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Sample records for candidate h1n1 pandemic

  1. A candidate H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine elicits protective immunity in mice.

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    Julia Steitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2009 a new pandemic disease appeared and spread globally. The recent emergence of the pandemic influenza virus H1N1 first isolated in Mexico and USA raised concerns about vaccine availability. We here report our development of an adenovirus-based influenza H1N1 vaccine tested for immunogenicity and efficacy to confer protection in animal model. METHODS: We generated two adenovirus(Ad5-based influenza vaccine candidates encoding the wildtype or a codon-optimized hemagglutinin antigen (HA from the recently emerged swine influenza isolate A/California/04/2009 (H1N1pdm. After verification of antigen expression, immunogenicity of the vaccine candidates were tested in a mouse model using dose escalations for subcutaneous immunization. Sera of immunized animals were tested in microneutalization and hemagglutination inhibition assays for the presence of HA-specific antibodies. HA-specific T-cells were measured in IFNgamma Elispot assays. The efficiency of the influenza vaccine candidates were evaluated in a challenge model by measuring viral titer in lung and nasal turbinate 3 days after inoculation of a homologous H1N1 virus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A single immunization resulted in robust cellular and humoral immune response. Remarkably, the intensity of the immune response was substantially enhanced with codon-optimized antigen, indicating the benefit of manipulating the genetic code of HA antigens in the context of recombinant influenza vaccine design. These results highlight the value of advanced technologies in vaccine development and deployment in response to infections with pandemic potential. Our study emphasizes the potential of an adenoviral-based influenza vaccine platform with the benefits of speed of manufacture and efficacy of a single dose immunization.

  2. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in captive cheetah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Beate; Hietala, Sharon; Hunt, Tania; Benjamin, Glenn; Martinez, Marie; Darnell, Daniel; Rubrum, Adam; Webby, Richard

    2012-02-01

    We describe virus isolation, full genome sequence analysis, and clinical pathology in ferrets experimentally inoculated with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus recovered from a clinically ill captive cheetah that had minimal human contact. Evidence of reverse zoonotic transmission by fomites underscores the substantial animal and human health implications of this virus.

  3. Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pandemic H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-06-06

    Dr. George Nelson, a CDC medical officer, discusses the relationship between pneumococcal pneumonia and Pandemic H1N1.  Created: 6/6/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/6/2012.

  4. 1918 pandemic H1N1 DNA vaccine protects ferrets against 2007 H1N1 virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, Karoline; Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Aasted, Bent;

    of the H1N1 pandemic virus from 1918 induce protection in ferrets against infection with a H1N1 (A/New Caledonia/20/99(H1N1)) virus which was included in the conventional vaccine for the 2006-2007 season. The viruses are separated by a time interval of 89 years and differ by 21.2% in the HA1 protein...

  5. Influenza A (H1N1) 2009: a pandemic alarm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Khanna; Neha Gupta; Ankit Gupta; V K Vijayan

    2009-09-01

    At this critical juncture when the world has not yet recovered from the threat of avian influenza, the virus has returned in the disguise of swine influenza, a lesser known illness common in pigs. It has reached pandemic proportions in a short time span with health personnel still devising ways to identify the novel H1N1 virus and develop vaccines against it. The H1N1 virus has caused a considerable number of deaths within the short duration since its emergence. Presently, there are no effective methods to contain this newly emerged virus. Therefore, a proper and clear insight is urgently required to prevent an outbreak in the future and make preparations that may be planned well in advance. This review is an attempt to discuss the historical perspective of the swine flu virus, its epidemiology and route of transmission to better understand the various control measures that may be taken to fight the danger of a global pandemic.

  6. Influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Lu; CAO Bin; WANG Chen

    2011-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection ranged from self-limited mild illness to progressive pneumonia,or even a fatal outcome.We summarize the clinical manifestations,risk factors for severe and fatal cases,pathologic findings and treatment of this disease in this paper based on current reports from different regions of the world.

  7. Pandemic (H1N1 influenza in Diyarbakir, 2009

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    Meliksah Ertem

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the pandemic (H1N1 influenza outbreak in 2009. Method: Influenza like illness (ILI cases were reported between the 36th to 53rd weeks of the pandemic, from all health centres. 731 nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from ILI cases. Results: The first H1N1 confirmed case was reported at the 36th week and an increasing trend continued. At the 43rd week the outbreak reached its maximum level and at the 53rd week the level had decreased to the level at the start. During the outbreak 31117 cases were reported as ILI and 635 cases were hospitalized (hospitalization rate was 2.0% and 17 H1N1 laboratory confirmed cases died (mortality rate 11.5/1.000.000. Symptoms of laboratory confirmed cases were similar to seasonal influenza. Coughing (90.9%, fever (84.5%, running nose (69.5%, headache (73.4%, diarrhoea (17.5% were the some of the symptoms in laboratory confirmed cases. The median interval between the onset of symptoms and hospital admission was 3.5 days (min: 1, max: 11 days and this was 7.5 days for the occurrence of death. Conclusion: During 36th to 53rd week an important outbreak of ILI was occurred. The mortality rate was not so high as expected but the infectivity was high. The delay for hospital admission may lead to higher mortality particularly for pregnant women.Key Words: Pandemic influenza; H1N1; case fatality rate; hospitalization rateDiyarbakır’da pandemik (H1N1 influenza, 2009Amaç: Bu çalışmada 2009 yılında -Türkiye’de pandemik influenza salgınını değerlendirmek amaçlanmıştır. Yöntem: Diyarbakır ’da 36 ve 53. haftalar arasında tüm sağlık kuruluşlarından influenza benzeri hastalık rapor edilmiştir. 731 nazofaringeal sürüntü alınmıştır. Bulgular: İlk H1N1 doğrulanmış vaka 36.haftada rapor edilmiştir ve vaka sayıları zaman içinde artış göstermiştir. 43. haftada salgın başlamış ve 53. haftada başlangıç düzeyine inmiştir.Salgın s

  8. 1918 pandemic H1N1 DNA vaccine protects ferrets against 2007 H1N1 virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, Karoline; Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Aasted, Bent;

    of the H1N1 pandemic virus from 1918 induce protection in ferrets against infection with a H1N1 (A/New Caledonia/20/99(H1N1)) virus which was included in the conventional vaccine for the 2006-2007 season. The viruses are separated by a time interval of 89 years and differ by 21.2% in the HA1 protein......Influenza vaccines with the ability to induce immune responses cross-reacting with drifted virus variants would be of great advantage for vaccine development against seasonal and emerging new strains. We demonstrate that gene gun administrated DNA vaccine encoding HA and NA and/or NP and M proteins....... These results suggest not only a unique ability of the DNA vaccines, but perhaps also natural infection, to induce cross-protective responses against even extremely drifted virus variants....

  9. Safety of pandemic H1N1 vaccines in children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. Wijnans (Leonoor); S. de Bie (Sandra); J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne); J. Bonhoeffer (Jan); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDuring the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic several pandemic H1N1 vaccines were licensed using fast track procedures, with relatively limited data on the safety in children and adolescents. Different extensive safety monitoring efforts were put in place to ensure timely detection of adve

  10. Adoption of Preventive Measures and Attitudes toward the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Anna; Rodríguez, Tània; López, Maria José; Continente, Xavier; Nebot, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study describes the perceived impact of H1N1 influenza and the adoption of the recommended measures to address the pandemic in schools. Methods: A cross-sectional self-reported survey was conducted in 433 schools in Barcelona addressed to the school principal or the H1N1 influenza designated person. A descriptive analysis was…

  11. Pediatric Healthcare Response to Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Influenza Stakeholder Meeting - Summary of Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the meeting was to bring together subject matter experts to develop tools and resources for use by the pediatric healthcare community in response to 2009 (H1N1) pandemic influenza activity during the 2009 influenza season.

  12. Reasons for Low Pandemic H1N1 2009 Vaccine Acceptance within a College Sample

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    Russell D. Ravert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined health beliefs associated with novel influenza A (H1N1 immunization among US college undergraduates during the 2009-2010 pandemic. Undergraduates (ages 18–24 years from a large Midwestern University were invited to complete an online survey during March, 2010, five months after H1N1 vaccines became available. Survey items measured H1N1 vaccine history and H1N1-related attitudes based on the health belief literature. Logistic regression was used to identify attitudes associated with having received an H1N1 vaccine, and thematic analysis of student comments was conducted to further understand influences on vaccine decisions. Among the 296 students who participated in the survey, 15.2% reported having received an H1N1 vaccine. In regression analysis, H1N1 immunization was associated with seasonal flu vaccine history, perceived vaccine effectiveness, perceived obstacles to vaccination, and vaccine safety concerns. Qualitative results illustrate the relationship of beliefs to vaccine decisions, particularly in demonstrating that students often held concerns that vaccine could cause H1N1 or side effects. Vaccine safety, efficacy, and obstacles to immunization were major considerations in deciding whether to accept the H1N1 pandemic vaccine. Therefore, focusing on those aspects might be especially useful in future vaccine efforts within the college population.

  13. Structural Basis of Preexisting Immunity to the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Virus

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    Xu, Rui; Ekiert, Damian C.; Krause, Jens C.; Hai, Rong; Crowe, Jr., James E.; Wilson, Ian A. (Sinai); (Scripps); (Vanderbilt)

    2010-05-25

    The 2009 H1N1 swine flu is the first influenza pandemic in decades. The crystal structure of the hemagglutinin from the A/California/04/2009 H1N1 virus shows that its antigenic structure, particularly within the Sa antigenic site, is extremely similar to those of human H1N1 viruses circulating early in the 20th century. The cocrystal structure of the 1918 hemagglutinin with 2D1, an antibody from a survivor of the 1918 Spanish flu that neutralizes both 1918 and 2009 H1N1 viruses, reveals an epitope that is conserved in both pandemic viruses. Thus, antigenic similarity between the 2009 and 1918-like viruses provides an explanation for the age-related immunity to the current influenza pandemic.

  14. The investigation of Risk factors of influenza pandemic H1N1

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    koorosh Holakooyi Naeini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Influenza pandemic H1N1 is an acute respiratory infectious disease that is combination of two types of influenza virus type A (H1N1. This study aimed to identify risk factors affecting influenza pandemic H1N1. Methods: In this case-control study, the cases were 18 positive cases of pandemic influenza H1N1 and the controls were the patients who were admitted during the same time as the cases to sections of Orthopedics, Urology, Surgery and Women of the same hospital for reasons other than influenza. The data were collected through a form by two experienced nurses and then were fed into SPSS, and were analyzed using independent T-test and chi-square. Results: A significant relationship was observed between pandemic H1N1 influenza infection and a history of domestic travel, contact with confirmed patients, respiratory diseases, and diabetes (P0.05. Conclusion: People with underlying diseases, especially respiratory diseases, diabetes, heart disease and a secondary infection and cardiovascular disease most likely are susceptible to influenza pandemic H1N1.

  15. Influenza virus A(H1N1)2009 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in young children prior to the H1N1 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesman, Annelies W; Westerhuis, Brenda M; Ten Hulscher, Hinke I; Jacobi, Ronald H; de Bruin, Erwin; van Beek, Josine; Buisman, Annemarie M; Koopmans, Marion P; van Binnendijk, Robert S

    2016-09-01

    Pre-existing immunity played a significant role in protection during the latest influenza A virus H1N1 pandemic, especially in older age groups. Structural similarities were found between A(H1N1)2009 and older H1N1 virus strains to which humans had already been exposed. Broadly cross-reactive antibodies capable of neutralizing the A(H1N1)2009 virus have been implicated in this immune protection in adults. We investigated the serological profile of a group of young children aged 9 years (n=55), from whom paired blood samples were available, just prior to the pandemic wave (March 2009) and shortly thereafter (March 2010). On the basis of A(H1N1)2009 seroconversion, 27 of the 55 children (49 %) were confirmed to be infected between these two time points. Within the non-infected group of 28 children (51 %), high levels of seasonal antibodies to H1 and H3 HA1 antigens were detected prior to pandemic exposure, reflecting past infection with H1N1 and H3N2, both of which had circulated in The Netherlands prior to the pandemic. In some children, this reactivity coincided with specific antibody reactivity against A(H1N1)2009. While these antibodies were not able to neutralize the A(H1N1)2009 virus, they were able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro upon interaction with the A(H1N1)2009 virus. This finding suggests that cross-reactive antibodies could contribute to immune protection in children via ADCC.

  16. Co-circulation of pandemic 2009 H1N1, classical swine H1N1 and avian-like swine H1N1 influenza viruses in pigs in China.

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    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jian; Qiao, Chuanling; Yang, Huanliang; Zhang, Ying; Xin, Xiaoguang; Chen, Hualan

    2013-01-01

    The pandemic A/H1N1 influenza viruses emerged in both Mexico and the United States in March 2009, and were transmitted efficiently in the human population. They were transmitted occasionally from humans to other mammals including pigs, dogs and cats. In this study, we report the isolation and genetic analysis of novel viruses in pigs in China. These viruses were related phylogenetically to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses isolated from humans and pigs, which indicates that the pandemic virus is currently circulating in swine populations, and this hypothesis was further supported by serological surveillance of pig sera collected within the same period. Furthermore, we isolated another two H1N1 viruses belonging to the lineages of classical swine H1N1 virus and avian-like swine H1N1 virus, respectively. Multiple genetic lineages of H1N1 viruses are co-circulating in the swine population, which highlights the importance of intensive surveillance for swine influenza in China.

  17. Framing of Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in a Singaporean newspaper.

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    Basnyat, Iccha; Lee, Seow Ting

    2015-12-01

    This study seeks to understand how public health messages provided by the government in Singapore during an Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic were framed by the news media for the public. News articles were analyzed to explore how the global pandemic was framed as a local event, providing a unique exploration of the dynamic involving public health communication, news media and the state. Thematic analysis (n = 309) included the government-issued press releases disseminating public health information about H1N1 that were directly linked to news stories (n = 56) and news stories about H1N1 generated by the newspaper (n = 253). Four themes were found: (i) imported disease, (ii) war/battle metaphors, (iii) social responsibility and (iv) lockdown policies. Frame analysis revealed that the news coverage during the H1N1 pandemic reflected how the newspaper framed and mediated the information flow, amplified a positive tone for the government response, emphasized individual responsibility and utilized gain frames to construct local messages about the global H1N1 pandemic that reified Singapore as a nation-state.

  18. Was Mandatory Quarantine Necessary in China for Controlling the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic?

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    Wenjun Geng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese government enforced mandatory quarantine for 60 days (from 10 May to 8 July 2009 as a preventative strategy to control the spread of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Such a prevention strategy was stricter than other non-pharmaceutical interventions that were carried out in many other countries. We evaluated the effectiveness of the mandatory quarantine and provide suggestions for interventions against possible future influenza pandemics. We selected one city, Beijing, as the analysis target. We reviewed the epidemiologic dynamics of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and the implementation of quarantine measures in Beijing. The infectious population was simulated under two scenarios (quarantined and not quarantined using a deterministic Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered (SEIR model. The basic reproduction number R0 was adjusted to match the epidemic wave in Beijing. We found that mandatory quarantine served to postpone the spread of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in Beijing by one and a half months. If mandatory quarantine was not enforced in Beijing, the infectious population could have reached 1,553 by 21 October, i.e., 5.6 times higher than the observed number. When the cost of quarantine is taken into account, mandatory quarantine was not an economically effective intervention approach against the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. We suggest adopting mitigation methods for an influenza pandemic with low mortality and morbidity.

  19. Pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 vaccine: An update

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    M K Goel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The world witnessed a the first influenza pandemic in this century and fourth overall since first flu pandemic was reported during the World War I. The past experiences with influenza viruses and this pandemic of H1N1 place a consider-able strain on health services and resulted in serious illnesses and a large number of deaths. Develop-ing countries were declared more likely to be at risk from the pandemic effects, as they faced the dual problem of highly vulnerable populations and limited resources to respond H1N1. The public health experts agreed that vaccination is the most effective ways to mitigate the negative effects of the pandemic. The vaccines for H1N1 virus have been used in over 40 coun-tries and administered to over 200 million people helped in a great way and on August 10, 2010, World Health Organization (WHO announced H1N1 to be in postpandemic period. But based on knowledge about past pandemics, the H1N1 (2009 virus is expected to continue to circulate as a seasonal virus and may undergo some agenic-variation. As WHO strongly recommends vaccination, vigilance for regular updating of the composition of influenza vaccines, based on an assessment of the future impact of circulating viruses along with safety surveillance of the vaccines is necessary. This review has been done to take a stock of the currently available H1N1 vaccines and their possible use as public health intervention in the postpandemic period.

  20. Replication, Pathogenesis and Transmission of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus in Non-Immune Pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brookes, S.M.; Nunez, A.; Choudhury, B.; Matrosovich, M.; Essen, S.C.; Clifford, D.; Slomka, M.J.; Kuntz-Simon, G.; Garcon, F.; Nash, B.; Hanna, A.; Heegaard, P.M.H.; Queguiner, S.; Chiapponi, C.; Bublot, M.; Garcia, J.M.; Gardner, R.; Foni, E.; Loeffen, W.L.A.; Larsen, L.; Reeth, K.; Banks, J.; Irvine, R.M.; Brown, I.H.

    2010-01-01

    The declaration of the human influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (H1N1/09) raised important questions, including origin and host range [1,2]. Two of the three pandemics in the last century resulted in the spread of virus to pigs (H1N1, 1918; H3N2, 1968) with subsequent independent establishment and evo

  1. Immunogenicity of Virus Like Particle Forming Baculoviral DNA Vaccine against Pandemic Influenza H1N1.

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    Yong-Dae Gwon

    Full Text Available An outbreak of influenza H1N1 in 2009, representing the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century, was transmitted to over a million individuals and claimed 18,449 lives. The current status in many countries is to prepare influenza vaccine using cell-based or egg-based killed vaccine. However, traditional influenza vaccine platforms have several limitations. To overcome these limitations, many researchers have tried various approaches to develop alternative production platforms. One of the alternative approach, we reported the efficacy of influenza HA vaccination using a baculoviral DNA vaccine (AcHERV-HA. However, the immune response elicited by the AcHERV-HA vaccine, which only targets the HA antigen, was lower than that of the commercial killed vaccine. To overcome the limitations of this previous vaccine, we constructed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV envelope-coated, baculovirus-based, virus-like-particle (VLP-forming DNA vaccine (termed AcHERV-VLP against pandemic influenza A/California/04/2009 (pH1N1. BALB/c mice immunized with AcHERV-VLP (1×107 FFU AcHERV-VLP, i.m. and compared with mice immunized with the killed vaccine or mice immunized with AcHERV-HA. As a result, AcHERV-VLP immunization produced a greater humoral immune response and exhibited neutralizing activity with an intrasubgroup H1 strain (PR8, elicited neutralizing antibody production, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in splenocytes, and diminished virus shedding in the lung after challenge with a lethal dose of influenza virus. In conclusion, VLP-forming baculovirus DNA vaccine could be a potential vaccine candidate capable of efficiently delivering DNA to the vaccinee and VLP forming DNA eliciting stronger immunogenicity than egg-based killed vaccines.

  2. The seroprevalence of pandemic influenza H1N1 (2009 virus in China.

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    Cuiling Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mainland China experienced pandemic influenza H1N1 (2009 virus (pH1N1 with peak activity during November-December 2009. To understand the geographic extent, risk factors, and attack rate of pH1N1 infection in China we conducted a nationwide serological survey to determine the prevalence of antibodies to pH1N1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Stored serum samples (n = 2,379 collected during 2006-2008 were used to estimate baseline serum reactogenicity to pH1N1. In January 2010, we used a multistage-stratified random sampling method to select 50,111 subjects who met eligibility criteria and collected serum samples and administered a standardized questionnaire. Antibody response to pH1N1 was measured using haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay and the weighted seroprevalence was calculated using the Taylor series linearization method. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to examine risk factors for pH1N1 seropositivity. Baseline seroprevalence of pH1N1 antibody (HI titer ≥40 was 1.2%. The weighted seroprevalence of pH1N1 among the Chinese population was 21.5%(vaccinated: 62.0%; unvaccinated: 17.1%. Among unvaccinated participants, those aged 6-15 years (32.9% and 16-24 years (30.3% had higher seroprevalence compared with participants aged 25-59 years (10.7% and ≥60 years (9.9%, P<0.0001. Children in kindergarten and students had higher odds of seropositivity than children in family care (OR: 1.36 and 2.05, respectively. We estimated that 207.7 million individuals (15.9% experienced pH1N1 infection in China. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Chinese population had low pre-existing immunity to pH1N1 and experienced a relatively high attack rate in 2009 of this virus. We recommend routine control measures such as vaccination to reduce transmission and spread of seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses.

  3. The Influenza A(H1N1)v Pandemic: An Exploratory System Dynamics Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruyt, E.; Hamarat, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a small exploratory System Dynamics model related to the dynamics of the 2009 flu pandemic, also known as the Mexican flu, swine flu, or A(H1N1)v. The model was developed in May 2009 in order to quickly foster understanding about the possible dynamics of this new flu variant and

  4. Antivirals Use During the Pandemic H1N1 2009 Outbreak

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-01-23

    Charisma Atkins, CDC public health analyst, discusses antiviral use during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic flu outbreak.  Created: 1/23/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/23/2012.

  5. Experimental pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection of cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. van den Brand (Judith); K.J. Stittelaar (Koert); G. van Amerongen (Geert); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); L.M.E. Leijten (Lonneke); T. Kuiken (Thijs); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTo demonstrate that pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus may cause respiratory disease in cats, we intratracheally infected cats. Diffuse alveolar damage developed. Seroconversion of sentinel cats indicated cat-to-cat virus transmission. Unlike in cats infected with highly pathogenic avian influen

  6. Initial incursion of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza A virus into European pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, M D; Baird, P M; Guelbenzu-Gonzalo, M P; Hanna, A; Reid, S M; Essen, S; Russell, C; Thomas, S; Barrass, L; McNeilly, F; McKillen, J; Todd, D; Harkin, V; McDowell, S; Choudhury, B; Irvine, R M; Borobia, J; Grant, J; Brown, I H

    2010-05-22

    The initial incursion of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza A virus (pH1N1) into a European pig population is reported. Diagnosis of swine influenza caused by pandemic virus was made during September 2009 following routine submission of samples for differential diagnosis of causative agents of respiratory disease, including influenza A virus. All four pigs (aged six weeks) submitted for investigation from a pig herd of approximately 5000 animals in Northern Ireland, experiencing acute-onset respiratory signs in finishing and growing pigs, were positive by immunofluorescence for influenza A. Follow-up analysis of lung tissue homogenates by real-time RT-PCR confirmed the presence of pH1N1. The virus was subsequently detected on two other premises in Northern Ireland; on one premises, detection followed the pre-export health certification testing of samples from pigs presumed to be subclinically infected as no clinical signs were apparent. None of the premises was linked to another epidemiologically. Sequencing of the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes revealed high nucleotide identity (>99.4 per cent) with other pH1N1s isolated from human beings. Genotypic analyses revealed all gene segments to be most closely related to those of contemporary pH1N1 viruses in human beings. It is concluded that all three outbreaks occurred independently, potentially as a result of transmission of the virus from human beings to pigs.

  7. Origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in swine in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Ignacio; Nelson, Martha I; Quezada-Monroy, Francisco; Dutta, Jayeeta; Cortes-Fernández, Refugio; Lara-Puente, J Horacio; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Cunha, Luis F; Trovão, Nídia S; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Rambaut, Andrew; van Bakel, Harm; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-06-28

    Asia is considered an important source of influenza A virus (IAV) pandemics, owing to large, diverse viral reservoirs in poultry and swine. However, the zoonotic origins of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus (pdmH1N1) remain unclear, due to conflicting evidence from swine and humans. There is strong evidence that the first human outbreak of pdmH1N1 occurred in Mexico in early 2009. However, no related swine viruses have been detected in Mexico or any part of the Americas, and to date the most closely related ancestor viruses were identified in Asian swine. Here, we use 58 new whole-genome sequences from IAVs collected in Mexican swine to establish that the swine virus responsible for the 2009 pandemic evolved in central Mexico. This finding highlights how the 2009 pandemic arose from a region not considered a pandemic risk, owing to an expansion of IAV diversity in swine resulting from long-distance live swine trade.

  8. Pandemic influenza A/H1N1pdm in Italy: age, risk and population susceptibility.

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    Stefano Merler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A common pattern emerging from several studies evaluating the impact of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic influenza (A/H1N1pdm conducted in countries worldwide is the low attack rate observed in elderly compared to that observed in children and young adults. The biological or social mechanisms responsible for the observed age-specific risk of infection are still to be deeply investigated. METHODS: The level of immunity against the A/H1N1pdm in pre and post pandemic sera was determined using left over sera taken for diagnostic purposes or routine ascertainment obtained from clinical laboratories. The antibody titres were measured by the haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay. To investigate whether certain age groups had higher risk of infection the presence of protective antibody (≥1∶40, was calculated using exact binomial 95% CI on both pre- and post- pandemic serological data in the age groups considered. To estimate age-specific susceptibility to infection we used an age-structured SEIR model. RESULTS: By comparing pre- and post-pandemic serological data in Italy we found age- specific attack rates similar to those observed in other countries. Cumulative attack rate at the end of the first A/H1N1pdm season in Italy was estimated to be 16.3% (95% CI 9.4%-23.1%. Modeling results allow ruling out the hypothesis that only age-specific characteristics of the contact network and levels of pre-pandemic immunity are responsible for the observed age-specific risk of infection. This means that age-specific susceptibility to infection, suspected to play an important role in the pandemic, was not only determined by pre-pandemic levels of H1N1pdm antibody measured by HI. CONCLUSIONS: Our results claim for new studies to better identify the biological mechanisms, which might have determined the observed pattern of susceptibility with age. Moreover, our results highlight the need to obtain early estimates of differential susceptibility with age in

  9. Evolutionary pathways of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 in the UK.

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    Monica Galiano

    Full Text Available The emergence of the influenza (H1N1 2009 virus provided a unique opportunity to study the evolution of a pandemic virus following its introduction into the human population. Virological and clinical surveillance in the UK were comprehensive during the first and second waves of the pandemic in 2009, with extensive laboratory confirmation of infection allowing a detailed sampling of representative circulating viruses. We sequenced the complete coding region of the haemagglutinin (HA segment of 685 H1N1 pandemic viruses selected without bias during two waves of pandemic in the UK (April-December 2009. Phylogenetic analysis showed that although temporal accumulation of amino acid changes was observed in the HA sequences, the overall diversity was less than that typically seen for seasonal influenza A H1N1 or H3N2. There was co-circulation of multiple variants as characterised by signature amino acid changes in the HA. A specific substitution (S203T became predominant both in UK and global isolates. No antigenic drift occurred during 2009 as viruses with greater than four-fold reduction in their haemagglutination inhibition (HI titre ("low reactors" were detected in a low proportion (3% and occurred sporadically. Although some limited antigenic divergence in viruses with four-fold reduction in HI titre might be related to the presence of 203T, additional studies are needed to test this hypothesis.

  10. Analysis of a pandemic in the Italian newspapers: the A(H1N1 experience

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    Alessandro Zanetti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: in 2009 a novel infective agent, a(H1n1, was recognized by the World Health organization (WHo as a pandemic virus. Like most European countries, Italy experienced a single pandemic wave during fall-winter 2009. The objective of our study was to evaluate the news reports and the representation of the a(H1n1 pandemic in the Italian newspapers both quantitatively and qualitatively.

    Methods: from april 24th, 2009 to February 28th, 2010, seven national newspapers were monitored for the quantitative reporting of a(H1n1. In a three month sample period, reports were evaluated quali- tatively by considering their front page presence, tones used for headlines, and images and figures dedicated to the topic.

    Results: in a ten month window, a total of 1220 articles were published. The reporting period showed four peaks and one hollow, with a similar pattern for all the newspapers. during the three-month sample period, we found a total of 382 articles, 98.4% of which appeared on front pages, 33.8% of which contained headlines using alarming tones, and 47.8% which contained info-graphic elements.

    Conclusions: the a(H1n1 2009 pandemic in Italy was mild; nonetheless, newspapers devoted great attention to the new influenza and used alarmist tones. In similar situations, there are several areas where scientists should play a greater role. scientists should support journalists in understanding scientific issues and help them translate scientific information into news items. scientists should also help to contain the anxiety aroused in lay people by a pandemic, and support vaccination efforts dedicated to it....

  11. Genetic Characteristics and Immunogenicity of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus Isolate from Pig in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyoung Joon; Oh, Jin Sik; Na, Woonsung; Yeom, Minjoo; Han, Sang Yoon; Kim, Sung Jae; Park, Bong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    A pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus strain was isolated from a pig farm in Korea in December 2009. The strain was propagated in and isolated from both the Madin-Darby canine kidney cell line and embryonated eggs. The partial and complete sequences of the strain were identical to those of A/California/04/2009, with >99% sequence similarity in the HA, NA, M, NS, NP, PA, PB1, and PB2 genes. The isolated strain was inactivated and used to prepare a swine influenza vaccine. This trial vaccine, containing the new isolate that has high sequence similarity with the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus, resulted in seroconversion in Guinea pigs and piglets. This strain could therefore be a potential vaccine candidate for swine influenza control in commercial farms.

  12. Learning from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic: prospects for more broadly effective influenza vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ethan C. Settembre; Philip R. Dormitzer; Rino Rappuoli

    2011-01-01

    Calls to develop a universal influenza vaccine have increased in the wake of the 2009 H1 N1 influenza pandemic. This demand comes at a time when analyses of the human antibody repertoire, informed by structures of complexes between broadly neutralizing antibodies and influenza hemagglutinin, have revealed the target of a class of broadly neutralizing antibodies. Recent studies suggest a path forward to more broadly protective influenza vaccines.%@@ Calls to develop a universal influenza vaccine have increased in the wake of the 2009 H1 N1 influenza pandemic.This demand comes at a time when analyses of the human antibody repertoire, informed by structures of complexes between broadly neutralizing antibodies and influenza hemagglutinin, have revealed the target of a class of broadly neutralizing antibodies.Recent studies suggest a path forward to more broadly protective influenza vaccines.

  13. THE A (H1N1 INFLUENZA. SYMBOLIC DIMENSIONS OF A PANDEMIC ARTEFACT

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    Andrés G. Seguel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to present the symbolic features that are exposed by the concept of artefact in the context of a pandemic alarm, such as the A (H1N1 influenza. The symbolic qualities entailed by the notion of artefact are well-known within the Social Sciences: Sociology, Anthropology, Archaeology, and Linguistics. The artefact is basically not an object, but an action aimed at designing, simulating or creating a simile by means of material, technological or linguistic structures. The purpose of the present work is to unveil the symbolic dimensions that are activated by the A (H1N1 influenza as a Pandemic Artefact: a the assumption of separating information from matter; b the need for a material support to enable the exchange; c the sociological reflexivity of the artefact and its agency; d the arbitrariness of its social use, that detaches it from the design as intention.

  14. The pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza virus is resistant to mannose-binding lectin

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    Ushirogawa Hiroshi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mannose-binding lectin (MBL is an important component of innate immunity because it promotes bacterial clearance and neutralization of human influenza A viruses. Since a majority of humans have no neutralizing antibody against the pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza (pandemic 2009 virus, innate immunity may be crucial and MBL susceptibility may therefore influence viral pathogenesis. Results We examined MBL susceptibility of influenza A viruses and observed that the pandemic 2009 virus was resistant to MBL, whereas all seasonal influenza A viruses tested were susceptible. The mortality of mice infected with a seasonal H1N1 influenza virus was evidently enhanced on transient blockage of MBL activity by simultaneous inoculation of mannan, whereas mannan inoculation had no effect on mice infected with a pandemic 2009 virus. This indicates that MBL protects mice against infection with the seasonal virus but not against that with the pandemic 2009 virus. Conclusions These results indicate that the pandemic 2009 virus is not susceptible to MBL, an important component of innate immunity.

  15. Pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza: Experience from a critical care unit in India

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    Sahoo Jyoti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This case series details our experience with seven patients with pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza from an intensive care unit in India. All the patients had respiratory failure requiring ventilation except one; two patients developed pneumothorax. Of the seven patients, two died (28.5% and five recovered. Four patients had co-morbid conditions and one was morbidly obese; all the five patients were discharged alive.

  16. Seroprevalence study in Vojvodina (Serbia following 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1v

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    Petrović Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The seroprevalence study was performed in Vojvodina during May and June 2010 in order to asses the effects of the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1v epidemic on herd immunity. It was a part of the Serbian Ministry of Health funded nationwide study. Objective. Prevalence of antibodies against 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1v was determined in a 1% sample of the population monitored for influenza-like illness and acute respiratory infections in Vojvodina through sentinel surveillance system. Methods. The study sample involved a total of 1004 inhabitants of Vojvodina. The control group consisted of randomly selected and age-adjusted 1054 sera collected in the pre-pandemic period. Sera were tested by the reaction of hemagglutination inhibition using influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1 antigen in dilution from 1:8 to 1:256. Antibody titers ≥1:32 and ≥1:8 were considered protective and diagnostic, respectively. Results. The differences between control and study sera in all age groups were significant for both diagnostic ≥1/8 and protective titres ≥1/32 of hemagglutination inhibition antibodies (chi square test, p<0.001. The highest percentage of seropositive subjects was registered in the age group 15-19 years followed by children aged 5-14 years. Both diagnostic and protective titres were about twice higher in the vaccinated as compared to the non-vaccinated group. There were no statistically significant differences in seroprevalence between seven districts of Vojvodina. Conclusion. The 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1v epidemic significantly influenced the herd immunity in our population regardless of low immunization coverage with highest immunity levels in adolescents aged 15-19 years and with similar herd immunity levels in all the regions in the province six months after the outbreak.

  17. Research Preparedness Paves the Way to Respond to Pandemic H1N1 2009 Influenza Virus

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    Michelle B French

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The international community has been preparing for an influenza pandemic because of the threat posed by H5N1 avian influenza. Over the past several years, Canada has dedicated funding to boost capacity for research, and public health and health care system readiness and response in the event of a pandemic. The current H1N1/09 influenza pandemic is now testing our readiness. From a research perspective, the present commentary discusses how have we prepared, along with the research gaps. We conclude that: sources of pandemics are not always predictable; investment in the past few years has paid off in a rapid response to pandemic H1N1/09 virus in Canada; and research to meet the challenges of infectious diseases has to be done on an ongoing long-term basis, and its funding has to be flexible, available and predictable to maintain capacity and expertise. In addition, new vaccine technologies are needed to develop and produce vaccines for public health emergencies in a timely fashion.

  18. Pandemic H1N1 2009 virus in Danish pigs: Diagnosis and lack of surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Nielsen, L. P.; Breum, Solvej Østergaard;

    In March-April 2009, a novel pandemic H1N1 virus (H1N1v) of likely swine origin emerged in the human population globally. The first case in pigs was reported from Canada in May 2009 and presently almost all countries with pig production have reported cases. The emergence of a new influenza subtype...... in swine with a genetic profile similar to older circulating strains implied a challenge for the veterinary diagnostic laboratories. We report the development, validation and implementation of a diagnostic strategy for specific diagnosis of H1N1v in pigs and the results of tests of pigs performed...... in Denmark. Routinely, detection of swine influenza virus in clinical specimens is performed by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assays (rRT-PCR) targeting the M and the NP genes. Alignment of the probe and primer sequences to available H1N1v gene sequences in GeneBank revealed that these assays most...

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of surface proteins of novel H1N1 virus isolated from 2009 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danishuddin, Mohd; Khan, Shahper N; Khan, Asad U

    2009-09-30

    Swine Influenza Virus (H1N1) is a known causative agent of swine flu. Transmission of Swine Influenza Virus form pig to human is not a common event and may not always cause human influenza. The 2009 outbreak by subtype H1N1 in humans is due to transfer of Swine Influenza Virus from pig to human. Thus to analyze the origin of this novel virus we compared two surface proteins (HA and NA) with influenza viruses of swine, avian and humans isolates recovered from 1918 to 2008 outbreaks. Phylogenetic analyses of hemagglutinin gene from 2009 pandemic found to be clustered with swine influenza virus (H1N2) circulated in U.S.A during the 1999-2004 outbreaks. Whereas, neuraminidase gene was clustered with H1N1 strains isolated from Europe and Asia during 1992-2007 outbreaks. This study concludes that the new H1N1 strain appeared in 2009 outbreak with high pathogenicity to human was originated as result of re-assortment (exchange of gene). Moreover, our data also suggest that the virus will remain sensitive to the pre-existing therapeutic strategies.

  20. Similarity of currently circulating H1N1 virus with the 2009 pandemic clone: viability of an imminent pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rachana; Roy, Ayan; Das, Santasabuj; Basak, Surajit

    2015-06-01

    The first influenza pandemic in the 21st century commenced in March, 2009 causing nearly 300,000 deaths globally within the first year of the pandemic. In late 2013 and in early 2014, there was gradual increase in the reported case of H1N1 infection and according to World Health Organization (WHO) report, influenza activity increased in several areas of the Southern Hemisphere and was dominated by the H1N1 pandemic strain of 2009. In the present study, a comprehensive comparison of the global amino acid composition and the structural features of all HA gene sequences of H1N1, available in the Flu Database (NCBI), from 1918 to December, 2014 has been performed to trace out the possibility of a further H1N1 pandemic in near future. The results suggest that the increased potential to enhance pathogenicity for the H1N1 samples of 2013 (latter part) and 2014 could lead to a more severe outbreak in the near future.

  1. Meteorological Influence on the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) Pandemic in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X.; Cai, J.; Feng, D.; Bai, Y.; Xu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Since May 2009, a novel influenza A (H1N1) pandemic has spread rapidly in mainland China from Mexico. Although there has been substantial analysis of this influenza, reliable work estimating its spatial dynamics and determinants remain scarce. The survival and transmission of this pandemic virus not only depends on its biological properties, but also a correlation with external environmental factors. In this study, we collected daily influenza A (H1N1) cases and corresponding annual meteorological factors in mainland China from May 2009 to April 2010. By analyzing these data at county-level, a similarity index, which considered the spatio-temporal characteristics of the disease, was proposed to evaluate the role and lag time of meteorological factors in the influenza transmission. The results indicated that the influenza spanned a large geographical area, following an overall trend from east to west across the country. The spatio-temporal transmission of the disease was affected by a series of meteorological variables, especially absolute humidity with a 3-week lag. These findings confirmed that the absolute humidity and other meteorological variables contributed to the local occurrence and dispersal of influenza A (H1N1). The impact of meteorological variables and their lag effects could be involved in the improvement of effective strategies to control and prevent disease outbreaks.

  2. Response to the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, C; Rota, M C; Bella, A; Giannitelli, S; De Santis, S; Nacca, G; Pompa, M G; Vellucci, L; Salmaso, S; Declich, S

    2010-12-01

    In Italy, the arrival of the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus triggered an integrated response that was mainly based on the 2006 National Pandemic Preparedness and Response Plan. In this article we analyse the main activities implemented for epidemiological surveillance, containment and mitigation of the pandemic influenza and the lesson learned from this experience. Overall, from week 31 (27 July – 2 August) of 2009 to week 17 (26 April – 2 May) of 2010, we estimate that there were approximately 5,600,000 cases of influenza-like illness (ILI) who received medical attention (with almost 2,000 laboratory-confirmed cases of pandemic influenza from May to October 2009). A total of 1,106 confirmed cases were admitted to hospital for serious conditions, of whom 532 were admitted to intensive care units. There were 260 reported deaths due to pandemic influenza. Approximately 870,000 first doses of the pandemic vaccine were administered, representing a vaccine coverage of 4% of the target population. One of the possible reasons for the low uptake of the pandemic vaccine in the target population could be the communication strategy adopted, for both the general population and healthcare workers, which turned out to be a major challenge. Active involvement of all health professionals (at local, regional and national level) in influenza pandemic preparedness and response should be encouraged in the future.

  3. Mass vaccination for the 2009 H1N1 pandemic: approaches, challenges, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhia, Kunal J; Watson, Matthew; Sell, Tara Kirk; Waldhorn, Richard; Toner, Eric

    2010-12-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic stimulated a nationwide response that included a mass vaccination effort coordinated at the federal, state, and local levels. This article examines a sampling of state and local efforts during the pandemic in order to better prepare for future public health emergencies involving mass distribution, dispensing, and administration of medical countermeasures. In this analysis, the authors interviewed national, state, and local leaders to gain a better understanding of the accomplishments and challenges of H1N1 vaccination programs during the 2009-10 influenza season. State and local health departments distributed and administered H1N1 vaccine using a combination of public and private efforts. Challenges encountered during the vaccination campaign included the supply of and demand for vaccine, prioritization strategies, and local logistics. To improve the response capabilities to deal with infectious disease emergencies, the authors recommend investing in technologies that will assure a more timely availability of the needed quantities of vaccine, developing local public health capacity and relationships with healthcare providers, and enhancing federal support of state and local activities. The authors support in principle the CDC recommendation to vaccinate annually all Americans over 6 months of age against seasonal influenza to establish a standard of practice on which to expand the ability to vaccinate during a pandemic. However, expanding seasonal influenza vaccination efforts will be an expensive and long-term investment that will need to be weighed against anticipated benefits and other public health needs. Such investments in public health infrastructure could be important for building capacity and practice for distributing, dispensing, and administering countermeasures in response to a future pandemic or biological weapons attack.

  4. Vaccine Narratives and Public Health: Investigating Criticisms of H1N1 Pandemic Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysinghe, Sudeepa

    2015-02-25

    Vaccine hesitancy is often understood and explored on the level of individual decision-making. However, questions surrounding the risk and efficacy of vaccination are evident in wider public discourse; social narratives of vaccination inform and impact on the individual level. This paper takes a narrative analysis approach from the sociology of health to examine data drawn from a wider study on global public health responses to the H1N1 pandemic. The paper concentrates upon criticisms to mass vaccination as recounted within the Council of Europe's debate of the handling of H1N1. It shows that three narratives were particularly dominant: problematizing the use of vaccination as a public health response; criticising the efficacy of the vaccines; and, questioning the safety of the strategy. This debate presents an important case study in understanding the way in which vaccines are problematized within the public discourse.

  5. Illinois department of public health H1N1/A pandemic communications evaluation survey.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, D.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2010-09-16

    Because of heightened media coverage, a 24-hour news cycle and the potential miscommunication of health messages across all levels of government during the onset of the H1N1 influenza outbreak in spring 2009, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) decided to evaluate its H1N1 influenza A communications system. IDPH wanted to confirm its disease information and instructions were helping stakeholders prepare for and respond to a novel influenza outbreak. In addition, the time commitment involved in preparing, issuing, monitoring, updating, and responding to H1N1 federal guidelines/updates and media stories became a heavy burden for IDPH staff. The process and results of the H1N1 messaging survey represent a best practice that other health departments and emergency management agencies can replicate to improve coordination efforts with stakeholder groups during both emergency preparedness and response phases. Importantly, the H1N1 survey confirmed IDPH's messages were influencing stakeholders decisions to activate their pandemic plans and initiate response operations. While there was some dissatisfaction with IDPH's delivery of information and communication tools, such as the fax system, this report should demonstrate to IDPH that its core partners believe it has the ability and expertise to issue timely and accurate instructions that can help them respond to a large-scale disease outbreak in Illinois. The conclusion will focus on three main areas: (1) the survey development process, (2) survey results: best practices and areas for improvement and (3) recommendations: next steps.

  6. Community-based measures for mitigating the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanyi Tang

    Full Text Available Since the emergence of influenza A/H1N1 pandemic virus in March-April 2009, very stringent interventions including Fengxiao were implemented to prevent importation of infected cases and decelerate the disease spread in mainland China. The extent to which these measures have been effective remains elusive. We sought to investigate the effectiveness of Fengxiao that may inform policy decisions on improving community-based interventions for management of on-going outbreaks in China, in particular during the Spring Festival in mid-February 2010 when nationwide traveling will be substantially increased. We obtained data on initial laboratory-confirmed cases of H1N1 in the province of Shaanxi and used Markov-chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC simulations to estimate the reproduction number. Given the estimates for the exposed and infectious periods of the novel H1N1 virus, we estimated a mean reproduction number of 1.68 (95% CI 1.45-1.92 and other A/H1N1 epidemiological parameters. Our results based on a spatially stratified population dynamical model show that the early implementation of Fengxiao can delay the epidemic peak significantly and prevent the disease spread to the general population but may also, if not implemented appropriately, cause more severe outbreak within universities/colleges, while late implementation of Fengxiao can achieve nothing more than no implementation. Strengthening local control strategies (quarantine and hygiene precaution is much more effective in mitigating outbreaks and inhibiting the successive waves than implementing Fengxiao. Either strong mobility or high transport-related transmission rate during the Spring Festival holiday will not reverse the ongoing outbreak, but both will result in a large new wave. The findings suggest that Fengxiao and travel precautions should not be relaxed unless strict measures of quarantine, isolation, and hygiene precaution practices are put in place. Integration and prompt implementation of

  7. Heterogeneous virulence of pandemic 2009 influenza H1N1 virus in mice

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    Farooqui Amber

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the pathogenesis of influenza infection is a key factor leading to the prevention and control of future outbreaks. Pandemic 2009 Influenza H1N1 infection, although frequently mild, led to a severe and fatal form of disease in certain cases that make its virulence nature debatable. Much effort has been made toward explaining the determinants of disease severity; however, no absolute reason has been established. Results This study presents the heterogeneous virulence of clinically similar strains of pandemic 2009 influenza virus in human alveolar adenocarcinoma cells and mice. The viruses were obtained from patients who were admitted in a local hospital in China with a similar course of infection and recovered. The A/Nanchang/8002/2009 and A/Nanchang/8011/2009 viruses showed efficient replication and high lethality in mice while infection with A/Nanchang/8008/2009 was not lethal with impaired viral replication, minimal pathology and modest proinflammatory activity in lungs. Sequence analysis displayed prominent differences between polymerase subunits (PB2 and PA of viral genomes that might correlate with their different phenotypic behavior. Conclusions The study confirms that biological heterogeneity, linked with the extent of viral replication, exists among pandemic H1N1 strains that may serve as a benchmark for future investigations on influenza pathogenesis.

  8. Entry screening to delay local transmission of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Helen WC

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After the WHO issued the global alert for 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1, many national health agencies began to screen travelers on entry in airports, ports and border crossings to try to delay local transmission. Methods We reviewed entry screening policies adopted by different nations and ascertained dates of official report of the first laboratory-confirmed imported H1N1 case and the first laboratory-confirmed untraceable or 'local' H1N1 case. Results Implementation of entry screening policies was associated with on average additional 7-12 day delays in local transmission compared to nations that did not implement entry screening, with lower bounds of 95% confidence intervals consistent with no additional delays and upper bounds extending to 20-30 day additional delays. Conclusions Entry screening may lead to short-term delays in local transmission of a novel strain of influenza virus. The resources required for implementation should be balanced against the expected benefits of entry screening.

  9. Persistence of the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus on N95 respirators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulliette, A D; Perry, K A; Edwards, J R; Noble-Wang, J A

    2013-04-01

    In the United States, the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (pH1N1) infected almost 20% of the population and caused >200,000 hospitalizations and >10,000 deaths from April 2009 to April 2010. On 24 April 2009, the CDC posted interim guidance on infection control measures in health care settings explicitly for pH1N1 and recommended using filtering face respirators (FFRs) when in close contact with a suspected- or confirmed-to-be-infected individual, particularly when performing aerosol-generating procedures. The persistence and infectivity of pH1N1 were evaluated on FFRs, specifically N95 respirators, under various conditions of absolute humidity (AH) (4.1 × 10(5) mPa, 6.5 × 10(5) mPa, and 14.6 × 10(5) mPa), sample matrices (2% fetal bovine serum [FBS], 5 mg/ml mucin, and viral medium), and times (4, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 144 h). pH1N1 was distributed onto N95 coupons (3.8 to 4.2 cm(2)) and extracted by a vortex-centrifugation-filtration process, and the ability of the remaining virus to replicate was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the log10 concentration of the infectious virus per coupon. Overall, pH1N1 remained infectious for 6 days, with an approximately 1-log10 loss of virus concentrations over this time period. Time and AH both affected virus survival. We found significantly higher (P ≤ 0.01) reductions in virus concentrations at time points beyond 24 to 72 h (-0.52-log10 reduction) and 144 h (-0.74) at AHs of 6.5 × 10(5) mPa (-0.53) and 14.6 × 10(5) mPa (-0.47). This research supports discarding respirators after close contact with a person with suspected or confirmed influenza infection due to the virus's demonstrated ability to persist and remain infectious.

  10. Household responses to pandemic (H1N1) 2009-related school closures, Perth, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effler, Paul V; Carcione, Dale; Giele, Carolien; Dowse, Gary K; Goggin, Leigh; Mak, Donna B

    2010-02-01

    School closure is often purported to reduce influenza transmission, but little is known about its effect on families. We surveyed families affected by pandemic (H1N1) 2009-related school closures in Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Surveys were returned for 233 (58%) of 402 students. School closure was deemed appropriate by 110 parents (47%); however, 91 (45%) parents of 202 asymptomatic students reported taking >or=1 day off work to care for their child, and 71 (35%) had to make childcare arrangements because of the class closures. During the week, 172 (74%) students participated in activities outside the home on >or=1 occasion, resulting in an average of 3.7 out-of-home activities for each student. In our survey, activities outside the home were commonly reported by students affected by school closure, the effect on families was substantial, and parental opinion regarding school closures as a means to mitigate the outbreak of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 was divided.

  11. Characterizing the epidemiology of the 2009 influenza A/H1N1 pandemic in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Chowell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mexico's local and national authorities initiated an intense public health response during the early stages of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic. In this study we analyzed the epidemiological patterns of the pandemic during April-December 2009 in Mexico and evaluated the impact of nonmedical interventions, school cycles, and demographic factors on influenza transmission. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used influenza surveillance data compiled by the Mexican Institute for Social Security, representing 40% of the population, to study patterns in influenza-like illness (ILIs hospitalizations, deaths, and case-fatality rate by pandemic wave and geographical region. We also estimated the reproduction number (R on the basis of the growth rate of daily cases, and used a transmission model to evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation strategies initiated during the spring pandemic wave. A total of 117,626 ILI cases were identified during April-December 2009, of which 30.6% were tested for influenza, and 23.3% were positive for the influenza A/H1N1 pandemic virus. A three-wave pandemic profile was identified, with an initial wave in April-May (Mexico City area, a second wave in June-July (southeastern states, and a geographically widespread third wave in August-December. The median age of laboratory confirmed ILI cases was ∼ 18 years overall and increased to ∼ 31 years during autumn (p<0.0001. The case-fatality ratio among ILI cases was 1.2% overall, and highest (5.5% among people over 60 years. The regional R estimates were 1.8-2.1, 1.6-1.9, and 1.2-1.3 for the spring, summer, and fall waves, respectively. We estimate that the 18-day period of mandatory school closures and other social distancing measures implemented in the greater Mexico City area was associated with a 29%-37% reduction in influenza transmission in spring 2009. In addition, an increase in R was observed in late May and early June in the southeast states, after mandatory school

  12. Clinical characteristics and outcomes among pediatric patients hospitalized with pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Lee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical and epidemiologic features and outcomes among children hospitalized with pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection. Methods : We retrospectively reviewed the charts of hospitalized pediatric patients (&lt;18 years diagnosed with pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction at a tertiary hospital in Seoul, Korea, between September 2009 and February 2010. Results : A total of 72 children were hospitalized with pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection (median age, 6.0 years; range, 2 months to 18 years. A total of 40% had at least 1 underlying medical condition, including asthma (17%, malignancies (19%, and heart diseases (17%. Of the 72 patients, 54 (76% children admitted with H1N1 infection showed radiographic alterations compatible with pneumonia. There was no significant difference in pre-existing conditions between pandemic influenza A/H1N1 infected patients with or without pneumonia. Children with pandemic influenza A/ H1N1 pneumonia were more likely to have a lower lymphocyte ratio (P=0.02, higher platelet count (P=0.02, and higher level of serum glucose (P=0.003, and more commonly presented with dyspnea than did those without pneumonia (P=0.04. Conclusion : No significant differences in age, sex, or presence of preexisting conditions were found between children hospitalized with pandemic influenza A/H1N1 H1N1 influenza infection with pneumonia and those without pneumonia. Higher leukocyte count, higher glucose level, and a lower lymphocyte ratio were associated with the development of pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza pneumonia.

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection is correlated with the severity of H1N1 pandemic influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Palacios

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Initial reports in May 2009 of the novel influenza strain H1N1pdm estimated a case fatality rate (CFR of 0.6%, similar to that of seasonal influenza. In July 2009, however, Argentina reported 3056 cases with 137 deaths, representing a CFR of 4.5%. Potential explanations for increased CFR included virus reassortment or genetic drift, or infection of a more vulnerable population. Virus genomic sequencing of 26 Argentinian samples representing both severe and mild disease indicated no evidence of reassortment, mutations associated with resistance to antiviral drugs, or genetic drift that might contribute to virulence. Furthermore, no evidence was found for increased frequency of risk factors for H1N1pdm disease. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined nasopharyngeal swab samples (NPS from 199 cases of H1N1pdm infection from Argentina with MassTag PCR, testing for 33 additional microbial agents. The study population consisted of 199 H1N1pdm-infected subjects sampled between 23 June and 4 July 2009. Thirty-nine had severe disease defined as death (n = 20 or hospitalization (n = 19; 160 had mild disease. At least one additional agent of potential pathogenic importance was identified in 152 samples (76%, including Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 62; Haemophilus influenzae (n = 104; human respiratory syncytial virus A (n = 11 and B (n = 1; human rhinovirus A (n = 1 and B (n = 4; human coronaviruses 229E (n = 1 and OC43 (n = 2; Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 2; Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 2; Serratia marcescens (n = 1; and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 35 and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, n = 6. The presence of S. pneumoniae was strongly correlated with severe disease. S. pneumoniae was present in 56.4% of severe cases versus 25% of mild cases; more than one-third of H1N1pdm NPS with S. pneumoniae were from subjects with severe disease (22 of 62 S. pneumoniae-positive NPS, p = 0.0004. In subjects 6 to 55 years of age, the adjusted odds ratio

  14. Epidemiology, clinical characteristics and resource implications of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in intensive care units in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nicolay, Nathalie

    2010-12-01

    To describe the incidence, clinical characteristics and outcomes of critically ill patients in Ireland with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infection, and to provide a dynamic assessment of the burden of such cases on Irish intensive care units.

  15. H7N9 Influenza Virus Is More Virulent in Ferrets than 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yum, Jung; Ku, Keun Bon; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2015-12-01

    The novel H7N9 influenza virus has been infecting humans in China since February 2013 and with a mortality rate of about 40%. This study compared the pathogenicity of the H7N9 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in a ferret model, which shows similar symptoms to those of humans infected with influenza viruses. The H7N9 influenza virus caused a more severe disease than did the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. All of the ferrets infected with the H7N9 influenza virus had died by 6 days after infection, while none of those infected with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus died. Ferrets infected with the H7N9 influenza virus had higher viral titers in their lungs than did those infected with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. Histological findings indicated that hemorrhagic pneumonia was caused by infection with the H7N9 influenza virus, but not with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. In addition, the lung tissues of ferrets infected with the H7N9 influenza virus contained higher levels of chemokines than did those of ferrets infected with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. This study suggests that close monitoring is needed to prevent human infection by the lethal H7N9 influenza virus.

  16. Safety of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine among Pregnant U.S. Military Women and Their Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Macdonald TM, Shakir S, Dryburgh M, Mantay BJ, McDonnell P, et al. Influenza H1N1 (swine flu ) vaccination : a safety surveillance feasibility study using...Naval Health Research Center Safety of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine among Pregnant Women and Their Newborns Ava M.S. Conlin Anna...Safety of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Among Pregnant U.S. Military Women and Their Newborns Ava Marie S. Conlin, DO, MPH, Anna T. Bukowinski

  17. Reassortment Networks and the evolution of pandemic H1N1 swine-origin influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, Shahid H; Pomeroy, Laura W; Janies, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Prior research developed Reassortment Networks to reconstruct the evolution of segmented viruses under both reassortment and mutation. We report their application to the swine-origin pandemic H1N1 virus (S-OIV). A database of all influenza A viruses, for which complete genome sequences were available in Genbank by October 2009, was created and dynamic programming was used to compute distances between all corresponding segments. A reassortment network was created to obtain the minimum cost evolutionary paths from all viruses to the exemplar S-OIV A/California/04/2009. This analysis took 35 hours on the Cray Extreme Multithreading (XMT) supercomputer, which has special hardware to permit efficient parallelization. Six specific H1N1/H1N2 bottleneck viruses were identified that almost always lie on minimum cost paths to S-OIV. We conjecture that these viruses are crucial to S-OIV evolution and worthy of careful study from a molecular biology viewpoint. In phylogenetics, ancestors are typically medians that have no functional constraints. In our method, ancestors are not inferred, but rather chosen from previously observed viruses along a path of mutation and reassortment leading to the target virus. This specificity and functional constraint render our results actionable for further experiments in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Student behavior during a school closure caused by pandemic influenza A/H1N1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many schools were temporarily closed in response to outbreaks of the recently emerged pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus. The effectiveness of closing schools to reduce transmission depends largely on student/family behavior during the closure. We sought to improve our understanding of these behaviors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To characterize this behavior, we surveyed students in grades 9-12 and parents of students in grades 5-8 about student activities during a week long closure of a school during the first months after the disease emerged. We found significant interaction with the community and other students-though less interaction with other students than during school-with the level of interaction increasing with grade. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are useful for the future design of social distancing policies and to improving the ability of modeling studies to accurately predict their impact.

