WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer radiation treatment

  1. Potential applications of synchrotron radiation to the treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although conventional radiotherapy remains to be one of the most useful treatments for cancer, it is not the best strategy to maximize the effects on the tumors and minimize the damage to the surrounding tissues due to its physical and biological characteristics. Synchrotron radiation (SR) with uniquely physical and biological advantages may represent an innovative approach for cancer treatment. In recent years, SR-based photon activation therapy, stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and micro-beam radiation treatment have been developed, and the results of in vitro and in vivo experiments are very promising. It is necessary to understand the physical and radiobiological principle of those novel strategies before the approach is applied to the clinic. In this paper, we summarize the advances of SR in terms of physical, radiobiological advantages and its potential clinical applications. With the successful operation of shanghai synchrotron radiation, good opportunities in China have been provided for investigations on the treatment of cancer with synchrotron radiation. (authors)

  2. Analytical signals from cancer patients following radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer patients are treated with high energy (8 to 30 MeV) gamma radiation. This treatment modality provides better depth dose distribution than more conventional low-energy gamma treatments, in particular for deeply located tumors. A by-product of the high-energy treatment is gamma-induced activity in the treatment volume following photonuclear reactions. These reactions are endogenic and require that the gamma radiation energy be above threshold value in order for the reaction to take place. For most elements, the threshold value is above 8 MeV; however, for low Z elements, this threshold may reach 18 MeV as is the case for oxygen. The cross sections for the (γ, n) reactions are few millibarns for low Z elements and increases up to few hundreds of millibarns for the heavy elements. The radionuclides resulting from photonuclear reaction are typically positron emitter or decay by electron capture. Thus, it is possible to monitor either the annihilation radiation (511 KeV) or the characteristic gamma radiation. The present work demonstrates that the activity induced in cancer patients following a single treatment (300 rad) enables the monitoring of nitrogen and phosphorus in the irradiated volume. The results from measurements in phantom, cadavers, and cancer patients from different regions in the body are presented. The hypothesis to be tested is whether there are local changes in these two elements during the course of radiation treatment which might correlate with the efficacy of the treatment

  3. Phenomenological modelling of second cancer incidence for radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is still an unanswered question whether a relatively low dose of radiation to a large volume or a higher dose to a small volume produces the higher cancer incidence. This is of interest in view of modalities like IMRT or rotation therapy where high conformity to the target volume is achieved at the cost of a large volume of normal tissue exposed to radiation. Knowledge of the shape of the dose response for radiation-induced cancer is essential to answer the question of what risk of second cancer incidence is implied by which treatment modality. This study therefore models the dose response for radiation-induced second cancer after radiation therapy of which the exact mechanisms are still unknown. A second cancer risk estimation tool for treatment planning is presented which has the potential to be used for comparison of different treatment modalities, and risk is estimated on a voxel basis for different organs in two case studies. The presented phenomenological model summarises the impact of microscopic biological processes into effective parameters of mutation and cell sterilisation. In contrast to other models, the effective radiosensitivities of mutated and non-mutated cells are allowed to differ. Based on the number of mutated cells present after irradiation, the model is then linked to macroscopic incidence by summarising model parameters and modifying factors into natural cancer incidence and the dose response in the lower-dose region. It was found that all principal dose-response functions discussed in the literature can be derived from the model. However, from the investigation and due to scarcity of adequate data, rather vague statements about likelihood of dose-response functions can be made than a definite decision for one response. Based on the predicted model parameters, the linear response can probably be rejected using the dynamics described, but both a flattening response and a decrease appear likely, depending strongly on the effective cell

  4. Phenomenological modelling of second cancer incidence for radiation treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfaffenberger, Asja; Oelfke, Uwe [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Medizinische Physik in der Strahlentherapie; Schneider, Uwe [Triemli Hospital and Vetsuisse Faculty, Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine; Poppe, Bjoern [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Medizinische Strahlenphysik

    2009-07-01

    It is still an unanswered question whether a relatively low dose of radiation to a large volume or a higher dose to a small volume produces the higher cancer incidence. This is of interest in view of modalities like IMRT or rotation therapy where high conformity to the target volume is achieved at the cost of a large volume of normal tissue exposed to radiation. Knowledge of the shape of the dose response for radiation-induced cancer is essential to answer the question of what risk of second cancer incidence is implied by which treatment modality. This study therefore models the dose response for radiation-induced second cancer after radiation therapy of which the exact mechanisms are still unknown. A second cancer risk estimation tool for treatment planning is presented which has the potential to be used for comparison of different treatment modalities, and risk is estimated on a voxel basis for different organs in two case studies. The presented phenomenological model summarises the impact of microscopic biological processes into effective parameters of mutation and cell sterilisation. In contrast to other models, the effective radiosensitivities of mutated and non-mutated cells are allowed to differ. Based on the number of mutated cells present after irradiation, the model is then linked to macroscopic incidence by summarising model parameters and modifying factors into natural cancer incidence and the dose response in the lower-dose region. It was found that all principal dose-response functions discussed in the literature can be derived from the model. However, from the investigation and due to scarcity of adequate data, rather vague statements about likelihood of dose-response functions can be made than a definite decision for one response. Based on the predicted model parameters, the linear response can probably be rejected using the dynamics described, but both a flattening response and a decrease appear likely, depending strongly on the effective cell

  5. Radiation treatment for newly diagnosed esophageal cancer with prior radiation to the thoracic cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sponseller, Patricia, E-mail: sponselp@uw.edu [University of Wisconsin at La Crosse, La Crosse, WI (United States); Lenards, Nishele [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kusano, Aaron; Patel, Shilpen [University of Wisconsin at La Crosse, La Crosse, WI (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to communicate the use of single-positron emission computed tomography scan in planning radiation treatments for patients with a history of radiation to the thoracic cavity. A patient presented with obstructive esophageal cancer, having previously received chemotherapy and radiation therapy to the mediastinum for non-Hodgkin lymphoma 11 years earlier. Owing to a number of comorbidities, the patient was not a surgical candidate and was referred to the University of Washington Medical Center for radiation therapy. Prior dose to the spinal cord and lung were taken into account before designing the radiation treatment plan.

  6. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  7. Molecular targeted treatment and radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, Friederike; Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Background: EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitors confer clinical benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer when combined with chemotherapy. An emerging strategy to improve outcomes in rectal cancer is to integrate biologically active, targeted agents as triple therapy into chemoradiation protocols. Material and methods: cetuximab and bevacizumab have now been incorporated into phase I-II studies of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. The rationale of these combinations, early efficacy and toxicity data, and possible molecular predictors for tumor response are reviewed. Computerized bibliographic searches of Pubmed were supplemented with hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of ASCO and ASTRO meetings. Results: the combination of cetuximab and CRT can be safely applied without dose compromises of the respective treatment components. Disappointingly low rates of pathologic complete remission have been noted in several phase II studies. The K-ras mutation status and the gene copy number of EGFR may predict tumor response. The toxicity pattern (radiation-induced enteritis, perforations) and surgical complications (wound healing, fistula, bleeding) observed in at least some of the clinical studies with bevacizumab and CRT warrant further investigations. Conclusion: longer follow-up (and, finally, randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates, and toxicity associated with these novel treatment approaches. (orig.)

  8. Process of coping with intracavity radiation treatment for gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to describe the process of coping with the experience of receiving intracavity radiation treatment (ICR) for gynecologic cancer. Data were collected on the outcomes of coping, emotion (Profile of Mood States) and level of function (Sickness Impact Profile), and symptom severity and upset the evening before, during, the day after, and 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The subjects (N = 28) had a mean age of 52 years, 39% were employed full-time, 56% had occupations as manual workers, 57% had completed 12 or more years of education, and 68% were married or widowed. The treatment required the subjects to be hospitalized on complete bedrest with radiation precautions for an average of 48 hours. Intrauterine devices were used to treat 18 subjects and vaginal applications were used to treat 10 subjects. Negative mood and level of disruption in function were generally low. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no change in negative mood over time while the change in function was attributable to the increase in disruption during treatment. Utilization of affective coping strategies and problem-oriented coping strategies was positively correlated with negative mood and disruption in function over the points of measurement. The results indicate that subjects tolerated ICR well and rapidly resumed usual function following discharge from the hospital, despite the persistence of some symptoms 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The positive association between the utilization of coping strategies and negative outcomes of coping suggests a need to examine the measurement of coping strategies and consider the possibility that these actions represent a response to a stressful situation rather than a method of dealing with the situation

  9. Process of coping with intracavity radiation treatment for gynecologic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nail, L.M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the process of coping with the experience of receiving intracavity radiation treatment (ICR) for gynecologic cancer. Data were collected on the outcomes of coping, emotion (Profile of Mood States) and level of function (Sickness Impact Profile), and symptom severity and upset the evening before, during, the day after, and 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The subjects (N = 28) had a mean age of 52 years, 39% were employed full-time, 56% had occupations as manual workers, 57% had completed 12 or more years of education, and 68% were married or widowed. The treatment required the subjects to be hospitalized on complete bedrest with radiation precautions for an average of 48 hours. Intrauterine devices were used to treat 18 subjects and vaginal applications were used to treat 10 subjects. Negative mood and level of disruption in function were generally low. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no change in negative mood over time while the change in function was attributable to the increase in disruption during treatment. Utilization of affective coping strategies and problem-oriented coping strategies was positively correlated with negative mood and disruption in function over the points of measurement. The results indicate that subjects tolerated ICR well and rapidly resumed usual function following discharge from the hospital, despite the persistence of some symptoms 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The positive association between the utilization of coping strategies and negative outcomes of coping suggests a need to examine the measurement of coping strategies and consider the possibility that these actions represent a response to a stressful situation rather than a method of dealing with the situation.

