1 fig

  6. OECD NEA Benchmark Database of Spent Nuclear Fuel Isotopic Compositions for World Reactor Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Sly, Nicholas C [ORNL; Michel-Sendis, Franco [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data on the isotopic concentrations in irradiated nuclear fuel represent one of the primary methods for validating computational methods and nuclear data used for reactor and spent fuel depletion simulations that support nuclear fuel cycle safety and safeguards programs. Measurement data have previously not been available to users in a centralized or searchable format, and the majority of accessible information has been, for the most part, limited to light-water-reactor designs. This paper describes a recent initiative to compile spent fuel benchmark data for additional reactor designs used throughout the world that can be used to validate computer model simulations that support nuclear energy and nuclear safeguards missions. Experimental benchmark data have been expanded to include VVER-440, VVER-1000, RBMK, graphite moderated MAGNOX, gas cooled AGR, and several heavy-water moderated CANDU reactor designs. Additional experimental data for pressurized light water and boiling water reactor fuels has also been compiled for modern assembly designs and more extensive isotopic measurements. These data are being compiled and uploaded to a recently revised structured and searchable database, SFCOMPO, to provide the nuclear analysis community with a centrally-accessible resource of spent fuel compositions that can be used to benchmark computer codes, models, and nuclear data. The current version of SFCOMPO contains data for eight reactor designs, 20 fuel assembly designs, more than 550 spent fuel samples, and measured isotopic data for about 80 nuclides.

  7. LOFT nuclear fuel rod behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the calculational models used to predict fuel rod response for Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) data from the first LOFT nuclear test is presented and discussed and a comparison of predictions with experimental data is made

  8. Applicability of a track-based multiprocess portable robot to some maintenance tasks in CANDU nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydro-Quebec has developed a six-axis, track-based, multiprocess robot. This lightweight (30 kg) compact robot travels on a bent track with a radius of curvature ranging from 1 m to infinity (straight track). Standard and tandem wires GMAW, FCAW and Narrow gap TIG welding as well as plasma gouging and cutting, electrical and pneumatic rough and precision grinding, and profile measurement functionalities have been incorporated. A description of this technology an its newly developed functionalities is given in this paper. Since 1995, a number of industrial and R and D projects have been performed using this technology now called the Scompi technology. The main field of application is the in situ repair of hydraulic turbine runners. However some applications have been developed in the nuclear field. One particular development was funded by the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Scompi was selected by the ITER US Home Team for a demonstration of remote techniques for welding, cutting and rewelding the 30 m diameter, 17 m high, vacuum vessel. The demonstration involved all position robotic plasma cutting and NG-TIG welding of a 316L, 40 mm thick, double wall. In 1998, two Scompi robots working in tandem performed in York, Pa, the joint welding and cutting of a full scale portion of the vacuum vessel. In 1995, the applicability of the Scompi technology to the repair of the divider plates in the four steam generators at Gentilly-2 was evaluated based on a joint proposal by Ontario Hydro Technologies (now Ontario Power Technologies-OPT) and Hydro-Quebec. A MIG welding procedure was proposed for the horizontal and vertical divider plates welds. A complete simulation of the robot and primary head demonstrated the feasibility of the concept. However, based on cost and scheduling, it was decided to proceed with a manual repair. Nevertheless it is anticipated that this technology will find its niche in the maintenance of Candu reactors. (author)

  9. Applicability of a track-based multiprocess portable robot to some maintenance tasks in CANDU nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazel, B.; Fihey, J.-L.; Laroche, Y. [Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Hydro-Quebec has developed a six-axis, track-based, multiprocess robot. This lightweight (30 kg) compact robot travels on a bent track with a radius of curvature ranging from 1 m to infinity (straight track). Standard and tandem wires GMAW, FCAW and Narrow gap TIG welding as well as plasma gouging and cutting, electrical and pneumatic rough and precision grinding, and profile measurement functionalities have been incorporated. A description of this technology an its newly developed functionalities is given in this paper. Since 1995, a number of industrial and R and D projects have been performed using this technology now called the Scompi technology. The main field of application is the in situ repair of hydraulic turbine runners. However some applications have been developed in the nuclear field. One particular development was funded by the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Scompi was selected by the ITER US Home Team for a demonstration of remote techniques for welding, cutting and rewelding the 30 m diameter, 17 m high, vacuum vessel. The demonstration involved all position robotic plasma cutting and NG-TIG welding of a 316L, 40 mm thick, double wall. In 1998, two Scompi robots working in tandem performed in York, Pa, the joint welding and cutting of a full scale portion of the vacuum vessel. In 1995, the applicability of the Scompi technology to the repair of the divider plates in the four steam generators at Gentilly-2 was evaluated based on a joint proposal by Ontario Hydro Technologies (now Ontario Power Technologies-OPT) and Hydro-Quebec. A MIG welding procedure was proposed for the horizontal and vertical divider plates welds. A complete simulation of the robot and primary head demonstrated the feasibility of the concept. However, based on cost and scheduling, it was decided to proceed with a manual repair. Nevertheless it is anticipated that this technology will find its niche in the maintenance of Candu reactors. (author)

  10. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Nuclear Engineering has shown expertise in the field of nuclear and energy systems ad correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained over decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in the design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in the production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. The Nuclear Fuel Center is responsible for the production of the nuclear fuel necessary for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor. Development of new fuel technologies is also a permanent concern

  11. Application of Be-free Zr-based amorphous sputter coatings as a brazing filler metal in CANDU fuel bundle manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous sputter coatings of Be-free multi-component Zr-based alloys were applied as a novel brazing filler metal for Zircaloy-4 brazing. By applying the homogeneous and amorphous-structured layers coated by sputtering the crystalline targets, the highly reliable joints were obtained with the formation of predominantly grown α-Zr grains owing to a complete isothermal solidification, exhibiting high tensile and fatigue strengths as well as excellent corrosion resistance, which were comparable to those of Zircaloy-4 base metal. The present investigation showed that Be-free and Zr-based multi-component amorphous sputter coatings can offer great potential for brazing Zr alloys and manufacturing fuel rods in CANDU fuel bundle system. (author)

  12. Alternatives for nuclear fuel disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Badillo A, V.; Palacios H, J.; Celis del Angel, L., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.m [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The spent fuel is one of the most important issues in the nuclear industry, currently spent fuel management is been cause of great amount of research, investments in the construction of repositories or constructing the necessary facilities to reprocess the fuel, and later to recycle the plutonium recovered in thermal reactors. What is the best solution? or, What is the best technology for a specific solution? Many countries have deferred the decision on selecting an option, while other works actively constructing repositories and others implementing the reprocessing facilities to recycle the plutonium obtained from nuclear spent fuel. In Mexico the nuclear power is limited to two reactors BWR type and medium size. So the nuclear spent fuel discharged has been accommodated at reactor's spent fuel pools. Originally these pools have enough capacity to accommodate spent fuel for the 40 years of designed plant operation. However, currently is under process an extended power up rate to 20% of their original power and also there are plans to extend operational life for 20 more years. Under these conditions there will not be enough room for spent fuel in the pools. So this work describes some different alternatives that have been studied in Mexico to define which will be the best alternative to follow. (Author)

  13. Physics and Control Assessment of AN 850 Mw(e) - Leu-Candu Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbone, Michelangelo

    The physics and control assessment of an 850 MW(e) Low Enriched Uranium CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (LEU -CANDU-PHW) reactor constitute the major objective of this thesis. The use of Low Enriched Uranium fuel in the present CANDU nuclear power generating stations is recognized as economically beneficial due to reduced fuelling costs. The LEU fuel cycle is also recognized as a stepping stone to transit from the present CANDU-PHW once-through natural Uranium cycle to advanced cycles such as those based on Plutonium recycle, once-through Th + U-235 cycle, Thorium with Uranium recycle and net U-235 feed, Thorium with Uranium recycle and Plutonium feed. However, although the use of Low Enriched Uranium in the present CANDU-PHW reactor has economic advantages, and it would act as a technical bridge between the present cycle and advanced cycles, technical problems in different areas of reactor physics and fuel management were anticipated. The present thesis research work adresses the areas of reactor physics, fuel management, and control (in particular, the spatial control of large CANDU-PHW reactors). The main conclusions that have been drawn following these studies are as follows: (1) The Low Enriched Uranium Cycle is feasible in a CANDU-PHW reactor of present design and provided that: (a) The enrichment is kept relatively low (that is, about 1% instead of 0.711%); (b) the number of bundles to be replaced at every refuelling operation is about one-half that of the natural Uranium fuel case; (c) The channels are refuelled in the same direction as the coolant. (2) The response of an LEU-CANDU-PHW reactor to reactivity perturbation such as single- and two-channel refuelling operation, shim transient, shutdown-start-up transient with enrichment levels of 0.9% and 1.2% is essentially very similar {provided that certain conditions in (1) are respected} to that of the natural uranium reactor core case without any reactor reoptimization. The general behaviour of the reactor

  14. Specifications for reactor physics experiments on CANFLEX-RU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is to describe reactor physics experiments to be performed in the ZED-2 reactor to study CANFLEX-RU fuel bundles in CANDU-type fuel channels. The experiments are to provide benchmark quality validation data for the computer codes and associated nuclear databases used for physics calculations, in particular WIMS-AECL. Such validation data is likely to be a requirement by the regulator as condition for licensing a CANDU reactor based on an enriched fuel cycle

  15. Nuclear fuel cycle. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle information in some countries that develop, supply or use nuclear energy is presented. Data about Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Netherlands, Italy, Denmarmark, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Finland, Spain and India are included. The information is presented in a tree-like graphic way. (C.S.A.)

  16. Nuclear fuel cycle. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle information in the main countries that develop, supply or use nuclear energy is presented. Data about Japan, FRG, United Kingdom, France and Canada are included. The information is presented in a tree-like graphic way. (C.S.A.)

  17. Probabilistic assessment for nuclear fuel rods behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BACO is a code for the simulation of the thermo-mechanical and fission gas behavior of a cylindrical fuel rod under operation conditions. Input parameters and, therefore, output ones may include statistical dispersion. In this paper, experimental CANDU fuel rods irradiated at the NRX reactor together with experimental MOX fuel rods and the IAEA'CRP FUMEX cases are used in order to determine the sensitivity of BACO code predictions. We analyze the CARA and CAREM fuel rods relation between predicted performance and statistical dispersion in order of enhanced their original designs. These exercises show the sensitivity of the predictions concerning such parameters and the extended features of the BACO code for a probability study. (author)

  18. Nuclear fuel procurement management at nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The market situation of nuclear fuel cycles is highlighted. It also summarises the possible contract models and the elements of effective management for nuclear fuel procurement at nuclear power station based upon the nuclear fuel procurement practice of Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS)

  19. CANDU nuclear plant configured for multiple oil sands and power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a need to meet expanding demand in Alberta for electricity for an expanding economy, high-pressure steam for oil sands recovery, and hydrogen for bitumen upgrading. This demand must be satisfied in a sustainable, environmentally acceptable and economic manner. Nuclear technology, and in particular AECL's new ACR-1000 reactor, is emerging as the best way to meet these multiple demands. The ACR-1000 can be configured to supply both high-pressure steam and electricity with the steam / electricity ratio optimized to standard turbine-generator sizing and oil sands requirements - thereby affording more options for nuclear plant siting and deployment. Energy for oil sands applications can be supplied in several ways by a centralized nuclear plant with a uniquely configured Balance of Plant (BOP). Steam could be piped to one or several in-situ oil Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) operations within 15 km of the plant boundary. Electricity could be transmitted to more remote facilities including an electrolytic hydrogen plant for bitumen upgraders, resistance-heating devices used for extraction of oil from shale, and electric boilers that generate steam for small in-situ oil sands recovery facilities. The various product streams from the 1200 MWe Class ACR-1000 could be sold by the plant owner through a combination of long-term power purchase agreements and flexible contracts that respond to variable grid prices and demand. In addition the electrolytic hydrogen plant to also serve as an energy storage facility at times of low power demand. These flexible nuclear power plant configurations increase the potential to use clean nuclear energy for more environmentally benign oil sands recovery while still meeting future energy demands economic constraints. (author)

  20. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The grid-shaped spacer for PWR fuel elements consists of flat, upright metal bars at right angles to the fuel rods. In one corner of a grid mesh it has a spring with two end parts for the fuel rod. The cut-outs for the end parts start from an end edge of the metal bar parallel to the fuel rods. The transverse metal bar is one of four outer metal bars. Both end parts of the spring have an extension parallel to this outer metal arm, which grips a grid mesh adjacent to this grid mesh at the side in one corner of the spacer and forms an end part of a spring for the fuel rod there on the inside of the outer metal bar. (HP)

  1. Methodology for identifying boundaries of systems important to safety in CANDU nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therrien, S.; Komljenovic, D.; Therrien, P.; Ruest, C.; Prevost, P.; Vaillancourt, R. [Hydro-Quebec, Nuclear Generating Station Gentilly-2, Becancour, Quebec (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology developed to identify the boundaries of the systems important to safety (SIS) at the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), Hydro-Quebec. The SIS boundaries identification considers nuclear safety only. Components that are not identified as important to safety are systematically identified as related to safety. A global assessment process such as WANO/INPO AP-913 'Equipment Reliability Process' will be needed to implement adequate changes in the management rules of those components. The paper depicts results in applying the methodology to the Shutdown Systems 1 and 2 (SDS 1, 2), and to the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS). This validation process enabled fine tuning the methodology, performing a better estimate of the effort required to evaluate a system, and identifying components important to safety of these systems. (author)

  2. Nuclear fuels accounting interface: River Bend experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This presentation describes nuclear fuel accounting activities from the perspective of nuclear fuels management and its interfaces. Generally, Nuclear Fuels-River Bend Nuclear Group (RBNG) is involved on a day-by-day basis with nuclear fuel materials accounting in carrying out is procurement, contract administration, processing, and inventory management duties, including those associated with its special nuclear materials (SNM)-isotopics accountability oversight responsibilities as the Central Accountability Office for the River Bend Station. As much as possible, these duties are carried out in an integrated, interdependent manner. From these primary functions devolve Nuclear Fuels interfacing activities with fuel cost and tax accounting. Noting that nuclear fuel tax accounting support is of both an esoteric and intermittent nature, Nuclear Fuels-RBNG support of developments and applications associated with nuclear fuel cost accounting is stressed in this presentation.

  3. Nuclear fuels accounting interface: River Bend experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes nuclear fuel accounting activities from the perspective of nuclear fuels management and its interfaces. Generally, Nuclear Fuels-River Bend Nuclear Group (RBNG) is involved on a day-by-day basis with nuclear fuel materials accounting in carrying out is procurement, contract administration, processing, and inventory management duties, including those associated with its special nuclear materials (SNM)-isotopics accountability oversight responsibilities as the Central Accountability Office for the River Bend Station. As much as possible, these duties are carried out in an integrated, interdependent manner. From these primary functions devolve Nuclear Fuels interfacing activities with fuel cost and tax accounting. Noting that nuclear fuel tax accounting support is of both an esoteric and intermittent nature, Nuclear Fuels-RBNG support of developments and applications associated with nuclear fuel cost accounting is stressed in this presentation

  4. Nondestructive measurements on spent fuel for the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondestructive measurements on spent fuel are being developed to meet safeguards and materials managment requirements at nuclear facilities. Spent-fuel measurement technology and its applications are reviewed

  5. Dry spent nuclear fuel transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newport News Shipbuilding, (NNS), has been transferring spent nuclear fuel in a dry condition for over 25 years. It is because of this successful experience that NNS decided to venture into the design, construction and operation of a commercial dry fuel transfer project. NNS is developing a remote handling system for the dry transfer of spent nuclear fuel. The dry fuel transfer system is applicable to spent fuel pool-to-cask or cask-to-cask or both operations. It is designed to be compatible with existing storage cask technology as well as the developing multi-purpose canister design. The basis of NNS' design is simple. It must be capable of transferring all fuel designs, it must be capable of servicing 100 percent of the commercial nuclear plants, it must protect the public and nuclear operators, it must be operated cost efficiently and it must be transportable. Considering the basic design parameters, the following are more specific requirements included in the design: (a) Total weight of transfer cask less than 24 tons; (b) no requirement for permanent site modifications to support system utilization; (c) minimal radiation dose to operating personnel; (d) minimal generation of radioactive waste; (e) adaptability to any size and length fuel or cask; (f) portability of system allowing its efficient movement from site to site; (g) safe system; all possible ''off normal'' situations are being considered, and resultant safety systems are being engineered into NNS' design to mitigate problems. The primary focus of this presentation is to provide an overview of NNS' Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Transfer System. (author). 5 refs

  6. Reactor physics and economic aspects of the CANDU reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A history of the development of the CANDU system is given along with a fairly detailed description of the 600 MW(e) CANDU reactor. Reactor physics calculation methods are described, as well as comparisons between calculated reactor physics parameters and those measured in research and power reactors. An examination of the economics of CANDU in the Ontario Hydro system and a comparison between fossil fuelled and light water reactors is presented. Some physics, economics and resources aspects are given for both low enriched uranium and thorium-fuelled CANDU reactors. Finally the RβD program in Advanced Fuel Cycles is briefly described

  7. Assessment of RELAP5/CANDU+ code for regulatory auditing analysis of CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Young Seok; Kim, Hho Jung; Yang, Chae Yong

    2001-12-15

    The objectives of this study are to undertake the verification and validation of RELAP5/CANDU+ code, which is developed in this project, by simulating the B8711 test of RD-14 facility, and to examine the properties of this code by doing the sensitivity analysis for experimental prediction modes about thermal-hydraulics phenomena in CANDU reactor systems added to this code. The B8711 test was an experiment of a 45% ROH break for simulating large LOCA. Also, in this study, the methods for making input cards related to CANDU options are described, so that some users can use the RELAP5/CANDU+ code with easy. RELAP/CANDU+ code can choose the options of Henry-Fauske mode, Ransom-Trapp model, and Moody model for prediction of the critical mass flow. It is examined that Henry-Fauske model and Ransom-Trapp model are considered properly, but Moody model is still required to be improved. Heat transfer correlations available in RELAP5/CANDU+ code for CANDU-type reactors are a horizontal stratified model, a fuel heat-up model and D2O/H2O CHF correlations, and these models take an important role to improve the predictability of the experimental procedures. It is concluded that RELAP5/CANDU+ code is useful for the auditing of the accident analysis of CANDU reactors, and the results of the sensitivity analysis for thermal-hydraulic models examined in this study are valuable for the actual auditing of real CANDU-type power plants.