  19. ‘Presenting CXR phenotype of H1N1’ flu compared with contemporaneous non-H1N1, community acquired pneumonia, during pandemic and post-pandemic outbreaks’

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, F.C., E-mail: Fiona.Minns@nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, New Royal Infirmary Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA (United Kingdom); Nimhuineachain, A, E-mail: draideen@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, New Royal Infirmary Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA (United Kingdom); Beek, E.J.R. van, E-mail: Edwin-vanbeek@ed.ac.uk [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, Midlothian EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Ritchie, G., E-mail: drgillritchie@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, New Royal Infirmary Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA (United Kingdom); Hill, A., E-mail: adam.hill318@nhs.net [Department of Respiratory Medicine, New Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Murchison, J.T., E-mail: john.murchison@nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, New Royal Infirmary Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SA (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Patients with H1N1 pneumonia demonstrated more opacified zones on chest x-ray than patients with non-H1N1 pneumonias. • A particular ‘phenotype’ of chest x-ray changes was identified in H1N1 patients. • This H1N1 ‘phenotype’ was the same for the two evaluated ‘flu seasons, during both pandemic and post pandemic stages. - Abstract: Aims: To review, phenotype and assess potential prognostic value of initial chest X-ray findings in patients with H1N1 influenza during seasonal outbreaks of 2009 and 2010, in comparison with non-H1N1, community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods: We retrospectively identified 72 patients admitted to hospital with pneumonia during the seasons of 2009 and 2010. H1N1 cases were confirmed by virology PCR. Presenting chest X-rays were jointly read by 2 radiologists, who were ‘blinded’ to further patient details and divided into 6 zones. Total number of opacified zones, the pattern and distribution of changes and length of hospital stay were recorded. Results: Patients with H1N1 demonstrated more opacified zones (mean of 2.9 compared with 2.0; p = 0.006), which were bilateral in two-thirds compared with a quarter of those with non-H1N1 CAP (p = 0.001). H1N1 radiographs were more likely to be ‘patchy’ versus ‘confluent’ changes of non-H1N1 CAP (p = 0.03) and more often demonstrated peripheral distribution (p = 0.01). H1N1 patients tended to stay in hospital longer (not significant; p = 0.08). A positive correlation existed between number of affected zones and length of inpatient stay, which was statistically significant for the cohorts combined (p = 0.02). The findings were the same for the two evaluated seasons. Conclusion: H1N1 patients demonstrated more extensive disease, which was more likely bilateral, ‘patchy’, and peripheral in distribution. With increasing global cases of H1N1, knowledge of the typical findings of the H1N1 presenting chest X-ray may assist with early triage of patients

  20. The challenges of global case reporting during pandemic A(H1N1) 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephanie; Fitzner, Julia; Merianos, Angela; Mounts, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    During the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza pandemic, the World Health Organization (WHO) asked all Member States to provide case-based data on at least the first 100 laboratory-confirmed influenza cases to generate an early understanding of the pandemic and provide appropriate guidance to affected countries. In reviewing the pandemic surveillance strategy, we evaluated the utility of case-based data collection and the challenges in interpreting these data at the global level. To do this, we assessed compliance with the surveillance recommendation and data completeness of submitted case records and described the epidemiological characteristics of up to the first 110 reported cases from each country, aggregated into regions. From April 2009 to August 2011, WHO received over 18 000 case records from 84 countries. Data reached WHO at different time intervals, in different formats and without information on collection methods. Just over half of the 18 000 records gave the date of symptom onset, which made it difficult to assess whether the cases were among the earliest to be confirmed. Descriptive epidemiological analyses were limited to summarizing age, sex and hospitalization ratios. Centralized analysis of case-based data had little value in describing key features of the pandemic. Results were difficult to interpret and would have been misleading if viewed in isolation. A better approach would be to identify critical questions, standardize data elements and methods of investigation, and create efficient channels for communication between countries and the international public health community. Regular exchange of routine surveillance data will help to consolidate these essential channels of communication.

  1. Economic impacts of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic : a cross-sectional analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Shaneyfelt, Calvin R.

    2010-06-01

    A NISAC study on the economic effects of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic was done in order to assess the differential impacts at the state and industry levels given changes in absenteeism, mortality, and consumer spending rates. Part of the analysis was to determine if there were any direct relationships between pandemic impacts and gross domestic product (GDP) losses. Multiple regression analysis was used because it shows very clearly which predictors are significant in their impact on GDP. GDP impact data taken from the REMI PI+ (Regional Economic Models, Inc., Policy Insight +) model was used to serve as the response variable. NISAC economists selected the average absenteeism rate, mortality rate, and consumer spending categories as the predictor variables. Two outliers were found in the data: Nevada and Washington, DC. The analysis was done twice, with the outliers removed for the second analysis. The second set of regressions yielded a cleaner model, but for the purposes of this study, the analysts deemed it not as useful because particular interest was placed on determining the differential impacts to states. Hospitals and accommodation were found to be the most important predictors of percentage change in GDP among the consumer spending variables.

  2. The effect of risk perception on the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Poletti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza dynamics in Italy was characterized by a notable pattern: as it emerged from the analysis of influenza-like illness data, after an initial period (September-mid-October 2009 characterized by a slow exponential increase in the weekly incidence, a sudden and sharp increase of the growth rate was observed by mid-October. The aim here is to understand whether spontaneous behavioral changes in the population could be responsible for such a pattern of epidemic spread. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to face this issue, a mathematical model of influenza transmission, accounting for spontaneous behavioral changes driven by cost/benefit considerations on the perceived risk of infection, is proposed and validated against empirical epidemiological data. The performed investigation revealed that an initial overestimation of the risk of infection in the general population, possibly induced by the high concern for the emergence of a new influenza pandemic, results in a pattern of spread compliant with the observed one. This finding is also supported by the analysis of antiviral drugs purchase over the epidemic period. Moreover, by assuming a generation time of 2.5 days, the initially diffuse misperception of the risk of infection led to a relatively low value of the reproductive number , which increased to in the subsequent phase of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study highlights that spontaneous behavioral changes in the population, not accounted by the large majority of influenza transmission models, can not be neglected to correctly inform public health decisions. In fact, individual choices can drastically affect the epidemic spread, by altering timing, dynamics and overall number of cases.

  3. On the roads to H1N1 pandemic era:drive safe and fearless using colour-coded masks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Shahid

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Notwithstanding the end of2009 H1N1 pandemic, the threat for its revisit still persists andWHO has warned to remain vigilant. During that time the situation was more panicky than fatal. In this article, a suggestion to minimize the panic is provided by the usage of colour-coded masks and is proposed hereby as a“population segregation”approach in case of the revisit ofH1N1 or similar threatening respiratory viral infections.

  4. Household transmission of influenza A(H1N1pdm09 in the pandemic and post-pandemic seasons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itziar Casado

    Full Text Available The transmission of influenza viruses occurs person to person and is facilitated by contacts within enclosed environments such as households. The aim of this study was to evaluate secondary attack rates and factors associated with household transmission of laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1pdm09 in the pandemic and post-pandemic seasons.During the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons, 76 sentinel physicians in Navarra, Spain, took nasopharyngeal and pharyngeal swabs from patients diagnosed with influenza-like illness. A trained nurse telephoned households of those patients who were laboratory-confirmed for influenza A(H1N1pdm09 to ask about the symptoms, risk factors and vaccination status of each household member.In the 405 households with a patient laboratory-confirmed for influenza A(H1N1pdm09, 977 susceptible contacts were identified; 16% of them (95% CI 14-19% presented influenza-like illness and were considered as secondary cases. The secondary attack rate was 14% in 2009-2010 and 19% in the 2010-2011 season (p=0.049, an increase that mainly affected persons with major chronic conditions. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the risk of being a secondary case was higher in the 2010-2011 season than in the 2009-2010 season (adjusted odds ratio: 1.72; 95% CI 1.17-2.54, and in children under 5 years, with a decreasing risk in older contacts. Influenza vaccination was associated with lesser incidence of influenza-like illness near to statistical significance (adjusted odds ratio: 0.29; 95% CI 0.08-1.03.The secondary attack rate in households was higher in the second season than in the first pandemic season. Children had a greater risk of infection. Preventive measures should be maintained in the second pandemic season, especially in high-risk persons.

  5. Possible basis for the emergence of H1N1 viruses with pandemic potential from avian hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçer, Zeynep A; Krauss, Scott; Zanin, Mark; Danner, Angela; Gulati, Shelly; Jones, Jeremy C; Friedman, Kimberly; Graham, Allison; Forrest, Heather; Seiler, Jon; Air, Gillian M; Webster, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    Influenza A viruses of the H1N1 subtype have emerged from the avian influenza gene pool in aquatic birds and caused human pandemics at least twice during the past century. Despite this fact, surprisingly little is known about the H1N1 gene pool in the aquatic bird reservoir. A preliminary study showed that an H1N1 virus from a shorebird of the Charadriiformes order was transmitted between animals through the airborne route of infection, whereas an H1N1 virus from a bird of the Anseriformes order was not. Here we show that two of the three H1N1 viruses isolated from Charadriiformes species in 2009 were transmitted between animals through the airborne route of infection, and five H1N1 isolates from Anseriformes species were not. The one H1N1 virus from a Charadriiformes species that failed to transmit through the airborne route was a reassortant possessing multiple internal gene segments from Anseriformes species. The molecular differences between the airborne-transmissible and non-airborne-transmissible H1N1 viruses were multigenic, involving the selection of virus with human-like receptor-binding specificity (α2-6 sialic acid) and multiple differences in the polymerase complex, mainly in the PB2, PB1-F2, and nonstructural genes.

  6. Assessing Google flu trends performance in the United States during the 2009 influenza virus A (H1N1 pandemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Cook

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Google Flu Trends (GFT uses anonymized, aggregated internet search activity to provide near-real time estimates of influenza activity. GFT estimates have shown a strong correlation with official influenza surveillance data. The 2009 influenza virus A (H1N1 pandemic [pH1N1] provided the first opportunity to evaluate GFT during a non-seasonal influenza outbreak. In September 2009, an updated United States GFT model was developed using data from the beginning of pH1N1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the accuracy of each U.S. GFT model by comparing weekly estimates of ILI (influenza-like illness activity with the U.S. Outpatient Influenza-like Illness Surveillance Network (ILINet. For each GFT model we calculated the correlation and RMSE (root mean square error between model estimates and ILINet for four time periods: pre-H1N1, Summer H1N1, Winter H1N1, and H1N1 overall (Mar 2009-Dec 2009. We also compared the number of queries, query volume, and types of queries (e.g., influenza symptoms, influenza complications in each model. Both models' estimates were highly correlated with ILINet pre-H1N1 and over the entire surveillance period, although the original model underestimated the magnitude of ILI activity during pH1N1. The updated model was more correlated with ILINet than the original model during Summer H1N1 (r = 0.95 and 0.29, respectively. The updated model included more search query terms than the original model, with more queries directly related to influenza infection, whereas the original model contained more queries related to influenza complications. CONCLUSIONS: Internet search behavior changed during pH1N1, particularly in the categories "influenza complications" and "term for influenza." The complications associated with pH1N1, the fact that pH1N1 began in the summer rather than winter, and changes in health-seeking behavior each may have played a part. Both GFT models performed well prior to and during pH1

  7. Clinical characteristics of pediatric hospitalizations associated with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 in Northern Bavaria, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieching Anna

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 (PIA virus infected large parts of the pediatric population with a wide clinical spectrum and an initially unknown complication rate. The aims of our study were to define clinical characteristics and outcome of pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009-associated hospitalizations (PIAH in children Results Between July 2009 and March 2010, 94 PIAH (62% males occurred in children Conclusions Most PIAH demonstrated a benign course of disease. However, six children (6% needed treatment at an intensive care unit for severe complications.

  8. Properly folded bacterially expressed H1N1 hemagglutinin globular head and ectodomain vaccines protect ferrets against H1N1 pandemic influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surender Khurana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the face of impending influenza pandemic, a rapid vaccine production and mass vaccination is the most effective approach to prevent the large scale mortality and morbidity that was associated with the 1918 "Spanish Flu". The traditional process of influenza vaccine production in eggs is time consuming and may not meet the demands of rapid global vaccination required to curtail influenza pandemic. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recombinant technology can be used to express the hemagglutinin (HA of the emerging new influenza strain in a variety of systems including mammalian, insect, and bacterial cells. In this study, two forms of HA proteins derived from the currently circulating novel H1N1 A/California/07/2009 virus, HA1 (1-330 and HA (1-480, were expressed and purified from E. coli under controlled redox refolding conditions that favoured proper protein folding. However, only the recombinant HA1 (1-330 protein formed oligomers, including functional trimers that bound receptor and caused agglutination of human red blood cells. These proteins were used to vaccinate ferrets prior to challenge with the A/California/07/2009 virus. Both proteins induced neutralizing antibodies, and reduced viral loads in nasal washes. However, the HA1 (1-330 protein that had higher content of multimeric forms provided better protection from fever and weight loss at a lower vaccine dose compared with HA (1-480. Protein yield for the HA1 (1-330 ranged around 40 mg/Liter, while the HA (1-480 yield was 0.4-0.8 mg/Liter. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study that describes production in bacterial system of properly folded functional globular HA1 domain trimers, lacking the HA2 transmembrane protein, that elicit potent neutralizing antibody responses following vaccination and protect ferrets from in vivo challenge. The combination of bacterial expression system with established quality control methods could provide a mechanism for rapid large

  9. Willingness to accept H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine: A cross-sectional study of Hong Kong community nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Carmen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2009 pandemic of influenza A (H1N1 infection has alerted many governments to make preparedness plan to control the spread of influenza A (H1N1 infection. Vaccination for influenza is one of the most important primary preventative measures to reduce the disease burden. Our study aims to assess the willingness of nurses who work for the community nursing service (CNS in Hong Kong on their acceptance of influenza A (H1N1 influenza vaccination. Methods 401 questionnaires were posted from June 24, 2009 to June 30, 2009 to community nurses with 67% response rate. Results of the 267 respondents on their willingness to accept influenza A (H1N1 vaccine were analyzed. Results Twenty-seven percent of respondents were willing to accept influenza vaccination if vaccines were available. Having been vaccinated for seasonable influenza in the previous 12 months were significantly independently associated with their willingness to accept influenza A (H1N1 vaccination (OR = 4.03; 95% CI: 2.03-7.98. Conclusions Similar to previous findings conducted in hospital healthcare workers and nurses, we confirmed that the willingness of community nurses to accept influenza A (H1N1 vaccination is low. Future studies that evaluate interventions to address nurses' specific concerns or interventions that aim to raise the awareness among nurses on the importance of influenza A (H1N1 vaccination to protect vulnerable patient populations is needed.

  10. Broadly cross-reactive antibodies dominate the human B cell response against 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza pandemic demonstrated the global health threat of reassortant influenza strains. Herein, we report a detailed analysis of plasmablast and monoclonal antibody responses induced by pandemic H1N1 infection in humans. Unlike antibodies elicited by annual influenza vaccinations, most neutralizing antibodies induced by pandemic H1N1 infection were broadly cross-reactive against epitopes in the hemagglutinin (HA) stalk and head domain of multiple influenza strains. T...

  11. Influenza pandêmica A (H1N1 2009: fatores de risco para o internamento Pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009: risk factors for hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Lenzi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os aspectos da influenza pandêmica A (H1N1 2009 em pacientes hospitalizados a fim de identificar os fatores de risco para o internamento e, consequentemente, para o agravamento da doença. MÉTODOS: Estudo observacional e retrospectivo realizado entre março e dezembro de 2010. Os dados foram coletados a partir do Sistema Nacional de Agravos de Notificação do Ministério da Saúde. Foram incluídos somente os pacientes hospitalizados e não hospitalizados com confirmação laboratorial da infecção durante o período de estudo. As variáveis referentes às características demográficas e clínicas foram avaliadas estatisticamente a fim de comparar as taxas de internamento na presença ou na ausência desses fatores. Os fatores de risco foram identificados por regressão logística. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos no estudo 4.740 pacientes com confirmação laboratorial da infecção. Desses, 1.911 foram internados, e 258 (13,5% foram a óbito. Os fatores de risco para o internamento foram idade (faixa etária de 20 a 29 anos, etnia negra ou indígena, presença de algumas comorbidades (cardiopatias, pneumopatias, nefropatias, hemoglobinopatia, imunodepressão, diabetes, obesidade, puerpério e tabagismo, número alto de comorbidades associadas, e alguns sintomas (dispneia, diarreia, vômito, dor torácica, hemoptise, pneumonia e sibilos. Níveis maiores de escolaridade e uso precoce do oseltamivir foram relacionados a fatores de proteção. A hospitalização contribuiu para o aumento da sobrevida. CONCLUSÕES: O conhecimento das características epidemiológicas que podem estar associadas a internação, gravidade da doença e mortalidade podem ser úteis na adoção de medidas preventivas e no diagnóstico e tratamento precoce da doença, colaborando para a diminuição dos óbitos e da necessidade de hospitalização.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 in hospitalized patients in order to identify risk

  12. Outbreaks of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal influenza A (H3N2) on cruise ship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kate A; Armstrong, Paul; McAnulty, Jeremy M; Iwasenko, Jenna M; Dwyer, Dominic E

    2010-11-01

    To determine the extent and pattern of influenza transmission and effectiveness of containment measures, we investigated dual outbreaks of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and influenza A (H3N2) that had occurred on a cruise ship in May 2009. Of 1,970 passengers and 734 crew members, 82 (3.0%) were infected with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, 98 (3.6%) with influenza A (H3N2) virus, and 2 (0.1%) with both. Among 45 children who visited the ship's childcare center, infection rate for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 was higher than that for influenza A (H3N2) viruses. Disembarked passengers reported a high level of compliance with isolation and quarantine recommendations. We found 4 subsequent cases epidemiologically linked to passengers but no evidence of sustained transmission to the community or passengers on the next cruise. Among this population of generally healthy passengers, children seemed more susceptible to pandemic (H1N1) 2009 than to influenza (H3N2) viruses. Intensive disease control measures successfully contained these outbreaks.

  13. Clinical and radiological features of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus infection manifesting as acute febrile respiratory illness at their initial presentations: comparison with contemporaneous non-H1N1 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Tae Jin (Dept. of Radiology, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Park, Chang Min; Choi, Seung Hong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Goo, Jin Mo (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)), email: cmpark@radiol.snu.ac.kr; Kwon, Gu Jin (Dept. of Family Medicine, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Family Medicine, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)); Woo, Sung Koo (Dept. of Radiology, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)); Park, Seung Hoon (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-05-15

    Background Since the first outbreak caused by the pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza in Mexico, the virus has spread widely across the world with meaningful morbidity and mortality. However, there are few data on the comparative investigations to assess the clinical and radiological features between the H1N1 patient and non-H1N1 patients. Purpose To assess the clinical and radiological features of patients infected by the pandemic H1N1 2009 flu virus at their initial presentation and to compare them with contemporaneous non-H1N1 patients with acute febrile respiratory illness. Material and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the ethics committee of the Armed Forces Medical Command, South Korea. From August to September 2009, 337 consecutive patients presented with an acute febrile respiratory illness in a tertiary military hospital. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain-reaction tests were performed in 62 of these patients under the impression of H1N1 infection. Clinical and radiological features at their initial presentation were described for the H1N1 group (n = 35) and non-H1N1 group (n = 27) and compared between the two groups. Results Increased C-reactive protein level (97%) without leukocytosis (9%) or increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (0%) was common in the H1N1 group at their initial presentation. On chest radiographs, 12 of 35 (34%) H1N1 patients had abnormal findings; nodules in 10 patients (83%) and consolidations in two (17%). Of the 28 H1N1 patients who underwent thin-section CT 16 patients (57%) showed abnormal findings; ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in 15 (94%), and nodules in 13 (81%). However, there were no significant differences between the H1N1 group and non-H1N1 group in terms of symptoms, laboratory results, or radiological findings (P > 0.05). Conclusion Patients with H1N1 infection show consistent clinical and radiological features at their initial presentation, however, clinical and radiological features of the H1N1 group are

  14. University life and pandemic influenza: Attitudes and intended behaviour of staff and students towards pandemic (H1N1 2009

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    MacIntyre C Raina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a pandemic young adults are more likely to be infected, increasing the potential for Universities to be explosive disease outbreak centres. Outbreak management is essential to reduce the impact in both the institution and the surrounding community. Through the use of an online survey, we aimed to measure the perceptions and responses of staff and students towards pandemic (H1N1 2009 at a major university in Sydney, Australia. Methods The survey was available online from 29 June to 30 September 2009. The sample included academic staff, general staff and students of the University. Results A total of 2882 surveys were completed. Nearly all respondents (99.6%, 2870/2882 were aware of the Australian pandemic situation and 64.2% (1851/2882 reported either "no anxiety" or "disinterest." Asian-born respondents were significantly (p Conclusions Responses to a pandemic are subject to change in its pre-, early and mid-outbreak stages. Lessons for these institutions in preparation for a second wave and future disease outbreaks include the need to promote positive public health behaviours amongst young people and students.

  15. Epidemiological characteristics of the influenza A(H1N1 2009 pandemic in the Western Pacific Region

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    Lisa McCallum

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The first laboratory-confirmed cases of infection with pandemic influenza A(H1N1 2009 in the Western Pacific Region were reported on 28 April 2009. By 11 June 2009, the day the pandemic was declared by the World Health Organization, nine Western Pacific Region countries and areas had reported laboratory-confirmed pandemic influenza A(H1N1 2009 cases. From April 2009 to July 2010, more than 250 000 cases and 1800 deaths from laboratory-confirmed pandemic influenza A(H1N1 2009 were reported from 34 countries and areas in the Region. By age group region-wide, 8.6%, 41.9%, 48.3%, and 1.2% of cases were in the < 5 years, 5–14 years, 15–64 years, and 65+ years age groups, respectively; the overall crude case fatality ratio in the Western Pacific Region was 0.5%. The pandemic demonstrated that region-wide disease reporting was possible. Countries and areas of the Western Pacific Region should take this opportunity to strengthen the systems established during the pandemic to develop routine disease reporting.

  16. The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic and Minnesota's K-12 schools: public health lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Como-Sabetti, Kathryn; Livingston, Franci; Gahr, Pamala; Nagle, Kayla; Martin, Karen; Morin, Craig; Parilla, Elizabeth

    2010-09-01

    Prior to 2009, influenza pandemic planners had primarily planned for a virus that would originate in a location other than North America, giving public health officials in the United States time to determine its severity before widespread disease occurred here. Thus, response plans for schools focused on closure in the case of a severe pandemic and potential closure in the event of a moderate one. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic, however, presented a different scenario. The severity of 2009 H1N1 was initially unknown and later was determined to be mild to moderate. Thus, as the pandemic unfolded, state and national public health entities found themselves adapting their recommendations for school closure. This article reviews Minnesota's experience with 2009 H1N1, focusing on the pandemic among school-aged children during the spring (April to August 2009) and fall (September 2009 to April 2010), and it chronicles how outbreak surveillance policies and recommendations for K-12 schools changed over the course of the pandemic.

  17. Pandemic H1N1 2009 virus in Norwegian pigs naïve to influenza A viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germundsson, A.; Gjerset, B.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane;

    In March-April 2009, a novel pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (pH1N1-09v) emerged in the human population. The first case of pH1N1v infection in pigs was reported from Canada in May 2009. In Norway, pH1N1v infection was recorded in a swine herd on the 10th of October of 2009. Here, we report...... showed clinical signs or iii) with a history of close contact with or close proximity to infected herds. In addition, blood samples were collected from nucleus and multiplier breeding herds. Detection of pH1N1-09v was initially performed using a real-time RT-PCR targeted to detect influenza A virus....... Positive samples were tested by a pH1N1-09v specific real-time RT-PCR. Blood samples were tested for presence of antibodies against influenza A virus by ELISA (IDVET) and positive samples in the ELISA were tested by haemagglutinin inhibition test using A/California/07/09 as antigen. From the onset...

  18. IL-17 response mediates acute lung injury induced by the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1)Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenggang Li; Chen Wang; Zhongwei Chen; Li Xing; Chong Tang; Xiangwu Ju; Feng Guo; Jiejie Deng; Yan Zhao; Peng Yang; Jun Tang; Penghui Yang; Huanling Wang; Zhongpeng Zhao; Zhinan Yin; Bin Cao; Xiliang Wang; Chengyu Jiang; Yang Sun; Taisheng Li; Chen Wang; Zhong Wang; Zhen Zou; Yiwu Yan; Wei Wang

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 flu pandemic involved the emergence of a new strain of a swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus(S-OIV H1N1)that infected almost every country in the world.Most infections resulted in respiratory illness and some severe cases resulted in acute lung injury.In this report,we are the first to describe a mouse model of S-OIV virus infection with acute lung injury and immune responses that reflect human clinical disease.The clinical efficacy of the antiviral oseltamivir(Tamiflu)administered in the early stages of S-OIV H1N1 infection was confirmed in the mouse model.Moreover,elevated levels of IL-17,Th-17 mediators and IL-17-responsive cytokines were found in serum samples of S-OIV-infected patients in Beijing.IL-17 deficiency or treatment with monoclonal antibodies against IL-17-ameliorated acute lung injury induced by the S-OIV H1N1 virus in mice.These results suggest that IL-17 plays an important role in S-OIV-induced acute lung injury and that monoclonal antibodies against IL-17 could be useful as a potential therapeutic remedy for future S-OIV H1N1 pandemics.

  19. Cross-neutralizing antibodies to pandemic 2009 H1N1 and recent seasonal H1N1 influenza A strains influenced by a mutation in hemagglutinin subunit 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus (2009 H1N1 differs from H1N1 strains that circulated in the past 50 years, but resembles the A/New Jersey/1976 H1N1 strain used in the 1976 swine influenza vaccine. We investigated whether sera from persons immunized with the 1976 swine influenza or recent seasonal influenza vaccines, or both, neutralize 2009 H1N1. Using retroviral pseudovirions bearing hemagglutinins on their surface (HA-pseudotypes, we found that 77% of the sera collected in 1976 after immunization with the A/New Jersey/1976 H1N1 swine influenza vaccine neutralized 2009 H1N1. Forty five percent also neutralized A/New Caledonia/20/1999 H1N1, a strain used in seasonal influenza vaccines during the 2000/01-2006/07 seasons. Among adults aged 48-64 who received the swine influenza vaccine in 1976 and recent seasonal influenza vaccines during the 2004/05-2008/09 seasons, 83% had sera that neutralized 2009 H1N1. However, 68% of age-matched subjects who received the same seasonal influenza vaccines, but did not receive the 1976 swine influenza vaccine, also had sera that neutralized 2009 H1N1. Sera from both 1976 and contemporary cohorts frequently had cross-neutralizing antibodies to 2009 H1N1 and A/New Caledonia/20/1999 that mapped to hemagglutinin subunit 2 (HA2. A conservative mutation in HA2 corresponding to a residue in the A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 and A/Brisbane/59/2007 H1N1 strains that circulated in the 2006/07 and 2007/08 influenza seasons, respectively, abrogated this neutralization. These findings highlight a cross-neutralization determinant influenced by a point mutation in HA2 and suggest that HA2 may be evolving under direct or indirect immune pressure.

  20. Potency of a vaccine prepared from A/swine/Hokkaido/2/1981 (H1N1 against A/Narita/1/2009 (H1N1 pandemic influenza virus strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamatsu Masatoshi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pandemic 2009 (H1N1 influenza virus has spread throughout the world and is now causing seasonal influenza. To prepare for the emergence of pandemic influenza, we have established a library of virus strains isolated from birds, pigs, and humans in global surveillance studies. Methods Inactivated whole virus particle (WV and ether-split (ES vaccines were prepared from an influenza virus strain, A/swine/Hokkaido/2/1981 (H1N1, from the library and from A/Narita/1/2009 (H1N1 pandemic strain. Each of the vaccines was injected subcutaneously into mice and their potencies were evaluated by challenge with A/Narita/1/2009 (H1N1 virus strain in mice. Results A/swine/Hokkaido/2/81 (H1N1, which was isolated from the lung of a diseased piglet, was selected on the basis of their antigenicity and growth capacity in embryonated chicken eggs. Two injections of the WV vaccine induced an immune response in mice, decreasing the impact of disease caused by the challenge with A/Narita/1/2009 (H1N1, as did the vaccine prepared from the homologous strain. Conclusion The WV vaccine prepared from an influenza virus in the library is useful as an emergency vaccine in the early phase of pandemic influenza.

  1. Epidemiological survey on pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in Kurdistan province, Islamic Republic of Iran, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrasiabian, S; Mohsenpour, B; Bagheri, K H; Barari, M; Ghaderi, E; Hashemi, R; Garibi, F

    2014-04-03

    This study evaluated the epidemiology of suspected cases of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in 2009-2010 in Kurdistan province, a frontier province of the Islamic Republic of Iran. A questionnaire covering demographic characteristics, clinical presentation and outcome, and history of exposure and travel was completed by patients attending health centres and hospitals in the province. Nasal and throat swabs were analysed by RT-PCR. A total of 1059 suspected cases were assessed; H1N1 influenza A was confirmed in 157 (14.8%). The highest proportion of confirmed cases was 30.0%, among children aged Kurdistan.

  2. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquette, Stéphane G. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Banner, David [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chi, Le Thi Bao [Department of Microbiology, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Carlo Urbani Centre, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Leon, Alberto J. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Huang, Stephen S.H. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Farooqui, Amber [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); and others

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development.

  3. A Metagenomic Analysis of Pandemic Influenza A (2009 H1N1) Infection in Patients from North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greninger, Alexander L.; Chen, Eunice C.; Sittler, Taylor; Scheinerman, Alex; Roubinian, Nareg; Yu, Guixia; Kim, Edward; Pillai, Dylan R.; Guyard, Cyril; Mazzulli, Tony; Isa, Pavel; Arias, Carlos F.; Hackett, John; Schochetman, Gerald; Miller, Steve; Tang, Patrick; Chiu, Charles Y.

    2010-01-01

    Although metagenomics has been previously employed for pathogen discovery, its cost and complexity have prevented its use as a practical front-line diagnostic for unknown infectious diseases. Here we demonstrate the utility of two metagenomics-based strategies, a pan-viral microarray (Virochip) and deep sequencing, for the identification and characterization of 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus. Using nasopharyngeal swabs collected during the earliest stages of the pandemic in Mexico, Canada, and the United States (n = 17), the Virochip was able to detect a novel virus most closely related to swine influenza viruses without a priori information. Deep sequencing yielded reads corresponding to 2009 H1N1 influenza in each sample (percentage of aligned sequences corresponding to 2009 H1N1 ranging from 0.0011% to 10.9%), with up to 97% coverage of the influenza genome in one sample. Detection of 2009 H1N1 by deep sequencing was possible even at titers near the limits of detection for specific RT-PCR, and the percentage of sequence reads was linearly correlated with virus titer. Deep sequencing also provided insights into the upper respiratory microbiota and host gene expression in response to 2009 H1N1 infection. An unbiased analysis combining sequence data from all 17 outbreak samples revealed that 90% of the 2009 H1N1 genome could be assembled de novo without the use of any reference sequence, including assembly of several near full-length genomic segments. These results indicate that a streamlined metagenomics detection strategy can potentially replace the multiple conventional diagnostic tests required to investigate an outbreak of a novel pathogen, and provide a blueprint for comprehensive diagnosis of unexplained acute illnesses or outbreaks in clinical and public health settings. PMID:20976137

  4. A metagenomic analysis of pandemic influenza A (2009 H1N1 infection in patients from North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L Greninger

    Full Text Available Although metagenomics has been previously employed for pathogen discovery, its cost and complexity have prevented its use as a practical front-line diagnostic for unknown infectious diseases. Here we demonstrate the utility of two metagenomics-based strategies, a pan-viral microarray (Virochip and deep sequencing, for the identification and characterization of 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus. Using nasopharyngeal swabs collected during the earliest stages of the pandemic in Mexico, Canada, and the United States (n = 17, the Virochip was able to detect a novel virus most closely related to swine influenza viruses without a priori information. Deep sequencing yielded reads corresponding to 2009 H1N1 influenza in each sample (percentage of aligned sequences corresponding to 2009 H1N1 ranging from 0.0011% to 10.9%, with up to 97% coverage of the influenza genome in one sample. Detection of 2009 H1N1 by deep sequencing was possible even at titers near the limits of detection for specific RT-PCR, and the percentage of sequence reads was linearly correlated with virus titer. Deep sequencing also provided insights into the upper respiratory microbiota and host gene expression in response to 2009 H1N1 infection. An unbiased analysis combining sequence data from all 17 outbreak samples revealed that 90% of the 2009 H1N1 genome could be assembled de novo without the use of any reference sequence, including assembly of several near full-length genomic segments. These results indicate that a streamlined metagenomics detection strategy can potentially replace the multiple conventional diagnostic tests required to investigate an outbreak of a novel pathogen, and provide a blueprint for comprehensive diagnosis of unexplained acute illnesses or outbreaks in clinical and public health settings.

  5. The decision to vaccinate or not during the H1N1 pandemic: selecting the lesser of two evils?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R Ashbaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the release of the H1N1 vaccine, there was much controversy surrounding its use despite strong encouragements to be vaccinated in the media. Though studies have examined factors influencing people's decision to be vaccinated, few have focused on how general beliefs about the world or where an individual gathers information might influence that decision. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional web-based survey (N = 817 was conducted during the H1N1 outbreak after the vaccine was available. Variables examined included sociodemographic information, health related behaviours, specific beliefs concerning the H1N1 virus and its vaccine, as well as general beliefs, such as fear of contamination, intolerance of uncertainty, emotional states, coping behaviour, and the source of information concerning the virus. Three converging statistical methods were used to examine the associations - analysis of variance, logistic regression, and recursive partition modelling. The most consistent and strongest association was that negative beliefs about the H1N1 vaccine (e.g. fear of its side effects was related to the decision not to be vaccinated, whereas beliefs about the dangers of the H1N1 virus was related to the decision to be vaccinated. Most notably, having very strong negative beliefs about the vaccine was a more powerful predictor than even strong beliefs about the dangers of the H1N1 virus. Furthermore, obtaining information from the Internet, as compared to more traditional sources of information (e.g., TV, newspapers was related to the decision not to be vaccinated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results are consistent with the Health Belief Model. Importantly they suggest that during future pandemics public health officials should not only discuss the dangers of the pandemic but also (i take additional steps to reassure the public about the safety of vaccines and (ii monitor the information disseminated over the Internet

  6. [Virological surveillance of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus and its genetic characteristics in Hunan Province, 2009-2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Huang, Yi-Wei; Liu, Yun-Zhi; Li, Fang-Cai; Chen, Zhang; Li, Wen-Chao; Deng, Zhi-Hong; Hu, Shi-Xiong; Gao, Li-Dong

    2013-03-01

    To understand and master the dynamic variation of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in Hunan province from 2009 to 2011, and to know the genetic characteristics and drug resistance of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 viruses. Throat swab specimens of influenza-like illness patients were collected from sentinel hospitals and tested for influenza by fluorescent PCR or virus isolation methods. Partial isolates were selected for sequencing. The sequences were used for phylogenetic analysis by MEGA 5. 05 software. From the 20th week of 2009 to the 52nd week of 2011, 17 773 specimens were tested. 3 831 specimens were influenza-positive with a positive rate of 21. 6%, of which 1 794 were positive specimens of pandemic (H1N1) 2009, accounting for 46. 8%00 of the influenza-positives. There were 2 epidemic peaks of pandemic (H1N1) 2009, which were in the 41st-53rd week of 2009 and the 1st-12nd week of 2011, respectively. The HA genes of 23 strains that were selected for sequencing had close relationship; the distribution of strains in the phylogenetic tree was basically in chronological order. The complete genome sequence analysis showed that all of 8 gene segments of 7 strains were homologous to the vaccine strain, and there was no gene reassortment. The HA amino acid sites of the 23 strains were highly similar to the vaccine strain (98. 2% - 100. 0% in homology), but all 23 strains had P83S, S203T and 1321V mutations. The 222 site mutation that may lead to enhanced virulence was found in the A/Hunan/YQ30/2009 strain. The mutation was D222E. There was no oseltamivir resistance mutation found in all strains. The pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in Hunan province from 2009 to 2011 had a bimodal distribution. There was no large-scale variation of virus genes. The clinical use of oseltamivir was still effective. Key words: Pandemic (H1N1) 2009; Surveillance; Genetic characteristics

  7. Prediction of the epidemic trends of pandemic H1N1 2009, using SEIR model%应用SEIR模型预测2009年甲型H1N1流感流行趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小莉; 曹志冬; 曾大军; 杨鹏; 张奕; 钱海坤; 田丽丽; 黎新宇; 王全意

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨SEIR模型预测甲型H1N1流感流行趋势的功效.方法 利用国庆前北京市流感样病例数、流感样病例中甲型H1N1流感阳性率及二级以上医院流感样病例就诊率等参数估算甲型H1N1流感实际感染人数,基于传染病传播动力学,建立SEIR模型,对国庆后甲型H1N1流感的流行趋势及高峰达到时间进行预测,与甲型H1N1流感病原学监测结果进行比较,评价模型的预测效果.结果 经SEIR模型估算,2009年北京市甲型H1N1流感的平均潜伏期约为1.51天,平均感染期为2.12天,基本再生数为1.28.病原学监测结果显示:2009年甲型H1N1流感于11月初达到高峰,而SEIR模型预测2009年甲型H1N1流感最晚将于12月4日达到高峰.结论 SEIR模型可根据流感流行的初期监测数据预测其未来流行趋势.%Objective To explore the efficiency of SEIR model(susceptible,exposed,infectious and recovered model) for predicting the trend of pandemic H1N1 2008.Methods Data of the number of influenza-like illness cases(ILIs),pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 positive rate among ILIs and rate on clinical visit of ILIs before National Day ( October 1 ) were collected and analyzed to develop SEIR model for predicting the trend of pandemic H1N1 2009 after National Day,based on dynamics of infectious disease transmission.The results were compared with the results from and pandemic H1N1 2009 virologic surveillance data to evaluate the efficiency of SEIR model.Results The mean incubation period of pandemic H1N1 2009 was estimated 1.51 days,with a mean duration of infectiousness of 2.12 days,and a mean basic reproductive number of 1.28.As shown in the virologic surveillance data,pandemic H1N1 2009 peaked in early November.However,SEIR model predicted that pandemic H1N1 2009 would peak no later than December 4th.Conclusion SEIR model could be developed to predict the trend of pandemic influenza based on the early surveillance data.

  8. Supply of neuraminidase inhibitors related to reduced influenza A (H1N1) mortality during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic: summary of an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paula E; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Hubbard, Roderick J; Li, Jiabai; Meyer, Alison E; Stephens, Peter; Mounts, Anthony W; Rolfes, Melissa A; Penn, Charles R

    2013-09-01

    When the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic spread across the globe from April 2009 to August 2010, many WHO Member States used antiviral drugs, specifically neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir and zanamivir, to treat influenza patients in critical condition. Antivirals have been found to be effective in reducing severity and duration of influenza illness, and likely reduce morbidity; however, it is unclear whether NAIs used during the pandemic reduced H1N1 mortality. To assess the association between antivirals and influenza mortality, at an ecologic level, country-level data on supply of oseltamivir and zanamivir were compared to laboratory-confirmed H1N1 deaths (per 100 000 people) from July 2009 to August 2010 in 42 WHO Member States. From this analysis, it was found that each 10% increase in kilograms of oseltamivir, per 100 000 people, was associated with a 1·6% reduction in H1N1 mortality over the pandemic period [relative rate (RR) = 0·84 per log increase in oseltamivir supply]. Each 10% increase in kilogram of active zanamivir, per 100 000, was associated with a 0·3% reduction in H1N1 mortality (RR = 0·97 per log increase). While limitations exist in the inference that can be drawn from an ecologic evaluation, this analysis offers evidence of a protective relationship between antiviral drug supply and influenza mortality and supports a role for influenza antiviral use in future pandemics. This article summarises the original study described previously, which can be accessed through the following citation: Miller PE, Rambachan A, Hubbard RJ, Li J, Meyer AE, et al. (2012) Supply of Neuraminidase Inhibitors Related to Reduced Influenza A (H1N1) Mortality during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Pandemic: An Ecological Study. PLoS ONE 7(9): e43491.

  9. Persistence of the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus in water and on non-porous surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Dublineau

    Full Text Available Knowledge of influenza A virus survival in different environmental conditions is a key element for the implementation of hygiene and personal protection measures by health authorities. As it is dependent on virus isolates even within the same subtype, we studied the survival of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm virus in water and on non-porous surface. The H1N1pdm virus was subjected to various environmental parameters over time and tested for infectivity. In water, at low and medium salinity levels and 4°C, virus survived at least 200 days. Increasing temperature and salinity had a strong negative effect on the survival of the virus which remained infectious no more than 1 day at 35°C and 270 parts per thousand (ppt of salt. Based on modeled data, the H1N1pdm virus retained its infectivity on smooth non-porous surface for at least 7 days at 35°C and up to 66 days at 4°C. The H1N1pdm virus has thus the ability to persist in water and on glass surface for extended periods of time, even at 35°C. Additional experiments suggest that external viral structures in direct contact with the environment are mostly involved in loss of virus infectivity.

  10. Haemagglutinin and nucleoprotein replicon particle vaccination of swine protects against the pandemic H1N1 2009 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Veen, R L; Mogler, M A; Russell, B J; Loynachan, A T; Harris, D L H; Kamrud, K I

    2013-10-12

    The recent emergence of the pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) and H3N2 variant influenza A viruses (IAV) in 2009 and 2011-2012, respectively, highlight the zoonotic potential of influenza viruses and the need for vaccines capable of eliciting heterosubtypic protection. In these studies, single-cycle, propagation-defective replicon particle (RP) vaccines expressing IAV haemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) genes were constructed and efficacy was evaluated in homologous and heterologous pig challenge studies with the pH1N1 2009 influenza virus (A/California/04/2009). Homologous HA RP vaccination eliminated virus shedding and decreased pulmonary pathology in pigs following pH1N1 2009 challenge. An RP vaccine expressing an H3N2-derived NP gene was able to decrease nasal shedding and viral load following heterosubtypic pH1N1 2009 challenge in pigs. These studies indicate that although homologous vaccination of swine remains the most effective means of preventing IAV infection, other vaccine alternatives do offer a level of heterosubtypic protection, and should continue to be evaluated for their ability to provide broader protection.

  11. Polymyositis following Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 and 2009-10 Seasonal Trivalent Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clodoveo Ferri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic associations between inflammatory myopathies with vaccinations were described in the literature, raising the possible trigger value of vaccines in the development of these autoimmune disorders. Here, we reported the clinical history of 3 patients who developed polymyositis complicated by interstitial lung disease (2 cases and dermatomyositis (1 case, after influenza A (H1N1 vaccination.

  12. Response to 2009 pandemic influenza a (H1N1) vaccine in HIV-infected patients and the influence of prior seasonal influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Soonawala (Darius); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); L.B.S. Gelinck (Luc); L.G. Visser; F.P. Kroon (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The immunogenicity of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) (pH1N1) vaccines and the effect of previous influenza vaccination is a matter of current interest and debate. We measured the immune response to pH1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected patients and in healthy controls. In addition w

  13. Pandemic influenza A (H1N1 vaccination among libyan health care personnel: A cross-sectional retrospective study

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    Nagiat Tayeb Hwisa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Vaccination rate among health-care personnel′s (HCPs are not promising notwithstanding the World Health Organization campaigns over three decades resulting in compromising patient safety. The H1N1 virus, which caused a world-wide pandemic earlier has now transformed into a seasonal flu virus. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the incidence of 2009-10 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 vaccination among Libyan HCPs in four hospitals of Al-Zawia, Libya. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire, which listed eight sections of parameters distributed among 310 HCPs to assess the vaccination rate and resulting adverse effects. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson′s χ2-test and Student′s t-test where appropriate. Results: The overall pandemic A (H1N1 vaccination among all HCPs was only 107 (39.9% out of 268 respondents. The distribution of respondents based on physicians, other staff and sex were found significant (P < 0.05. The common barriers of H1N1 vaccination being lack of awareness fear of adverse effects, allergies and religious beliefs. The major adverse effect observed was erythema in 95.56% of physicians and 87.1% in other staff. About 2% of HCPs have reported arthralgia. No significant differences existed between the responses of general variables and adverse effects. The glycoprotein 120 and squalene were found responsible for the reported adverse effects. 37 (82.22% vaccinated medical HCPs have advised their patients to get vaccinated. Conclusions: Due to recurrence of H1N1 influenza in recent times, vaccination campaigns should be promoted immediately to address the knowledge gap of HCPs for intervention by regulatory and health organizations in Libya. The health belief model could be applied to improve vaccination among HCPs.

  14. Antiviral therapy and outcomes of patients with pneumonia caused by influenza A pandemic (H1N1 virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-gui Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is limited data on the clinical outcome of patients with pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1 pneumonia who received oseltamivir treatment, especially when the treatment was administered more than 48 hours after symptom onset. METHODS: During the pandemic in 2009, a cohort of pH1N1 influenza pneumonia was built in China, and their clinical information was collected systematically, and analyzed with Cox models. RESULTS: 920 adults and 541 children with pneumonia who didn't receive corticosteroids were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was higher in adults who did not receive antiviral therapy (18.2% than those with who received oseltamivir ≤ 2 days (2.9%, between 2-5 days (4.6% and >5 days after illness onset (4.9%, p5 days, respectively. For males patients, aged ≥ 14 years and baseline PaO(2/FiO(23.8 mg/kg/d did not improve clinical outcome (mortality, higher dose 2.5% vs standard dose 2.8%, p>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Antiviral therapy might reduce mortality of patients with pH1N1 pneumonia, even when initiated more than 48 hours after onset of illness. Greater protective effects might be in males, patients aged 14-60 years, and patients with PaO(2/FiO(2<200.

  15. Metabolic syndrome as an independent risk factor of hypoxaemia in influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijani, Behzad; Pahlevan, Ali Asghar; Qasemi-Barqi, Reza; Jahanihashemi, Hassan

    2016-06-01

    A swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) emerged as a pandemic in 2009. We investigated the association between the overweight, metabolic syndrome and the severity of disease in the confirmed cases in Qazvin province, Iran. The study sample included all patients over 12 years old with confirmed influenza A (H1N1) in the province of Qazvin, Iran, in the 2009 pandemic, excluding pregnant women. To define overweight, sex and age-specific body mass index (BMI) cutoffs recommended by the International Obesity Task Force were used. Metabolic syndrome was defined by ATP III criteria. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify statistically independent predictors of hypoxaemia. Out of 55 confirmed cases, 28 (50.9%) were overweight and 24 (45.3%) were identified as having metabolic syndrome by ATP III criteria. Twenty four patients had hypoxaemia (arterial oxygen saturation below 90%) during the course of the disease. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, pulmonary co-morbidity (OR=9.54; 95% CI, 1.36 to 66.88; p= 0.023) and the metabolic syndrome (OR=18.66; 95% CI, 1.60 to 217.47; p= 0.019) were revealed to be independent risk factors for hypoxaemia in influenza A (H1N1) pdm09. The results of the present study reveal the role of the metabolic syndrome on the severity of influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 infection.

  16. Characterization In Vitro and In Vivo of a Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus from a Fatal Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Maria Teresa; Pozo, Francisco; Guerra, Susana; García-Barreno, Blanca; Martinez-Orellana, Pamela; Pérez-Breña, Pilar; Montoya, Maria; Melero, Jose Antonio; Pizarro, Manuel; Ortin, Juan; Casas, Inmaculada; Nieto, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Pandemic 2009 H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza viruses caused mild symptoms in most infected patients. However, a greater rate of severe disease was observed in healthy young adults and children without co-morbid conditions. Here we tested whether influenza strains displaying differential virulence could be present among circulating pH1N1 viruses. The biological properties and the genotype of viruses isolated from a patient showing mild disease (M) or from a fatal case (F), both without known co-morbid conditions were compared in vitro and in vivo. The F virus presented faster growth kinetics and stronger induction of cytokines than M virus in human alveolar lung epithelial cells. In the murine model in vivo, the F virus showed a stronger morbidity and mortality than M virus. Remarkably, a higher proportion of mice presenting infectious virus in the hearts, was found in F virus-infected animals. Altogether, the data indicate that strains of pH1N1 virus with enhanced pathogenicity circulated during the 2009 pandemic. In addition, examination of chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) genotype, recently reported as involved in severe influenza virus disease, revealed that the F virus-infected patient was homozygous for the deleted form of CCR5 receptor (CCR5Δ32). PMID:23326447

  17. Household transmission of pandemic (H1N1) 2009, San Antonio, Texas, USA, April-May 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Oliver W; Parks, Sharyn; Shim, Trudi; Blevins, Patricia A; Lucas, Pauline M; Sanchez, Roger; Walea, Nancy; Loustalot, Fleetwood; Duffy, Mark R; Shim, Matthew J; Guerra, Sandra; Guerra, Fernando; Mills, Gwen; Verani, Jennifer; Alsip, Bryan; Lindstrom, Stephen; Shu, Bo; Emery, Shannon; Cohen, Adam L; Menon, Manoj; Fry, Alicia M; Dawood, Fatimah; Fonseca, Vincent P; Olsen, Sonja J

    2010-04-01

    To assess household transmission of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in San Antonio, Texas, USA, during April 15-May 8, 2009, we investigated 77 households. The index case-patient was defined as the household member with the earliest onset date of symptoms of acute respiratory infection (ARI), influenza-like illness (ILI), or laboratory-confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Median interval between illness onset in index and secondary case-patients was 4 days (range 1-9 days); the index case-patient was likely to be or =50 years of age (4%-12%). Early in the outbreak, household transmission primarily occurred from children to other household members and was lower than the transmission rate for seasonal influenza.

  18. Virulence-associated substitution D222G in the hemagglutinin of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus affects receptor binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Chutinimitkul (Salin); S. Herfst (Sander); J. Steel (John); A.C. Lowen (Anice); J. Ye (Jian); D.A.J. van Riel (Debby); E.J.A. Schrauwen (Eefje); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); B.F. Koel (Björn); D.F. Burke (David); K.H. Sutherland-Cash (Kyle); C.S. Whittleson (Chris); C.A. Russell (Colin); D.J. Wales (David); D.J. Smith (Derek); M. Jonges (Marcel); A. Meijer (Adam); M. Koopmans (Matty); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); T. Kuiken (Thijs); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A. García-Sastre (Adolfo); D.R. Perez (Daniel); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe clinical impact of the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus (pdmH1N1) has been relatively low. However, amino acid substitution D222G in the hemagglutinin of pdmH1N1 has been associated with cases of severe disease and fatalities. D222G was introduced in a prototype pdmH1N1 by rever

  19. Specific Inhibitory Effect of κ-Carrageenan Polysaccharide on Swine Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus.

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    Qiang Shao

    Full Text Available The 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic placed unprecedented demands on antiviral drug resources and the vaccine industry. Carrageenan, an extractive of red algae, has been proven to inhibit infection and multiplication of various enveloped viruses. The aim of this study was to examine the ability of κ-carrageenan to inhibit swine pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus to gain an understanding of antiviral ability of κ-carrageenan. It was here demonstrated that κ-carrageenan had no cytotoxicity at concentrations below 1000 μg/ml. Hemagglutination, 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 and cytopathic effect (CPE inhibition assays showed that κ-carrageenan inhibited A/Swine/Shandong/731/2009 H1N1 (SW731 and A/California/04/2009 H1N1 (CA04 replication in a dose-dependent fashion. Mechanism studies show that the inhibition of SW731 multiplication and mRNA expression was maximized when κ-carrageenan was added before or during adsorption. The result of Hemagglutination inhibition assay indicate that κ-carrageenan specifically targeted HA of SW731 and CA04, both of which are pandemic H1N/2009 viruses, without effect on A/Pureto Rico/8/34 H1N1 (PR8, A/WSN/1933 H1N1 (WSN, A/Swine/Beijing/26/2008 H1N1 (SW26, A/Chicken/Shandong/LY/2008 H9N2 (LY08, and A/Chicken/Shandong/ZB/2007 H9N2 (ZB07 viruses. Immunofluorescence assay and Western blot showed that κ-carrageenan also inhibited SW731 protein expression after its internalization into cells. These results suggest that κ-carrageenan can significantly inhibit SW731 replication by interfering with a few replication steps in the SW731 life cycles, including adsorption, transcription, and viral protein expression, especially interactions between HA and cells. In this way, κ-carrageenan might be a suitable alternative approach to therapy meant to address anti-IAV, which contains an HA homologous to that of SW731.

  20. Specific Inhibitory Effect of κ-Carrageenan Polysaccharide on Swine Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qiang; Guo, Qiang; Xu, Wen ping; Li, Zandong; Zhao, Tong tong

    2015-01-01

    The 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic placed unprecedented demands on antiviral drug resources and the vaccine industry. Carrageenan, an extractive of red algae, has been proven to inhibit infection and multiplication of various enveloped viruses. The aim of this study was to examine the ability of κ-carrageenan to inhibit swine pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus to gain an understanding of antiviral ability of κ-carrageenan. It was here demonstrated that κ-carrageenan had no cytotoxicity at concentrations below 1000 μg/ml. Hemagglutination, 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) and cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibition assays showed that κ-carrageenan inhibited A/Swine/Shandong/731/2009 H1N1 (SW731) and A/California/04/2009 H1N1 (CA04) replication in a dose-dependent fashion. Mechanism studies show that the inhibition of SW731 multiplication and mRNA expression was maximized when κ-carrageenan was added before or during adsorption. The result of Hemagglutination inhibition assay indicate that κ-carrageenan specifically targeted HA of SW731 and CA04, both of which are pandemic H1N/2009 viruses, without effect on A/Pureto Rico/8/34 H1N1 (PR8), A/WSN/1933 H1N1 (WSN), A/Swine/Beijing/26/2008 H1N1 (SW26), A/Chicken/Shandong/LY/2008 H9N2 (LY08), and A/Chicken/Shandong/ZB/2007 H9N2 (ZB07) viruses. Immunofluorescence assay and Western blot showed that κ-carrageenan also inhibited SW731 protein expression after its internalization into cells. These results suggest that κ-carrageenan can significantly inhibit SW731 replication by interfering with a few replication steps in the SW731 life cycles, including adsorption, transcription, and viral protein expression, especially interactions between HA and cells. In this way, κ-carrageenan might be a suitable alternative approach to therapy meant to address anti-IAV, which contains an HA homologous to that of SW731.

  1. Healthcare workers as parents: attitudes toward vaccinating their children against pandemic influenza A/H1N1

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    Torun Fuat

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both the health care workers (HCWs and children are target groups for pandemic influenza vaccination. The coverage of the target populations is an important determinant for impact of mass vaccination. The objective of this study is to determine the attitudes of HCWs as parents, toward vaccinating their children with pandemic influenza A/H1N1 vaccine. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted with health care workers (HCWs in a public hospital during December 2009 in Istanbul. All persons employed in the hospital with or without a health-care occupation are accepted as HCW. The HCWs who are parents of children 6 months to 18 years of age were included in the study. Pearson's chi-square test and logistic regression analysis was applied for the statistical analyses. Results A total of 389 HCWs who were parents of children aged 6 months-18 years participated study. Among all participants 27.0% (n = 105 reported that themselves had been vaccinated against pandemic influenza A/H1N1. Two third (66.1% of the parents answered that they will not vaccinate their children, 21.1% already vaccinated and 12.9% were still undecided. Concern about side effect was most reported reason among who had been not vaccinated their children and among undecided parents. The second reason for refusing the pandemic vaccine was concerns efficacy of the vaccine. Media was the only source of information about pandemic influenza in nearly one third of HCWs. Agreement with vaccine safety, self receipt of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 vaccine, and trust in Ministry of Health were found to be associated with the positive attitude toward vaccinating their children against pandemic influenza A/H1N1. Conclusions Persuading parents to accept a new vaccine seems not be easy even if they are HCWs. In order to overcome the barriers among HCWs related to pandemic vaccines, determination of their misinformation, attitudes and behaviors regarding the

  2. Radiological and Clinical Characteristics of a Military Outbreak of Pandemic H1N1 2009 Influenza Virus Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Tae Jin; Kwon, Gu Jin; Oh, Mi Kyeong; Woo, Sung Koo; Park, Seung Hoon; Choi, Seung Hong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Goo, Jin Mo; Yim, Jae Joon; Kim, Jong Sung; Park, Chang Min [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    To describe detailed clinical and radiological features of the pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza viral infection among healthy young males in a semiclosed institutionalized setting. A total of 18 patients confirmed with the pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus infection from July 18 to July 30, 2009 were enrolled in this study. Each patient underwent an evaluation to determine detailed clinical and radiological features. All patients presented with high fever (> 38.0..C), with accompanying symptoms of cough, rhinorrhea, sore throat, myalgia and diarrhea, and increased C-reactive protein (CRP) values with no leukocytosis nor elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). All patients, including one patient who progressed into acute respiratory distress syndrome, were treated with oseltamivir phosphate and quickly recovered from their symptoms. Chest radiographs showed abnormalities of small nodules and lobar consolidation in only two out of 18 patients. However, six of 12 patients who underwent thin-section CT examinations showed abnormal findings for small ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in addition to poorly-defined nodules with upper lobe predominance. In a population of healthy young adults, elevated CRP with normal ESR and white blood cell levels combined with GGOs and nodules on thin section CT scans may indicate early signs of infection by the pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus

  3. Pandemic A/H1N1v influenza 2009 in hospitalized children: a multicenter Belgian survey

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    Blumental Sophie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the 2009 influenza A/H1N1v pandemic, children were identified as a specific "at risk" group. We conducted a multicentric study to describe pattern of influenza A/H1N1v infection among hospitalized children in Brussels, Belgium. Methods From July 1, 2009, to January 31, 2010, we collected epidemiological and clinical data of all proven (positive H1N1v PCR and probable (positive influenza A antigen or culture pediatric cases of influenza A/H1N1v infections, hospitalized in four tertiary centers. Results During the epidemic period, an excess of 18% of pediatric outpatients and emergency department visits was registered. 215 children were hospitalized with proven/probable influenza A/H1N1v infection. Median age was 31 months. 47% had ≥ 1 comorbid conditions. Febrile respiratory illness was the most common presentation. 36% presented with initial gastrointestinal symptoms and 10% with neurological manifestations. 34% had pneumonia. Only 24% of the patients received oseltamivir but 57% received antibiotics. 10% of children were admitted to PICU, seven of whom with ARDS. Case fatality-rate was 5/215 (2%, concerning only children suffering from chronic neurological disorders. Children over 2 years of age showed a higher propensity to be admitted to PICU (16% vs 1%, p = 0.002 and a higher mortality rate (4% vs 0%, p = 0.06. Infants less than 3 months old showed a milder course of infection, with few respiratory and neurological complications. Conclusion Although influenza A/H1N1v infections were generally self-limited, pediatric burden of disease was significant. Compared to other countries experiencing different health care systems, our Belgian cohort was younger and received less frequently antiviral therapy; disease course and mortality were however similar.

  4. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of influenza A H1N1 pandemic viruses in Cuba, May 2009 to August 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alexander Piñón; Herrera, Belsy Acosta; Ramírez, Odalys Valdés; García, Amely Arencibia; Jiménez, Mayra Muné; Valdés, Clara Savón; Fernández, Angel Goyenechea; González, Grehete; Fernández, Suset I Oropesa; Báez, Guelsys González; Espinosa, Bárbara Hernández

    2013-07-01

    The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus was detected in Cuba in May 2009. The introduction of a new virus with increased transmissibility into a population makes surveillance of the pandemic strain to the molecular level necessary. The aim of the present study was the molecular and phylogenetic analysis of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strains that circulated in Cuba between May 2009 and August 2010. Seventy clinical samples were included in the study. Nucleotide sequences from the hemagglutinin HA1 region segment were obtained directly from clinical samples. Genetic distances were calculated using MEGA v.5.05. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using MrBayes v.3.1.2 software. Potential N-glycosylation sites were predicted using NetNGlyc server 1.0. The 48 Cuban sequences of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 obtained were similar to the A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) vaccine strain. Most of the Cuban strains belonged to clade 7. Cuban viruses showed amino acid changes, some of them located at three antigenic sites: Ca, Sa, and Sb. Two dominant mutations were detected: P83S (100%) and S203T (85.7%). Glycosylation site analysis revealed the gain of one site at position 162 in 13 sequences. The findings in this study contribute to our understanding of the progress of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, since this virus is at the starting point of its evolution in humans.