  10. Radiation treatment in recurrent squamous cell cancer of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment and outcome of recurrent vulvar cancer. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective review of 26 women referred to the Department of Radiation Oncology between 1982 and 1995, patient records were analyzed with respect to the findings at original surgery, the time to locoregional recurrence, the location of the recurrence, and the subsequent management and outcome. Results: Sixteen recurrences were managed with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy, and the remainder with radiation treatment, combined with chemotherapy in some cases. The overall survival for the entire cohort at 5 years was 22%. The 5-year survival for those with recurrence confined to the vulva (n = 13) was 46%, compared with 0% for those women with a recurrence located or extending beyond the vulva (p = 0.002). The local control rate was 34.6%. Conclusion: Our results confirm the poor overall prognosis for this condition. In particular, they highlight the importance of the location of the recurrence as a prognostic indicator. Based on this review, we conclude that radiotherapy fields should encompass the region at risk if the intent is curative. Finally, low-dose palliation for groin node recurrence is ineffectual

  11. Leukemia and other cancers following radiation treatment of pelvic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follow-up studies of patients treated for cancer of the cervix with radiotherapy have shown such women to be at little or no increased risk of leukemia subsequent to the radiation exposure. However, women exposed to lower doses of radiation in the pelvic area, in the induction of an artificial menopause, appear to show increased risks of both leukemia and cancers of those sites directly in the radiation field. The studies of these two types of radiation exposure are reviewed. The findings may possibly be reconciled with each other on the basis of the distribution of radiation dose to the bone marrow. Irradiation for cancer of the cervix delivers radiation doses to a small portion of the marrow which are probably lethal for most marrow cells. The mean dose to cells distant from the cervix may be too small to produce a detectable increase in leukemia incidence. The lower and more uniformly distributed radiation dose used to induce an artificial menopause will be less lethal for marrow cells and may consequently deliver a higher ''effective'' marrow dose to surviving cells, resulting in an increased leukemia risk

  12. The role of PET/CT in radiation treatment planning for cancer patient treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and, more recently, integrated positron emission tomography/X ray computed tomography (PET/CT) have appeared as significant diagnostic imaging systems in clinical medicine. Accurate recognition of cancers in patients by means of PET scanning with Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has illustrated a need to determine a mode of therapy to achieve better prognoses. The clinical management of cancer patients has improved dramatically with the introduction of clinical PET. For treatment of cancer patients, on the other hand, radiation therapy (RT) plays an important role as a non-invasive therapy. It is crucial that cancers are encompassed by high dose irradiation, particularly in cases of curative RT. Irradiation should precisely target the entire tumour and aim to minimise the size of microscopic extensions of the cancer, as well as minimize radiation damage to normal tissues. A new imaging technique has therefore been sought to allow precise delineation of the cancer target to be irradiated. Clinical PET, combined with utilization of 18F-FDG, may have an important role in radiation treatment planning (RTP) in lung cancer. In addition to determining if RT is appropriate and whether therapy will be given with curative or palliative intent, 18F-FDG-PET is useful for determining therapy ports. It can be used both to limit ports to spare normal tissue and to include additional involved regions. Several studies have shown that PET has an impact on RTP in an important proportion of patients. It is to be hoped that treatment plans that include all the 18F-FDG-avid lesions or the 18F-FDG-avid portions of a complex mass will result in more effective local control with less unnecessary tissue being treated. The IAEA has placed emphasis on the issue of application of clinical PET for radiation treatment planning in various cancer patients. Two consultants meetings were held in 2006 and their results are summarized into this IAEA

  13. Superficial Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minni, John; Herold, David

    2015-01-01

    Superficial radiation therapy has become more widely available to dermatologists. With the advent of more portable machines, it has become more convenient for dermatology practices to employ in an office-based setting. The goal of this paper is to provide a deeper insight into the role of superficial radiation therapy in dermatology practice and to review the current literature surrounding its use in the treatment of both basal and squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:26705443

  14. Cancer patients with cardiac pacemakers needing radiation treatment: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Anusheel Munshi; Jai Prakash Agarwal; Kailash Chander Pandey

    2013-01-01

    With improving average life expectancy of individuals in most countries, there has been increase in the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Radiation oncologists therefore are likely to encounter an increasing number of cancer patients with in situ cardiac pacemaker devices needing radiation treatments. Pacemaker technology has advanced rapidly in recent years. As a result, the potential interactions of these devices with radiation therapy have changed since American Association...

  15. Radiation therapy in complex treatment for stage III breast cancer with reconstructive plastic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-operative radiation therapy in patients with stage III breast cancer on the third month after reconstructive plastic surgery allows to eliminate scar deformities of the organ and does not aggravate the treatment results when compared with mastectomized patients.

  16. The radiation sensitizing effect of PSK in the treatment for the cervical cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSK is the protein-bound polysaccharide isolated from Coriolus versicolor (strain CM-101) belonging to Basidiomycetes. It has been widely used as antitumor agent by oral route in Japan for cancer of digestive organs, lung cancer, breast cancer and so on. In this paper, clinical data for the radiation sensitizing effect of PSK in the treatment for the cervical cancer patients is reported. The action mechanism of PSK is still unclear. (Auth.)

  17. A case of jawbone necrosis resulting from radiation treatment of multiple bone metastases from breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy for malignant tumors is sometimes associated with side effects that can appear early in the course of treatment. Radiation necrosis of the jawbone sometimes occurs after exposure to a radiation dose of 60 Gy or more for treatment of malignant tumors of the head and neck, and this can have a marked influence on subsequent dental care. The effect is often more marked in the lower than in the upper jaw, and becomes typically evident at the time of tooth extraction. As well as cancers of the head and neck, patients with breast cancer can also be affected by radiation necrosis of the jawbone. It is well known that the rate of bone metastases from breast cancer is much high especially appearing the mandibular in the head and neck lesions. Here we report an overview of jawbone necrosis in the light of our experience of one such case following radiation treatment of multiple bone metastases from breast cancer. (author)

  18. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of localized prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostatic carcinoma is one of the leading causes of male cancer deaths. However, the routine diagnostic and therapeutic strategies have not yet been established. Although the outcome of surgical and radiotherapeutical approaches has frequently been reported to be comparable, the profile of side effects is different. This could offer the basis for selecting the treatment of choice in individual cases. During the last decade the radiotherapeutical technique has markedly improved, in part due to the achievements in the field of computer assisted tomography planning and conformal technique; the outcome of side-effects has decreased with concurrent increase in the rate of local control. The prescribing, recording and reporting of irradiation have also recently developed, as well as the staging of the disease. Therefore we consider it timely to review progress in this subject and to emphasize the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of localized prostatic cancer. (orig.)

  19. Focal Therapy, Differential Therapy, and Radiation Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Anudh K.; Ennis, Ronald D

    2012-01-01

    Focal and differential therapy represent an approach to improve the therapeutic ratio of prostate cancer treatments. This concept is a shift from treating the whole gland to intensely treating the portion of the gland that contains significant tumor. However, there are many challenges in the move towards focal approaches. Defining which patients are suitable candidates for focal therapy approaches is an area of significant controversy, and it is likely that additional data from imaging or det...