  8. An analytic study on LBLOCA for CANDU type reactor using MARS-KS/CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides the simulation results using MARS-KS/CANDU code for the Large Break LOCA of CANDU type reactor. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the capability of MARS-KS/CANDU for simulating the actual plants (Wolsong 2/3/4). The steady state and the transient analysis results were provided. After the sensitivity study depend on break size, the case that 35% of the inlet header known as the accident that has the most limiting effect on the temperature of the fuel sheath was calculated. In order to evaluate the results, the results were compared with those of CATHENA simulation. (author)

  9. Thorium utilization in Candu reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, means of thorium utilization in a CANDU reactor are considered. A once through thorium-DUPIC cycle is analyzed in detail. CANDU has the best neutron economy among the commercially available power reactors, which makes it suitable for many different fuel cycle options. A review of the available fuel cycles is also done in the scope of this study to select an economically viable cycle which does not impose profound changes in the neutronic properties of the core that require remodeling of core and related systems. To create a good model ot the CANDU core for the necessary calculations, the steady state properties of CANDU reactor are analyzed. It is assumed that approximation ot refueling as moving the bundles at a constant velocity is valid. This approximation leads to a corollary; The average cross sections of two adjacent bidirectionally refueled channels are independent of axial location. This is also veritied. A result of this corollary the CANDU core can be modeled only in radial direction in cylindirical geometry. The steady state CANDU core model is prepared using the actual power values and these values are sought in the results. The control systems which effect the neutron flux shape are introduced into the model later in the form of additional absorption cross section and lower diffusion coefficient. The results are in good agreement with the actual values. Several different thorium-DUPIC fuel bundle configurations are considered and the one with 12 Th02 elements in the third ring is found to have similar burnup dependent cross-sections and location infinite multiplication factors. Using the model created, the bundle is tested also in the tull core model and it is tound that this bundle configuration complies with the current refueling scheme. That is, no changes are necessary in the refuelind rate or the control systems. A higher conversion ratio of 0.82 is attained, while the excess reactivity of the core is found to decrease by 0.01 Ak

  10. PARTICULARITIES REGARDING THE OPERATING PROCESS OF THE CUTTING AND EXTRACTION DEVICE IN THE CANDU HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS PRESSURE TUBE DECOMMISSIONING PART I: MOVEMENT AND FIXING DEVICE INSIDE THE PRESSURE TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin POPESCU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some details of operation process for a Cutting and Extraction Device (CED in order to achieve the decommissioning of the horizontal fuel channels pressure tube in the CANDU 6 nuclear reactor. The most important characteristic of the Cutting and Extraction Device (CED is his capability of totally operator’s protection against the nuclear radiation during pressure tube decommissioning. The movement and fixing processes present few particularities due to special adopted technical solutions: train guiding-fixing modules equipped with elastic guiding rollers and fixing claws, traction modules with elastic rollers and variable pitch, also with propriety to adapt the system according to various dimensions of the tube. The Cutting and Extraction Device (CED is a train of modules equipped with special systems to be fully automated, connected with a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC and controlled by an operator panel type Human Machine Interface (HMI. All processes are monitored by video cameras. In case of error, the process is automatically stopped, the operator receiving an error message and the last sequence could be reinitialized or aborted due to safety reasons

  11. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and

  12. Nuclear generating station and heavy water plant cost estimates for strategy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear generating station capital, operating and maintenance costs are basic input data for strategy analyses of alternate nuclear fuel cycles. This report presents estimates of these costs for natural uranium CANDU stations, CANDU stations operating on advanced fuel cycles, and liquid metal fast breeder reactors. Cost estimates for heavy water plants are also presented. The results show that station capital costs for advanced fuel cycles are not expected to be significantly greater than those for natural uranium stations. LMFBR capital costs are expected to be 25-30 percent greater than for CANDU's. (auth)

  13. CANDU steam generator life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steam generators are a critical component of a nuclear power reactor, and can contribute significantly to station unavailability, as has been amply demonstrated in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). CANDU steam generators are not immune to steam generator degradation, and the variety of CANDU steam generator designs and tube materials has led to some unexpected challenges. However, aggressive remedial actions, and careful proactive maintenance activities, have led to a decrease in steam generator-related station unavailability of Canadian CANDUs. AECL and the CANDU utilities have defined programs that will enable existing or new steam generators to operate effectively for 40 years. Research and development work covers corrosion and mechanical degradation of tube bundles and internals, chemistry, thermalhydraulics, fouling, inspection and cleaning, as well as provision for specially tool development for specific problem solving. A major driving force is development of CANDU-specific fitness-for-service guidelines, including appropriate inspection and monitoring technology to measure steam generator condition. Longer-range work focuses on development of intelligent on-line monitoring for the feedwater system and steam generator. New designs have reduced risk of corrosion and fouling, are more easily inspected and cleaned, and are less susceptible to mechanical damage. The Canadian CANDU utilities have developed programs for remedial actions to combat degradation of performance (Gentilly-2, Point Lepreau, Bruce A/B, Pickering A/B), and have developed strategic plans to ensure that good future operation is ensured. The research and development program, as well as operating experience, has identified where improvements in operating practices and/or designs can be made in order to ensure steam generator design life at an acceptable capacity factory. (author)

  14. AECL's concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste and the importance of its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1978, Canada has been investigating a concept for permanently dealing with the nuclear fuel waste from Canadian CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) nuclear generating stations. The concept is based on disposing of the waste in a vault excavated 500 to 1000 m deep in intrusive igneous rock of the Canadian Shield. AECL Research will soon be submitting an environmental impact statement (EIS) on the concept for review by a Panel through the federal environmental assessment and review process (EARP). In accordance with AECL Research's mandate and in keeping with the detailed requirements of the review Panel, AECL Research has conducted extensive studies on a wide variety of technical and socio-economic issues associated with the concept. If the concept is accepted, we can and should continue our responsible approach and take the next steps towards constructing a disposal facility for Canada's used nuclear fuel waste

  15. Nuclear fuel cycle studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the metal-matrix encapsulation of radioactive waste, brittle-fracture, leach-rate, and migration studies are being conducted. For fuel reprocessing, annular and centrifugal contactors are being tested and modeled. For the LWBR proof-of-breeding project, the full-scale shear and the prototype dissolver were procured and tested. 5 figures

  16. Contracting for nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with uranium sales contracts, i.e. with contractual arrangements in the first steps of the fuel cycle, which cover uranium production and conversion. The various types of contract are described and, where appropriate, their underlying business philosophy and their main terms and conditions. Finally, the specific common features of such contracts are reviewed. (NEA)

  17. Nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable a tight seal in fuel rods while keeping the sealing gas pressure at an exact predetermined pressure in fuel rods. Constitution: A vent aperture and a valve are provided to the upper end plug of a cladding tube. At first, the valve is opened to fill gas at a predetermined pressure in the fuel can. Then, a conical valve body is closely fitted to a valve seat by the rotation of a needle valve to eliminate the gap in the engaging thread portion and close the vent aperture. After conducting the reduced pressure test for the fuel rod in a water tank, welding joints are formed between the valve and the end plug through welding to completely seal the cladding tube. Since the welding is conducted after the can has been closed by the valve, the predetermined gas pressure can be maintained at an exact level with no efforts from welding heat and with effective gas leak prevention by the double sealing. (Kawakami, Y.)

  18. Nuclear fuel elements design, fabrication and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Frost, Brian R T

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Elements: Design, Fabrication and Performance is concerned with the design, fabrication, and performance of nuclear fuel elements, with emphasis on fast reactor fuel elements. Topics range from fuel types and the irradiation behavior of fuels to cladding and duct materials, fuel element design and modeling, fuel element performance testing and qualification, and the performance of water reactor fuels. Fast reactor fuel elements, research and test reactor fuel elements, and unconventional fuel elements are also covered. This volume consists of 12 chapters and begins with an overvie

  19. Spent nuclear fuel reprocessing modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term wide development of nuclear power requires new approaches towards the realization of nuclear fuel cycle, namely, closed nuclear fuel cycle (CNFC) with respect to fission materials. Plant nuclear fuel cycle (PNFC), which is in fact the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel unloaded from the reactor and the production of new nuclear fuel (NF) at the same place together with reactor plant, can be one variant of CNFC. Developing and projecting of PNFC is a complicated high-technology innovative process that requires modern information support. One of the components of this information support is developed by the authors. This component is the programme conducting calculations for various variants of process flow sheets for reprocessing SNF and production of NF. Central in this programme is the blocks library, where the blocks contain mathematical description of separate processes and operations. The calculating programme itself has such a structure that one can configure the complex of blocks and correlations between blocks, appropriate for any given flow sheet. For the ready sequence of operations balance calculations are made of all flows, i.e. expenses, element and substance makeup, heat emission and radiation rate are determined. The programme is open and the block library can be updated. This means that more complicated and detailed models of technological processes will be added to the library basing on the results of testing processes using real equipment, in test operating mode. The development of the model for the realization of technical-economic analysis of various variants of technologic PNFC schemes and the organization of 'operator's advisor' is expected. (authors)

  20. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste

  1. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste.

  2. Fully ceramic nuclear fuel and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venneri, Francesco; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-03-29

    Various embodiments of a nuclear fuel for use in various types of nuclear reactors and/or waste disposal systems are disclosed. One exemplary embodiment of a nuclear fuel may include a fuel element having a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix. An exemplary method of manufacturing a nuclear fuel is also disclosed. The method may include providing a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles, mixing the plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles with silicon carbide powder to form a precursor mixture, and compacting the precursor mixture at a predetermined pressure and temperature.

  3. Method and facility for reprocessing nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For reprocessing of nuclear fuels used in fuel elements with several metallic cladding tubes that are especially applied for light water reactors, the cladding tubes separated from the fuel element structure are individually cut in longitudinal direction so that the nuclear fuel can be removed from the metal parts. The nuclear fuel then is filled into an acid bath for further treatment, whereas the metal parts are conditioned in solid form for ultimate storage by embedding them in a binder. (orig./RW)

  4. CANDU reactors, their regulation in Canada, and the identification of relevant NRC safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) and its subsidiary in the US, are considering submitting the CANDU 3 design for standard design certification under 10 CFR Part 52. CANDU reactors are pressurized heavy water power reactors. They have some substantially different safety responses and safety systems than the LWRs that the commercial power reactor licensing regulations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have been developed to deal with. In this report, the authors discuss the basic design characteristics of CANDU reactors, specifically of the CANDU 3 where possible, and some safety-related consequences of these characteristics. The authors also discuss the Canadian regulatory provisions, and the CANDU safety systems that have evolved to satisfy the Canadian regulatory requirements as of December 1992. Finally, the authors identify NRC regulations, mainly in 10 CFR Parts 50 and 100, with issues for CANDU 3 reactor designs. In all, eleven such regulatory issues are identified. They are: (1) the ATWS rule (section 50.62); (2) station blackout (section 50.63); (3) conformance with Standard Review Plan (SRP); (4) appropriateness of the source term (section 50.34(f) and section 100.11); (5) applicability of reactor coolant pressure boundary (RCPB) requirements (section 50.55a, etc); (6) ECCS acceptance criteria (section 50.46)(b); (7) combustible gas control (section 50.44, etc); (8) power coefficient of reactivity (GDC 11); (9) seismic design (Part 100); (10) environmental impacts of the fuel cycle (section 51.51); and (11) (standards section 50.55a)

  5. Apparatus for locating defective nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrasonic search unit for locating defective fuel elements within a fuel assembly used in a water cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The unit is capable of freely traversing the restricted spaces between the fuel elements

  6. Nuclear propulsion technology advanced fuels technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Walter A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on advanced fuels technology are presented. Topics covered include: nuclear thermal propulsion reactor and fuel requirements; propulsion efficiency and temperature; uranium fuel compounds; melting point experiments; fabrication techniques; and sintered microspheres.

  7. Compositions and methods for treating nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z; Johnsen, Amanda M; McNamara, Bruce K; Hanson, Brady D; Smith, Steven C; Peper, Shane M

    2014-01-28

    Compositions are provided that include nuclear fuel. Methods for treating nuclear fuel are provided which can include exposing the fuel to a carbonate-peroxide solution. Methods can also include exposing the fuel to an ammonium solution. Methods for acquiring molybdenum from a uranium comprising material are provided.

  8. Compositions and methods for treating nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z; Johnsen, Amanda M; McNamara, Bruce K; Hanson, Brady D; Smith, Steven C; Peper, Shane M

    2013-08-13

    Compositions are provided that include nuclear fuel. Methods for treating nuclear fuel are provided which can include exposing the fuel to a carbonate-peroxide solution. Methods can also include exposing the fuel to an ammonium solution. Methods for acquiring molybdenum from a uranium comprising material are provided.

  9. Assessment of ASSERT-PV for prediction of post-dryout heat transfer in CANDU bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Assessment of the new Canadian subchannel code ASSERT-PV 3.2 for PDO sheath temperature prediction. • CANDU 28-, 37- and 43-element bundle PDO experiments. • Prediction improvement of ASSERT-PV 3.2 over previous code versions. • Sensitivity study of the effect of PDO model options. - Abstract: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the subchannel thermalhydraulics code ASSERT-PV for the Canadian nuclear industry. The recently released ASSERT-PV 3.2 provides enhanced models for improved predictions of subchannel flow distribution, critical heat flux (CHF), and post-dryout (PDO) heat transfer in horizontal CANDU fuel channels. This paper presents results of an assessment of the new code version against PDO tests performed during five full-size CANDU bundle experiments conducted between 1992 and 2009 by Stern Laboratories (SL), using 28-, 37- and 43-element bundles. A total of 10 PDO test series with varying pressure-tube creep and/or bearing-pad height were analyzed. The SL experiments encompassed the bundle geometries and range of flow conditions for the intended ASSERT-PV applications for existing CANDU reactors. Code predictions of maximum PDO fuel-sheath temperature were compared against measurements from the SL PDO tests to quantify the code's prediction accuracy. The prediction statistics using the recommended model set of ASSERT-PV 3.2 were compared to those from previous code versions. Furthermore, separate-effects sensitivity studies quantified the contribution of each PDO model change or enhancement to the improvement in PDO heat transfer prediction. Overall, the assessment demonstrated significant improvement in prediction of PDO sheath temperature in horizontal fuel channels containing CANDU bundles

  10. Assessment of ASSERT-PV for prediction of post-dryout heat transfer in CANDU bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Z., E-mail: chengz@aecl.ca; Rao, Y.F., E-mail: raoy@aecl.ca; Waddington, G.M., E-mail: waddingg@aecl.ca

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Assessment of the new Canadian subchannel code ASSERT-PV 3.2 for PDO sheath temperature prediction. • CANDU 28-, 37- and 43-element bundle PDO experiments. • Prediction improvement of ASSERT-PV 3.2 over previous code versions. • Sensitivity study of the effect of PDO model options. - Abstract: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the subchannel thermalhydraulics code ASSERT-PV for the Canadian nuclear industry. The recently released ASSERT-PV 3.2 provides enhanced models for improved predictions of subchannel flow distribution, critical heat flux (CHF), and post-dryout (PDO) heat transfer in horizontal CANDU fuel channels. This paper presents results of an assessment of the new code version against PDO tests performed during five full-size CANDU bundle experiments conducted between 1992 and 2009 by Stern Laboratories (SL), using 28-, 37- and 43-element bundles. A total of 10 PDO test series with varying pressure-tube creep and/or bearing-pad height were analyzed. The SL experiments encompassed the bundle geometries and range of flow conditions for the intended ASSERT-PV applications for existing CANDU reactors. Code predictions of maximum PDO fuel-sheath temperature were compared against measurements from the SL PDO tests to quantify the code's prediction accuracy. The prediction statistics using the recommended model set of ASSERT-PV 3.2 were compared to those from previous code versions. Furthermore, separate-effects sensitivity studies quantified the contribution of each PDO model change or enhancement to the improvement in PDO heat transfer prediction. Overall, the assessment demonstrated significant improvement in prediction of PDO sheath temperature in horizontal fuel channels containing CANDU bundles.

  11. CANDU safety and licensing framework and process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Safety is a shared responsibility of the Industry, public and the Government. The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) safety fundamentals, basic objectives and safety guides lay down the principles from which requirements, recommendations and methodologies for safety design of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) are derived. Within the framework of the international regulations and those of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), this paper will discuss the overall safety objectives, the defence in depth philosophy guiding CANDU safety, as well as the licensing process defined to meet all applicable CNSC regulations. The application of such philosophy to the ACR design and safety approach will also be discussed along with aspects of its implementation. The role of deterministic analysis, and Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) in the design and licensing process of the Advanced CANDU Reactor will be discussed. Postulated initiating events and their combinations, acceptance criteria, CANDU margins and limits, supporting methodologies and computer codes used in safety analysis will be reviewed. The paper will also note intrinsic safety characteristics of CANDU, some of the ACR passive safety features built-in by design, CANDU distinctive features with respect to severe core damage, mechanisms of heat rejection in those extreme conditions, emergency coolant injection system features and other post accident mitigating systems. Update on the ACR Canadian and US licensing progress will also be provided. (authors)

  12. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

    2011-02-18

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount

  13. Grids for nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to grids for nuclear fuel assemblies with the object of providing an improved grid, tending to have greater strength and tending to offer better location of the fuel pins. It comprises sets of generally parallel strips arranged to intersect to define a structure of cellular form, at least some of the intersections including a strip which is keyed to another strip at more than one point. One type of strip may be dimpled along its length and another type of strip may have slots for keying with the dimples. (Auth.)

  14. Nuclear fuel microsphere gamma analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Kenneth H.; Long, Jr., Ernest L.; Willey, Melvin G.

    1977-01-01

    A gamma analyzer system is provided for the analysis of nuclear fuel microspheres and other radioactive particles. The system consists of an analysis turntable with means for loading, in sequence, a plurality of stations within the turntable; a gamma ray detector for determining the spectrum of a sample in one section; means for analyzing the spectrum; and a receiver turntable to collect the analyzed material in stations according to the spectrum analysis. Accordingly, particles may be sorted according to their quality; e.g., fuel particles with fractured coatings may be separated from those that are not fractured, or according to other properties.

  15. Coal and nuclear electricity fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative economic analysis is used to contrast the economic advantages of nuclear and coal-fired electric generating stations for Canadian regions. A simplified cash flow method is used with present value techniques to yield a single levelized total unit energy cost over the lifetime of a generating station. Sensitivity analysis illustrates the effects of significant changes in some of the cost data. The analysis indicates that in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and British Columbia nuclear energy is less costly than coal for electric power generation. In the base case scenario the nuclear advantage is 24 percent in Quebec, 29 percent in Ontario, 34 percent in Manitoba, and 16 percent in British Columbia. Total unit energy cost is sensitive to variations in both capital and fuel costs for both nuclear and coal-fuelled power stations, but are not very sensitive to operating and maintenance costs

  16. AECL's concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste and the importance of its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1978, Canada has been investigating a concept for permanently dealing with the nuclear fuel waste from Canadian CANDU nuclear generating stations. The concept is based on disposing of the waste in a vault excavated 500 to 1000 m deep in intrusive igneous rock of the Canadian Shield. AECL will soon be submitting an environmental impact statement on the concept to a federal environmental assessment review panel. In accordance with AECL's mandate, and in keeping with the detailed requirements of the panel, AECL has conducted extensive studies on a wide variety of technical and socio-economic issues associated with the concept. If the concept is accepted, we can and should continue our responsible approach, and take the next steps towards constructing a disposal facility for Canada's used fuel wastes. 16 refs

  17. CANDU safety under severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of the CANDU reactor relevant to severe accidents are set first by the inherent properties of the design, and second by the Canadian safety/licensing approach. The pressure-tube concept allows the separate, low-pressure, heavy-water moderator to act as a backup heat sink even if there is no water in the fuel channels. Should this also fail, the calandria shell itself can contain the debris, with heat being transferred to the water-filled shield tank around the core. Should the severe core damage sequence progress further, the shield tank and the concrete reactor vault significantly delay the challenge to containment. Furthermore, should core melt lead to containment overpressure, the containment behaviour is such that leaks through the concrete containment wall reduce the possibility of catastrophic structural failure. The Canadian licensing philosophy requires that each accident, together with failure of each safety system in turn, be assessed (and specified dose limits met) as part of the design and licensing basis. In response, designers have provided CANDUs with two independent dedicated shutdown systems, and the likelihood of Anticipated Transients Without Scram is negligible. Probabilistic safety assessment studies have been performed on operating CANDU plants, and on the 4 x 880 MW(e) Darlington station now under construction; furthermore a scoping risk assessment has been done for a CANDU 600 plant. They indicate that the summed severe core damage frequency is of the order of 5 x 10-6/year. 95 refs, 3 tabs

  18. A study on manufacturing and quality control technology of DUPIC fuel -A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the first year of the experimental research for the manufacturing and irradiation of prototypic DUPIC nuclear fuel, UO2 pellets made from the natural uranium dioxide were used for the study of OREOX (oxidation/reduction of oxide fuel) process. The reference oxidation and reduction processes were established from the evaluation of the characteristics of produced powders and pellets. The manufacturing process and the layout of the manufacturing equipment were established in consideration of the high radioactivity of DUPIC process and the function of hot cells. The properties of materials to be used for DUPIC manufacturing were evaluated, and the punching machine for decladding was also developed. (Author)

  19. Nuclear Fuels: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Olander

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The important new developments in nuclear fuels and their problems are reviewed and compared with the status of present light-water reactor fuels. The limitations of these fuels and the reactors they power are reviewed with respect to important recent concerns, namely provision of outlet coolant temperatures high enough for use in H2 production, destruction of plutonium to eliminate proliferation concerns, and burning of the minor actinides to reduce the waste repository heat load and long-term radiation hazard. In addition to current oxide-based fuel-rod designs, the hydride fuel with liquid metal thermal bonding of the fuel-cladding gap is covered. Finally, two of the most promising Generation IV reactor concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor and the Sodium Fast Reactor, and the accompanying reprocessing technologies, aqueous-based UREX and pyrometallurgical, are summarized. In all of the topics covered, the thermodynamics involved in the material's behavior under irradiation and in the reprocessing schemes are emphasized.