  5. Neurology of the H1N1 pandemic in Singapore: a nationwide case series of children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prerna, Asha; Lim, Jocelyn Y X; Tan, Natalie W H; Isa, Mas Suhaila; Oh, Helen May-Lin; Yassin, Norazieda; Low, Chian-Yong; Chan, Derrick W S; Chong, Chia-Yin; Leo, Yee-Sin; Chow, Angela Li-Ping; Tambyah, Paul Ananth; Tan, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    Neurologic complications have long been associated with influenza. A novel strain of influenza A (H1N1) first described in humans to have outbreak potential in 2009 in Mexico went on to become the first influenza pandemic of this century. We evaluated the neurologic complications of the novel influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in children and adults admitted to all public hospitals in Singapore during the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic between May 2009 and March 2010. All patients were positive for novel H1N1 infection and presented with neurologic symptoms prior to oseltamivir treatment. Ninety-eight patients (median age 6.6 years, range 0.4-62.6) were identified; 90 % were younger than 18 years; 32 % suffered from preexisting neurological, respiratory, or cardiac disease; and 66 % presented with seizures. Of those presenting with seizures, new onset seizures were the most common manifestation (n = 40, 61.5 %), followed by breakthrough seizures (n = 18, 27.7 %) and status epilepticus (n = 7, 10.8 %). Influenza-associated encephalopathy occurred in 20 %. The majority of children (n = 88) presented with seizures (n = 63, 71.6 %), encephalopathy (n = 19, 21.6 %), and syncope (n = 4, 4.5 %). Among adults, a wider range of neurological conditions were seen, with half of them presenting with an exacerbation of their underlying neurological disease. The neurological symptoms developed at a median of 2 days after the onset of systemic symptoms. The median length of hospital stay was 3 days, and 79 % were monitored in general wards. Neurologic complications associated with the novel influenza A (H1N1) 2009 strain were generally mild and had a good outcome. They occurred more frequently in patients with underlying neurological disorders. Seizures and encephalopathy were the most common manifestations, similar to other influenza virus strains.

  6. Persistence of pandemic influenza H1N1 virus in young patients after oseltamivir therapy in the 2009-2010 season: a comparison with seasonal H1N1 with or without H275Y mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Naoki; Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Iwaki, Norio; Kondou, Kunio; Hirotsu, Nobuo; Kawashima, Takashi; Maeda, Tetsunari; Tanaka, Osame; Doniwa, Ken-ichi; Iwakuni, Osamu; Egashira, Keisuke; Yamaji, Kouzaburo; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo

    2012-04-01

    Comparison of the viral persistence of pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and seasonal H1N1 with or without H275Y mutation after oseltamivir therapy has not been adequately done. Virus was isolated before and on days 4-6 from the start of oseltamivir treatment for 158 cases of seasonal (2007-2008 and 2008-2009 seasons) or pandemic (2009-2010 season) H1N1 influenza. Sequence analysis was done for each season and NA inhibition assay (IC(50)) was done in the 2009-2010 season. H275Y mutation before therapy was 0% in the 2007-2008 and 2009-2010 seasons, but 100% in the 2008-2009 season. Fever and other symptoms were noticeably prolonged after oseltamivir therapy for children with H275Y mutated seasonal H1N1 (2008-2009 season), but not in patients with seasonal H1N1 without mutation (2007-2008) or H1N1pdm (2009-2010). The viral persistence rate was significantly higher for patients 15 years or younger than for those 16 years and older with H275Y mutated seasonal H1N1 (46.2% and 10.5%, respectively) or with H1N1pdm (43.3% and 11.5%, respectively). The H275Y mutation emerged after oseltamivir treatment in 2.4% (2/82) of all patients with H1N1pdm. In two children, the H275Y mutation emerged after therapy and the IC(50) increased more than 200 fold; however, the prolongation of fever was not so prominent. In conclusion, oseltamivir was effective for fever and other clinical symptoms; however, the virus persisted longer than expected after treatment in H1N1pdm influenza-infected children in the 2009-2010 season, similar to seasonal H1N1 with H275Y mutation in the 2008-2009 season.

  7. Detection of extensive cross-neutralization between pandemic and seasonal A/H1N1 Influenza Viruses using a pseudotype neutralization assay.

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    Béatrice Labrosse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cross-immunity between seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 influenza viruses remains uncertain. In particular, the extent that previous infection or vaccination by seasonal A/H1N1 viruses can elicit protective immunity against pandemic A/H1N1 is unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Neutralizing titers against seasonal A/H1N1 (A/Brisbane/59/2007 and against pandemic A/H1N1 (A/California/04/2009 were measured using an HIV-1-based pseudovirus neutralization assay. Using this highly sensitive assay, we found that a large fraction of subjects who had never been exposed to pandemic A/H1N1 express high levels of pandemic A/H1N1 neutralizing titers. A significant correlation was seen between neutralization of pandemic A/H1N1 and neutralization of a standard seasonal A/H1N1 strain. Significantly higher pandemic A/H1N1 neutralizing titers were measured in subjects who had received vaccination against seasonal influenza in 2008-2009. Higher pandemic neutralizing titers were also measured in subjects over 60 years of age. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings reveal that the extent of protective cross-immunity between seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 influenza viruses may be more important than previously estimated. This cross-immunity could provide a possible explanation of the relatively mild profile of the recent influenza pandemic.

  8. From press release to news: mapping the framing of the 2009 H1N1 A influenza pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seow Ting; Basnyat, Iccha

    2013-01-01

    Pandemics challenge conventional assumptions about health promotion, message development, community engagement, and the role of news media. To understand the use of press releases in news coverage of pandemics, this study traces the development of framing devices from a government public health agency's press releases to news stories about the 2009 H1N1 A influenza pandemic. The communication management of the H1N1 pandemic, an international news event with local implications, by the Singapore government is a rich locus for understanding the dynamics of public relations, health communication, and journalism. A content analysis shows that the evolution of information from press release to news is marked by significant changes in media frames, including the expansion and diversification in dominant frames and emotion appeals, stronger thematic framing, more sources of information, conversion of loss frames into gain frames, and amplification of positive tone favoring the public health agency's position. Contrary to previous research that suggests that government information subsidies passed almost unchanged through media gatekeepers, the news coverage of the pandemic reflects journalists' selectivity in disseminating the government press releases and in mediating the information flow and frames from the press releases.

  9. Increased risk of narcolepsy in children and adults after pandemic H1N1 vaccination in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Monaca Charley, Christelle; Franco, Patricia; Drouot, Xavier; d'Ortho, Marie-Pia; Launois, Sandrine; Lignot, Séverine; Bourgin, Patrice; Nogues, Béatrice; Rey, Marc; Bayard, Sophie; Scholz, Sabine; Lavault, Sophie; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Saussier, Cristel; Pariente, Antoine

    2013-08-01

    An increased incidence of narcolepsy in children was detected in Scandinavian countries where pandemic H1N1 influenza ASO3-adjuvanted vaccine was used. A campaign of vaccination against pandemic H1N1 influenza was implemented in France using both ASO3-adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted vaccines. As part of a study considering all-type narcolepsy, we investigated the association between H1N1 vaccination and narcolepsy with cataplexy in children and adults compared with matched controls; and compared the phenotype of narcolepsy with cataplexy according to exposure to the H1N1 vaccination. Patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy were included from 14 expert centres in France. Date of diagnosis constituted the index date. Validation of cases was performed by independent experts using the Brighton collaboration criteria. Up to four controls were individually matched to cases according to age, gender and geographic location. A structured telephone interview was performed to collect information on medical history, past infections and vaccinations. Eighty-five cases with narcolepsy-cataplexy were included; 23 being further excluded regarding eligibility criteria. Of the 62 eligible cases, 59 (64% males, 57.6% children) could be matched with 135 control subjects. H1N1 vaccination was associated with narcolepsy-cataplexy with an odds ratio of 6.5 (2.1-19.9) in subjects agednarcolepsy-cataplexy exposed to H1N1 vaccination (n=32; mostly AS03-adjuvanted vaccine, n=28) to non-exposed cases (n=30), including shorter delay of diagnosis and a higher number of sleep onset rapid eye movement periods for exposed cases. No difference was found regarding history of infections. In this sub-analysis, H1N1 vaccination was strongly associated with an increased risk of narcolepsy-cataplexy in both children and adults in France. Even if, as in every observational study, the possibility that some biases participated in the association cannot be completely ruled out, the associations appeared robust to

  10. Oseltamivir-resistant pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 influenza viruses detected through enhanced surveillance in the Netherlands, 2009-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Adam; Jonges, Marcel; Abbink, Floor; Ang, Wim; van Beek, Janko; Beersma, Matthias; Bloembergen, Peter; Boucher, Charles; Claas, Eric; Donker, Ge; van Gageldonk-Lafeber, Rianne; Isken, Leslie; Kroes, Aloys; Leenders, Sander; van der Lubben, Mariken; Mascini, Ellen; Niesters, Bert; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Osterhaus, Albert; Riesmeijer, Rob; Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies; Schutten, Martin; Sebens, Fre; Stelma, Foekje; Swaan, Corien; Timen, Aura; van 't Veen, Annemarie; van der Vries, Erhard; Wierik, Margreet Te; Koopmans, Marion; de Jong, A

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced surveillance of infections due to the pandemic A(H1N1) influenza virus, which included monitoring for antiviral resistance, was carried out in the Netherlands from late April 2009 through late May 2010. More than 1100 instances of infection with the pandemic A(H1N1) influenza virus from 200

  11. Transmission characteristics of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic: comparison of 8 Southern hemisphere countries.

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    Lulla Opatowski

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available While in Northern hemisphere countries, the pandemic H1N1 virus (H1N1pdm was introduced outside of the typical influenza season, Southern hemisphere countries experienced a single wave of transmission during their 2009 winter season. This provides a unique opportunity to compare the spread of a single virus in different countries and study the factors influencing its transmission. Here, we estimate and compare transmission characteristics of H1N1pdm for eight Southern hemisphere countries/states: Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, New Zealand, South Africa and Victoria (Australia. Weekly incidence of cases and age-distribution of cumulative cases were extracted from public reports of countries' surveillance systems. Estimates of the reproduction numbers, R(0, empirically derived from the country-epidemics' early exponential phase, were positively associated with the proportion of children in the populations (p = 0.004. To explore the role of demography in explaining differences in transmission intensity, we then fitted a dynamic age-structured model of influenza transmission to available incidence data for each country independently, and for all the countries simultaneously. Posterior median estimates of R₀ ranged 1.2-1.8 for the country-specific fits, and 1.29-1.47 for the global fits. Corresponding estimates for overall attack-rate were in the range 20-50%. All model fits indicated a significant decrease in susceptibility to infection with age. These results confirm the transmissibility of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was relatively low compared with past pandemics. The pattern of age-dependent susceptibility found confirms that older populations had substantial--though partial--pre-existing immunity, presumably due to exposure to heterologous influenza strains. Our analysis indicates that between-country-differences in transmission were at least partly due to differences in population demography.

  12. Influenza pandêmica A (H1N1) 2009: fatores de risco para o internamento Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009: risk factors for hospitalization

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Avaliar os aspectos da influenza pandêmica A (H1N1) 2009 em pacientes hospitalizados a fim de identificar os fatores de risco para o internamento e, consequentemente, para o agravamento da doença. MÉTODOS: Estudo observacional e retrospectivo realizado entre março e dezembro de 2010. Os dados foram coletados a partir do Sistema Nacional de Agravos de Notificação do Ministério da Saúde. Foram incluídos somente os pacientes hospitalizados e não hospitalizados com confirmação laborator...

  13. Seasonal influenza vaccine and protection against pandemic (H1N1 2009-associated illness among US military personnel.

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    Matthew C Johns

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A novel A/H1N1 virus is the cause of the present influenza pandemic; vaccination is a key countermeasure, however, few data assessing prior seasonal vaccine effectiveness (VE against the pandemic strain of H1N1 (pH1N1 virus are available. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Surveillance of influenza-related medical encounter data of active duty military service members stationed in the United States during the period of April-October 2009 with comparison of pH1N1-confirmed cases and location and date-matched controls. Crude odds ratios (OR and VE estimates for immunized versus non-immunized were calculated as well as adjusted OR (AOR controlling for sex, age group, and history of prior influenza vaccination. Separate stratified VE analyses by vaccine type (trivalent inactivated [TIV] or live attenuated [LAIV], age groups and hospitalization status were also performed. For the period of April 20 to October 15, 2009, a total of 1,205 cases of pH1N1-confirmed cases were reported, 966 (80% among males and over one-half (58% under 25 years of age. Overall VE for service members was found to be 45% (95% CI, 33 to 55%. Immunization with prior season's TIV (VE = 44%, 95% CI, 32 to 54% as well as LAIV (VE = 24%, 95% CI, 6 to 38% were both found to be associated with protection. Of significance, VE against a severe disease outcome was higher (VE = 62%, 95% CI, 14 to 84% than against milder outcomes (VE = 42%, 95% CI, 29 to 53%. CONCLUSION: A moderate association with protection against clinically apparent, laboratory-confirmed Pandemic (H1N1 2009-associated illness was found for immunization with either TIV or LAIV 2008-09 seasonal influenza vaccines. This association with protection was found to be especially apparent for severe disease as compared to milder outcome, as well as in the youngest and older populations. Prior vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccines in 2004-08 was also independently associated with protection.

  14. FDG uptake in axillary lymph nodes after vaccination against pandemic (H1N1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagiotidis, Emmanouil; Exarhos, Demetrios; Housianakou, Irene; Bournazos, Apostolos; Datseris, Ioannis [General Hospital, PET/CT Unit, Athens (Greece)

    2010-05-15

    To alert the imaging community to potential false positive findings related to current immunization programmes against H1N1 influenza virus. We reviewed 10 patients referred for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) who had undergone recent vaccination. All studies showed{sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the draining axillary lymph nodes close to the vaccination site, while low-dose CT revealed lymph nodes ranged between 0.5 cm and 1.2 cm at the same site. This potential pitfall in PET/CT should be borne in mind during current vaccination programmes. (orig.)

  15. [Effects of school closure during influenza A/H1N1 pandemic in 2009 in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Mitsuo; Kaneko, Minoru; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Honda, Takayuki; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2013-01-01

    Schools were closed worldwide during the 2009 influenza A/H1N1 pandemic to prevent the viral spread; however, to date, there has been insufficient evidence to conclude that the closures were beneficial. Therefore, in the present review, we evaluated the effects of school closure during the 2009 influenza A/H1N1 pandemic in Japan. A search of PubMed and Japanese journals identified 24 articles that evaluated the effects of school closure using the following methods: descriptive epidemiology, changes in absenteeism rate, a simulation model, and reproductive number. Almost all of the retrieved studies showed that school closure effectively reduced the number of new infections and thus subsequently suppressed the epidemic. On the other hand, two major sets of confounding variables were identified. First, the effect of school closure was confounded by the methods used to measure, viral infectivity, subject characteristics, increased immunization rates, nonpharmaceutical interventions, antiviral administration, student contact patterns during school closure, and individual household environments. Secondly, school closure implementation was affected by differences between proactive and reactive closures, differences between seasonal and pandemic influenza, decision factors regarding school closure, socioeconomic cost, and ethics of imposing restrictions on individuals. Therefore, a comprehensive, longitudinal study is necessary to clarify the effects of school closure during viral pandemics.

  16. Aptamers that bind to the hemagglutinin of the recent pandemic influenza virus H1N1 and efficiently inhibit agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Kumar, Penmetcha K R

    2013-11-01

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) mediates both receptor (glycan) binding and membrane fusion for cell entry and has been the basis for typing influenza A viruses. In this study we have selected RNA aptamers (D-12 and D-26) that specifically target the HA protein of the recent pandemic influenza virus pdmH1N1 (A/California/07/2009). Among the selected aptamers the D-26 aptamer showed higher affinity for the HA of pdmH1N1 and was able to distinguish HA derived from other sub-types of influenza A viruses. The affinity of the D-26 aptamer was further improved upon incorporation of 2'-fluoropyrimidines to a level of 67 fM. Furthermore, the high affinity D-12 and D-26 aptamers were tested for their ability to interfere with HA-glycan interactions using a chicken red blood cell (RBC) agglutination assay. At a concentration of 200 nM the D-26 aptamer completely abolished the agglutination of RBCs, whereas D-12 only did so at 400 nM. These studies suggest that the selected aptamer D-26 not only has a higher affinity and specificity for the HA of pdmH1N1 but also has a better ability to efficiently interfere with HA-glycan interactions compared with the D-12 aptamer. The D-26 aptamer warrants further study regarding its application in developing topical virucidal products against the pdmH1N1 virus and also in surveillance of the pdmH1N1 influenza virus.

  17. Acute Respiratory Infections in the Context of the Influenza A (H1N1 Pandemic

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    Hilda María Delgado Acosta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: acute respiratory infections are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Objective: to characterize acute respiratory infections in the context of the influenza pandemic in Cienfuegos province. Methods: A case series study including 844 inpatients diagnosed with influenza-like illness, 806 suspected cases and 38 confirmed cases of pandemic influenza, was conducted. An analysis of the acute respiratory infections was performed, describing the pandemic in space and time. Suspected and confirmed cases were compared according to general variables, risk factors and interesting clinical features. Virus isolation and classification of confirmed cases considering source of infection and progress over time were showed. Data was collected from the Statistics Department of the Provincial Hygiene and Epidemiology Center and the inpatient database. Percentages, rates, the mean, standard deviation and Chi-square test with a 5 % margin of error were used.Results: acute respiratory infections morbidity increased since 2008, largely because of the impact of the pandemic and the increased clinical and epidemiological surveillance. Its association with risk factors such as pregnancy, chronic diseases and traveling abroad was demonstrated. Circulation of the pandemic influenza virus with displacement of seasonal viruses and prevalence of indigenous cases were observed. Conclusions: the characteristics of pandemic influenza in the province do not differ greatly from those described nationally and globally.

  18. Dynamic social representations of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic: Shifting patterns of sense-making and blame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Eric; Eicher, Véronique; Bangerter, Adrian; Gilles, Ingrid; Clémence, Alain; Green, Eva G T

    2013-11-01

    We investigate dynamics of public perceptions of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic to understand changing patterns of sense-making and blame regarding the outbreak of emerging infectious diseases. We draw on social representation theory combined with a dramaturgical perspective to identify changes in how various collectives are depicted over the course of the pandemic, according to three roles: heroes, villains and victims. Quantitative results based on content analysis of three cross-sectional waves of interviews show a shift from mentions of distant collectives (e.g., far-flung countries) at Wave 1 to local collectives (e.g., risk groups) as the pandemic became of more immediate concern (Wave 2) and declined (Wave 3). Semi-automated content analysis of media coverage shows similar results. Thematic analyses of the discourse associated with collectives revealed that many were consistently perceived as heroes, villains and victims.

  19. When pictures waste a thousand words: analysis of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic on television news.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westerly Luth

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Effective communication by public health agencies during a pandemic promotes the adoption of recommended health behaviours. However, more information is not always the solution. Rather, attention must be paid to how information is communicated. Our study examines the television news, which combines video and audio content. We analyse (1 the content of television news about the H1N1 pandemic and vaccination campaign in Alberta, Canada; (2 the extent to which television news content conveyed key public health agency messages; (3 the extent of discrepancies in audio versus visual content. METHODS: We searched for "swine flu" and "H1N1" in local English news broadcasts from the CTV online video archive. We coded the audio and visual content of 47 news clips during the peak period of coverage from April to November 2009 and identified discrepancies between audio and visual content. RESULTS: The dominant themes on CTV news were the vaccination rollout, vaccine shortages, long line-ups (queues at vaccination clinics and defensive responses by public health officials. There were discrepancies in the priority groups identified by the provincial health agency (Alberta Health and Wellness and television news coverage as well as discrepancies between audio and visual content of news clips. Public health officials were presented in official settings rather than as public health practitioners. CONCLUSION: The news footage did not match the main public health messages about risk levels and priority groups. Public health agencies lost control of their message as the media focused on failures in the rollout of the vaccination campaign. Spokespeople can enhance their local credibility by emphasizing their role as public health practitioners. Public health agencies need to learn from the H1N1 pandemic so that future television communications do not add to public confusion, demonstrate bureaucratic ineffectiveness and contribute to low vaccination rates.

  20. Surveillance of hospitalizations with pandemic A(H1N1 2009 influenza infection in Queensland, Australia

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    Frances Birrell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients hospitalized with pandemic A(H1N1 2009 infection in Queensland, Australia between 25 May and 3 October 2009 and to examine the relationship between timing of antiviral treatment and severity of illness.Method: Using data from the Queensland Health EpiLog information system, descriptive analysis and logistic regression modelling were used to describe and model factors which influence patient outcomes (death, admission to intensive care unit and/or special care unit. Data on patients admitted to hospital in Queensland with confirmed pandemic A(H1N1 2009 infection were included in this analysis.Results: 1236 patients with pandemic A(H1N1 2009 infection were admitted to hospitals in Queensland during the study period. Of the total group: 15% were admitted to an intensive care unit or special care unit; 3% died; 34% were under the age of 18 years and 8% were 65 years of age or older; and 55% had at least one underlying medical condition. Among the 842 patients for whom data were available regarding the use of antiviral drugs, antiviral treatment was initiated in 737 (87.5% patients with treatment commencing at a median of one day (range 1–33 days after onset of illness. Admission to an intensive care unit or special care unit (ICU/SCU or death was significantly associated with increased age, lack of timeliness of antiviral treatment, chronic renal disease and morbid obesity.Discussion: Early antiviral treatment was significantly associated with lower likelihood of ICU/SCU admission or death. Early antiviral treatment for influenza cases may therefore have important public health implications.

  1. Continued dominance of pandemic A(H1N1 2009 influenza in Victoria, Australia in 2010

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    James E. Fielding

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The 2010 Victorian influenza season was characterized by normal seasonal influenza activity and the dominance of the pandemic A(H1N1 2009 strain. General Practice Sentinel Surveillance rates peaked at 9.4 ILI cases per 1000 consultations in week 36 for metropolitan practices, and at 10.5 ILI cases per 1000 in the following week for rural practices. Of the 678 ILI cases, 23% were vaccinated, a significantly higher percentage than in previous years. A significantly higher percentage of ILI patients were swabbed in 2010 compared to 2003–2008, but similar to 2009, with a similar percentage being positive for influenza as in previous years. Vaccination rates increased with patient age. Melbourne Medical Deputising Service rates peaked in week 35 at 19.1 ILI cases per 1000 consultations. Of the 1914 cases of influenza notified to the Department of Health, Victoria, 1812 (95% were influenza A infections - 1001 (55% pandemic A(H1N1 2009, 4 (<1% A(H3N2 and 807 (45% not subtyped; 88 (5% were influenza B; and 14 (< 1% were influenza A and B co-infections. The World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza tested 403 isolates of which 261 were positive for influenza, 250 of which were influenza A and 11 were influenza B. Ninety-two per cent of the influenza A viruses were pandemic A(H1N1 2009, and following antigenic analysis all of these were found to be similar to the current vaccine strain. Three viruses (0.9% were found to be oseltamivir resistant due to an H275Y mutation in the neuraminidase gene.

  2. Prediction of clinical factors associated with pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 in Pakistan.

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    Nadia Nisar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza is a viral infection that can lead to serious complications and death(s in vulnerable groups if not diagnosed and managed in a timely manner. This study was conducted to improve the accuracy of predicting influenza through various clinical and statistical models. METHODOLOGY: A retrospective cross sectional analysis was done on demographic and epidemiological data collected from March 2009 to March 2010. Patients were classified as ILI or SARI using WHO case definitions. Respiratory specimens were tested by RT-PCR. Clinical symptoms and co-morbid conditions were analyzed using binary logistic regression models. RESULTS: In the first approach, analysis compared children (≤12 and adults (>12. Of 1,243 cases, 262 (21% tested positive for A(H1N1pdm09 and the proportion of children (≤12 and adults (>12 were 27% and 73% respectively. Four symptoms predicted influenza in children: fever (OR 2.849, 95% CI 1.931-8.722, cough (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.512-3.643, diarrhea (OR 2.100, 95% CI 2.040-3.25 and respiratory disease (OR 3.269, 95% CI 2.128-12.624. In adults, the strongest clinical predictor was fever (OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.025-3.135 followed by cough (OR 1.431, 95% CI 1.032-2.815. In the second instance, patients were separated into two groups: SARI 326 (26% and ILI 917 (74% cases. Male to female ratio was 1.41∶1.12 for SARI and 2∶1.5 for ILI cases. Chi-square test showed that fever, cough and sore throat were significant factors for A(H1N1pdm09 infections (p = 0.008. CONCLUSION: Studies in a primary care setting should be encouraged focused on patients with influenza-like illness to develop sensitive clinical case definition that will help to improve accuracy of detecting influenza infections. Formulation of a standard "one size fits all" case definition that best correlates with influenza infections can help guide decisions for additional diagnostic testing and also discourage unjustified antibiotic prescription and usage

  3. Factors associated with household transmission of pandemic (H1N1 2009 among self-quarantined patients in Beijing, China.

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    Daitao Zhang

    Full Text Available As the pandemic (H1N1 2009 progressed, the Ministry of Health of China advised cases with mild symptoms to remain home for isolation and observation, which may have increased the risk for infection among other household members. Describing the transmission characteristics of this novel virus is indispensable to effectively controlling the spread of disease; thus, the aim of this study was to assess risk factors associated with household transmission of pandemic H1N1 from self-quarantined patients in Beijing, the capital city of China. A 1:2 case-control study with 54 case households and 108 control households was conducted between August 1 and September 30, 2009 in Beijing. Cases were households with a self-quarantined index patient and a secondary case, while controls were households with a self-quarantined index patient and a close contact. Controls were also matched to cases for sex and age of index case-patient. A structured interview guide was used to collect the data. Conditional logistical models were employed to estimate Odds Ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results indicated that higher education level (OR 0.42; 95% CI 0.22-0.83, sharing room with an index case-patient (OR 3.29; 95%CI 1.23-8.78, daily room ventilation (OR 0.28; 95%CI 0.08-0.93, and hand washing ≥ 3/d (OR 0.71; 95%CI 0.48-0.94 were related to the household transmission of pandemic H1N1 from self-quarantined patients. These results highlight that health education, as well as the quarantine of the index case-patient immediately after infection, frequent hand hygiene, and ventilation are critical to mitigating household spread of pandemic H1N1 virus and minimizing its impact. Household contacts should be educated to promote these in-home practices to contain transmission, particularly when household members are quarantined at home.

  4. Use of antiviral drugs to reduce household transmission of pandemic (H1N1) 2009, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebody, Richard G; Harris, Ross; Kafatos, George; Chamberland, Mary; Campbell, Colin; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; McLean, Estelle; Andrews, Nick; White, Peter J; Wynne-Evans, Edward; Green, Jon; Ellis, Joanna; Wreghitt, Tim; Bracebridge, Sam; Ihekweazu, Chikwe; Oliver, Isabel; Smith, Gillian; Hawkins, Colin; Salmon, Roland; Smyth, Bryan; McMenamin, Jim; Zambon, Maria; Phin, Nick; Watson, John M

    2011-06-01

    The United Kingdom implemented a containment strategy for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 through administering antiviral agents (AVs) to patients and their close contacts. This observational household cohort study describes the effect of AVs on household transmission. We followed 285 confirmed primary cases in 259 households with 761 contacts. At 2 weeks, the confirmed secondary attack rate (SAR) was 8.1% (62/761) and significantly higher in persons 50 years of age (18.9% vs. 1.2%, psecondary case-patients, 45 had not received AV prophylaxis. The effectiveness of AV prophylaxis in preventing infection was 92%.

  5. Factors associated with household transmission of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 among self-quarantined patients in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daitao; Liu, Wenting; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xinyu; Germ, Kaylyn E; Tang, Song; Sun, Wenjie; Wang, Quanyi

    2013-01-01

    As the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 progressed, the Ministry of Health of China advised cases with mild symptoms to remain home for isolation and observation, which may have increased the risk for infection among other household members. Describing the transmission characteristics of this novel virus is indispensable to effectively controlling the spread of disease; thus, the aim of this study was to assess risk factors associated with household transmission of pandemic H1N1 from self-quarantined patients in Beijing, the capital city of China. A 1:2 case-control study with 54 case households and 108 control households was conducted between August 1 and September 30, 2009 in Beijing. Cases were households with a self-quarantined index patient and a secondary case, while controls were households with a self-quarantined index patient and a close contact. Controls were also matched to cases for sex and age of index case-patient. A structured interview guide was used to collect the data. Conditional logistical models were employed to estimate Odds Ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results indicated that higher education level (OR 0.42; 95% CI 0.22-0.83), sharing room with an index case-patient (OR 3.29; 95%CI 1.23-8.78), daily room ventilation (OR 0.28; 95%CI 0.08-0.93), and hand washing ≥ 3/d (OR 0.71; 95%CI 0.48-0.94) were related to the household transmission of pandemic H1N1 from self-quarantined patients. These results highlight that health education, as well as the quarantine of the index case-patient immediately after infection, frequent hand hygiene, and ventilation are critical to mitigating household spread of pandemic H1N1 virus and minimizing its impact. Household contacts should be educated to promote these in-home practices to contain transmission, particularly when household members are quarantined at home.

  6. Enhanced surveillance of initial cases of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza in Ireland, April-July 2009.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, J

    2009-09-24

    From 28 April to 18 July 2009 there were 156 cases of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza confirmed in Ireland. During this time, Ireland was in containment phase, and detailed case-based epidemiological information was gathered on all cases presenting in the community and acute health care setting. Active case finding was performed among contacts of cases. Eighty percent of cases were in people less than 35 years of age and 86% were imported. The most frequent symptoms were fever, sore throat, myalgia and dry cough. Nine people were hospitalized, no fatalities occurred.

  7. Response to the challenges of pandemic H1N1 in a small island state: the Barbadian experience

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    Ferdinand Elizabeth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Having been overwhelmed by the complexity of the response needed for the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS epidemic, public health professionals in the small island state of Barbados put various measures in place to improve its response in the event of a pandemic Methods Data for this study was collected using Barbados’ National Influenza Surveillance System, which was revitalized in 2007. It is comprised of ten sentinel sites which send weekly notifications of acute respiratory illness (ARI and severe acute respiratory illness (SARI to the Office of the National Epidemiologist. During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, meetings of the National Pandemic Planning Committee and the Technical Command Committee were convened. The pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs implemented as a result of these meetings form the basis of the results presented in this paper. Results On June 3, 2009, Barbados reported its first case of 2009 H1N1. From June until October 2009, there were 155 laboratory confirmed cases of 2009 H1N1, with one additional case occurring in January 2010. For the outbreak period (June-October 2009, the surveillance team received reports of 2,483 ARI cases, compared to 412 cases for the same period in 2008. The total hospitalization rate due to SARIs for the year 2009 was 90.1 per 100,000 people, as compared to 7.3 per 100,000 people for 2008. Barbados’ pandemic response was characterized by a strong surveillance system combining active and passive surveillance, good risk communication strategy, a strengthened public and private sector partnership, and effective regional and international collaborations. Community restriction strategies such as school and workplace closures and cancellation of group events were not utilized as public health measures to delay the spread of the virus. Some health care facilities struggled with providing adequate isolation facilities. Conclusions The number of

  8. The Association of H1N1 Pandemic Influenza with Congenital Anomaly Prevalence in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the context of the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) surveillance response to the 2009 influenza pandemic, we sought to establish whether there was a detectable increase of congenital anomaly prevalence among pregnancies exposed to influenza seasons in general...

  9. Pandemic H1N1 influenza: zoonoses are a two-way street

    Science.gov (United States)

    Influenza is a zoonotic viral disease representing a worldwide health and economic threat to humans and animals. Swine influenza was first recognized clinically in pigs in the Midwestern United States in 1918 concurrent with the Spanish flu human pandemic. Since the first report that flu was caused ...

  10. Coordination Costs for School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics, Maine, 2009 H1N1 Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asay, Garrett R. Beeler; Cho, Bo-Hyun; Lorick, Suchita A.; Tipton, Meredith L.; Dube, Nancy L.; Messonnier, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    School nurses played a key role in Maine's school-located influenza vaccination (SLV) clinics during the 2009-2010 pandemic season. The objective of this study was to determine, from the school district perspective, the labor hours and costs associated with outside-clinic coordination activities (OCA). The authors defined OCA as labor hours spent…

  11. Biosurveillance capability requirements for the global health security agenda: lessons from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoto, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The biosurveillance capabilities needed to rapidly detect and characterize emerging biological threats are an essential part of the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA). The analyses of the global public health system's functioning during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic suggest that while capacities such as those identified in the GHSA are essential building blocks, the global biosurveillance system must possess 3 critical capabilities: (1) the ability to detect outbreaks and determine whether they are of significant global concern, (2) the ability to describe the epidemiologic characteristics of the pathogen responsible, and (3) the ability to track the pathogen's spread through national populations and around the world and to measure the impact of control strategies. The GHSA capacities-laboratory and diagnostic capacity, reporting networks, and so on-were essential in 2009 and surely will be in future events. But the 2009 H1N1 experience reminds us that it is not just detection but epidemiologic characterization that is necessary. Similarly, real-time biosurveillance systems are important, but as the 2009 H1N1 experience shows, they may contain inaccurate information about epidemiologic risks. Rather, the ability of scientists in Mexico, the United States, and other countries to make sense of the emerging laboratory and epidemiologic information that was critical-an example of global social capital-enabled an effective global response. Thus, to ensure that it is meeting its goals, the GHSA must track capabilities as well as capacities.

  12. Pandemics in the age of Twitter: content analysis of Tweets during the 2009 H1N1 outbreak.

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    Cynthia Chew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surveys are popular methods to measure public perceptions in emergencies but can be costly and time consuming. We suggest and evaluate a complementary "infoveillance" approach using Twitter during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Our study aimed to: 1 monitor the use of the terms "H1N1" versus "swine flu" over time; 2 conduct a content analysis of "tweets"; and 3 validate Twitter as a real-time content, sentiment, and public attention trend-tracking tool. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Between May 1 and December 31, 2009, we archived over 2 million Twitter posts containing keywords "swine flu," "swineflu," and/or "H1N1." using Infovigil, an infoveillance system. Tweets using "H1N1" increased from 8.8% to 40.5% (R(2 = .788; p<.001, indicating a gradual adoption of World Health Organization-recommended terminology. 5,395 tweets were randomly selected from 9 days, 4 weeks apart and coded using a tri-axial coding scheme. To track tweet content and to test the feasibility of automated coding, we created database queries for keywords and correlated these results with manual coding. Content analysis indicated resource-related posts were most commonly shared (52.6%. 4.5% of cases were identified as misinformation. News websites were the most popular sources (23.2%, while government and health agencies were linked only 1.5% of the time. 7/10 automated queries correlated with manual coding. Several Twitter activity peaks coincided with major news stories. Our results correlated well with H1N1 incidence data. CONCLUSIONS: This study illustrates the potential of using social media to conduct "infodemiology" studies for public health. 2009 H1N1-related tweets were primarily used to disseminate information from credible sources, but were also a source of opinions and experiences. Tweets can be used for real-time content analysis and knowledge translation research, allowing health authorities to respond to public concerns.

  13. A review of adult mortality due to 2009 pandemic (H1N1 influenza A in California.

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    Janice K Louie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While children and young adults had the highest attack rates due to 2009 pandemic (H1N1 influenza A (2009 H1N1, studies of hospitalized cases noted high fatality in older adults. We analyzed California public health surveillance data to better characterize the populations at risk for dying due to 2009 H1N1. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A case was an adult ≥20 years who died with influenza-like symptoms and laboratory results indicative of 2009 H1N1. Demographic and clinical data were abstracted from medical records using a standardized case report form. From April 3, 2009-August 10, 2010, 541 fatal cases ≥20 years with 2009 H1N1 were reported. Influenza fatality rates per 100,000 population were highest in persons 50-59 years (3.5; annualized rate = 2.6 and 60-69 years (2.3; annualized rate = 1.7 compared to younger and older age groups (0.4-1.9; annualized rates = 0.3-1.4. Of 486 cases hospitalized prior to death, 441 (91% required intensive care unit (ICU admission. ICU admission rates per 100,000 population were highest in adults 50-59 years (8.6. ICU case-fatality ratios among adults ranged from 24-42%, with the highest ratios in persons 70-79 years. A total of 425 (80% cases had co-morbid conditions associated with severe seasonal influenza. The prevalence of most co-morbid conditions increased with increasing age, but obesity, pregnancy and obstructive sleep apnea decreased with age. Rapid testing was positive in 97 (35% of 276 tested. Of 482 cases with available data, 384 (80% received antiviral treatment, including 49 (15% of 328 within 48 hours of symptom onset. CONCLUSIONS: Adults aged 50-59 years had the highest fatality due to 2009 H1N1; older adults may have been spared due to pre-existing immunity. However, once infected and hospitalized in intensive care, case-fatality ratios were high for all adults, especially in those over 60 years. Vaccination of adults older than 50 years should be encouraged.

  14. 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus outbreak and response--Rwanda, October, 2009-May, 2010.

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    Justin Wane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In October 2009, the first case of pandemic influenza A(H1N1pdm09 (pH1N1 was confirmed in Kigali, Rwanda and countrywide dissemination occurred within several weeks. We describe clinical and epidemiological characteristics of this epidemic. METHODS: From October 2009 through May 2010, we undertook epidemiologic investigations and response to pH1N1. Respiratory specimens were collected from all patients meeting the WHO case definition for pH1N1, which were tested using CDC's real time RT-PCR protocol at the Rwandan National Reference Laboratory (NRL. Following documented viral transmission in the community, testing focused on clinically severe and high-risk group suspect cases. RESULTS: From October 9, 2009 through May 31, 2010, NRL tested 2,045 specimens. In total, 26% (n = 532 of specimens tested influenza positive; of these 96% (n = 510 were influenza A and 4% (n = 22 were influenza B. Of cases testing influenza A positive, 96.8% (n = 494, 3% (n = 15, and 0.2% (n = 1 were A(H1N1pdm09, Seasonal A(H3 and Seasonal A(non-subtyped, respectively. Among laboratory-confirmed cases, 263 (53.2% were children <15 years and 275 (52% were female. In total, 58 (12% cases were hospitalized with mean duration of hospitalization of 5 days (Range: 2-15 days. All cases recovered and there were no deaths. Overall, 339 (68% confirmed cases received oseltamivir in any setting. Among all positive cases, 26.9% (143/532 were among groups known to be at high risk of influenza-associated complications, including age <5 years 23% (122/532, asthma 0.8% (4/532, cardiac disease 1.5% (8/532, pregnancy 0.6% (3/532, diabetes mellitus 0.4% (2/532, and chronic malnutrition 0.8% (4/532. CONCLUSIONS: Rwanda experienced a PH1N1 outbreak which was epidemiologically similar to PH1N1 outbreaks in the region. Unlike seasonal influenza, children <15 years were the most affected by pH1N1. Lessons learned from the outbreak response included the need to

  15. Structural Characterization of the Hemagglutinin Receptor Specificity from the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic

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    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Paulson, James C.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps)

    2012-02-13

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the viral envelope protein that mediates viral attachment to host cells and elicits membrane fusion. The HA receptor-binding specificity is a key determinant for the host range and transmissibility of influenza viruses. In human pandemics of the 20th century, the HA normally has acquired specificity for human-like receptors before widespread infection. Crystal structures of the H1 HA from the 2009 human pandemic (A/California/04/2009 [CA04]) in complex with human and avian receptor analogs reveal conserved recognition of the terminal sialic acid of the glycan ligands. However, favorable interactions beyond the sialic acid are found only for {alpha}2-6-linked glycans and are mediated by Asp190 and Asp225, which hydrogen bond with Gal-2 and GlcNAc-3. For {alpha}2-3-linked glycan receptors, no specific interactions beyond the terminal sialic acid are observed. Our structural and glycan microarray analyses, in the context of other high-resolution HA structures with {alpha}2-6- and {alpha}2-3-linked glycans, now elucidate the structural basis of receptor-binding specificity for H1 HAs in human and avian viruses and provide a structural explanation for the preference for {alpha}2-6 siaylated glycan receptors for the 2009 pandemic swine flu virus.

  16. Clinical features of initial cases of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Macau, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Bao-tong; FAN Yun-ming; LI Tak-ming; LIU Xiao-qing

    2010-01-01

    Background The first case of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in Macau Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the People's Republic of China was documented on June 18, 2009. Subsequently, persons with suspected infection or of contact with suspected cases received screening. All the confirmed cases were hospitalized and treated with oseltamivir. Their clinical features were observed. This may help for better management for later patients and be of benefit to the government of Macau SAR to adjust its strategy to combat the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection more efficiently.Methods From June to July 2009, the initial 72 cases of influenza A (H1N1) in Macau were hospitalized in Common Hospital Centre S. Januario (CHCSJ). The infection was confirmed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The clinical features of the disease were closely observed and documented. Oseltamivir was given to all patients within 48 hours after the onset of disease and maintained for 5 days.Results The mean age of the 72 patients was 21 years old. Forty of them were men and 32 were women. The median incubation of the virus was 2 days (1 to 7 days). The most common symptoms were fever (97.2%) and cough (77.8%).The rate of gastrointestinal symptoms including nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea was 2.8%. Fever typically lasted for 3days (1 to 9 days). The median time from the onset to positive results of real-time RT-PCR was 6 days (3 to 13 days).After treatment with oseltamivir, most patients became afebrile within 48 hours. Only one aged patient with a history of glaucoma and hypothyroidism was found to have lung infiltration on chest X-ray.Conclusions The initial cases of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in Macau SAR showed that most of the infected persons had a mild course. The virus could be detected by real-time RT-PCR within a median of 6 days from the onset. Oseltamivir was effective.

  17. Influenza A (H1N1-2009) pandemic in Singapore--public health control measures implemented and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Joanne; Ng, Yeuk Fan; Cutter, Jeffery L; James, Lyn

    2010-04-01

    We describe the public health control measures implemented in Singapore to limit the spread of influenza A (H1N1-2009) and mitigate its social effects. We also discuss the key learning points from this experience. Singapore's public health control measures were broadly divided into 2 phases: containment and mitigation. Containment strategies included the triage of febrile patients at frontline healthcare settings, admission and isolation of confirmed cases, mandatory Quarantine Orders (QO) for close contacts, and temperature screening at border entry points. After sustained community transmission became established, containment shifted to mitigation. Hospitals only admitted H1N1-2009 cases based on clinical indications, not for isolation. Mild cases were managed in the community. Contact tracing and QOs tapered off, and border temperature screening ended. The 5 key lessons learnt were: (1) Be prepared, but retain flexibility in implementing control measures; (2) Surveillance, good scientific information and operational research can increase a system's ability to manage risk during a public health crisis; (3) Integrated systems-level responses are essential for a coherent public health response; (4) Effective handling of manpower surges requires creative strategies; and (5) Communication must be strategic, timely, concise and clear. Singapore's effective response to the H1N1-2009 pandemic, founded on experience in managing the 2003 SARS epidemic, was a whole-of-government approach towards pandemic preparedness planning. Documenting the measures taken and lessons learnt provides a learning opportunity for both doctors and policy makers, and can help fortify Singapore's ability to respond to future major disease outbreaks.

  18. 清新县甲型H1N1流感流行因素分析%Analysis on factors of H1N1 flu pandemic influenza in Qingxin county

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄彩琼; 黄德厚; 周志珊; 朱永坚; 邝西金; 李初升; 欧映红; 马励斌

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]To grasp the dynamic features and popular rule of H1N1 flu outbreak in our county through the system monitoring survey,to analyze the popular factors of influenza H1N1flu,provide the scientific basis for improving the prevention and control measures.[Methods]Six towns were selected as monitoring stations in Qingxin county central,southem and northern region,extracting the general population venous blood,ELISA test was carried out on a H1N1 IgG antibody serologicad survey,at the same time the face to face questionnaire of epidemiological investigation was also conducted.[Results]The serum samples of 1325 persons were tested,influenza H1N1 flu antibody positive for 190 people,positive rate was 14.34%,H1N1 influenza virus infection in patients in our county were mainly light and inapparent,the life of a crowd gathered H1N1 IgG antibody was higher than that in the crowd gathered(P< 0.05),influenza H1N1 flu vaccine for 2.49% rate,the effect of immunity for 57.58%,a cold of visit for 70.66% rate,the case of H1N1 influenza was not found in the survey group.[Conclusions]The main factors influencing our county H1N1 flu pandemic influenza are the vaccine immunization rates among immune effect and medical diagnosis accuracy,the susceptibility of living gathering group,infections status with light and inapparent as main condition,the vaccination for H1N1 flu vaccine crowd influenza and influenza H1N1 flu knowledge training for clinical doctors should be strengthened,the nursery institutions and schools and other clustering area are still important places to be prevented and controlled for H1N1 flu prevention in our county.%[目的]通过系统监测调查,及时掌握我县甲型H1N1流感的疫情动态和流行规律,分析其流行因素,为我县完善甲型H1N1流感的防控工作提供科学依据.[方法]在清新县中部、南部、北部地区选择6个镇作为监测点,抽取普通人群静脉血,用酶联免疫试验检测甲型H1N1 IgG抗

  19. Reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus with circulating human and avian influenza viruses: public health risk implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stincarelli, Maria; Arvia, Rosaria; De Marco, Maria Alessandra; Clausi, Valeria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Cotti, Claudia; Delogu, Mauro; Donatelli, Isabella; Azzi, Alberta; Giannecchini, Simone

    2013-08-01

    Exploring the reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A/H1N1pdm09) influenza virus with other circulating human or avian influenza viruses is the main concern related to the generation of more virulent or new variants having implications for public health. After different coinfection experiments in human A549 cells, by using the A/H1N1pdm09 virus plus one of human seasonal influenza viruses of H1N1 and H3N2 subtype or one of H11, H10, H9, H7 and H1 avian influenza viruses, several reassortant viruses were obtained. Among these, the HA of H1N1 was the main segment of human seasonal influenza virus reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Conversely, HA and each of the three polymerase segments, alone or in combination, of the avian influenza viruses mainly reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Of note, A/H1N1pdm09 viruses that reassorted with HA of H1N1 seasonal human or H11N6 avian viruses or carried different combination of avian origin polymerase segments, exerted a higher replication effectiveness than that of the parental viruses. These results confirm that reassortment of the A/H1N1pdm09 with circulating low pathogenic avian influenza viruses should not be misjudged in the prediction of the next pandemic.

  20. Next generation syndromic surveillance: molecular epidemiology, electronic health records and the pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadan, Raul; Calman, Neil; Hripcsak, George

    2009-08-22

    In the early phase of the 2009 A (H1N1) pandemic a marked increase in severity and a shift in the age distribution toward younger persons was found, with higher severity reported in patients with pre-existing medical conditions and pregnant women. Consistent with previous pandemics, the age and clinical history of the patients play a critical role in the morbidity and mortality associated with the pandemic virus. This is the first influenza pandemic in the information era, where enormous amounts of information will be available from the pathogen and the patient. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided an enormous amount of information about pathogens in near real time and at relatively low cost. Electronic Health Records (EHRs) provide another enormously rich set of information about patients, which include patient preconditions, previous exposures, immunization history, presenting complaints, duration and severity of illness, treatment history, and geographic location. An infectious disease is a complex interplay between host and pathogen. The morbidity and mortality of a virus depend on the virus, the patient, and the environment. To evaluate and understand the severity of the pandemic virus and to identify the populations at risk of mild or severe, life-threatening illness, it is compulsory to integrate viral and patient information in a fast and accurate way. Both advances in biomedical informatics with the creation of EHRs and molecular techniques provide the framework to achieve these aims.

  1. Modelling the spatial-temporal progression of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Raimund; Chowell, Gerardo; Mulet, Pep; Villada, Luis M

    2016-02-01

    A spatial-temporal transmission model of 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic influenza across Chile, a country that spans a large latitudinal range, is developed to characterize the spatial variation in peak timing of that pandemic as a function of local transmission rates, spatial connectivity assumptions for Chilean regions, and the putative location of introduction of the novel virus into the country. Specifically, a metapopulation SEIR (susceptible-exposed-infected-removed) compartmental model that tracks the transmission dynamics of influenza in 15 Chilean regions is calibrated. The model incorporates population mobility among neighboring regions and indirect mobility to and from other regions via the metropolitan central region ('hub region'). The stability of the disease-free equilibrium of this model is analyzed and compared with the corresponding stability in each region, concluding that stability may occur even with some regions having basic reproduction numbers above 1. The transmission model is used along with epidemiological data to explore potential factors that could have driven the spatial-temporal progression of the pandemic. Simulations and sensitivity analyses indicate that this relatively simple model is sufficient to characterize the south-north gradient in peak timing observed during the pandemic, and suggest that south Chile observed the initial spread of the pandemic virus, which is in line with a retrospective epidemiological study. The 'hub region' in our model significantly enhanced population mixing in a short time scale.

  2. Expanding practitioner scopes of practice during public health emergencies: experiences from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccination efforts.

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    Courtney, Brooke; Morhard, Ryan; Bouri, Nidhi; Cicero, Anita

    2010-09-01

    In a public health emergency involving significant surges in patients and shortages of medical staff, supplies, and space, temporarily expanding scopes of practice of certain healthcare practitioners may help to address heightened population health needs. Scopes of practice, which are defined by state practice acts, set forth the range of services that licensed practitioners are authorized to perform. The U.S. has had limited experience with temporarily expanding scopes of practice during emergencies. However, during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response, many states took some form of action to expand the practice scopes of certain categories of practitioners in order to authorize them to administer the pandemic vaccine. No standard legal approach for expanding scopes of practice during emergencies exists across states, and scope of practice expansions during routine, nonemergency times have been the subject of professional society debate and legal action. These issues raise the question of how states could effectively implement expansions for health services beyond administering vaccine and ensure consistency in expansions across states during catastrophic events that require a shift to crisis standards of care. This article provides an overview of scopes of practice, a summary of the range of legal and regulatory approaches used in the U.S. to expand practice scopes for vaccination during the 2009 H1N1 response, and recommendations for future research.

  3. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of childhood pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus infection: an observational cohort study

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    Youn You-Sook

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There was a pandemic influenza around the world in 2009 including South Korea since last pandemic occurred four decades ago. We aimed to evaluate the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of this infection in childhood. Methods We evaluated the epidemiologic characteristics of all the subjects infected with the 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus (2,971 patients, ≤ 15 years of age, and the clinical and laboratory findings of the inpatients (217 patients, 80 had pneumonia between 1 September 2009 and 31 January 2010 in a single hospital throughout the epidemic. Results The age distribution of all the subjects was relatively even. Over 90% of cases occurred during a two-month period. Two hundred and five patients (94.5% received oseltamivir within 48 h of fever onset, and 97% of inpatients defervesced within 48 h of medication. The group with pneumonia included more males than females, and had higher leukocytes counts with lower lymphocyte differentials than the group without pneumonia. The white blood cell count and lymphocyte differential were associated with the severity of pneumonia. Corticosteroid treatment for severe pneumonia patients was highly effective in preventing disease progression. Conclusion Children of all ages affected with even rates of infection, but males were predominant in pneumonia patients. Pneumonia patients showed lymphopenia and its severity was associated with the severity of illness. Our results suggest that the mechanism of lung injury in 2009 H1N1 virus infection may be associated with the host immune response.

  4. Neuraminidase and hemagglutinin matching patterns of a highly pathogenic avian and two pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses.

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    Yonghui Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza A virus displays strong reassortment characteristics, which enable it to achieve adaptation in human infection. Surveying the reassortment and virulence of novel viruses is important in the prevention and control of an influenza pandemic. Meanwhile, studying the mechanism of reassortment may accelerate the development of anti-influenza strategies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA matching patterns of two pandemic H1N1 viruses (the 1918 and current 2009 strains and a highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (H5N1 were studied using a pseudotyped particle (pp system. Our data showed that four of the six chimeric HA/NA combinations could produce infectious pps, and that some of the chimeric pps had greater infectivity than did their ancestors, raising the possibility of reassortment among these viruses. The NA of H5N1 (A/Anhui/1/2005 could hardly reassort with the HAs of the two H1N1 viruses. Many biological characteristics of HA and NA, including infectivity, hemagglutinating ability, and NA activity, are dependent on their matching pattern. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest the existence of an interaction between HA and NA, and the HA NA matching pattern is critical for valid viral reassortment.

  5. Relapse of minimal change disease following infection with the 2009 pandemic influenza (H1N1) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seo Rin; Lee, Soo Bong; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Dong Won; Rhee, Harin; Seong, Eun Young; Song, Sang Heon; Kwak, Ihm Soo

    2012-04-01

    We report a case of relapse of minimal change disease following infection with the influenza A (H1N1) virus responsible for the 2009 pandemic. A 22-year-old man who had been diagnosed with minimal change disease presented with systemic edema. He had achieved complete remission with an oral steroid (prednisolone 1 mg/kg/day) by the 17th day of administration. On the 27th day of prednisolone administration, he presented with a new onset of generalized edema after several days of productive coughing. His urine showed proteinuria (4+) with a protein/creatinine ratio (PCR) of 2852.1 mg/g. His nasal swab sample was positive for the 2009 pandemic influenza (H1N1) virus by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). He received oseltamivir (150 mg/day) for 5 days. A day after completing the oseltamivir therapy, his proteinuria returned to a normal range; urinalysis was negative for protein with PCR 79.2 mg/g. One month later, the patient remained normal with no proteinuria.

  6. Preliminary study about sublingual administration of bacteria-expressed pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in miniature pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyekwon; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Song, Hohyun; Choi, Jungah; Shim, Byoungshik; Kang, Bokyu; Moon, Hyoungjoon; Yeom, Minjoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Song, Daesub; Song, Manki

    2014-09-01

    Sublingual (SL) administration of influenza vaccine would be non-invasive and effective way to give human populations protective immunity against the virus, especially when pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this study, the efficacy of pandemic influenza virus-based subunit vaccines was tested after sublingual (SL) adjuvant administration in pigs. Eight specific pathogen-free Yucatan pigs were divided into 4 groups: nonvaccinated but challenged (A) and vaccinated and challenged (B, C, and D). The vaccinated groups were subdivided by vaccine type and inoculation route: SL subunit vaccine (hemagglutinin antigen 1 [HA1] + wild-type cholera toxin [wtCT], B); IM subunit vaccine (HA1 + aluminum hydroxide, C); and IM inactivated vaccine (+ aluminum hydroxide, D). The vaccines were administered twice at a 2-week interval. All pigs were challenged with pandemic influenza virus (A/swine/GCVP-KS01/2009 [H1N1]) and monitored for clinical signs, serology, viral shedding, and histopathology. After vaccination, hemagglutination inhibition titre was higher in group D (320) than in the other vaccinated groups (40-80) at the time of challenge. The mobility and feed intake were reduced in group C. Both viral shedding and histopathological lesions were reduced in groups B and D. Although this study has limitation due to the limited number of pigs (2 pigs per a group), the preliminary data in this study provided the protective potential of SL administration of bacteria-expressed pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in pigs. There should be additional animal studies about effective adjuvant system and vaccine types for the use of SL influenza vaccination.

  7. Impact of cytokine in type 1 narcolepsy: Role of pandemic H1N1 vaccination ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecendreux, Michel; Libri, Valentina; Jaussent, Isabelle; Mottez, Estelle; Lopez, Régis; Lavault, Sophie; Regnault, Armelle; Arnulf, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures (pandemic influenza 2009 vaccination) provide strong support that narcolepsy type 1 is an immune-mediated disease. Considering the limited knowledge regarding the immune mechanisms involved in narcolepsy whether related to flu vaccination or not and the recent progresses in cytokine measurement technology, we assessed 30 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors using the Luminex technology in either peripheral (serum) or central (CSF) compartments in a large population of 90 children and adult patients with narcolepsy type 1 in comparison to 58 non-hypocretin deficient hypersomniacs and 41 healthy controls. Furthermore, we compared their levels in patients with narcolepsy whether exposed to pandemic flu vaccine or not, and analyzed the effect of age, duration of disease and symptom severity. Comparison for sera biomarkers between narcolepsy (n = 84, 54 males, median age: 15.5 years old) and healthy controls (n = 41, 13 males, median age: 20 years old) revealed an increased stimulation of the immune system with high release of several pro- and anti-inflammatory serum cytokines and growth factors with interferon-γ, CCL11, epidermal growth factor, and interleukin-2 receptor being independently associated with narcolepsy. Increased levels of interferon-γ, CCL11, and interleukin-12 were found when close to narcolepsy onset. After several adjustments, only one CSF biomarker differed between narcolepsy (n = 44, 26 males, median age: 15 years old) and non-hypocretin deficient hypersomnias (n = 57, 24 males, median age: 36 years old) with higher CCL 3 levels found in narcolepsy. Comparison for sera biomarkers between patients with narcolepsy who developed the disease post-pandemic flu vaccination (n = 36) to those without vaccination (n = 48) revealed an increased stimulation of the immune system with high release of three cytokines, regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed

  8. Efficacy of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus vaccine in pigs against the pandemic influenza virus is superior to commercially available swine influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, W L A; Stockhofe, N; Weesendorp, E; van Zoelen-Bos, D; Heutink, R; Quak, S; Goovaerts, D; Heldens, J G M; Maas, R; Moormann, R J; Koch, G

    2011-09-28

    In April 2009 a new influenza A/H1N1 strain, currently named "pandemic (H1N1) influenza 2009" (H1N1v), started the first official pandemic in humans since 1968. Several incursions of this virus in pig herds have also been reported from all over the world. Vaccination of pigs may be an option to reduce exposure of human contacts with infected pigs, thereby preventing cross-species transfer, but also to protect pigs themselves, should this virus cause damage in the pig population. Three swine influenza vaccines, two of them commercially available and one experimental, were therefore tested and compared for their efficacy against an H1N1v challenge. One of the commercial vaccines is based on an American classical H1N1 influenza strain, the other is based on a European avian H1N1 influenza strain. The experimental vaccine is based on reassortant virus NYMC X179A (containing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of A/California/7/2009 (H1N1v) and the internal genes of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1)). Excretion of infectious virus was reduced by 0.5-3 log(10) by the commercial vaccines, depending on vaccine and sample type. Both vaccines were able to reduce virus replication especially in the lower respiratory tract, with less pathological lesions in vaccinated and subsequently challenged pigs than in unvaccinated controls. In pigs vaccinated with the experimental vaccine, excretion levels of infectious virus in nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, were at or below 1 log(10)TCID(50) per swab and lasted for only 1 or 2 days. An inactivated vaccine containing the HA and NA of an H1N1v is able to protect pigs from an infection with H1N1v, whereas swine influenza vaccines that are currently available are of limited efficaciousness. Whether vaccination of pigs against H1N1v will become opportune remains to be seen and will depend on future evolution of this strain in the pig population. Close monitoring of the pig population, focussing on presence and evolution of

  9. Analysis of the Influenza A (H1N1 2009 Pandemic Infection in Japanese Asthmatic Patients: Using a Questionnaire-Based Survey

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    Nao Koshio

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The effectiveness of the vaccination against the H1N1 pdm09 virus was confirmed during the first pandemic season, but it was limited. Further investigation on H1N1 pdm09 virus infection in asthmatics will be required.