  20. Experimental study for cancer treatment using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is one of the most powerful treatments for brain tumor. Penetrating ionizing particles is aimed toward the tumor, delivering as high radiation to it as is usefully suppressive of tumor growth, and tolerated by normal vital tissues inevitably irradiated with the tumor. The use of a high-energy synchrotron-radiation thin X-ray beams (microplanar beams, or microbeams) produced through a multi-slit collimator has been reported to enhance the tolerance of normal tissue to radiation. The high collimation and dose rate of synchrotron X-ray beams favor radiotherapy. Irradiation with parallel arrays of microbeam, planar slices of spares normal brain, and preferentially damages tumors. The width of the peak region was 20-25 μm, and the spacing between the regions was 100-300 μm. We firstly examined the dose distribution with micro-scale resolution in order to clarify this phenomenon. Secondary, radiotherapy of malignant brain tumors in rats was performed. The treatment results in extended median survival time. The effects are mediated, at least in part, by the tissue's microvasculature that seems to effectively repair itself in normal brain but fails to do so in tumors. (author)

  1. A multi-target approach to pancreatic cancer treatment using radiation and concurrent dual targeting chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer has a survival rate of less than 5% five years after diagnosis. Treatment for pancreatic cancer consists of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Despite this multimodality approach local regional reoccurrence of pancreatic cancer is common. In many cases pancreatic cancer recurrence is due to the therapeutic resistance of pancreatic cancer cells. While the genetics of pancreatic cancer are highly complex, about 90% of all pancreatic cancers exhibit a constitutively active KRAS oncogene. Common characteristics of this mutation are constitutive activation of the pro-survival transcription factor NF-kB and increased activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. NF-kB controls cell survival, angiogenesis, and invasion while PDH kinase causes the shift commonly seen in cancer metabolism to aerobic glycolysis (Warburg metabolism). We hypothesized that by blocking the pro-survival signals from NF-kB with the inhibitor Dimethylamino-parthenolide (DMAPT) and by shifting the metabolism from Warburg metabolism back to oxidative metabolism by using Dichloroacetate (DCA that we can increase the effectiveness of radiation therapy in treating pancreatic carcinomas clinically). This study examined the effectiveness of Dimethylamino-parthenolide (DMAPT) and Dichloroacetate (DCA) to induce cytotoxicity and increase radiation-induced cell killing in human pancreatic cancer cells MIA PaCa-2, BxPc-3, and AsPc-1. We found that dual treatment of the three pancreatic cancer cell lines: altered Warburg metabolism; decreased cell viability; altered cell cycle distribution; increased population doubling times; and increased radiation-induced cell killing after single and fractionated doses through inhibition of split dose and DNA double strand break repair. In summary, we have established that dual treatment with DMAPT and DCA is not only cytotoxic but also significantly enhances radiation-induced cell killing of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. (author)

  2. Is cardiac toxicity a relevant issue in the radiation treatment of esophageal cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In recent years several papers have been published on radiation-induced cardiac toxicity, especially in breast cancer patients. However, in esophageal cancer patients the radiation dose to the heart is usually markedly higher. To determine whether radiation-induced cardiac toxicity is also a relevant issue for this group, we conducted a review of the current literature. Methods: A literature search was performed in Medline for papers concerning cardiac toxicity in esophageal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Results: The overall crude incidence of symptomatic cardiac toxicity was as high as 10.8%. Toxicities corresponded with several dose–volume parameters of the heart. The most frequently reported complications were pericardial effusion, ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Conclusion: Cardiac toxicity is a relevant issue in the treatment of esophageal cancer. However, valid Normal Tissue Complication Probability models for esophageal cancer are not available at present

  3. Multimodality Treatment for Patients with Node-Positive Prostate Cancer: the Role of Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Satoru; Nomoto, Yoshihito; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Yamashita, Yasufumi; Watanabe, Yui; Toyomasu, Yutaka; Kawamura, Tomoko; Takada, Akinori; Ii, Noriko; Sakuma, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the secondary most frequently diagnosed cancer in the world. Although numerous prospective randomized trial have been conducted to guide the management of patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer, few clinical trials targeting node-positive prostate cancer have been reported. Therefore, there are still controversies in the optimal management of node-positive prostate cancer. Recently, efficacy of multimodality treatment, including radiation therapy (RT), for such patients has been reported in several articles. The results indicate potential benefit of RT both in adjuvant therapy after prostatectomy and in definitive therapy for node-positive prostate cancer. The aim in this article was to summarize the current evidence for RT and evaluate the role in multimodality treatment for patients with node-positive prostate cancer. PMID:27221830

  4. Radiation exposure and familial aggregation of cancers as risk factors for colorectal cancer after radioiodine treatment for thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In thyroid cancer patients, radioiodine treatment has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of colon carcinoma. The aim of this study in thyroid cancer patients was to evaluate the role of familial factors in the risk of colorectal cancer and their potential interaction with radioiodine exposure. Methods and Materials: We performed a case-control study on 15 colorectal cancer patients and 76 matched control subjects, nested in a cohort of 3708 thyroid cancer patients treated between 1933 and 1998. For each patient, the radiation dose delivered to the colon by radioiodine was estimated by use of standard tables. In those who received external radiation therapy, the average radiation doses delivered to the colon and rectum were estimated by use of DOSEg software. A complete familial history was obtained by face-to-face interviews, and a familial index was defined to evaluate the degree of familial aggregation. Results: The risk of colorectal cancer increased with familial aggregation of colorectal cancer (p = 0.02). After adjustment for the radiation dose delivered to the colon and rectum, the risk of colorectal cancer was 2.8-fold higher (95% CI, 1.0-8.0) for patients with at least one relative affected by colorectal cancer than for patients without such a family history (p = 0.05). The radiation dose delivered to the colon and rectum by 131I and external radiation therapy was associated with an increase of risk near the significance threshold (p = 0.1). No significant interaction was found between radiation dose and having an affected relative (p = 0.9). Conclusions: The role of familial background in the risk of colorectal cancer following a differentiated thyroid carcinoma appears to increase with the radiation dose delivered to the colon and rectum. However, the study population was small and no interaction was found between these two factors

  5. Cognitive defenses and compliance with radiation treatment in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the relationships between four cognitive defenses and compliance with radiation therapy in cancer patients. The role of accurate self-report of usage of each of the defenses was examined as well. A distinction between direct-action and emotion-focused coping was utilized to conceptualize the possible relationships between compliance and the defenses. Based on the proposals of Heilbrun and Renert (1986) regarding the relative evasiveness of the defenses and available evidence from the compliance literature, it was predicted that noncompliant patients would show more repression, projection, and denial and less rationalization than compliant patients. In addition, based upon the findings of Heilbrun and Pepe (1985) that related self-deception to effectiveness of the defenses in dealing with stress, predictions were also made regarding differences in accuracy of reported defense usage by compliant and noncompliant patients. Noncompliant repressors and projectors and compliant rationalizers were predicted to be less aware of their respective use of these defenses than their compliant counterparts; noncompliant deniers were predicted to be more aware of the use of this defense than compliant deniers

  6. Role of radiation therapy in the multi-modal treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of radiation therapy as part of the multi-modal treatment of head and neck cancer appeared to be important with respect to functional and cosmetic morbidity. As for oral cancer, the value of brachytherapy was excellent in cases of localized disease. As far as the latter technique was applicable, patients with tongue cancer at T1, T2 and T3 could be treated by radiation as the initial choice unless palpable neck node metastasis was present. In contrast, cure of the lesion would not be expected from external irradiation alone even when combined with chemotherapy. Accordingly, in such advanced cases, salvage surgery should be applied with or without radiation and/or chemotherapy. As for maxillary cancer, the introduction of ''trimodal therapy'' has improved the local control rate only to a slight degree. After the application of conservative surgery followed by conventional trimodal combination therapy, local control and five-year survival rates have been improved markedly. (author)

  7. The breast cancer patient's experience of making radiation therapy treatment decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer have many decisions to make during the course of their treatment. The aims of this paper are to describe the women's experience of making radiation therapy treatment decisions for early breast cancer and to explore how women feel about receiving radiation therapy. An in-depth understanding of the women's experience was developed using a qualitative research approach underpinned by hermeneutic phenomenology. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 women who had completed treatment for early breast cancer. The themes that emerged from the data were: being challenged, getting ready, beyond control, regaining a sense of control and getting through it. This study provides health professionals with an initial understanding of the women's perspective of the experience of making radiation therapy treatment decisions for early breast cancer. This study concludes by suggesting that further research needs to be conducted to gain an understanding of how other patients feel about treatment decision making and radiation therapy. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Radiography

  8. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: emerging cancer treatment technology

    OpenAIRE

    T.S. Hong; Ritter, M. A.; Tomé, W. A.; Harari, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is rapidly advancing in the field of radiation oncology. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy allows for improved dose conformality, thereby affording the potential to decrease the spectrum of normal tissue toxicities associated with IMRT. Preliminary results with IMRT are quite promising; however, the clinical data is relatively immature and overall patient numbers remain small. High-quality IMRT requires intensive physics support and ...

  9. Three technique for non coplanar conformal field radiation treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation treatment of the breast is a challenge for radio therapists and physicists, because of the proximity of organs at risk such as lung and heart. For many years tangential irradiation technique has been the technique of choice in these cases. A novel technique described by the group Cancer Institute's work of Italian Switzerland, has been employed by us, good results. (Author)

  10. In vitro study of combined cilengitide and radiation treatment in breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain metastasis from breast cancer poses a major clinical challenge. Integrins play a role in regulating adhesion, growth, motility, and survival, and have been shown to be critical for metastatic growth in the brain in preclinical models. Cilengitide, an αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin inhibitor, has previously been studied as an anti-cancer drug in various tumor types. Previous studies have shown additive effects of cilengitide and radiation in lung cancer and glioblastoma cell lines. The ability of cilengitide to enhance the effects of radiation was examined preclinically in the setting of breast cancer to assess its possible efficacy in the setting of brain metastasis from breast cancer. Our panel of breast cells was composed of four cell lines: T-47D (ER/PR+, Her2-, luminal A), MCF-7 (ER/PR+, Her2-, luminal A), MDA-MB-231 (TNBC, basal B), MDA-MB-468 (TNBC, basal A). The presence of cilengitide targets, β3 and β5 integrin, was first determined. Cell detachment was determined by cell counting, cell proliferation was determined by MTS proliferation assay, and apoptosis was measured by Annexin V staining and flow cytometry. The efficacy of cilengitide treatment alone was analyzed, followed by assessment of combined cilengitide and radiation treatment. Integrin β3 knockdown was performed, followed by cilengitide and radiation treatment to test for incomplete target inhibition by cilengitide, in high β3 expressing cells. We observed that all cell lines examined expressed both β3 and β5 integrin and that cilengitide was able to induce cell detachment and reduced proliferation in our panel. Annexin V assays revealed that a portion of these effects was due to cilengitide-induced apoptosis. Combined treatment with cilengitide and radiation served to further reduce proliferation compared to either treatment alone. Following β3 integrin knockdown, radiosensitization in combination with cilengitide was observed in a previously non-responsive cell line (MDA-MB-231