  20. Sustainability Features of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Passerini; Mujid Kazimi

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle is the series of stages that nuclear fuel materials go through in a cradle to grave framework. The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is the current fuel cycle implemented in the United States; in which an appropriate form of the fuel is irradiated through a nuclear reactor only once before it is disposed of as waste. The discharged fuel contains materials that can be suitable for use as fuel. Thus, different types of fuel recycling technologies may be introduced in order to more...

  1. Antineutrino monitoring of spent nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Brdar, Vedran; Huber, Patrick; Kopp, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Military and civilian applications of nuclear energy have left a significant amount of spent nuclear fuel over the past 70 years. Currently, in many countries world wide, the use of nuclear energy is on the rise. Therefore, the management of highly radioactive nuclear waste is a pressing issue. In this letter, we explore antineutrino detectors as a tool for monitoring and safeguarding nuclear waste material. We compute the flux and spectrum of antineutrinos emitted by spent nuclear fuel eleme...

  2. ACR-1000TM - advanced Candu reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the Advanced CANDU ReactorTM- 1000 (ACR-1000TM) as an evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6TM reactor. This evolutionary advancement is based on AECL's in-depth knowledge of CANDU structures, systems, components and materials, gained during 50 years of continuous construction, engineering and commissioning, as well as on the experience and feedback received from operators of CANDU plants. The ACR design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. These innovations improve economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance, while retaining the proven benefits of the CANDU family of nuclear power plants. The Canadian nuclear reactor design evolution that has reached today's stage represented by the ACR-1000, has a long history dating back to the early 1950's. In this regard, Canada is in a unique situation, shared only by a very few other countries, where original nuclear power technology has been invented and further developed. The ACR design has been reviewed by domestic and international regulatory bodies, and has been given a positive regulatory opinion about its licensability. The Canadian regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) completed the Phase 1 and Phase 2 pre-project design reviews in December 2008 and August 2009, respectively, and concluded that there are no fundamental barriers to licensing the ACR-1000 design in Canada. The final stage of the ACR-1000 design is currently underway and will be completed by fall of 2011, along with the final elements of the safety analyses and probabilistic safety analyses supporting the finalized design. The generic Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for the ACR-1000 was completed in September 2009. The PSAR demonstrates ACR-1000 safety case and compliance with Canadian and international regulatory requirements and expectations. (authors)

  3. Assessment of ASSERT-PV for prediction of critical heat flux in CANDU bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Assessment of the new Canadian subchannel code ASSERT-PV 3.2 for CHF prediction. • CANDU 28-, 37- and 43-element bundle CHF experiments. • Prediction improvement of ASSERT-PV 3.2 over previous code versions. • Sensitivity study of the effect of CHF model options. - Abstract: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the subchannel thermalhydraulics code ASSERT-PV for the Canadian nuclear industry. The recently released ASSERT-PV 3.2 provides enhanced models for improved predictions of flow distribution, critical heat flux (CHF), and post-dryout (PDO) heat transfer in horizontal CANDU fuel channels. This paper presents results of an assessment of the new code version against five full-scale CANDU bundle experiments conducted in 1990s and in 2009 by Stern Laboratories (SL), using 28-, 37- and 43-element (CANFLEX) bundles. A total of 15 CHF test series with varying pressure-tube creep and/or bearing-pad height were analyzed. The SL experiments encompassed the bundle geometries and range of flow conditions for the intended ASSERT-PV applications for CANDU reactors. Code predictions of channel dryout power and axial and radial CHF locations were compared against measurements from the SL CHF tests to quantify the code prediction accuracy. The prediction statistics using the recommended model set of ASSERT-PV 3.2 were compared to those from previous code versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity studies evaluated the contribution of each CHF model change or enhancement to the improvement in CHF prediction. Overall, the assessment demonstrated significant improvement in prediction of channel dryout power and axial and radial CHF locations in horizontal fuel channels containing CANDU bundles

  4. Assessment of ASSERT-PV for prediction of critical heat flux in CANDU bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Y.F., E-mail: raoy@aecl.ca; Cheng, Z., E-mail: chengz@aecl.ca; Waddington, G.M., E-mail: waddingg@aecl.ca

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Assessment of the new Canadian subchannel code ASSERT-PV 3.2 for CHF prediction. • CANDU 28-, 37- and 43-element bundle CHF experiments. • Prediction improvement of ASSERT-PV 3.2 over previous code versions. • Sensitivity study of the effect of CHF model options. - Abstract: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the subchannel thermalhydraulics code ASSERT-PV for the Canadian nuclear industry. The recently released ASSERT-PV 3.2 provides enhanced models for improved predictions of flow distribution, critical heat flux (CHF), and post-dryout (PDO) heat transfer in horizontal CANDU fuel channels. This paper presents results of an assessment of the new code version against five full-scale CANDU bundle experiments conducted in 1990s and in 2009 by Stern Laboratories (SL), using 28-, 37- and 43-element (CANFLEX) bundles. A total of 15 CHF test series with varying pressure-tube creep and/or bearing-pad height were analyzed. The SL experiments encompassed the bundle geometries and range of flow conditions for the intended ASSERT-PV applications for CANDU reactors. Code predictions of channel dryout power and axial and radial CHF locations were compared against measurements from the SL CHF tests to quantify the code prediction accuracy. The prediction statistics using the recommended model set of ASSERT-PV 3.2 were compared to those from previous code versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity studies evaluated the contribution of each CHF model change or enhancement to the improvement in CHF prediction. Overall, the assessment demonstrated significant improvement in prediction of channel dryout power and axial and radial CHF locations in horizontal fuel channels containing CANDU bundles.

  5. Fuel enrichment and temperature distribution in nuclear fuel rod in (D-T) driven hybrid reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Ypek [Suleyman Demirel Universitesi Muhendislik-Mimarlyk Fakultesi, Isparta (Turkey)

    2001-07-01

    In this study, melting point of the fuel rod and temperature distribution in nuclear fuel rod are investigated for different coolants under various first wall loads (P{sub w}, =5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 MWm{sup -2}) in Fusion-Fission reactor fueled with 50%LWR +50%CANDU. The fusion source of neutrons of 14.1 MeV is simulated by a movable target along the main axis of cylindrical geometry as a line source. In addition, the fusion chamber was thought as a cylindrical cavity with a diameter of 300 cm that is comparatively small value. The fissile fuel zone is considered to be cooled with four different coolants, gas, flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}), natural lithium (Li), and eutectic lithium (Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83}). Investigations are observed during 4 years for discrete time intervals of{delta}t= 0.5 month and by a plant factor (PF) of 75%. Volumetric ratio of coolant-to fuel is 1:1, 45.515% coolant, 45.515% fuel, 8.971% clad, in fuel zone. (author)

  6. Simulation-based reactor control design methodology for CANDU 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kattan, M.K.; MacBeth, M.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Chan, W.F.; Lam, K.Y. [Cassiopeia Technologies Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-07-01

    The next generation of CANDU nuclear power plant being designed by AECL is the 900 MWe CANDU 9 station. This design is based upon the Darlington CANDU nuclear power plant located in Ontario which is among the world leading nuclear power stations for highest capacity factor with the lowest operation, maintenance and administration costs in North America. Canadian-designed CANDU pressurized heavy water nuclear reactors have traditionally been world leaders in electrical power generation capacity performance. This paper introduces the CANDU 9 design initiative to use plant simulation during the design stage of the plant distributed control system (DCS), plant display system (PDS) and the control centre panels. This paper also introduces some details of the CANDU 9 DCS reactor regulating system (RRS) control application, a typical DCS partition configuration, and the interfacing of some of the software design processes that are being followed from conceptual design to final integrated design validation. A description is given of the reactor model developed specifically for use in the simulator. The CANDU 9 reactor model is a synthesis of 14 micro point-kinetic reactor models to facilitate 14 liquid zone controllers for bulk power error control, as well as zone flux tilt control. (author)

  7. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: engineered barriers alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste involves emplacing the waste in a vault excavated at a depth of 500 to 1000 m in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The solid waste would be isolated from the biosphere by a multibarrier system consisting of engineered barriers, including long-lived containers and clay and cement-based sealing materials, and the natural barrier provided by the massive geological formation. The technical feasibility of this concept and its impact on the environment and human health are being documented in an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), which will be submitted for review under the federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process. This report, one of nine EIS primary references, describes the various alternative designs and materials for engineered barriers that have been considered during the development of the Canadian disposal concept and summarizes engineered barrier concepts being evaluated in other countries. The basis for the selection of a reference engineered barrier system for the EIS is presented. This reference system involves placing used CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) fuel bundles in titanium containers, which would then be emplaced in boreholes drilled in the floor of disposal rooms. Clay-based sealing materials would be used to fill both the space between the containers and the rock and the remaining excavations. In the section on waste forms, the properties of both used-fuel bundles and solidified high-level wastes, which would be produced by treating wastes resulting from the reprocessing of used fuel, are discussed. Methods of solidifying the wastes and the chemical durability of the solidified waste under disposal conditions are reviewed. Various alternative container designs are reviewed, ranging from preliminary conceptual designs to designs that have received extensive prototype testing. Results of structural performance, welding and inspection studies are also summarized. The corrosion of

  8. An introduction to the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work;second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity;and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US. 34 figs., 10 tabs

  9. Role of accident analysis in development of severe accident management guidance for multi-unit CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the role of accident analysis in support of the development of Severe Accident Management Guidance for domestic CANDU reactors. In general, analysis can identify what types of challenges can be expected during accident progression but it cannot specify when and to what degree accident phenomena will occur. SAMG overcomes these limitations by monitoring the actual values of key plant indicators that can be used directly or indirectly to infer the condition of the plant and by establishing setpoints beyond which corrective action is required. Analysis can provide a means to correlate observed post-accident plant behavior against predicted behaviour to improve the confidence in and quality of accident mitigation decisions. (author)

  10. Nuclear fuel cycle assessment of India: A technical study for U.S.-India cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Taraknath Woddi Venkat

    breeder core concept involving the CANDU core design. The end-of-life fuel characteristics evolved from the designed fuel composition is proliferation resistant and economical in integrating this technology into the Indian nuclear fuel cycle. Furthermore, it is shown that the separation of the military and civilian components of the Indian fuel cycle can be facilitated through the implementation of such a system.

  11. Plant condition assessments as a requirement before major investment in life extension for a CANDU nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Since, to extend the life of a CANDU-6 reactor beyond its original design life requires the replacement of reactor components (380 pressure and calandria tubes), a major investment will have to be done. After a preliminary technical and economical feasibility study, Hydro- Quebec, owner of the Gentilly-2 NPP, has decided to perform a more detailed assessment to: 1. Get assurance that it is technically and economically viable to extend Gentilly-2 for another 20 years beyond the original design life; 2. Identify the detailed work to be done during the refurbishment period planned in 2008-2009; 3. Define the overall cost and the general schedule of the refurbishment phase; 4. Ensure an adequate licensing strategy to restart after refurbishment; 5. Complete all the Environmental Impact Studies required to obtain the government authorizations. The business case to support the refurbishment of Gentilly-2 has to take in consideration the reactor core components, which will be the major work to be completed during refurbishment. In summary the following main component will have to be changed or refreshed: The pressure and calandria tubes and the feeders (partial replacement only) (ageing mechanisms); The control computers (obsolescence); The condenser tubes (tubes plugging); The turbine control and electric-governor (obsolescence). An extensive campaign is under way to assess the 'health' of the station systems, structures and components (SSC). Two processes have been used for this assessment: Plant Life Management Studies (PLIM) for approximately 10 critical SSC or families of SSC (PLIM Studies); Condition Assessment Studies for other SSC with a lower impact on the Plant production or safety). The PLIM Studies are done on SSC's, which were judged critical because they are not replaceable (Reactor Building, Calandria), or that their failure could have a significant impact on safety or production (electrical motors, majors pumps, heat exchangers and pressure

  12. Korea signs for 2nd CANDU at Wolsong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sale of a second CANDU 6 reactor to Korea for the Wolsong site is discussed in relation to nuclear power in Korea, the Korean economy generally, Canadian trade with Korea, and cooperation between AECL and KAERI

  13. CANDU 9 safety enhancements and licensability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU 9 design has followed the evolutionary product development approach that has characterized the CANDU family of nuclear power plants. In addition to utilizing proven equipment and systems from operating stations, the CANDU 9 design has looked ahead to incorporate design and safety enhancements necessary to meet evolving utility and regulatory requirements both in Canada and overseas. To demonstrate licensability in Canada, and to assure overseas customers that the design had independent regulatory review in the country of origin, the pre-project Basic Engineering Program included an extensive two year formal review by the Canadian regulatory authority, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). Documentation submitted for this licensing review included the licensing basis, safety requirements and safety analysis necessary to demonstrate compliance with regulations as well as to assess system design and performance. The licensing review was successfully completed in 1997 January. In addition, to facilitate licensability in Korea, CANDU 9 incorporates feedback from the application of Korean licensing requirements to the CANDU 6 reactors at Wolsong site. (author)

  14. Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States [CIS]). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future

  15. Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States [CIS]). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

  16. Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

  17. Multi-step approach to Code-coupling for progression induced severe accidents in CANDU NPPs (MACPISA-CANDU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, D.J.; Luxat, J.C. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Engineering Physics, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Giannotti, W.; D' Auria, F. [Univ. of Pisa, Dept. of Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Engineering, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    This paper reviews the progression of severe accidents, describes computer codes currently employed for analysis of severe accidents and outlines a new methodology to modelling the progression of severe accidents in CANDU nuclear power plants (NPPs) called the Multi-step Approach to Code-coupling for Progression Induced Severe Accidents in CANDU NPPs (MACPISA-CANDU). The MACPISA-CANDU methodology was used to couple the U.S. NRC codes SCDAP/RELAP5 (RELAP/SCDAPSIM Mod 3.4) and MELCOR (1.8.5) in order to model a small break loss of coolant accident with loss of emergency coolant injection (SBLOCA-LOECI) under natural circulation in a CANDU 6 NPP. Using this model it was shown that the sheath temperature did not exceed the zirconium melting temperature of 2098 K and hence the progression of the severe accident was terminated as expected. (author)

  18. Studies of nuclear fuel by means of nuclear spectroscopy methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter

    2000-02-01

    This paper is a summary text of several works performed by the author regarding spectroscopic measurements on spent nuclear fuel. Methods for determining the decay heat of spent nuclear fuel by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy and for verifying the integrity of nuclear fuel by means of tomography is presented. A summary of work performed regarding gamma-ray detector technology for studies of fission gas release is presented.

  19. Optimization and implementation study of plutonium disposition using existing CANDU Reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Since early 1994, the Department of Energy has been sponsoring studies aimed at evaluating the merits of disposing of surplus US weapons plutonium as Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel in existing commercial Canadian Pressurized Heavy Water reactors, known as CANDU`s. The first report, submitted to DOE in July, 1994 (the 1994 Executive Summary is attached), identified practical and safe options for the consumption of 50 to 100 tons of plutonium in 25 years in some of the existing CANDU reactors operating the Bruce A generating station, on Lake Huron, about 300 km north east of Detroit. By designing the fuel and nuclear performance to operate within existing experience and operating/performance envelope, and by utilizing existing fuel fabrication and transportation facilities and methods, a low cost, low risk method for long term plutonium disposition was developed. In December, 1995, in response to evolving Mission Requirements, the DOE requested a further study of the CANDU option with emphasis on more rapid disposition of the plutonium, and retaining the early start and low risk features of the earlier work. This report is the result of that additional work.

  20. Semi-annual status report of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, April 1--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, E.D. [comp.

    1992-02-01

    This report is the eleventh in a series of semi-annual status reports on the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. it describes progress achieved in the three major subprograms, engineered systems, natural systems and performance assessment, from 1991 April 1 to September 30. It also gives a brief description of the activities being carried out in preparation for the public and governmental review of the disposal concept. Since 1987, this program has been jointly funded by AECL and Ontario Hydro under the auspices of the CANDU Owners Group (COG).

  1. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: engineering for a disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents some general considerations for engineering a nuclear fuel waste disposal facility, alternative disposal-vault concepts and arrangements, and a conceptual design of a used-fuel disposal centre that was used to assess the technical feasibility, costs and potential effects of disposal. The general considerations and alternative disposal-vault arrangements are presented to show that options are available to allow the design to be adapted to actual site conditions. The conceptual design for a used-fuel disposal centre includes descriptions of the two major components of the disposal facility, the Used-Fuel Packaging Plant and the disposal vault; the ancillary facilities and services needed to carry out the operations are also identified. The development of the disposal facility, its operation, its decommissioning, and the reclamation of the site are discussed. The costs, labour requirements and schedules used to assess socioeconomic effects and that may be used to assess the cost burden of waste disposal to the consumer of nuclear energy are estimated. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is funded jointly by AECL and Ontario Hydro under the auspices of the CANDU Owners Group. (author)

  2. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures

  3. International Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  4. Nuclear Fusion Fuel Cycle Research Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, we at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and our National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) colleagues are investigating nuclear fusion fuel cycle hardware including a nuclear fusion fuel Storage and Delivery System (SDS). To have a better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we present our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). To have better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we presented our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). Our efforts to enhance the tritium confinement will be continued for the development of cleaner nuclear fusion power plants

  5. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  6. Variants of closing the nuclear fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianova, E. A.; Davidenko, V. D.; Tsibulskiy, V. F.; Tsibulskiy, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of the nuclear energy structure, the conditions of fuel burnup, and accumulation of new fissile isotopes from the raw isotopes on the main parameters of a closed fuel cycle is considered. The effects of the breeding ratio, the cooling time of the spent fuel in the external fuel cycle, and the separation of the breeding area and the fissile isotope burning area on the parameters of the fuel cycle are analyzed.