  10. Pandemic 2009 Influenza A (H1N1 Infection in Children

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    Taner Özgür

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study is to share our experience of sixty-eight pediatric hospitalizations associated with influenza-like illness and pneumonia between November, 2009 and December, 2009.Materials and Methods: Clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory and radiological results, length of stay in hospital and intensive care unit, treatments and complications were compared in laboratory confirmed pandemic influenza A positive and negative cases.Results: There was no significant difference in gender distribution between the two groups. The number of positive cases in patients over 5 years of age were significantly higher than the same age group in negative patients (p=0.004. There were underlying health conditions in 78.8% of the positive cases and in 68.8% of the negative cases (p=0.57. The incidence of diarrhea in positive group was significantly higher than in the negative group (p=0.02. Low immunization rates of the seasonal influenza vaccine were remarkable in each group. There was no significant difference in vaccination rates between the two groups (p=0.99.Conclusions: The severity of the disease remained similar in patients with positive and negative groups. In both groups, the high ratio of those having an underlying disease was noteworthy. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2011; 9: 53-9Key words: Pandemic 2009 influenza A, childhood, pneumonia

  11. Age distribution of cases of 2009 (H1N1 pandemic influenza in comparison with seasonal influenza.

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    Drosos E Karageorgopoulos

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Several aspects of the epidemiology of 2009 (H1N1 pandemic influenza have not been accurately determined. We sought to study whether the age distribution of cases differs in comparison with seasonal influenza. METHODS: We searched for official, publicly available data through the internet from different countries worldwide on the age distribution of cases of influenza during the 2009 (H1N1 pandemic influenza period and most recent seasonal influenza periods. Data had to be recorded through the same surveillance system for both compared periods. RESULTS: For 2009 pandemic influenza versus recent influenza seasons, in USA, visits for influenza-like illness to sentinel providers were more likely to involve the age groups of 5-24, 25-64 and 0-4 years compared with the reference group of >64 years [odds ratio (OR (95% confidence interval (CI: 2.43 (2.39-2.47, 1.66 (1.64-1.69, and 1.51 (1.48-1.54, respectively]. Pediatric deaths were less likely in the age groups of 2-4 and 65 years [OR (95% CI: 7.19 (6.67-7.75, 5.33 (4.90-5.79, 5.04 (4.70-5.41, 3.12 (2.89-3.36 and 1.89 (1.75-2.05, respectively]. In New Zealand, consultations for influenza-like illness by sentinel providers were more likely in the age groups of 65 years [OR (95% CI: 2.38 (1.74-3.26, 1.99 (1.62-2.45, 1.57 (1.30-1.89, 1.57 (1.30-1.88, 1.40 (1.17-1.69 and 1.39 (1.14-1.70, respectively]. CONCLUSIONS: The greatest increase in influenza cases during 2009 (H1N1 pandemic influenza period, in comparison with most recent seasonal influenza periods, was seen for school-aged children, adolescents, and younger adults.

  12. Oseltamivir compounding in the hospital pharmacy during the (H1N1 influenza pandemic

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    Márcia Lúcia de Mário Marin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Pandemics impose large demands on the health care system. The supply of appropriate chemotherapeutic agents, namely oseltamivir solution, presented a serious challenge in the recent influenza pandemic. This study reports on the rational series of pharmacotechnical steps that were followed to appropriately handle bulk oseltamivir powder to meet the increased demand. METHODS: During a six-week period in August and September of 2009, a task force was created in the Central Pharmacy of Hospital das Clínicas to convert imported oseltamivir phosphate into ready-to-use solution for utilization by physicians and public health authorities. The protocol included dissolution, physico-chemical tests and the bottling of a liquid microdose formulation for emergency room and outpatient dispensing with adequate quality control during all phases. RESULTS: The successful production routine was based on a specially designed flowchart according to which a batch of 33210 g of oseltamivir powder was converted into 32175 solution units during the aforementioned period with a net loss of only 2.6%. The end products were bottles containing 50 ml of 15 mg/mL oseltamivir solution. The measured concentration was stable and accurate (97.5% - 102.0% of the nominal value. The drug was prescribed as both a prophylactic and therapeutic agent. DISCUSSION: Hospital pharmacies are conventionally engaged in the manipulation of medical prescriptions and specialty drugs. They are generally responsible for only small-scale equipment used for manufacturing and quality-control procedures. The compounding of oseltamivir was a unique effort dictated by exceptional circumstances. CONCLUSION: The shortage of oseltamivir solution for clinical use was solved by emergency operationalization of a semi-industrial process in which bulk powder was converted into practical vials for prompt delivery.

  13. Serologic survey on 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Fujian Province%福建省甲型H1N1流感血清流行病学调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑奎城; 沈晓娜; 杨式芹; 林元波; 周朝晖; 谢剑锋; 陈炜; 翁育伟; 严延生

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the serologic responses to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus in Fujian Province before and after the H1 N1 pandemic. Before the occurrence of the H1N1 pandemic, 800 serum specimen were obtained in 2008, whereas 1250 specimen were taken from different districts from January to April, after the pandemic in 2010.Antibody titres were measured by using haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. The results showed that the positive rates of HI≥10 and HI≥40 after the pandemic were increased to 52.72% and 36.24 from 6.5% and 0.63% respectively before the pandemic (P<0.01), and geometric mean titer (GMT) was increased to 18.26 from 5.39 (P<0.01). The levels of HI antibody after the pandemic was significantly higher than those before the pandemic in each age group (P<0.01). The positive rates of HI≥10, HI≥40 and GMT in the subjects of 6-17 years old were 74.02%, 57.22% and 38.15 respectively, which were the highest among various age groups. There were no significant difference in the levels of HI antibody between males and females (P>0.05). The levels of HI antibody in the subjects from Fuzhou were the highest among 9 prefectures. The positive of HI≥10, HI≥46 and GMT in the subjects received H1N1 vaccination were 83.84%, 64.62% and 46.62 respectively, which were significantly higher than those in the subjects without vaccination. Our data revealed that the levels of HI antibody had been significantly increased and the development of immunological barrier to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus had been formed, to some extent after the pandemic in Fujian Province. However, mass vaccination campaigns targeting the key age groups should be strengthened to prevent the rebound of pandemic.%目的 了解甲型H1N1流感(甲流)大流行前后福建省人群甲流血清流行病学特征.方法 采集2008年甲流流行前血清标本800例和2010年1-4月甲流流行后不同地区血清标本1250例,以

  14. Oseltamivir for treatment and prevention of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus infection in households, Milwaukee, 2009

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    Miller Joel C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During an influenza pandemic, a substantial proportion of transmission is thought to occur in households. We used data on influenza progression in individuals and their contacts collected by the City of Milwaukee Health Department (MHD to study the transmission of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus in 362 households in Milwaukee, WI, and the effects of oseltamivir treatment and chemoprophylaxis. Methods 135 households had chronological information on symptoms and oseltamivir usage for all household members. The effect of oseltamivir treatment and other factors on the household secondary attack rate was estimated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression with households as the unit of analysis. The effect of oseltamivir treatment and other factors on the individual secondary attack rate was estimated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression with individual household contacts as the unit of analysis, and a generalized estimating equations approach was used to fit the model to allow for clustering within households. Results Oseltamivir index treatment on onset day or the following day (early treatment was associated with a 42% reduction (OR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.19, 1.73 in the odds of one or more secondary infections in a household and a 50% reduction (OR: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.17, 1.46 in the odds of a secondary infection in individual contacts. The confidence bounds are wide due to a small sample of households with early oseltamivir index usage - in 29 such households, 5 had a secondary attack. Younger household contacts were at higher risk of infection (OR: 2.79, 95% CI: 1.50-5.20. Conclusions Early oseltamivir treatment may be beneficial in preventing H1N1pdm influenza transmission; this may have relevance to future control measures for influenza pandemics. Larger randomized trials are needed to confirm this finding statistically.

  15. Determinants of non-vaccination against pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza in pregnant women: a prospective cohort study.

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    Romain Freund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In October 2009, the French government organized a national-wide, free of charge vaccination campaign against pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, especially targeting pregnant women, a high risk group for severe illness. The study objective was to evaluate pandemic flu vaccine uptake and factors associated with non-vaccination in a population of pregnant women. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a prospective cohort conducted in 3 maternity hospitals in Paris, 882 pregnant women were randomly included between October 12, 2009 and February 3, 2010, with the aim to study characteristics of pandemic influenza during pregnancy. At inclusion, socio-demographic, medical, obstetrical factors and those associated with a higher risk of flu exposition and disease-spreading were systematically collected. Pandemic flu vaccine uptake was checked until delivery. 555 (62.9% women did not get vaccinated. Determinants associated with non-vaccination in a multivariate logistic regression were: geographic origin (Sub-Saharan African origin, adjusted Odd Ratio aOR = 5.4[2.3-12.7], North African origin, aOR = 2.5[1.3-4.7] and Asian origin, aOR = 2.1[1.7-2.6] compared to French and European origin and socio-professional categories (farmers, craftsmen and tradesmen, aOR = 2.3[2.0-2.6], intermediate professionals, aOR = 1.3[1.0-1.6], employees and manual workers, aOR = 2.5[1.4-4.4] compared to managers and intellectual professionals. The probability of not receiving pandemic flu vaccine was lower among women vaccinated against seasonal flu in the previous 5 years (aOR = 0.6[0.4-0.8] and among those who stopped smoking before or early during pregnancy (aOR = 0.6[0.4-0.8]. Number of children less than 18 years old living at home, work in contact with children or in healthcare area, or professional contact with the public, were not associated with a higher vaccine uptake. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this cohort of pregnant women, vaccine coverage against pandemic

  16. Monitoring extravascular lung water in acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by probable 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus: report of two cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-liang; WANG Zong-yu; YAO Gai-qi; ZHU Xi

    2010-01-01

    @@ During the spring of 2009, a pandemic novel influenza A (H1N1) vims emerged and spread globally. As of January 3, 2009, more than 208 countries and overseas territories or communities have reported laboratory-confirmed cases of pandemic influenza H1N1 2009, including at least 12 799 death cases.1 Critical cases developed severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) rapidly, which was refractory to conventional mechanical ventilation and rescue therapies.

  17. Investigating obesity as a risk factor for influenza-like illness during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic using the Health Survey for England

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, R.; Fragaszy, E. B.; Hayward, A. C.; Warren-Gash, C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, obesity was shown to be associated with severe influenza outcomes. It remains unclear whether obesity was a risk factor for milder influenza-like illness (ILI). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether obesity was associated with an increased risk of self-reported ILI during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic using Health Survey for England (HSE) 2010 cross-sectional data. METHODS: This study used HSE data collected from English households between...

  18. Mutations in polymerase genes enhanced the virulence of 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in mice.

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    Wenfei Zhu

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus can infect a wide variety of animal species with illness ranging from mild to severe, and is a continual cause for concern. Genetic mutations that occur either naturally or during viral adaptation in a poorly susceptible host are key mechanisms underlying the evolution and virulence of influenza A virus. Here, the variants containing PA-A36T or PB2-H357N observed in the mouse-adapted descendants of 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (pH1N1, A/Sichuan/1/2009 (SC, were characterized. Both mutations enhanced polymerase activity in mammalian cells. These effects were confirmed using recombinant SC virus containing polymerase genes with wild type (WT or mutant PA or PB2. The PA-A36T mutant showed enhanced growth property compared to the WT in both human A549 cells and porcine PK15 cells in vitro, without significant effect on viral propagation in murine LA-4 cells and pathogenicity in mice; however, it did enhance the lung virus titer. PB2-H357N variant demonstrated growth ability comparable to the WT in A549 cells, but replicated well in PK15, LA-4 cells and in mice with an enhanced pathogenic phenotype. Despite such mutations are rare in nature, they could be observed in avian H5 and H7 subtype viruses which were currently recognized to pose potential threat to human. Our findings indicated that pH1N1 may adapt well in mammals when acquiring these mutations. Therefore, future molecular epidemiological surveillance should include scrutiny of both markers because of their potential impact on pathogenesis.

  19. Lack of Group X Secreted Phospholipase A2 Increases Survival Following Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelvin, Alyson A.; Degousee, Norbert; Banner, David; Stefanski, Eva; Leon, Alberto J.; Angoulvant, Denis; Paquette, Stéphane G.; Huang, Stephen S. H.; Danesh, Ali; Robbins, Clinton S.; Noyan, Hossein; Husain, Mansoor; Lambeau, Gerard; Gelb, Michael H.; Kelvin, David J.; Rubin, Barry B.

    2014-01-01

    The role of Group X secreted phospholipase A2 (GX-sPLA2) during influenza infection has not been previously investigated. We examined the role of (Reviewer 2 Minor Comment 2) GX-sPLA2 during H1N1 pandemic influenza infection in a GX-sPLA2 gene targeted mouse (GX−/−) model and found that survival after infection was significantly greater in GX−/− mice than in GX+/+ mice. Downstream products of GX-sPLA2 activity, PGD2, PGE2, LTB4, cysteinyl leukotrienes and Lipoxin A4 were significantly lower in GX−/− mice BAL fluid. Lung microarray analysis identified an earlier and more robust induction of T and B cell associated genes in GX−/− mice. Based on the central role of sPLA2 enzymes as key initiators of inflammatory processes, we propose that activation of GX-sPLA2 during H1N1pdm infection is an early step of pulmonary inflammation and its (Reviewer 2 Minor Comment 2) inhibition increases adaptive immunity and improves survival. Our findings suggest that GX-sPLA2 may be a potential therapeutic target during influenza. PMID:24725934

  20. Onset of a pandemic: characterizing the initial phase of the swine flu (H1N1 epidemic in Israel

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    Mendelson Ella

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The swine influenza H1N1 first identified in Mexico, spread rapidly across the globe and is considered the fastest moving pandemic in history. The early phase of an outbreak, in which data is relatively scarce, presents scientific challenges on key issues such as: scale, severity and immunity which are fundamental for establishing sound and rapid policy schemes. Our analysis of an Israeli dataset aims at understanding the spatio-temporal dynamics of H1N1 in its initial phase. Methods We constructed and analyzed a unique dataset from Israel on all confirmed cases (between April 26 to July 7, 2009, representing most swine flu cases in this period. We estimated and characterized fundamental epidemiological features of the pandemic in Israel (e.g. effective reproductive number, age-class distribution, at-risk social groups, infections between sexes, and spatial dynamics. Contact data collected during this stage was used to estimate the generation time distribution of the pandemic. Results We found a low effective reproductive number (Re = 1.06, an age-class distribution of infected individuals (skewed towards ages 18-25, at-risk social groups (soldiers and ultra Orthodox Jews, and significant differences in infections between sexes (skewed towards males. In terms of spatial dynamics, the pandemic spread from the central coastal plain of Israel to other regions, with higher infection rates in more densely populated sub-districts with higher income households. Conclusions Analysis of high quality data holds much promise in reducing uncertainty regarding fundamental aspects of the initial phase of an outbreak (e.g. the effective reproductive number Re, age-class distribution, at-risk social groups. The formulation for determining the effective reproductive number Re used here has many advantages for studying the initial phase of the outbreak since it neither assumes exponential growth of infectives and is independent of the

  1. Emergency Physicians’ Adherence to Center for Disease Control and Prevention Guidance During the 2009 Influenza A H1N1 Pandemic

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    Yu-Hsiang Hsieh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known regarding compliance with management guidelines for epidemicinfluenza in adult emergency department (ED settings during the 2009 novel influenza A(H1N1 epidemic, especially in relation to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCguidance.Methods: We investigated all patients with a clinical diagnosis of influenza at an inner-citytertiary academic adult ED with an annual census of approximately 60,000 visits from May 2008to December 2009. We aimed to determine patterns of presentation and management for adultpatients with an ED diagnosis of influenza during the H1N1 pandemic, using seasonal influenza(pre-H1N1 as reference and to determine the ED provider’s adherence to American College ofEmergency Physicians and CDC guidance during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Adherenceto key elements of CDC 2009 H1N1 guidance was defined as (1 the proportion of admittedpatients who were recommended to receive testing or treatment who actually received testingfor influenza or treatment with antivirals; and (2 the proportion of high-risk patients who weresupposed to be treated who actually were treated with antivirals.Results: Among 339 patients with clinically diagnosed influenza, 88% occurred during the H1N1pandemic. Patients were similarly managed during both phases. Median length of visit (pre-H1N1:385 min, H1N1: 355 min, P > 0.05 and admission rates (pre-H1N1: 8%, H1N1: 11%, P > 0.05were similar between the 2 groups. 28% of patients in the pre-H1N1 group and 16% of patientsin the H1N1 group were prescribed antibiotics during their ED visits (P > 0.05. There were 34admitted patients during the pandemic;, 30 (88% of them received influenza testing in the ED,and 22 (65% were prescribed antivirals in the ED. Noticeably, 19 (56% of the 34 admittedpatients, including 6 with a positive influenza test, received antibiotic treatment during their ED stay.Conclusion: During the recent H1N1 pandemic, most admitted patients

  2. The new school absentees reporting system for pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection in Japan.

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    Takeshi Suzue

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the new Japanese School Absentees Reporting System for Infectious Disease (SARSID for pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection in comparison with the National epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Disease (NESID. METHODS: We used data of 53,223 students (97.7% in Takamatsu city Japan. Data regarding school absentees in SARSID was compared with that in NESID from Oct 13, 2009 to Jan 12, 2010. RESULTS: Similar trends were observed both in SARSID and NESID. However, the epidemic trend for influenza in SARSID was thought to be more sensitive than that in NESID. CONCLUSION: The epidemic trend for influenza among school-aged children could be easily and rapidly assessed by SARSID compared to NESID. SARSID might be useful for detecting the epidemic trend of influenza.

  3. Isolation and quarantine during pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza in NSW: the operational experience of public health units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binns, Philippa L; Sheppeard, Vicky; Staff, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    During the DELAY and CONTAIN phases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza in NSW, public health units needed to rapidly surge operations to manage the 3070 potential cases and 1894 contacts notified to them. The Incident Control System, NetEpi (the web-based multi-user access database), training to up-skill surge staff, and electronic communication were all integral to the outbreak response. Ongoing identification and training of surge staff would assist a timely and effective response to future large scale outbreaks. Investing and incorporating information technology tools into routine public health unit business to assist with communication, outbreak management and reporting will improve familiarity and capability within the network to respond to public health emergencies.

  4. Evaluation of the spread of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 among Japanese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Mitsuo; Kaneko, Minoru; Tsukahara, Teruomi; Washizuka, Shinsuke; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-09-01

    The pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009 virus is commonly known to affect younger individuals. Several epidemiological studies have clarified the epidemic features of university students in Japan. In this study, we reviewed these studies in Japan in comparison with reports from other countries. The average cumulative incidence rate among university students was 9.6 %, with the major symptoms being cough, sore throat, and rhinorrhea. These epidemiological features were similar between Japan and other countries. Attitudes and behaviors toward pandemic influenza control measures were different before and improved during and after the epidemic. These features were also similar to those in other countries. On the other hand, the epidemic spread through club activities or social events, and transmission was attenuated after temporary closure of such groups in Japan. This transmission pattern was inconsistent among countries, which may have been due to differences in lifestyle and cultural habits. Based on these results, infection control measures of pandemic influenza for university organizations in Japan should be considered.

  5. The Relationship between Tuberculosis and Influenza Death during the Influenza (H1N1 Pandemic from 1918-19

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    Welling Oei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiological mechanisms behind the W-shaped age-specific influenza mortality during the Spanish influenza (H1N1 pandemic 1918-19 have yet to be fully clarified. The present study aimed to develop a formal hypothesis: tuberculosis (TB was associated with the W-shaped influenza mortality from 1918-19. Three pieces of epidemiological information were assessed: (i the epidemic records containing the age-specific numbers of cases and deaths of influenza from 1918-19, (ii an outbreak record of influenza in a Swiss TB sanatorium during the pandemic, and (iii the age-dependent TB mortality over time in the early 20th century. Analyzing the data (i, we found that the W-shaped pattern was not only seen in mortality but also in the age-specific case fatality ratio, suggesting the presence of underlying age-specific risk factor(s of influenza death among young adults. From the data (ii, TB was shown to be associated with influenza death (P=0.09, and there was no influenza death among non-TB controls. The data (iii were analyzed by employing the age-period-cohort model, revealing harvesting effect in the period function of TB mortality shortly after the 1918-19 pandemic. These findings suggest that it is worthwhile to further explore the role of TB in characterizing the age-specific risk of influenza death.

  6. Factors associated with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 vaccination acceptance among university students from India during the post-pandemic phase

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    Thejaswini Venkatesh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There was a low adherence to influenza A (H1N1 vaccination program among university students and health care workers during the pandemic influenza in many parts of the world. Vaccination of high risk individuals is one of the recommendations of World Health Organization during the post-pandemic period. It is not documented about the student's knowledge, attitude and willingness to accept H1N1 vaccination during the post-pandemic period. We aimed to analyze the student's knowledge, attitude and willingness to accept H1N1 vaccination during the post-pandemic period in India. Methods Vaccine against H1N1 was made available to the students of Vellore Institute of Technology, India from September 2010. The data are based on a cross-sectional study conducted during October 2010 to January 2011 using a self-administered questionnaire with a representative sample of the student population (N = 802. Results Of the 802 respondents, only 102/802 (12.7% had been vaccinated and 105/802 (13% planned to do so in the future, while 595/802 (74% would probably or definitely not get vaccinated in the future. The highest coverage was among the female (65/102, 63.7% and non-compliance was higher among men in the group (384/595; 64.5% (p Conclusions Our study shows that the vaccination coverage among university students remains very low in the post-pandemic period and doubts about the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine are key elements in their rejection. Our results indicate a need to provide accessible information about the vaccine safety by scientific authorities and fill gaps and confusions in this regard.

  7. Response to the 2009-H1N1 influenza pandemic in the Mekong Basin: surveys of country health leaders

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    Dausey David J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soon after the 2009-H1N1 virus emerged as the first influenza pandemic in 41 years, countries had an early opportunity to test their preparedness plans, protocols and procedures, including their cooperation with other countries in responding to the global pandemic threat. The Mekong Basin Disease Surveillance cooperation (MBDS comprises six countries - Cambodia, China (Yunnan and Guangxi Provinces, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam - that formally organized themselves in 2001 to cooperate in disease surveillance and control. The pandemic presented an opportunity to assess their responses in light of their individual and joint planning. We conducted two surveys of the MBDS leadership from each country, early during the pandemic and shortly after it ended. Results On average, participants rated their country's pandemic response performance as good in both 2009 and 2010. Post-pandemic (2010, perceived performance quality was best for facility-based interventions (overall mean of 4.2 on a scale from 1 = poor to 5 = excellent, followed by surveillance and information sharing (4.1, risk communications (3.9 and disease prevention and control in communities (3.7. Performance was consistently rated as good or excellent for use of hotlines for case reporting (2010 mean of 4.4 and of selected facility-based interventions (each with a 2010 mean of 4.4: using hospital admission criteria, preparing or using isolation areas, using PPE for healthcare workers and using antiviral drugs for treatment. In at least half the countries, the post-pandemic ratings were lower than initial 2009 assessments for performance related to surveillance, facility-based interventions and risk communications. Conclusions MBDS health leaders perceived their pandemic responses effective in areas previously considered problematic. Most felt that MBDS cooperation helped drive and thus added value to their efforts. Surveillance capacity

  8. Detection of Seasonal Influenza H1N1 and H3N2 Viruses using RT-PCR Assay during 2009 Pandemic Influenza in Golestan Province

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    Zhand, S. (MSc

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The emergence of a novel H1N1influenza A virus of animal origin with transmissibility from human to human poses pandemic concern. Current subtypes of Seasonal influenza A viruses spread in human are influenza A H1N1 influenza A H3N2 and influenza type B viruses. The aim of this study was to determine current strains of the H3N2 and new H1N1 subtypes of influenza A virus from patients suspected influenza infection in 2009 flu pandemic in Golestan province, Iran. Material and Methods: In this descriptive study, respiratory samples (n = 153 from patients with acute respiratory symptoms were collected in 2009 flu pandemic applied during 2009 pandemic influenza in Golestan province. After reverse transcription of extracted viral RNA, PCR was developed for both H1N1and H3N2subtypes using CDC specific primers. Results: The mean age of patients was 16.59. Of them 45.1% were male. Thirteen (8.49% were infected with seasonal influenza H1N1 and 25(16.33% with seasonal H3N2influenza. Conclusion: The rate of infection with seasonal H1N1and H3N2is similar to other studies reported from Iran, but lower than the rate reported from other parts of the world

  9. Development and preclinical testing of HNVAC, a cell culture-based H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Nagendra R; Kumar, Deepak; Rao, P Panduranga; Kumari, P Krishna; Kaushik, Yashpal; Ravikrishnan, R; Prasad, Sai D; Ella, Krishna M

    2014-06-17

    Several limitations of the use of embryonated eggs and the threat of pandemics have highlighted the need for other platforms for the production of influenza vaccines. We report the indigenous development and pre-clinical testing of an MDCK-based H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine HNVAC from India. The cell bank and virus seed were characterized extensively. The cells were characterized by PCR, electron microscopy, and karyotyping, and found to be of female canine epithelial origin. The virus was confirmed by neutralization, haemagglutination inhibition, neuraminidase inhibition, and PCR and nucleotide sequencing. Adventitious agent testing was performed by both in vitro and in vivo studies. The in vitro studies included culturing, haemadsorption, haemagglutination, PCR and RT-PCR, whereas in vivo studies included passage in embryonated eggs and in laboratory animals. Both cell bank and virus seed were free of adventitious agents. MDCK cell lysates as well as cellular DNA did not produce tumours in newborn or adult laboratory animals. The bioprocess parameters were standardized to recover antigen with minimal levels of process-related impurities. The vaccine bulk was tested for the presence of specific antigen, and quantified by single radial immunodiffusion. Finally, non-adjuvanted and aluminium hydroxide adjuvanted vaccine formulations were found to be safe in preclinical toxicity studies in mice, rats, guinea pigs and rabbits, and immunogenic in mice and rabbits. This is the first and only cell culture-based influenza vaccine platform developed in any developing country.

  10. Assortativity and the Probability of Epidemic Extinction: A Case Study of Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1-2009

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    Hiroshi Nishiura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike local transmission of pandemic influenza A (H1N1-2009, which was frequently driven by school children, most cases identified in long-distance intranational and international travelers have been adults. The present study examines the relationship between the probability of temporary extinction and the age-dependent next-generation matrix, focusing on the impact of assortativity. Preferred mixing captures as a good approximation the assortativity of a heterogeneously mixing population. We show that the contribution of a nonmaintenance host (i.e., a host type which cannot sustain transmission on its own to the risk of a major epidemic is greatly diminished as mixing patterns become more assortative, and in such a scenario, a higher proportion of non-maintenance hosts among index cases elevates the probability of extinction. Despite the presence of various other epidemiological factors that undoubtedly influenced the delay between first importations and the subsequent epidemic, these results suggest that the dominance of adults among imported cases represents one of the possible factors explaining the delays in geographic spread observed during the recent pandemic.

  11. Seroincidence of Influenza Among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected Men During the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic, Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Shikha; Olsen, Sonja J; Fernandez, Stefan; Muangchana, Charung; Rungrojcharoenkit, Kamonthip; Prapasiri, Prabda; Katz, Jacqueline M; Curlin, Marcel E; Gibbons, Robert V; Holtz, Timothy H; Chitwarakorn, Anupong; Dawood, Fatimah S

    2014-12-01

    Among 368 Thai men who have sex with men with paired serum samples collected before and during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, we determined influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 seroconversion rates (≥4-fold rise in antibody titers by hemagglutination inhibition or microneutralization assays). Overall, 66 of 232 (28%) participants seroconverted after the first year of A(H1N1)pdm09 activity, and 83 of 234 (35%) participants seroconverted after the second year. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 seroconversion did not differ between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (55 of 2157 [35%]) and HIV-uninfected (71 of 2211 [34%]) participants (P = .78). Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 seroconversion occurred in approximately one third of our Thai study population and was similar among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants.

  12. Determinants of refusal of A/H1N1 pandemic vaccination in a high risk population: a qualitative approach.

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    Eugenie d'Alessandro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our study analyses the main determinants of refusal or acceptance of the 2009 A/H1N1 vaccine in patients with cystic fibrosis, a high-risk population for severe flu infection, usually very compliant for seasonal flu vaccine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews in 3 cystic fibrosis referral centres in Paris, France. The study included 42 patients with cystic fibrosis: 24 who refused the vaccine and 18 who were vaccinated. The two groups differed quite substantially in their perceptions of vaccine- and disease-related risks. Those who refused the vaccine were motivated mainly by the fears it aroused and did not explicitly consider the 2009 A/H1N1 flu a potentially severe disease. People who were vaccinated explained their choice, first and foremost, as intended to prevent the flu's potential consequences on respiratory cystic fibrosis disease. Moreover, they considered vaccination to be an indirect collective prevention tool. Patients who refused the vaccine mentioned multiple, contradictory information sources and did not appear to consider the recommendation of their local health care provider as predominant. On the contrary, those who were vaccinated stated that they had based their decision solely on the clear and unequivocal advice of their health care provider. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results of our survey led us to formulate three main recommendations for improving adhesion to new pandemic vaccines. (1 it appears necessary to reinforce patient education about the disease and its specific risks, but also general population information about community immunity. (2 it is essential to disseminate a clear and effective message about the safety of novel vaccines. (3 this message should be conveyed by local health care providers, who should be involved in implementing immunization.

  13. Surveillance on the levels of antibody to pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus before and after vaccination with pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 vaccines in Shanghai middle school students%上海地区在校中学生接种甲型H1N1流感疫苗前后抗体水平监测分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高颖阳; 申惠国; 陈蓓; 杨忠东; 陈浩; 吕锡宏; 居丽雯

    2010-01-01

    Objective To understand the levels of antibody to pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus before and after vaccination with pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 vaccines in Shanghai middle school students, and to observe the protection of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 vaccines for this group.Methods The levels of antibody to pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus in Shanghai middle school students were determined using the routine micro-hemagglutination inhibition test in three periods, and the positive rates of the antibodies in three periods were compared by Pearson's x2 test. Results Before the epidemic of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009, the positive rate of antibody to pandemic influenza A (H1N1)2009 virus among Shanghai middle school students was only 1.3%, and then it increased to 8.5% after a period of epidemic. After vaccination with pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 vaccines, the positive rate of antibody to pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus among middle school students increased to 87.3%. The result of Pearson' sx2 test showed that differences of the positive rate of antibody in three periods had statistical significance(x2 = 243.7, P < 0. 05). Conclusions Before the epidemic of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009, Shanghai middle school students almost have no immunity against this new type of virus, and vaccination with pandemic irfluenza A(H1N1)2009 vaccines can provide stronger protection for this group.%目的 了解上海地区在校中学生接种甲型H1N1流感疫苗前后的抗体水平,观察甲型H1N1流感疫苗对该人群的免疫保护作用.方法 应用常规微量血凝抑制试验(micro-hemagglutination inhibition test,HIT)对上海地区在校中学生分3个时间段进行甲型H1N1流感病毒抗体的血清学监测,3个时间段的抗体阳性率比较采用Pearson x2检验进行分析.结果 2009年甲型H1N1流感流行前上海地区在校中学生的血清抗体阳性率仅为1.3%.经过一段时间流行后,血清抗体阳性率升至8

  14. Conservation and diversity of influenza A H1N1 HLA-restricted T cell epitope candidates for epitope-based vaccines.

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    Paul Thiamjoo Tan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The immune-related evolution of influenza viruses is exceedingly complex and current vaccines against influenza must be reformulated for each influenza season because of the high degree of antigenic drift among circulating influenza strains. Delay in vaccine production is a serious problem in responding to a pandemic situation, such as that of the current H1N1 strain. Immune escape is generally attributed to reduced antibody recognition of the viral hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins whose rate of mutation is much greater than that of the internal non-structural proteins. As a possible alternative, vaccines directed at T cell epitope domains of internal influenza proteins, that are less susceptible to antigenic variation, have been investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HLA transgenic mouse strains expressing HLA class I A*0201, A*2402, and B*0702, and class II DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*0401 were immunized with 196 influenza H1N1 peptides that contained residues of highly conserved proteome sequences of the human H1N1, H3N2, H1N2, H5N1, and avian influenza A strains. Fifty-four (54 peptides that elicited 63 HLA-restricted peptide-specific T cell epitope responses were identified by IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. The 54 peptides were compared to the 2007-2009 human H1N1 sequences for selection of sequences in the design of a new candidate H1N1 vaccine, specifically targeted to highly-conserved HLA-restricted T cell epitopes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Seventeen (17 T cell epitopes in PB1, PB2, and M1 were selected as vaccine targets based on sequence conservation over the past 30 years, high functional avidity, non-identity to human peptides, clustered localization, and promiscuity to multiple HLA alleles. These candidate vaccine antigen sequences may be applicable to any avian or human influenza A virus.

  15. Association of swine influenza H1N1 pandemic virus (SIV-H1N1p) with porcine respiratory disease complex in sows from commercial pig farms in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Luisa Fernanda Mancipe; Ramírez Nieto, Gloria; Alfonso, Victor Vera; Correa, Jairo Jaime

    2014-08-01

    Porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is a serious health problem that mainly affects growing and finishing pigs. PRDC is caused by a combination of viral and bacterial agents, such as porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), swine influenza virus (SIV), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Myh), Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP), Pasteurella multocida and Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2). To characterize the specific role of swine influenza virus in PRDC presentation in Colombia, 11 farms from three major production regions in Colombia were examined in this study. Nasal swabs, bronchial lavage and lung tissue samples were obtained from animals displaying symptoms compatible with SIV. Isolation of SIV was performed in 9-day embryonated chicken eggs or Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells. Positive isolates, identified via the hemagglutination inhibition test, were further analyzed using PCR. Overall, 7 of the 11 farms were positive for SIV. Notably, sequencing of the gene encoding the hemagglutinin (HA) protein led to grouping of strains into circulating viruses identified during the human outbreak of 2009, classified as pandemic H1N1-2009. Serum samples from 198 gilts and multiparous sows between 2008 and 2009 were obtained to determine antibody presence of APP, Myh, PCV2 and PRRSV in both SIV-H1N1p-negative and -positive farms, but higher levels were recorded for SIV-H1N1p-positive farms. Odds ratio (OR) and P values revealed statistically significant differences (p<0.05) in PRDC presentation in gilts and multiparous sows of farms positive for SIV-H1N1p. Our findings indicate that positive farms have increased risk of PRDC presentation, in particular, PCV2, APP and Myh.

  16. Fatal acute myocarditis and fulminant hepatic failure in an infant with pandemic human influenza A, H1N1 (2009) virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Mortada H.F. El-Shabrawi; Bazaraa, Hafez M; Hanan Zekri; Hanaa I. Rady

    2011-01-01

    We report the clinical presentation of a 10 month-old infant who succumbed with acute myocarditis and fulminant hepatic failure associated with a virologically confirmed human influenza A, H1N1 (2009) virus infection. To date, this is the first pediatric patient presenting with this fatal combination of complications during the current H1N1 pandemic. Therefore, we recommend meticulous assessment and follow up of the cardiac status, liver enzymes and coagulation profile in all pediatric patien...

  17. Fatal acute myocarditis and fulminant hepatic failure in an infant with pandemic human influenza A, H1N1 (2009 virus infection

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    Mortada H.F. El-Shabrawi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the clinical presentation of a 10 month-old infant who succumbed with acute myocarditis and fulminant hepatic failure associated with a virologically confirmed human influenza A, H1N1 (2009 virus infection. To date, this is the first pediatric patient presenting with this fatal combination of complications during the current H1N1 pandemic. Therefore, we recommend meticulous assessment and follow up of the cardiac status, liver enzymes and coagulation profile in all pediatric patients with severe H1N1 influenza infection.

  18. Post-pandemic seroprevalence of pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 infection (swine flu among children <18 years in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger von Kries

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We determined antibodies to the pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 virus in children to assess: the incidence of (H1N1 2009 infections in the 2009/2010 season in Germany, the proportion of subclinical infections and to compare titers in vaccinated and infected children. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eight pediatric hospitals distributed over Germany prospectively provided sera from in- or outpatients aged 1 to 17 years from April 1(st to July 31(st 2010. Vaccination history, recall of infections and sociodemographic factors were ascertained. Antibody titers were measured with a sensitive and specific in-house hemagglutination inhibition test (HIT and compared to age-matched sera collected during 6 months before the onset of the pandemic in Germany. We analyzed 1420 post-pandemic and 300 pre-pandemic sera. Among unvaccinated children aged 1-4 and 5-17 years the prevalence of HI titers (≥1∶10 was 27.1% (95% CI: 23.5-31.3 and 53.5% (95% CI: 50.9-56.2 compared to 1.7% and 5.5%, respectively, for pre-pandemic sera, accounting for a serologically determined incidence of influenza A (H1N1 2009 during the season 2009/2010 of 25,4% (95% CI : 19.3-30.5 in children aged 1-4 years and 48.0% (95% CI: 42.6-52.0 in 5-17 year old children. Of children with HI titers ≥1∶10, 25.5% (95% CI: 22.5-28.8 reported no history of any infectious disease since June 2009. Among vaccinated children, 92% (95%-CI: 87.0-96.6 of the 5-17 year old but only 47.8% (95%-CI: 33.5-66.5 of the 1-4 year old children exhibited HI titers against influenza A virus (H1N1 2009. CONCLUSION: Serologically determined incidence of influenza A (H1N1 2009 infections in children indicates high infection rates with older children (5-17 years infected twice as often as younger children. In about a quarter of the children with HI titers after the season 2009/2010 subclinical infections must be assumed. Low HI titers in young children after vaccination with the AS03(B

  19. Characterization of the 2009 pandemic A/Beijing/501/2009 H1N1 influenza strain in human airway epithelial cells and ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghui Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A novel 2009 swine-origin influenza A H1N1 virus (S-OIV H1N1 has been transmitted among humans worldwide. However, the pathogenesis of this virus in human airway epithelial cells and mammals is not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this study, we showed that a 2009 A (H1N1 influenza virus strain, A/Beijing/501/2009, isolated from a human patient, caused typical influenza-like symptoms including weight loss, fluctuations in body temperature, and pulmonary pathological changes in ferrets. We demonstrated that the human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line A549 was susceptible to infection and that the infected cells underwent apoptosis at 24 h post-infection. In contrast to the seasonal H1N1 influenza virus, the 2009 A (H1N1 influenza virus strain A/Beijing/501/2009 induced more cell death involving caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in A549 cells. Additionally, ferrets infected with the A/Beijing/501/2009 H1N1 virus strain exhibited increased body temperature, greater weight loss, and higher viral titers in the lungs. Therefore, the A/Beijing/501/2009 H1N1 isolate successfully infected the lungs of ferrets and caused more pathological lesions than the seasonal influenza virus. Our findings demonstrate that the difference in virulence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus and the seasonal H1N1 influenza virus in vitro and in vivo may have been mediated by different mechanisms. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our understanding of the pathogenesis of the 2009 A (H1N1 influenza virus infection in both humans and animals is broadened by our findings that apoptotic cell death is involved in the cytopathic effect observed in vitro and that the pathological alterations in the lungs of S-OIV H1N1-infected ferrets are much more severe.

  20. Sublingual administration of bacteria-expressed influenza virus hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) induces protection against infection with 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Byoung-Shik; Choi, Jung-Ah; Song, Ho-Hyun; Park, Sung-Moo; Cheon, In Su; Jang, Ji-Eun; Woo, Sun Je; Cho, Chung Hwan; Song, Min-Suk; Kim, Hyemi; Song, Kyung Joo; Lee, Jae Myun; Kim, Suhng Wook; Song, Dae Sub; Choi, Young Ki; Kim, Jae-Ouk; Nguyen, Huan Huu; Kim, Dong Wook; Bahk, Young Yil; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Song, Man Ki

    2013-02-01

    Influenza viruses are respiratory pathogens that continue to pose a significantly high risk of morbidity and mortality of humans worldwide. Vaccination is one of the most effective strategies for minimizing damages by influenza outbreaks. In addition, rapid development and production of efficient vaccine with convenient administration is required in case of influenza pandemic. In this study, we generated recombinant influenza virus hemagglutinin protein 1 (sHA1) of 2009 pandemic influenza virus as a vaccine candidate using a well-established bacterial expression system and administered it into mice via sublingual (s.l.) route. We found that s.l. immunization with the recombinant sHA1 plus cholera toxin (CT) induced mucosal antibodies as well as systemic antibodies including neutralizing Abs and provided complete protection against infection with pandemic influenza virus A/CA/04/09 (H1N1) in mice. Indeed, the protection efficacy was comparable with that induced by intramuscular (i.m.) immunization route utilized as general administration route of influenza vaccine. These results suggest that s.l. vaccination with the recombinant non-glycosylated HA1 protein offers an alternative strategy to control influenza outbreaks including pandemics.

  1. 2009年甲型H1N1流感大流行时空分布特征分析%Characterization of the Global Spatio-temporal Transmission of the 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋之犇; 白建军; 蔡俊; 李瑞云; 金震宇; 徐冰

    2012-01-01

    本文利用球面距离的Ripley'K函数,分析了全球2009年甲型H1N1流感大流行早期疫情的点空间分布模式.同时,通过对比2000-2008年甲型流感病例数据,分析不同纬度国家2009年甲型H1N1流感新增病例数的时间序列特征及其与国家入境人数的相关性.结果表明,2009年甲型H1N1流感大流行早期疫情呈聚类分布,其L函数值最大值区间与65个全球城市的最大值区间相同.78.5%的病例分布在全球城市周围600km半径内.时间序列特征总体上类似于历年甲型流感,但是北回归线以北部分国家在6、7月非甲型流感流行季节仍有大量病例出现.并且北回归线以北国家冬季暴发集中在第45周到第48周之间,早于历年甲型流感流行时间.进一步分析认为,全球城市是本次流感国际传播网络的关键节点.国际旅行是流感传播的重要途径,并在本次流感大流行前期主导着流感跨国传播方向.同时不同纬度的环境条件对2009年甲型H1N1流感大流行有重要影响.%In March of 2009, a novel swine-origin influenza A(H1N1) virus was first discovered in Mexico and quickly spread to over 200 countries in less than two years. However, limited research has been conducted on the characterization of the global spatio-temporal transmission of the pandemic. Applying Ripley 's K function based on the spherical distances, we analyzed spatial pattern of the outbreaks of the H1N1 pandemic from March 15, 2009 to June 9, 2009. Compared with other type A influenza occurred during 2000-2008, the 2009 H1N1 influenza showed generally similar temporal trend, but marked difference when we broke down the outbreak data of each country along the latitude. To look into the differences, we further associated the number of weekly cases of the H1N1 influenza with national arrivals through customs. Results show that the 2009 H1N1 influenza in early period was spatially clustered. The maximum value of the function L was

  2. Portrait of two years old Influenza A( H1N1 )Pandemic%甲型H1N1流感大流行2周年记

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宇鹏

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A( H1N1) outbreak began in Mexico in April 2009,and it was spreading globally rapidly. The World Health Organization declared the outbreak a pandemic on June 11,2009 and it had already been in the post-pandemic period until August 10,2010. Two years have passed since the flu outbreak,when we look back we can learn many experiences and lessons from it,and we'll be ready to handle the new outbreak that'll possibly occur in the future.%2009年4月,墨西哥暴发甲型H1N1流感疫情,并迅速蔓延至全球.2009年6月11日,世界卫生组织宣布进入流感大流行,直到2010年8月10日世卫组织宣布世界步入流感大流行后期.自流感暴发已经2年过去了,回顾整个过程我们从中可以学到许多经验和教训,并随时准备应对将来可能发生的新的流感疫情.

  3. Why do I need it? I am not at risk! Public perceptions towards the pandemic (H1N1 2009 vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Kirsten F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On the 30th September 2009, the pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza vaccine was made available to adults and children aged 10 years and over, in Australia. Acceptance of a novel vaccine is influenced by perceptions of risk including risk of infection, risk of death or severe illness and risk of serious vaccine side-effects. We surveyed a sample of residents from Sydney, Australia to ascertain their risk perception, attitudes towards the pandemic and willingness to accept the pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza vaccine. Methods We sampled residents using a cross-sectional intercept design during the WHO Phase 6. Members of the public were approached in shopping and pedestrian malls to undertake the survey during September and October 2009. The survey measured perceived risk, seriousness of disease, recent behavioural changes, likely acceptance of the pandemic (H1N1 2009 vaccine and issues relating to uptake and perceived safety. Results Of the 627 respondents, the majority felt that they had a "very low to low" (332/627, 52.9% risk of acquiring H1N1. 24.5% (154/627 of respondents believed that the disease would "very seriously or extremely" affect their health. Nearly half (305/627, 48.6% reported that in response to the "swine flu" outbreak they had undertaken one or more of the investigated behavioural changes. Overall, the self-reported likelihood of accepting vaccination against novel H1N1 was 54.7% (343/627. Conclusions While, most participants did not believe they were at high risk of acquiring pandemic H1N1 2009, over half of the sample indicated that they would accept the vaccine. Participants who were vaccinated against the seasonal influenza were more likely to receive the H1N1 vaccine. Concerns about safety, the possibility of side effects and the vaccine development process need to be addressed.

  4. A pandemic influenza H1N1 live vaccine based on modified vaccinia Ankara is highly immunogenic and protects mice in active and passive immunizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Hessel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of novel influenza vaccines inducing a broad immune response is an important objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate live vaccines which induce both strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses against the novel human pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, and to show protection in a lethal animal challenge model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For this purpose, the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of the influenza A/California/07/2009 (H1N1 strain (CA/07 were inserted into the replication-deficient modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA virus--a safe poxviral live vector--resulting in MVA-H1-Ca and MVA-N1-Ca vectors. These live vaccines, together with an inactivated whole virus vaccine, were assessed in a lung infection model using immune competent Balb/c mice, and in a lethal challenge model using severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice after passive serum transfer from immunized mice. Balb/c mice vaccinated with the MVA-H1-Ca virus or the inactivated vaccine were fully protected from lung infection after challenge with the influenza H1N1 wild-type strain, while the neuraminidase virus MVA-N1-Ca induced only partial protection. The live vaccines were already protective after a single dose and induced substantial amounts of neutralizing antibodies and of interferon-gamma-secreting (IFN-gamma CD4- and CD8 T-cells in lungs and spleens. In the lungs, a rapid increase of HA-specific CD4- and CD8 T cells was observed in vaccinated mice shortly after challenge with influenza swine flu virus, which probably contributes to the strong inhibition of pulmonary viral replication observed. In addition, passive transfer of antisera raised in MVA-H1-Ca vaccinated immune-competent mice protected SCID mice from lethal challenge with the CA/07 wild-type virus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The non-replicating MVA-based H1N1 live vaccines induce a broad protective immune response and are promising vaccine candidates for

  5. Intensive cytokine induction in pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection accompanied by robust production of IL-10 and IL-6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The innate immune system is the first line of defense against viruses by inducing expression of cytokines and chemokines. Many pandemic influenza H1N1 virus [P(H1N1] infected severe cases occur in young adults under 18 years old who were rarely seriously affected by seasonal influenza. Results regarding host cytokine profiles of P(H1N1 are ambivalent. In the present study we investigated host cytokine profiles in P(H1N1 patients and identified cytokines related to disease severity. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrieved 77, 59, 26 and 26 sera samples from P(H1N1 and non-flu influenza like illness (non-ILIs cases with mild symptoms (mild patients, P(H1N1 vaccinees and healthy individuals, respectively. Nine and 16 sera were from hospitalized P(H1N1 and non-ILIs patients with severe symptoms (severe patients. Cytokines of IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ and TNF-α were assayed by cytokine bead array, IL-17 and IL-23 measured with ELISA. Mild P(H1N1 patients produced significantly elevated IL-2, IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-5, IL-10, IL-17 and IL-23 versus to healthy controls. While an overwhelming IL-6 and IL-10 production were observed in severe P(H1N1 patients. Higher IL-10 secretion in P(H1N1 vaccinees confirmed our observation that highly increased level of sera IL-6 and IL-10 in P(H1N1 patients may lead to disease progression. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: A comprehensive innate immune response was activated at the early stage of P(H1N1 infection with a combine Th1/Th2/Th3 cytokines production. As disease progression, a systemic production of IL-6 and IL-10 were observed in severe P(H1N1 patients. Further analysis found a strong correlation between IL-6 and IL-10 production in the severe P(H1N1 patients. IL-6 may be served as a mediator to induce IL-10 production. Highly elevated level of sera IL-6 and IL-10 in P(H1N1 patients may lead to disease progression, but the underlying mechanism awaits

  6. Identification of TMPRSS2 as a Susceptibility Gene for Severe 2009 Pandemic A(H1N1) Influenza and A(H7N9) Influenza

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, Zhongshan; Zhou, Jie; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Chu, Hin; Li, Cun; Wang, Dong; Yang, Dong; Zheng, Shufa; Hao, Ke; Bosse, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Song, You-Qiang; Chen, Yu; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Li, Lanjuan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The genetic predisposition to severe A(H1N1) 2009 (A[H1N1]pdm09) influenza was evaluated in 409 patients, including 162 cases with severe infection and 247 controls with mild infection. We prioritized candidate variants based on the result of a pilot genome-wide association study and a lung expressi

  7. Immune response after one or two doses of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) monovalent, AS03-adjuvanted vaccine in HIV infected adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bybeck Nielsen, Allan; Nielsen, Henriette Schjønning; Nielsen, Lars;

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Continued research is needed to evaluate and improve the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines in HIV infected patients. We aimed to determine the antibody responses after one or two doses of the AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine in HIV infected patients. METHOD......: Following the influenza season 2009/2010, 219 HIV infected patients were included and divided into three groups depending on whether they received none (n=60), one (n=31) or two (n=128) doses of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. At inclusion, antibody titers for all patients were analyzed and compared.......7% and seroconversion rate of 86.7%. CONCLUSION: A single dose of AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine created an adequate immune response in HIV infected patients lasting as long as 4-9 months. Two doses improved the immunogenicity further....

  8. Novel reassortant influenza viruses between pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and other influenza viruses pose a risk to public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weili; Wang, Feibing; Dong, Bin; Ou, Changbo; Meng, Demei; Liu, Jinhua; Fan, Zhen-Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is characterized by eight single-stranded, negative sense RNA segments, which allows for gene reassortment among different IAV subtypes when they co-infect a single host cell simultaneously. Genetic reassortment is an important way to favor the evolution of influenza virus. Novel reassortant virus may pose a pandemic among humans. In history, three human pandemic influenza viruses were caused by genetic reassortment between avian, human and swine influenza viruses. Since 2009, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (pdm/09 H1N1) influenza virus composed of two swine influenza virus genes highlighted the genetic reassortment again. Due to wide host species and high transmission of the pdm/09 H1N1 influenza virus, many different avian, human or swine influenza virus subtypes may reassert with it to generate novel reassortant viruses, which may result in a next pandemic among humans. So, it is necessary to understand the potential threat of current reassortant viruses between the pdm/09 H1N1 and other influenza viruses to public health. This study summarized the status of the reassortant viruses between the pdm/09 H1N1 and other influenza viruses of different species origins in natural and experimental conditions. The aim of this summarization is to facilitate us to further understand the potential threats of novel reassortant influenza viruses to public health and to make effective prevention and control strategies for these pathogens.

  9. Transmission of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) at a Public University--Delaware, April-May 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guh, Alice; Reed, Carrie; Gould, L Hannah; Kutty, Preeta; Iuliano, Danielle; Mitchell, Tarissa; Dee, Deborah; Desai, Mitesh; Siebold, Joseph; Silverman, Paul; Massoudi, Mehran; Lynch, Michael; Sotir, Mark; Armstrong, Gregory; Swerdlow, David

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the first documented university outbreak of the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) to identify factors associated with disease transmission. An online student survey was administered to assess risk factors for influenza-like illness (ILI), defined as fever with cough or sore throat. Of 6049 survey respondents, 567 (9%) experienced ILI during 27 March to 9 May 2009. Studying with an ill contact (adjusted risk ratios [aRR], 1.29; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.01-1.65) and caring for an ill contact (aRR, 1.51; CI, 1.14-2.01) any time during 27 March to 9 May were predictors for ILI. Respondents reported that 680 (6%) of 11,411 housemates were ill; living with an ill housemate was a predictor for ILI (RR, 1.38; CI, 1.04-1.83). Close contact or prolonged exposures to ill persons were likely associated with experiencing ILI. Self-protective measures should be promoted in university populations to mitigate transmission.

  10. Reconstruction of epidemic curves for pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 at city and sub-city levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Ngai Sze

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To better describe the epidemiology of influenza at local level, the time course of pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 in the city of Hong Kong was reconstructed from notification data after decomposition procedure and time series analysis. GIS (geographic information system methodology was incorporated for assessing spatial variation. Between May and September 2009, a total of 24415 cases were successfully geocoded, out of 25473 (95.8% reports in the original dataset. The reconstructed epidemic curve was characterized by a small initial peak, a nadir followed by rapid rise to the ultimate plateau. The full course of the epidemic had lasted for about 6 months. Despite the small geographic area of only 1000 Km2, distinctive spatial variation was observed in the configuration of the curves across 6 geographic regions. With the relatively uniform physical and climatic environment within Hong Kong, the temporo-spatial variability of influenza spread could only be explained by the heterogeneous population structure and mobility patterns. Our study illustrated how an epidemic curve could be reconstructed using regularly collected surveillance data, which would be useful in informing intervention at local levels.

  11. Public Hygiene Campaign in Denmark during the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Had No Effect on Hospitalization Rate of Communicable Diseases in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Sevelsted, Astrid; Bisgaard, Hans

    2013-01-01

    During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic the Danish National board of Health carried out massive public hygiene campaigns to limit spread of disease. We aimed to investigate whether this resulted in lower incidences of communicable diseases in the paediatric population.......During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic the Danish National board of Health carried out massive public hygiene campaigns to limit spread of disease. We aimed to investigate whether this resulted in lower incidences of communicable diseases in the paediatric population....

  12. [Attitudes and side effects related to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccination in healthcare personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormen, Bahar; Türker, Nesrin; Vardar, Ilknur; Kaptan, Figen; El, Sibel; Ural, Serap; Kaya, Fatih; Coşkun, Nejat Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the attitudes towards H1N1 vaccination and to determine the safety and side effects following 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccination. Pandemic influenza vaccine had been administered to the healthcare personnel in our research and training hospital in December 2009. The rate being vaccinated was established as 40% (800/2000). Four months following vaccination, the opinions about vaccination were asked to the healthcare workers, and also side effects were questioned to the vaccinated group. Two different questionnaires (for vaccinated and unvaccinated subjects) were delivered to the volunteers who agreed to participate in the study. Demographic features, reasons related to being vaccinated or not, were questioned. The vaccinated group was also questioned for the presence of chronic diseases, previous vaccinations (pandemic/seasonal influenza), local or systemic reactions that develop after vaccination. A total of 332 volunteers participated in the questionnaire. Of them 247 (74.4%) were vaccinated and 85 (25.6%) were unvaccinated. Male/female ratio of the participants was 1.2, and 55.7% of them were older than 30-year-old. Most of the participants (82.8%) were highly educated (high school and faculty-graduated). Vaccination rates were found statistically significant in advanced age group compared to young adults (p= 0.042); in male gender compared to females (p= 0.001) and in parents compared to subjects who didn't have children (p= 0.021). Vaccination rates were observed to be higher (57.5%) in non-medical staff (cleaning employers, administrative personnel, etc.) than the physicians (29.1%) and nurses (13.4%), and the rate was also high (54.7%) in personnel who worked in intensive care units, emergency department and administrative units than the personnel who worked in the clinics of internal medicine (22.3%) and surgery (23.1%) (p= 0.001). The most important causes of rejecting vaccination were being afraid of the

  13. Correlates of 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Acceptance among Middle and High School Teachers in Rural Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Lisa M.; Painter, Julia E.; Sales, Jessica M.; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M.; Weiss, Paul; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Hughes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Teachers play an essential role in the school community, and H1N1 vaccination of teachers is critical to protect not only themselves but also adolescents they come in contact within the classroom through herd immunity. School-aged children have a greater risk of developing H1N1 disease than seasonal influenza. The goal of this study…

  14. Pandemic H1N1 (2009) and renal failure: the experience of the Irish national tertiary referral centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Brien, F J

    2011-03-01

    H1N1 influenza A, was first described in April 2009. A significant cohort of patients from this outbreak developed acute respiratory distress syndrome or pneumonia. H1N1 has since been transmitted across the world. Little has been described on the renal complications of this illness.

  15. Understanding the socioeconomic heterogeneity in healthcare in US counties: the effect of population density, education and poverty on H1N1 pandemic mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnambalam, L; Samavedham, L; Lee, H R; Ho, C S

    2012-05-01

    The recent outbreak of H1N1 has provided the scientific community with a sad but timely opportunity to understand the influence of socioeconomic determinants on H1N1 pandemic mortality. To this end, we have used data collected from 341 US counties to model H1N1 deaths/1000 using 12 socioeconomic predictors to discover why certain counties reported fewer H1N1 deaths compared to other counties. These predictors were then used to build a decision tree. The decision tree developed was then used to predict H1N1 mortality for the whole of the USA. Our estimate of 7667 H1N1 deaths are in accord with the lower bound of the CDC estimate of 8870 deaths. In addition to the H1N1 death estimates, we have listed possible counties to be targeted for health-related interventions. The respective state/county authorities can use these results as the basis to target and optimize the distribution of public health resources.

  16. Reducing Occurrence and Severity of Pneumonia Due to Pandemic H1N1 2009 by Early Oseltamivir Administration: A Retrospective Study in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera Iglesias, Anjarath Lorena; Kudo, Koichiro; Manabe, Toshie; Corcho Berdugo, Alexander Enrique; Baeza, Ariel Corrales; Ramos, Leticia Alfaro; Gutiérrez, René Guevara; Manjarrez Zavala, María Eugenia; Takasaki, Jin; Izumi, Shinyu; Bautista, Edgar; Perez Padilla, José Rogelio

    2011-01-01

    Background Anti-viral treatment has been used to treat severe or progressive illness due to pandemic H1N1 2009. A main cause of severe illness in pandemic H1N1 2009 is viral pneumonia; however, it is unclear how effective antiviral treatment is against pneumonia when administered >48 hours after symptom onset. Therefore, we aimed to determine how time from symptom onset to antiviral administration affected the effectiveness of antiviral treatment against pneumonia due to pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Methods/Principal Findings A retrospective medical chart review of 442 patients was conducted in a hospital in Mexico. Subjects had tested positive for pandemic H1N1 2009 virus by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction and were administered oseltamivir. Median time from symptom onset to oseltamivir administration was 5.0 days (range, 0–43). 442 subjects, 71 (16.1%) had severe pneumonia which required mechanical ventilation, 191 (43.2%) had mild to moderate pneumonia, and 180 (40%) did not have pneumonia. Subjects were divided into four groups based on time to oseltamivir administration: ≤2, 3–7, 8–14, and >14 days. Severity of respiratory features was associated with time to treatment, and multivariate analysis indicated that time to oseltamivir administration was associated with severity of respiratory features. A proportional odds model indicated that 50% probability for occurrence of pneumonia of any severity and that of severe pneumonia in patients who would develop pneumonia reached at approximately 3.4 and 21 days, respectively, after symptom onset. Patients with a shorter time to oseltamivir administration were discharged earlier from the hospital. Conclusions Earlier initiation of oseltamivir administration after symptom onset significantly reduced occurrence and severity of pneumonia and shortened hospitalization due to pandemic H1N1 2009. Even when administered >48 hours after symptom onset, oseltamivir showed considerable potential for

  17. Determinants of receiving the pandemic (H1N1 2009 vaccine and intention to receive the seasonal influenza vaccine in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ta-Chien Chan

    Full Text Available The paper examines the factors associated with both receiving pandemic (H1N1 2009 vaccines and individuals' intentions to get the next seasonal influenza vaccine in Taiwan.We conducted a representative nationwide survey with in-person household interviews during April-July 2010. Multivariate logistic regression incorporated socio-demographic background, household characteristics, health status, behaviors, and perceptions of influenza and vaccination.We completed interviews with 1,954 respondents. Among those, 548 (28.0% received the pandemic (H1N1 2009 vaccination, and 469 (24.0% intended to get the next seasonal influenza vaccine. Receipt of the H1N1 vaccine was more prevalent among schoolchildren, the elderly, those who had contact with more people in their daily lives, and those who had received influenza vaccinations in previous years. In comparison, the intention to receive the next seasonal influenza vaccine tended to be stronger among children, the elderly, and those who reported less healthy status or lived with children, who received a seasonal influenza vaccination before, and who worried more about a possible new pandemic.Children, the elderly, and those who had gotten seasonal flu shots before in Taiwan were more likely to both receive a pandemic H1N1 vaccination and intend to receive a seasonal influenza vaccine.