  11. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ojerholm, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roses, Robert E., E-mail: Robert.Roses@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mamtani, Ronac [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Fraker, Douglas L.; Drebin, Jeffrey A. [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Datta, Jashodeep [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  12. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered

  13. Impact of Radiation in Critical Organs in Radiotherapy Treatment of Breast and Lung Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakuryal, Anil; Chen, Chiu-Hao; Dhungana, Sudarshan

    2010-02-01

    Various 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques are commonly used in the treatment of cancerous tumors at appropriate prescription doses (PDs). The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of radiation in heart and lungs in left breast and left lung cancer patients treated using 3DCRT techniques. Treatment plans for the eight breast cancer patients (n=8), eight lung cancer patients at early stage (m=8), and eight lung cancer patients at stage II and III (k=8) were evaluated. Relative complication probabilities (RCPs) for the irradiated organs were computed from the plans using HART [Med. Phys. 36, p.2547 (2009)] program at PD. The RCPs were found to be (i) 2.3% (n=8, PD=56 Gy), 6.4% (m=8, PD=30.7 Gy), and 16.7% (k=8, PD=54.8 Gy) for the heart, (ii) 1% (n=6, PD=58.4 Gy) for the left lung, and (iii) 7% (m=6, PD=31 Gy) and 5.3% (k=8, PD=54.8 Gy) for the whole lung. Homogeneous target coverage and improved dose conformality were the major advantages in the treatment of breast cancer. Therefore, simple 3DCRT based whole-breast irradiation and partial lung treatment techniques can offer promising results while adequately sparing the organs in the treatment of breast and lung cancers. )

  14. Cancer Treatment with Gene Therapy and Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kaliberov, Sergey A.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy methods have evolved remarkably in recent years which have resulted in more effective local tumor control with negligible toxicity of surrounding normal tissues. However, local recurrence and distant metastasis often occur following radiation therapy mostly due to the development of radioresistance through the deregulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inhibition of DNA damage repair mechanisms. Over the last decade, extensive progress in radiotherapy and gene therapy co...

  15. Impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections in stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Herman Tania De; Gabrish Heather; Herman Terence; Vlachaki Maria; Ahmad Salahuddin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections on dosimetry of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Four-dimensional computed tomography data from 15 low stage non-small cell lung cancer patients was used. Treatment planning and dose calculations were done using pencil beam convolution algorithm of Varian Eclipse system with Modified Batho Power Law for tissue heterogeneity. Patient plans were generated with 6 MV co-planar non-opposing four to six...

  16. Role of the Technical Aspects of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Treatment of Prostate Cancer: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente, Stefania, E-mail: clemente_stefania@libero.it [Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata Rionero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy); Nigro, Roberta [Azienda Sanitaria Locale Rieti, Roma (Italy); Oliviero, Caterina [Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata Rionero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy); Marchioni, Chiara [Azienda Sanitaria Locale Rieti, Roma (Italy); Esposito, Marco [Azienda Sanitaria, Firenze (Italy); Giglioli, Francesca Romana [Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Torino (Italy); Mancosu, Pietro [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Marino, Carmelo [Humanitas Centro Catanese di Oncologia, Catania (Italy); Russo, Serenella [Azienda Sanitaria, Firenze (Italy); Stasi, Michele [Azienda Ospedaliera Ordine Mauriziano di Torino, Torino (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Veronese, Ivan [Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Landoni, Valeria [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Roma (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of moderate (<35 fractions) and extreme (<5 fractions) hypofractionated radiation therapy in prostate cancer is yielding favorable results, both in terms of maintained biochemical response and toxicity. Several hypofractionation (HF) schemes for the treatment of prostate cancer are available, although there is considerable variability in the techniques used to manage intra-/interfraction motion and deliver radiation doses. We performed a review of the published studies on HF regimens as a topic of interest for the Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy working group, which is part of the Italian Association of Medical Physics. Aspects of organ motion management (imaging for contouring, target volume definition, and rectum/bladder preparation) and treatment delivery (prostate localization, image guided radiation therapy strategy and frequency) were evaluated and categorized to assess outcome relative to disease control and toxicity. Despite the heterogeneity of the data, some interesting trends that emerged from the review might be useful in identifying an optimum HF strategy.

  17. Role of the Technical Aspects of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Treatment of Prostate Cancer: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing use of moderate (<35 fractions) and extreme (<5 fractions) hypofractionated radiation therapy in prostate cancer is yielding favorable results, both in terms of maintained biochemical response and toxicity. Several hypofractionation (HF) schemes for the treatment of prostate cancer are available, although there is considerable variability in the techniques used to manage intra-/interfraction motion and deliver radiation doses. We performed a review of the published studies on HF regimens as a topic of interest for the Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy working group, which is part of the Italian Association of Medical Physics. Aspects of organ motion management (imaging for contouring, target volume definition, and rectum/bladder preparation) and treatment delivery (prostate localization, image guided radiation therapy strategy and frequency) were evaluated and categorized to assess outcome relative to disease control and toxicity. Despite the heterogeneity of the data, some interesting trends that emerged from the review might be useful in identifying an optimum HF strategy

  18. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Ocimum sanctum in Prevention and Treatment of Cancer and Exposure to Radiation: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, N; Verma, P; B. R. Pandey; Bhalla, M

    2012-01-01

    Extensive studies, experimental and clinical prove that Tulsi possess anti-stress/adatogenic, antioxidant, immunomodulator and anti-radiation properties which also may help it to play major role in prevention and treatment of cancer. As Tulsi has health benefitting effects by reducing stress and improving both cellular and humoral immunity, its role in prevention and treatment of cancer cases may be a new approach in therapy of cancer and in prevention of ill effects of radiation. Studies in ...

  20. Application of intensity modulated radiation therapy for the cancer patients treatment in Bach Mai Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of the modern techniques in cancer treatment, in which dose is delivered optimally into the shape of the tumor and minimally in surround benign tissues. In developed countries, this technique has been performed routinely by Linacs with MLC for tumors at the critical areas. In Vietnam, because of the wet climate, the use of Linacs with MLC is difficult to operate and maintain. However, IMRT can be implemented by Linacs without MLC via independent jaws, Jaws-only IMRT (JO-IMRT), in which beams are separated into many segments with different weights to optimize highest dose in the tumor and lowest dose in the surrounding health organs. Methods: We describe the new treatment technic application and compare it with normal radiotherapy method (3D-CRT). Results: From 7/2008, the Dep of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology at Bach Mai Hospital has been conducting JO-IMRT to treat cancer patients. Up to now, we have 81 cases treated by IMRT including head and neck cancers (NPC, larynx cancer, maxillary sinus cancer, brain tumor), cancers in the thorax (esophagus cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer), cancers in the pelvis (prostate cancer, cervical cancer, rectal cancer). On the average, beam number is from 5 to 9 and 5-9 segments per beam. Treatment time for a fraction is from 6 to 12 minutes with 2.25 Gy for CTV1 per day. Discrepancies of doses were below 3% (0.15 to 2.84%) between planning and practice. In plan, the preeminences with IMRT are clearly superior to 3D radiation therapy. In clinical, almost patients had good respond, whereas side effects were quite less than conventional radiotherapy. Conclusions: JO-IMRT is a modern technic with more advantage than normal 3D-CRT. It help radiation dose to concentrate maximally in treatment target while influence minimally for sensitive surrounding tissues. Another, it is a high technic to appropriate with the climatic condition in Vietnam. (author)

  1. Treatment results of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Image Guided Radiation Therapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose is to evaluate treatment results of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) for head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: descriptive cross sectional study on 45 head and neck cancer patients treated by IMRT-IGRT with curative intent at Department of Radiation Oncology, 108 Central Military Hospital from 12/2013 to 3/2015. Results: 100% IMRT plan underwent quality assurance with gamma index ≥ 95%. Mean conformity index of IMRT plans was 1.21 ± 0.13. Patient setup errors in supero-inferior (SI), antero-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) were ≤ 3 mm. Overall treatment complete response, partial response and stable disease rates were 75.6% and 15.6 % and 8.8%, respectively. There were 42.2 % patients with no xerostomia; 57.8% grade 1 and no grade 2 - 4 xerostomia. Conclusions: Head and neck cancers treatment with IMRT-IGRT showed good tumor response with safety, high accuracy and acceptable side effects. (author)

  2. Multimodality treatment by radiation and hyperthermochemotherapy for pulmonary and pleural metastases of breast cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endou, Masaru; Suzuki, Hirotoshi; Nakashima, Yukihiro (St. Marianna Univ., Kawasaki (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-06-01

    We treated 17 patients with metastatic pulmonary and pleural breast cancer by a combination of radiation, chemotherapy and hyperthermia. Hyperthermia with chemotherapy using adriamycin, farmorubicin, mitomycin C, 5-fluorouracil, tegafur and/or cisplatin in the form of continuous intravenous infusion was given. The thermochemotherapy had only a limited effectiveness. But good responses are seen in postirradiation adjuvant thermochemotherapy. Heating could alleviate some chemotherapeutic side effects in some way by heat reservoir. Fifty percent survival period was 12 months by the Kaplan-Meier method. As severe or serious side effects were not experienced, this treatment was thought available for outpatients. We believe that multimodality treatment by thermochemotherapy with radiation is promising for advanced or recurrent pulmonary metastases of breast cancers. (author).