  7. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society 15. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the 15. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society cover a wide range of nuclear topics, but the emphasis is on CANDU reactors and Canadian experience. The 89 papers are arranged in 17 sessions dealing with the following subjects: thermalhydraulics, fuel channels, operations, reactor physics, fuel, new technology, safety, training, waste management. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  8. The Impact of Power Coefficient of Reactivity on CANDU 6 Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined effects of reactivity coefficients, along with other core nuclear characteristics, determine reactor core behavior in normal operation and accident conditions. The Power Coefficient of Reactivity (PCR) is an aggregate indicator representing the change in reactor core reactivity per unit change in reactor power. It is an integral quantity which captures the contributions of the fuel temperature, coolant void, and coolant temperature reactivity feedbacks. All nuclear reactor designs provide a balance between their inherent nuclear characteristics and the engineered reactivity control features, to ensure that changes in reactivity under all operating conditions are maintained within a safe range. The CANDU reactor design takes advantage of its inherent nuclear characteristics, namely a small magnitude of reactivity coefficients, minimal excess reactivity, and very long prompt neutron lifetime, to mitigate the demand on the engineered systems for controlling reactivity and responding to accidents. In particular, CANDU reactors have always taken advantage of the small value of the PCR associated with their design characteristics, such that the overall design and safety characteristics of the reactor are not sensitive to the value of the PCR. For other reactor design concepts a PCR which is both large and negative is an important aspect in the design of their engineered systems for controlling reactivity. It will be demonstrated that during Loss of Regulation Control (LORC) and Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA) events, the impact of variations in power coefficient, including a hypothesized larger than estimated PCR, has no safety-significance for CANDU reactor design. Since the CANDU 6 PCR is small, variations in the range of values for PCR on the performance or safety of the reactor are not significant

  9. Licensing assessment of the Candu Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. Preliminary safety information document. Volume II. [USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    ERDA has requested United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) to evaluate the design of the Canadian natural uranium fueled, heavy water moderated (CANDU) nuclear reactor power plant to assess its conformance with the licensing criteria and guidelines of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) for light water reactors. This assessment was used to identify cost significant items of nonconformance and to provide a basis for developing a detailed cost estimate for a 1140 MWe, 3-loop Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) located at the Middletown, USA Site.

  10. Licensing assessment of the Candu Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. Preliminary safety information document. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ERDA has requested United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) to evaluate the design of the Canadian natural uranium fueled, heavy water moderated (CANDU) nuclear reactor power plant to assess its conformance with the licensing criteria and guidelines of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) for light water reactors. This assessment was used to identify cost significant items of nonconformance and to provide a basis for developing a detailed cost estimate for a 1140 MWe, 3-loop Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) located at the Middletown, USA Site

  11. A prediction method of the effect of radial heat flux distribution on critical heat flux in CANDU fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel irradiation experiments to study fuel behaviors have been performed in the experimental loops of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) in support of the development of new fuel technologies. Before initiating a fuel irradiation experiment, the experimental proposal must be approved to ensure that the test fuel strings put into the NRU loops meet safety margin requirements in critical heat flux (CHF). The fuel strings in irradiation experiments can have varying degrees of fuel enrichment and burnup, resulting in large variations in radial heat flux distribution (RFD). CHF experiments performed in Freon flow at CRL for full-scale bundle strings with a number of RFDs showed a strong effect of RFD on CHF. A prediction method was derived based on experimental CHF data to account for the RFD effect on CHF. It provides good CHF predictions for various RFDs as compared to the data. However, the range of the tested RFDs in the CHF experiments is not as wide as that required in the fuel irradiation experiments. The applicability of the prediction method needs to be examined for the RFDs beyond the range tested by the CHF experiments. The Canadian subchannel code ASSERT-PV was employed to simulate the CHF behavior for RFDs that would be encountered in fuel irradiation experiments. The CHF predictions using the derived method were compared with the ASSERT simulations. It was observed that the CHF predictions agree well with the ASSERT simulations in terms of CHF, confirming the applicability of the prediction method in fuel irradiation experiments. (author)

  12. Spent nuclear fuel disposal liability insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis examines the social efficiency of nuclear power when the risks of accidental releases of spent fuel radionuclides from a spent fuel disposal facility are considered. The analysis consists of two major parts. First, a theoretical economic model of the use of nuclear power including the risks associated with releases of radionuclides from a disposal facility is developed. Second, the costs of nuclear power, including the risks associated with a radionuclide release, are empirically compared to the costs of fossil fuel-fired generation of electricity. Under the provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the federally owned and operated spent nuclear fuel disposal facility is not required to maintain a reserve fund to cover damages from an accidental radionuclide release. Thus, the risks of a harmful radionuclide release are not included in the spent nuclear fuel disposal fee charged to the electric utilities. Since the electric utilities do not pay the full, social costs of spent fuel disposal, they use nuclear fuel in excess of the social optimum. An insurance mechanism is proposed to internalize the risks associated with spent fueled disposal. Under this proposal, the Federal government is required to insure the disposal facility against any liabilities arising from accidental releases of spent fuel radionuclides

  13. Sustainability Features of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Passerini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear fuel cycle is the series of stages that nuclear fuel materials go through in a cradle to grave framework. The Once Through Cycle (OTC is the current fuel cycle implemented in the United States; in which an appropriate form of the fuel is irradiated through a nuclear reactor only once before it is disposed of as waste. The discharged fuel contains materials that can be suitable for use as fuel. Thus, different types of fuel recycling technologies may be introduced in order to more fully utilize the energy potential of the fuel, or reduce the environmental impacts and proliferation concerns about the discarded fuel materials. Nuclear fuel cycle systems analysis is applied in this paper to attain a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of fuel cycle alternatives. Through the use of the nuclear fuel cycle analysis code CAFCA (Code for Advanced Fuel Cycle Analysis, the impact of a number of recycling technologies and the associated fuel cycle options is explored in the context of the U.S. energy scenario over 100 years. Particular focus is given to the quantification of Uranium utilization, the amount of Transuranic Material (TRU generated and the economics of the different options compared to the base-line case, the OTC option. It is concluded that LWRs and the OTC are likely to dominate the nuclear energy supply system for the period considered due to limitations on availability of TRU to initiate recycling technologies. While the introduction of U-235 initiated fast reactors can accelerate their penetration of the nuclear energy system, their higher capital cost may lead to continued preference for the LWR-OTC cycle.

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEROY, P.G.

    2000-11-03

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities.

  15. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities

  16. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System. A directory of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 2009 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) is an international directory of civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities, published online as part of the Integrated Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (iNFCIS: http://www-nfcis.iaea.org/). This is the fourth hardcopy publication in almost 30 years and it represents a snapshot of the NFCIS database as of the end of 2008. Together with the attached CD-ROM, it provides information on 650 civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities in 53 countries, thus helping to improve the transparency of global nuclear fuel cycle activities

  17. The safety of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel cycle covers the procurement and preparation of fuel for nuclear power reactors, its recovery and recycling after use and the safe storage of all wastes generated through these operations. The facilities associated with these activities have an extensive and well documented safety record accumulated over the past 40 years by technical experts and safety authorities. This report constitutes an up-to-date analysis of the safety of the nuclear fuel cycle, based on the available experience in OECD countries. It addresses the technical aspects of fuel cycle operations, provides information on operating practices and looks ahead to future activities

  18. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  19. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO2 or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures

  20. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  1. The CANTEACH project: preserving CANDU technical knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost sixty years have passed since the nuclear energy venture began in Canada. Fifty years have passed since the founding of AECL. Tens of thousands of dedicated people have forged a new and successful primary energy supply. CANDU technology is well into its second century. This specialty within the world's fission technology community is quite unique, first because it was established as a separate effort very early in the history of world fission energy, and second because it grew in an isolated environment, with tight security requirements, in its early years. Commercial security rules later sustained a considerable degree of isolation. The pioneers of CANDU development have finished their work. Most of the second generation also has moved on. As yet, we cannot point to a consistent and complete record of this remarkable achievement. We, as a nuclear enterprise, have not captured the design legacy in a form that is readily accessible to the current and future generation of professionals involved with CANDU reactors, be they students, designers, operations staff, regulators, consultants or clients. This is a serious failure. Young people entering our field of study must make do with one or two textbooks and a huge collection of diverse technical papers augmented by limited-scope education and training materials. Those employed in the various parts of the nuclear industry rely mostly on a smaller set of CANDU- related documents available within their own organization; documents that sometimes are rather limited in scope. University professors often have even more limited access to in-depth and up to date information. In fact, they often depend on literature published in other countries when preparing lectures, enhanced by guest lecturers from various parts of the industry. Because CANDU was developed mostly inside Canada, few of these text materials contain useful data describing processes important to the CANDU system. For many years it has been recognized that

  2. Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel cycle is substantially more complicated than the energy production cycles of conventional fuels because of the very low abundance of uranium 235, the presence of radioactivity, the potential for producing fissile nuclides from irradiation, and the risk that fissile materials will be used for nuclear weapons. These factors add enrichment, recycling, spent fuel storage, and safeguards to the cycle, besides making the conventional steps of exploration, mining, processing, use, waste disposal, and transportation more difficult

  3. Used Nuclear Fuel: From Liability to Benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbach, Raymond L.

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear power has proven safe and reliable, with operating efficiencies in the U.S. exceeding 90%. It provides a carbon-free source of electricity (with about a 10% penalty arising from CO2 released from construction and the fuel cycle). However, used fuel from nuclear reactors is highly toxic and presents a challenge for permanent disposal -- both from technical and policy perspectives. The half-life of the ``bad actors'' is relatively short (of the order of decades) while the very long lived isotopes are relatively benign. At present, spent fuel is stored on-site in cooling ponds. Once the used fuel pools are full, the fuel is moved to dry cask storage on-site. Though the local storage is capable of handling used fuel safely and securely for many decades, the law requires DOE to assume responsibility for the used fuel and remove it from reactor sites. The nuclear industry pays a tithe to support sequestration of used fuel (but not research). However, there is currently no national policy in place to deal with the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel. This administration is opposed to underground storage at Yucca Mountain. There is no national policy for interim storage---removal of spent fuel from reactor sites and storage at a central location. And there is no national policy for liberating the energy contained in used fuel through recycling (separating out the fissionable components for subsequent use as nuclear fuel). A ``Blue Ribbon Commission'' has been formed to consider alternatives, but will not report until 2012. This paper will examine alternatives for used fuel disposition, their drawbacks (e.g. proliferation issues arising from recycling), and their benefits. For recycle options to emerge as a viable technology, research is required to develop cost effective methods for treating used nuclear fuel, with attention to policy as well as technical issues.

  4. Operation of the nuclear fuel cycle test facilities -Operation of the hot test loop facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, S. Y.; Jeong, M. K.; Park, C. K.; Yang, S. K.; Won, S. Y.; Song, C. H.; Jeon, H. K.; Jeong, H. J.; Cho, S.; Min, K. H.; Jeong, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    A performance and reliability of a advanced nuclear fuel and reactor newly designed should be verified by performing the thermal hydraulics tests. In thermal hydraulics research team, the thermal hydraulics tests associated with the development of an advanced nuclear fuel and reactor haven been carried out with the test facilities, such as the Hot Test Loop operated under high temperature and pressure conditions, Cold Test Loop, RCS Loop and B and C Loop. The objective of this project is to obtain the available experimental data and to develop the advanced measuring techniques through taking full advantage of the facilities. The facilities operated by the thermal hydraulics research team have been maintained and repaired in order to carry out the thermal hydraulics tests necessary for providing the available data. The performance tests for the double grid type bottom end piece which was improved on the debris filtering effectivity were performed using the PWR-Hot Test Loop. The CANDU-Hot Test Loop was operated to carry out the pressure drop tests and strength tests of CANFLEX fuel. The Cold Test Loop was used to obtain the local velocity data in subchannel within HANARO fuel bundle and to study a thermal mixing characteristic of PWR fuel bundle. RCS thermal hydraulic loop was constructed and the experiments have been carried out to measure the critical heat flux. In B and C Loop, the performance tests for each component were carried out. (author). 19 tabs., 78 figs., 19 refs.

  5. Operation of the nuclear fuel cycle test facilities -Operation of the hot test loop facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A performance and reliability of a advanced nuclear fuel and reactor newly designed should be verified by performing the thermal hydraulics tests. In thermal hydraulics research team, the thermal hydraulics tests associated with the development of an advanced nuclear fuel and reactor haven been carried out with the test facilities, such as the Hot Test Loop operated under high temperature and pressure conditions, Cold Test Loop, RCS Loop and B and C Loop. The objective of this project is to obtain the available experimental data and to develop the advanced measuring techniques through taking full advantage of the facilities. The facilities operated by the thermal hydraulics research team have been maintained and repaired in order to carry out the thermal hydraulics tests necessary for providing the available data. The performance tests for the double grid type bottom end piece which was improved on the debris filtering effectivity were performed using the PWR-Hot Test Loop. The CANDU-Hot Test Loop was operated to carry out the pressure drop tests and strength tests of CANFLEX fuel. The Cold Test Loop was used to obtain the local velocity data in subchannel within HANARO fuel bundle and to study a thermal mixing characteristic of PWR fuel bundle. RCS thermal hydraulic loop was constructed and the experiments have been carried out to measure the critical heat flux. In B and C Loop, the performance tests for each component were carried out. (author). 19 tabs., 78 figs., 19 refs

  6. Studies of Nuclear Fuel by Means of Nuclear Spectroscopic Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The increasing demand for characterization of nuclear fuel, both from an operator and authority point of view, motivates the development of new experimental and, preferable, non-destructive methods. In this thesis, some methods based on nuclear spectroscopic techniques are presented. Various parameters of irradiated fuel are shown to be determined with high accuracy and confidence by utilizing gamma-ray scanning, tomography and passive neutron assay. Specifically, fuel parameters relevant for...

  7. Investigation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Pool Coolability

    OpenAIRE

    Nimander, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    The natural catastrophe at Fukushima Dai-ichi 2011 enlightened the nuclear community. This master thesis reveals the non-negligible risks regarding the short term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The thesis has also investigated the possibility of using natural circulation of air in a passive safety system to cool the spent nuclear fuel pools. The results where conclusive: The temperature difference between the heated air and ambient air is far too low for natural circulation of air to remove a...

  8. Establishment of China Nuclear Fuel Assembly Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENPeng; ZHANGYing-chao; LIUTing-jin; JINYong-li

    2003-01-01

    During researching, designing, manufacturing and post irradiation, a large amount of data on fuel assembly of China nuclear power plants has been accumulated. It is necessary to collect the data together,so that the researchers, designers, manufactures and managers could use the data conveniently. It was proposed to establish a China Nuclear Fuel Assembly Database through the Internet on workstations during the year of 2003 to 2006, so the data would be shared in China nuclear industry.

  9. Risk management and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If nuclear fuel is the answer to the future energy crisis, more must be done in the area of protecting financial interests. This paper discusses what has been done in the area of insurance to protect the owner, processor, vendors, etc. What is available in the insurance market is reviewed; the Nuclear Energy Liability Property Insurance Association is virtually the only nuclear insuror, except for the mutual company Nuclear Mutual Limited in Bermuda. Methods being used today to insure each phase of the processing for nuclear fuel are reviewed next. There are basically three (overlapping) types of primary insurance for the fuel cycle: conventional insurance, nuclear insurance pools, and Price-Anderson indemnification. There is no clearcut assumption of risk because the contract between owner, converter, fabricator or reprocessor is usually completed before insurance is considered. The need to educate the insurors about nuclear matters is emphasized

  10. Design requirements, criteria and methods for seismic qualification of CANDU power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the requirements and criteria for the seismic design and qualification of systems and equipment in CANDU nuclear power plants. Acceptable methods and techniques for seismic qualification of CANDU nuclear power plants to mitigate the effects or the consequences of earthquakes are also described. (auth)

  11. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, the fifth of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes activities over the past year in the following areas: public interaction; used fuel storage and transportation; immobilization of used fuel and fuel recycle waste; geoscience research related to deep underground disposal; environmental research; and environmental and safety assessment

  12. Candu technology: the next generation now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the development philosophy, direction and concepts that are being utilized by AECL to refine the CANDU reactor to meet the needs of current and future competitive energy markets. The technology development path for CANDU reactors is based on the optimization of the pressure tube concept. Because of the inherent modularity and flexibility of this basis for the core design, it is possible to provide a seamless and continuous evolution of the reactor design and performance. There is no need for a drastic shift in concept, in technology or in fuel. By continual refinement of the flow and materials conditions in the channels, the basic reactor can be thermally and operationally efficient, highly competitive and economic, and highly flexible in application. Thus, the design can build on the successful construction and operating experience of the existing plants, and no step changes in development direction are needed. This approach minimizes investor, operator and development risk but still provides technological, safety and performance advances. In today's world energy markets, major drivers for the technology development are: (a) reduced capital cost; (b) improved operation; (c) enhanced safety; and (d) fuel cycle flexibility. The drivers provide specific numerical targets. Meeting these drivers ensures that the concept meets and exceeds the customer economic, performance, safety and resource use goals and requirements, including the suitable national and international standards. This logical development of the CANDU concept leads naturally to the 'Next Generation' of CANDU reactors. The major features under development include an optimized lattice for SEU (slightly enriched uranium) fuel, light water cooling coupled with heavy water moderation, advanced fuel channels and CANFLEX fuel, optimization of plant performance, enhanced thermal and BOP (balance of plant) efficiency, and the adoption of layout and construction technology adapted from successful on

  13. National Policy on Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National policy on nuclear fuel cycle is aimed at attaining the expected condition, i.e. being able to support optimality the national energy policy and other related Government policies taking into account current domestic nuclear fuel cycle condition and the trend of international nuclear fuel cycle development, the national strength, weakness, thread and opportunity in the field of energy. This policy has to be followed by the strategy to accomplish covering the optimization of domestic efforts, cooperation with other countries, and or purchasing licences. These policy and strategy have to be broken down into various nuclear fuel cycle programmes covering basically assesment of the whole cycle, performing research and development of the whole cycle without enrichment and reprocessing being able for weapon, as well as programmes for industrialization of the fuel cycle stepwisery commencing with the middle part of the cycle and ending with the edge of the back-end of the cycle

  14. Desktop Severe Accident Graphic Simulator Module for CANDU6 : PSAIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. Y.; Song, Y. M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The ISAAC ((Integrated Severe Accident Analysis Code for CANDU Plant) code is a system level computer code capable of performing integral analyses of potential severe accident progressions in nuclear power plants, whose main purpose is to support a Level 2 probabilistic safety assessment or severe accident management strategy developments. The code has the capability to predict a severe accident progression by modeling the CANDU6- specific systems and the expected physical phenomena based on the current understanding of the unique accident progressions. The code models the sequence of accident progressions from a core heatup, pressure tube/calandria tube rupture after an uncovery from inside and outside, a relocation of the damaged fuel to the bottom of the calandria, debris behavior in the calandria, corium quenching after a debris relocation from the calandria to the calandria vault and an erosion of the calandria vault concrete floor, a hydrogen burn, and a reactor building failure. Along with the thermal hydraulics, the fission product behavior is also considered in the primary system as well as in the reactor building.