  18. Predictors of influenza in the adult population during seasonal and A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza periods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, G.; Tacken, M.; Kolthof, J.; Mulder, B.; Korevaar, J.C.; Stirbu-Wagner, I.; Bos, J.; Stolk, R.P.; Hak, E.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to assess whether the characteristics of influenza-like illness (ILI) cases in the general population were similar during the seasonal and pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza periods. We conducted a study using a general population database, which included demographic (sex, age) and clinical (u

  19. The incidence of narcolepsy in Europe: Before, during, and after the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic and vaccination campaigns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. Wijnans (Leonoor); C. Lecomte (Coralie); C.S. de Vries (Corinne); D.M. Weibel (Daniel); C. Sammon (Cormac); A. Hviid (Anders); H. Svanström (Henrik); D. Mølgaard-Nielsen (Ditte); H. Heijbel (Harald); L.A. Dahlström (Lisen Arnheim); J. Hallgren (Jonas); P. Sparen (Pär); P. Jennum (Poul); M. Mosseveld (Mees); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); N.A.T. van der Maas (Nicoline); M. Partinen (Markku); S.A. Romio (Silvana); F. Trotta (Francesco); C. Santuccio (Carmela); A. Menna (Angelo); G. Plazzi (Giuseppe); K.K. Moghadam (Keivan Kaveh); M.T. Ferro (María); G.J. Lammers (Gert Jan); S. Overeem (Sebastiaan); K. Johansen (Kari); P Kramarz (Piotr); J. Bonhoeffer (Jan); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In August 2010 reports of a possible association between exposure to AS03 adjuvanted pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine and occurrence of narcolepsy in children and adolescents emerged in Sweden and Finland. In response to this signal, the background rates of narcolepsy in Europe

  20. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccines: A multinational self-controlled case series in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Romio (Silvana); D.M. Weibel (Daniel); J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne); H.K. Olberg (Henning); C.S. de Vries (Corinne); C. Sammon (Cormac); N.J. Andrews (Nick); H. Svanström (Henrik); D. Mølgaard-Nielsen (Ditte); A. Hviid (Anders); M. Lapeyre-Mestre (Maryse); A. Sommet (Agnès); C. Saussier (Christel); A. Castot (Anne); H. Heijbel (Harald); L. Arnheim-Dahlström (Lisen); P. Sparen (Pär); M. Mosseveld (Mees); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); N.A.T. van der Maas (Nicoline); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); T. Leino (Tuija); T. Kilpi (Terhi); J. Storsaeter (Jann); K. Johansen (Kari); P Kramarz (Piotr); J. Bonhoeffer (Jan); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09) immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following

  1. Radiologic Review of an Outbreak of the Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus Infection at a University Hospital in Seoul, Korea

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    Choi, Seung Hee; Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Yoon Kyung; Woo, Ok Hee; Yong, Hwan Seok; Oh, Yu Whan [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jang Su [Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    To assess the frequency of radiologic abnormalities and investigate the radiologic findings of patients with a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection at a University hospital in Seoul, Korea. In November 2009, 9,427 patients were tested for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus and 3,849 (41%) were positive. Among them, only 338 (9%) underwent chest radiographs and 13 (0.3%) received chest CT. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed all the radiologic images. Among the 338 patients, 287 (85%) were normal and 51 (15%) showed abnormalities. The frequency of abnormalities was significantly higher in children (41/212=19%) than in adults (10/126=8%) (p = 0.005). Of them, 42 (82%) patients had airspace pneumonia, whereas the remaining patients showed a bronchopneumonia pattern. Unilateral (82%) involvement was more common than bilateral (18%) involvement. Among patients who received chest CT, 12 (92%) showed abnormalities, with bilateral (67%) and random (75%) involvement being more common. Ground-glass opacity (67%) and centrilobular nodules (58%) were the more common CT findings. Only a small number of patients were critically ill enough to undergo further radiologic evaluation as a result of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection, and most patients had normal chest radiographs. Unilateral airspace pneumonia was the most common abnormality in patients infected with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus.

  2. Predictors of influenza in the adult population during seasonal and A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza periods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, G.; Tacken, M.; Kolthof, J.; Mulder, B.; Korevaar, J. C.; Stirbu-Wagner, I.; Bos, J.; Stolk, R. P.; Hak, E.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to assess whether the characteristics of influenza-like illness (ILI) cases in the general population were similar during the seasonal and pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza periods. We conducted a study using a general population database, which included demographic (sex, age) and clinical (u

  3. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP related to the Pandemic (H1N1 2009 among Chinese General Population: a Telephone Survey

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    Yan Weirong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background China is at greatest risk of the Pandemic (H1N1 2009 due to its huge population and high residential density. The unclear comprehension and negative attitudes towards the emerging infectious disease among general population may lead to unnecessary worry and even panic. The objective of this study was to investigate the Chinese public response to H1N1 pandemic and provide baseline data to develop public education campaigns in response to future outbreaks. Methods A close-ended questionnaire developed by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention was applied to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP of pandemic (H1N1 2009 among 10,669 responders recruited from seven urban and two rural areas of China sampled by using the probability proportional to size (PPS method. Results 30.0% respondents were not clear whether food spread H1N1 virusand. 65.7% reported that the pandemic had no impact on their life. The immunization rates of the seasonal flu and H1N1vaccine were 7.5% and 10.8%, respectively. Farmers and those with lower education level were less likely to know the main transmission route (cough or talk face to face. Female and those with college and above education had higher perception of risk and more compliance with preventive behaviors. Relationships between knowledge and risk perception (OR = 1.69; 95%CI 1.54-1.86, and knowledge and practices (OR = 1.57; 95%CI 1.42-1.73 were found among the study subjects. With regard to the behavior of taking up A/H1N1 vaccination, there are several related factors found in the current study population, including the perception of life disturbed (OR = 1.29; 95%CI 1.11-1.50, the safety of A/H1N1 vaccine (OR = 0.07; 95%CI 0.04-0.11, the knowledge of free vaccination policy (OR = 7.20; 95%CI 5.91-8.78, the state's priority vaccination strategy(OR = 1.33; 95%CI 1.08-1.64, and taking up seasonal influenza vaccine behavior (OR = 4.69; 95%CI 3.53-6.23. Conclusions This A/H

  4. Pneumonia due to pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus and Klebsiella pneumoniae capsular serotype K16 in a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Pei-Lin; Tan, Che-Kim; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Kao, Chiang-Lian; Wang, Jin-Town; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus and group A Streptoccocus, but no Klebsiella pneumoniae were responsible for bacterial coinfections during the 2009 and previous influenza pandemics. We hereby report a case with concurrent bacteremic pneumonia due to an unusual capsular serotype K16 K. pneumoniae and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza in a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer. Such a coinfection has not previously been described.

  5. Searching for sharp drops in the incidence of pandemic A/H1N1 influenza by single year of age.

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    Jessica Hartman Jacobs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1, morbidity and mortality sparing was observed among the elderly population; it was hypothesized that this age group benefited from immunity to pH1N1 due to cross-reactive antibodies generated from prior infection with antigenically similar influenza viruses. Evidence from serologic studies and genetic similarities between pH1N1 and historical influenza viruses suggest that the incidence of pH1N1 cases should drop markedly in age cohorts born prior to the disappearance of H1N1 in 1957, namely those at least 52-53 years old in 2009, but the precise range of ages affected has not been delineated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To test for any age-associated discontinuities in pH1N1 incidence, we aggregated laboratory-confirmed pH1N1 case data from 8 jurisdictions in 7 countries, stratified by single year of age, sex (when available, and hospitalization status. Using single year of age population denominators, we generated smoothed curves of the weighted risk ratio of pH1N1 incidence, and looked for sharp drops at varying age bandwidths, defined as a significantly negative second derivative. Analyses stratified by hospitalization status and sex were used to test alternative explanations for observed discontinuities. We found that the risk of laboratory-confirmed infection with pH1N1 declines with age, but that there was a statistically significant leveling off or increase in risk from about 45 to 50 years of age, after which a sharp drop in risk occurs until the late fifties. This trend was more pronounced in hospitalized cases and in women and was independent of the choice in smoothing parameters. The age range at which the decline in risk accelerates corresponds to the cohort born between 1951-1959 (hospitalized and 1953-1960 (not hospitalized. CONCLUSIONS: The reduced incidence of pH1N1 disease in older individuals shows a detailed age-specific pattern consistent with protection conferred by exposure to

  6. Clinico-epidemiological profile, pandemic influenza a h1n1/2009 and seasonal influenza, august 2009-march 2013, Himachal Pradesh, India

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    Vinod Kumar Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Novel influenza A (H1N1 virus emerged in April, 2009, spread rapidly to become pandemic by June, 2009. Objective: To study the clinco-epidemiological profile of pH1N1and seasonal influenza (SI from 2009 to 2013. Materials and Methods : Retrospective, hospital-based study was done by reviewing medical records for collecting demographic and clinical profile of the study samples. Result: Out of 969 samples, positivity and case fatality for pH1N1 and SI was 9.39 and 20.87% vs 11.76 and 7.89%, respectively. Among pH1N1and SI, sex distribution, mean age, and age group involved were 54.95% females, 37.10 years, and 20-29 years (23.08% vs 43.86% females, 40.32 years, and 20-29 years (22.81%, respectively. Mortality shift was observed from younger to older and healthier, 75% to comorbid, 100% from 2009-2010 to 2012-13 for pH1N1. Conclusion: We observed seasonal variation, cocirculation, similar clinical features, decreased virulence, and community spread with respect to pH1N1 and SI from 2009-2013.

  7. The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: the role of threat, coping, and media trust on vaccination intentions in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Sheena Aislinn; Matheson, Kimberly; Anisman, Hymie

    2013-01-01

    Swine flu (H1N1) reached pandemic proportions in 2009, yet ambivalence was met concerning intentions to be vaccinated. The present investigation determined predictors of perceived H1N1 contraction risk and vaccination intentions among Canadian adults (N = 1,027) responding to an online questionnaire. The relatively low rate of vaccination intent (30.12%, and 34.99% being unsure of their intent) was related to a sense of invulnerability regarding illness contraction and symptom severity. Most individuals were skeptical that H1N1 would be widespread, believing that less than 10% of the population would contract H1N1. Yet, they also indicated that their attitudes would change once a single person they knew contracted the illness. Also, worry regarding H1N1 was related to self-contraction risk and odds of individuals seeking vaccination. Moreover, vaccination intent was related to the perception that the threat was not particularly great, mistrust of the media to provide accurate information regarding H1N1, and whether individuals endorsed problem-focused versus avoidant coping strategies. Given the role media plays in public perceptions related to a health crisis, trust in this outlet and credibility regarding the threat are necessary for adherence to recommended measures to minimize health risk.

  8. PD-L1 expression induced by the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus impairs the human T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ferat-Osorio, Eduardo; Mora-Velandia, Luz María; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Sánchez-Torres, Luvia Enid; Isibasi, Armando; Bonifaz, Laura; López-Macías, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    PD-L1 expression plays a critical role in the impairment of T cell responses during chronic infections; however, the expression of PD-L1 on T cells during acute viral infections, particularly during the pandemic influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), and its effects on the T cell response have not been widely explored. We found that A(H1N1)pdm09 virus induced PD-L1 expression on human dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells, as well as PD-1 expression on T cells. PD-L1 expression impaired the T cell response against A(H1N1)pdm09 by promoting CD8⁺ T cell death and reducing cytokine production. Furthermore, we found increased PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells from influenza-infected patients from the first and second 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico City. PD-L1 expression on CD8⁺ T cells correlated inversely with T cell proportions in patients infected with A(H1N1)pdm09. Therefore, PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells could be associated with an impaired T cell response during acute infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 virus.

  9. PD-L1 Expression Induced by the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) Virus Impairs the Human T Cell Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ferat-Osorio, Eduardo; Mora-Velandia, Luz María; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Sánchez-Torres, Luvia Enid; Isibasi, Armando; Bonifaz, Laura; López-Macías, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    PD-L1 expression plays a critical role in the impairment of T cell responses during chronic infections; however, the expression of PD-L1 on T cells during acute viral infections, particularly during the pandemic influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), and its effects on the T cell response have not been widely explored. We found that A(H1N1)pdm09 virus induced PD-L1 expression on human dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells, as well as PD-1 expression on T cells. PD-L1 expression impaired the T cell response against A(H1N1)pdm09 by promoting CD8+ T cell death and reducing cytokine production. Furthermore, we found increased PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells from influenza-infected patients from the first and second 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico City. PD-L1 expression on CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with T cell proportions in patients infected with A(H1N1)pdm09. Therefore, PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells could be associated with an impaired T cell response during acute infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. PMID:24187568

  10. PD-L1 Expression Induced by the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1 Virus Impairs the Human T Cell Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuriban Valero-Pacheco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PD-L1 expression plays a critical role in the impairment of T cell responses during chronic infections; however, the expression of PD-L1 on T cells during acute viral infections, particularly during the pandemic influenza virus (A(H1N1pdm09, and its effects on the T cell response have not been widely explored. We found that A(H1N1pdm09 virus induced PD-L1 expression on human dendritic cells (DCs and T cells, as well as PD-1 expression on T cells. PD-L1 expression impaired the T cell response against A(H1N1pdm09 by promoting CD8+ T cell death and reducing cytokine production. Furthermore, we found increased PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells from influenza-infected patients from the first and second 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico City. PD-L1 expression on CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with T cell proportions in patients infected with A(H1N1pdm09. Therefore, PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells could be associated with an impaired T cell response during acute infection with A(H1N1pdm09 virus.

  11. Detection of the Pandemic H1N1/2009 Influenza A Virus by a Highly Sensitive Quantitative Real-time Reverse-transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Yang; Guoliang Mao; Yujun Liu; Yuan-Chuan Chen; Chengjing Liu; Jun Luo; Xihan Li

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay with specific primers recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) has been widely used successfully for detection and monitoring of the pandemic H1N 1/2009 influenza A virus.In this study,we report the design and characterization of a novel set of primers to be used in a qRT-PCR assay for detecting the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus.The newly designed primers target three regions that are highly conserved among the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of the pandemic H1N1/2009 viruses and are different from those targeted by the WHO-recommended primers.The qRT-PCR assays with the newly designed primers are highly specific,and as specific as the WHO-recommended primers for detecting pandemic H1N1/2009 viruses and other influenza viruses including influenza B viruses and influenza A viruses of human,swine,and raccoon dog origin.Furthermore,the qRT-PCR assays with the newly designed primers appeared to be at least 10-fold more sensitive than those with the WHO-recommended primers as the detection limits of the assays with our primers and the WHO-recommended primers were 2.5 and 25 copies of target RNA per reaction,respectively.When tested with 83 clinical samples,32 were detected to be positive using the qRT-PCR assays with our designed primers,while only 25 were positive by the assays with the WHO-recommended primers.These results suggest that the qRT-PCR system with the newly designed primers represent a highly sensitive assay for diagnosis of the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus infection.

  12. In vitro reassortment between endemic H1N2 and 2009 H1N1 pandemic swine influenza viruses generates attenuated viruses.

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    Ben M Hause

    Full Text Available The pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1 influenza virus was first reported in humans in the spring of 2009 and soon thereafter was identified in numerous species, including swine. Reassortant viruses, presumably arising from the co-infection of pH1N1 and endemic swine influenza virus (SIV, were subsequently identified from diagnostic samples collected from swine. In this study, co-infection of swine testicle (ST cells with swine-derived endemic H1N2 (MN745 and pH1N1 (MN432 yielded two reassortant H1N2 viruses (R1 and R2, both possessing a matrix gene derived from pH1N1. In ST cells, the reassortant viruses had growth kinetics similar to the parental H1N2 virus and reached titers approximately 2 log(10 TCID(50/mL higher than the pH1N1 virus, while in A549 cells these viruses had similar growth kinetics. Intranasal challenge of pigs with H1N2, pH1N1, R1 or R2 found that all viruses were capable of infecting and transmitting between direct contact pigs as measured by real time reverse transcription PCR of nasal swabs. Lung samples were also PCR-positive for all challenge groups and influenza-associated microscopic lesions were detected by histology. Interestingly, infectious virus was detected in lung samples for pigs challenged with the parental H1N2 and pH1N1 at levels significantly higher than either reassortant virus despite similar levels of viral RNA. Results of our experiment suggested that the reassortant viruses generated through in vitro cell culture system were attenuated without gaining any selective growth advantage in pigs over the parental lineages. Thus, reassortant influenza viruses described in this study may provide a good system to study genetic basis of the attenuation and its mechanism.

  13. A whole virus pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccine is highly immunogenic and protective in active immunization and passive protection mouse models.

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    Otfried Kistner

    Full Text Available The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus challenge. The immunogenicity in this model was comparable to that of a whole virus H5N1 vaccine, which had previously been demonstrated to induce high levels of seroprotection in clinical studies. The efficacy of the H1N1 pandemic vaccine in protecting against live virus challenge was also seen to be equivalent to that of the H5N1 vaccine. The protective efficacy of the H1N1 vaccine was also confirmed using a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mouse model. It was demonstrated that mouse and guinea pig immune sera elicited following active H1N1 vaccination resulted in 100% protection of SCID mice following passive transfer of immune sera and lethal challenge. The immune responses to a whole virus pandemic H1N1 and a split seasonal H1N1 vaccine were also compared in this study. It was demonstrated that the whole virus vaccine induced a balanced Th-1 and Th-2 response in mice, whereas the split vaccine induced mainly a Th-2 response and only minimal levels of Th-1 responses. These data supported the initiation of clinical studies with the same low doses of whole virus vaccine that had previously been demonstrated to be immunogenic in clinical studies with a whole virus H5N1 vaccine.

  14. Determinants of vaccine immunogenicity in HIV-infected pregnant women: analysis of B and T cell responses to pandemic H1N1 monovalent vaccine.

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    Adriana Weinberg

    Full Text Available Influenza infections have high frequency and morbidity in HIV-infected pregnant women, underscoring the importance of vaccine-conferred protection. To identify the factors that determine vaccine immunogenicity in this group, we characterized the relationship of B- and T-cell responses to pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1 vaccine with HIV-associated immunologic and virologic characteristics. pH1N1 and seasonal-H1N1 (sH1N1 antibodies were measured in 119 HIV-infected pregnant women after two double-strength pH1N1 vaccine doses. pH1N1-IgG and IgA B-cell FluoroSpot, pH1N1- and sH1N1-interferon γ (IFNγ and granzyme B (GrB T-cell FluoroSpot, and flow cytometric characterization of B- and T-cell subsets were performed in 57 subjects. pH1N1-antibodies increased after vaccination, but less than previously described in healthy adults. pH1N1-IgG memory B cells (Bmem increased, IFNγ-effector T-cells (Teff decreased, and IgA Bmem and GrB Teff did not change. pH1N1-antibodies and Teff were significantly correlated with each other and with sH1N1-HAI and Teff, respectively, before and after vaccination. pH1N1-antibody responses to the vaccine significantly increased with high proportions of CD4+, low CD8+ and low CD8+HLADR+CD38+ activated (Tact cells. pH1N1-IgG Bmem responses increased with high proportions of CD19+CD27+CD21- activated B cells (Bact, high CD8+CD39+ regulatory T cells (Treg, and low CD19+CD27-CD21- exhausted B cells (Bexhaust. IFNγ-Teff responses increased with low HIV plasma RNA, CD8+HLADR+CD38+ Tact, CD4+FoxP3+ Treg and CD19+IL10+ Breg. In conclusion, pre-existing antibody and Teff responses to sH1N1 were associated with increased responses to pH1N1 vaccination in HIV-infected pregnant women suggesting an important role for heterosubtypic immunologic memory. High CD4+% T cells were associated with increased, whereas high HIV replication, Tact and Bexhaust were associated with decreased vaccine immunogenicity. High Treg increased antibody responses but

  15. A Large Proportion of the Mexican Population Remained Susceptible to A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection One Year after the Emergence of 2009 Influenza Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veguilla, Vic; López-Gatell, Hugo; López-Martínez, Irma; Aparicio-Antonio, Rodrigo; Barrera-Badillo, Gisela; Rojo-Medina, Julieta; Gross, Felicia Liaini; Jefferson, Stacie N.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic initially affected Mexico from April 2009 to July 2010. By August 2010, a fourth of the population had received the monovalent vaccine against the pandemic virus (A(H1N1)pdm09). To assess the proportion of the Mexican population who remained potentially susceptible to infection throughout the summer of 2010, we estimated the population seroprevalence to A(H1N1)pdm09 in a serosurvey of blood donors. Methods We evaluated baseline cross-reactivity to the pandemic strain and set the threshold for seropositivity using pre-pandemic (2005–2008) stored serum samples and sera from confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infected individuals. Between June and September 2010, a convenience sample serosurvey of adult blood donors, children, and adolescents was conducted in six states of Mexico. Sera were tested by the microneutralization (MN) and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays, and regarded seropositive if antibody titers were equal or exceeded 1:40 for MN and 1:20 for HI. Age-standardized seroprevalence were calculated using the 2010 National Census population. Results Sera from 1,484 individuals were analyzed; 1,363 (92%) were blood donors, and 121 (8%) children or adolescents aged ≤19 years. Mean age (standard deviation) was 31.4 (11.5) years, and 276 (19%) were women. A total of 516 (35%) participants declared history of influenza vaccination after April 2009. The age-standardized seroprevalence to A(H1N1)pdm09 was 48% by the MN and 41% by the HI assays, respectively. The youngest quintile, aged 1 to 22 years, had the highest the seroprevalence; 61% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 56, 66%) for MN, and 56% (95% CI: 51, 62%) for HI. Conclusions Despite high transmission of A(H1N1)pdm09 observed immediately after its emergence and extensive vaccination, over a half of the Mexican population remained potentially susceptible to A(H1N1)pdm09 infection. Subsequent influenza seasons with high transmission of A(H1N1)pdm09, as 2011–2012 and

  16. Epidemiological Characterization of a Fourth Wave of Pandemic A/H1N1 Influenza in Mexico, Winter 2011–2012: Age Shift and Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja-Aburto, Víctor H.; Chowell, Gerardo; Viboud, Cécile; Simonsen, Lone; Miller, Mark A.; Grajales-Muñiz, Concepción; González-Bonilla, Cesar R.; Diaz-Quiñonez, Jose A; Echevarría-Zuno, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims A substantial recrudescent wave of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 affected the Mexican population from December 1, 2011–March 20, 2012 following a 2-year period of sporadic transmission. Methods We analyzed demographic and geographic data on all hospitalizations with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) and laboratory-confirmed A/H1N1 influenza, and inpatient deaths, from a large prospective surveillance system maintained by a Mexican social security medical system during April 1, 2009– March 20, 2012. We also estimated the reproduction number (R) based on the growth rate of the daily case incidence by date of symptoms onset. Results A total of 7569 SARI hospitalizations and 443 in-patient deaths (5.9%) were reported between December 1, 2011, and March 20, 2012 (1115 A/H1N1-positive inpatients and 154 A/H1N1-positive deaths). The proportion of laboratory-confirmed A/H1N1 hospitalizations and deaths was higher among subjects ≥60 years of age (χ2 test, p <0.0001) and lower among younger age groups (χ2 test, p <0.04) for the 2011–2012 pandemic wave compared to the earlier waves in 2009. The reproduction number of the winter 2011–2012 wave in central Mexico was estimated at 1.2–1.3, similar to that reported for the fall 2009 wave, but lower than that of spring 2009. Conclusions We documented a substantial increase in the number of SARI hospitalizations during the period December 2011–March 2012 and an older age distribution of laboratory-confirmed A/H1N1 influenza hospitalizations and deaths relative to 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic patterns. The gradual change in the age distribution of A/H1N1 infections in the post-pandemic period is consistent with a build-up of immunity among younger populations. PMID:23079035

  17. Response to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected patients and the influence of prior seasonal influenza vaccination.

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    Darius Soonawala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The immunogenicity of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1 (pH1N1 vaccines and the effect of previous influenza vaccination is a matter of current interest and debate. We measured the immune response to pH1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected patients and in healthy controls. In addition we tested whether recent vaccination with seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV induced cross-reactive antibodies to pH1N1. (clinicaltrials.gov Identifier:NCT01066169. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this single-center prospective cohort study MF59-adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine (Focetria®, Novartis was administered twice to 58 adult HIV-infected patients and 44 healthy controls in November 2009 (day 0 and day 21. Antibody responses were measured at baseline, day 21 and day 56 with hemagglutination-inhibition (HI assay. The seroprotection rate (defined as HI titers ≥ 1 : 40 for HIV-infected patients was 88% after the first and 91% after the second vaccination. These rates were comparable to those in healthy controls. Post-vaccination GMT, a sensitive marker of the immune competence of a group, was lower in HIV-infected patients. We found a high seroprotection rate at baseline (31%. Seroprotective titers at baseline were much more common in those who had received 2009-2010 seasonal TIV three weeks prior to the first dose of pH1N1 vaccine. Using stored serum samples of 51 HIV-infected participants we measured the pH1N1 specific response to 2009-2010 seasonal TIV. The seroprotection rate to pH1N1 increased from 22% to 49% after vaccination with 2009-2010 seasonal TIV. Seasonal TIV induced higher levels of antibodies to pH1N1 in older than in younger subjects. CONCLUSION: In HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy, with a median CD4+ T-lymphocyte count above 500 cells/mm(3, one dose of MF59-adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine induced a high seroprotection rate comparable to that in healthy controls. A second dose had a modest additional effect. Furthermore

  18. Effect of human rhinovirus infection in pediatric patients with influenza-like illness on the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yu; Zhu Ru'nan; Zhao Linqing; Deng Jie; Wang Fang; Ding Yaxin; Yuan Yi

    2014-01-01

    Background Some research groups have hypothesized that human rhinoviruses (HRVs) delayed the circulation of the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus (A(H1N1)pdm09) at the beginning of Autumn 2009 in France.This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between HRV and A(H1N1)pdm09 in pediatric patients with influenza-like illness in Beijing,China.Methods A systematic analysis to detect A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza A virus (FLU A) was performed on 4 349 clinical samples from pediatric patients with influenza-like illness during the period June 1,2009 to February 28,2010,while a one-step real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assay was used to detect HRV in 1 146 clinical specimens selected from those 4 349 specimens.Results During the survey period,only one wave of A(H1N1)pdm09 was observed.The percentage of positive cases for A(H1N1)pdm09 increased sharply in September with a peak in November 2009 and then declined in February 2010.Data on the monthly distribution of HRVs indicated that more HRV-positive samples were detected in September (2.2%) and October (3.3%),revealing that the peak of HRV infection in 2009 was similar to that of other years.Among the 1 146 specimens examined for HRVs,21 (1.8%) were HRV-positive,which was significantly lower than that reported previously in Beijing (15.4% to 19.2%) (P <0.01).Overall,6 samples were positive for both A(H1N1)pdm09 and HRV,which represented a positive relative frequency of 1.60% and 2.08% HRV,considering the A(H1N1)pdm09-positive and-negative specimens,respectively.The odds ratio was 0.87 (95% CI 0.32; 2.44,P=0.80).Conclusions HRVs and A (H1N1)pdm09 co-circulated in this Chinese population during September and October 2009,and the HRV epidemic in 2009 did not affect A(H1N1)pdm09 infection rates in Beijing,China as suggested by other studies.However,the presence of A(H1N1)pdm09 might explain the unexpected reduction in the percentage of HRV positive cases during the period studied.

  19. Attack rates assessment of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A in children and their contacts: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Aharona Glatman-Freedman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The recent H1N1 influenza A pandemic was marked by multiple reports of illness and hospitalization in children, suggesting that children may have played a major role in the propagation of the virus. A comprehensive detailed analysis of the attack rates among children as compared with their contacts in various settings is of great importance for understanding their unique role in influenza pandemics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We searched MEDLINE (PubMed and Embase for published studies reporting outbreak investigations with direct measurements of attack rates of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A among children, and quantified how these compare with those of their contacts. We identified 50 articles suitable for review, which reported school, household, travel and social events. The selected reports and our meta-analysis indicated that children had significantly higher attack rates as compared to adults, and that this phenomenon was observed for both virologically confirmed and clinical cases, in various settings and locations around the world. The review also provided insight into some characteristics of transmission between children and their contacts in the various settings. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The consistently higher attack rates of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A among children, as compared to adults, as well as the magnitude of the difference is important for understanding the contribution of children to disease burden, for implementation of mitigation strategies directed towards children, as well as more precise mathematical modeling and simulation of future influenza pandemics.

  20. Effective detection of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in U.S. Veterans Affairs medical centers using a national electronic biosurveillance system.

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    Patricia Schirmer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 2008-09 influenza season was the time in which the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA utilized an electronic biosurveillance system for tracking and monitoring of influenza trends. The system, known as ESSENCE or Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics, was monitored for the influenza season as well as for a rise in influenza cases at the start of the H1N1 2009 influenza pandemic. We also describe trends noted in influenza-like illness (ILI outpatient encounter data in VA medical centers during the 2008-09 influenza season, before and after the recognition of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined prevalence of ILI coded visits using VA's ESSENCE for 2008-09 seasonal influenza (Sept. 28, 2008-April 25, 2009 corresponding to CDC 2008-2009 flu season weeks 40-16 and the early period of pandemic H1N1 2009 (April 26, 2009-July 31, 2009 corresponding to CDC 2008-2009 flu season weeks 17-30. Differences in diagnostic ICD-9-CM code frequencies were analyzed using Chi-square and odds ratios. There were 649,574 ILI encounters captured representing 633,893 patients. The prevalence of VA ILI visits mirrored the CDC's Outpatient ILI Surveillance Network (ILINet data with peaks in late December, early February, and late April/early May, mirroring the ILINet data; however, the peaks seen in the VA were smaller. Of 31 ILI codes, 6 decreased and 11 increased significantly during the early period of pandemic H1N1 2009. The ILI codes that significantly increased were more likely to be symptom codes. Although influenza with respiratory manifestation (487.1 was the most common code used among 150 confirmed pandemic H1N1 2009 cases, overall it significantly decreased since the start of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: VA ESSENCE effectively detected and tracked changing ILI trends during pandemic H1N1 2009 and represents an important temporal alerting

  1. Pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009: epidemiological analysis of cases in a tropical/semi-arid region of Brazil

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    Roberto da Justa Pires Neto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The year 2009 marked the beginning of a pandemic caused by a new variant of influenza A (H1N1. After spreading through North America, the pandemic influenza virus (H1N1 2009 spread rapidly throughout the world. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of cases of pandemic influenza in a tropical/semi-arid region of Brazil. Methods A retrospective study analyzed all suspected cases of pandemic influenza (H1N1 2009 reported in the Ceará State through the National Information System for Notifiable Diseases during the pandemic period between 28 April, 2009 and November 25, 2010. Results A total of 616 suspected cases were notified, 58 (9.4% in the containment phase and 558 (90.6% in the mitigation phase. Most cases were of affected young people resident in the City of Fortaleza, the largest urban center in the State of Ceará. The most frequent symptoms presented by the cases with confirmed infection were fever, cough, myalgia, arthralgia, and nasal congestion. Mortality rate was 0.0009/1,000 inhabitants and lethality was 5.6%. Deaths were observed only in the mitigation phase. Mortality rates were similar for both sexes but were higher in the age group under 5 years. Conclusions The study suggests that the influenza A (H1N1 pandemic in this tropical/semi-arid region had a lower magnitude when compared to states in the Southern and Southeastern regions of Brazil.

  2. Whole genome characterization of human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated from Kenya during the 2009 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachara, George; Symekher, Samuel; Otieno, Michael; Magana, Japheth; Opot, Benjamin; Bulimo, Wallace

    2016-06-01

    An influenza pandemic caused by a novel influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 spread worldwide in 2009 and is estimated to have caused between 151,700 and 575,400 deaths globally. While whole genome data on new virus enables a deeper insight in the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and drug sensitivities of the circulating viruses, there are relatively limited complete genetic sequences available for this virus from African countries. We describe herein the full genome analysis of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated in Kenya between June 2009 and August 2010. A total of 40 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated during the pandemic were selected. The segments from each isolate were amplified and directly sequenced. The resulting sequences of individual gene segments were concatenated and used for subsequent analysis. These were used to infer phylogenetic relationships and also to reconstruct the time of most recent ancestor, time of introduction into the country, rates of substitution and to estimate a time-resolved phylogeny. The Kenyan complete genome sequences clustered with globally distributed clade 2 and clade 7 sequences but local clade 2 viruses did not circulate beyond the introductory foci while clade 7 viruses disseminated country wide. The time of the most recent common ancestor was estimated between April and June 2009, and distinct clusters circulated during the pandemic. The complete genome had an estimated rate of nucleotide substitution of 4.9×10(-3) substitutions/site/year and greater diversity in surface expressed proteins was observed. We show that two clades of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were introduced into Kenya from the UK and the pandemic was sustained as a result of importations. Several closely related but distinct clusters co-circulated locally during the peak pandemic phase but only one cluster dominated in the late phase of the pandemic suggesting that it possessed greater adaptability.

  3. Temporal trends of influenza A (H1N1 virus seroprevalence following 2009 pandemic wave in Guangdong, China: three cross-sectional serology surveys.

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    Fen Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the temporal trends of seroprevalence to pH1N1 among the Guangdong population following 2009 H1N1 pandemic wave, we conducted three cross-sectional serology surveys in 2010. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three surveys were carried out consecutively in 2010 from January 8 to January 24, from March 15 to April 10 and from August 23 to September 4. Sample populations comprising of 4725, 4727, and 4721 subjects respectively were randomly selected for study in these three surveys. The level of antibodies against pH1N1 was evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition assay. In survey 1, the seroprevalence of pH1N1 among all the subjects is 25.1%, declining to 18.4% in survey 2 and increasing to 21.4% in survey 3. Among vaccinated subjects, the seroprevalence was 49.0%, 53.0%, and 49.4% in the three consecutive surveys, showing no significant differences. In contrast, among non-vaccinated subjects, the seroprevalence declined significantly from 22.8% (survey 1 to 14.3% (survey 2 and subsequently increased to 18.1% (survey 3. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that seroprevalence to pH1N1 in non-vaccinated individuals correlated with the investigated order of the surveys, age, and region (all P<0.05. However, it was not correlated with gender (P = 0.650, seasonal influenza vaccination history (P = 0.402 and symptoms (P = 0.074. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In Guangdong, the seroprevalance to pH1N1 decreased initially and then rebounded modestly during the first 9 months following the 2009 pandemic wave. Our results suggest that the prevalence of pH1N1 is still correlated with age and population density during the post-pandemic period. An early end to the free pH1N1 vaccination program might be another important reason for the slight rebound in seroprevalance. Our study findings can help the Guangdong authorities to make evidence-based decisions about a long-term vaccination strategy and boost immunity in specific

  4. Partial protection of seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine against novel pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009: case-control study in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Lourdes; Valdespino-Gómez, Jose Luis; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Jimenez-Corona, Aida; Higuera-Iglesias, Anjarath; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Cano-Arellano, Bulmaro; Garcia-Anaya, Antonio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ponce-de-León-Rosales, Samuel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Rodriguez-López, Mario Henry; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Hernandez-Avila, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of 2008-9 seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine with cases of influenza A/H1N1 during the epidemic in Mexico. Design Frequency matched case-control study. Setting Specialty hospital in Mexico City, March to May 2009. Participants 60 patients with laboratory confirmed influenza A/H1N1 and 180 controls with other diseases (not influenza-like illness or pneumonia) living in Mexico City or the State of Mexico and matched for age and socioeconomic status. Main outcome measures Odds ratio and effectiveness of trivalent inactivated vaccine against influenza A/H1N1. Results Cases were more likely than controls to be admitted to hospital, undergo invasive mechanical ventilation, and die. Controls were more likely than cases to have chronic conditions that conferred a higher risk of influenza related complications. In the multivariate model, influenza A/H1N1 was independently associated with trivalent inactivated vaccine (odds ratio 0.27, 95% confidence interval 0.11 to 0.66) and underlying conditions (0.15, 0.08 to 0.30). Vaccine effectiveness was 73% (95% confidence interval 34% to 89%). None of the eight vaccinated cases died. Conclusions Preliminary evidence suggests some protection from the 2008-9 trivalent inactivated vaccine against pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009, particularly severe forms of the disease, diagnosed in a specialty hospital during the influenza epidemic in Mexico City. PMID:19808768

  5. Acute infectious diseases and immunologic responses. Some stories from clinical practice apropos the Influenza A (H1N1 pandemic

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    Alfredo Darío Espinosa Brito

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Apropos of the appearance of some unusual clinical pictures in the course of the recent epidemic of Influenza A (H1N1, and with the intention of sharing controversial ideas related to the immunologic responses of the patients to the infectious agents, we expose here a group of stories arisen from a clinical practice of almost five decades.

  6. Pandemic H1N1 (2009) and renal failure: the experience of the Irish national tertiary referral centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Brien, F J

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: H1N1 influenza A, was first described in April 2009. A significant cohort of patients from this outbreak developed acute respiratory distress syndrome or pneumonia. H1N1 has since been transmitted across the world. Little has been described on the renal complications of this illness. METHODS: A retrospective review of all patients admitted to our institution with H1N1 infection was carried out from July to November 2009. Renal biochemistry, need for renal replacement therapy and hospital outcome was recorded. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients with H1N1 were admitted. Average length of admission was 10 days (3-84). Eleven patients (32%) developed acute kidney injury (AKI) as defined by the RIFLE criteria (creatinine range 120-610). Four patients required renal replacement therapy, for a range of 10-52 days. Seven patients developed AKI that responded to volume resuscitation. The commonest cause of AKI was sepsis with acute tubular necrosis. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the significance and frequency of renal complications associated with this illness.

  7. Efficacy of vaccination with different combinations of MF59-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines against pandemic H1N1 (2009) influenza virus infection in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brand, Judith M A; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; Bodewes, Rogier; Stittelaar, Koert J; van Amerongen, Geert; Kuiken, Thijs; Simon, James; Fouchier, Ron A M; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2011-03-01

    Serum antibodies induced by seasonal influenza or seasonal influenza vaccination exhibit limited or no cross-reactivity against the 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza virus of the H1N1 subtype (pH1N1). Ferrets immunized once or twice with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine exhibited significantly reduced lung virus titers but no substantial clinical protection against pH1N1-associated disease. However, priming with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine significantly increased the efficacy of a pandemic MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine against pH1N1 challenge. Elucidating the mechanism involved in this priming principle will contribute to our understanding of vaccine- and infection-induced correlates of protection. Furthermore, a practical consequence of these findings is that during an emerging pandemic, the implementation of a priming strategy with an available adjuvanted seasonal vaccine to precede the eventual pandemic vaccination campaign may be useful and life-saving.

  8. Determinants of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in Europe: implications for real-time modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merler, Stefano; Ajelli, Marco; Pugliese, Andrea; Ferguson, Neil M

    2011-09-01

    Influenza pandemics in the last century were characterized by successive waves and differences in impact and timing between different regions, for reasons not clearly understood. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic showed rapid global spread, but with substantial heterogeneity in timing within each hemisphere. Even within Europe substantial variation was observed, with the UK being unique in experiencing a major first wave of transmission in early summer and all other countries having a single major epidemic in the autumn/winter, with a West to East pattern of spread. Here we show that a microsimulation model, parameterised using data about H1N1pdm collected by the beginning of June 2009, explains the occurrence of two waves in UK and a single wave in the rest of Europe as a consequence of timing of H1N1pdm spread, fluxes of travels from US and Mexico, and timing of school vacations. The model provides a description of pandemic spread through Europe, depending on intra-European mobility patterns and socio-demographic structure of the European populations, which is in broad agreement with observed timing of the pandemic in different countries. Attack rates are predicted to depend on the socio-demographic structure, with age dependent attack rates broadly agreeing with available serological data. Results suggest that the observed heterogeneity can be partly explained by the between country differences in Europe: marked differences in school calendars, mobility patterns and sociodemographic structures. Moreover, higher susceptibility of children to infection played a key role in determining the epidemiology of the 2009 pandemic. Our work shows that it would have been possible to obtain a broad-brush prediction of timing of the European pandemic well before the autumn of 2009, much more difficult to achieve with simpler models or pre-pandemic parameterisation. This supports the use of models accounting for the structure of complex modern societies for giving insight to policy

  9. Determinants of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in Europe: implications for real-time modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Merler

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Influenza pandemics in the last century were characterized by successive waves and differences in impact and timing between different regions, for reasons not clearly understood. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic showed rapid global spread, but with substantial heterogeneity in timing within each hemisphere. Even within Europe substantial variation was observed, with the UK being unique in experiencing a major first wave of transmission in early summer and all other countries having a single major epidemic in the autumn/winter, with a West to East pattern of spread. Here we show that a microsimulation model, parameterised using data about H1N1pdm collected by the beginning of June 2009, explains the occurrence of two waves in UK and a single wave in the rest of Europe as a consequence of timing of H1N1pdm spread, fluxes of travels from US and Mexico, and timing of school vacations. The model provides a description of pandemic spread through Europe, depending on intra-European mobility patterns and socio-demographic structure of the European populations, which is in broad agreement with observed timing of the pandemic in different countries. Attack rates are predicted to depend on the socio-demographic structure, with age dependent attack rates broadly agreeing with available serological data. Results suggest that the observed heterogeneity can be partly explained by the between country differences in Europe: marked differences in school calendars, mobility patterns and sociodemographic structures. Moreover, higher susceptibility of children to infection played a key role in determining the epidemiology of the 2009 pandemic. Our work shows that it would have been possible to obtain a broad-brush prediction of timing of the European pandemic well before the autumn of 2009, much more difficult to achieve with simpler models or pre-pandemic parameterisation. This supports the use of models accounting for the structure of complex modern societies for giving

  10. Becoming Modern after SARS. Battling the H1N1 Pandemic and the Politics of Backwardness in China′s Pearl River Delta

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    Katherine A. Mason

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the early evolution of the H1N1 pandemic as it played out in China′s Pearl River Delta in the spring and summer of 2009, as local public health professionals there tried to contain the virus when their American counterparts did not do so. My informants′ difficulties in escaping their perceived status as a source, rather than a victim, of dangerous viruses; their use of disease control tactics that were portrayed abroad as excessive, unscientific, and unsophisticated; and their fatalism about reforming their local system of governance; all frustrated their ambitions. At the same time, the gulf between their reactions to H1N1 and the reactions across the Pacific suggests the need for a more serious global debate about what local places in all parts of the globe should and should not be prepared to do in the name of pandemic preparedness.

  11. Scales of governance: the role of surveillance in facilitating new diplomacy during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Morag; Warren, Adam; Budd, Lucy

    2012-11-01

    The 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic has highlighted the importance of global health surveillance. Increasingly, global alerts are based on 'unexpected' 'events' detected by surveillance systems grounded in particular places. An emerging global governance literature investigates the supposedly disruptive impact of public health emergencies on mobilities in an interdependent world. Little consideration has been given to the varied scales of governance--local, national and global--that operate at different stages in the unfolding of an 'event', together with the interactions and tensions between them. By tracking the chronology of the H1N1 pandemic, this paper highlights an emergent dialogue between local and global scales. It also draws attention to moments of national autonomy across the global North and South which undermined the WHO drive for transnational cooperation.

  12. CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes imbalance in children with severe 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 pneumonia

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    Ji Eun Kim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : This study was conducted to investigate the immune responses of children with moderate and severe novel influenza A virus (H1N1 pneumonia, and to compare their clinical and immunological findings with those of control subjects. Methods : Thirty-two admitted patients with H1N1 pneumonia were enrolled in the study. The clinical profiles, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses of the 16 H1N1 pneumonia patients who were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (severe pneumonia group, 16 H1N1 pneumonia patients admitted to the pediatric general ward (moderate pneumonia group and 13 control subjects (control group were measured. Results : Total lymphocyte counts were significantly lower in patients with H1N1 pneumonia than in the control group (P=0.02. The number of CD4+ T lymphocytes was significantly lower in the severe pneumonia group (411.5±253.5/μL than in the moderate pneumonia (644.9±291.1/μL, P=0.04 and control (902.5±461.2/μL, P=0.01 groups. However, the number of CD8+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in the severe pneumonia group (684.2±420.8/μL than in the moderate pneumonia (319.7±176.6/μL, P=0.02 and control (407.2±309.3/μL, P=0.03 groups. The CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes ratio was significantly lower in the severe pneumonia group (0.86±0.24 than in the moderate pneumonia (1.57±0.41, P=0.01 and control (1.61±0.49, P=0.01 groups. The serum levels of immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin E were significantly higher in the severe pneumonia group than in the 2 other groups. Conclusion : The results of this study suggest that increased humoral immune responses and the differences in the CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte profiles, and imbalance of their ratios may be related to the severity of H1N1 pneumonia in children.

  13. Partial protection against 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) of seasonal influenza vaccination and related regional factors: Updated systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-yuan; Chen, Jin-yan; Zhang, Yan-ling; Fu, Wei-ming

    2015-01-01

    This updated systematic review and meta-analyses aims to systematically evaluate the cross-protection of seasonal influenza vaccines against the 2009 pandemic A (H1N1) influenza infection, and investigate the potential effect of the influenza strains circulating previous to the pandemic on the association between vaccine receipt and pandemic infection. In addition, subgroup analysis was performed based on the study locations and previous circulating influenza viruses. Relevant articles in English and Chinese from 2009 to October 2013 were systematically searched, and 21 eligible studies were included. For case-control studies, an insignificant 20% reduced risk for pandemic influenza infection based on combined national data (OR = 0.80; 95%CI: 0.60, 1.05) was calculated for people receiving seasonal influenza vaccination. However, for RCTs, an insignificant increase in the risk of seasonal influenza vaccines was observed (RR = 1.27; 95% CI: 0.46, 3.53). For the subgroup analysis, a significant 35% cross-protection was observed in the subgroup where influenza A outbreaks were detected before the 2009 pandemic. Moreover, the results indicated that seasonal influenza vaccination may reduce the risk of influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) (RR = 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99). Our findings partially support the hypothesis that seasonal vaccines may offer moderate cross-protection for adults against laboratory-confirmed pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection and ILIs. Further immunological studies are needed to understand the mechanism underlying these findings.

  14. Morbid obesity as a risk factor for hospitalization and death due to 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1 disease.

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    Oliver W Morgan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe illness due to 2009 pandemic A(H1N1 infection has been reported among persons who are obese or morbidly obese. We assessed whether obesity is a risk factor for hospitalization and death due to 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1, independent of chronic medical conditions considered by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP to increase the risk of influenza-related complications. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a case-cohort design to compare cases of hospitalizations and deaths from 2009 pandemic A(H1N1 influenza occurring between April-July, 2009, with a cohort of the U.S. population estimated from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; pregnant women and children or=20 year olds, hospitalization was associated with being morbidly obese (BMI>or=40 for individuals with ACIP-recognized chronic conditions (OR = 4.9, 95% CI 2.4-9.9 and without ACIP-recognized chronic conditions (OR = 4.7, 95%CI 1.3-17.2. Among 2-19 year olds, hospitalization was associated with being underweight (BMIor=20 years without ACIP-recognized chronic medical conditions death was associated with obesity (OR = 3.1, 95%CI: 1.5-6.6 and morbid obesity (OR = 7.6, 95%CI 2.1-27.9. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings support observations that morbid obesity may be associated with hospitalization and possibly death due to 2009 pandemic H1N1 infection. These complications could be prevented by early antiviral therapy and vaccination.

  15. Secondary household transmission of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus among an urban and rural population in Kenya, 2009-2010.

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    Clara Y Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Kenya, >1,200 laboratory-confirmed 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 (pH1N1 cases occurred since June 2009. We used population-based infectious disease surveillance (PBIDS data to assess household transmission of pH1N1 in urban Nairobi (Kibera and rural Lwak. METHODS: We defined a pH1N1 patient as laboratory-confirmed pH1N1 infection among PBIDS participants during August 1, 2009-February 5, 2010, in Kibera, or August 1, 2009-January 20, 2010, in Lwak, and a case household as a household with a laboratory-confirmed pH1N1 patient. Community interviewers visited PBIDS-participating households to inquire about illnesses among household members. We randomly selected 4 comparison households per case household matched by number of children aged <5. Comparison households had a household visit 10 days before or after the matched patient symptom onset date. We defined influenza-like illnesses (ILI as self-reported cough or sore throat, and a self-reported fever ≤8 days after the pH1N1 patient's symptom onset in case households and ≤8 days before selected household visit in comparison households. We used the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test to compare proportions of ILIs among case and comparison households, and log binomial-model to compare that of Kibera and Lwak. RESULTS: Among household contacts of patients with confirmed pH1N1 in Kibera, 4.6% had ILI compared with 8.2% in Lwak (risk ratio [RR], 0.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3-0.9. Household contacts of patients were more likely to have ILIs than comparison-household members in both Kibera (RR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.8 and Lwak (RR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.6-4.3. Overall, ILI was not associated with patient age. However, ILI rates among household contacts were higher among children aged <5 years than persons aged ≥5 years in Lwak, but not Kibera. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial pH1N1 household transmission occurred in urban and rural Kenya. Household transmission rates were higher in the rural area.

  16. Age-specific contacts and travel patterns in the spatial spread of 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic

    CERN Document Server

    Apolloni, Andrea; Colizza, Vittoria

    2013-01-01

    Confirmed cases during the early stage of the 2009 H1N1 pdm in various countries showed an age shift between importations and local transmission cases, with adults mainly responsible for seeding unaffected regions and children most frequently driving community outbreaks. We introduce a multi-host stochastic metapopulation model with two age classes to analytically address the role of a heterogeneously mixing population and its associated non-homogeneous travel behaviors on the risk of a major epidemic. We inform the model with statistics on demography, mixing and travel behavior for Europe and Mexico, and calibrate it to the 2009 H1N1 pdm early outbreak. We varied model parameters to explore the invasion conditions under different scenarios. We derive the expression for the global invasion potential of the epidemic that depends on disease transmissibility, transportation network and mobility features, demographic profile and mixing pattern. Highly assortative mixing favor the spatial containment of the epidem...

  17. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Weibin [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Aizhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Miao, Yi [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Xia, Shengli [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shu, Yuelong [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Ma, Xiaowei [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Lin, Xiaojun, E-mail: linxiaojun@hualan.com [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Bian, Chao, E-mail: cbian@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Bing, E-mail: bsun@sibs.ac.cn [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  18. A PB1 T296R substitution enhance polymerase activity and confer a virulent phenotype to a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhijun; Cheng, Kaihui; Sun, Weiyang; Zhang, Xinghai; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Wang, Hualei; Zhang, Qianyi; Xin, Yue; Xue, Li; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Jing; Yang, Songtao; Qin, Chuan; Wilker, Peter R; Yue, Donghui; Chen, Hualan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-12-01

    While the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus has become established in the human population as a seasonal influenza virus, continued adaptation may alter viral virulence. Here, we passaged a 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (A/Changchun/01/2009) in mice. Serial passage in mice generated viral variants with increased virulence. Adapted variants displayed enhanced replication kinetics in vitro and vivo. Analysis of the variants genomes revealed 6 amino acid changes in the PB1 (T296R), PA (I94V), HA (H3 numbering; N159D, D225G, and R226Q), and NP (D375N). Using reverse genetics, we found that a PB1-T296R substitution found in all adapted viral variants enhanced viral replication kinetics in vitro and vivo, increased viral polymerase activity in human cells, and was sufficient for enhanced virulence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus in mice. Therefore, we defined a novel influenza pathogenic determinant, providing further insights into the pathogenesis of influenza viruses in mammals.

  19. Reducing occurrence and severity of pneumonia due to pandemic H1N1 2009 by early oseltamivir administration: a retrospective study in Mexico.

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    Anjarath Lorena Higuera Iglesias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-viral treatment has been used to treat severe or progressive illness due to pandemic H1N1 2009. A main cause of severe illness in pandemic H1N1 2009 is viral pneumonia; however, it is unclear how effective antiviral treatment is against pneumonia when administered >48 hours after symptom onset. Therefore, we aimed to determine how time from symptom onset to antiviral administration affected the effectiveness of antiviral treatment against pneumonia due to pandemic (H1N1 2009. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective medical chart review of 442 patients was conducted in a hospital in Mexico. Subjects had tested positive for pandemic H1N1 2009 virus by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction and were administered oseltamivir. Median time from symptom onset to oseltamivir administration was 5.0 days (range, 0-43. 442 subjects, 71 (16.1% had severe pneumonia which required mechanical ventilation, 191 (43.2% had mild to moderate pneumonia, and 180 (40% did not have pneumonia. Subjects were divided into four groups based on time to oseltamivir administration: ≤2, 3-7, 8-14, and >14 days. Severity of respiratory features was associated with time to treatment, and multivariate analysis indicated that time to oseltamivir administration was associated with severity of respiratory features. A proportional odds model indicated that 50% probability for occurrence of pneumonia of any severity and that of severe pneumonia in patients who would develop pneumonia reached at approximately 3.4 and 21 days, respectively, after symptom onset. Patients with a shorter time to oseltamivir administration were discharged earlier from the hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Earlier initiation of oseltamivir administration after symptom onset significantly reduced occurrence and severity of pneumonia and shortened hospitalization due to pandemic H1N1 2009. Even when administered >48 hours after symptom onset, oseltamivir showed considerable

  20. A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination: A retrospective evaluation of adverse maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes in a cohort of pregnant women in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, Massimo; Bella, Antonino; Rota, Maria C; Clagnan, Elena; Gallo, Tolinda; D'Amato, Maurizio; Pezzotti, Patrizio; Ferrara, Lorenza; Demicheli, Vittorio; Martinelli, Domenico; Prato, Rosa; Rizzo, Caterina

    2015-05-05

    Although concerns about safety of influenza vaccination during pregnancy have been raised in the past, vaccination of pregnant women was recommended in many countries during the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic influenza. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the risk of adverse maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes among pregnant women vaccinated with a MF59-adjuvanted A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine. The study was carried out in four Italian regions (Piemonte, Friuli-Venezia-Giulia, Lazio, and Puglia) among 102,077 pregnant women potentially exposed during the second or third trimester of gestation to the vaccination campaign implemented in 2009/2010. Based on data retrieved from the regional administrative databases, the statistical analysis was performed using the Cox proportional-hazards model, adjusting for the propensity score to account for the potential confounding effect due to the socio-demographic characteristics and the clinical and reproductive history of women. A total of 100,332 pregnant women were eligible for the analysis. Of these, 2003 (2.0%) received the A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination during the second or third trimester of gestation. We did not observe any statistically significant association between the A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination and different maternal outcomes (hospital admissions for influenza, pneumonia, hypertension, eclampsia, diabetes, thyroid disease, and anaemia), fetal outcomes (fetal death after the 22nd gestational week) and neonatal outcomes (pre-term birth, low birth weight, low 5-min Apgar score, and congenital malformations). Pre-existing health-risk conditions (hospital admissions and drug prescriptions for specific diseases before the onset of pregnancy) were observed more frequently among vaccinated women, thus suggesting that concomitant chronic conditions increased vaccination uptake. The results of this study add some evidence on the safety of A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination during

  1. Perceptions and behaviors related to hand hygiene for the prevention of H1N1 influenza transmission among Korean university students during the peak pandemic period

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    Kim Seon-Ung

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to better assess the perceptions, motivating factors, and behaviors associated with the use of hand washing to prevent H1N1 influenza transmission during the peak pandemic period in Korea. Methods A cross-sectional survey questionnaire was completed by 942 students at a university campus in Suwon, Korea, between December 1 and 8, 2009. The survey included questions regarding individual perceptions, motivating factors, and behaviors associated with hand washing for the prevention of H1N1 influenza transmission. Results Compared to one year prior, 30.3% of participants reported increasing their hand washing frequency. Female students were more likely to practice more frequent hand washing. Women also perceived the effectiveness of hand washing to be lower, and illness severity and personal susceptibility to H1N1 infection to be higher. Study participants who were female (OR: 1.79-3.90 who perceived of hand washing to be effective (OR: 1.34-12.15 and illness severity to be greater (OR: 1.00-3.12 washed their hands more frequently. Conclusions Korean students increased their frequency of hand hygiene practices during the pandemic, with significant gender differences existing in the attitudes and behaviors related to the use of hand hygiene as a means of disease prevention. Here, the factors that affected hand washing behavior were similar to those identified at the beginning of the H1N1 or SARS pandemics, suggesting that public education campaigns regarding hand hygiene are effective in altering individual hand hygiene habits during the peak periods of influenza transmission.

  2. Outbreak of H3N2 influenza at a US military base in Djibouti during the H1N1 pandemic of 2009.

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    Michael T Cosby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza pandemics have significant operational impact on deployed military personnel working in areas throughout the world. The US Department of Defense global influenza-like illness (ILI surveillance network serves an important role in establishing baseline trends and can be leveraged to respond to outbreaks of respiratory illness. OBJECTIVE: We identified and characterized an operationally unique outbreak of H3N2 influenza at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti occurring simultaneously with the H1N1 pandemic of 2009 [A(H1N1pdm09]. METHODS: Enhanced surveillance for ILI was conducted at Camp Lemonnier in response to local reports of a possible outbreak during the A(H1N1pdm09 pandemic. Samples were collected from consenting patients presenting with ILI (utilizing a modified case definition and who completed a case report form. Samples were cultured and analyzed using standard real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rt-RT-PCR methodology and sequenced genetic material was phylogenetically compared to other published strains. RESULTS: rt-RT-PCR and DNA sequencing revealed that 25 (78% of the 32 clinical samples collected were seasonal H3N2 and only 2 (6% were A(H1N1pdm09 influenza. The highest incidence of H3N2 occurred during the month of May and 80% of these were active duty military personnel. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that sequenced H3N2 strains were genetically similar to 2009 strains from the United States of America, Australia, and South east Asia. CONCLUSIONS: This outbreak highlights challenges in the investigation of influenza among deployed military populations and corroborates the public health importance of maintaining surveillance systems for ILI that can be enhanced locally when needed.