  3. Targeted therapies and radiation for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-15

    The purpose of this review is to provide an update on novel radiation treatments for head and neck cancer. Despite the remarkable advances in chemotherapy and radiotherapy techniques, the management of advanced head and neck cancer remains challenging. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an appealing target for novel therapies in head and neck cancer because not only EGFR activation stimulates many important signaling pathways associated with cancer development and progression, and importantly, resistance to radiation. Furthermore, EGFR overexpression is known to be portended for a worse outcome in patients with advanced head and neck cancer. Two categories of compounds designed to abrogate EGFR signaling, such as monoclonal antibodies (Cetuximab) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (ZD1839 and OSI-774) have been assessed and have been most extensively studied in preclinical models and clinical trials. Additional TKIs in clinical trials include a reversible agent, Cl-1033, which blocks activation of all erbB receptors. Encouraging preclinical data for head and neck cancers resulted in rapid translation into the clinic. Results from initial clinical trials show rather surprisingly that only minority of patients benefited from EGFR inhibition as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy. In this review, we begin with a brief summary of erbB-mediated signal transduction. Subsequently, we present data on prognostic-predictive value of erbB receptor expression in HNC followed by preclinical and clinical data on the role of EGFR antagonists alone or in combination with radiation in the treatment of HNC. Finally, we discuss the emerging thoughts on resistance to EGFR blockade and efforts in the development of multiple-targeted therapy for combination with chemotherapy or radiation. Current challenges for investigators are to determine (1) who will benefit from targeted agents and which agents are most appropriate to combine with radiation and/or chemotherapy, (2

  4. Second primary cancers after radiation for prostate cancer: A systematic review of the clinical data and impact of treatment technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a radiation induced second primary cancer (SPC) is one the most serious long term consequences of successful cancer treatment. This review aims to evaluate SPC in prostate cancer (PCa) patients treated with radiotherapy, and assess whether radiation technique influences SPC. A systematic review of the literature was performed to identify studies examining SPC in irradiated PCa patients. This identified 19 registry publications, 21 institutional series and 7 other studies. There is marked heterogeneity in published studies. An increased risk of radiation-induced SPC has been identified in several studies, particularly those with longer durations of follow-up. The risk of radiation-induced SPC appears small, in the range of 1 in 220 to 1 in 290 over all durations of follow-up, and may increase to 1 in 70 for patients followed up for more than 10 years, based on studies which include patients treated with older radiation techniques (i.e. non-conformal, large field). To date there are insufficient clinical data to draw firm conclusions about the impact of more modern techniques such as IMRT and brachytherapy on SPC risk, although limited evidence is encouraging. In conclusion, despite heterogeneity between studies, an increased risk of SPC following radiation for PCa has been identified in several studies, and this risk appears to increase over time. This must be borne in mind when considering which patients to irradiate and which techniques to employ

  5. SU-E-T-208: Incidence Cancer Risk From the Radiation Treatment for Acoustic Neuroma Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D [Kyung Hee University International Med. Serv., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, W [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, D [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to compare the incidence risk of a secondary cancer from therapeutic doses in patients receiving intensitymodulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their incidnece excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) were estimated using the corresponding therapeutic doses measured at various organs by radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. Results: When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, normal liver, colon, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were measured. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A LAR were estimated that more than 0.03% of AN patients would get radiation-induced cancer. Conclusion: The tyroid was highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN. We found that LAR can be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  6. Health regulations about radiation oncology in Spain: The legislative dilemma between radiation protection and treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Royal Decree 1566/1998 of July 17th establishes the criteria on quality in radiation therapy and is a cornerstone in Spanish regulation of this medical field. The Royal Decree gives some rules that, from a medical point of view, are considered as a good practice. Radiation protection of patients is necessary to achieve a high quality radiation oncology treatments. That is the reason why Royal decree 1566/1998 is titled 'quality criteria in radiation therapy'. A quality control program must be tailored to every single radiation oncology department and, for this reason, its standardization is difficult. Nevertheless, some medical procedures are defined by the royal decree and such procedures are the minimum criteria that all the departments must follow in the development of its own quality control program. The authors make some reflections about health regulations about radiation oncology in Spain, pointing out that a legislative dilemma between radiation protection and treatment of cancer due to application of the legislative rules may occur. The social and medical cost of rigid bureaucratic procedures is pointed out. A large amount of equipment controls and measurements takes time that could be used in treating patients. This is more important in an environment of limited technical and human resources. (author)

  7. The role of anaemia in the effectivity of radiation treatment of cancer of the collum uteri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of anaemia is studied in 129 patients with cancer of the collum uteri subjected to combined radiation treatment by comparing data on anaemia and five years survival rates. Since prognosis as well as incidence of anaemia depend on the extend of the disorder the comparison is done for each clinical stage separately. Only in patients found in clinical III b statistical verification (p<0.001) is present witnessing that survival of anaemia patients is shorter than in the rest of the patients. Factors contributing to these differences being discussed a conclusion is drawn that it may be due to a lowered effectivity of the radiation treatment induced by the existing hypoxy. With this regard the relationship is discussed between oxygen tissue diffusion, cellular proliferation of tumors and the effect of ionizing radiation. (author)

  8. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon; Shin, Dongoh; Park, Sungho; Chung, Weon Kuu; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Kim, Dong Wook

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  9. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dongoh [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungho [Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Weonkuu; Jahng, Geonho; Kim, Dongwook [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  10. The case of treatment of recurrent cancer of skin of hairy part of the head complicated with radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a case of surgical treatment of recurrent cancer of skin of hairy part of the head in combination with late radiation skin necrosis, osteomyelitis of the parietooccipital cyst and radiation encephalopathy of the parasaggital region of the brain with lower paraparesis, that occurred after radiation therapy of fungi-shaped form of locally advanced cancer of skin of calvaria ( a short-focused x-ray therapy with a total dose of 60 Gy)

  11. Treatment choices in breast cancer: a comparative analysis of mastectomy patients and radiation patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This descriptive-exploratory study identified factors that distinguished women on the basis of the treatment they chose for breast cancer. A semi-structured interview and questionnaire was administered to 30 respondents who received mastectomy and 31 who received lumpectomy with radiation. The variables investigated as potential predictors of treatment choice were (1) participation in treatment planning, (2) knowledge of illness and treatment alternatives, (3) health locus of control, (4) sex-role identification, (5) body image, (6) social support and (7) age. As perceptions of the outcome of treatment influence attitudes about treatment choice, five variables relating to perceived treatment consequences were also examined. These were (1) social support, (2) body image, (3) satisfaction with medical care, (4) satisfaction with treatment and (5) general well-being. The major findings in regard to the predictor variables included a profile of the characteristics of each group. The radiation group had more knowledge, participated in planning to a greater extent, investigated treatment options more often and typically made their own decisions about treatment. The mastectomy group was older, attributed locus of control to chance and demonstrated nonsignificant trends toward locus of control in powerful others and toward a feminine sex-role identification; 50% cited Surgeon's Advice as the basis of their choice

  12. A study of the radiobiological modeling of the conformal radiation therapy in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakuryal, Anil Prasad

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortalities in the world. The precise diagnosis of the disease helps the patients to select the appropriate modality of the treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The physics of X-radiation and the advanced imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the efficient diagnosis and therapeutic treatments in cancer. However, the accuracy of the measurements of the metabolic target volumes (MTVs) in the PET/CT dual-imaging modality is always limited. Similarly the external beam radiation therapy (XRT) such as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most common modality in the radiotherapy treatment. These treatments are simulated and evaluated using the XRT plans and the standard methodologies in the commercial planning system. However, the normal organs are always susceptible to the radiation toxicity in these treatments due to lack of knowledge of the appropriate radiobiological models to estimate the clinical outcomes. We explored several methodologies to estimate MTVs by reviewing various techniques of the target volume delineation using the static phantoms in the PET scans. The review suggests that the more precise and practical method of delineating PET MTV should be an intermediate volume between the volume coverage for the standardized uptake value (SUV; 2.5) of glucose and the 50% (40%) threshold of the maximum SUV for the smaller (larger) volume delineations in the radiotherapy applications. Similarly various types of optimal XRT plans were designed using the CT and PET/CT scans for the treatment of various types of cancer patients. The qualities of these plans were assessed using the universal plan-indices. The dose-volume criteria were also examined in the targets and organs by analyzing the conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The biological models such as tumor