  15. Elements of radioprotection culture at Nuclear Fuel Plant at Pitesti, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culture as an element of human existence is characterized primarily by accumulating, skills, attitudes, behavior and promotion to something. Nuclear security culture has developed a desire to prepare to cope with nuclear risk, born with the discovery of radioactivity. Culture of radiation protection is required for the implementation of safety and security in the protection against ionizing radiation. In the activity of producing nuclear fuel for CANDU based on natural and depleted uranium stakeholders are developing a specific radiation protection culture due the existing radiological risks that can lead to exposure to ionizing radiation. For Nuclear Fuel Plant Pitesti (FCN) where nuclear material is both as bulk and as itemized form, individual radiological monitoring as well as the working environment are established in Radiological Security Manual (MSR), in accordance with national legislation and international. All employees FCN are classified as A and B classes of exposure to ionizing radiation. Classification is based on work performed and the degree of exposure and specific training for radiological safety is sized for each category. External workers, contractors and visitors are aware of the entry in the plant on the risks of exposure to ionizing radiation and are properly trained. Basics of radiation protection culture as individual monitoring, communication, rigorous and prudent approach, pro-active action activity are transmitted continuously. In addition the radiation protection culture existed there from the beginning of the commissioning of the plant, but its elements still remain scattered in knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of employees. (authors)

  16. CANDU safety analysis system establishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Byung Joo; Rhee, B. W.; Park, J. H.; Kim, H. T.; Choi, H. B.; Shim, J. I.; Yoon, C.; Yang, M. K

    2002-03-01

    To develop CANDU safety analysis system, methodology, and assessment technology, GAIs from CNSC and GSIs drived by IAEA are summarized. Furthermore, the following safety items are investigated in the present study. - It is intended to secure credibility of the void reactivity in the stage of nuclear design and analysis. The measurement data concerned with the void reactivity were reviewed and used to assess the physics code such as POWDERPUFS-V/RFSP, and the lattice code such as WIMS-AECL and MCNP-4B. - Reviewing the Final Safety Analysis Report for Wolsong-2/3/4 Units, the safety analysis methodology, classification for accident scenarios, safety analysis codes, their interface, etc. were examined. - The development of 3D CFD transient analysis model has been performed to predict local subcooling of the moderator in the vicinity of Calandria tubes in a CANDU-6 reactor in the case of Large LOCA transient. - The trip coverage analysis methodology based on CATHENA code is developed. The simulation of real plant transient showed good agreement. The trip coverage map was generated successfully for two typical depressurization and pressurization event. - The multi-dimensional analysis methodology for hydrogen distribution and hydrogen burning phenomena in PHWR containment is developed using GOTHIC code. The multi-dimensional analysis predicts the local hydrogen behaviour compared to the lumped parameter model.

  17. Annotated Bibliography for Drying Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebecca E. Smith

    2011-09-01

    Internationally, the nuclear industry is represented by both commercial utilities and research institutions. Over the past two decades many of these entities have had to relocate inventories of spent nuclear fuel from underwater storage to dry storage. These efforts were primarily prompted by two factors: insufficient storage capacity (potentially precipitated by an open-ended nuclear fuel cycle) or deteriorating quality of existing underwater facilities. The intent of developing this bibliography is to assess what issues associated with fuel drying have been identified, to consider where concerns have been satisfactorily addressed, and to recommend where additional research would offer the most value to the commercial industry and the U. S. Department of Energy.

  18. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I.W.; Patridge, M.D.

    1991-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECN/NEA activities reports; not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  19. Nuclear fuel conversion and fabrication chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following irradiation and reprocessing of nuclear fuel, two operations are performed to prepare the fuel for subsequent reuse as fuel: fuel conversion, and fuel fabrication. These operations complete the classical nuclear fuel cycle. Fuel conversion involves generating a solid form suitable for fabrication into nuclear fuel. For plutonium based fuels, either a pure PuO2 material or a mixed PuO2-UO2 fuel material is generated. Several methods are available for preparation of the pure PuO2 including: oxalate or peroxide precipitation; or direct denitration. Once the pure PuO2 is formed, it is fabricated into fuel by mechanically blending it with ceramic grade UO2. The UO2 can be prepared by several methods which include direct denitration. ADU precipitation, AUC precipitation, and peroxide precipitation. Alternatively, UO2-PuO2 can be generated directly using coprecipitation, direct co-denitration, or gel sphere processes. In coprecipitation, uranium and plutonium are either precipitated as ammonium diuranate and plutonium hydroxide or as a mixture of ammonium uranyl-plutonyl carbonate, filtered and dried. In direct thermal denitration, solutions of uranium and plutonium nitrates are heated causing concentration and, subsequently, direct denitration. In gel sphere conversion, solutions of uranium and plutonium nitrate containing additives are formed into spherical droplets, gelled, washed and dried. Refabrication of these UO3-PuO2 starting materials is accomplished by calcination-reduction to UO2-PuO2 followed by pellet fabrication. (orig.)

  20. Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of nuclear reactors to provide electrical energy has shown considerable growth since the first nuclear plant started commercial operation in the mid 1950s. Although the main purpose of this paper is to review the fuel cycle capabilities in the United States, the introduction is a brief review of the types of nuclear reactors in use and the world-wide nuclear capacity

  1. Radioecology of nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sites where radioactive wastes are found are solid waste burial grounds, soils below liquid stoage areas, surface ditches and ponds, and the terrestrial environment around chemical processing facilities that discharge airborne radioactive debris from stacks. This study provides information to help assess the environmental impacts and certain potentiall human hazards associated with nuclear fuel cycles. A data base is being developed to define and quantify biological transport routes which will permit credible predictions and assessment of routine and potential large-scale releases of radionuclides and other toxic materials. These data, used in assessment models, will increase the accuracy of estimating radiation doses to man and other life forms. Information obtained from existing storage and disposal sites will provide a meaningful radioecological perspective with which to improve the effectiveness of waste management practices. Results will provide information to determine if waste management procedures on the Hanford Site have caused ecological perturbations, and if so, to determine the source, nature, and magnitude of such disturbances

  2. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under two nuclear supply scenarios. These two scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries in the World Outside Centrally Planned Economic Areas (WOCA). A No New Orders scenarios is also presented for the Unites States. This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the WOCA projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel; discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2020 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2036, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case

  3. Application of a Zircaloy/Steam Oxidation Model to a CFX-10 Code for its Validation against a CANDU Fuel Channel Experiment: CS28-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Park, Joo Hwan; Rhee, Bo Wook

    2007-11-15

    Oxidation of a Zircaloy cladding exposed to high-temperature steam is an important phenomenon in the safety analysis of CANDU reactors during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), since a Zircaloy/steam reaction is highly exothermic and results in hydrogen production.

  4. Ultrasonic measurement method of calandria tube sagging in CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calandria tube wrapping each pressure tube is one of the key structural components of CANDU reactor (calandria) which is consisted of many pressure tubes containing nuclear fuel assemblies. As the calandria tube (made of zirconium alloy) is sagging due to its thermal and irradiation creep during the plant operation, it possibly contacts with liquid injection nozzle crossing beneath the calandria tube, which subsequently results in difficulties on the safe operation. It is therefore necessary to check the gap for the confirmation of no contacts between the two tubes, calandria tube and liquid inject ion tube, with a proper measure during the life of plant. In this study, an ultrasonic measurement method was selected among several methods investigated. The ultrasonic device being developed for the measurement of the gap was introduced and its preliminary performance test results were presented here

  5. Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-31

    DOE is investigating methods for long term dispositioning of weapons grade plutonium. One such method would be to utilize the plutonium in Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel assemblies in existing CANDU reactors. CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium) reactors are designed, licensed, built, and supported by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), and currently use natural uranium oxide as fuel. The MOX spent fuel assemblies removed from the reactor would be similar to the spent fuel currently produced using natural uranium fuel, thus rendering the plutonium as unattractive as that in the stockpiles of commercial spent fuel. This report presents the results of a study sponsored by the DOE for dispositioning the plutonium using CANDU technology. Ontario Hydro`s Bruce A was used as reference. The fuel design study defined the optimum parameters to disposition 50 tons of Pu in 25 years (or 100 tons). Two alternate fuel designs were studied. Safeguards, security, environment, safety, health, economics, etc. were considered. Options for complete destruction of the Pu were also studied briefly; CANDU has a superior ability for this. Alternative deployment options were explored and the potential impact on Pu dispositioning in the former Soviet Union was studied. An integrated system can be ready to begin Pu consumption in 4 years, with no changes required to the reactors other than for safe, secure storage of new fuel.

  6. Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE is investigating methods for long term dispositioning of weapons grade plutonium. One such method would be to utilize the plutonium in Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel assemblies in existing CANDU reactors. CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium) reactors are designed, licensed, built, and supported by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), and currently use natural uranium oxide as fuel. The MOX spent fuel assemblies removed from the reactor would be similar to the spent fuel currently produced using natural uranium fuel, thus rendering the plutonium as unattractive as that in the stockpiles of commercial spent fuel. This report presents the results of a study sponsored by the DOE for dispositioning the plutonium using CANDU technology. Ontario Hydro's Bruce A was used as reference. The fuel design study defined the optimum parameters to disposition 50 tons of Pu in 25 years (or 100 tons). Two alternate fuel designs were studied. Safeguards, security, environment, safety, health, economics, etc. were considered. Options for complete destruction of the Pu were also studied briefly; CANDU has a superior ability for this. Alternative deployment options were explored and the potential impact on Pu dispositioning in the former Soviet Union was studied. An integrated system can be ready to begin Pu consumption in 4 years, with no changes required to the reactors other than for safe, secure storage of new fuel

  7. Coolability of severely degraded CANDU cores. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneley, D.A.; Blahnik, C.; Rogers, J.T.; Snell, V.G.; Nijhawan, S

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies have shown that the separately cooled moderator in a CANDU reactor provides an effective heat sink in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) accompanied by total failure of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS). The moderator heat sink prevents fuel melting and maintains the integrity of the fuel channels, therefore terminating this severe accident short of severe core damage. Nevertheless, there is a probability, however low, that the moderator heat sink could fail in such an accident. The pioneering work of Rogers (1984) for such a severe accident using simplified models showed that the fuel channels would fail and a bed of dry, solid debris would be formed at the bottom of the calandria which would heat up and eventually melt. However, the molten pool of core material would be retained in the calandria vessel, cooled by the independently cooled shield-tank water, and would eventually resolidify. Thus, the calandria vessel would act inherently as a 'core-catcher' as long as the shield tank integrity is maintained. The present paper reviews subsequent work on the damage to a CANDU core under severe accident conditions and describes an empirically based mechanistic model of this process. It is shown that, for such severe accident sequences in a CANDU reactor, the end state following core disassembly consists of a porous bed of dry solid, coarse debris, irrespective of the initiating event and the core disassembly process. (author)

  8. Mitigating aging in CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aging degradation is a phenomenon we all experience throughout life, both on a personal basis and in business. Many industries have been successful in postponing the inevitable impact on their related systems and components through programs to maintain long-term reliability, maintainability and safety. However, this has not always been the case for nuclear power. While all power plants are experiencing the world trend of increasing operating costs with age, few (if any) have been able to fully define the parameters that solve the aging equation, particularly in relation to major components. Inspection and preventive maintenance have not been effective in predicting life-limiting degradation and failure. In CANDU nuclear plants, utilities are taking a comprehensive approach in dealing with the aging problem. Programs have been established to identify the current condition and degradation mechanisms of critical components, the failure of which would impact negatively on station competitiveness and safety. These include subcomponents under the general headings of reactor components, civil structures, piping (nuclear and conventional), steam generators, turbines and cables. In support of these efforts, R and D projects have been defined under the CANDU Owners Group to deal with generic issues on aging common to its members (e.g., investigation of degradation mechanisms, development of tools and techniques to mitigate the effects of aging, etc.). This paper describes recent developments of this cost-shared program with specific reference to concrete aging and crack repairs, flow-assisted corrosion in piping, elastomer service life, cable aging, degradation mechanisms in steam generators and lubricant breakdown. (author)

  9. Levelized nuclear fueling cost in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic nuclear fuel cycle mode options are discussed as they apply to PWR-type reactors. Forecast fueling costs have been computed and are reported for the two main choices - basic front-end cost supplemented by either a throw- away mode option or a reprocessing mode option. It is concluded that reprocessing could result in total unit fueling costs ranging from a minimum slightly lower, through a maximum about 30% higher than the total unit fueling cost using the throw-away mode option. Moreover, in massive breeder development the total unit fueling cost can extend even below the numerically calculated limit. (H.K.)

  10. Canada's national policy on the long-term management of nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear energy is an important part of Canada's diversified energy mix. There are 22 CANDU reactors in Canada located in the provinces of Ontario, New Brunswick, and Quebec. Like any other industry, nuclear fuel cycle operations produce some waste, and for this paper, we will focus on nuclear fuel waste, i.e., the irradiated fuel taken out of nuclear reactors at the end of their useful life. Canada has no plans to reprocess and recycle this used nuclear fuel, so current plans are based on direct long-term management. Although nuclear fuel wastes is currently in safe storage, steps are now underway to develop and proceed effectively with the implementation of long-term management solutions. A cornerstone of Canada's approach to addressing radioactive waste management is the Government of Canada's 1996 Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste, which has set general policy for dealing with a all radioactive waste from the nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel waste, low level radioactive waste, and uranium mine and mill waste). The Framework clearly indicates that the federal government will ensure safe, environmentally sound, comprehensive, cost-effective and integrated waste management, including disposal; that it will develop policy, regulate and oversee the waste owners to ensure compliance with legal and financial requirement in accordance with approved disposal plans; and that the waste owners are responsible for the funding, organization, management and operation of long term management, including disposal, facilities. With respect to the long-term management of nuclear fuel waste, a deep geological disposal concept was developed by the federal crown corporation Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and Ontario Hydro, and, in October 1988, it was referred by the government for review by an independent Federal Environmental Assessment Panel. AECL submitted the Environmental Impact Statement to the Panel in 1994. The Panel reported its conclusions and

  11. Cost and schedule reduction for next-generation Candu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has developed a suite of technologies for CanduR reactors that enable the next step in the evolution of the Candu family of heavy-water-moderated fuel-channel reactors. These technologies have been combined in the design for the Advanced Candu Reactor TM1 (ACRTM), AECL's next generation Candu power plant. The ACR design builds extensively on the existing Candu experience base, but includes innovations, in design and in delivery technology, that provide very substantial reductions in capital cost and in project schedules. In this paper, main features of next generation design and delivery are summarized, to provide the background basis for the cost and schedule reductions that have been achieved. In particular the paper outlines the impact of the innovative design steps for ACR: - Selection of slightly enriched fuel bundle design; - Use of light water coolant in place of traditional Candu heavy water coolant; - Compact core design with unique reactor physics benefits; - Optimized coolant and turbine system conditions. In addition to the direct cost benefits arising from efficiency improvement, and from the reduction in heavy water, the next generation Candu configuration results in numerous additional indirect cost benefits, including: - Reduction in number and complexity of reactivity mechanisms; - Reduction in number of heavy water auxiliary systems; - Simplification in heat transport and its support systems; - Simplified human-machine interface. The paper also describes the ACR approach to design for constructability. The application of module assembly and open-top construction techniques, based on Candu and other worldwide experience, has been proven to generate savings in both schedule durations and overall project cost, by reducing premium on-site activities, and by improving efficiency of system and subsystem assembly. AECL's up-to-date experience in the use of 3-D CADDS and related engineering tools has also been proven to reduce both engineering and

  12. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as...

  13. Survey of considerations involved in introducing CANDU reactors into the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C E; Bohn, E M; Chang, Y I; van Erp, J B

    1977-01-01

    The important issues that must be considered in a decision to utilize CANDU reactors in the U.S. are identified in this report. Economic considerations, including both power costs and fuel utilization, are discussed for the near and longer term. Safety and licensing considerations are reviewed for CANDU-PHW reactors in general. The important issues, now and in the future, associated with power generation costs are the capital costs of CANDUs and the factors that impact capital cost comparisons. Fuel utilization advantages for the CANDU depend upon assumptions regarding fuel recycle at present, but the primary issue in the longer term is the utilization of the thorium cycle in the CANDU. Certain safety features of the CANDU are identified as intrinsic to the concept and these features must be examined more fully regarding licensability in the U.S.

  14. Methodology Improvement of Reactor Physics Codes for CANDU Channels Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Hyun; Choi, Geun Suk; Win, Naing; Aung, Tharndaing; Baek, Min Ho; Lim, Jae Yong [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    As the operational time increase, pressure tubes and calandria tubes in CANDU core encounter inevitably a geometrical deformation along the tube length. A pressure tube may be sagged downward within a calandria tube by creep from irradiation. This event can bring about a problem that is serious in integrity of pressure tube. A measurement of deflection state of in-service pressure tube is, therefore, very important for the safety of CANDU reactor. In this paper, evaluation of impacts on nuclear characteristic due to fuel channel deformation were aimed in order to improve nuclear design tools for concerning the local effects from abnormal deformations. It was known that sagged pressure tube can cause the eccentric configuration of fuel bundles in pressure tube by O.6cm maximum. In this case, adverse pin power distribution and reactivity balance can affect reactor safety under normal and accidental condition. Thermal and radiation-induced creep in pressure tube would expand a tube size. It was known that maximum expansion may be 5% in volume. In this case, more coolant make more moderation in the deformed channel resulting in the increase of reactivity. Sagging of pressure tube did not cause considerable change in K-inf values. However, expansion of the pressure tube made relatively large change in K-inf. Modeling of eccentric and enlarged configuration is not easy in preparation of input geometry at both HELlOS and MCNP. On the other hand, there is no way to consider this deformation in one-dimensional homogenization tool such as WIMS code. The way of handling this deformation was suggested as the correction method of expansion effect by adjusting the number density of coolant. The number density of heavy water coolant was set to be increased as the rate of expansion increase. This correction was done in the intact channel without changing geometry. It was found that this correction was very effective in the prediction of K-inf values. In this study, further

  15. Spacer for fuel rods in nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spacers for fuel rods in nuclear reactor fuel elements are described, especially for use aboard ships. Spacers are used in a grid formed by web plates orthogonally intersecting and assembled together in a tooth-comb fashion forming a plurality of channels. The web plates are joined together and each of the web plates includes apertures through which resilient and separator members are joined. The resilient and separator members are joined. The resilient and separator members are in adjacent channels and with other similar members in the same channel, contact a fuel rod in the channel. The contact pressure between the members and fuel rod is radially directed

  16. Nuclear spent fuel management. Experience and options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel can be stored safely for long periods at relatively low cost, but some form of permanent disposal will eventually be necessary. This report examines the options for spent fuel management, explores the future prospects for each stage of the back-end of the fuel cycle and provides a thorough review of past experience and the technical status of the alternatives. Current policies and practices in twelve OECD countries are surveyed

  17. A study to develop the domestic functional requirements of the specific safety systems of CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Woong; Lee, Jae Young; Bang, Kwang Hyun [Handong Global Univ., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2001-03-15

    The present research has been made to develop and review critically the functional requirements of the specific safety systems of CANDU such as SOS-1, SOS-2, ECCS and containment. Based on R documents for this, a systematic study was made to develop the domestic regulation statements. Also, the conventional laws are carefully reviewed to see the compatibility to CANDU. Also, the safety assessment method for CANDU was studied by reviewing C documents and recommendation of IAEA. Through the present works, the vague policy in the CANDU safety regulation is cleaning up in a systematic form and a new frame to measure the objective risk of nuclear power plants was developed.