  3. Phylogenetic analyses of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 hemagglutinin gene during and after the pandemic event in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Paola Cristina; Motta, Fernando Couto; Born, Priscila Silva; Machado, Daniela; Caetano, Braulia Costa; Brown, David; Siqueira, Marilda Mendonça

    2015-12-01

    Pandemic influenza A H1N1 [A(H1N1)pdm09] was first detected in Brazil in May 2009, and spread extensively throughout the country causing a peak of infection during June to August 2009. Since then, it has continued to circulate with a seasonal pattern, causing high rates of morbidity and mortality. Over this period, the virus has continually evolved with the accumulation of new mutations. In this study we analyze the phylogenetic relationship in a collection of 220 A(H1N1)pdm09 hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences collected during and after the pandemic period (2009 to 2014) in Brazil. In addition, we have looked for evidence of viral polymorphisms associated with severe disease and compared the range of viral variants with the vaccine strain (A/California/7/2009) used throughout this period. The phylogenetic analyses in this study revealed the circulation of at least eight genetic groups in Brazil. Two (G6-pdm and G7-pdm) co-circulated during the pandemic period, showing an early pattern of viral diversification with a low genetic distance from vaccine strain. Other phylogenetic groups, G5, G6 (including 6B, 6C and 6D subgroups), and G7 were found in the subsequent epidemic seasons from 2011 to 2014. These viruses exhibited more amino acid differences from the vaccine strain with several substitutions at the antigenic sites. This is associated with a theoretical decrease in the vaccine efficacy. Furthermore, we observed that the presence of any polymorphism at residue 222 of the HA gene was significantly associated with severe/fatal cases, reinforcing previous reports that described this residue as a potential virulence marker. This study provides new information about the circulation of some viral variants in Brazil, follows up potential genetic markers associated with virulence and allows infer if the efficacy of the current vaccine against more recent A(H1N1)pdm09 strains may be reduced.

  4. Control of a Reassortant Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus Outbreak in an Intensive Swine Breeding Farm: Effect of Vaccination and Enhanced Farm Management Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Beato, Maria Serena; Angeloni, Giorgia; Monne, Isabella; Buniolo, Filippo; Zuliani, Federica; Morini, Matteo; Castellan, Alberto; Bonfanti, Lebana; Marangon, Stefano

    2015-04-13

    Influenza A viruses in swine cause considerable economic losses and raise concerns about their zoonotic potential. The current paucity of thorough empirical assessments of influenza A virus infection levels in swine herds under different control interventions hinders our understanding of their effectiveness. Between 2012 and 2013, recurrent outbreaks of respiratory disease caused by a reassortant pandemic 2009 H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus were registered in a swine breeding farm in North-East Italy, providing the opportunity to assess an outbreak response plan based on vaccination and enhanced farm management. All sows/gilts were vaccinated with a H1N1pdm-specific vaccine, biosecurity was enhanced, weaning cycles were lengthened, and cross-fostering of piglets was banned. All tested piglets had maternally-derived antibodies at 30 days of age and were detectable in 5.3% of ~90 day-old piglets. There was a significant reduction in H1N1pdm RT-PCR detections after the intervention. Although our study could not fully determine the extent to which the observed trends in seropositivity or RT-PCR positivity among piglets were due to the intervention or to the natural course of the disease in the herd, we provided suggestive evidence that the applied measures were useful in controlling the outbreak, even without an all-in/all-out system, while keeping farm productivity at full.

  5. Description of a large urban school-located 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccination campaign, New York City 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narciso, Heather E; Pathela, Preeti; Morgenthau, Beth Maldin; Kansagra, Susan M; May, Linda; Scaccia, Allison; Zucker, Jane R

    2012-04-01

    In the spring of 2009, New York City (NYC) experienced the emergence and rapid spread of pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus (pH1N1), which had a high attack rate in children and caused many school closures. During the 2009 fall wave of pH1N1, a school-located vaccination campaign for elementary schoolchildren was conducted in order to reduce infection and transmission in the school setting, thereby reducing the impact of pH1N1 that was observed earlier in the year. In this paper, we describe the planning and outcomes of the NYC school-located vaccination campaign. We compared consent and vaccination data for three vaccination models (school nurse alone, school nurse plus contract nurse, team). Overall, >1,200 of almost 1,600 eligible schools participated, achieving 26.8% consent and 21.5% first-dose vaccination rates, which did not vary significantly by vaccination model. A total of 189,902 doses were administered during two vaccination rounds to 115,668 students at 998 schools included in the analysis; vaccination rates varied by borough, school type, and poverty level. The team model achieved vaccination of more children per day and required fewer vaccination days per school. NYC's campaign is the largest described school-located influenza vaccination campaign to date. Despite substantial challenges, school-located vaccination is feasible in large, urban settings, and during a public health emergency.

  6. The dynamics of risk perceptions and precautionary behavior in response to 2009 (H1N1 pandemic influenza

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    Li Meng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The trajectory of an infectious disease outbreak is affected by the behavior of individuals, and the behavior is often related to individuals' risk perception. We assessed temporal changes and geographical differences in risk perceptions and precautionary behaviors in response to H1N1 influenza. Methods 1,290 US adults completed an online survey on risk perceptions, interests in pharmaceutical interventions (preventive intervention and curative intervention, and engagement in precautionary activities (information seeking activities and taking quarantine measures in response to H1N1 influenza between April 28 and May 27 2009. Associations of risk perceptions and precautionary behaviors with respondents' sex, age, and household size were analyzed. Linear and quadratic time trends were assessed by regression analyses. Geographic differences in risk perception and precautionary behaviors were evaluated. Predictors of willingness to take pharmaceutical intervention were analyzed. Results Respondents from larger households reported stronger interest in taking medications and engaged in more precautionary activities, as would be normatively predicted. Perceived risk increased over time, whereas interest in pharmaceutical preventive interventions and the engagement in some precautionary activities decreased over time. Respondents who live in states with higher H1N1 incidence per population perceived a higher likelihood of influenza infection, but did not express greater interests in pharmaceutical interventions, nor did they engage in a higher degree of precautionary activities. Perceived likelihood of influenza infection, willingness to take medications and engagement in information seeking activities were higher for women than men. Conclusions Perceived risk of infection and precautionary behavior can be dynamic in time, and differ by demographic characteristics and geographical locations. These patterns will likely influence the

  7. Respiratory viral coinfection among hospitalized patients with H1N1 2009 during the first pandemic wave in Brazil

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    Clarice Camargo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A coinfections with other respiratory viruses were investigated in 25.8% (41/159 of the samples from patients hospitalized in 2009 at our University Hospital. Out of the 41 influenza A cases, nine cases (21.9% were coinfected with other viruses, with a similar frequency among children and adults (p = 0.47, and seasonal influenza cases were more prevalent than H1N1 2009 influenza virus. Adenovirus was the most frequently detected (4/9 among coinfected cases. Coinfection was not associated with higher morbidity or mortality (p = 0.75.

  8. Burden of the 1999-2008 seasonal influenza epidemics in Italy: comparison with the H1N1v (A/California/07/09) pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Piero Luigi; Panatto, Donatella; Ansaldi, Filippo; Canepa, Paola; Amicizia, Daniela; Patria, Antonio Giuseppe; Gasparini, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Despite preventive efforts, seasonal influenza epidemics are responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality every year worldwide, including developed countries. The A/H1N1v pandemic imposed a considerable healthcare and economic burden. In order to obtain an accurate estimate of the economic burden of influenza, and hence to guide policymakers effectively, systematic studies are necessary. To this end, data from epidemiological surveillance are essential. To estimate the impact of the 1999-2008 seasonal influenza epidemics and the H1N1v pandemic, we analyzed data from the Italian Influenza Surveillance System (CIRI NET). In the period 1999-2008, the Italian surveillance network consisted of sentinel general practitioners and pediatricians, who reported cases of Influenza-Like Illness (ILI) and Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI ) observed during their clinical practice from mid-October to late April each year; reports were sent to the Center for Research on Influenza and other Viral Infections (CIRI -IV). CIRI -IV receives data from 9 of the 20 Italian regions: Liguria, Abruzzo, Calabria, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Lombardy, Puglia, Sicily, Tuscany and Umbria. Previous estimates of influenza case costs were used in economic evaluations. Clinical-epidemiological and virological surveillance of the seasonal epidemics from 1999-2008 showed that the highest epidemic period was 2004-2005, when a new variant of the H3N2 influenza virus subtype emerged (A/California/07/04). Indeed, the highest peak of morbidity in the decade occurred in February 2005 (12.6 per 1,000 inhabitants). In 1999-2008, H1N1 subtype strains circulated and co-circulated with strains belonging to the H3N2 subtype and B type. Regarding B viruses in 2001-02, viruses belonged to the B/Victoria/02/07 lineage re-emerged, and in subsequent years co-circulated with viruses belonging to the B/Yamagata/lineage. The estimated costs of seasonal epidemics from 1999-2008 in Italy ranged from €15 to €20

  9. The public's acceptance of novel vaccines during a pandemic: a focus group study and its application to influenza H1N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, N; Holmes, B

    2009-01-01

    As influenza H1N1 spreads around the world, health officials are considering the development and use of a new vaccine to protect the public and help control the outbreak. Acceptance of novel vaccines during health crises, however, is influenced by perceptions of a range of risks, including the risk of infection, risk of becoming severely ill or dying if infected, as well as the risk of serious side and long-term effects of the vaccine. A study on 11 focus groups was conducted with the public in Vancouver, Canada in 2006 and 2007 to explore how people assess these risks and how these assessments relate to their willingness to use novel vaccines in a pandemic. Concerns about using new vaccines during a pandemic differ from concerns about using established products in a non-crisis situation. Participants were hesitant to use novel vaccines because of a low perception of the early risk of infection in a pandemic, coupled with the many uncertainties that surround new vaccines and the emerging infectious disease, and owing to the concern that unsafe pharmaceuticals may be rushed to market during a health crisis. Understanding the public´s assessment of the risks related to, and willingness to use, novel vaccines during a pandemic can help officials promote disease-control measures in ways that improve the likelihood of acceptance by the public and may increase uptake of an H1N1 vaccine.

  10. The public's acceptance of novel vaccines during a pandemic: A focus group study and its application to influenza H1N1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Henrich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    As influenza H1N1 spreads around the world, health officials are considering the development and use of a new vaccine to protect the public and help control the outbreak. Acceptance of novel vaccines during health crises, however, is influenced by perceptions of a range of risks, including risk of infection, risk of becoming severely ill or dying if infected, and risk of serious side- and long-term effects of the vaccine. Eleven focus groups were conducted with the public in Vancouver, Canada in 2006 and 2007 to explore how people assess these risks and how these assessments relate to willingness to use novel vaccines in a pandemic. Concerns about using new vaccines during a pandemic differ from concerns about using established products in a non-crisis situation. Participants were hesitant to use the novel vaccines because of a low perception of risk of infection early in a pandemic coupled with the many uncertainties that surround new vaccines and the emerging infectious disease, and concern that unsafe pharmaceuticals may be rushed to market during the health crisis. Understanding adults|[rsquo]| assessment of risks related to, and willingness to use, novel vaccines during a pandemic can help officials promote disease-control measures in ways that improve the likelihood of acceptance by the public and may increase uptake of an H1N1 vaccine.

  11. Surveillance of illness associated with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection among adults using a global clinical site network approach: the INSIGHT FLU 002 and FLU 003 studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dwyer, Dominic E; Nielsen, Henrik Ib

    2011-01-01

    The novel pandemic influenza A (H1H1) 2009 virus spread rapidly around the world in 2009. The paucity of prospective international epidemiologic data on predictors of clinical outcomes with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection stimulated the INSIGHT network, an international network of community...... and hospital-based investigators, to commence two worldwide clinical observational studies to describe pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus activity. The purpose of these two studies was to estimate the percent of adult patients with illness due to laboratory-confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection...

  12. Secondary attack rate of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 in Western Australian households, 29 May-7 August 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, D; Giele, C M; Goggin, L S; Kwan, K S; Smith, D W; Dowse, G K; Mak, D B; Effler, P

    2011-01-20

    Understanding household transmission of the pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus, including risk factors for transmission, is important for refining public health strategies to reduce the burden of the disease. During the influenza season of 2009 we investigated transmission of the emerging virus in 595 households in which the index case was the first symptomatic case of influenza A(H1N1)2009. Secondary cases were defined as household contacts with influenza-like illness (ILI) or laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1)2009, occurring at least one day after but within seven days following symptom onset in the index case. ILI developed in 231 of the 1,589 household contacts, a secondary attack rate of 14.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 12.9–16.4). At least one secondary case occurred in 166 of the 595 households (a household transmission rate of 27.9%; 95% CI: 24.5–31.6).Of these, 127 (76.5%) households reported one secondary case and 39 (23.5%) households reported two or more secondary cases. Secondary attack rates were highest in children younger than five years (p=0.001), and young children were also more efficient transmitters (p=0.01). Individual risk was not associated with household size. Prophylactic antiviral therapy was associated with reduced transmission (p=0.03). The secondary attack rate of ILI in households with a confirmed pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 index case was comparable to that described previously for seasonal influenza.

  13. Pandemic H1N1 influenza isolated from free-ranging Northern Elephant Seals in 2010 off the central California coast.

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    Tracey Goldstein

    Full Text Available Interspecies transmission of influenza A is an important factor in the evolution and ecology of influenza viruses. Marine mammals are in contact with a number of influenza reservoirs, including aquatic birds and humans, and this may facilitate transmission among avian and mammalian hosts. Virus isolation, whole genome sequencing, and hemagluttination inhibition assay confirmed that exposure to pandemic H1N1 influenza virus occurred among free-ranging Northern Elephant Seals (Mirounga angustirostris in 2010. Nasal swabs were collected from 42 adult female seals in April 2010, just after the animals had returned to the central California coast from their short post-breeding migration in the northeast Pacific. Swabs from two seals tested positive by RT-PCR for the matrix gene, and virus was isolated from each by inoculation into embryonic chicken eggs. Whole genome sequencing revealed greater than 99% homology with A/California/04/2009 (H1N1 that emerged in humans from swine in 2009. Analysis of more than 300 serum samples showed that samples collected early in 2010 (n = 100 were negative and by April animals began to test positive for antibodies against the pH1N1 virus (HI titer of ≥1∶40, supporting the molecular findings. In vitro characterizations studies revealed that viral replication was indistinguishable from that of reference strains of pH1N1 in canine kidney cells, but replication was inefficient in human epithelial respiratory cells, indicating these isolates may be elephant seal adapted viruses. Thus findings confirmed that exposure to pandemic H1N1 that was circulating in people in 2009 occurred among free-ranging Northern Elephant Seals in 2010 off the central California coast. This is the first report of pH1N1 (A/Elephant seal/California/1/2010 in any marine mammal and provides evidence for cross species transmission of influenza viruses in free-ranging wildlife and movement of influenza viruses between humans and wildlife.

  14. Pig producers' perceptions of the Influenza Pandemic H1N1/09 outbreak and its effect on their biosecurity practices in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Jover, Marta; Taylor, Melanie; Holyoake, Patricia; Dhand, Navneet

    2012-10-01

    The Influenza Pandemic (H1N1/09) virus was first reported in humans in Mexico in April 2009 and a pandemic level was declared on 11th of June 2009 by the World Health Organization (Chan, 2009; WHO, 2009a). Public misconceptions about the transmission of H1N1/09 were caused by the inadequate naming of the disease as 'swine influenza'. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the height of the outbreak in the Australian human population and before the virus was reported in the first piggery in Australia in July 2009 (OIE, 2009b; Holyoake et al., 2011). The aims of this study were to evaluate pig producers' perceptions about the virus and the outbreak financial impact and influence on on-farm biosecurity practices. A questionnaire was designed and posted to Australian Pork Limited (APL) members (n=460), obtaining responses from 182 producers (39.6%). Pig producers had good general knowledge on potential transmission pathways for H1N1/09 between people, with direct or close contact with a sick person perceived as the most likely pathways. Changes on biosecurity practices, such as asking visitors if they had recently been overseas (27.8%) and not allowing any visitor to inspect their pigs (18.3%), were reported among respondents. In addition, approximately 40% of producers asked their employees to notify flu like symptoms, consulted a veterinarian on H1N1/09 and visited websites to seek information on H1N1/09. A higher adoption of these practices was observed among large (>100 sows) than small herds. Only 2.9% of respondents reported a reduction in pig sales during the outbreak. However, approximately one third of producers reported being financially and emotionally stressed, 38.2% were distressed about the health of their pigs and 16.7% about their own health. The most important sources of information were APL (93%), veterinarians (89%) and the state Department of Primary Industries (DPI) (75%). The first two considered the most trusted sources of information

  15. Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Isolated from Free-Ranging Northern Elephant Seals in 2010 off the Central California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Simon J.; Medina, Rafael; Robinson, Patrick W.; Greig, Denise J.; Costa, Daniel P.; Lipkin, W. Ian; Garcia-Sastre, Adolfo; Boyce, Walter M.

    2013-01-01

    Interspecies transmission of influenza A is an important factor in the evolution and ecology of influenza viruses. Marine mammals are in contact with a number of influenza reservoirs, including aquatic birds and humans, and this may facilitate transmission among avian and mammalian hosts. Virus isolation, whole genome sequencing, and hemagluttination inhibition assay confirmed that exposure to pandemic H1N1 influenza virus occurred among free-ranging Northern Elephant Seals (Mirounga angustirostris) in 2010. Nasal swabs were collected from 42 adult female seals in April 2010, just after the animals had returned to the central California coast from their short post-breeding migration in the northeast Pacific. Swabs from two seals tested positive by RT-PCR for the matrix gene, and virus was isolated from each by inoculation into embryonic chicken eggs. Whole genome sequencing revealed greater than 99% homology with A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) that emerged in humans from swine in 2009. Analysis of more than 300 serum samples showed that samples collected early in 2010 (n = 100) were negative and by April animals began to test positive for antibodies against the pH1N1 virus (HI titer of ≥1∶40), supporting the molecular findings. In vitro characterizations studies revealed that viral replication was indistinguishable from that of reference strains of pH1N1 in canine kidney cells, but replication was inefficient in human epithelial respiratory cells, indicating these isolates may be elephant seal adapted viruses. Thus findings confirmed that exposure to pandemic H1N1 that was circulating in people in 2009 occurred among free-ranging Northern Elephant Seals in 2010 off the central California coast. This is the first report of pH1N1 (A/Elephant seal/California/1/2010) in any marine mammal and provides evidence for cross species transmission of influenza viruses in free-ranging wildlife and movement of influenza viruses between humans and wildlife. PMID:23690933

  16. Risk factors for adult death due to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection: a 2151 severe and critical cases analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng-jun; CAO Bin; LI Xiao-li; LIANG Li-rong; YANG Shi-gui; GU Li; XU Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Background The 2009 pandemic H1 N1 (pH1N1) influenza showed that relatively young adults accounted for the highest rates of hospital admission and death.In preparation for pH1N1,the aim of the study is to identify factors associated with the mortality of patients with 2009 pH1N1 infection,especially for young patients without chronic medical conditions.Methods Retrospective observational study of 2151 severe or critical adult cases (-≥14 years old) admitted to a hospital with pH1N1 influenza from September 1,2009 to December 31,2009 from 426 hospitals of 27 Chinese provinces.A confirmed case was a person whose pH1N1 virus infection was verified by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR).Severe and critical cases were defined according to the H1N1 2009 Clinical guidelines (Third Edition,2009) released by the Ministry of Health of China.Results Among the 2151 patients,the mean age was 34.0 years.Two hundred and ninty-three (13.6%) died during hospital stay.One thousand four hundred and forty-two patients (67.0%) had no comorbidities and 189 (13.1%) of them died.Pregnancy (OR 8.03),pneumonia (OR 8.91),dyspnea (OR 3.95),central nervous system (CNS) symptom (OR 1.55),higher APACHE (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation) Ⅱ score (OR 1.06),Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (OR 1.002),and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level (OR 1.001) were independent risk factors for death among adults without chronic medical conditions.Higher APACHE Ⅱ score (OR 1.08) and age (OR 1.06) were independent risk factors for death among adults with respiratory diseases.A multivariate analysis showed an association between mortality and CNS symptoms (OR 2.66),higher APACHE Ⅱ score (OR 1.03),ALT (OR 1.006),and LDH level (OR 1.002) in patients with cardiovascular diseases.Dyspnea (OR 11.32) was an independent risk factor for patient death in patients with diabetes mellitus.Conclusion Clinical knowledge of identified prognostic factors for mortality

  17. [Children hospitalized with influenza A H1N1. The field of private care during the pandemic in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Leboreiro, José; Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique; Marín-Romero, Margarito; Bernárdez-Zapata, Isabel; Del Carmen López-Enríquez, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la pandemia de influenza A H1N1 en México generó gran preocupación por su potencial alta letalidad. El objetivo de esta investigación fue analizar las características y evolución de los pacientes pediátricos atendidos en un hospital privado. Métodos: se incluyeron todos los casos hospitalizados de abril de 2009 a marzo de 2010 con diagnóstico confirmado de influenza A H1N1 por medio de RT-PCR. Se analizaron los datos clínicos, radiológicos y tratamiento de los pacientes. Se determinaron días de estancia, muerte y necesidad de cuidados intensivos. Resultados: fueron hospitalizados 50 niños, 15 menores de tres años de edad (30 %), 23 de tres a cinco años (46 %) y 12 mayores de cinco años (24 %). Ninguno ameritó cuidados en terapia intensiva y no hubo defunciones; 86 % ingresó por fiebre y 40 % con dificultad respiratoria de leve a moderada. En 10 hubo evidencia radiológica de neumonía intersticial, en cuatro de condensación pulmonar y en seis de obstrucción aérea. Todos fueron tratados con oseltamivir y cuatro con antibióticos. La estancia media hospitalaria fue de 48 horas. Todos se egresaron sin complicaciones. Conclusiones: la evolución de los pacientes hospitalizados fue benigna.

  18. The response of the Liguria Region (Italy) to the pandemic influenza virus A/H1N1sv.

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    Amicizia, D; Cremonesi, I; Carloni, R; Schiaffino, S

    2011-09-01

    Influenza is a cause of acute respiratory disease. It has a typical epidemic nature during the winter season, but may also assume a pandemic pattern when a completely new virus spreads among humans. Influenza places a heavy economic and healthcare burden on both the National Health Service and society. During the 2009/2010 influenza pandemic season, the Liguria Region drew upon the specific skills of the various sectors of the Department of Health and Social Services. In collaboration with the Department of Health Sciences of the University of Genova, the Regional Health Agency (RHA) and other public organizations, steps were taken to address the issues of technical and scientific updating and the coordination of all the departments of Local Healthcare Units in Liguria. The main activities conducted at the regional level provided an adequate response to the influenza pandemic. These activities focused on Local and National Influenza Surveillance Systems, the regional Pandemic Plan, vaccination strategies for seasonal and pandemic influenza, and the communication of data from monitoring programs (sentinel physicians--syndromic surveillance). The prevention of influenza transmission and containment of epidemics and pandemics require effective communication strategies that should target the whole population.

  19. Low acceptability of A/H1N1 pandemic vaccination in French adult population: did public health policy fuel public dissonance?

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    Michaël Schwarzinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In July 2009, French public health authorities embarked in a mass vaccination campaign against A/H1N1 2009 pandemic-influenza. We explored the attitudes and behaviors of the general population toward pandemic vaccination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a cross-sectional online survey among 2,253 French representative adults aged 18 to 64 from November 17 to 25, 2009 (completion rate: 93.8%. The main outcome was the acceptability of A/H1N1 vaccination as defined by previous receipt or intention to get vaccinated ("Yes, certainly", "Yes, probably". Overall 17.0% (CI 95%, 15.5% to 18.7% of respondents accepted A/H1N1 vaccination. Independent factors associated with acceptability included: male sex (p = .0001; older age (p = .002; highest or lowest level of education (p = .016; non-clerical occupation (p = .011; having only one child (p = .008; and having received seasonal flu vaccination in prior 3 years (p<.0001. Acceptability was also significantly higher among pregnant women (37.9% and other at risk groups with chronic diseases (34.8% (p = .002. Only 35.5% of respondents perceived A/H1N1 influenza illness as a severe disease and 12.7% had experienced A/H1N1 cases in their close relationships with higher acceptability (p<.0001 and p = .006, respectively. In comparison to 26.0% respondents who did not consult their primary care physician, acceptability was significantly higher among 8.0% respondents who were formally advised to get vaccinated, and lower among 63.7% respondents who were not advised to get vaccinated (respectively: 15.8%, 59.5% and 11.7%- p<.0001. Among respondents who refused vaccination, 71.2% expressed concerns about vaccine safety. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our survey occurred one week before the peak of the pandemic in France. We found that alarming public health messages aiming at increasing the perception of risk severity were counteracted by daily personal experience which did not confirm the threat

  20. Pandemic H1N1 in Canada and the use of evidence in developing public health policies--a policy analysis.

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    Rosella, Laura C; Wilson, Kumanan; Crowcroft, Natasha S; Chu, Anna; Upshur, Ross; Willison, Donald; Deeks, Shelley L; Schwartz, Brian; Tustin, Jordan; Sider, Doug; Goel, Vivek

    2013-04-01

    When responding to a novel infectious disease outbreak, policies are set under time constraints and uncertainty which can limit the ability to control the outbreak and result in unintended consequences including lack of public confidence. The H1N1 pandemic highlighted challenges in public health decision-making during a public health emergency. Understanding this process to identify barriers and modifiable influences is important to improve the response to future emergencies. The purpose of this study is to examine the H1N1 pandemic decision-making process in Canada with an emphasis on the use of evidence for public health decisions. Using semi-structured key informant interviews conducted after the pandemic (July-November 2010) and a document analysis, we examined four highly debated pandemic policies: use of adjuvanted vaccine by pregnant women, vaccine priority groups and sequencing, school closures and personal protective equipment. Data were analysed for thematic content guided by Lomas' policy decision-making framework as well as indicative coding using iterative methods. We interviewed 40 public health officials and scientific advisors across Canada and reviewed 76 pandemic policy documents. Our analysis revealed that pandemic pre-planning resulted in strong beliefs, which defined the decision-making process. Existing ideological perspectives of evidence strongly influenced how information was used such that the same evidentiary sources were interpreted differently according to the ideological perspective. Participants recognized that current models for public health decision-making failed to make explicit the roles of scientific evidence in relation to contextual factors. Conflict avoidance theory explained policy decisions that went against the prevailing evidence. Clarification of roles and responsibilities within the public health system would reduce duplication and maintain credibility. A more transparent and iterative approach to incorporating evidence

  1. Event-based biosurveillance of respiratory disease in Mexico, 2007-2009: connection to the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic?

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    Nelson, N P; Brownstein, J S; Hartley, D M

    2010-07-29

    The emergence of the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus in North America and its subsequent global spread highlights the public health need for early warning of infectious disease outbreaks. Event-based biosurveillance, based on local- and regional-level Internet media reports, is one approach to early warning as well as to situational awareness. This study analyses media reports in Mexico collected by the Argus biosurveillance system between 1 October 2007 and 31 May 2009. Results from Mexico are compared with the United States and Canadian media reports obtained from the HealthMap system. A significant increase in reporting frequency of respiratory disease in Mexico during the 2008-9 influenza season relative to that of 2007-8 was observed (p<0.0001). The timing of events, based on media reports, suggests that respiratory disease was prevalent in parts of Mexico, and was reported as unusual, much earlier than the microbiological identification of the pandemic virus. Such observations suggest that abnormal respiratory disease frequency and severity was occurring in Mexico throughout the winter of 2008-2009, though its connection to the emergence of the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus remains unclear.

  2. Geographic trends and spread of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in the metropolitan areas of Japan studied from the national sentinel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaida, Shinako; Yasui, Yoshinori; Tada, Yuki; Taniguchi, Kiyosu; Okabe, Nobuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The identification of geographic trends of an influenza pandemic is important for analyzing its social epidemic factors. We performed spatiotemporal analyses focusing on the metropolitan areas in Japan by using the influenza-like illness (ILI) sentinel surveillance data for the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal influenza. The epidemic curves and spread features expressed by the kriging method of geographic information system (GIS) and correlations between reported cases and demographic data were analyzed. The incidence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 increased gradually at the beginning and showed more sporadic epidemic features compared to seasonal influenza. However, there were coincidental locations of patient clusters affected by the seasonal influenza, with a significant coefficient for the total sentinel reported cases (r = 0.71, P < 0.01). This suggested similar patterns of the epidemic over seasons. Patient clusters tended to be located in suburban areas, and there seemed to be stronger relationships between epidemics and higher ratio of larger families (with r = 0.26-0.35, P < 0.01, between ratio of families having more than 3 members and total reported cases in Tokyo and Nagoya areas). Whether populous areas had a greater probability of maintaining the epidemic patterns needs to be determined. Nonetheless, the patterns found in this study can be useful for further analyses for epidemic modeling and designing relevant controls.

  3. Vaccination for 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A did not induce conserved epitope-specific memory CD8 T cell responses in HIV+ northern Thai children.

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    Chawansuntati, Kriangkrai; Aurpibul, Linda; Wipasa, Jiraprapa

    2015-09-11

    The influenza virus causes severe illness in susceptible populations, including children and people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Here, we investigated cell-mediated immune responses (CMI) against influenza CD8 T cell conserved epitopes in HIV-infected (HIV+) northern Thai children following the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A vaccination. Sixty HIV+ children were vaccinated with two doses of the 2009 pandemic influenza vaccine and their CD8T cell responses were assessed. We found no significant differences in the increase of cytokines-producing and CD107a-expressing CD8+ T cells or CD8+ memory T cells in response to pooled conserved epitopes stimulation in vitro between children with different serologic responses to the vaccine at all time points of the study. Our results suggest that the 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine did not induce the conserved epitope-specific immune responses in HIV+ children. Vaccine design and vaccination strategy against influenza in these populations warrant further studies.

  4. Assessment of border control measures and community containment measures used in Japan during the early stages of Pandemic (H1N1 2009.

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    Hiroko Sakaguchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the early stages of Pandemic (H1N1 2009, border control measures were taken by quarantine stations to block the entry of infected individuals into Japan and community containment measures were implemented to prevent the spreading. The objectives of this study were to describe these measures and the characteristics of infected individuals, and to assess the measures' effectiveness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Border control and community containment measures implemented from April to June (Period I: April 28-May 21, Period II: May 22-June 18 2009 were described. Number of individuals identified and disease characteristics were analyzed. For entry screening, a health declaration form and an infrared thermoscanner were used to detect symptomatic passengers. Passengers indicated for the rapid influenza test underwent the test followed by RT-PCR. Patients positive for H1N1 were isolated, and close contacts were quarantined. Entry cards were handed out to all asymptomatic passengers informing them about how to contact a health center in case they developed symptoms. Nine individuals were identified by entry screening and 1 during quarantine to have Pandemic (H1N1 2009. Health monitoring by health centers was performed in period I for passengers arriving from affected countries and in period II for those who had come into contact with the individuals identified by entry screening. Health monitoring identified 3 infected individuals among 129,546 in Period I and 5 among 746 in Period II. Enhanced surveillance, which included mandatory reporting of details of the infected individuals, identified 812 individuals, 141 (18% of whom had a history of international travel. Twenty-four of these 141 passengers picked up by enhanced surveillance had been developing symptoms on entry and were missed at screening. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Symptomatic passengers were detected by the various entry screening measures put in place. Enhanced

  5. Protection against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus infection in cynomolgus monkeys by an inactivated H5N1 whole particle vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Misako; Shichinohe, Shintaro; Itoh, Yasushi; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Kitano, Mitsutaka; Arikata, Masahiko; Pham, Van Loi; Ishida, Hideaki; Kitagawa, Naoko; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Ichikawa, Takaya; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Le, Quynh Mai; Ito, Mutsumi; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi; Ogasawara, Kazumasa

    2013-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) infection has been reported in poultry and humans with expanding clade designations. Therefore, a vaccine that induces immunity against a broad spectrum of H5N1 viruses is preferable for pandemic preparedness. We established a second H5N1 vaccine candidate, A/duck/Hokkaido/Vac-3/2007 (Vac-3), in our virus library and examined the efficacy of inactivated whole particles of this strain against two clades of H5N1 HPAIV strains that caused severe morbidity in cynomolgus macaques. Virus propagation in vaccinated macaques infected with either of the H5N1 HPAIV strains was prevented compared with that in unvaccinated macaques. This vaccine also prevented propagation of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in macaques. In the vaccinated macaques, neutralization activity, which was mainly shown by anti-hemagglutinin antibody, against H5N1 HPAIVs in plasma was detected, but that against H1N1 virus was not detected. However, neuraminidase inhibition activity in plasma and T-lymphocyte responses in lymph nodes against H1N1 virus were detected. Therefore, cross-clade and heterosubtypic protective immunity in macaques consisted of humoral and cellular immunity induced by vaccination with Vac-3.

  6. Correlation between emergency room visits for influenza-like illness during the influenza A (H1/N1) pandemic in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénet, Thomas; Cassier, Pierre; Voirin, Nicolas; Morélon-Daum, Sophie; Floret, Daniel; Gillet, Yves; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; Vanhems, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Surveillance of incident influenza-like illness (ILI) was implemented in two children and adult medical emergency departments during the influenza A (H1/N1) pandemic to assess correlations in the daily number of ILI-related emergency room visits (ERV) between these departments. A total of 7165 ILIs in children and 610 ILIs in adults were observed. We noticed a high linear correlation between the number of ERV involving ILI on day D in the pediatric department and the number of ERV because of ILI 2 days later in adults (R = 0·82, P ILI-related ERV might be anticipated based on the rate of pediatric ERV.

  7. Viral shedding duration of pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus during an elementary school outbreak--Pennsylvania, May-June 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Achuyt; Villanueva, Julie; Palekar, Rakhee S; Fagan, Ryan; Sessions, Wendy; Winter, Jörn; Berman, Lashondra; Lute, James; Leap, Rebecca; Marchbanks, Tiffany; Sodha, Samir V; Moll, Mària; Xu, Xiyan; Fry, Alicia; Fiore, Anthony; Ostroff, Stephen; Swerdlow, David L

    2011-01-01

    We report shedding duration of 2009 pandemic influenza A (pH1N1) virus from a school-associated outbreak in Pennsylvania during May through June 2009. Outbreak-associated students or household contacts with influenza-like illness (ILI) onset within 7 days of interview were recruited. Nasopharyngeal specimens, collected every 48 hours until 2 consecutive nonpositive tests, underwent real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and culture for pH1N1 virus. Culture-positive specimens underwent virus titrations. Twenty-six (median age, 8 years) rRT-PCR-positive persons, for pH1N1 virus, were included in analysis. Median shedding duration from fever onset by rRT-PCR was 6 days (range, 1-13) and 5 days (range, 1-7) by culture. Following fever resolution virus was isolated for a median of 2 days (range, 0-5). Highest and lowest virus titers detected, 2 and 5 days following fever onset, were 3.2 and 1.2 log(10) TCID(50)/mL respectively. Overall, shedding duration in children and adults were similar to seasonal influenza viruses.

  8. Viral Etiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations during the A/H1N1pdm09 Pandemic and Postpandemic Period

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    Ivan Sanz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections are one of the main causes of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE-COPD. Emergence of A/H1N1pdm influenza virus in the 2009 pandemic changed the viral etiology of exacerbations that were reported before the pandemic. The aim of this study was to describe the etiology of respiratory viruses in 195 Spanish patients affected by AE-COPD from the pandemic until the 2011-12 influenza epidemic. During the study period (2009–2012, respiratory viruses were identified in 48.7% of samples, and the proportion of viral detections in AE-COPD was higher in patients aged 30–64 years than ≥65 years. Influenza A viruses were the pathogens most often detected during the pandemic and the following two influenza epidemics in contradistinction to human rhino/enteroviruses that were the main viruses causing AE-COPD before the pandemic. The probability of influenza virus detection was 2.78-fold higher in patients who are 30–64 years old than those ≥65. Most respiratory samples were obtained during the pandemic, but the influenza detection rate was higher during the 2011-12 epidemic. There is a need for more accurate AE-COPD diagnosis, emphasizing the role of respiratory viruses. Furthermore, diagnosis requires increased attention to patient age and the characteristics of each influenza epidemic.

  9. Evaluating Syndromic surveillance systems at institutions of higher education (IHEs: A retrospective analysis of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic at two universities

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    May Larissa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Syndromic surveillance has been widely adopted as a real-time monitoring tool for timely response to disease outbreaks. During the second wave of the pH1N1 pandemic in Fall 2009, two major universities in Washington, DC collected data that were potentially indicative of influenza-like illness (ILI cases in students and staff. In this study, our objectives were three-fold. The primary goal of this study was to characterize the impact of pH1N1 on the campuses as clearly as possible given the data available and their likely biases. In addition, we sought to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the data series themselves, in order to inform these two universities and other institutions of higher education (IHEs about real-time surveillance systems that are likely to provide the most utility in future outbreaks (at least to the extent that it is possible to generalize from this analysis. Methods We collected a wide variety of data that covered both student ILI cases reported to medical and non-medical staff, employee absenteeism, and hygiene supply distribution records (from University A only. Communication data were retrieved from university broadcasts, university preparedness websites, and H1N1-related on campus media reports. Regional data based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Outpatient Influenza-like Illness Surveillance Network (CDC ILINet surveillance network, American College Health Association (ACHA pandemic influenza surveillance data, and local Google Flu Trends were used as external data sets. We employed a "triangulation" approach for data analysis in which multiple contemporary data sources are compared to identify time patterns that are likely to reflect biases as well as those that are more likely to be indicative of actual infection rates. Results Medical personnel observed an early peak at both universities immediately after school began in early September and a second peak in early November

  10. Guillain-Barre syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 vaccines: a multinational self-controlled case series in Europe.

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    Silvana Romio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1pdm09 immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following influenza A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination. METHODS: A self-controlled case series (SCCS analysis was performed in Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Information was collected according to a common protocol and standardised procedures. Cases classified at levels 1-4a of the Brighton Collaboration case definition were included. The risk window was 42 days starting the day after vaccination. Conditional Poisson regression and pooled random effects models estimated adjusted relative incidences (RI. Pseudo likelihood and vaccinated-only methods addressed the potential contraindication for vaccination following GBS. RESULTS: Three hundred and three (303 GBS and Miller Fisher syndrome cases were included. Ninety-nine (99 were exposed to A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination, which was most frequently adjuvanted (Pandemrix and Focetria. The unadjusted pooled RI for A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination and GBS was 3.5 (95% Confidence Interval (CI: 2.2-5.5, based on all countries. This lowered to 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2-3.1 after adjustment for calendartime and to 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1-3.2 when we accounted for contra-indications. In a subset (Netherlands, Norway, and United Kingdom we further adjusted for other confounders and there the RI decreased from 1.7 (adjusted for calendar month to 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7-2.8, which is the main finding. CONCLUSION: This study illustrates the potential of conducting European collaborative vaccine safety studies. The main, fully adjusted analysis, showed that the RI of GBS was not significantly elevated after influenza A(H1N1pdm09 vaccination (RI = 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7-2.8. Based on the upper limits of the pooled estimate we can rule out with

  11. Clinical features and risk factors for severe and critical pregnant women with 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza infection in China

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    Zhang Peng-jun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1 influenza posed an increased risk of severe illness among pregnant women. Data on risk factors associated with death of pregnant women and neonates with pH1N1 infections are limited outside of developed countries. Methods Retrospective observational study in 394 severe or critical pregnant women admitted to a hospital with pH1N1 influenza from Sep. 1, 2009 to Dec. 31, 2009. rRT-PCR testing was used to confirm infection. In-hospital mortality was the primary endpoint of this study. Univariable logistic analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to investigate the potential factors on admission that might be associated with the maternal and neonatal mortality. Results 394 pregnant women were included, 286 were infected with pH1N1 in the third trimester. 351 had pneumonia, and 77 died. A PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 200 (odds ratio (OR, 27.16; 95% confidence interval (CI, 2.64-279.70 and higher BMI (i.e. ≥ 30 on admission (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.47 were independent risk factors for maternal death. Of 211 deliveries, 146 neonates survived. Premature delivery (OR, 4.17; 95% CI, 1.19-14.56 was associated neonatal mortality. Among 186 patients who received mechanical ventilation, 83 patients were treated with non-invasive ventilation (NIV and 38 were successful with NIV. The death rate was lower among patients who initially received NIV than those who were initially intubated (24/83, 28.9% vs 43/87, 49.4%; p = 0.006. Septic shock was an independent risk factor for failure of NIV. Conclusions Severe hypoxemia and higher BMI on admission were associated with adverse outcomes for pregnant women. Preterm delivery was a risk factor for neonatal death among pregnant women with pH1N1 influenza infection. NIV may be useful in selected pregnant women without septic shock.

  12. Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Adjuvanted Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Vaccines: A Multinational Self-Controlled Case Series in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, Jeanne P.; Olberg, Henning K.; de Vries, Corinne S.; Sammon, Cormac; Andrews, Nick; Svanström, Henrik; Mølgaard-Nielsen, Ditte; Hviid, Anders; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Sommet, Agnès; Saussier, Christel; Castot, Anne; Heijbel, Harald; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Sparen, Par; Mosseveld, Mees; Schuemie, Martijn; van der Maas, Nicoline; Jacobs, Bart C.; Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi; Storsaeter, Jann; Johansen, Kari; Kramarz, Piotr; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Sturkenboom, Miriam C. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09) immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. Methods A self-controlled case series (SCCS) analysis was performed in Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Information was collected according to a common protocol and standardised procedures. Cases classified at levels 1–4a of the Brighton Collaboration case definition were included. The risk window was 42 days starting the day after vaccination. Conditional Poisson regression and pooled random effects models estimated adjusted relative incidences (RI). Pseudo likelihood and vaccinated-only methods addressed the potential contraindication for vaccination following GBS. Results Three hundred and three (303) GBS and Miller Fisher syndrome cases were included. Ninety-nine (99) were exposed to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination, which was most frequently adjuvanted (Pandemrix and Focetria). The unadjusted pooled RI for A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and GBS was 3.5 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.2–5.5), based on all countries. This lowered to 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2–3.1) after adjustment for calendartime and to 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1–3.2) when we accounted for contra-indications. In a subset (Netherlands, Norway, and United Kingdom) we further adjusted for other confounders and there the RI decreased from 1.7 (adjusted for calendar month) to 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7–2.8), which is the main finding. Conclusion This study illustrates the potential of conducting European collaborative vaccine safety studies. The main, fully adjusted analysis, showed that the RI of GBS was not significantly elevated after influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination (RI = 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7–2.8). Based on the upper limits of the pooled estimate we can rule

  13. Phenotypic differences in virulence and immune response in closely related clinical isolates of influenza A 2009 H1N1 pandemic viruses in mice.

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    Jeremy V Camp

    Full Text Available To capture the possible genotypic and phenotypic differences of the 2009 influenza A virus H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm strains circulating in adult hospitalized patients, we isolated and sequenced nine H1N1pdm viruses from patients hospitalized during 2009-2010 with severe influenza pneumonia in Kentucky. Each viral isolate was characterized in mice along with two additional H1N1 pandemic strains and one seasonal strain to assess replication and virulence. All isolates showed similar levels of replication in nasal turbinates and lung, but varied in their ability to cause morbidity. Further differences were identified in cytokine and chemokine responses. IL-6 and KC were expressed early in mice infected with strains associated with higher virulence. Strains that showed lower pathogenicity in mice had greater IFNγ, MIG, and IL-10 responses. A principal component analysis (PCA of the cytokine and chemokine profiles revealed 4 immune response phenotypes that correlated with the severity of disease. A/KY/180/10, which showed the greatest virulence with a rapid onset of disease progression, was compared in additional studies with A/KY/136/09, which showed low virulence in mice. Analyses comparing a low (KY/136 versus a high (KY/180 virulent isolate showed a significant difference in the kinetics of infection within the lower respiratory tract and immune responses. Notably by 4 DPI, virus titers within the lung, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf, and cells within the BAL (BALc revealed that the KY/136 replicated in BALc, while KY/180 replication persisted in lungs and BALc. In summary, our studies suggest four phenotypic groups based on immune responses that result in different virulence outcomes in H1N1pdm isolates with a high degree of genetic similarity. In vitro studies with two of these isolates suggested that the more virulent isolate, KY/180, replicates productively in macrophages and this may be a key determinant in tipping the response toward a

  14. ADHERENCE TO INFLUENZA VACCINATION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS DURING AND AFTER INFLUENZA A (H1N1) PANDEMIC.

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    Paula, Stéfano Ivani de; Paula, Gustavo Ivani de; Cunegundes, Kelly Simone Almeida; Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel de

    2016-11-03

    This study evaluated the adherence to influenza vaccination among medical students in 2010 and 2011. From August to December 2011, a questionnaire was used to record the influenza vaccination in 2010 and 2011, reasons for acceptance of the influenza vaccine and knowledge of healthcare workers about the influenza vaccine recommendation. One hundred and forty-four students from the 2ndto the 6th years of the medical school were interviewed. A great adherence to pandemic influenza vaccine was noted in 2010, (91% of the students), with "self-protection" being the most common reason cited for vaccination. Other determinants for the vaccination during pandemic were "convenient access to vaccine" and "encouragement by peers and teachers in workplaces and at the university". However, there was a great decay in the acceptance to vaccine in the next influenza season (2011). Only 42% of the students received the vaccine. They claimed "lack of time" and "have forgotten to take the vaccine" as the main reasons. The "knowledge on the recommendation of influenza vaccine to healthcare workers" increased when the students come to attend the last year of the medical school, but that was an insufficient motivator for vaccination. Strategies to increase vaccination should be based on the abovementioned aspects for the adoption of effective measures in both, pandemic and seasonal periods.

  15. Time trend and predictors of lab positivity among suspected cases in the post pandemic phase of H1N1: An observation from a tertiary care hospital, South India

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    Sitanshu Sekhar Kar; Kalaiselvi Selvaraj; Archana Ramalingam; Gautam Roy

    2016-01-01

    Background WHO declared Influenza A H1N1 to have entered the post pandemic phase on August 10, 2010. Continued surveillance activities are recommended in the post pandemic phase to watch over the trend, severity and impact of Influenza like illnesses (ILI). Aims This study aimed to document the epidemiological profile of lab positive H1N1 cases in post pandemic period from August 2010-December 2014 in nodal H1N1 surveillance centre of Puducherry. Methods The study analysed seco...

  16. Economic Evaluation of Health Services Costs During Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 Pdm09 Infection in Pregnant and Non-Preg¬nant Women in Spain

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    María MORALES-SUÁREZ-VARELA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The healthcare and socio-economic burden resulting from influenza A (H1N1 pdm09 in Spain was considerable. Our aim was to estimate and compare the management (resource utilization and economic healthcare impact in an at-risk group of unvaccinated pregnant women with an unvaccinated group of non-pregnant woman of childbearing age (15-44 yr old.Methods: We addressed this question with a longitudinal, observational, multicentre study. Inputs were the requirements in managing both groups of women. Outcome measures were healthcare costs. Direct healthcare (including medical utilisation, prescriptions of antivirals, medication, diagnostic tests, and hospitalisation costs and indirect (productivity loss costs were considered. Unit of cost was attributed to the frequency of health service resources utilisation. The mean cost per patient was calculated in this group of women.Results: We found that the influenza clinical pattern was worse in non-pregnant women as they had a high medical risk of 20.4% versus 6.1% of pregnant women. Non-pregnant required more antipyretics and antibiotics, and needed more health service resource utilisation (338 medical visits in non-pregnant women vs. 42 in pregnant women. The total cost of non-pregnant women was higher (€4,689.4/non-pregnant and €2,945.07/pregnant.Conclusions: Cost per (H1N1 pdm09 was lower for pregnant women, probably due to more preventive measures adopted for their protection in Spain. The highest costs were incurred by hospitalisations/day and work absenteeism for non-pregnant than for pregnant women. These data will allow better future pandemic influenza planning. Keywords: Pandemic influenza A (H1N1, Costs, Health services, Pregnant women, Spain

  17. Molecular findings from influenza A(H1N1pdm09 detected in patients from a Brazilian equatorial region during the pandemic period

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    Maria José Couto Oliveira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available After the World Health Organization officially declared the end of the first pandemic of the XXI century in August 2010, the influenza A(H1N1pdm09 virus has been disseminated in the human population. In spite of its sustained circulation, very little on phylogenetic data or oseltamivir (OST resistance is available for the virus in equatorial regions of South America. In order to shed more light on this topic, we analysed the haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of influenza A(H1N1pdm09 positive samples collected during the pandemic period in the Pernambuco (PE, a northeastern Brazilian state. Complete HA sequences were compared and amino acid changes were related to clinical outcome. In addition, the H275Y substitution in NA, associated with OST resistance, was investigated by pyrosequencing. Samples from PE were grouped in phylogenetic clades 6 and 7, being clustered together with sequences from South and Southeast Brazil. The D222N/G HA gene mutation, associated with severity, was found in one deceased patient that was pregnant. Additionally, the HA mutation K308E, which appeared in Brazil in 2010 and was only detected worldwide the following year, was identified in samples from hospitalised cases. The resistance marker H275Y was not identified in samples tested. However, broader studies are needed to establish the real frequency of resistance in this Brazilian region.

  18. A Meta-analysis of Point-of-care Laboratory Tests in the Diagnosis of Novel 2009 Swine-lineage Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1)

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    Babin, Steven M.; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Rothman, Richard E.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews fourteen published studies describing performance characteristics, including sensitivity and specificity, of commercially-available rapid, point-of-care (POC) influenza tests in patients affected by an outbreak of a novel swine-related influenza A (H1N1) that was declared a pandemic in 2009. Although these POC tests weren’t intended to be specific for this pandemic influenza strain, the non-specialized skills required and the timeliness of results make these POC tests potentially valuable for clinical and public health use. Pooled sensitivity and specificity for the POC tests studied were 68% and 81%, respectively, but published values were not homogeneous with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 10–88% and 51–100%, respectively. Pooled positive and negative likelihood ratios were 5.94 and 0.42, respectively. These results support current recommendations for use of rapid POC tests when H1N1 is suspected, recognizing that positive results are more reliable than negative results in determining infection, especially when disease prevalence is high. PMID:21396538

  19. Vaccination against the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) among healthcare workers in the major teaching hospital of Sicily (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodio, Emanuele; Anastasi, Giovanna; Marsala, Maria Grazia Laura; Torregrossa, Maria Valeria; Romano, Nino; Firenze, Alberto

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate factors involved in vaccination acceptance among healthcare workers (HCWs) and adverse reactions rates associated with pandemic influenza vaccination. The study was carried out in the major teaching hospital of Sicily from November 2009 to February 2010 on 2267 HCWs. A total of 407 (18%) HCWs were vaccinated against the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1). A logistic regression analysis indicates an increased risk of non-vaccination against pandemic influenza in females (OR=1.6; 95% CI=1.3-2.1) compared to males, in nurses/technicians/administrative workers (OR=1.7; 95% CI=1.3-2.2) compared to doctors/biologists, and in HCWs who were non-vaccinated against seasonal influenza in 2008-2009 (OR=4.9; 95% CI=3.7-6.5) compared to vaccinated HCWs. Overall, 302 (74.2%) out of 407 questionnaires distributed to vaccinated HCWs were returned within the observation period. One hundred fifty-two workers (50.3%) experienced at least one adverse reaction (30.1%, local reactions; 6.6% systemic reactions and 13.6% both of them). The most frequent side effect of vaccination was pain at the injection site (43.4%). Twelve (3.9%) out of 302 HCWs stated they experienced influenza-like illness episodes during the follow-up period. The use of an adjuvanted vaccine against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) appears to be an effective and safe preventive strategy, showing a prevalence of both local and systemic adverse reactions not very different from that seen after vaccination with non-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine. Despite this finding, vaccination coverage among HCWs remains very low, suggesting the need to implement educational campaigns directed to groups with lower coverage rates.

  20. Burden of pediatric influenza A virus infection post swine-flu H1N1 pandemic in Egypt

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    Adel Khattab; Malak Shaheen; Terez Kamel; Amel El Faramay; Safaa Abd El Rahman; Dalia Nabil; Mohamed Gouda

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To screen children with influenza like illness or with symptoms of acute respiratory tract infections for influenza A virus infection—post swine flu pandemic era—using rapid influenza diagnostic tests. Methods:During two years (2010&2011), 1 200 children with influenza like illness or acute respiratory tract infections (according to World Health Organization criteria) were recruited. Their ages ranged from 2-60 months. Nasopharyngeal aspirates specimens were collected from all children for rapid influenza A diagnostic test. Results: Influenza A virus rapid test was positive in 47.5%of the children;the majority (89.6%) were presented with lower respiratory tract infections. Respiratory rate and temperature were significantly higher among positive rapid influenza test patients. Conclusions:Influenza A virus infection is still a major cause of respiratory tract infections in Egyptian children. It should be considered in all cases with cough and febrile episodes and influenza like symptoms even post swine flu pandemic.

  1. Systems-level comparison of host responses induced by pandemic and seasonal influenza A H1N1 viruses in primary human type I-like alveolar epithelial cells in vitro

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    Guan Yi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pandemic influenza H1N1 (pdmH1N1 virus causes mild disease in humans but occasionally leads to severe complications and even death, especially in those who are pregnant or have underlying disease. Cytokine responses induced by pdmH1N1 viruses in vitro are comparable to other seasonal influenza viruses suggesting the cytokine dysregulation as seen in H5N1 infection is not a feature of the pdmH1N1 virus. However a comprehensive gene expression profile of pdmH1N1 in relevant primary human cells in vitro has not been reported. Type I alveolar epithelial cells are a key target cell in pdmH1N1 pneumonia. Methods We carried out a comprehensive gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray platform to compare the transcriptomes of primary human alveolar type I-like alveolar epithelial cells infected with pdmH1N1 or seasonal H1N1 virus. Results Overall, we found that most of the genes that induced by the pdmH1N1 were similarly regulated in response to seasonal H1N1 infection with respect to both trend and extent of gene expression. These commonly responsive genes were largely related to the interferon (IFN response. Expression of the type III IFN IL29 was more prominent than the type I IFN IFNβ and a similar pattern of expression of both IFN genes was seen in pdmH1N1 and seasonal H1N1 infection. Genes that were significantly down-regulated in response to seasonal H1N1 but not in response to pdmH1N1 included the zinc finger proteins and small nucleolar RNAs. Gene Ontology (GO and pathway over-representation analysis suggested that these genes were associated with DNA binding and transcription/translation related functions. Conclusions Both seasonal H1N1 and pdmH1N1 trigger similar host responses including IFN-based antiviral responses and cytokine responses. Unlike the avian H5N1 virus, pdmH1N1 virus does not have an intrinsic capacity for cytokine dysregulation. The differences between pdmH1N1 and seasonal H1N1 viruses

  2. 甲型H1N1流感大流行的流行病学概述%An outline of epidemiologic features of influenza A( H1 N1 ) pandemic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国平; 李芙蓉; 刘红; 吴家兵

    2011-01-01

    American and Mexico has reported people infected Influenza A(H1 N1 ) virus in March 2009, then this new influenza virus translated persistently and caused plague outbreak in all the world. This article review epidemiologic feature of this plague and provide basis for prevention and control of influenza in future.%2009年3月美国和墨西哥相继报告人感染甲型H1N1流感病毒,随后这种新型流感病毒在人群中持续传播并引起全球疫情的暴发.本文对这次疫情的流行特征进行分析,为今后流感疫情的防控提供依据.

  3. Serological response to the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus for disease diagnosis and estimating the infection rate in Thai population.

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    Hatairat Lerdsamran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Individuals infected with the 2009 pandemic virus A(H1N1 developed serological response which can be measured by hemagglutination-inhibition (HI and microneutralization (microNT assays. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MicroNT and HI assays for specific antibody to the 2009 pandemic virus were conducted in serum samples collected at the end of the first epidemic wave from various groups of Thai people: laboratory confirmed cases, blood donors and health care workers (HCW in Bangkok and neighboring province, general population in the North and the South, as well as archival sera collected at pre- and post-vaccination from vaccinees who received influenza vaccine of the 2006 season. This study demonstrated that goose erythrocytes yielded comparable HI antibody titer as compared to turkey erythrocytes. In contrast to the standard protocol, our investigation found out the necessity to eliminate nonspecific inhibitor present in the test sera by receptor destroying enzyme (RDE prior to performing microNT assay. The investigation in pre-pandemic serum samples showed that HI antibody was more specific to the 2009 pandemic virus than NT antibody. Based on data from pre-pandemic sera together with those from the laboratory confirmed cases, HI antibody titers ≥ 40 for adults and ≥ 20 for children could be used as the cut-off level to differentiate between the individuals with or without past infection by the 2009 pandemic virus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the cut-off criteria, the infection rates of 7 and 12.8% were estimated in blood donors and HCW, respectively after the first wave of the 2009 influenza pandemic. Among general population, the infection rate of 58.6% was found in children versus 3.1% in adults.

  4. Low clinical burden of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 infection during pregnancy on the island of La Reunion.

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    Patrick Gérardin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pregnant women have been identified as a group at risk, both for respiratory complications than for the admissions to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic (pdm. The purpose of this prospective register-based cohort-study was to characterize the clinical virulence of the pdm (H1N1/09v during pregnancy in La Réunion. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Over a twelve-week pdm wave (13 July to 3 October 2009, 294 pregnant women presented with an influenza-like illness (ILI to one of the three maternity departments of the South Reunion area, Indian Ocean. Out of these, 278 were checked by RT-PCR for influenza viruses (157 positive and 121 negative, of whom, 141 with pdm flu and 132 with ILIs of non pdm origin, 5 untyped. The median body temperature was higher in women experiencing pdm flu than in those with non pdm ILI (38.9 degrees C versus 38.3 degrees C, P<0.0001, without evidence linked to circulating viremia. Oseltamivir was given for 86% of pdm flu cases in a median time inferior than 48 hrs (range 0-7 days. The hospitalization rate for pdm flu was of 60% and not associated with underlying conditions. Six viral pneumonia and fourteen asthma attacks were observed among 84 hospitalized pdm flu cases, of whom, only one led to the ICU for an acute lung injury. No maternal death occurred during the pdm wave. None adverse pregnancy outcome was associated with pdm flu. No congenital birth defect, nor early-onset neonatal influenza infection was attributable to pdm flu exposure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report mitigates substantially the presumed severity of pandemic H1N1/09 influenza infection during pregnancy. The reasons for which the clinical burden of H1N1/09 influenza virus may differ worldwide raise questions about a differential local viral-strain effect and public health preparedness, notably in timely access to special care and antiviral treatments.

  5. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine.

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    Nuriban Valero-Pacheco

    Full Text Available The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs, have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans.

  6. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban; Pérez-Toledo, Marisol; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Valencia, Adriana; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Lara-Puente, Horacio; Espitia, Clara; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura C; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans.