  13. Results of surgical treatment of regional cervical cancer cytotoxic drugs with when combined radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the department of clinical radio oncology brachytherapy unit of the National Cancer Institute con-ducted combined radiotherapy 103 patients with cervical cancer stage IIB-IIIB cancer. Depending on the method of combined radiotherapy patients divided into 2 major (33 and 34 patients) and control (36 patients) group. In the study group patients underwent conformal radiotherapy and brachytherapy sources of high activity dose radiation (HDR). In the study group I patients during radiotherapy combined tegafur used orally in radiomodifying dose of 800 mg per day and cisplatin intravenously 50 mg 1 time per week to a total dose of 200-300 mg. In the control group patients underwent conventional external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy sources intermediate dose radiation (MDR). Use chemoradiomodification facilities and modern radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer helps to speed up the pace and increase the degree of regression of cervical cancer compared to the standard method of combined radiotherapy does not increase the frequency and manifestations of general and local toxicity of treatment

  14. Treatment modalities of oral mucositis after radiation of head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute mucositis is common after radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. During the past 3 decades, there was a gradual evolution in the treatment modalities for locally advanced carcinomas (concomitant radio-chemotherapy, accelerated radiotherapy). These new strategies are accompanied by an increase in early mucosal reactions. At the present time, there is no widely accepted prophylaxis or effective treatment. Many traditional remedies or new agents seem ineffective (Sucralfate, Chlorhexidine, GM-CSF, Silver nitrate, Prostaglandin, anti-oxidants, Benzydamine hydrochloride), while others seem promising (Povidone-iodine, nonabsorbable antibiotic lozenges and anti-fungal, local GM-CSF, Glutamide, Low-energy laser, corticosteroids). Radioprotectors are controversial and should be only used in experimental protocols and not in routine practice. However, some recommendations can be proposed: general prevention and global care before cancer therapy should be systematic (oral hygiene, dental and periodontal treatment, advice to avoid the use of tobacco and alcohol); frequent oral rinsing with a bland mouthwash (Povidone-iodine or others) should be used at the start of treatment because there are significant modifications of the oral microflora increased by a disturbed salivary flow; these mouthwashes could be associated with nonabsorbable antibiotic lozenges or anti-fungal topical (bicarbonates, Amphotericine B); Systematic percutaneous fluoroscopic gastrostomy should be decided before any aggressive treatments (concomitant radio-chemotherapy, accelerated radiotherapy); pain should be controlled; finally, the radiation technique should be optimized (mucosal sparing block, conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy). (authors)

  15. Is cardiac toxicity a relevant issue in the radiation treatment of esophageal cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukema, Jannet C; van Luijk, Peter; Widder, Joachim; Langendijk, Johannes A; Muijs, Christina T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In recent years several papers have been published on radiation-induced cardiac toxicity, especially in breast cancer patients. However, in esophageal cancer patients the radiation dose to the heart is usually markedly higher. To determine whether radiation-induced cardiac toxicity is also

  16. Analysis of the clinical benefit of 5-fluorouracil and radiation treatment in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the palliative benefit of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiotherapy in patients with surgically unresectable localized pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced surgically unresectable symptomatic pancreatic cancer received 5-FU chemotherapy and local radiation therapy. They were retrospectively reviewed in regard to their clinical benefit response (a composite of measurement of pain assessment, weight, and Karnofsky performance status [KPS]), as well as radiological response, time to progression, and overall survival. Results: Median survival for the 25 patients was 9 months and median progression-free survival was 6 months. Thirty-two percent of patients survived in excess of 1 year. Analgesic requirements increased >50% in 2 patients and KPS deteriorated in 10 patients. Of the 13 remaining patients, 2 sustained a >7% weight loss and 2 gained weight post-treatment. Six patients improved in one parameter of analgesic consumption, weight loss or KPS without deteriorating in any others. Thus, the clinical benefit response index for 5-FU-radiation was 6/25 (24%). In terms of tumor response, 8 patients (44%) demonstrated a reduction in tumor volume post-treatment, 4 of whom (22%) experienced a >50% reduction. Four additional patients had radiologically stable disease. Conclusion: In this retrospective analysis, the clinical benefit response index for 5-FU-radiation was 24%, a value similar to the 23.8% reported for single agent gemcitabine. The median survival of 7 months was also similar to the 5.65 months reported for gemcitabine. The radiological partial response rate of 22% and the 1-year survival of 32% were higher for 5-FU-radiation than the reported values for gemcitabine. A randomized trial would be necessary to compare 5-FU-radiation to gemcitabine directly; however, from this review it did not appear that the overall palliative benefit of 5-FU-radiation was inferior to gemcitabine

  17. Radiation Injury Treatment Network®: Preparedness Through a Coalition of Cancer Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Cullen

    2016-08-01

    This article provides an overview of Radiation Injury Treatment Network® (RITN), its preparedness activities and capabilities, including training and educating over 11,500 hospital staff, coordinating over 500 exercises, developing treatment guidelines, developing standard operating procedures, and being recognized by the U.S. federal government as a national response asset. The RITN provides comprehensive evaluation and treatment for victims with marrow toxic injuries. Many of the casualties from the detonation of an improvised nuclear device (IND) (a.k.a. terrorist nuclear bomb) with only radiation injuries will be salvageable; however, they would require outpatient and/or inpatient care. Recognizing this, the U.S. National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP), U.S. Navy, and American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) collaboratively developed RITN, which comprises medical centers with expertise in the management of bone marrow failure. The medical community will undoubtedly be taxed by the resulting medical surge from an IND despite the well-defined United States emergency medical system, the National Disaster Medical System; however, one area that is unique for radiological disasters is the care for casualties with acute radiation syndrome. Hematologists and oncologists purposefully expose their cancer patients to high doses of radiation and toxic chemicals for chemotherapy as they treat their patients, resulting in symptoms not unlike casualties with exposure to ionizing radiation from a radiological disaster. This makes the staff from cancer centers ideal for the specialized care that will be required for thousands of casualties following a mass casualty radiological incident. The RITN is a model for how a collaborative effort can fill a readiness gap-through its network of 76 hospitals, blood donor centers, and cord blood banks, the RITN is preparing to provide outpatient care and specialized supportive care to up to 63,000 radiological casualties

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen in the radiation treatment of head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sealy, R. (Mersey Regional Centre for Radiotherapy and Oncology, Merseyside (United Kingdom))

    1991-01-01

    Published report on the use of hyperbaric oxygen in the radiation therapy of head and neck cancer are reviewed. The weight of evidence, from randomized trials, is that it is of clinical value in the control of medium sized head and neck tumours. It is also of value in the treatment of lymph node disease. Four attempts to improve the results of the treatment, by various physiological measures,are reviewed. It is concluded that hyperbaric oxygen may be of use when combined with nitro- imidazoles as a radiation sensitizer and warrants further study when combined with induced anaemia, aimed to reduce the tumour cord and prevent repopulation between fractions. (author). 21 refs.; 2 tabs.

  19. Parenteral nutrition in radiation therapy and combined treatment of patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results obtained while studying 165 patients with esophageal cancer are presented. It is shown that radiation therapy and combined treatment result in the body mass loss, in the increase of katabolic processes in organism, in the negative nitrogen balance. Weaken patients, being under starvation conditions, are subjected more often to reaction changes and complications developing during the treatment. A comparison characteristics of two methods providing the organism with nutrition is given, i.e. gastrostomy and parenteral nutrition. Shown is the advantage of the adequate parenteral nutrition preventing the appearence of reaction changes and complications, improving the subjective state of patients, homeostasis indices, promoting the elimination of esophagitis phenomena, general radiation response and reaction to chemical preparations; resulting in the increase of quantity of leucocytes at leukopenia

  20. Assess results of PET/CT in cancer diagnosis, follow up treatment and simulation for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET/CT (Positron Emission Computed Tomography) has been studied and established as routine at the Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Center, Bach Mai hospital. From 8/2009 to 5/2015, 6223 patients have been undergone PET/CT scan. Among them, diagnostic and simulation PET/CT scan for cancer patients accounted to 5833 (93.8%). Researches about value of PET/CT for most common cancers have been done. Results: PET/CT can help the primary tumor diagnosis, metastases detection, staging, simulation for radiation therapy, response to treatment assessment, and relapses after treatment identification. Percentage accordance between PET / CT and histopathology was 96% (esophagus cancer), 94.7% (lung cancer). Average maxSUV value of primary tumor of the esophagus cancer, colorectal cancer, nasopharynx cancer, lung cancer, and NHL respectively 9.50, 9.78, 11.08, 9.17, 10.21. MaxSUV value increased with histological grade and tumor size. After undergone PET / CT, stage of disease changed in 28% esophagus cancer; 22.7% colorectal cancer; stage of disease increased in 23.5% of NHL, 32.0% of lung cancer, and 25.0% of nasopharynx cancer. PET / CT simulation for radiation therapy target volume reduced in 28% of nasopharynx cancer, which helped the radioactive dose concentrate exactly in the target lesions, minimize effect to healthy tissues, improved the effectiveness of treatment and reduced complications. (author)

  1. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Prostate Cancer Treatment Prostate cancer overview? What are my treatment options? What ... any new developments in treating my disease? Prostate cancer overview Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer ...