  18. A study to develop the domestic functional requirements of the specific safety systems of CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Park, Kun Chul [Handong Global Univ., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2003-03-15

    The present research has been made to develop and review critically the functional requirements of the specific safety systems of CANDU such as SDS-1, SDS2, ECCS, and containment. Based on R documents for this, a systematic study was made to develop the domestic regulation statements. Also, the conventional laws are carefully reviewed to see the compatibility to CANDU. Also, the safety assessment method for CANDU was studied by reviewing C documents and recommendation of IAEA. Through the present works, the vague policy in the CANDU safety regulation is cleaning up in a systematic form and a new frame to measure the objective risk of nuclear power plants was developed.

  19. Assessment of LOCA with loss of class IV power for CANDU-6 reactors using RELAP-CANDU/SCAN coupled code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, there is an effort to improve the accuracy and reality in the transient simulation of nuclear power plants. In the prediction of the system transient, the system code simulates the system transient using the power transient curve predicted from the reactor core physics code. However, the pre-calculated power curve could not adequately predict the behavior of power distribution during transient since the coolant density change has influence on the power shape due to the change of the void reactivity. Therefore, the consolidation between the reactor core physics code and the system thermal-hydraulic code takes into consideration to predict more accurate and realistic for the transient simulation. In this regard, there are two codes are developed to assess the safety of CANDU reactor. RELAP-CANDU is a thermal-hydraulic system code for CANDU reactors developed on the basis of RELAP5/MOD3 in such a way to modify inside model for simulating the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of horizontal type reactors. SCAN (SNU CANDU-PHWR Neutronics) is a three dimensional neutronics nodal code to simulate the core physics characteristics for CANDU reactors. To couple SCAN code with RELAP-CANDU code, SCAN code was improved as a spatial kinetics calculation module in such a way to generate a SCAN DLL (dynamic linked library version of SCAN). The coupled code system, RELAP-CANDU/SCAN, enables real-time feedback calculations between thermal-hydraulic variables of RELAP-CANDU and reactor powers of SCAN. To verify the reliability of RELAP-CANDU/SCAN coupled code system, an assessment of 40% reactor inlet header (RIH) break loss of coolant accident (LOCA) with loss of Class IV power (LOP) for Wolsong Unit 2 conducted using RELAP/CANDU-SCAN coupled system. The LOCA with LOP is one of GAI (Generic Action Items) for CANDU reactors issued by CNSC (Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission) and IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency)

  20. Fuels for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuels for advanced nuclear reactors differ greatly from conventional light water reactor fuels and vary widely between the different concepts, due differences in reactor architecture and deployment. Functional requirements of all fuel designs include (1) retention of fission products and fuel nuclides, (2) dimensional stability, and (3) maintaining a coolable geometry. In all cases, the anticipated fuel performance under normal or off-normal conditions is the limiting factor in reactor system design, and cumulative effects of increased exposure to higher burnup degrades fuel performance. In high-temperature (thermal) gas reactor systems, fuel particles of uranium dioxide or uranium oxycarbide particles are coated with layers of carbon and SiC (or ZrC). Such fuels have been used successfully to very high burnup (10-20% of heavy-metal atoms) and can withstand transient temperatures up to 1600 C. Oxide (pellet-type) and metal (pin-type) fuels clad in stainless steel tubes have been successfully used in liquid metal cooled fast reactors, attaining burnup of 20% or more of heavy-metal atoms. Those fuel designs are being adapted for actinide management missions, requiring greater contents of minor actinides (e.g. Am, Np, Cm). The current status of each fuel system is reviewed and technical challenges confronting the implementation of each fuel in the context of the entire advanced reactor fuel cycle (fabrication, reactor performance, recycle) are discussed

  1. Waste management and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present lecture deals with energy needs and nuclear power, the importance of waste and its relative place in the fuel cycle, the games of controversies over nuclear waste in the strategies of energy and finally with missions and functions of the IAEA for privileging the rational approach and facilitating the transfer of technology. (RW)

  2. Basic research and industrialization of CANDU advanced fuel - Effect of transverse convex curvature on boiling heat transfer and ONB point of nucleate fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Chun; Lee, Young; Lee, Sung Hong [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    Recently, the effect of convex curvature on heat transfer should not be ignored when the radius of curvature tends to be small and/or associated with high heat transfer rate cases. Both analytical and experimental studies were performed to prove the effect of transverse convex curvature on the boiling heat transfer in concentric annuli flows. The effect of the transverse convex surface curvature on ONB are studied analytically in the case of reactor and evaporator. It is seen that the inner wall heat flux depends on R/sub i/, Rc, Re, Pr, {alpha}, and the {theta} of working fluid. An experimental study on the incipience of nucleate boiling is performed as a verification ad extension of previous analyses. Through flow visualization, the results show that the most dominant parameter to affect the heat flux at ONB is found to be the surface curvature. The heat flux data at ONB increases with the Re and the subcooling, and the effect of subcooling on ONB becomes smaller with decreasing Re. The heat flux at ONB increases rapidly as increase in {alpha} due to higher convective motion of bulk flow. Comparison between both results are accomplished with respect to the relative enhancement due to the convex curvature. The relative heat transfer enhancement ratio shows a good agreement between theory and experiment qualitatively and quantitatively. In conclusion, the obtained results suggest that the effect transverse convex curvature appears significantly in the boiling heat transfer. Therefore, it can be clearly expected that the effect should be more strong at the case of critical heat flux condition which is the most important design goal of the advanced nuclear fuel rods. 30 refs., 78 figs. (Author)

  3. Integrated spent nuclear fuel database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Distributed Information Systems software Unit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has designed and developed an Integrated Spent Nuclear Fuel Database System (ISNFDS), which maintains a computerized inventory of all US Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Commercial SNF is not included in the ISNFDS unless it is owned or stored by DOE. The ISNFDS is an integrated, single data source containing accurate, traceable, and consistent data and provides extensive data for each fuel, extensive facility data for every facility, and numerous data reports and queries

  4. Long term wet spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting showed that there is continuing confidence in the use of wet storage for spent nuclear fuel and that long-term wet storage of fuel clad in zirconium alloys can be readily achieved. The importance of maintaining good water chemistry has been identified. The long-term wet storage behaviour of sensitized stainless steel clad fuel involves, as yet, some uncertainties. However, great reliance will be placed on long-term wet storage of spent fuel into the future. The following topics were treated to some extent: Oxidation of the external surface of fuel clad, rod consolidation, radiation protection, optimum methods of treating spent fuel storage water, physical radiation effects, and the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies of long-term wet storage conditions. A number of papers on national experience are included

  5. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

    2014-04-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel • A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension • Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR • New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel • Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions • Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and • An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  6. Vertical integration in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertical integration in the nuclear fuel cycle and its contribution to market power of integrated fuel suppliers were studied. The industry subdivision analyzed is the uranium raw materials sector. The hypotheses demonstrated are that (1) this sector of the industry is trending toward vertical integration between production of uranium raw materials and the manufacture of nuclear fuel elements, and (2) this vertical integration confers upon integrated firms a significant market advantage over non-integrated fuel manufacturers. Under microeconomic concepts the rationale for vertical integration is the pursuit of efficiency, and it is beneficial because it increases physical output and decreases price. The Market Advantage Model developed is an arithmetical statement of the relative market power (in terms of price) between non-integrated nuclear fuel manufacturers and integrated raw material/fuel suppliers, based on the concept of the ''squeeze.'' In operation, the model compares net profit and return on sales of nuclear fuel elements between the competitors, under different price and cost circumstances. The model shows that, if integrated and non-integrated competitors sell their final product at identical prices, the non-integrated manufacturer returns a net profit only 17% of the integrated firm. Also, the integrated supplier can price his product 35% below the non-integrated producer's price and still return the same net profit. Vertical integration confers a definite market advantage to the integrated supplier, and the basic source of that advantage is the cost-price differential of the raw material, uranium

  7. Heavy water cycle in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen atom has two isotopes: deuterium 1H2 and tritium 1H3. The deuterium oxide D2O is called heavy water due to its density of 1105.2 Kg/m3. Another important physical property of the heavy water is the low neutron capture section, suitable to moderate the neutrons into natural uranium fission reactor as CANDU. Due to the fact that into this reactor the fuel is cooled into the pressure tubes surrounded by a moderator, the usage of D2O as primary heat transport (PHT) agent is mandatory. Therefore a large amount of heavy water (approx. 500 tons) is used in a CANDU reactor. Being a costly resource - it represents 20% of the initial plant capital cost, D2O management is required to preserve it. (author)

  8. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Real Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Havlíček

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this paper describes the nuclear fuel cycle. It is divided into three parts. The first part, called Front-End, covers all activities connected with fuel procurement and fabrication. The middle part of the cycle includes fuel reload design activities and the operation of the fuel in the reactor. Back-End comprises all activities ensuring safe separation of spent fuel and radioactive waste from the environment. The individual stages of the fuel cycle are strongly interrelated. Overall economic optimization is very difficult. Generally, NPV is used for an economic evaluation in the nuclear fuel cycle. However the high volatility of uranium prices in the Front-End, and the large uncertainty of both economic and technical parameters in the Back-End, make the use of NPV difficult. The real option method is able to evaluate the value added by flexibility of decision making by a company under conditions of uncertainty. The possibility of applying this method to the nuclear fuel cycle evaluation is studied. 

  9. Significant incidents in nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast to nuclear power plants, events in nuclear fuel cycle facilities are not well documented. The INES database covers all the nuclear fuel cycle facilities; however, it was developed in the early 1990s and does not contain information on events prior to that. The purpose of the present report is to collect significant events and analyze them in order to give a safety related overview of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Significant incidents were selected using the following criteria: release of radioactive material or exposure to radiation; degradation of items important to safety; and deficiencies in design, quality assurance, etc. which include criticality incidents, fire, explosion, radioactive release and contamination. This report includes an explanation, where possible, of root causes, lessons learned and action taken. 4 refs, 4 tabs

  10. Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    The book presented is designed to function both as a text for first-year graduate courses in nuclear materials and as a reference for workers involved in the materials design and performance aspects of nuclear power plants. The contents are arranged under the following chapter headings: statistical thermodynamics, thermal properties of solids, crystal structures, cohesive energy of solids, chemical equilibrium, point defects in solids, diffusion in solids, dislocations and grain boundaries, equation of state of UO/sub 2/, fuel element thermal performance, fuel chemistry, behavior of solid fission products in oxide fuel elements, swelling due to fission gases, pore migration and fuel restructuring kinetics, fission gas release, mechanical properties of UO/sub 2/, radiation damage, radiation effects in metals, interaction of sodium and stainless steel, modeling of the structural behavior of fuel elements and assemblies. (DG)

  11. Discovery and design of nuclear fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Stan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate the discovery and design of innovative nuclear fuels, multi-scale models and simulations are used to predict irradiation effects on properties such as thermal conductivity, oxygen diffusivity, and thermal expansion. The multi-scale approach is illustrated using results on ceramic fuels, with a focus on predictions of point defect concentration, stoichiometry, and phase stability. The high performance computer simulations include coupled heat transport, diffusion, and thermal expansion, and gas bubble formation and evolution in a fuel element consisting of UO2 fuel and metallic cladding. The second part of the paper is dedicated to a discussion of an international strategy for developing advanced, innovative nuclear fuels. Four initiatives are proposed to accelerate the discovery and design of new materials: (a Create Institutes for Materials Discovery and Design, (b Create an International Knowledgebase for experimental data, models (mathematical expressions, and simulations (codes, (c Improve education and (d Set up international collaborations.

  12. Identification of unknown nuclear material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaou, G. [University of Thrace, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Laboratory of Nuclear Technology, Kimmerria Campus, 67100 Xanthi (Greece)

    2010-07-01

    Aim: provenance determination of unknown nuclear material: - demonstrated for spent nuclear fuel; - information sought for unknown: fuel type, reactor type where fuel was irradiated, final burnup; Using an isotopic finger-printing method: - U, Pu or Pu isotopics or fission products; - simulations of fuel evolution during irradiation, using ORIGEN; - multivariate statistical tools. Fuel considered: simulated commercial spent fuel for a range of burnups: - PWR UO{sub 2} 3.1% and 3.5% {sup 235}U, - PWR thermal MOX, - BWR UO{sub 2} 3.2% {sup 235}U, - CANDU-N natural U, - CANDU-S UO{sub 2} 3.2% {sup 235}U, - fast Reactor MOX; simulated commercial spent fuel for a range of burnups: - PWR UO{sub 2} 3.1% and 3.5% {sup 235}U, - PWR thermal MOX, - BWR UO{sub 2} 3.2% {sup 235}U, - CANDU-N natural U, - CANDU-S UO{sub 2} 3.2% {sup 235}U, - fast Reactor MOX; 'unknown' spent fuel: - PWR 1: UO{sub 2} 3.1% {sup 235}U (26 GWd/t), - PWR 2: UO{sub 2} 3.1% {sup 235}U (32 GWd/t). Procedures: U, Pu or Pu isotopic compositions or fission products: - isotopic composition of unknown spent fuel, - simulated for commercial spent fuel from a range of nuclear power reactors {yields} comparison of compositions through factor analysis {yields} unknown has the provenance of the commercial spent fuel with which it exhibits the most similar composition. In conclusion: different reactor-fuel types well resolved; fuel and reactor type accurately predicted; burnup predicted to within 5% of declared; different reactor-fuel types. (authors)

  13. Fuel element for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to avoid a can box or an adjacent fuel element sitting on the spacer of a fuel element in the corner during assembly, the top and bottom edges of the outer bars of the spacers are provided with deflector bars, which have projections projecting beyond the outside of the outer bars. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH

  15. Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

    2012-05-01

    The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

  16. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayer, J E; Clark, A T; Loysen, P; Ballinger, M Y; Mishima, J; Owczarski, P C; Gregory, W S; Nichols, B D

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH.

  17. Nuclear energy; Le nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  18. Waste Stream Analyses for Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. R. Soelberg

    2010-08-01

    A high-level study was performed in Fiscal Year 2009 for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) to provide information for a range of nuclear fuel cycle options (Wigeland 2009). At that time, some fuel cycle options could not be adequately evaluated since they were not well defined and lacked sufficient information. As a result, five families of these fuel cycle options are being studied during Fiscal Year 2010 by the Systems Analysis Campaign for the DOE NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program. The quality and completeness of data available to date for the fuel cycle options is insufficient to perform quantitative radioactive waste analyses using recommended metrics. This study has been limited thus far to qualitative analyses of waste streams from the candidate fuel cycle options, because quantitative data for wastes from the front end, fuel fabrication, reactor core structure, and used fuel for these options is generally not yet available.

  19. Panorama 2010: Nuclear fuel resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abundance of projects to build nuclear power plants, the desire of new countries to acquire civil atomic power, contracts sometimes deemed fantastically high for the operation of uranium mines, etc. All of these signals indicate a return to nuclear power in a context dominated by the fight against global warming. But can nuclear power make a durable contribution to the effort to meet the ever-increasing demand for energy? (author)

  20. Development of the advanced CANDU technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, Soo Dong; Min, Byung Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Na, Y. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Choi, J. H.; Lee, B. C.; Kim, S. N.; Jo, C. H.; Paik, J. S.; On, M. R.; Park, H. S.; Kim, S. R. [Korea Electric Power Co., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the advanced design technology to improve safety, operability and economy and to develop and advanced safety evaluation system. More realistic and reasonable methodology and modeling was employed to improve safety margin in containment analysis. Various efforts have been made to verify the CATHENA code which is the major safety analysis code for CANDU PHWR system. Fully computerized prototype ECCS was developed. The feasibility study and conceptual design of the distributed digital control system have been performed as well. The core characteristics of advanced fuel cycle, fuel management and power upgrade have been studied to determine the advanced core. (author). 77 refs., 51 tabs., 108 figs.

  1. Advancing CANDU experience to the world steam generator market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tube degradation in certain recirculating nuclear steam generators has provided a market for steam generator replacement. Prior to this need, B and W supplied over 200 steam generators for CANDU nuclear plants. With this experience, and implementing extensive research and development improvements in material selection, design enhancements, and new manufacturing and analytical methods, B and W has supplied or secured orders for the replacement of 26 steam generators. Along with plans for new replacement orders, B and W will continue to supply steam generators for future CANDU plants. This paper will review the progression of B and W's CANDU experience to meet the replacement steam generator market, and examine the continuous improvements required for today's increasingly demanding nuclear specifications. (author). 1 tab., 4 figs

  2. Innovative Nuclear Fuels: Results and Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials discovery involves exploring and identifying existing (natural) materials with desirable properties and functionality. Materials design aims at creating new (artificial) materials with predefined properties and functionality. Nuclear fuels are often developed using both methods, with a certain advantage given to discovery. To facilitate the discovery and design of innovative nuclear fuels, multi-scale models and simulations are used to predict irradiation effects on the thermal conductivity, oxygen diffusivity, and thermal expansion of oxide fuels. The scientific method used in this approach covers a large spectrum of time and space scales, from electronic structure to atomistic levels, through meso-scale and all the way to continuum phenomena. The multi-scale approach is illustrated using results on UO2/PuO2 fuels with a focus on predictions of point defect concentrations, stoichiometry, and phase stability. The high performance computer simulations include coupled heat transport, diffusion, and thermal expansion, gas bubble formation and temperature evolution in a fuel element consisting of UO2 fuel and metallic cladding. Uncertainty evaluation reveals that ignoring the composition dependence of fuel properties in the simulations can lead to large errors (>100 k) in the calculations of the centerline temperature. The second part of the talk is dedicated to a discussion of an international strategy for developing advanced, innovative nuclear fuels. It starts with a brief review of the international status of nuclear fuels research, including results from American, European, and Japanese national laboratories and universities. In an effort to improve collaborative work, the status of thermo-chemical databases is used as an example of outstanding opportunities and exciting scientific programs that require better synchronization to advance the research and to avoid excessive redundancy. The presentation ends with a discussion of existing and emerging

  3. Speciation of iodine (I-127) in the natural environment around Canadian CANDU sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, S.J.; Kotzer, T.G.; Chant, L.A

    2001-06-01

    In Canada, very little data is available regarding the concentrations and chemical speciation of iodine in the environment proximal and distal to CANDU Nuclear Power Generating Stations (NPGS). In the immediate vicinity of CANDU reactors, the short-lived iodine isotope {sup 131}I (t{sub 1/2} = 8.04 d), which is produced from fission reactions, is generally below detection and yields little information about the environmental cycling of iodine. Conversely, the fission product {sup 129}I has a long half-life (t{sub 1/2} = 1.57x10{sup 7} y) and has had other anthropogenic inputs (weapons testing, nuclear fuel reprocessing) other than CANDU over the past 50 years. As a result, the concentrations of stable iodine ({sup 127}I) have been used as a proxy. In this study, a sampling system was developed and tested at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to collect and measure the particulate and gaseous inorganic and organic fractions of stable iodine ({sup 127}I) in air and associated organic and inorganic reservoirs. Air, vegetation and soil samples were collected at CRL, and at Canadian CANDU Nuclear Power Generating Stations (NPGS) at OPG's (Ontario Power Generation) Pickering (PNGS) and Darlington NPGS (DNGS) in Ontario, as well as at NB Power's Pt. Lepreau NPGS in New Brunswick. The concentrations of particulate and inorganic iodine in air at CRL were extremely low, and were often found to be below detection. The concentrations are believed to be at this level because the sediments in the CRL area are glacial fluvial and devoid of marine ionic species, and the local atmospheric conditions at the sampling site are very humid. Concentrations of a gaseous organic species were comparable to worldwide levels. The concentrations of particulate and inorganic iodine in air were also found to be low at PNGS and DNGS, which may be attributed to reservoir effects of the large freshwater lakes in southern Ontario, which might serve to dilute the atmospheric iodine

  4. International nuclear fuel cycle evaluation (INFCE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study describes and analyzes the structures, the procedures and decision making processes of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE). INFCE was agreed by the Organizing Conference to be a technical and analytical study and not a negotiation. The results were to be transmitted to governments for their consideration in developing their nuclear energy policies and in international discussions concerning nuclear energy cooperation and related controls and safeguards. Thus INFCE provided a unique example for decision making by consensus in the nuclear world. It was carried through under mutual respect for each country's choices and decisions, without jeopardizing their respective fuel cycle policies or international co-operation agreements and contracts for the peaceful use of nuclear energy, provided that agreed safeguards are applied. (orig.)