  7. Factors Affecting the Acceptance of Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 Vaccine amongst Essential Service Providers: A Cross Sectional Study

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    Charlotte Roberts

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although mentioned in the UK pandemic plan, essential service providers were not among the priority groups. They may be important targets of future influenza pandemic vaccination campaigns. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional survey among 380 employees from West Midlands police headquarters and 15 operational command units in the West Midlands Area during December 2009–February 2010 to identify factors affecting intention to accept the pandemic influenza A (H1N1 vaccine. One hundred and ninety nine (52.4% employees completed the questionnaire. 39.7% were willing to accept the vaccine. The most common reasons for intention to accept were worry about catching Swine Flu (n = 42, 53.2% and about infecting others (n = 40, 50.6%. The most common reason for declination was worry about side effects (n = 45, 57.0%. The most important factor predicting vaccine uptake was previous receipt of seasonal vaccine (OR 7.9 (95% CI 3.4, 18.5. Employees aged <40 years, males, current smokers, and those who perceived a greater threat and severity of swine flu were also more likely to agree to the vaccine. The findings of this study could be used to improve future pandemic immunization strategies. Targeted education programs should be used to address misconceptions; the single most important factor which might lead to a large improvement in uptake is to allay concern about side effects.

  8. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Valencia, Adriana; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Lara-Puente, Horacio; Espitia, Clara; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura C.; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans. PMID:26919288

  9. Narcolepsy, 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic influenza, and pandemic influenza vaccinations: what is known and unknown about the neurological disorder, the role for autoimmunity, and vaccine adjuvants.

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    Ahmed, S Sohail; Schur, Peter H; MacDonald, Noni E; Steinman, Lawrence

    2014-05-01

    The vaccine safety surveillance system effectively detected a very rare adverse event, narcolepsy, in subjects receiving AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine made using the European inactivation/purification protocol. The reports of increased cases of narcolepsy in non-vaccinated subjects infected with wild A(H1N1) pandemic influenza virus suggest a role for the viral antigen(s) in disease development. However, additional investigations are needed to better understand what factor(s) in wild influenza infection trigger(s) narcolepsy in susceptible hosts. An estimated 31 million doses of European AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine were used in more than 47 countries. The Canadian AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine was used with high coverage in Canada where an estimated 12 million doses were administered. As no similar narcolepsy association has been reported to date with the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine made using the Canadian inactivation/purification protocol, this suggests that the AS03 adjuvant alone may not be responsible for the narcolepsy association. To date, no narcolepsy association has been reported with the MF59®-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine. This review article provides a brief background on narcolepsy, outlines the different types of vaccine preparations including the ones for influenza, reviews the accumulated evidence for the safety of adjuvants, and explores the association between autoimmune diseases and natural infections. It concludes by assimilating the historical observations and recent clinical studies to formulate a feasible hypothesis on why vaccine-associated narcolepsy may not be solely linked to the AS03 adjuvant but more likely be linked to how the specific influenza antigen component of the European AS03-adjuvanted pandemic vaccine was prepared. Careful and long-term epidemiological studies of subjects who developed narcolepsy in association with AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine prepared with

  10. Influenza pandemic (H1N1 2009 activity during summer 2009: Effectiveness of the 2008-9 trivalent vaccine against pandemic influenza in Spain Actividad de la gripe pandémica (H1N1 2009 durante el verano de 2009: Efectividad de la vacuna trivalente 2008-9 frente a la gripe pandémica en España

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    Amparo Larrauri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Spanish influenza surveillance system (SISS maintained its activity during the summer of 2009 to monitor the influenza pandemic. Objectives: To describe pandemic influenza activity from May to September 2009 and to estimate the effectiveness of the 2008-9 seasonal influenza vaccine against laboratory-confirmed pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza. Methods: Data from the SISS were used to identify the trend of pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza outside the influenza season. For the effectiveness study, we compared the vaccination status of notified cases [influenza-like illnesses (ILI laboratory confirmed as pandemic influenza] with that of the test-negative controls. Results: The first laboratory-confirmed case of the pandemic virus was notified in the system in week 20/2009. The ILI rate increased gradually in the study period, exceeding basic activity in week 38. The proportion of pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza viruses detected by the system represented 14% in week 20/2009 and rapidly increased to 90% in week 34. The adjusted vaccine effectiveness of the 2008-9 seasonal vaccine against laboratory-confirmed pandemic influenza was 12% (-30; 41. Conclusions: The SISS became an essential tool for pandemic monitoring in Spain. The improved SISS will provide more accurate information on influenza activity in future seasonal or pandemic waves. Using surveillance data, we could not demonstrate the effectiveness of the seasonal 2008-9 vaccine against laboratory-confirmed pandemic influenza.Introducción: El Sistema de Vigilancia de Gripe en España (SVGE continuó y reforzó su actividad durante el verano de 2009 con el objetivo de vigilar la evolución de la pandemia en España. Objetivos: Describir la actividad de la gripe pandémica en España de mayo a septiembre de 2009 y estimar la efectividad de la vacuna antigripal estacional 2008-2009 frente a casos confirmados de gripe pandémica (H1N1 2009. Métodos: Se utilizaron datos del SVGE para

  11. Protection of pigs against pandemic swine origin H1N1 influenza A virus infection by hemagglutinin- or neuraminidase-expressing attenuated pseudorabies virus recombinants.

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    Klingbeil, Katharina; Lange, Elke; Blohm, Ulrike; Teifke, Jens P; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Fuchs, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Influenza is an important respiratory disease of pigs, and may lead to novel human pathogens like the 2009 pandemic H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus (SoIV). Therefore, improved influenza vaccines for pigs are required. Recently, we demonstrated that single intranasal immunization with a hemagglutinin (HA)-expressing pseudorabies virus recombinant of vaccine strain Bartha (PrV-Ba) protected pigs from H1N1 SoIV challenge (Klingbeil et al., 2014). Now we investigated enhancement of efficacy by prime-boost vaccination and/or intramuscular administration. Furthermore, a novel PrV-Ba recombinant expressing codon-optimized N1 neuraminidase (NA) was included. In vitro replication of this virus was only slightly affected compared to parental virus. Unlike HA, the abundantly expressed NA was efficiently incorporated into PrV particles. Immunization of pigs with the two PrV recombinants, either singly or in combination, induced B cell proliferation and the expected SoIV-specific antibodies, whose titers increased substantially after boost vaccination. After immunization of animals with either PrV recombinant H1N1 SoIV challenge virus replication was significantly reduced compared to PrV-Ba vaccinated or naïve controls. Protective efficacy of HA-expressing PrV was higher than of NA-expressing PrV, and not significantly enhanced by combination. Despite higher serum antibody titers obtained after intramuscular immunization, transmission of challenge virus to naïve contact animals was only prevented after intranasal prime-boost vaccination with HA-expressing PrV-Ba.

  12. Immunization of pigs with an attenuated pseudorabies virus recombinant expressing the haemagglutinin of pandemic swine origin H1N1 influenza A virus.

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    Klingbeil, Katharina; Lange, Elke; Teifke, Jens P; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Fuchs, Walter

    2014-04-01

    Pigs can be severely harmed by influenza, and represent important reservoir hosts, in which new human pathogens such as the recent pandemic swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus can arise by mutation and reassortment of genome segments. To obtain novel, safe influenza vaccines for pigs, and to investigate the antigen-specific immune response, we modified an established live-virus vaccine against Aujeszky's disease of swine, pseudorabies virus (PrV) strain Bartha (PrV-Ba), to serve as vector for the expression of haemagglutinin (HA) of swine-origin H1N1 virus. To facilitate transgene insertion, the genome of PrV-Ba was cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome. HA expression occurred under control of the human or murine cytomegalovirus immediate early promoters (P-HCMV, P-MCMV), but could be substantially enhanced by synthetic introns and adaptation of the codon usage to that of PrV. However, despite abundant expression, the heterologous glycoprotein was not detectably incorporated into mature PrV particles. Replication of HA-expressing PrV in cell culture was only slightly affected compared to that of the parental virus strain. A single immunization of pigs with the PrV vector expressing the codon-optimized HA gene under control of P-MCMV induced high levels of HA-specific antibodies. The vaccinated animals were protected from clinical signs after challenge with a related swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus, and challenge virus shedding was significantly reduced.

  13. Pandemic influenza A (H1N1v infection in pediatric population: a multicenter study in a North-East area of Italy

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    Calistri Arianna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background - Data on clinical presentation, morbidity and mortality of 2009 pandemic influenza virus (H1N1v in paediatric population are still emerging; most of the data so far available came from selected cohorts of children admitted to tertiary care paediatric hospitals. Methods - An observational study involving all the 19 Divisions of Paediatrics of the Veneto Region was conducted with the aim of investigating into the demographic and clinical characteristics, the treatment, the outcome and the risk factors for disease severity of H1N1v infection occurring in children. Results - Two hundred children, median age of 4.15 years (range 0-15 were enrolled from the last week of October till the first week of January 2010 for an overall hospitalization rate of 23/100.000. At least one underlying medical condition was found in 44% of patients. Fever and cough were the most frequent symptoms (93% and 65% respectively. 11 patients (6% were admitted to a PICU and 5 (2.5% required mechanical ventilation. Antiviral therapy was administered in 103 patients (51.5% Death occurred in 2 patients (1%; both had severe prior medical conditions. Pre-existing neurologic diseases (OR 7.82; 95%CI: 1.15-53.34, the presence of hypoxemia (OR 10.47; 95%CI: 2.12-51.70 and anemia (Haemoglobin Conclusions - This observational study in a given area of North-East Italy confirms the rather favourable prognosis of children with influenza A H1N1 (2009. Pre-existing conditions, and which is new, significant anemia, are risk factors for a complicated course.

  14. Surveillance of influenza viruses attacking children in Beijing during 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1)%2009甲型H1N1流感大流行期间北京儿童的流感监测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱汝南; 沙莉; 袁艺; 王菲; 胡凤华; 李杰; 胡岚; 张宝元; 曹玲; 金丽敏; 李娟娟; 钱渊; 王晓颖; 孙宇; 王芳; 邓洁; 赵林清; 曲东; 李颖; 任晓旭

    2010-01-01

    目的 了解2009年甲型H1N1流感大流行期间北京地区儿童中流感流行的情况.方法 采用WHO推荐的实时荧光定量RT-PCR和国家流感中心推荐的分型方法,对2009年甲型H1N1流感大流行期间因流感样症状来首都儿科研究所附属儿童医院就诊患儿的咽拭子标本进行流感病毒核酸检测.结果 2009年6月1日至2010年2月28日期间共检测了4363份咽拭子标本,其中623例为甲型H1N1阳性,阳性率为14.3%,657例为其他甲型流感病毒阳性(15.1%),所有甲型流感病毒的总阳性率为29.3%.623例中有23例为危重症病例(占阳性患者的3.7%),其中5例死亡.618例信息完整的甲型H1N1病例中,患儿年龄为14天~16岁,性别比例为男比女为1.3:1.1~3岁儿童占25.2%,3~6岁学龄前儿童和6~12岁学龄儿童所占比例相近,各约占30%.在监测期间,仅呈现了一个甲型H1N1的流行波.2009年11月达到最高峰,随后减弱,2010年2月快速下降至2.7%.对监测期间每周20~30份临床标本同时进行季节性流感的监测显示,季节性H3N2、甲型H1N1和乙型流感交替流行.呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)在甲型H1N1流行趋势减缓后逐渐流行成为流行优势株.结论 2009年6月至2010年2月北京地区儿童中出现甲型H1N1的流行,主要累及学龄前和学龄儿童.季节性流感和RSV与甲型H1N1交替流行.%Objective To investigate the prevalence of influenza virus infections in infants and young children during the pandemic period of 2009 influenza A(H1N1)in Beijing.Methods Throat swabs were collected from children visited the affiliated Children's Hospital to Capital Institute of Pediatrics for influenza-like illness from June 1,2009 to February 28,2010.The specific gene segments of 2009 pandemic influenza H1N1 and seasonal influenza viruses were amplified from samples by real-time RT-PCR recommended by WHO and National Influenza Reference Center of China.Results Out of 4363 clinical samples tested by real

  15. Transmission and pathogenicity of novel reassortants derived from Eurasian avian-like and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in mice and guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weili; Liu, Qinfang; Sun, Yipeng; Wang, Yu; Gao, Huijie; Liu, Lirong; Qin, Zhihua; He, Qiming; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Wang, Dayan; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun; Chang, Kin-Chow; Shu, Yuelong; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-06-02

    Given the present extensive co-circulation in pigs of Eurasian avian-like (EA) swine H1N1 and 2009 pandemic (pdm/09) H1N1 viruses, reassortment between them is highly plausible but largely uncharacterized. Here, experimentally co-infected pigs with a representative EA virus and a pdm/09 virus yielded 55 novel reassortant viruses that could be categorized into 17 genotypes from Gt1 to Gt17 based on segment segregation. Majority of novel reassortants were isolated from the lower respiratory tract. Most of reassortant viruses were more pathogenic and contagious than the parental EA viruses in mice and guinea pigs. The most transmissible reassortant genotypes demonstrated in guinea pigs (Gt2, Gt3, Gt7, Gt10 and Gt13) were also the most lethal in mice. Notably, nearly all these highly virulent reassortants (all except Gt13) were characterized with possession of EA H1 and full complement of pdm/09 ribonucleoprotein genes. Compositionally, we demonstrated that EA H1-222G contributed to virulence by its ability to bind avian-type sialic acid receptors, and that pdm/09 RNP conferred the most robust polymerase activity to reassortants. The present study revealed high reassortment compatibility between EA and pdm/09 viruses in pigs, which could give rise to progeny reassortant viruses with enhanced virulence and transmissibility in mice and guinea pig models.

  16. A Tale of Many Cities: A Contemporary Historical Study of the Implementation of School Closures during the 2009 pA(H1N1) Influenza Pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, J Alexander; Kohl, Katrin S; Cetron, Martin S; Markel, Howard

    2016-06-01

    Applying qualitative historical methods, we examined the consideration and implementation of school closures as a nonpharmaceutical intervention (NPI) in thirty US cities during the spring 2009 wave of the pA(H1N1) influenza pandemic. We gathered and performed close textual readings of official federal, state, and municipal government documents; media coverage; and academic publications. Lastly, we conducted oral history interviews with public health and education officials in our selected cities. We found that several local health departments pursued school closure plans independent of CDC guidance, that uncertainty of action and the rapidly evolving understanding of pA(H1N1) contributed to tension and pushback from the public, that the media and public perception played a significant role in the response to school closure decisions, and that there were some notable instances of interdepartmental communication breakdown. We conclude that health departments should continue to develop and fine-tune their action plans while also working to develop better communication methods with the public, and work more closely with education officials to better understand the complexities involved in closing schools. Lastly, state and local governments should work to resolve lingering issues of legal authority for school closures in times of public health crises.

  17. Genome wide analysis of narcolepsy in China implicates novel immune loci and reveals changes in association prior to versus after the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Han

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in narcolepsy, an autoimmune disorder affecting hypocretin (orexin neurons and recently associated with H1N1 influenza, have demonstrated significant associations with five loci. Using a well-characterized Chinese cohort, we refined known associations in TRA@ and P2RY11-DNMT1 and identified new associations in the TCR beta (TRB@; rs9648789 max P = 3.7 × 10(-9 OR 0.77, ZNF365 (rs10995245 max P = 1.2 × 10(-11 OR 1.23, and IL10RB-IFNAR1 loci (rs2252931 max P = 2.2 × 10(-9 OR 0.75. Variants in the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA- DQ region were associated with age of onset (rs7744020 P = 7.9×10(-9 beta -1.9 years and varied significantly among cases with onset after the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic compared to previous years (rs9271117 P = 7.8 × 10(-10 OR 0.57. These reflected an association of DQB1*03:01 with earlier onset and decreased DQB1*06:02 homozygosity following 2009. Our results illustrate how genetic association can change in the presence of new environmental challenges and suggest that the monitoring of genetic architecture over time may help reveal the appearance of novel triggers for autoimmune diseases.

  18. Progress of Post-marketing Surveillance on Adverse Events Following Immunization of the Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) Vaccine%甲型H1N1流行性感冒疫苗疑似预防接种异常反应监测进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴冰冰; 刘大卫; 李克莉; 武文娣; 许涤沙; 贾磊

    2011-01-01

    甲型H1N1流行性感冒(甲流)疫苗上市后,疑似预防接种异常反应(Adverse Events Following Immunization,AEFI)监测是评价甲流疫苗安全性的重要方法.文章对各国甲流疫苗的监测概况和监测结果 进行了综述.%Post-marketing surveillance on Adverse Events Following Immunization (AEFI)is crucial for evaluating the safety of vaccines against the pandemic influenza A (H1N1)virus.Progress of postmarketing surveillance of AEFI of the pandemic influenza A(H1N1 )vaccine among countries has been reviewed in this article.

  19. Public debates driven by incomplete scientific data: the cases of evolution theory, global warming and H1N1 pandemic influenza

    CERN Document Server

    Galam, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Public debates driven by incomplete scientific data where nobody can claim absolute certainty, due to current state of scientific knowledge, are studied. The cases of evolution theory, global warming and H1N1 pandemic influenza are investigated. The first two are of controversial impact while the third is more neutral and resolved. To adopt a cautious balanced attitude based on clear but inconclusive data appears to be a lose-out strategy. In contrast overstating arguments with wrong claims which cannot be scientifically refuted appear to be necessary but not sufficient to eventually win a public debate. The underlying key mechanism of these puzzling and unfortunate conclusions are identified using the Galam sequential probabilistic model of opinion dynamics. It reveals that the existence of inflexible agents and their respective proportions are the instrumental parameters to determine the faith of incomplete scientific data public debates. Acting on one's own inflexible proportion modifies the topology of th...

  20. Perception of the A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and acceptance of influenza vaccination by Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 staff: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Sélilah; Djhehiche, Khaled; Zamora, Adeline; Bergeret, Alain; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perception and attitudes of university staff, including medical school and other science specialties, toward the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and influenza vaccination program. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among 4,529 university personnel on October 19-20, 2009. Seven hundred (15%) employees participated in the study. Only 18% were willing to be vaccinated, men more than women (29% versus 9%, P < 0.001), and professors/researchers more than administrative/technical staff (30% vs. 6%, P < 0.001). Intention to be vaccinated was insufficient. Additional efforts are needed to improve information dissemination among university staff. Medical university personnel should receive more information to increase vaccine coverage and protect them as well as patients.

  1. Hemagglutinin 222D/G polymorphism facilitates fast intra-host evolution of pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza A viruses.

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    Nora Seidel

    Full Text Available The amino acid substitution of aspartic acid to glycine in hemagglutinin (HA in position 222 (HA-D222G as well as HA-222D/G polymorphism of pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza viruses (A(H1N1pdm09 were frequently reported in severe influenza in humans and mice. Their impact on viral pathogenicity and the course of influenza has been discussed controversially and the underlying mechanism remained unclarified. In the present study, BALB/c mice, infected with the once mouse lung- and cell-passaged A(H1N1pdm09 isolate A/Jena/5258/09 (mpJena/5258, developed severe pneumonia. From day 2 to 3 or 4 post infection (p.i. symptoms (body weight loss and clinical score continuously worsened. After a short disease stagnation or even recovery phase in most mice, severity of disease further increased on days 6 and 7 p.i. Thereafter, surviving mice recovered. A 45 times higher virus titer maximum in the lung than in the trachea on day 2 p.i. and significantly higher tracheal virus titers compared to lung on day 6 p.i. indicated changes in the organ tropism during infection. Sequence analysis revealed an HA-222D/G polymorphism. HA-D222 and HA-G222 variants co-circulated in lung and trachea. Whereas, HA-D222 variant predominated in the lung, HA-G222 became the major variant in the trachea after day 4 p.i. This was accompanied by lower neutralizing antibody titers and broader receptor recognition including terminal sialic acid α-2,3-linked galactose, which is abundant on mouse trachea epithelial cells. Plaque-purified HA-G222-mpJena/5258 virus induced severe influenza with maximum symptom on day 6 p.i. These results demonstrated for the first time that HA-222D/G quasispecies of A(H1N1pdm09 caused severe biphasic influenza because of fast viral intra-host evolution, which enabled partial antibody escape and minor changes in receptor binding.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF TEST KIT FOR DETECTION OF PANDEMIC STRAIN INFLUENZA VIRUS A (H1N1 2009 BY REAL TIME POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Stepaniuk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses A play an important role in the structure of the incidence of people with acute respiratory viral infection, which make up 90% from all other infectious diseases. According to the World Health Organization, only severe flu worldwide suffer annually 3.5 million, of which 45–60% are children. An economic loss from seasonal flu epidemic is in average about 85% of economic losses from infectious diseases in general. The experience of fighting the flu, accumulated over the years, has shown that to develop and deliver effective preventive measures necessary to build a system of permanent monitoring for influenza virus circulation, based on use of laboratory methods for accurate and rapid dentification and characterization of circulating strains of influenza virus A. Among the methods of laboratory diagnosis of influenza, the most effective is a method of polymerase chain reaction. Data on the evelopment of diagnostic test kits in the format of two-stage multiplex RTPCR-analysis for detection and genotyping of pandemic influenza virus A (H1N12009 are given. The results of laboratory and experimental research of «DIA Influenza H1N1» test system showed that it is effective and specific for detection of California pandemic influenza virus A (H1N12009 strains and can be used to diagnose disease caused by this strain of virus. Clinical trial of the course of the State registration by Ministry of Health of Ukraine have shown sensitivity and specificity of «DIA Influenza H1N1» test systems up to 100%.

  3. 甲型H1N1流行性感冒疫苗接种人群的血清抗体分析%Analysis of serum antibody level in population vaccinated with H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈艺韵; 鲁恩洁; 李铁钢; 蒋力云; 狄飚; 吴新伟

    2012-01-01

    目的:了解接种甲型H1N1流行性感冒(流感)疫苗后,人群中血清抗体的变化情况,为甲型H1N1流感疫苗的接种提供依据.方法:随机采集不同年龄已接种甲型H1N1流感疫苗人群的血清,采用血凝抑制实验检测血清中甲型H1N1流感抗体的血凝抑制滴度(HI滴度),HI滴度≥1:40判定为阳性,同时调查采样对象的甲型H1N1流感疫苗与季节性流感疫苗的接种史.结果:甲型H1N1流感抗体阳性率为57.4%(402份/700份),抗体几何平均滴度(GMT)为1:35.6;甲型H1N1流感抗体阳性率与GMT较高的是10~30岁组人群,较低的是60岁以上的人群;接种甲型H1N1流感疫苗后30~90天,GMT水平达到高峰(1:56);随着季节性流感疫苗接种次数的增多,人群血清中甲型H1N1流感抗体的阳性率与GMT值反而降低.结论:青少年与成人接种甲型H1N1流感疫苗的免疫效果比儿童和老年人的好;甲型H1N1流感疫苗对人群的保护作用能持续90天左右;甲型H1N1流感抗体在0~10岁组,10~30岁组人群中持续的时间比30~60岁,>60岁组人群长;多次接种季节性流感疫苗可能会影响甲型H1N1流感抗体的产生.建议对儿童和老年人开展双倍剂量甲型H1N1流感疫苗接种;甲型H1N1流感疫苗的接种时间最好在流行期前1~3月内,并且应每年接种一次.%Objective:To investigate the change of antibody level in people who were vaccinated with H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine, and to provide advices for the vaccination project. Methods:The serum specimens were collected randomly from people who were vaccinated with H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine and antibody levels were examined by Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. Samples with HI titer≥40 was considered as positive. The information of the vaccination history of H1N1 pandemic influenza and seasonal influenza vaccine was collected. Results:700 serum specimens were collected, 402(57. 4% ) of those were positive, the geometric mean titer(GMT) was 1

  4. 2009年新型甲型H1N1流感病毒血凝素基因进化及变异特征分析%Genetic evolution and variation of hemagglutinin gene of the novel A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus in 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑华; 韩一芳; 谢佳新; 韩磊; 苏彤; 鹿文英; 曹广文

    2009-01-01

    目的 了解自2009年3月新型甲型H1N1流感流行以来,其主要免疫原件基因-HA基因的进化及氨基酸变异特性.方法 从NCBI下载2009年新型甲型H1N1流感病毒以及北美地区、欧洲地区、亚洲地区以往流行的甲型H1N1流感病毒HA基因序列,利用MEGA 4.0软件对所选序列进行基因进化系统发育树分析;对2009年新型甲型H1N1流感病毒HA基因的核苷酸同源性及氨基酸特异性进行分析,并与北美地区、欧洲地区、亚洲地区分离株进行比较.结果 2009年新型甲型HlNl流感病毒HA基因与2006-2007年美国A/swine/H1N1流感病毒同源性最高,核苷酸序列差异为0%~0.8%;与美国各州1930-2007年分离的A/swine/H1N1流感病毒具有明显的时间上的进化关系;与欧洲及亚洲地区A/swine/H1N1流感病毒进化无关.其重要的抗原性位点与A/human/H1N1流感病毒及流感疫苗株存在较大差异.全球流行半年多以来该病毒株没有发生明显变异.结论 2009年新型甲型H1N1流感病毒HA基因是北美A/swine/H1N1流感病毒长期进化的结果,目前尚未发现明显抗原位点的变异.%Objective To elucidate the characteristics of genetic evolution and variation trend of hemagglutinin ( HA). a major antigenic gene of the novel A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus in 2009. Methods HA gene sequences of the novel A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus in 2009, as well as that of the A/H1N1 influenza virus spread in North America, Europe and Asia, were downloaded from NCBI database. MEGA4.0 software was used to analyze the constructed phylogenetic tree of the selected sequences of HA gene. The nucleotide homology and amino acid specificity of the novel A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus in 2009 were analyzed and compared with those in North America, Europe and Asia regions. Results HA gene of the novel A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus in 2009 showed a highest homology (93. 2%-93. 4%) with the corresponding sequences of A/swine/H1N1 influenza

  5. 北京市中小学生甲型H1N1流感感染影响因素的病例对照研究%A case-control study on risk factors of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 ) in primary and secondary school students in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段玮; 杨鹏; 张奕; 刘爽; 刘文婷; 王全意

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨北京市中、小学生甲型H1N1流感感染的相关影响因素.方法采用1∶2病例-对照研究方法,通过问卷调查,在6个区县收集304对病例和对照的个人卫生习惯、疫苗接种史、搭乘交通工具等信息.结果多因素logistic回归结果显示,教室内学生密度,教室通风情况,课间活动范围,打喷嚏后是否洗手,睡眠时间,上学交通方式,接种甲流疫苗和不带病上课与甲型H1N1流感感染有关.结论参加户外活动、加强教室通风、注意手卫生、保证睡眠允足、不乘坐密闭的交通工具、接种甲型H1N1流感疫苗是预防中小学生甲型H1N1流感感染的重要手段.%Objective To explore the risk factors of the students infected with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 ) infectious in primary and secondary schools in Beijing. Methods A 1:2 matched casecontrol study was used to analyze the information of personal hygienic habits, vaccination history, means of transportation etc via standardized questionnaires . 304pairs of cases and controls were collected from 6 districta. Results The following variables were significantly associated with 2009 pandemic influenza ( H1N1 )infection in multivariate factor logistic regression analysis including classroom space per student, classroom ventilation, area of recreation activities, hand washing after sneezing, hours of sleep, means of transportation to school and H1 N1 vaccination. Conclusions Having outdoor activities, maintaining classroom ventilation, hand hygiene and adequate sleep, taking the unsealed vehicles and H1N1 vaccination are important measures to prevent pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection among primary and secondary school students.

  6. Changes and analysis of peripheral white blood cells and lymphocyte subsets for patients with pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1) infection%甲型H1N1流感患者外周血白细胞和淋巴细胞亚群变化分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈威巍; 赵敏; 毛远丽; 谢杨新; 张云辉; 冯艳青; 李伯安; 李波; 洪炜; 刘佳; 马洪滨

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨甲型H1N1流感患者白细胞和淋巴细胞亚群的变化特点,为甲型H1N1流感的诊断、治疗和预后判断提供实验室依据.方法 采用全血细胞分析和流式细胞分析法分别检测59例甲型H1N1流感患者急性期和恢复期的外周血白细胞及淋巴细胞亚群,与43名健康人和24例普通甲型流感患者比较.结果 甲型H1N1流感轻症患者白细胞总数在急性期显著下降,重症患者白细胞总数下降不显著,而中性粒细胞显著升高;与普通甲型流感相似,所有H1N1流感患者淋巴细胞总数、CD3、CD4、CD8百分比和绝对值在急性期大幅度下降,恢复期迅速回升;而重症患者NK和NKT细胞绝对值在急性期下降幅度超过20%.结论 甲型H1N1流感患者白细胞和淋巴细胞亚群变化与普通甲流相似;急性期NK、NKT细胞绝对值的大幅降低可以提示病情重症化倾向.%Objective To investigate the characters and changes of peripheral white blood cells and lymphocyte subsets of patients with pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1 ) infection and to provide evidences for diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of influenza A ( H1N1 ) infection. Methods Peripheral white blood cell parameters and the percentages of lymphocyte subsets in acute and recovery phases of 59 cases of influenza A virus (H1N1) infectious patients (42 mild cases and 17 severe cases)were investigated and analyzed, and compared respectively with those of 43 cases of healthy adults as control (HC) and 24 cases of general influenza A virus (no-H1N1) infectious using whole blood cell analysis and flow cytometry.Results Peripheral white blood cell counts of mild cases decreased greatly but those of severe cases did not decrease significantly; the neutrophils of severe cases increased significantly in acute phase; similar to general influenza A virus (no-H1N1) infectious, the peripheral lymphocytes, CD3, CD4, CD8 and B cells of all patients with influenza A virus (H1N1) infection

  7. 应用CUSUM和EWMA模型探测甲型H1N1流感流行起始的预警研究%Study on early detection of the onset of the epidemic of pandemic H1N1 2009, using CUSUM and EWMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小莉; 张奕; 杨鹏; 钱海坤; 张莉; 田丽丽; 黎新宇; 王全意

    2011-01-01

    Objects To explore the efficiency of Cumulative Sum (CUSUM) and Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA) for detecting the onset of the epidemic of pandemic H1N1 2008.Methods Influenza like-illness (ILI) surveillance data was analyzed to detect the onset week of the epidemic of pandemic H1N1 2009,using the model of CUSUM and EWMA.The results were compared with the gold standard at different combination of parameter values.Results The 41 st week was considered as onset of the epidemic of pandemic H1N1 2009 according to the gold standard based on the results from influenza virologic surveillance data.Both CUSUM and EWMA triggered the signal before the 42nd week.Differences in performances were observed as parameter values changed.Conclusions The parameter values of CUSUM and EWMA had a correlation to their performances.CUSUM and EWMA could be used for detecting the onset of the epidemic of pandemic H1N1 2008.%目的 探讨累计和( CUSUM)和指数加权移动平均(EWMA)模型探测甲型H1 N1流感流行起始的功效.方法 利用北京市2009年流感样病例监测数据,分别采用CUSUM和EWMA模型对数据进行分析,与流感病原学监测数据进行对比,分析了不同参数组合下2种模型探测甲型H1N1流感流行起始的效果.结果 流感病原学监测显示2009年北京市甲型H1N1流感流行的起始时间为第41周,而CUSUM和EWMA模型均能在第42周之前发出预警信号;参数不同,CUSUM和EWMA模型的预警功效亦不同.结论 CUSUM和EWMA模型参数值与其预警功效有关,CUSUM和EWMA模型可用于探测甲型H1N1流感流行的起始.

  8. Using high-throughput sequencing to leverage surveillance of genetic diversity and oseltamivir resistance: a pilot study during the 2009 influenza A(H1N1 pandemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Téllez-Sosa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza viruses display a high mutation rate and complex evolutionary patterns. Next-generation sequencing (NGS has been widely used for qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of genetic diversity in complex biological samples. The "deep sequencing" approach, enabled by the enormous throughput of current NGS platforms, allows the identification of rare genetic viral variants in targeted genetic regions, but is usually limited to a small number of samples. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We designed a proof-of-principle study to test whether redistributing sequencing throughput from a high depth-small sample number towards a low depth-large sample number approach is feasible and contributes to influenza epidemiological surveillance. Using 454-Roche sequencing, we sequenced at a rather low depth, a 307 bp amplicon of the neuraminidase gene of the Influenza A(H1N1 pandemic (A(H1N1pdm virus from cDNA amplicons pooled in 48 barcoded libraries obtained from nasal swab samples of infected patients (n  =  299 taken from May to November, 2009 pandemic period in Mexico. This approach revealed that during the transition from the first (May-July to second wave (September-November of the pandemic, the initial genetic variants were replaced by the N248D mutation in the NA gene, and enabled the establishment of temporal and geographic associations with genetic diversity and the identification of mutations associated with oseltamivir resistance. CONCLUSIONS: NGS sequencing of a short amplicon from the NA gene at low sequencing depth allowed genetic screening of a large number of samples, providing insights to viral genetic diversity dynamics and the identification of genetic variants associated with oseltamivir resistance. Further research is needed to explain the observed replacement of the genetic variants seen during the second wave. As sequencing throughput rises and library multiplexing and automation improves, we foresee that

  9. Non-pharmaceutical interventions during an outbreak of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection at a large public university, April-May 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tarissa; Dee, Deborah L; Phares, Christina R; Lipman, Harvey B; Gould, L Hannah; Kutty, Preeta; Desai, Mitesh; Guh, Alice; Iuliano, A Danielle; Silverman, Paul; Siebold, Joseph; Armstrong, Gregory L; Swerdlow, David L; Massoudi, Mehran S; Fishbein, Daniel B

    2011-01-01

    Nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs), such as home isolation, social distancing, and infection control measures, are recommended by public health agencies as strategies to mitigate transmission during influenza pandemics. However, NPI implementation has rarely been studied in large populations. During an outbreak of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) virus infection at a large public university in April 2009, an online survey was conducted among students, faculty, and staff to assess knowledge of and adherence to university-recommended NPI. Although 3924 (65%) of 6049 student respondents and 1057 (74%) of 1401 faculty respondents reported increased use of self-protective NPI, such as hand washing, only 27 (6.4%) of 423 students and 5 (8.6%) of 58 faculty with acute respiratory infection (ARI) reported staying home while ill. Nearly one-half (46%) of student respondents, including 44.7% of those with ARI, attended social events. Results indicate a need for efforts to increase compliance with home isolation and social distancing measures.

  10. Perceptions of immunization information systems for collecting pandemic H1N1 immunization data within Canada's public health community: A qualitative study

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    Heidebrecht Christine L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunization information systems (IISs are electronic registries used to monitor individual vaccination status and assess vaccine coverage. IISs are currently not widely used across Canada, where health jurisdictions employ a range of approaches to capture influenza immunization information. Conducted in advance of the 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign, the objectives of this study were to understand the perceived value of individual-level data and IISs for influenza control, identify ideal system functions, and explore barriers to implementation. Methods In July and August 2009, semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants engaged in vaccine delivery and/or pandemic planning at regional, provincial/territorial and federal levels across Canada. Key informants were recruited using a combination of convenience and snowball sampling methodologies. Qualitative analysis was used to extract themes from interview content. Results Patient management, assessment of vaccine coverage, and evaluation of safety and effectiveness were identified as public health priorities that would be achieved in a more timely manner, and with greater accuracy, through the use of an IIS. Features described as ideal included system flexibility, rapid data entry, and universality. Financial and human resource constraints as well as coordination between immunization providers were expressed as barriers to implementation. Conclusions IISs were perceived as valuable by key informants for strengthening management capacity and improving evaluation of both seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccination campaigns. However, certain implementation restrictions may need to be overcome for these benefits to be achieved.

  11. National surveillance of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) infection-related admissions to intensive care units during the 2009-10 winter peak in Denmark: two complementary approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gubbels, S; Perner, A; Valentiner-Branth, Palle

    2010-01-01

    Surveillance of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in Denmark was enhanced during the 2009–10 winter season with a system monitoring the burden of the pandemic on intensive care units (ICUs), in order to inform policymakers and detect shortages in ICUs in a timely manner. Between week 46 of 2009...

  12. The immunogenicity of the intradermal injection of seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine containing influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in COPD patients soon after a pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuaychoo, Benjamas; Kositanont, Uraiwan; Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Niyomthong, Parichat; Songserm, Thaweesak; Maranetra, Khun Nanta; Rattanasaengloet, Kanokwan; Nana, Arth

    2016-07-02

    The antibody responses of a reduced-dose intradermal seasonal influenza vaccination have never been studied in COPD patients soon after a pandemic. A total of 149 COPD patients (60 y of age or older) were randomized to receive trivalent influenza vaccine (Sanofi-Pasteur, France) either 9 µg of hemagglutinin (HA) per strain split into 2-site intradermal (ID) injections via the Mantoux technique or one intramuscular (IM) injection of 15 µg of HA per strain. The geometric mean titers, seroconversion factors, seroconversion rates and seroprotection rates for influenza A(H3N2) and B administered through the ID injection (n = 75) were similar to those obtained with the IM injection (n = 74) 4 weeks post-vaccination. The antibody responses for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 administered through the ID injection were lower than those obtained with the IM injection, but all of these responses met the 3 criteria proposed by the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP) for annual re-licensure. The seroprotection rates 4 weeks post-vaccination for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 were 64.0% (95%CI 52.7-74.0%) in the ID group vs. 78.4% (95% CI 67.6-86.3%) in the IM group (p = 0.053). Influenza-related acute respiratory illness (ARI), diagnosed as a 4-fold rise in HI titers with a convalescent titer > 1:40, and/or the RT-PCR between the ID group (5.3%) and the IM group (8.1%) were not significantly different. The reduced-dose intradermal influenza vaccine may expand vaccine coverage in cases of vaccine shortage.

  13. 2009年新型甲型H1N1流感病毒的进化趋势及未来防控中应考虑的问题%Evolutionary trend of the novel A/H1N1 influenza virus in 2009 and the major problems concerning prevention and control of this pandemic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹广文

    2009-01-01

    2009年流行的新型甲型H1N1流感病毒的8个功能基因各自有一定的进化特点,其主要免疫原性基因--血凝素(HA)基因源于北美猪流感病毒.2005年在美国衣阿华(Iowa)州分离的感染人的猪H1N1的HA基因、病毒聚合酶(PB2、PBl和PA)基因、核蛋白基因(NP)和非结构基因(NS)与此次新型甲型HlNl病毒高度同源(同源性超过90%),可能是此次新型甲型H1N1病毒进化过程中的中间步骤.神经氨酸酶(NA)基因源于欧洲H1N1猪流感病毒,基质蛋白(M1和M2)基因来自欧洲H3N2亚型猪流感病毒,两段基因可能在猪体内与Iowa株发生重排而进化成此次新型甲型H1N1病毒.本文分析了新型甲型H1N1流感病毒可能的进化过程,并提出了未来防控工作中需要注意的几个科学问题.%Objective Eight functional fragments of the novel A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus in 2009 had their own evolutionary characteristics. Among them, the hemagglutinin (HA), the major antigenic gene, was originated from swine influenza virus epidemics in North America. The HA gene, polymerase genes (PB2, PB1 and PA), nucleoprotein gene (NP) and nonstructural protein gene (NS) of the virus strain isolated in Iowa of US in 2005 shared close homology (identities more than 90%) with the corresponding sequences of the novel A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus in 2009. The Iowa strain might be an intermediate step of the evolutionary process of this novel A/H1N1 influenza virus. The evolutionary process of the novel A/H1N1 influenza might be realized in pigs re-assorted with the neuraminidase (NA) gene from European swine H1N1 influenza virus and matrix proteins (M1 and M2) genes from European H3N2 swine influenza virus. The present paper presented possible evolutionary processes of the novel A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus in 2009, and pointed out several relevant scientific points which should be emphasized in the prevention and control of the epidemics of the novel A/H1N1 influenza in

  14. Personal decision-making criteria related to seasonal and pandemic A(H1N1 influenza-vaccination acceptance among French healthcare workers.

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    Lila Bouadma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza-vaccination rates among healthcare workers (HCW remain low worldwide, even during the 2009 A(H1N1 pandemic. In France, this vaccination is free but administered on a voluntary basis. We investigated the factors influencing HCW influenza vaccination. METHODS: In June-July 2010, HCW from wards of five French hospitals completed a cross-sectional survey. A multifaceted campaign aimed at improving vaccination coverage in this hospital group was conducted before and during the 2009 pandemic. Using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire, we assessed the relationships between seasonal (SIV and pandemic (PIV influenza vaccinations, and sociodemographic and professional characteristics, previous and current vaccination statuses, and 33 statements investigating 10 sociocognitive domains. The sociocognitive domains describing HCWs' SIV and PIV profiles were analyzed using the classification-and-regression-tree method. RESULTS: Of the HCWs responding to our survey, 1480 were paramedical and 401 were medical with 2009 vaccination rates of 30% and 58% for SIV and 21% and 71% for PIV, respectively (p<0.0001 for both SIV and PIV vaccinations. Older age, prior SIV, working in emergency departments or intensive care units, being a medical HCW and the hospital they worked in were associated with both vaccinations; while work shift was associated only with PIV. Sociocognitive domains associated with both vaccinations were self-perception of benefits and health motivation for all HCW. For medical HCW, being a role model was an additional domain associated with SIV and PIV. CONCLUSIONS: Both vaccination rates remained low. Vaccination mainly depended on self-determined factors and for medical HCW, being a role model.

  15. Risk of narcolepsy associated with inactivated adjuvanted (AS03 A/H1N1 (2009 pandemic influenza vaccine in Quebec.

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    Jacques Montplaisir

    Full Text Available An association between an adjuvanted (AS03 A/H1N1 pandemic vaccine and narcolepsy has been reported in Europe.To assess narcolepsy risk following administration of a similar vaccine in Quebec.Retrospective population-based study.Neurologists and lung specialists in the province were invited to report narcolepsy cases to a single reference centre.Patients were interviewed by two sleep experts and standard diagnostic tests were performed. Immunization status was verified in the provincial pandemic influenza vaccination registry.Confirmed narcolepsy with or without cataplexy with onset of excessive daytime sleepiness between January 1st, 2009, and December 31st, 2010. Relative risks (RRs were calculated using a Poisson model in a cohort analysis, by a self-controlled case series (SCCS and a case-control method.A total of 24 cases were included and overall incidence rate was 1.5 per million person-years. A cluster of 7 cases was observed among vaccinated persons in the winter 2009-2010. In the primary cohort analysis, 16-week post-vaccination RR was 4.32 (95% CI: 1.50-11.12. RR was 2.07 (0.70-6.17 in the SCCS, and 1.48 (0.37-7.03 using the case-control method. Estimates were lower when observation was restricted to the period of pandemic influenza circulation, and tended to be higher in persons <20 years old and for cataplexy cases.Results are compatible with an excess risk of approximately one case per million vaccine doses, mainly in persons less than 20 years of age. However, a confounding effect of the influenza infection cannot be ruled out.

  16. Personal Decision-Making Criteria Related to Seasonal and Pandemic A(H1N1) Influenza-Vaccination Acceptance among French Healthcare Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouadma, Lila; Barbier, François; Biard, Lucie; Esposito-Farèse, Marina; Le Corre, Bertrand; Macrez, Annick; Salomon, Laurence; Bonnal, Christine; Zanker, Caroline; Najem, Christophe; Mourvillier, Bruno; Lucet, Jean Christophe; Régnier, Bernard; Wolff, Michel; Tubach, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza-vaccination rates among healthcare workers (HCW) remain low worldwide, even during the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic. In France, this vaccination is free but administered on a voluntary basis. We investigated the factors influencing HCW influenza vaccination. Methods In June–July 2010, HCW from wards of five French hospitals completed a cross-sectional survey. A multifaceted campaign aimed at improving vaccination coverage in this hospital group was conducted before and during the 2009 pandemic. Using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire, we assessed the relationships between seasonal (SIV) and pandemic (PIV) influenza vaccinations, and sociodemographic and professional characteristics, previous and current vaccination statuses, and 33 statements investigating 10 sociocognitive domains. The sociocognitive domains describing HCWs' SIV and PIV profiles were analyzed using the classification-and-regression–tree method. Results Of the HCWs responding to our survey, 1480 were paramedical and 401 were medical with 2009 vaccination rates of 30% and 58% for SIV and 21% and 71% for PIV, respectively (p<0.0001 for both SIV and PIV vaccinations). Older age, prior SIV, working in emergency departments or intensive care units, being a medical HCW and the hospital they worked in were associated with both vaccinations; while work shift was associated only with PIV. Sociocognitive domains associated with both vaccinations were self-perception of benefits and health motivation for all HCW. For medical HCW, being a role model was an additional domain associated with SIV and PIV. Conclusions Both vaccination rates remained low. Vaccination mainly depended on self-determined factors and for medical HCW, being a role model. PMID:22848342

  17. Influenza A (H1N1) neuraminidase inhibitors from Vitis amurensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Anh; Dao, Trong Tuan; Tung, Bui Thanh;

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a novel H1N1 influenza A virus (H1N1/09 virus) was identified and considered a strong candidate for a novel influenza pandemic. As part of an ongoing anti-influenza screening programme on natural products, eight oligostilbenes were isolated as active principles from the methanol extract...

  18. Clinical diagnosis of pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 influenza in children with negative rapid influenza diagnostic test by lymphopenia and lower C-reactive protein levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Chang, Ling-Sai; Lee, Ing-Kit; Tang, Kuo-Shu; Li, Chung-Chen; Eng, Hock-Liew; You, Huey-Ling; Yang, Kuender D

    2014-01-01

    Background The sensitivity of rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT) of children with influenza-like illness (ILI) remains low. Objective We compare the parameters between pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 influenza with negative RIDT and ILI not H1N1 for improving the low sensitivity of RIDT for children with ILI. Methods In a cohort of consecutive laboratory-confirmed H1N1 influenza, we identified 150 H1N1 children with positive RIDT, 152 H1N1 children with negative RIDT, and 75 children with ILI not H1N1. Viral load in throat, complete blood count (CBC), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels between H1N1 children with negative RIDT and children with ILI not H1N1 were assessed. Results The diagnostic sensitivity of the RIDT was 45·5%. An analysis of CBC and CRP levels indicated that H1N1 children with negative RIDT had lower total leukocyte, neutrophil, lymphocyte, and basophil counts, and serum CRP levels (P < 0·01). Lymphocyte counts less than 1500 cells/mm3 and CRP levels <15 mg/l, determined by a receiver operating characteristic curve, showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 52·5% and 80·7%, respectively. Combining the lymphocyte counts and CRP levels provided a diagnostic sensitivity of 91·5%. Moreover, H1N1 children with negative RIDT had a lower viral load than those with positive RIDT (3·33 versus 4·48 log10 copies/ml, P < 0·001); the viral load was negatively correlated to the lymphocyte count (P < 0·001). Conclusions A combination of a low lymphocyte count and a low CRP level could, in the early disease phase, provide a useful screening for H1N1 children with false-negative RIDT, potentially facilitating differential diagnoses. PMID:24373294

  19. Severe pandemic H1N1 2009 infection is associated with transient NK and T deficiency and aberrant CD8 responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Fox

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is unclear why the severity of influenza varies in healthy adults or why the burden of severe influenza shifts to young adults when pandemic strains emerge. One possibility is that cross-protective T cell responses wane in this age group in the absence of recent infection. We therefore compared the acute cellular immune response in previously healthy adults with severe versus mild pandemic H1N1 infection. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 49 previously healthy adults admitted to the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases, Viet Nam with RT-PCR-confirmed 2009 H1N1 infection were prospectively enrolled. 39 recovered quickly whereas 10 developed severe symptoms requiring supplemental oxygen and prolonged hospitalization. Peripheral blood lymphocyte subset counts and activation (HLADR, CD38 and differentiation (CD27, CD28 marker expression were determined on days 0, 2, 5, 10, 14 and 28 by flow cytometry. NK, CD4 and CD8 lymphopenia developed in 100%, 90% and 60% of severe cases versus 13% (p<0.001, 28%, (p = 0.001 and 18% (p = 0.014 of mild cases. CD4 and NK counts normalized following recovery. B cell counts were not significantly associated with severity. CD8 activation peaked 6-8 days after mild influenza onset, when 13% (6-22% were HLADR+CD38+, and was accompanied by a significant loss of resting/CD27+CD28+ cells without accumulation of CD27+CD28- or CD27-CD28- cells. In severe influenza CD8 activation peaked more than 9 days post-onset, and/or was excessive (30-90% HLADR+CD38+ in association with accumulation of CD27+CD28- cells and maintenance of CD8 counts. CONCLUSION: Severe influenza is associated with transient T and NK cell deficiency. CD8 phenotype changes during mild influenza are consistent with a rapidly resolving memory response whereas in severe influenza activation is either delayed or excessive, and partially differentiated cells accumulate within blood indicating that recruitment of effector cells to the lung

  20. Increase in IFNγ(-IL-2(+ cells in recent human CD4 T cell responses to 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza.

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    Jason M Weaver

    Full Text Available Human CD4 T cell recall responses to influenza virus are strongly biased towards Type 1 cytokines, producing IFNγ, IL-2 and TNFα. We have now examined the effector phenotypes of CD4 T cells in more detail, particularly focusing on differences between recent versus long-term, multiply-boosted responses. Peptides spanning the proteome of temporally distinct influenza viruses were distributed into pools enriched for cross-reactivity to different influenza strains, and used to stimulate antigen-specific CD4 T cells representing recent or long-term memory. In the general population, peptides unique to the long-circulating influenza A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1 induced Th1-like responses biased toward the expression of IFNγ(+TNFα(+ CD4 T cells. In contrast, peptide pools enriched for non-cross-reactive peptides of the pandemic influenza A/California/04/09 (H1N1 induced more IFNγ(-IL-2(+TNFα(+ T cells, similar to the IFNγ(-IL-2(+ non-polarized, primed precursor T cells (Thpp that are a predominant response to protein vaccination. These results were confirmed in a second study that compared samples taken before the 2009 pandemic to samples taken one month after PCR-confirmed A/California/04/09 infection. There were striking increases in influenza-specific TNFα(+, IFNγ(+, and IL-2(+ cells in the post-infection samples. Importantly, peptides enriched for non-cross-reactive A/California/04/09 specificities induced a higher proportion of Thpp-like IFNγ(-IL-2(+TNFα(+ CD4 T cells than peptide pools cross-reactive with previous influenza strains, which induced more Th1 (IFNγ(+TNFα(+ responses. These IFNγ(-IL-2(+TNFα(+ CD4 T cells may be an important target population for vaccination regimens, as these cells are induced upon infection, may have high proliferative potential, and may play a role in providing future effector cells during subsequent infections.

  1. Real-time forecasting of an epidemic using a discrete time stochastic model: a case study of pandemic influenza (H1N1-2009

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    Nishiura Hiroshi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time forecasting of epidemics, especially those based on a likelihood-based approach, is understudied. This study aimed to develop a simple method that can be used for the real-time epidemic forecasting. Methods A discrete time stochastic model, accounting for demographic stochasticity and conditional measurement, was developed and applied as a case study to the weekly incidence of pandemic influenza (H1N1-2009 in Japan. By imposing a branching process approximation and by assuming the linear growth of cases within each reporting interval, the epidemic curve is predicted using only two parameters. The uncertainty bounds of the forecasts are computed using chains of conditional offspring distributions. Results The quality of the forecasts made before the epidemic peak appears largely to depend on obtaining valid parameter estimates. The forecasts of both weekly incidence and final epidemic size greatly improved at and after the epidemic peak with all the observed data points falling within the uncertainty bounds. Conclusions Real-time forecasting using the discrete time stochastic model with its simple computation of the uncertainty bounds was successful. Because of the simplistic model structure, the proposed model has the potential to additionally account for various types of heterogeneity, time-dependent transmission dynamics and epidemiological details. The impact of such complexities on forecasting should be explored when the data become available as part of the disease surveillance.

  2. Stigma, health disparities, and the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic: how to protect Latino farmworkers in future health emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch-Spana, Monica; Bouri, Nidhi; Rambhia, Kunal J; Norwood, Ann

    2010-09-01

    At the outset of the 2009 H1N1 influenza ("swine flu") pandemic, Mexican nationals and Mexican commodities were shunned globally, and, in the United States, some media personalities characterized Mexican immigrants as disease vectors who were a danger to the country. We investigated instances in the U.S. of stigmatization of Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFWs) and developed guidance for officials in curtailing its effects. At the same time, we explored social factors that make farmworkers more vulnerable to influenza infection and its complications, including high rates of underlying medical conditions, limited access to health care, and certain circumstances that interfere with the ability to implement community mitigation measures. This article reviews study findings and concludes with advice to policymakers and practitioners on the need to mitigate stigmatization in future outbreaks, to create public health preparedness systems that better protect migrant and seasonal farmworkers, and to undertake larger reforms to reduce institutional conditions that render farmworkers at greater risk for morbidity and mortality during health emergencies.

  3. What happened after the initial global spread of pandemic human influenza virus A (H1N1? A population genetics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-Hernandez Fernando

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral population evolution dynamics of influenza A is crucial for surveillance and control. In this paper we analyzed viral genetic features during the recent pandemic caused by the new influenza human virus A H1N1, using a conventional population genetics approach based on 4689 hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA sequences available in GenBank submitted between March and December of 2009. This analysis showed several relevant aspects: a a scarce initial genetic variability within the viral isolates from some countries that increased along 2009 when influenza was dispersed around the world; b a worldwide virus polarized behavior identified when comparing paired countries, low differentiation and high gene flow were found in some pairs and high differentiation and moderate or scarce gene flow in others, independently of their geographical closeness, c lack of positive selection in HA and NA due to increase of the population size of virus variants, d HA and NA variants spread in a few months all over the world being identified in the same countries in different months along 2009, and e containment of viral variants in Mexico at the beginning of the outbreak, probably due to the control measures applied by the government.

  4. Public debates driven by incomplete scientific data: The cases of evolution theory, global warming and H1N1 pandemic influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galam, Serge

    2010-09-01

    Public debates driven by incomplete scientific data where nobody can claim absolute certainty, due to the current state of scientific knowledge, are studied. The cases of evolution theory, global warming and H1N1 pandemic influenza are investigated. The first two are of controversial impact while the third is more neutral and resolved. To adopt a cautious balanced attitude based on clear but inconclusive data appears to be a lose-out strategy. In contrast overstating arguments with incorrect claims which cannot be scientifically refuted appears to be necessary but not sufficient to eventually win a public debate. The underlying key mechanisms of these puzzling and unfortunate conclusions are identified using the Galam sequential probabilistic model of opinion dynamics (Galam, 2002 [4], Galam, 2005 [18], Galam and Jacobs, 2007 [19]). It reveals that the existence of inflexible agents and their respective proportions are the instrumental parameters to determine the faith of incomplete scientific data in public debates. Acting on one’s own inflexible proportion modifies the topology of the flow diagram, which in turn can make irrelevant initial supports. On the contrary focusing on open-minded agents may be useless given some topologies. When the evidence is not as strong as claimed, the inflexibles rather than the data are found to drive the opinion of the population. The results shed a new but disturbing light on designing adequate strategies to win a public debate.

  5. Satisfaction and public health cost of a statewide influenza nurse triage line in response to pandemic H1N1 influenza.

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    Alicen B Spaulding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 2009 H1N1 pandemic strained healthcare systems. There was a need for supportive services, rapid antiviral access, and minimization of unnecessary healthcare contacts particularly face-to-face interactions. In response, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH launched a telephone-based nurse triage line (NTL called the Minnesota FluLine coordinating all major MN healthcare systems with NTLs to form a single toll-free number triage service. Callers were evaluated for symptoms of influenza-like illness (ILI and were prescribed an antiviral if indicated, using nurse administered protocols. METHODS: To determine caller outcomes, associated healthcare seeking, and satisfaction a telephone survey of Minnesota FluLine callers was conducted using a 5% random sample of those who completed the protocol and those who did not. RESULTS: Of 6,122 callers with ILI who began the nurse protocol administered by the contract NTL, 1,221 people were contacted for the survey and 325 agreed to participate; response rate was 26%. Of those who completed the nurse protocol 73% said they would have sought healthcare without the Minnesota FluLine, 89% reported the service was moderately or very helpful, and 91% reported being satisfied or very satisfied. Of those not completing the protocol, 50% reported the service was moderately or very helpful and 50% reported being satisfied or very satisfied. 72% of qualitative responses to open-ended questions were positive regarding the MN FluLine. Cost to MDH for operating the Minnesota FluLine service was $331,226 to service 27,391 callers ($12.09/call. DISCUSSION: The Minnesota FluLine diverted patients with mild ILI symptoms away from acute care visits at low cost and had a high rate of satisfaction among callers. Early intervention likely prevented morbidity and possibly additional cases. NTLs are powerful and flexible tools for pandemic response and should be considered as an important tool for future emergency

  6. Protective efficacy of an inactivated Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine influenza vaccine against homologous H1N1 and heterologous H1N1 and H1N2 viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jinyu; Yang, Dawei; Qiao, Chuanling; Xu, Huiyang; Xu, Bangfeng; Wu, Yunpu; Yang, Huanliang; Chen, Yan; Chen, Hualan

    2016-07-19

    Eurasian avian-like H1N1 (EA H1N1) swine influenza viruses are prevalent in pigs in Europe and Asia, but occasionally cause human infection, which raises concern about their pandemic potential. Here, we produced a whole-virus inactivated vaccine with an EA H1N1 strain (A/swine/Guangxi/18/2011, SW/GX/18/11) and evaluated its efficacy against homologous H1N1 and heterologous H1N1 and H1N2 influenza viruses in mice. A strong humoral immune response, which we measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and virus neutralization (VN), was induced in the vaccine-inoculated mice upon challenge. The inactivated SW/GX/18/11 vaccine provided complete protection against challenge with homologous SW/GX/18/11 virus in mice and provided effective protection against challenge with heterologous H1N1 and H1N2 viruses with distinctive genomic combinations. Our findings suggest that this EA H1N1 vaccine can provide protection against both homologous H1N1 and heterologous H1N1 or H1N2 virus infection. As such, it is an excellent vaccine candidate to prevent H1N1 swine influenza.

  7. Ethnicity, deprivation and mortality due to 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in England during the 2009/2010 pandemic and the first post-pandemic season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Harris, R J; Ellis, J; Pebody, R G

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between risk of death following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection and ethnicity and deprivation during the 2009/2010 pandemic period and the first post-pandemic season of 2010/2011 in England was examined. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the mortality risk, adjusted for age, gender, and place of residence. Those of non-White ethnicity experienced an increased mortality risk compared to White populations during the 2009/2010 pandemic [10·5/1000 vs. 6·0/1000 general population; adjusted risk ratio (RR) 1·84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·39-2·54] with the highest risk in those of Pakistani ethnicity. However, no significant difference between ethnicities was observed during the following 2010/2011 season. Persons living in areas with the highest level of deprivation had a significantly higher risk of death (RR 2·08, 95% CI 1·49-2·91) compared to the lowest level for both periods. These results highlight the importance of rapid identification of groups at higher risk of severe disease in the early stages of future pandemics to enable the implementation of optimal prevention and control measures for vulnerable populations.