  2. Dosimetric Studies of Mixed Energy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Haneefa, K.; K. K. Shakir; Siddhartha, A.; T. Siji Cyriac; Musthafa, M. M.; R. Ganapthi Raman

    2014-01-01

    Dosimetric studies of mixed field photon beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer using pencil beam (PB) and collapsed cone convolution (CCC) algorithms using Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system (v. 4.3) are investigated in this study. Three different plans were generated using 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed beam (both 6 and 15 MV). Fifteen patients with two sets of plans were generated: one by using PB and the other by using CCC for the same planning parameters...

  3. Role of radiation therapy on the use of primary (''neoadjuvant'') systemic treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: the indications for primary (''neoadjuvant'') systemic treatment (PST) for breast cancer have evolved over the last few years. PST is not only used in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) and inoperable tumors but also plays a role for operable tumors aiming at breast conservation and higher complete remission rates (ypCR). The contribution of radiotherapy and the optimal sequencing of chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy still have to be defined. Material and methods: objectives and results of PST for inflammatory, locally advanced and operable breast cancer were analyzed according to tumor stage. Results: radiotherapy following PST and surgery is the standard of care for inflammatory breast cancer, LABC and nonresectable lesions. Comparable results are achieved for good responders after PST receiving radiotherapy or surgery. The evaluation of a preoperative radiotherapeutic approach is complicated by different chemo- and radiotherapy regimens, continuation of chemotherapy after surgery and heterogeneous patient groups. Conclusion: for LABC and inflammatory breast cancer the role of PST is well defined. For operable lesions, however, the value of preoperative radiotherapy still has to be established. This should be assessed within the framework of a clinical trial using standardized parameters for applying chemotherapy as well as radiation therapy. (orig.)

  4. Androgen Induces Adaptation to Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Treatment with Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehonathan H. Pinthus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is a standard treatment for prostate cancer (PC. The postulated mechanism of action for radiation therapy is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Adjuvant androgen deprivation (AD therapy has been shown to confer a survival advantage over radiation alone in high-risk localized PC. However, the mechanism of this interaction is unclear. We hypothesize that androgens modify the radioresponsiveness of PC through the regulation of cellular oxidative homeostasis. Using androgen receptor (AR+ 22rv1 and AR− PC3 human PC cell lines, we demonstrated that testosterone increased basal reactive oxygen species (bROS levels, resulting in dose-dependent activation of phospho-p38 and pAKT, increased expression of clusterin, catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase. Similar data were obtained in three human PC xenografts; WISH-PC14, WISH-PC23, CWR22, growing in testosterone-supplemented or castrated SCID mice. These effects were reversible through AD or through incubation with a reducing agent. Moreover, testosterone increased the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutases, glutathione reductase. Consequently, AD significantly facilitated the response of AR+ cells to oxidative stress challenge. Thus, testosterone induces a preset cellular adaptation to radiation through the generation of elevated bROS, which is modified by AD. These findings provide a rational for combined hormonal and radiation therapy for localized PC.

  5. Computer-assisted planning and dosimetry for radiation treatment of head and neck cancer in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This evaluation was part of a multicenter, multinational study sponsored by the International Agency for Atomic Energy (Vienna) to investigate a simple, reliable computer-assisted planning and dosimetry system for radiation treatment of head and neck cancers in developing countries. Over a 13-month period (April 1992-April 1993), 120 patients with histologically-proven head or neck cancer were included in the evaluation. In each patient, planning and dosimetry were done both manually and using the computer-assisted system. The manual and computerized systems were compared on the basis of accuracy of determination of the outer contour, target volume, and critical organs; volume inequality resolution; structure heterogeneity correction; selection of the number, angle, and size of beams; treatment time calculation; availability of dosimetry predictions; and duration and cost of the procedure. Results demonstrated that the computer-assisted procedure was superior over the manual procedure, despite less than optimal software. The accuracy provided by the completely computerized procedure is indispensable for Level II radiation therapy, which is particularly useful in tumors of the sensitive, complex structures in the head and neck. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Use of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Radiation Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezban Berberoğlu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy (RT plays an important role in the treatment of lung cancer. Accurate diagnosis and staging are crucial in the delivery of RT with curative intent. Target miss can be prevented by accurate determination of tumor contours during RT planning. Currently, tumor contours are determined manually by computed tomography (CT during RT planning. This method leads to differences in delineation of tumor volume between users. Given the change in RT tools and methods due to rapidly developing technology, it is now more significant to accurately delineate the tumor tissue. F18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (F18 FDG PET/CT has been established as an accurate method in correctly staging and detecting tumor dissemination in lung cancer. Since it provides both anatomic and biologic information, F18 FDG PET decreases interuser variability in tumor delineation. For instance, tumor volumes may be decreased as atelectasis and malignant tissue can be more accurately differentiated, as well as better evaluation of benign and malignant lymph nodes given the difference in FDG uptake. Using F18 FDG PET/CT, the radiation dose can be escalated without serious adverse effects in lung cancer. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of F18 FDG PET/CT for RT planning in lung cancer.

  7. Consistency in electronic portal imaging registration in prostate cancer radiation treatment verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A protocol of electronic portal imaging (EPI) registration for the verification of radiation treatment fields has been implemented at our institution. A template is generated using the reference images, which is then registered with the EPI for treatment verification. This study examines interobserver consistency among trained radiation therapists in the registration and verification of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for patients with prostate cancer. 20 consecutive patients with prostate cancer undergoing EBRT were analyzed. The EPIs from the initial 10 fractions were registered independently by 6 trained radiation therapist observers. For each fraction, an anterior-posterior (AP or PA) and left lateral (Lat) EPIs were generated and registered with the reference images. Two measures of displacement for the AP EPI in the superior-inferior (SI) and right left (RL) directions and two measures of displacement for the Lat EPI in the AP and SI directions were prospectively recorded. A total of 2400 images and 4800 measures were analyzed. Means and standard deviations, as well as systematic and random errors were calculated for each observer. Differences between observers were compared using the chi-square test. Variance components analysis was used to evaluate how much variance is attributed to the observers. Time trends were estimated using repeated measures analysis. Inter-observer variation expressed as the standard deviation of the six observers' measurements within each image were 0.7, 1.0, 1.7 and 1.4 mm for APLR, APSI, LatAP and LatSI respectively. Variance components analysis showed that the variation attributed to the observers was small compared to variation due to the images. On repeated measure analysis, time trends were apparent only for the APLR and LatSI measurements. Their magnitude however was small. No clinically important systematic observer effect or time trends were identified in the registration of EPI by the radiation therapist observers

  8. Hyperthermia with radiation in the treatment of advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxic cells are deterrent to cure with radiotherapy. Hyperthermia (HT) which has the potential to be cytocidal can be complementary to radiation therapy. HT can be complementary to radiation as the targets of cellular lethality are different and hypoxic cells are more sensitive. The present study involves radiation of locally advanced Head and neck cancer with weekly HT as an adjuvant

  9. Long-term results and complications of preoperative radiation in the treatment of rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, W.P.; Garb, J.L.; Park, W.C.; Stark, A.J.; Chabot, J.R.; Friedmann, P.

    1988-02-01

    A retrospective study of 149 patients with rectal cancer diagnosed between 1972 and 1979 was undertaken to compare survival, disease-free survival, recurrence sites, and long-term complications of 40 patients who received 4000 to 4500 rads of preoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (radiation group) with those of 109 patients treated by resection alone (control group). After a mean follow-up of 84 months and 99 months, respectively, survival of the irradiated patients was significantly better than that of controls (68% versus 52%, p less than 0.05). Disease-free survival of those patients rendered free of disease by treatment was also superior for the irradiated group (84% versus 57%, p less than 0.005). Local recurrence without signs of distant metastases developed only one-third as often in irradiated patients (6% versus 18%). Distant metastases, alone or in combination with local recurrence, were also less common after radiation (12% versus 27%). Second primary tumors developed in 15% and 10% of the respective groups, a difference that was not statistically significant. When we consider the survival benefit of preoperative radiation therapy, long-term complications were relatively mild. Delayed healing of the perineum was noted in two irradiated patients. Persistent diarrhea was severe enough to warrant treatment in only one case, and one patient required a colostomy for intestinal obstruction from pelvic fibrosis.