  5. Assessment and balancing of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1981 nuclear energy had a share of ca. 17% in the electric power supply of the F.R. of Germany. The amount of nuclear fuels required is equal to ca. 15 million tce. In public technical discussions the economic importance which must be assigned to nuclear energy, e.g. with regard to curbing the energy price development or relieving our balance of payments, is discussed in detail. On the other hand, a number of industrial aspects of nuclear energy utilization - problems of commercial or fiscal law - have been little considered in the technical literature. The following contribution is to present the principles of commercial and fiscal law which have taken shape in connection with the assessment and balancing of the single stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. (orig./UA)

  6. A review of CANDU plant lifetime management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, plant lifetime management(PLIM) including life extension has become the focus of the nuclear industry worldwide due to a number of factors which have arisen over the past decade : new siting difficulties, imbalance of power supply and demand, and high construction costs. In order to solve the problems, the PLIM program is being developed for the purpose of life extension and improvement of plant availability and safety. This paper describes the current activities and prospects of AECL and CANDU utilities, the conceptional evaluation results for the degradation mechanisms, and PLIM regulatory aspects. In addition, this paper provides the applicability of CANDU PLIM to Wolsong Unit 1 which has been operated for 17 years

  7. Proceedings of the seventeenth annual Canadian Nuclear Society conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventeenth annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, presented in Fredericton, New Brunswick. The conference includes papers on general topics of interest on the nuclear community, waste management and the environment, instrumentation and design of Candu reactors, safety analysis, thermal hydraulics, fuel channels, plant operations and in-core instrumentation

  8. Sustaining nuclear fuel science and technology base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To fulfil energy demand, the Indonesian Government has made efforts to optimize the use of various-fossil and non fossil-potential energy resources in synergy (energy mix), which is stated in national energy policy. According to national energy policy, Indonesia is going to use nuclear energy for electricity supply, and up to 2025, the use of nuclear energy is projected at about 2% of the total primary energy or 4 to 5% of the national electricity supply. This energy demand is described in NPP road map, which consists of NPP preparation, construction and operation up to 2025. To sustain the activity of nuclear power plants, the continuity of nuclear reactor fuel supply is an absolute necessity; therefore, it will become industrially prospective and have an effect on national industries. As a nuclear research center and guidance in nuclear energy system in Indonesia, Batan also plays a role to promote this prospect and to increase the national content at NPP construction. In this point of view, Batan should have the competency especially in nuclear fuel cycle technology, and in this case PTBN is viewed as the competent center since PTBN's main task is to conduct the development of Nuclear Fuel Technology. This competency is performed as mastering its science and technology base. In this case, PTBN is noticed to have the capability to function suitably since PTBN is equipped with documents for fuel fabrication industry such as bidding, construction and commissioning and qualified man power. Basically, PTBN does not have the mandatory to operate nuclear fuel fabrication commercially. However, PTBN has the capability to prepare competent man power through training and coaching in nuclear fuel fabrication. In fact, the present condition shows that some of the equipments does not function properly or are not utilized optimally or are not operable. Besides, the process documents available have not yet validated and qualified, and the man power is not qualified yet

  9. CANDU Safety R&D Status, Challenges, and Prospects in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In Canada, safe operation of CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium; it is a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited reactors is supported by a full-scope program of nuclear safety research and development (R&D in key technical areas. Key nuclear R&D programs, facilities, and expertise are maintained in order to address the unique features of the CANDU as well as generic technology areas common to CANDU and LWR (light water reactor. This paper presents an overview of the CANDU safety R&D which includes background, drivers, current status, challenges, and future directions. This overview of the Canadian nuclear safety R&D programs includes those currently conducted by the COG (CANDU Owners Group, AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Candu Energy Inc., and the CNSC (Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and by universities via UNENE (University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering sponsorship. In particular, the nuclear safety R&D program related to the emerging CANDU ageing issues is discussed. The paper concludes by identifying directions for the future nuclear safety R&D.

  10. A neutronic study of the cycle PWR-CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alberto da; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora Fortini; Fortini, Angela; Pinheiro, Ricardo Brant [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: albertomoc@terra.com.br; claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br; dora@nuclear.ufmg.br; fortini@nuclear.ufmg.br; rbp@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2007-07-01

    The cycle PWR-CANDU was simulated using the WIMSD-5B and ORIGEN2.1 codes. It was simulated a fuel burnup of 33,000 MWd/t for UO{sub 2} with enrichment of 3.2% and a fuel extended burnup of 45,000 MWd/t for UO{sub 2} with enrichments of 3.5%, 4.0% and 5.0% in a PWR reactor. The PWR discharged fuel was submitted to the simulation of deposition for five years. After that, it was submitted to AYROX reprocessing and used to produce a fuel to CANDU reactor. Then, it was simulated the burnup in the CANDU. Parameters such as infinite medium multiplication factor, k{sub inf}, fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity, {alpha}{sub TF}, moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity, {alpha}{sub TM}, the ratio rapid flux/total flux and the isotopic composition in the begin and the end of life were evaluated. The results showed that the fuels analyzed could be used on PWR and CANDU reactors without the need of change on the design of these reactors. (author)

  11. MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

    1960-01-01

    Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

  12. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly with fuel rod removal means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly is described for a nuclear reactor. The assembly has a bottom nozzle, at least one longitudinally extending control rod guide thimble attached to and projecting upwardly from the bottom nozzle and transverse grids spaced along the thimble. An organized array of elongated fuel rods are transversely spaced and supported by the grids and axially captured between the bottom nozzle and a top nozzle. The assembly comprises: (a) a transversely extending adapter plate formed by an arrangement of integral cross-laced ligaments defining a plurality of coolant flow openings; (b) means for mounting the adapter plate on an upper end portion of the thimble and spaced axially above and disposed transversely over the upper ends of all of the fuel rods present in the fuel assembly such that ones of the ligaments overlie corresponding ones of the fuel rods so as to prevent the fuel rods from moving upwardly through the coolant flow openings; and (c) removable plug means confined within the adapter plate and positioned over and spaced axially above selected ones of the fuel rods in providing access to at least one fuel rod for removal thereof upwardly through the axially spaced adapter plate without removing the top nozzle from the fuel assembly

  13. Human factors issues in fuel handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The staff of the Atomic Energy Control Board wish to further their understanding of human factors issues of potential concern associated with fuel handling in CANDU nuclear power stations. This study contributes to that objective by analysing the role of human performance in the overall fuel handling process at Ontario Hydro's Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, and reporting findings in several areas. A number of issues are identified in the areas of design, operating and maintenance practices, and the organizational and management environment

  14. Uranium to Electricity: The Chemistry of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settle, Frank A.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a series of industrial processes that produce fuel for the production of electricity in nuclear reactors, use the fuel to generate electricity, and subsequently manage the spent reactor fuel. While the physics and engineering of controlled fission are central to the generation of nuclear power, chemistry…

  15. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors -Development of DUPIC fuel on manufacturing and quality control technology-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Yung Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    Oxidation/reduction process was established after analysis of the effect of process parameter on the sintering behavior using SIMFUEL. Process equipment was studied more detail and some of process equipment items were designed and procured. The chemical analysing method of fission products and fissile content in DUPIC fuel was studied and the behavior and the characteristics of fission products in fuel was also done. Requirement for irradiation in HANARO was analysed to prepare performance evaluation. 100 figs, 48 tabs, 170 refs. (Author).

  16. Intelligent Automated Nuclear Fuel Pellet Inspection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time, nuclear pellet inspection is performed manually using naked eyes for judgment and decisionmaking on accepting or rejecting pellets. This current practice of pellet inspection is tedious and subject to inconsistencies and error. Furthermore, unnecessary re-fabrication of pellets is costly and the presence of low quality pellets in a fuel assembly is unacceptable. To improve the quality control in nuclear fuel fabrication plants, an automated pellet inspection system based on advanced techniques is needed. Such a system addresses the following concerns of the current manual inspection method: (1) the reliability of inspection due to typical human errors, (2) radiation exposure to the workers, and (3) speed of inspection and its economical impact. The goal of this research is to develop an automated nuclear fuel pellet inspection system which is based on pellet video (photographic) images and uses artificial intelligence techniques

  17. Nuclear fuel element having oxidation resistant cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes an improved nuclear fuel element of the type including a zirconium alloy tube, a zirconium barrier layer metallurgically bonded to the inside surface of the alloy tube, and a central core of nuclear fuel material partially filling the inside of the tube so as to leave a gap between the sponge zirconium barrier and the nuclear fuel material. The improvement comprising an alloy layer formed on the inside surface of the zirconium barrier layer. The alloy layer being composed of one or more impurities present in a thin layer region of the zirconium barrier in amounts less than 1% by weight but sufficient to inhibit the oxidation of the inside surface of the zirconium barrier layer without substantially affecting the plastic properties of the barrier layer, wherein the impurities are selected from the group consisting of iron, chromium, copper, nitrogen, and niobium

  18. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1992-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  19. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1988-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source or information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

  20. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is a consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users

  1. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I W; Mitchell, S J

    1990-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops, etc. The data listed do not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  2. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops, etc. The data listed do not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information

  3. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source or information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users

  4. Leaf spring puller for nuclear fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogg, J.L.

    1981-11-03

    A fuel rod puller in the form of a collet for pulling fuel rods from a storage area into grids of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. The rod puller moves longitudinally through the grids to a storage area where projections on the end of leaf springs grasp onto an end plug in a fuel rod. Drive apparatus then pulls the rod puller and connected fuel rod from the storage area into the fuel assembly grids. The rod puller includes an outer tube having leaf springs on one end thereof in one modification, mounted within the outer tube is a movable plunger which acts to urge the leaf springs outwardly to a position to permit passing or with the end of a end plug. Upon withdrawal of the plunger, the leaf springs move into a groove formed in the end of a fuel rod end plug, and the fuel rod subsequently is pulled into the fuel assembly grids. In another modification, the leaf springs on the outer rod are biased in an outward direction and a longitudinally movable tube on the outer rod is moved in a direction to contract the leaf springs into a position where the projections thereof engage the groove formed in a fuel rod end plug.

  5. Nuclear fuel supply: challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowen, S. [Cameco Corp., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Prices of uranium, conversion services and enrichment services have all significantly increased in the last few years. These price increases have generally been driven by a tightening in the supply of these products and services, mostly due to long lead times required to bring these products and services to the market. This paper will describe the various steps in the nuclear fuel cycle for natural and enriched uranium fuel, will discuss the development of the front-end fuel cycle for low void reactivity fuel, and will address the challenges faced in the long-term supply of each component, particularly in the light of potential demand increases as a result of a nuclear renaissance. The opportunities for new capacity and uranium production will be outlined and the process required to achieve sufficient new supply will be discussed. (author)

  6. Options for treatment of legacy and advanced nuclear fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, Christopher John

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of advanced nuclear fuels is relevant to the stabilisation of legacy spent fuels or nuclear materials and fuels from future nuclear reactors. Historically, spent fuel reprocessing has been driven to recover uranium and plutonium for reuse. Future fuel cycles may also recover the minor actinides neptunium, americium and perhaps curium. These actinides would be fabricated into new reactor fuel to produce energy and for transmutation of the minor actinides. This has the potential t...

  7. Spent nuclear fuel project integrated schedule plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squires, K.G.

    1995-03-06

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrated Schedule Plan establishes the organizational responsibilities, rules for developing, maintain and status of the SNF integrated schedule, and an implementation plan for the integrated schedule. The mission of the SNFP on the Hanford site is to provide safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner which stages it to final disposition. This particularly involves K Basin fuel.

  8. A comparison of the void reactivity effect between the CANDU standard and CANDU-6 SEU-43 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a CANDU type reactor the void coefficient of the reactivity is positive. The experimental data are available only for fresh fuel in cold conditions. On the other hand, taking into account the reactivity effects induced by changes of the coolant properties is often difficult. The safety analyses require an estimation of the calculation error. A comparison between models is an usual approach to obtain detailed information. In our paper a heterogeneous multi-stratified coolant model is used both for the CANDU standard fuel assembly cell and CANDU SEU-43 cell concept. The coolant is treated as a two phase (liquid and vapors) medium gravitationally separated. The results are inter-compared for different burnups in the partial or total void cases. (authors)

  9. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel sintered product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To eliminate various restrictions in view of the production such as addition amount of organic additives and obtain sintered fuels of excellent burning property. Method: Metal oxide powder for use in nuclear fuels is selected from UO2 and Gd2O3. Further, organic material additives are selected from those constituted with carbon and at least one of nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen, such as succinic acid and maleic acid. Further, another metal oxide powder for use in nuclear fuels is selected from U3O8, (Gd,O)3O8 at a higher oxidized state than that of the previously mentioned metal oxide powder for use in nuclear fuels. These materials are mixed and molded into starting powder for nuclear fuels. Then, the molding products are sintered in a reducing atmosphere. It is thus possible to obtain normal fine structures by sintering in a usual reducing atmosphere while eliminating the restrictions for the addition amount of the organic additives or using no particular additive removing furnace. (T.M.)

  10. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Association 28. annual conference held in Winnipeg, Manitoba, June 12-15, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the 28. CNA (Canadian Nuclear Association) conference contain 28 papers under the following headings: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; and, applications of nuclear technology. CANDU reactors are emphasized. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  11. World nuclear fuel market. Seventeenth annual meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented at the seventeenth World Nuclear Fuels Market meeting are cataloged individually. This volume includes information on the following areas of interest: historical and current aspects of the uranium and plutonium market with respect to supply and demand, pricing, spot market purchasing, and other market phenomena; impact of reprocessing and recycling uranium, plutonium, and mixed oxide fuels; role of individual countries in the market: Hungary, Germany, the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, France, and the US; the impact of public opinion and radioactive waste management on the nuclear industry, and a debate regarding long term versus short term contracting by electric utilities for uranium and enrichment services

  12. Long island to Limerick, nuclear fuel transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The issue described is: how to move 33 shipments of radioactive nuclear fuel - 200 tons of enriched uranium pellets - on rail cars through the heart of Philadelphia, without upsetting politicians, the media and anti-nuclear activists, after a similar plan to move the fuel through New York City had been rejected in a political disaster. The answer to this is: Strategic Communications Planning. At PECO Energy's department of Corporate and Public Affairs, the research is quite clear that in risk management situations like this, the side that gets out front with the most credible information inevitably wins. That is exactly what was set out to do

  13. Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savrasov, Sergey [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Kotliar, Gabriel [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Haule, Kristjan [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-03

    The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

  14. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts...... of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as fabricated parts are included. The collection contains 158 neutron radiographs, reproduced on photographic paper...

  15. Chemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reprocessing of nuclear fuels from atomic power stations has a twofold goal. On the one hand it is serving for fuel supply by recovering the fissile materials which have not been consumed or which have been freshly generated in the reactor. On the other hand the radioactive waste products from nuclear power generation are pretreated for long-term safe disposal. The core element of the chemical processing is the PUREX Process, a counter-current solvent extraction procedure using tributyl phosphate (TBP) as the solvent for uranium and plutonium. The chemical basis and the technological performance of the process are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Seismic response of nuclear fuel assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlaváč Z.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with mathematical modelling and computer simulation of the seismic response of fuel assembly components. The seismic response is investigated by numerical integration method in time domain. The seismic excitation is given by two horizontal and one vertical synthetic accelerograms at the level of the pressure vessel seating. Dynamic response of the hexagonal type nuclear fuel assembly is caused by spatial motion of the support plates in the reactor core investigated on the reactor global model. The modal synthesis method with condensation is used for calculation of the fuel assembly component displacements and speeds on the level of the spacer grid cells.