  8. Pandemic influenza 1918 H1N1 and 1968 H3N2 DNA vaccines induce cross-reactive immunity in ferrets against infection with viruses drifted for decades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, Karoline; Martel, Cyril; Thomsen, Joakim S.;

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Bragstad et al. (2010) Pandemic influenza 1918 H1N1 and 1968 H3N2 DNA vaccines induce cross-reactive immunity in ferrets against infection with viruses drifted for decades. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 13-23. Background Alternative influenza vaccines...... immunised by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (gene gun) with DNA vaccines based on the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) and/or the matrix (M) and nucleoprotein genes of the 1918 H1N1 Spanish influenza pandemic virus or the 1968 H3N2 Hong Kong influenza pandemic virus. The animals were......, based on the HA and NA of the 1968 H3N2 pandemic virus, induced cross-reactive immune responses against a recent 2005 H3N2 virus challenge. Conclusions DNA vaccines based on pandemic or recent seasonal influenza genes induced cross-reactive immunity against contemporary virus challenge as good...

  9. Health services utilization, work absenteeism and costs of pandemic influenza A (H1N1 2009 in Spain: a multicenter-longitudinal study.

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    Mariana Galante

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to estimate healthcare resource utilization, work absenteeism and cost per patient with pandemic influenza (H1N12009, from its beginning to March 2010, in Spain. We also estimated the economic impact on healthcare services. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Longitudinal, descriptive, multicenter study of in- and outpatients with confirmed diagnosis of influenza A (H1N1 in Spain. Temporal distribution of cases was comparable to that in Spain. Information of healthcare and social resources used from one week before admission (inpatient or index-medical visit (outpatient until recovery was gathered. Unit cost was imputed to utilization frequency for the monetary valuation of use. Mean cost per patient was calculated. A sensitivity analysis was conducted, and variables correlated with cost per patient were identified. Economic impact on the healthcare system was estimated using healthcare costs per patient and both, the reported number of confirmed and clinical cases in Spain. 172 inpatients and 224 outpatients were included. Less than 10% were over 65 years old and more than 50% had previous comorbidities. 12.8% of inpatients were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. Mean length of hospital stay of patients not requiring critical care was 5 days (SD = 4.4. All working-inpatients and 91.7% working-outpatients went on sick leave. On average, work absenteeism was 30.5 days (SD = 20.7 for the first ones and 9 days (SD = 6.3 for the latest. Caregivers of 21.7% of inpatients and 8.5% of outpatients also had work absenteeism during 10.7 and 4.1 days on average respectively. Mean cost was €6,236/inpatient (CI95% = 1,384-14,623 and €940/outpatient (CI95% = 66-3,064. The healthcare economic burden of patients with confirmed influenza was €144,773,577 (IC95% 13,753,043-383,467,535. More than 86% of expenditures were a result of outpatients' utilization. CONCLUSION: Cost per H1N1-patient did not defer much from seasonal

  10. Seasonal flu vaccination in Dutch at-risk populations was not affected by A(H1N1) 2009 pandemic vaccination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacken, M.A.J.B.; Mulder, J.; Verheij, R.A.; Heijnen, M.L.A.; Campbell, S.M.; Braspenning, J.C.C.

    2011-01-01

    We read with interest the recent paper by Maurer and colleagues describing the attitudes toward seasonal and H1N1 vaccination and vaccination uptake among US adults (Maurer et al., 2010). They found the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) vaccine uptake as considerably lower than seasonal vaccine uptake, which i

  11. Emerged HA and NA mutants of the pandemic influenza H1N1 viruses with increasing epidemiological significance in Taipei and Kaohsiung, Taiwan, 2009-10.

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    Chuan-Liang Kao

    Full Text Available The 2009 influenza pandemic provided an opportunity to observe dynamic changes of the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA of pH1N1 strains that spread in two metropolitan areas--Taipei and Kaohsiung. We observed cumulative increases of amino acid substitutions of both HA and NA that were higher in the post-peak than in the pre-peak period of the epidemic. About 14.94% and 3.44% of 174 isolates had one and two amino acids changes, respective, in the four antigenic sites. One unique adaptive mutation of HA2 (E374K was first detected three weeks before the epidemic peak. This mutation evolved through the epidemic, and finally emerged as the major circulated strain, with significantly higher frequency in the post-peak period than in the pre-peak (64.65% vs 9.28%, p<0.0001. E374K persisted until ten months post-nationwide vaccination without further antigenic changes (e.g. prior to the highest selective pressure. In public health measures, the epidemic peaked at seven weeks after oseltamivir treatment was initiated. The emerging E374K mutants spread before the first peak of school class suspension, extended their survival in high-density population areas before vaccination, dominated in the second wave of class suspension, and were fixed as herd immunity developed. The tempo-spatial spreading of E374K mutants was more concentrated during the post-peak (p = 0.000004 in seven districts with higher spatial clusters (p<0.001. This is the first study examining viral changes during the naïve phase of a pandemic of influenza through integrated virological/serological/clinical surveillance, tempo-spatial analysis, and intervention policies. The vaccination increased the percentage of E374K mutants (22.86% vs 72.34%, p<0.001 and significantly elevated the frequency of mutations in Sa antigenic site (2.36% vs 23.40%, p<0.001. Future pre-vaccination public health efforts should monitor amino acids of HA and NA of pandemic influenza viruses isolated at

  12. Immune Analysis of Brisbane and California H1N1 in Human Sera and the MIMIC System, and Correlating a H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Clinical Trial with a Clinical Trial in a Test Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    09-C-0119 BAA09-31 & BAA-10-55 Final Report Date of Proposal: Prepared by Sanofi Pasteur VaxDesign Campus...the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) and Fraunhofer CBM USA, were to provide a systematic immunological assessment of the candidate

  13. Detection of pandemic strain of influenza virus (A/H1N1/pdm09 in pigs, West Africa: implications and considerations for prevention of future influenza pandemics at the source

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    Oluwagbenga A. Adeola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human and animal influenza are inextricably linked. In particular, the pig is uniquely important as a mixing vessel for genetic reassortment of influenza viruses, leading to emergence of novel strains which may cause human pandemics. Significant reduction in transmission of influenza viruses from humans, and other animals, to swine may therefore be crucial for preventing future influenza pandemics. This study investigated the presence of the 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus, A(H1N1pdm09, in Nigerian and Ghanaian pigs, and also determined levels of acceptance of preventive measures which could significantly reduce the transmission of this virus from humans to pigs. Methods: Nasal swab specimens from 125 pigs in Ibadan, Nigeria, and Kumasi, Ghana, were tested for the presence of influenza A/California/04/2009 (H1N1 by quantitative antigen-detection ELISA. A semi-structured questionnaire was also administered to pig handlers in the two study areas and responses were analyzed to evaluate their compliance with seven measures for preventing human-to-swine transmission of influenza viruses. Results: The virus was detected among pigs in the two cities, with prevalence of 8% in Ibadan and 10% in Kumasi. Levels of compliance of pig handlers with relevant preventive measures were also found to be mostly below 25 and 40% in Ibadan and Kumasi, respectively. Conclusion: Detection of influenza A(H1N1pdm09 among pigs tested suggests the possibility of human-to-swine transmission, which may proceed even more rapidly, considering the very poor acceptance of basic preventive measures observed in this study. This is also the first report on detection of influenza A(H1N1pdm09 in Ghanaian pigs. We recommend improvement on personal hygiene among pig handlers, enforcement of sick leave particularly during the first few days of influenza-like illnesses, and training of pig handlers on recognition of influenza-like signs in humans and pigs. These could be

  14. Surveillance on pathogen and serology of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in Inner Mongolia in 2009%内蒙古2009年甲型H1N1流感病原与血清学监测结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昕; 董杰; 雷霞; 海岩; 南晓伟; 跃华

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To analyze epidemical characteristic of the pandemic (H1 N1 ) 2009 and to study infection situation on health people in Inner Mongolia, in 2009. This study can provide scientific basis for defending influenza pandemic effectively.Methods: Real - time RT - PCR and RT - PCR were used to detect nucleic acid of influenza virus from specimens. The viruses were inoculated and isolated with embryonated egg from the positive specimens. And, the hamagglutination (HA) and the hamagglutination inhibition (HI) tests were used to detect the antibody of health people. Results: In 2009, the network laboratoies tested 7663 specimens in Inner Mongolia, of which 1543 (20. 14% ) were positive for influenza. Among them, 68 were seasonal influenza A(H1N1 ), 158 were A(H3N2), 957 were the pandemic (H1N1) 2009, 164 were influenza B, 192 were influenza A (pandemic (H1N1) 2009, seasonal influenza A( H1N1 ) and A(H3N2) excluded), and 4 were influenza A and influenza B mixture. 162 influenza virus strains were isolated from 509 positive specimens have been detected by this laboratory, positive rate was 31.83%. The HA and HI were used to identify type and subtype of these isolates, of which 155 (96.91% ) were positive for the pandemic ( H1N1 ) 2009. 472 specimens collecting from the health people have been detected the level of antibody to the pandemic ( H1N1 ) 2009, of which 95 (20.13%) were positive. Conclusion: After July 2009, the pandemic ( H1N1 ) 2009 virus became predominant strain in Inner Mongolia and the peak of epidemic of influenza in October and November. Generally, the antibody level of the pandemic ( H1N1 ) 2009 virus was low. But, the antibody level from students was high comparatively.%目的:分析2009年内蒙古甲型H1NI流感流行特点和健康人群感染状况,为进一步应对流感大流行提供科学依据.方法:采用RT-PCR、Real-time PCR法进行核酸检测,阳性样本进行鸡胚病毒分离培养.人群血清采用血凝(HA)和血凝

  15. The impact of altitude on hospitalization and hospital mortality from pandemic 2009 influenza A (H1N1 virus pneumonia in Mexico El impacto de la altitud en las tasas de hospitalización y mortalidad por el virus de la influenza A (H1N1 pandémico en México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogelio Pérez-Padilla

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of altitude of residence on influenza A (H1N1. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed 207 135 officially notified of influenza-like illness (ILI cases, 23 048 hospitalizations and 573 deaths during the first months of the novel pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus, to examine if residents of high altitude had more frequently these adverse outcomes. RESULTS: Adjusted rates for hospitalization and hospital mortality rates increased with altitude, probably due to hypoxemia.OBJETIVO: Determinar el efecto de la altitud del lugar de residencia sobre la epidemia de influenza A (H1N1. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se analizaron 207 135 casos notificados a la Secretaría de Salud, 23 048 hospitalizaciones y 573 muertes por enfermedad similar a la influenza (ILI, por sus siglas en inglés durante los primeros meses de la pandemia del nuevo virus de la influenza A H1N1 durante 2009, para examinar si los residentes de zonas más altas presentaron tasas más altas de hospitalización y muerte. RESULTADOS: Las tasas ajustadas de hospitalización y mortalidad hospitalaria se incrementaron con la altitud probablemente por la presencia de hipoxemia.

  16. Immunogenic and Protective Properties of the First Kazakhstan Vaccine against Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 in Ferrets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaissar Tabynov; Zhailaubai Kydyrbayev; Abylai Sansyzbay; Berik Khairullin; Sholpan Ryskeldinova; Nurika Assanzhanova; Yerken Kozhamkulov; Dulat Inkarbekov

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a pre-clinical study of the immunogenicity and efficacy of an egg-derived,inactivated,whole-virion adjuvanted vaccine (Refluvac(R)) on ferret models.For this purpose,groups of eight ferrets (6 to 7 months old) were injected with 0.5 mL of vaccine specimens containing 3.75,7.5 or 15.0 μg of virus hemagglutinin.Administration was intramuscular and given either as a single dose or as two doses 14 days apart.All vaccine specimens manifested immunogenicity in ferrets for single (HI titer,from 51 ± 7 to 160 ± 23) and double (HI titer,from 697 ± 120 to 829 ± 117) administrations.To assess the protective effects of the vaccine,ferrets from the vaccinated and control groups were infected intranasally with pandemic virus A/California/7/09 (H1N1) pdm09 at a dose of 106 EID50/0.5 mL.Fourteen days post-infection,the ferrets inoculated with single or double vaccines containing 3.75,7.5 or 15.0 μg of hemagglutinin per dose showed no signs of influenza infection,weight loss,or body temperature rise,and no premature deaths occurred.The number of vaccinated ferrets shedding the virus via the upper airway,as well as the amount of virus shed after infection,was significantly reduced in comparison with animals from the control group.Based on our results,we suggest that a single vaccination at a dose of 3.75 or 7.5 μg hemagglutinin be used for Phase I clinical trials.

  17. Comparative study of lymphocytes from individuals that were vaccinated and unvaccinated against the pandemic 2009-2011 H1N1 influenza virus in Southern Brazil

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    Deise Nascimento de Freitas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTINTRODUCTION:While no single factor is sufficient to guarantee the success of influenza vaccine programs, knowledge of the levels of immunity in local populations is critical. Here, we analyzed influenza immunity in a population from Southern Brazil, a region with weather conditions that are distinct from those in the rest of country, where influenza infections are endemic, and where greater than 50% of the population is vaccinated annually.METHODS:Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from 40 individuals. Of these, 20 had received the H1N1 vaccine, while the remaining 20 were unvaccinated against the disease. Cells were stimulated in vitro with the trivalent post-pandemic influenza vaccine or with conserved major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I peptides derived from hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Cell viability was then analyzed by [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide]-based colorimetric assay (MTT, and culture supernatants were assayed for helper T type 1 (Th1 and Th2-specific cytokine levels.RESULTS:Peripheral blood lymphocytes from vaccinated, but not unvaccinated, individuals exhibited significant proliferation in vitro in the presence of a cognate influenza antigen. After culturing with vaccine antigens, cells from vaccinated individuals produced similar levels of interleukin (IL-10 and interferon (IFN-γ, while those from unvaccinated individuals produced higher levels of IFN-γ than of IL-10.CONCLUSIONS:Our data indicate that peripheral blood lymphocytes from vaccinated individuals are stimulated upon encountering a cognate antigen, but did not support the hypothesis that cross-reactive responses related to previous infections can ameliorate the immune response. Moreover, monitoring IL-10 production in vaccinated individuals could comprise a valuable tool for predicting disease evolution.

  18. Intense co-circulation of non-influenza respiratory viruses during the first wave of pandemic influenza pH1N1/2009: a cohort study in Reunion Island.

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    Hervé Pascalis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to weigh up, at the community level, the respective roles played by pandemic Influenza (pH1N1 virus and co-circulating human Non-Influenza Respiratory Viruses (NIRVs during the first wave of the 2009 pH1N1 pandemic. METHODS: A population-based prospective cohort study was conducted in Reunion Island during the austral winter 2009 (weeks 30-44 that allowed identification of 125 households with at least one member who developed symptoms of Influenza-like illness (ILI. Three consecutive nasal swabs were collected from each household member (443 individuals on day 0, 3 and 8 post-ILI report and tested for pH1N1 and 15 NIRVs by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Two successive waves of viral infections were identified: a first wave (W33-37 when pH1N1 was dominant and co-circulated with NIRVs, sharply interrupted by a second wave (W38-44, almost exclusively composed of NIRVs, mainly human Rhinoviruses (hRV and Coronaviruses (hCoV. Data suggest that some interference may occur between NIRVs and pH1N1 when they co-circulate within the same household, where NIRVs were more likely to infect pH1N1 negative individuals than pH1N1 positive peers (relative risk: 3.13, 95% CI: 1.80-5.46, P<0.001. Viral shedding was significantly shorter (P = 0.035 in patients who were co-infected by pH1N1 and NIRV or by two different NIRVs compared to those who were infected with only one virus, whatever this virus was (pH1N1 or NIRVs. Although intense co-circulation of NIRVs (especially hRV likely brought pH1N1 under the detection threshold, it did not prevent spread of the pandemic Influenza virus within the susceptible population nor induction of an extensive herd immunity to it. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that NIRV co-infections during Influenza epidemics may act as cofactors that contribute to shape an outbreak and modulate the attack rate. They further warrant broad spectrum studies to fully understand viral epidemics.

  19. Maternal and neonatal outcomes among pregnant women with 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1 illness in Florida, 2009-2010: a population-based cohort study.

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    Timothy J Doyle

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pregnant women have been identified as a high risk group for severe illness with 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1 virus infection (pH1N1. Obesity has also been identified as a risk factor for severe illness, though this has not been thoroughly assessed among pregnant women. The objectives of this study were to provide risk estimates for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes associated with pH1N1 illness during pregnancy and to assess the role of obesity in these outcomes. METHODS: We established a retrospective population-based cohort of all live births occurring in Florida during the first 15 months of the pandemic. Illness with pH1N1 during pregnancy was ascertained through record linkage with the Florida state notifiable disease surveillance database. Data from the birth record, including pre-pregnancy body mass index, were analyzed to assess risk of adverse outcomes associated with pH1N1 illness. RESULTS: A total of 194 women were identified through surveillance with pH1N1 illness during pregnancy. Children born to women with pH1N1 illness during pregnancy were at increased risk for low birth weight [OR (95%CI: 1.78 (1.11-2.860], premature birth [2.21 (1.47-3.330], and infant death [4.46 (1.80-11.00], after adjusting for other factors. Women with pH1N1 illness during pregnancy were at increased risk for severe outcomes including admission to an intensive care unit. Obesity was an observed risk factor, both for the more severe pH1N1 illness detected through surveillance, and for severe maternal outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Case-patients in this analysis likely represent the most severely ill subset of all women infected with pH1N1 during pregnancy, limiting the generalizability of these findings to more severely ill patients rather than influenza infection in general. Nevertheless, these results suggest that more severe pH1N1 illness during pregnancy is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes and that pregnant women should continue

  20. Internet-based surveillance of Influenza-like-illness in the UK during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic

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    Ealden Toby

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internet-based surveillance systems to monitor influenza-like illness (ILI have advantages over traditional (physician-based reporting systems, as they can potentially monitor a wider range of cases (i.e. including those that do not seek care. However, the requirement for participants to have internet access and to actively participate calls into question the representativeness of the data. Such systems have been in place in a number of European countries over the last few years, and in July 2009 this was extended to the UK. Here we present results of this survey with the aim of assessing the reliability of the data, and to evaluate methods to correct for possible biases. Methods Internet-based monitoring of ILI was launched near the peak of the first wave of the UK H1N1v influenza pandemic. We compared the recorded ILI incidence with physician-recorded incidence and an estimate of the true number of cases over the course of the epidemic. We also compared overall attack rates. The effect of using different ILI definitions and alternative denominator assumptions on incidence estimates was explored. Results The crude incidence measured by the internet-based system appears to be influenced by individuals who participated only once in the survey and who appeared more likely to be ill. This distorted the overall incidence trend. Concentrating on individuals who reported more than once results in a time series of ILI incidence that matches the trend of case estimates reasonably closely, with a correlation of 0.713 (P-value: 0.0001, 95% CI: 0.435, 0.867. Indeed, the internet-based system appears to give a better estimate of the relative height of the two waves of the UK pandemic than the physician-recorded incidence. The overall attack rate is, however, higher than other estimates, at about 16% when compared with a model-based estimate of 6%. Conclusion Internet-based monitoring of ILI can capture the trends in case numbers if

  1. Diagnosis of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (pH1N1) and Seasonal Influenza Using Rapid Influenza Antigen Tests, San Antonio, Texas, April-June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    CDC Atlanta US. CDC protocol of realtime RTPCR for influenza A(H1N1) revision 1. 30 April 2009. Available at: http://www.who.int/ csr / resources...2009; 325:483–7. 24. Munster VJ, de Wit E, van den Brand JM, et al. Pathogenesis and Transmission of Swine-Origin 2009 A(H1N1) Influenza Virus in Fer

  2. 甲型 H1N1流感疫苗神经氨酸酶含量测定参考品的建立%Establishment of reference material for qualification of neuraminidase content in pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐康维; 陶磊; 邵铭; 刘书珍; 李长贵

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish a reference material for qualification of the neuraminidase content in the pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine.Methods Proteins of pandemic influenza H1N1 virus were separated by reducing SDS-PAGE. To take out the staining band of neuraminidase in SDS-PAGE,it was identified by Western blot,Glycoprotein staining and edman degradation method.Lowry protein assay and SDS-PAGE in combination with densitometry analysis were used to quantify the neuraminidase contents in influenza H1N1 vaccine bulk.Results The neuraminidase band in SDS-PAGE was about MW 71 000.The neuraminidase proportion of multiple lots of H1N1 influenza vaccine bulk were tested.Vaccine bulk lots with some higher neuraminidase propotions were chosen for neuraminidase quantification,and the total proteins were de-terminated as 1 046.00 μg/mL and the neuraminidase content acounted for 123.22 μg/mL(11.78%).Conclusion The reference material for qualification of neuraminidase content in the H1N1 influenza vaccine was successfully established in this study,in a same way to develop the reference materials of NA content in preparation of other influenza strain vaccines.%目的:建立甲型 H1N1流感疫苗神经氨酸酶含量测定参考品。方法对甲型 H1N1流感疫苗原液进行还原电泳后,采用免疫印迹,糖蛋白染色,方法初步确定甲流 H1N1疫苗原液中神经氨酸酶 SDS-PAGE 条带位置,切取条带后通过 edman N 端测序法进行确认。采用 Lowry 法进行总蛋白定量,SDS-PAGE 密度扫描的方法确定神经氨酸酶比例,计算出疫苗原液中神经氨酸酶含量。结果确定甲流疫苗原液中神经氨酸酶在 SDS-PAGE 中相对分子质量约71000,对多批次疫苗原液进行测定后,选取神经氨酸酶含量较高的批次进行测定,总蛋白质量浓度为1046.00μg/mL,神经氨酸酶质量分数11.78%。二者相乘得出该批次疫苗原液神经氨酸酶含量为123.22μg/mL。结

  3. Clinical profile and predictors of mortality of severe pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus infection needing intensive care: A multi-centre prospective study from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Ramakrishna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This multi-center study from India details the profile and outcomes of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU with pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 2009 virus [P(H1N12009v] infection. Materials and Methods: Over 4 months, adult patients diagnosed to have P(H1N12009v infection by real-time RT-PCR of respiratory specimens and requiring ICU admission were followed up until death or hospital discharge. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA scores were calculated daily. Results: Of the 1902 patients screened, 464 (24.4% tested positive for P(H1N12009v; 106 (22.8% patients aged 35±11.9 (mean±SD years required ICU admission 5.8±2.7 days after onset of illness. Common symptoms were fever (96.2%, cough (88.7%, and breathlessness (85.9%. The admission APACHE-II and SOFA scores were 14.4±6.5 and 5.5±3.1, respectively. Ninety-six (90.6% patients required ventilation for 10.1±7.5 days. Of these, 34/96 (35.4% were non-invasively ventilated; 16/34 were weaned successfully whilst 18/34 required intubation. Sixteen patients (15.1% needed dialysis. The duration of hospitalization was 14.0±8.0 days. Hospital mortality was 49%. Mortality in pregnant/puerperal women was 52.6% (10/19. Patients requiring invasive ventilation at admission had a higher mortality than those managed with non-invasive ventilation and those not requiring ventilation (44/62 vs. 8/44, P<0.001. Need for dialysis was independently associated with mortality (P=0.019. Although admission APACHE-II and SOFA scores were significantly (P<0.02 higher in non-survivors compared with survivors on univariate analysis, individually, neither were predictive on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: In our setting, a high mortality was observed in patients admitted to ICU with severe P(H1N12009v infection. The need for invasive ventilation and dialysis were associated with a poor outcome.

  4. EFSA Panel Animal Health and Welfare (AHAW); Scientific Opinion on the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza and its potential implications for animal health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette; Brown, Ian; Capua, Ilaria;

    . Occasionally, pigs have been infected following exposure to pH1N1 infected humans. In pigs, a subclinical course was common and when clinical signs were seen (coughing, fever) they were generally mild. Presently, the clinical impact of pH1N1virus on the EU pig population is considered minimal. In poultry...... of wild birds with pH1N1 virus has been reported. From an animal health perspective, no specific disease control measures are considered necessary. Vaccines based on the pH1N1 virus appear to induce protection in swine similar to that induced by the existing swine influenza virus (SIV) vaccines....... Such vaccines efficiently prevent disease by reducing virus replication in the lungs. However, voluntary vaccination of swine with these vaccines has not halted the circulation of SIV in swine. There is no urgency for vaccination of pigs against pH1N1 virus. Currently, no vaccines against H1 viruses for poultry...

  5. Is a Mass Prevention and Control Program for Pandemic (H1N1 2009 Good Value for Money? Evidence from the Chinese Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biyan Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to provide guidance on the efficient allocation of health resources when handling public health emergencies in the future, the study evaluated the H1N1 influenza prevention and control program in Hubei Province of China using cost-benefit analysis.Methods: The costs measured the resources consumed and other expenses incurred in the prevention and control of H1N1. The assumed benefits include resource consumption and economic losses which could be avoided by the measures for the prevention and control of H1N1. The benefit was evaluated by counterfactual thinking, which estimates the resource consumption and economic losses could be happened without any measures for the prevention and control, which have been avoided after measures were taken to prevent and control H1N1 in Hubei Province, these constitutes the benefit of this project.Results: The total costs of this program were 38.81 million U.S. dollars, while the total benefit was assessed as 203.71 million U.S. dollars. The net benefit was 164.9 million U.S. dollars with a cost-effectiveness ratio of 1:5.25.Conclusions: The joint prevention and control strategy introduced by Hubei for H1N1 influenza is cost-effective.

  6. A case-control study of the transmission of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus in families%甲型H1N1流感家庭内传播影响因素的病例对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文婷; 庞星火; 邓瑛; 杨鹏; 黎新宇; 张奕; 段玮; 王小莉; 王全意

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the characteristics of transmission of pandemic influenza A/H1N1, and to analyze the possible factors of influencing transmission in families and to provide scientific evidence for formulating strategies of H1N1 prevention and control. Methods A 1∶ 2 matched case-control study was conducted. The case was defined as a household with 2 or more cases and the control was defined as that with 1 case. Face-to-face interview with questionnaire was used to collect information of work and family life of the study participants. Conditional logistic regression was used to analyze the data. ResultsUnivariate analysis showed that factors such as education level of the secondary case, the number of family members, per capita living space, flu-like symptom, insulation of case, ventilation, hand-washing, and influenza A/H1N1 vaccine immunization were all associated with infection of influenza A/H1N1. Results of multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that variables such as education level of secondary case (OR=0.42), insulation of case(OR=3.29), ventilation, (OR=0.28), hand-washing(OR=0.71), influenza A/H1N1 vaccine immunization (OR=0.05)were all correlated to infection of influenza A/H1N1. Conclusions Factors such as vaccine, insulation, ventilation, and hand-washing can help persons in protection from infection of influenza A/H1N1, suggesting the importance of good hygienic habit and immunization with influenza A/H1N1 vaccine.%目的 探讨影响甲型H1N1流感家庭内传播的危险因素,为制定防控策略提供理论依据.方法按1:2的病例对照研究设计,通过"疾病监测信息报告管理系统"在北京市范围内选择符合条件的出现二代病例的家庭作为病例组,调查该家庭中的首发病例和二代病例;而未出现二代病例的家庭且与病例组中的病例相匹配的家庭作为对照组,调查确诊病例和与确诊病例接触频率最高的一位家庭成员.通过问卷调查,收集家庭成

  7. Pathogenic characteristics of influenza in Shenyang area before and after influenza A ( H1N1 ) pandemic%甲型H1N1流感大流行前后沈阳地区流感病原学流行特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符文华; 王冰; 白杉

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析甲型H1N1流行性感冒(流感)大流行前后沈阳流感病原学流行特征.方法 采集2005年10月-2011年3月连续5.5a哨点医院的流感样病例咽拭子,进行流感病毒的分离和分型鉴定,并按甲型H1N1流感流行前后划分为3个时期.结果3个时期共采集流感样病例咽拭子样本6808份,分离到流感病毒861株,总分离率为12.6%;流行前、流行中和流行后3个时期流感病毒检出率分别为13.8%、18.2%和5.2%.男性和女性流感病毒感染率差异无统计学意义,不同时期流感样病例的年龄构成差异有统计学意义.新的甲型H1N1流感侵袭的人群主要是低年龄组人群,新的甲型H1N1流行期间和流行后,流感季节高峰发生前移.不同年度流感流行毒株型别不同,前1年监测周期的优势株在下1个周期中可被其他型别抑制甚至取代.结论 甲型H1N1流感流行后沈阳的流感流行特征已发生了部分改变,这种改变是否持续存在还有待持续监测来得以验证,在2011-2012年监测周期中应密切关注A3(H3N2)亚型和新的甲型H1N1亚型流感毒株的活动情况.%[Objective] To analyze the pathogenic characteristics of influenza in Shenyang before and after influenza A (H1N1) pandemic. [ Methods] The throat swab specimens of influenza-like cases were collected from sentinel hospitals from October 2005 to March 2011, and influenza virus was isolated and identified. The study duration were divided into three periods according to influenza A (H1N1) pandemic. [Results] A total of 6 808 throat swab specimens of influenza-like cases were collected, and 861 stains of influenza virus were isolated with the total isolation rate of 12.6%. The detection rate of influenza virus before, during and after pandemic was 13.8% , 18.2% and 5.2% , respectively. There was no significant difference in the infection rate of influenza virus between males and females, and the difference in age structure of influenza

  8. AID activity in B cells strongly correlates with polyclonal antibody affinity maturation in-vivo following pandemic 2009-H1N1 vaccination in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Surender; Frasca, Daniela; Blomberg, Bonnie; Golding, Hana

    2012-09-01

    The role of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) in somatic hypermutation and polyclonal antibody affinity maturation has not been shown for polyclonal responses in humans. We investigated whether AID induction in human B cells following H1N1pdm09 vaccination correlated with in-vivo antibody affinity maturation against hemagglutinin domains in plasma of young and elderly individuals. AID was measured by qPCR in B cells from individuals of different ages immunized with the H1N1pdm09 influenza vaccine. Polyclonal antibody affinity in human plasma for the HA1 and HA2 domains of the H1N1pdm09 hemagglutinin was measured by antibody-antigen complex dissociation rates using real time kinetics in Surface Plasmon Resonance. Results show an age-related decrease in AID induction in B cells following H1N1pdm09 vaccination. Levels of AID mRNA before vaccination and fold-increase of AID mRNA expression after H1N1pdm09 vaccination directly correlated with increase in polyclonal antibody affinity to the HA1 globular domain (but not to the conserved HA2 stalk). In the younger population, significant affinity maturation to the HA1 globular domain was observed, which associated with initial levels of AID and fold-increase in AID after vaccination. In some older individuals (>65 yr), higher affinity to the HA1 domain was observed before vaccination and H1N1pdm09 vaccination resulted in minimal change in antibody affinity, which correlated with low AID induction in this age group. These findings demonstrate for the first time a strong correlation between AID induction and in-vivo antibody affinity maturation in humans. The ability to generate high affinity antibodies could have significant impact on the elucidation of age-specific antibody responses following vaccination and eventual clinical efficacy and disease outcome.

  9. Decreased serologic response in vaccinated military recruits during 2011 correspond to genetic drift in concurrent circulating pandemic A/H1N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Faix

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Population-based febrile respiratory illness surveillance conducted by the Department of Defense contributes to an estimate of vaccine effectiveness. Between January and March 2011, 64 cases of 2009 A/H1N1 (pH1N1, including one fatality, were confirmed in immunized recruits at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, suggesting insufficient efficacy for the pH1N1 component of the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test serologic protection, serum samples were collected at least 30 days post-vaccination from recruits at Fort Jackson (LAIV, Parris Island (LAIV and trivalent inactivated vaccine [TIV] at Cape May, New Jersey (TIV and responses measured against pre-vaccination sera. A subset of 78 LAIV and 64 TIV sera pairs from recruits who reported neither influenza vaccination in the prior year nor fever during training were tested by microneutralization (MN and hemagglutination inhibition (HI assays. MN results demonstrated that seroconversion in paired sera was greater in those who received TIV versus LAIV (74% and 37%. Additionally, the fold change associated with TIV vaccination was significantly different between circulating (2011 versus the vaccine strain (2009 of pH1N1 viruses (ANOVA p value = 0.0006. HI analyses revealed similar trends. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR analysis revealed that the quantity, IgG/IgM ratios, and affinity of anti-HA antibodies were significantly greater in TIV vaccinees. Finally, sequence analysis of the HA1 gene in concurrent circulating 2011 pH1N1 isolates from Fort Jackson exhibited modest amino acid divergence from the vaccine strain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Among military recruits in 2011, serum antibody response differed by vaccine type (LAIV vs. TIV and pH1N1 virus year (2009 vs. 2011. We hypothesize that antigen drift in circulating pH1N1 viruses contributed to reduce vaccine effectiveness at Fort Jackson. Our findings have wider implications regarding

  10. Partial protection of seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine against novel pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009: case-control study in Mexico City

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Garcia, Lourdes; Valdespino-Gómez, Jose Luis; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Jimenez-Corona, Aida; Higuera-Iglesias, Anjarath; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Cano-Arellano, Bulmaro; Garcia-Anaya, Antonio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ponce-de-León-Rosales, Samuel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Rodriguez-López, Mario Henry; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of 2008-9 seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine with cases of influenza A/H1N1 during the epidemic in Mexico. Design Frequency matched case-control study. Setting Specialty hospital in Mexico City, March to May 2009. Participants 60 patients with laboratory confirmed influenza A/H1N1 and 180 controls with other diseases (not influenza-like illness or pneumonia) living in Mexico City or the State of Mexico and matched for age and socioeconomic status. Mai...

  11. Highly Pathogenic H5N1 and Novel H7N9 Influenza A Viruses Induce More Profound Proteomic Host Responses than Seasonal and Pandemic H1N1 Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Philippe François; McCorrister, Stuart; Hu, Pingzhao; Chong, Patrick; Silaghi, Alex; Westmacott, Garrett; Coombs, Kevin M; Kobasa, Darwyn

    2015-11-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) are important human and animal pathogens with potential for causing pandemics. IAVs exhibit a wide spectrum of clinical illness in humans, from relatively mild infections by seasonal strains to acute respiratory distress syndrome during infections with some highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. In the present study, we infected A549 human cells with seasonal H1N1 (sH1N1), 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pdmH1N1), or novel H7N9 and HPAI H5N1 strains. We used multiplexed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification to measure proteomic host responses to these different strains at 1, 3, and 6 h post-infection. Our analyses revealed that both H7N9 and H5N1 strains induced more profound changes to the A549 global proteome compared to those with low-pathogenicity H1N1 virus infection, which correlates with the higher pathogenicity these strains exhibit at the organismal level. Bioinformatics analysis revealed important modulation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) oxidative stress response in infection. Cellular fractionation and Western blotting suggested that the phosphorylated form of NRF2 is not imported to the nucleus in H5N1 and H7N9 virus infections. Fibronectin was also strongly inhibited in infection with H5N1 and H7N9 strains. This is the first known comparative proteomic study of the host response to H7N9, H5N1, and H1N1 viruses and the first time NRF2 is shown to be implicated in infection with highly pathogenic strains of influenza.

  12. Antiviral Prophylaxis and H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Richard Pebody, a consultant epidemiologist at the Health Protection Agency in London, UK, discusses the use of antiviral post-exposure prophylaxis and pandemic H1N1.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  13. Impact of influenza in the post-pandemic phase: Clinical features in hospitalized patients with influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 and H3N2 viruses, during 2013 in Santa Fe, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusznierz, Gabriela; Carolina, Cudós; Manuel, Rudi Juan; Sergio, Lejona; Lucila, Ortellao; Julio, Befani; Mirta, Villani; Pedro, Morana; Graciana, Morera; Andrea, Uboldi; Elsa, Zerbini

    2016-12-22

    It is important to characterize the clinical and epidemiological pattern of the influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 virus and compare it with influenza A (H3N2) virus, as surveyed in just a few studies, in order to contribute to the implementation and strengthening of influenza control and prevention strategies. The aims in this study were to describe influenza clinical and epidemiological characteristics in hospitalized patients, caused by influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and influenza A (H3N2) viruses during 2013, in Santa Fe, Argentina. A retrospective study was conducted over 2013 among hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza diagnosis. In contrast to patients with influenza A (H3N2) (20.5%), a higher proportion of hospitalizations associated with influenza H1N1pdm were reported among adults aged 35-65 years (42.8%). Of all patients, 73.6% had an underlying medical condition. Hospitalized patients with H1N1pdm were subject to 2.6 (95%CI, 1.0-6.8) times higher risk of severity, than those hospitalized with influenza A (H3N2). This results demonstrate the impact in the post-pandemic era of H1N1pdm virus, with increased risk of severe disease, in relation to H3N2 virus, both viruses co-circulating during 2013.

  14. Genetic Characteristics of the Haemagglutinin Genes of Pandemic(H1N1)2009 Viruses in Hebei Province%河北省甲型H1N1流行性感冒病毒血凝素基因特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩光跃; 申悦霞; 刘艳芳; 李岩; 刘兰芬; 李琦; 齐顺祥

    2012-01-01

    目的 掌握河北省甲型H1N1流行性感冒(甲流)病毒的流行情况;对分离到的甲流病毒株血凝素(Hemagglutinin,HA)基因序列进行测定比较,分析HA重链区(HA1)第222位氨基酸位点的突变情况.此位点编码的天冬氨酸(Aspartic Acid,N)突变为甘氨酸(Glycine,G)(D222G),可能会使病毒更容易结合下呼吸道受体,为流感大流行的预防控制提供参考.方法 采集流感样病例的鼻咽拭子,用狗肾传代细胞分离流感病毒,经血凝抑制试验鉴定分型.选取不同时间、地域的10株甲流病毒进行HA基因全序列分析,167株病毒测HA区379~1204片段,用DNA(脱氧核糖核酸,Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Star软件比较分析同源性、变异趋势.结果 10株甲流病毒毒株HA基因与疫苗株A(甲)/California(加利福尼亚)/07/2009相比高度同源,核苷酸同源性为98.9%~99.5%,氨基酸同源性为98.4%~99.3%,有3个位点氨基酸发生同样的替换(脯氨酸,Proline)100S(丝氨酸,Serine),S220T(苏氨酸,Threonine),E(谷氨酸,Glutamic Acid)391K(赖氨酸,Lysine).从采集于2010年12月标本分离的2株甲流病毒A/河北桥东/SWL (Swine-like) 178/2010和A/河北裕华/SWL1261/2010,在202、214、468三个氨基酸位点与其他毒株不同.所有167株甲流病毒的HA1第222位氨基酸均未发生D222G突变.结论 河北省甲流病毒HA基因与疫苗株A/California/07/2009高度同源,与疫苗株及各毒株之间核苷酸同源性均≥98.9%,尚未发现D222G变异.%Objective To study the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 viruses activity and the characteristics of hemagglutinin CHA) genes of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 viruses isolated in Hebei province. To analyze whether the isolated viruses represented such mutation as the amino acid change from aspartic acid (D) to glycine ( G ) at residue 222 might giving a rise to the combination of virus to lower respiratory tract receptor and to provide the scientific basis for influenza pandemic. Methods The pharynx

  15. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Influenza Virus Infection in A Survivor Who Has Recovered from Severe H7N9 Virus Infection, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shan-Hui; Wu, Meng-Na; Qian, Yan-Hua; Ma, Guang-Yuan; Wang, Guo-Lin; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Teng; Lu, Bing; Ma, Mai-Juan; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    We firstly report a patient who presented with severe complications after infection with influenza A(H1N1) pdm2009, more than 1 year after recovery from severe H7N9 virus infections. The population of patients who recovered from severe H7N9 infections might be at a higher risk to suffer severe complications after seasonal influenza infections, and they should be included in the high-risk populations recommended to receive seasonal influenza vaccination. PMID:27757100

  16. Pandemic (H1N1 2009 Influenza Virus Infection in A Survivor who has recovered from severe H7N9 Virus Infection, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Hui Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We firstly report a patient who presented with severe complications after infection with influenza A(H1N1 pdm2009, more than one year after recovery from severe H7N9 virus infections. The population of patients who recovered from severe H7N9 infections might be at a higher risk to suffer severe complications after seasonal influenza infections, and they should be included in the high-risk populations recommended to receive seasonal influenza vaccination.

  17. Decreased Serologic Response in Vaccinated Military Recruits during 2011 Correspond to Genetic Drift in Concurrent Circulating Pandemic A/H1N1 Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    responsible pathogens , and pathogen subtypes. To counter outbreaks of influenza, the trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) has been used to protect...increased virulence in mouse models [47]. The reversion mutation S84N, Figure 4. Phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of influenza pH1N1...members for periodic HIV testing and operationally required pre- and post-deployment blood draws [51]. Baseline samples were shipped to NHRC on dry

  18. Molecular characterization of a novel reassortant H1N2 influenza virus containing genes from the 2009 pandemic human H1N1 virus in swine from eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiuming; Wu, Haibo; Xu, Lihua; Peng, Xiaorong; Cheng, Linfang; Jin, Changzhong; Xie, Tiansheng; Lu, Xiangyun; Wu, Nanping

    2016-06-01

    Pandemic outbreaks of H1N1 swine influenza virus have been reported since 2009. Reassortant H1N2 viruses that contain genes from the pandemic H1N1 virus have been isolated in Italy and the United States. However, there is limited information regarding the molecular characteristics of reassortant H1N2 swine influenza viruses in eastern China. Active influenza surveillance programs in Zhejiang Province identified a novel H1N2 influenza virus isolated from pigs displaying clinical signs of influenza virus infection. Whole-genome sequencing was performed and this strain was compared with other influenza viruses available in GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the novel strain contained genes from the 2009 pandemic human H1N1 and swine H3N2 viruses. BALB/c mice were infected with the isolated virus to assess its virulence in mice. While the novel H1N2 isolate replicated well in mice, it was found to be less virulent. These results provide additional evidence that swine serve as intermediate hosts or 'mixing vessels' for novel influenza viruses. They also emphasize the importance of surveillance in the swine population for use as an early warning system for influenza outbreaks in swine and human populations.

  19. Revealing the True Incidence of Pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza in Finland during the First Two Seasons - An Analysis Based on a Dynamic Transmission Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubin, Mikhail; Lebedev, Artem; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Auranen, Kari

    2016-03-01

    The threat of the new pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 imposed a heavy burden on the public health system in Finland in 2009-2010. An extensive vaccination campaign was set up in the middle of the first pandemic season. However, the true number of infected individuals remains uncertain as the surveillance missed a large portion of mild infections. We constructed a transmission model to simulate the spread of influenza in the Finnish population. We used the model to analyse the two first years (2009-2011) of A(H1N1)pdm09 in Finland. Using data from the national surveillance of influenza and data on close person-to-person (social) contacts in the population, we estimated that 6% (90% credible interval 5.1 - 6.7%) of the population was infected with A(H1N1)pdm09 in the first pandemic season (2009/2010) and an additional 3% (2.5 - 3.5%) in the second season (2010/2011). Vaccination had a substantial impact in mitigating the second season. The dynamic approach allowed us to discover how the proportion of detected cases changed over the course of the epidemic. The role of time-varying reproduction number, capturing the effects of weather and changes in behaviour, was important in shaping the epidemic.

  20. Regional differences in mortality associated with pandemic Influenza A H1N1 in Brazil Diferencias regionales en la mortalidad asociada a la gripe A H1N1 pandémica en Brasil Diferenças regionais na mortalidade associada à influenza A H1N1 pandêmica no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cerbino Neto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to examine regional differences in mortality associated with influenza from 2006 to 2010 in Brazil. Syndromic surveillance, which includes deaths from pneumonia and influenza recorded in the Mortality Information System, only showed an increase in mortality during the pandemic in the South, Southeast, and Central, regions. In these regions, especially in the South, this increase occurred from July to September 2009. A review of deaths from confirmed influenza cases reported to the Information System for Notifiable Diseases showed different temporal patterns in the South/Southeast and the North/Northeast, with an increase from July to November 2009 for all regions and another peak, only for the latter, in March 2010, before the vaccination campaign. The results show regional differences in the intensity and temporal distribution of pandemic influenza and highlight the need for specific surveillance tools and control strategies for regions of the country.El objetivo de este artículo es examinar las diferencias regionales en la mortalidad asociada a la gripe, entre 2006 y 2010, en Brasil. La vigilancia de sindrómica, que incluye óbitos por neumonía y gripe, registrados en el Sistema de Información sobre Mortalidad, mostró un aumento en la mortalidad durante la pandemia sólo en las regiones Sur, Sudeste y Centro-Oeste. En esas regiones, principalmente en la Región Sur, ese aumento ocurrió entre julio y setiembre de 2009. Evaluándose los óbitos de casos confirmados de gripe, comunicados al Sistema de Información de Agravamientos por Notificación, se verificó un patrón temporal diferente entre las regiones Sur/Sudeste y las regiones Norte/Nordeste, con un aumento entre julio y noviembre de 2009 en todas las regiones y otro pico en marzo de 2010, antes de la campaña de vacunación, solamente en las últimas. Los resultados muestran diferencias regionales en la intensidad y en la distribución temporal de la

  1. Titering of 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin inhibition antibody in nonvaccinated pregnant women in Shiraz, Southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarvar, Behnam; Moghadami, Mohsen; Moattari, Afagh; Emami, Amir; Tabatabaee, Hamid Reza; Jahromi, Bahia Namavar; Asadi, Nasrin; Mousavizadeh, Ali; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Joulaei, Hassan; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz

    2012-05-01

    Influenza may cause severe complications for pregnant women. In this study antibody response against 2009 H1N1 influenza virus in pregnant women was investigated. This seroprevalance cross sectional and questionnaire based study was conducted using a convenient sampling method. Blood samples of pregnant women were checked for antibodies against 2009 H1N1 influenza virus using hemagglutination inhibition assay. An antibody titer level of ≥ 1:40 dilution was considered as the protective level. 167 (43.60%) of 383 pregnant women who participated in this study had protective antibody levels against this virus. 62 (35.63%) of 3rd trimester, 79 (46.74%) of 2nd trimester, and 21(52.50%) of 1st trimester pregnant women were immune respectively (χ2(for trend) = 8.20, p pregnant women of 3rd trimester of pregnancy (OR = 2.37, CI = 1.09-5.18). Pregnant women with higher education (OR = 1.67, CI = 1.02-2.73) and those with history of anemia (OR = 2.09, CI = 1.18-3.68) had more immunity. Older women (OR = 0.95, CI = 0.91-0.99) and those with history of psychological diseases (OR = 0.19, CI = 0.05-0.70) had less immunity. Vaccination of pregnant women, especially those who are in the higher trimesters of pregnancy, older, or less educated, against the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus should be continued.

  2. 社区甲型流感临床特征分析与比较%Clinical features of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in community:a comparative study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李真; 江倔; 孙成栋; 陈亮; 冯丽

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze clinical features of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) and seasonal influenza A.METHODS During May and Oct 2009, a total of 129 patients infected with influenza A who were quarantined in fever department of Jishuitan Hospital were observed.Real-time-fluorescence quantitative polymerase-chainreaction(PCR) assay was used to confirm infection.The clinic al features of the disease were closely monitored.RESULTS The 129 patients infected with influenza A had 65 patients infected with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and 64 patients infected with seasonal influenza A.The mean age of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) and influenza A were 21 years and 36 years, respectively.Students both influenza A were 47 and 13, respectively.Statistically significant difference was found (P<0.01).Expect for rhinorrhea and swelling of tonsils, the clinical features of both influenza A had few statistica differences.CONCLUSIONS The patients investigated the influenza A in our hospital has a mild illness.The young students of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) are the major.The clinical features of both influenza A resemble.They need to be confirmed by PCR.%目的 分析和比较社区散发新型甲型H1N1流感和季节性流感临床特征,为临床诊治甲型流感提供参考依据. 方法 回顾性分析2009年5-10月来医院发热门诊就诊的具有流感样症状的患者,均经实时荧光定量PCR检测. 结果 在确诊的129例甲型流感患者中,新型甲型H1N1流感65例,占50.4%,季节性甲型流感64例,占49.6%;新型甲型H1N1流感组平均年龄21岁,季节性甲型流感组36岁,两组差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);新型甲型H1N1流感组学生占47例,占72.3%,季节性甲型流感组13例,占20.3%,两组差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);从临床表现比较,除流涕、扁桃体肿大,两组差异有统计学意义(均P<0.01)外;其他差异均无统计学意义. 结论 医院确诊的甲型流感患者均为轻型;新型甲型H1N1

  3. Monitoring the level of government trust, risk perception and intention of the general public to adopt protective measures during the influenza A (H1N1 pandemic in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oudhoff Jurriaan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the course of an influenza pandemic, governments know relatively little about the possibly changing influence of government trust, risk perception, and receipt of information on the public's intention to adopt protective measures or on the acceptance of vaccination. This study aims to identify and describe possible changes in and factors associated with public's intentions during the 2009 influenza A (H1N1 pandemic in the Netherlands. Methods Sixteen cross-sectional telephone surveys were conducted (N = 8060 between April - November 2009. From these repeated measurements three consecutive periods were categorized based on crucial events during the influenza A (H1N1 pandemic. Time trends in government trust, risk perception, intention to adopt protective measures, and the acceptance of vaccination were analysed. Factors associated with an intention to adopt protective measures or vaccination were identified. Results Trust in the government was high, but decreased over time. During the course of the pandemic, perceived vulnerability and an intention to adopt protective measures increased. Trust and vulnerability were associated with an intention to adopt protective measures in general only during period one. Higher levels of intention to receive vaccination were associated with increased government trust, fear/worry, and perceived vulnerability. In periods two and three receipt of information was positively associated with an intention to adopt protective measures. Most respondents wanted to receive information about infection prevention from municipal health services, health care providers, and the media. Conclusions The Dutch response to the H1N1 virus was relatively muted. Higher levels of trust in the government, fear/worry, and perceived vulnerability were all positively related to an intention to accept vaccination. Only fear/worry was positively linked to an intention to adopt protective measures during the entire

  4. Different transmission patterns in the early stages of the influenza A(H1N1)v pandemic: a comparative analysis of 12 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasche, Stefan; Hens, Niel; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Mossong, Joël; van Ballegooijen, W Marijn; Nunes, Baltazar; Rizzo, Caterina; Popovici, Florin; Santa-Olalla, Patricia; Hrubá, Frantiska; Parmakova, Kremena; Baguelin, Marc; van Hoek, Albert Jan; Desenclos, Jean-Claude; Bernillon, Pascale; Cámara, Amparro Larrauri; Wallinga, Jacco; Asikainen, Tommi; White, Peter J; Edmunds, W John

    2011-06-01

    Following the emergence of a novel strain of influenza A(H1N1) in Mexico and the United States in April 2009, its epidemiology in Europe during the summer was limited to sporadic and localised outbreaks. Only the United Kingdom experienced widespread transmission declining with school holidays in late July. Using statistical modelling where applicable we explored the following causes that could explain this surprising difference in transmission dynamics: extinction by chance, differences in the susceptibility profile, age distribution of the imported cases, differences in contact patterns, mitigation strategies, school holidays and weather patterns. No single factor was able to explain the differences sufficiently. Hence an additive mixed model was used to model the country-specific weekly estimates of the effective reproductive number using the extinction probability, school holidays and weather patterns as explanatory variables. The average extinction probability, its trend and the trend in absolute humidity were found to be significantly negatively correlated with the effective reproduction number - although they could only explain about 3% of the variability in the model. By comparing the initial epidemiology of influenza A (H1N1) across different European countries, our analysis was able to uncover a possible role for the timing of importations (extinction probability), mixing patterns and the absolute humidity as underlying factors. However, much uncertainty remains. With better information on the role of these epidemiological factors, the control of influenza could be improved.

  5. Estimation of the Serial Interval for Pandemic Influenza (pH1N1 in the Most Southern Province of Argentina

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    PW Orellano

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A retrospective cohort study, in the context of household transmission, to estimate the serial interval (SI of pH1N1 influenza in the island of Tierra del Fuego was carried out.Methods: We collected data from the epidemiological surveillance system during disease outbreak in Ushuaia and Rio Grande, the two main cities of the southernmost province of Argentina. Only the records of patients and households with a positive result of RT-PCR assay for pH1N1 virus were used.Results: A total of 283 laboratory confirmed cases were detected, from 550 samples analyzed. Hospitalizations were necessary in 13.8% of patients, yet no deaths were reported. Complete data of household contacts were available in 13 patients. We calculated an SI of 2.0 days (95% CI = 1.5 – 2.6 days, fitting to a log-normal distribution, the one that presented the best adjustment.Conclusion: These results were consistent with estimates of SI calculated from Mexico, but lower than estimations from Canada, Germany and USA. We discuss these differences in relation to limitations of the current study design.

  6. "Pandemic Public Health Paradox": Time Series Analysis of the 2009/10 Influenza A / H1N1 Epidemiology, Media Attention, Risk Perception and Public Reactions in 5 European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reintjes, Ralf; Das, Enny; Klemm, Celine; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Keßler, Verena; Ahmad, Amena

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, influenza A H1N1 caused the first pandemic of the 21st century. Although a vaccine against this influenza subtype was offered before or at the onset of the second epidemic wave that caused most of the fatal cases in Europe, vaccination rates for that season were lower than expected. We propose that the contradiction between high risk of infection and low use of available prevention measures represents a pandemic public health paradox. This research aims for a better understanding of this paradox by exploring the time-dependent interplay among changing influenza epidemiology, media attention, pandemic control measures, risk perception and public health behavior among five European countries (Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Spain and the UK). Findings suggest that asynchronicity between media curves and epidemiological curves may potentially explain the pandemic public health paradox; media attention for influenza A H1N1 in Europe declined long before the epidemic reached its peak, and public risk perceptions and behaviors may have followed media logic, rather than epidemiological logic.

  7. Pandemic 2009 Influenza A (H1N1 virus infection in cancer and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients; a multicenter observational study. [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4bi

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    Maria Cecilia Dignani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: During March 2009 a novel Influenza A virus emerged in Mexico. We describe the clinical picture of the pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 Influenza in cancer patients during the 2009 influenza season. Methods: Twelve centers participated in a multicenter retrospective observational study of cancer patients with confirmed infection with the 2009 H1N1 Influenza A virus (influenza-like illness or pneumonia plus positive PCR for the 2009 H1N1 Influenza A virus  in respiratory secretions. Clinical data were obtained by retrospective chart review and analyzed.  Results: From May to August 2009, data of 65 patients were collected. Median age was 51 years, 57 % of the patients were female. Most patients (47 had onco-hematological cancers and 18 had solid tumors. Cancer treatment mainly consisted of chemotherapy (46, or stem cell transplantation (SCT (16. Only 19 of 64 patients had received the 2009 seasonal Influenza vaccine. Clinical presentation included pneumonia (43 and upper respiratory tract infection (22. Forty five of 58 ambulatory patients were admitted. Mechanical ventilation was required in 12 patients (18%. Treatment included oseltamivir monotherapy or in combination with amantadine for a median of 7 days. The global 30-day mortality rate was 18%. All 12 deaths were among the non-vaccinated patients. No deaths were observed among the 19 vaccinated patients. Oxygen saturation <96% at presentation was a predictor of mortality (OR 19.5; 95%CI: 2.28 to 165.9. Conclusions: In our cancer patient population, the pandemic 2009 Influenza A (H1N1 virus was associated with high incidence of pneumonia (66%, and 30-day mortality (18.5%. Saturation <96% was significantly associated with death. No deaths were observed among vaccinated patients.

  8. Importation and spread of pandemic influenza virus a(H1N1 in Autonomous Province of vojvodina in preepidemic period

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    Ristić Mioljub

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Influenza is the most frequently reported communicable disease, having epidemic and pandemic potential. The first influenza pandemic in this century started in Mexico and spread quickly throughout the world. This paper analyses importation of pandemic influenza cases and local transmission among population in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina. Material and methods. According to the WHO guidelines and national recommendations, the influenza surveillance activities were conducted in Vojvodina in order to detect, isolate and treat affected international travelers and their close contacts. Patients whose pandemic influenza infection was laboratory confirmed were classified as confirmed cases, while those with symptoms who were epidemiologically linked with confirmed cases were classified as probable cases. Results. During the period from the 24th of June to 17th of August 2009, 123 pandemic influenza cases were recorded in Vojvodina. Infection was imported through international travelers and our citizens coming from countries affected by influenza outbreaks. Majority of cases had mild clinical picture. Most frequently reported symptoms were high fever (above 38oC (85.6%, and cough (61.6%. Difficulty in breathing was recorded in 20 (16.0% cases, while pneumonia developed in 4 (3.2% cases but none of the cases required mechanical ventilation. Conclusion. The imported cases of pandemic influenza in the pre-epidemic period led to limited local transmission in general population and caused a small outbreak among visitors of International music festival called EXIT.

  9. Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza Virus Replicates to Higher Levels and Induces More Fever and Acute Inflammatory Cytokines in Cynomolgus versus Rhesus Monkeys and Can Replicate in Common Marmosets.

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    Mooij, Petra; Koopman, Gerrit; Mortier, Daniëlla; van Heteren, Melanie; Oostermeijer, Herman; Fagrouch, Zahra; de Laat, Rudy; Kobinger, Gary; Li, Yan; Remarque, Edmond J; Kondova, Ivanela; Verschoor, Ernst J; Bogers, Willy M J M

    2015-01-01

    The close immunological and physiological resemblance with humans makes non-human primates a valuable model for studying influenza virus pathogenesis and immunity and vaccine efficacy against infection. Although both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are frequently used in influenza virus research, a direct comparison of susceptibility to infection and disease has not yet been performed. In the current study a head-to-head comparison was made between these species, by using a recently described swine-origin pandemic H1N1 strain, A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009. In comparison to rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques developed significantly higher levels of virus replication in the upper airways and in the lungs, involving both peak level and duration of virus production, as well as higher increases in body temperature. In contrast, clinical symptoms, including respiratory distress, were more easily observed in rhesus macaques. Expression of sialyl-α-2,6-Gal saccharides, the main receptor for human influenza A viruses, was 50 to 73 times more abundant in trachea and bronchus of cynomolgus macaques relative to rhesus macaques. The study also shows that common marmosets, a New World non-human primate species, are susceptible to infection with pandemic H1N1. The study results favor the cynomolgus macaque as model for pandemic H1N1 influenza virus research because of the more uniform and high levels of virus replication, as well as temperature increases, which may be due to a more abundant expression of the main human influenza virus receptor in the trachea and bronchi.

  10. The new member of the swine influenza virus gene pool: the existence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus gene fragments and potential threats%猪流感病毒基因池中的新成员:新甲型H1N1流感病毒基因片段的存在及潜在威胁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高灵茜; 崔梦一; 樊晓晖

    2016-01-01

    新甲型H1N1流感病毒(2009 pandemic H1N1 virus,pdm/09)于2009年在人群中暴发以后,迅速在全球范围内传播,引起了21世纪的第一次流感大流行.pdm/09是由人的流感病毒、禽流感和猪流感病毒(swine influenza virus,SIV)经过重配后形成的病毒,它的基因片段已经进入了猪流感病毒当中并开始产生新的变异毒株,这些新的变异流感毒株在欧亚大陆、北美大陆及中国南部的各个地区被不断报道和发现,这表明猪源性pdm/09在人间流行后可返传给猪,成为猪流感病毒基因池中的固有组成,获得与SIV重组形成新