  17. Nuclear fuel assembly identification using computer vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an improved method of remotely identifying irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies. The method uses existing in-cell TV cameras to input an image of the notch-coded top of the fuel assemblies into a computer vision system, which then produces the identifying number for that assembly. This system replaces systems that use either a mechanical mechanism to feel the notches or use human operators to locate notches visually. The system was developed for identifying fuel assemblies from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor, but could be used for other reactor assembly identification, as appropriate

  18. Options contracts in the nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses options trading in the nuclear fuels industry. Although there now exists no formal options market in the nuclear industry, flexibilities, or embedded options, are actually quite common in the long-term supply contracts. The value of these flexibilities can be estimated by applying the methods used to evaluate options. The method used is the Black-Scholes Model, and it is applied to a number of examples

  19. SOLID GAS SUSPENSION NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluderberg, D.C.; Ryon, J.W.

    1962-05-01

    A fuel assembly is designed for use in a gas-suspension cooled nuclear fuel reactor. The coolant fluid is an inert gas such as nitrogen or helium with particles such as carbon suspended therein. The fuel assembly is contained within an elongated pressure vessel extending down into the reactor. The fuel portion is at the lower end of the vessel and is constructed of cylindrical segments through which the coolant passes. Turbulence promotors within the passageways maintain the particles in agitation to increase its ability to transfer heat away from the outer walls. Shielding sections and alternating passageways above the fueled portion limit the escape of radiation out of the top of the vessel. (AEC)

  20. Equipment system for advanced nuclear fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the settlement of equipment system for nuclear Fuel Technology Development Facility(FTDF) is to build a seismic designed facility that can accommodate handling of nuclear materials including <20% enriched Uranium and produce HANARO fuel commercially, and also to establish the advanced common research equipment essential for the research on advanced fuel development. For this purpose, this research works were performed for the settlement of radiation protection system and facility special equipment for the FTDF, and the advanced common research equipment for the fuel fabrication and research. As a result, 11 kinds of radiation protection systems such as criticality detection and alarm system, 5 kinds of facility special equipment such as environmental pollution protection system and 5 kinds of common research equipment such as electron-beam welding machine were established. By the settlement of exclusive domestic facility for the research of advanced fuel, the fabrication and supply of HANARO fuel is possible and also can export KAERI-invented centrifugal dispersion fuel materials and its technology to the nations having research reactors in operation. For the future, the utilization of the facility will be expanded to universities, industries and other research institutes

  1. Nuclear policies: fuel without the bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The essays, developed from studies conducted by the California seminar on arms control and foreign policy, address technical, political, and economic aspects of nonproliferation. How to halt nuclear proliferation commands worldwide attention today. The search for new energy resources by industrial as well as nonindustral nations has led to the spread of nuclear technology and the production of weapons grade fuel materials such as plutonium and enriched uranium in the name of energy independence. The background and consequences of this growing danger and possible solutions to it are the substance of the essays. Conceding the desirability (if not necessity) of developing nuclear power as an energy source, the writers focus on the different reactor technologies; an historical perspective of proliferation through the example of India; the rationales for stringent international monitoring; and finally, the link between proliferation and the spread of nuclear weapons. The chapters are: Nuclear technology: essential elements for decisionmakers, Robert Gillette; Must we decide now for worldwide commerce in plutonium fuel, Albert Wohlstetter; US peaceful aid and the Indian bomb, Roberta Wohlstetter; International discipline over the uses of nuclear energy, Victor Gilinsky; and Nuclear energy and the proliferation of nuclear weapons, Victor Gilinsky

  2. World Nuclear Association position statement: Safe management of nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This WNA Position Statement summarises the worldwide nuclear industry's record, progress and plans in safely managing nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel. The global industry's safe waste management practices cover the entire nuclear fuel-cycle, from the mining of uranium to the long-term disposal of end products from nuclear power reactors. The Statement's aim is to provide, in clear and accurate terms, the nuclear industry's 'story' on a crucially important subject often clouded by misinformation. Inevitably, each country and each company employs a management strategy appropriate to a specific national and technical context. This Position Statement reflects a confident industry consensus that a common dedication to sound practices throughout the nuclear industry worldwide is continuing to enhance an already robust global record of safe management of nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel. This text focuses solely on modern civil programmes of nuclear-electricity generation. It does not deal with the substantial quantities of waste from military or early civil nuclear programmes. These wastes fall into the category of 'legacy activities' and are generally accepted as a responsibility of national governments. The clean-up of wastes resulting from 'legacy activities' should not be confused with the limited volume of end products that are routinely produced and safely managed by today's nuclear energy industry. On the significant subject of 'Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities', which is integral to modern civil nuclear power programmes, the WNA will offer a separate Position Statement covering the industry's safe management of nuclear waste in this context. The paper's conclusion is that the safe management of nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel is a widespread, well-demonstrated reality. This strong safety record reflects a high degree of nuclear industry expertise and of industry responsibility toward the well-being of current and future generations. Accumulating

  3. Proceeding of the Fifth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Development of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology in Third Millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceeding contains papers presented in the Fifth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Fuel Element Cycle with theme of Development of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology in Third Millennium, held on 22 February in Jakarta, Indonesia. These papers were divided by three groups that are technology of exploration, processing, purification and analysis of nuclear materials; technology of nuclear fuel elements and structures; and technology of waste management, safety and management of nuclear fuel cycle. There are 35 papers indexed individually. (id)

  4. Independence and diversity in CANDU shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy Control Board regulations state that Canadian CANDU reactors shall have two fully effective, independent and diverse shutdown systems. The Darlington Nuclear Generating Station is the first power plant operated by Ontario Hydro to make use of software-based computer control in its shutdown systems. By virtue of the reliance placed on these systems to prevent exposure of the public to harmful radioactivity in the event of an accident, the shutdown system software has been categorized as safety critical software. An important issue that was considered in the design of the Darlington shutdown systems was how the software should be designed and incorporated into the systems to comply with the independence and diversity requirement. This paper describes how the independence and diversity requirement was complied with in previous CANDU shutdown system designs utilizing hardware components. The difference between systems utilizing hardware alone, and those utilizing both hardware and software are discussed. The results of a literature search into the issue of software diversity, the behaviour of multi-version software systems, and experience in other industries utilizing safety critical software are referred to. This paper advocates a systems approach to designing independent shutdown systems utilizing software. Opportunities exist at the system level for design decisions that can enhance software diversity and can reduce the likelihood of common mode faults in the systems. In the light of recent experience in implementing diverse safety critical software, potential improvements to the design process for CANDU shutdown systems are identified. (Author) 19 refs

  5. Numerical model for thermal and mechanical behaviour of a CANDU 37-element bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prediction of transient fuel bundle deformations is important for assessing the integrity of fuel and the surrounding structural components under different operating conditions including accidents. For numerical simulation of the interactions between fuel bundle and pressure tube, a reliable numerical bundle model is required to predict thermal and mechanical behaviour of the fuel bundle assembly under different thermal loading conditions. To ensure realistic representations of the bundle behaviour, this model must include all of the important thermal and mechanical features of the fuel bundle, such as temperature-dependent material properties, thermal viscoplastic deformation in sheath, fuel-to-sheath interactions, endplate constraints and contacts between fuel elements. In this paper, we present a finite element based numerical model for predicting macroscopic transient thermal-mechanical behaviour of a complete 37-element CANDU nuclear fuel bundle under accident conditions and demonstrate its potential for being used to investigate fuel bundle to pressure tube interaction in future nuclear safety analyses. This bundle model has been validated against available experimental and numerical solutions and applied to various simulations involving steady-state and transient loading conditions. (author)

  6. Nuclear fuel waste policy in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1996 Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste established the approach in Canada for dealing with all radioactive waste, and defined the respective roles of Government and waste producers and owners. The Policy Framework sets the stage for the development of institutional and financial arrangements to implement long-term waste management solutions in a safe, environmentally sound, comprehensive, cost-effective and integrated manner. For nuclear fuel waste, a 10-year environmental review of the concept to bury nuclear fuel waste bundles at a depth of 500 m to 1000 m in stable rock of the Canadian Shield was completed in March 1998. The Review Panel found that while the concept was technically safe, it did not have the required level of public acceptability to be adopted at this time as Canada's approach for managing its nuclear fuel waste. The Panel recommended that a Waste Management Organization be established at arm's length from the nuclear industry, entirely funded by the waste producers and owners, and that it be subject to oversight by the Government. In its December 1998 Response to the Review Panel, the Government of Canada provided policy direction for the next steps towards developing Canada's approach for the long-term management of nuclear fuel waste. The Government chose to maintain the responsibility for long-term management of nuclear fuel waste close with the producers and owners of the waste. This is consistent with its 1996 Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste. This approach is also consistent with experience in many countries. In addition, the federal government identified the need for credible federal oversight. Cabinet directed the Minister of NRCan to consult with stakeholders, including the public, and return to ministers within 12 months with recommendations on means to implement federal oversight. (author)

  7. Thorium nuclear fuel cycle technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Tae Yoon; Do, Jae Bum; Choi, Yoon Dong; Park, Kyoung Kyum; Choi, In Kyu; Lee, Jae Won; Song, Woong Sup; Kim, Heong Woo

    1998-03-01

    Since thorium produces relatively small amount of TRU elements after irradiation in the reactor, it is considered one of possible media to mix with the elements to be transmuted. Both solid and molten-salt thorium fuel cycles were investigated. Transmutation concepts being studied involved fast breeder reactor, accelerator-driven subcritical reactor, and energy amplifier with thorium. Long-lived radionuclides, especially TRU elements, could be separated from spent fuel by a pyrochemical process which is evaluated to be proliferation resistance. Pyrochemical processes of IFR, MSRE and ATW were reviewed and evaluated in detail, regarding technological feasibility, compatibility of thorium with TRU, proliferation resistance, their economy and safety. (author). 26 refs., 22 figs

  8. Securing the nuclear fuel cycle: What next?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The greatest challenge to the international nuclear non-proliferation regime is posed by nuclear energy's dual nature for both peaceful and military purposes. Uranium enrichment and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing (here after called sensitive nuclear technologies) are critical from the non-proliferation viewpoint because they may be used to produce weapons-grade nuclear materials: highly enriched uranium and separated plutonium. Alongside measures to limit the spread of sensitive nuclear technologies, multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) started to be discussed. Spiralling prices for hydrocarbons and prospects of their imminent extinction are encouraging more and more countries to look at nuclear energy as an alternative means to ensure their sustainable development. To this end, it's becoming increasingly important to link the objective need for an expanded use of nuclear energy with strengthening nuclear non-proliferation by, in particular, preventing the spread of sensitive nuclear technologies and securing access for interested countries to NFC products and services. With this in mind, at the IAEA General Conference in 2003, IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei called for establishing an international experts group on multilateral nuclear approaches. The proposal was supported, and in February 2005 the international experts, headed by Bruno Pellaud, issued a report (published by the IAEA as INFCIRC-640; see www.iaea.org) with recommendations on different multilateral approaches. The recommendations can be generalized as follows: reinforcement of existing market mechanisms; involvement of governments and the IAEA in the assurance of supply, including the establishment of low-enriched uranium (LEU) stocks as reserves; conversion of existing national uranium enrichment and SNF reprocessing enterprises into multilateral ones under international management and control, and setting up new multilateral enterprises on regional and

  9. International nuclear fuel cycle centers in global nuclear power infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest among the nations of the world to use nuclear energy is increasing due to economic, environmental and energy security reasons. The increase in the number of nations using nuclear energy might raise political risk of non-peaceful use of sensitive nuclear technologies. Therefore, additional measures should be taken in order to minimize risk of proliferation in connection with the awaited renaissance of nuclear power. The problem of nuclear nonproliferation is an extremely complicated one and in order to mitigate it different dimensions should be taken into account: political, technological and institutional. Early in 2006 Russia proposed an initiative on global nuclear power infrastructure which will permit nondiscrimination access to nuclear energy of all interested countries observing requirements of nonproliferation regime. The key element of such infrastructure should be system of International Centers (IC) to provide services of nuclear fuel cycle including at first stage uranium enrichment and later on management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under the IAEA control. For effective management of SNF it is necessary to have developed technologies at least in four areas including fast reactors (FR) and closed fuel cycle technologies, SNF reprocessing, transuranium (TRU) fuel fabrication, nuclear waste management. At present the technology for only one area mentioned above have reached commercial level - LWR SNF aqueous reprocessing. Two other areas - technologies of sodium FR, MOX fuel for FR - have been demonstrated at semi-industrial level. Other technologies are still at R and D level - reprocessing of FR SNF, multi recycling of TRU fuel in FR, and nuclear waste management. Business as usual scenario of ICs establishment for SNF management might be to wait until some nations commercialize all associated with FR and closed fuel cycle areas driven mainly by national interest in addressing uranium resource shortages. Obviously this way needs significant time

  10. Nuclear Energy and Synthetic Liquid Transportation Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Richard

    2012-10-01

    This talk will propose a plan to combine nuclear reactors with the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process to produce synthetic carbon-neutral liquid transportation fuels from sea water. These fuels can be formed from the hydrogen and carbon dioxide in sea water and will burn to water and carbon dioxide in a cycle powered by nuclear reactors. The F-T process was developed nearly 100 years ago as a method of synthesizing liquid fuels from coal. This process presently provides commercial liquid fuels in South Africa, Malaysia, and Qatar, mainly using natural gas as a feedstock. Nuclear energy can be used to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen as well as to extract carbon dioxide from sea water using ion exchange technology. The carbon dioxide and hydrogen react to form synthesis gas, the mixture needed at the beginning of the F-T process. Following further refining, the products, typically diesel and Jet-A, can use existing infrastructure and can power conventional engines with little or no modification. We can then use these carbon-neutral liquid fuels conveniently long into the future with few adverse environmental impacts.

  11. Nuclear Propulsion using Thin Foiled Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.

    1998-11-01

    A new way to produce plasma for nuclear propulsion is proposed. A thin foiled fuel can be used for converting fission energy to propulsion energy efficiently. The fission products coming out of the thin foil directly ionize the hydrogen molecules which are used for propulsion. Thus very small portion of fission energy deposited in the thin foil, and integrity of the thin foiled fuel can be maintained even in high nuclear power. Fuel material with large thermal fission cross-section is preferable to make thin foiled fuel and the heat deposition in the foil can be reduced. To get high power from the foiled fuel assembly, thermal neutrons which are created out from the assembly can be supplied, or the assembly itself can create the high intensity thermal neutrons by self-multiplication. A flexible design of a highly efficient nuclear propulsion system can be made. The thickness of the foil and the maintenance of the thermo-mechanical integrity can be determined from the fission cross-section and the slowing down power for fission products. The talk discusses the issues related to heat removal from the assembly.

  12. On the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The president of U.S.A. proposed to various countries in his new policy on atomic energy to reevaluate nuclear fuel cycle internationally from the viewpoint of the prevention of nuclear proliferation. It was decided at the summit meeting of seven advanced countries in London from May 7 to 9, 1977, to start the INFCE taking the necessity of promoting atomic energy development and the importance of reducing the danger of nuclear proliferation as the objects. The preliminary conference was held in Paris in June and July, 1977, and the general meeting to establish the INFCE was held in Washington from October 19 to 21, 1977. 40 countries and 4 international organizations took part, and the plan of works to be completed in 2 years thereafter was decided. 8 working groups were set up to carry out the works. The response to these development and the basic concept of Japan are described. Japan was assigned to the chairman country of the 4th working group concerning fuel reprocessing, handling of plutonium and recycle. The state of activities of respective working groups, the intermediate general meeting held from November 27 to 29, 1978, and the technical coordinating committee is reported. As the post-INFCE problems, the concepts of International Plutonium Storage and International Spent Fuel Management and the guarantee system for nuclear fuel supply are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  13. Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Program user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this manual is to present procedures to execute the Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Model (SNFSM) program. This manual includes an overview of the model, operating environment, input and output specifications and user procedures. An example of the execution of the program is included to assist potential users

  14. Decision Analysis For Nuclear Fuel Cycle Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prime objective in this talk is to explore the impact of widely different (or hypothetical) fuel cycle requirement rather than to attempt to predict a probable scenario. In the course of preparation of this talk, it was realized that, despite the very speculative nature of this kind of endeavor, studies like these are considered essential to the long-range planning needs of the national nuclear power industry, utilities and those providing supporting services, even though the current presentation are extremely primitive in that purpose. A nuclear electricity utility tries to reduce fuel cycle costs. But the problems have to be approached with a long-term perspective, and the logical conclusion is that utility has to make technical progress. As nuclear generation gradually become great, supplies of the fuel cycle services are responsible for the R and D about the nuclear fuel cycle services which is useful to implement the technical choices they propose. Then it is for the utility to choose according to his knowledge, if necessary by carrying out additional research. But only the utility acquires real operating experience and prototype reactor or laboratory tests offer limited knowledge quantities. One way to ensure a good guarantee of supply is, obviously, to make the order far enough ahead of time to have a stock. But, on the other hand, stocks are expensive and should be kept to a strict minimum. Therefore, a detailed analysis of uncertainties is required, as well as an effort to optimize the handling of the overall problem. As mentioned earlier, in recent years, specifically the right way to handle the back-end of the fuel cycle has been always hotly contested and ultimately it was a question of reprocessing or direct disposal of spent fuel elements. Direct disposal of spent fuel is, at present, the only possibility of spent fuel disposal option available to the Korean utility. Korea, having virtually no indigenous uranium resources, can hardly afford to

  15. Development of a best estimate auditing code for CANDU thermal hydraulic safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, B.D.; Lee, W.J.; Lim, H.S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop a thermal hydraulic auditing code for the CANDU reactor, modifying the model of existing PWR auditing tool , i.e. RELAP5/MOD3. This scope of project is a third step of the whole project, and expand the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU version for implementation of LOCA Analysis. There are three main area of model development, i.e. Moody critical flow model, flow regime model of horizontal CANDU bundle, and fuel element heatup model when the stratification occurs. Newly developed version, namely RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU+ is applicable to CANDU plant analysis with keeping the function of light water reactor analysis. The limited validations of model installation were performed. Assessment of CHF model using AECL separated effect test and calculation for Wolsong 2 plant were performed also for the applicability test of the developed version. 15 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  16. Development of best estimate auditing code for CANDU thermal hydraulic safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, B. D.; Lee, W. J.; Lim, H. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    The main purpose of this study is to develop a thermal hydraulic auditing code for the CANDU reactor, modifying the model if existing PWR auditing tool, i.e. RELAP5/MOD3. This scope of project is a third step of the whole project, and expand the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU version for implementation of LOCA analysis. There are three main area of model development, i.e. moody critical flow model, flow regime model of horizontal CANDU bundle, and fuel element heatup model when the stratification occurs. Newly developed version, namely RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU+ is applicable to CANDU plant analysis with keeping the function of light water reactor analysis. The limited validations of model installation were performed. Assessment of CHF model using AECL separated effect test and calculation for Wolsong 2 plant were performed also for the applicability test of the developed version.

  17. Proceedings of the fourth international conference on CANDU maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    These proceedings record the information presented at the 4th International Conference on CANDU Maintenance held November 16-18,1997 in Toronto, Canada. The papers for these proceedings were prepared on component maintenance, human performance, steam generator leak detection, fuel channel inspections, rotating equipment maintenance, surveillance programs, inspection techniques, valve maintenance, steam generator repairs and performance, reactor aging management and preventative maintenance.

  18. Proceedings of the fourth international conference on CANDU maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings record the information presented at the 4th International Conference on CANDU Maintenance held November 16-18,1997 in Toronto, Canada. The papers for these proceedings were prepared on component maintenance, human performance, steam generator leak detection, fuel channel inspections, rotating equipment maintenance, surveillance programs, inspection techniques, valve maintenance, steam generator repairs and performance, reactor aging management and preventative maintenance

  19. Multidimensional multiphysics simulation of nuclear fuel behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, R. L.; Hales, J. D.; Novascone, S. R.; Tonks, M. R.; Gaston, D. R.; Permann, C. J.; Andrs, D.; Martineau, R. C.

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear fuel operates in an environment that induces complex multiphysics phenomena, occurring over distances ranging from inter-atomic spacing to meters, and times scales ranging from microseconds to years. This multiphysics behavior is often tightly coupled and many important aspects are inherently multidimensional. Most current fuel modeling codes employ loose multiphysics coupling and are restricted to 2D axisymmetric or 1.5D approximations. This paper describes a new modeling tool able to simulate coupled multiphysics and multiscale fuel behavior, for either 2D axisymmetric or 3D geometries. Specific fuel analysis capabilities currently implemented in this tool are described, followed by a set of demonstration problems which include a 10-pellet light water reactor fuel rodlet, three-dimensional analysis of pellet clad mechanical interaction in the vicinity of a defective fuel pellet, coupled heat transfer and fission product diffusion in a TRISO-coated fuel particle, a demonstration of the ability to couple to lower-length scale models to account for material property variation with microstructural evolution, and a demonstration of the tool's ability to efficiently solve very large and complex problems using massively-parallel computing. A final section describes an early validation exercise, comparing simulation results to a light water reactor fuel rod experiment.

  20. Method for inspecting nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for disassembling a nuclear reactor fuel element without destroying the individual fuel pins and other structural components from which the element is assembled is described. A traveling bridge and trolley span a water-filled spent fuel storage pool and support a strongback. The strongback is under water and provides a working surface on which the spent fuel element is placed for inspection and for the manipulation that is associated with disassembly and assembly. To remove, in a non-destructive manner, the grids that hold the fuel pins in the proper relative positions within the element, bars are inserted through apertures in the grids with the aid of special tools. These bars are rotated to flex the adjacent grid walls and, in this way relax the physical engagement between protruding portions of the grid walls and the associated fuel pins. With the grid structure so flexed to relax the physical grip on the individual fuel pins, these pins can be withdrawn for inspection or replacement as necessary without imposing a need to destroy fuel element components