  10. Long-term results and complications of preoperative radiation in the treatment of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 149 patients with rectal cancer diagnosed between 1972 and 1979 was undertaken to compare survival, disease-free survival, recurrence sites, and long-term complications of 40 patients who received 4000 to 4500 rads of preoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (radiation group) with those of 109 patients treated by resection alone (control group). After a mean follow-up of 84 months and 99 months, respectively, survival of the irradiated patients was significantly better than that of controls (68% versus 52%, p less than 0.05). Disease-free survival of those patients rendered free of disease by treatment was also superior for the irradiated group (84% versus 57%, p less than 0.005). Local recurrence without signs of distant metastases developed only one-third as often in irradiated patients (6% versus 18%). Distant metastases, alone or in combination with local recurrence, were also less common after radiation (12% versus 27%). Second primary tumors developed in 15% and 10% of the respective groups, a difference that was not statistically significant. When we consider the survival benefit of preoperative radiation therapy, long-term complications were relatively mild. Delayed healing of the perineum was noted in two irradiated patients. Persistent diarrhea was severe enough to warrant treatment in only one case, and one patient required a colostomy for intestinal obstruction from pelvic fibrosis

  11. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role in ... the affected area). Damage to the bowels, causing diarrhea and ... a second cancer caused by radiation exposure. Second cancers that develop ...

  12. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  13. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  14. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006–2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  15. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Alexandra D., E-mail: Alexandra.Jensen@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, Simeon [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [Clinical Co-Operation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Bendl, Rolf [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen; Muenter, Marc W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006-2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  16. Soft tissue sarcomas after radiation treatment for breast cancer. Three case studies and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aims: By means of 3 cases with infield soft tissue carcinomas after radiotherapy for breast cancer, symptoms and therapy are described. Consequences for treatment planning and patient's information before radiotherapy for breast cancer are discussed. Patients: Three of 1,025 patients with breast cancer irradiated from 1984 to 1997 suffered from infield secondary soft tissue sarcomas. The latency periods were 61, 49 and 59 months. Two patients had been treated with breast-conserving therapy (computerized planning, 50 Gy to reference point, 5 times 2 Gy/week, 5-MV photons), 1 patient received a local boost dose of 15 Gy (10-MeV electrons), patient 3 radiotherapy of the thoracic wall and regional lymph nodes after mastectomy using 12-MeV electrons (thoracic wall) and 5-MV photons (lymph node areas) to 50 Gy, 5 times 2 Gy/week. No adjuvant chemotherapy was given. All sarcomas were very extensive, all patients died from local progression and/or distant failure after 17, 13 and 12 months. Results: The incidence of spontaneous sarcomas of the breast in about 0.06%, after operation and radiotherapy 0.09 to 0.45%. No correlations to radiotherapy technique and no risk factors were found. Radiation dose could play a role, but there are very sparse data about this. (orig.)

  17. Acute phase response before treatment predicts radiation esophagitis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Radiation esophagitis (RE) represents an inflammatory reaction to radiation therapy (RT). We hypothesized that aspects of the physiologic acute phase response (APR) predicts RE. Material and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 285 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation. The primary analysis was the association of pretreatment lab values reflective of the APR with symptomatic (grade ⩾2) RE. Univariate and multivariate odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to test associations of clinical and pretreatment lab values with RE. Optimal cutpoints and multivariable risk stratification groupings were determined via recursive partitioning analysis. Results: Pretreatment platelet counts were higher and hemoglobin levels lower in patients who developed RE (P < 0.05). Based on these two pre-treatment risk factors, an APR score was defined as 0 (no risk factors), 1 (either risk factor), or 2 (both risk factors). APR score was significantly associated with RE in both univariate (OR = 2.3 for each point, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5–3.4, P = 0.001) and multivariate (OR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.3–3.4, P = 0.002) analyses. Conclusions: The APR score may represent a novel metric to predict RE. However, pending validation in an independent dataset, caution is advised when interpreting these results given their retrospective and thus exploratory nature

  18. Breast cancer induced by radiation. Relation to mammography and treatment of acne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is given of cases of 16 women in whom cancer of the breast developed after radiation therapy for acne or hirsutism, suggesting another group at higher risk than is generally expected for cancer of the breast. It is prudent to regard the carcinogenic effect of radiation on the breast as proportional to dose without a threshold. Mammography in young women should be ordered only selectively, not for screening

  19. Impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections in stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at evaluating the impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections on dosimetry of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Four-dimensional computed tomography data from 15 low stage non-small cell lung cancer patients was used. Treatment planning and dose calculations were done using pencil beam convolution algorithm of Varian Eclipse system with Modified Batho Power Law for tissue heterogeneity. Patient plans were generated with 6 MV co-planar non-opposing four to six field beams optimized with tissue heterogeneity corrections to deliver a prescribed dose of 60 Gy in three fractions to at least 95% of the planning target volume, keeping spinal cord dose < 10 Gy. The same plans were then regenerated without heterogeneity correction by recalculating previously optimized treatment plans keeping identical beam arrangements, field fluences and monitor units. Compared with heterogeneity corrected plans, the non-corrected plans had lower average minimum, mean, and maximum tumor doses by 13%, 8% and 6% respectively. The results indicate that tissue heterogeneity is an important determinant of dosimetric optimization of SBRT plans. (author)

  20. Impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections in stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Tania De

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at evaluating the impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections on dosimetry of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Four-dimensional computed tomography data from 15 low stage non-small cell lung cancer patients was used. Treatment planning and dose calculations were done using pencil beam convolution algorithm of Varian Eclipse system with Modified Batho Power Law for tissue heterogeneity. Patient plans were generated with 6 MV co-planar non-opposing four to six field beams optimized with tissue heterogeneity corrections to deliver a prescribed dose of 60 Gy in three fractions to at least 95% of the planning target volume, keeping spinal cord dose <10 Gy. The same plans were then regenerated without heterogeneity correction by recalculating previously optimized treatment plans keeping identical beam arrangements, field fluences and monitor units. Compared with heterogeneity corrected plans, the non-corrected plans had lower average minimum, mean, and maximum tumor doses by 13%, 8%, and 6% respectively. The results indicate that tissue heterogeneity is an important determinant of dosimetric optimization of SBRT plans.

  1. Long-term results of accelerated radiation treatment for advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: This report presents long-term follow-up data from a prospective but unrandomized trial of a continuous 3.5-week course of accelerated radiation treatment (ART) used as primary treatment for patients with loco-regionally advanced head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: Ninety-three patients in three centres in New Zealand and Australia were treated with ART (59.40 Gy in 33 fractions over 24-25 days). Their disease originated from three anatomical regions (oral cavity, 35 patients; pharynx, 31 patients; larynx, 27 patients). Seventy-nine of these patients had stage III or IV cancers. Results: Follow-up ranged from 68 to 203 months (median 139 months). Loco-regional (LR) failure occurred in 52 patients leading to a 10-year actuarial expectation of LR control of 38%. The actuarial expectation of LR control at 10 years was highly dependent on stage and for stage III, IVA and IVB patients it was 57±8.1%, 32±1.7% and 7±0.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis could not confirm an independent impact of primary site or histological differentiation on LR failure. Two patients died of acute toxicity of treatment and six patients developed grade 3/4 late complications affecting soft tissues only, yielding an actuarial expectation of complications of this severity at 5 years of 9%. No cases of osteoradionecrosis or myelitis were observed. Conclusion: This ART, which has proved easy to use at a number of large and small centres, has produced encouraging long-term LR control at a cost of limited soft tissue morbidity. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. Osteoradionecrosis after the radiation treatment for tongue cancer. The relationship between dental extraction and osteoradionecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) generally follows radiotherapy for tongue cancer, and ORN is the most serious clinical problem among these complications. In this study, we focused on the incidence of ORN of the mandible and its relationship with preradiation dental extraction. During the period 1975 through 1990, 124 previously untreated patients with histologically verified squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue were treated by brachytherapy alone or in combination with external radiotherapy. All patients were diagnosed as T1N0, T2N0, according to the TNM classification of UICC, 1979. Twenty-one (18.4%) of 114 tongue cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy without a spacer developed ORN. Nine (20.9%) of 43 and 12 of 71 (16.9%) patients who did and did not undergo preradiation, respectively, developed ORN. The intervals between extraction and radiotherapy for the patients who did and did not develop ORN were 6.9 and 12.4 days, respectively, indicating that at least two weeks should be allowed to elapse after extraction before starting radiotherapy. The patients who underwent preradiation extraction tended to develop ORN earlier than those who did not, and the short interval between extraction and radiotherapy in our institute indicates that an inadequate healing time may increase the risk of ORN in the early postradiotherapy stage. We have used radiation prostheses for 10 patients since 1985, but in this study, their treatment effect was not clear although other workers have already established their usefulness. (author)

  3. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of anal cancer: Toxicity and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess survival, local control, and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated with nine-field IMRT plans. Thirteen received concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C, whereas 1 patient received 5-fluorouracil alone. Seven patients were planned with three-dimensional anteroposterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) fields for dosimetric comparison to IMRT. Results: Compared with AP/PA, IMRT reduced the mean and threshold doses to small bowel, bladder, and genitalia. Treatment was well tolerated, with no Grade ≥3 acute nonhematologic toxicity. There were no treatment breaks attributable to gastrointestinal or skin toxicity. Of patients who received mitomycin C, 38% experienced Grade 4 hematologic toxicity. IMRT did not afford bone marrow sparing, possibly resulting from the clinical decision to prescribe 45 Gy to the whole pelvis in most patients, vs. the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-recommended 30.6 Gy whole pelvic dose. Three of 17 patients, who did not achieve a complete response, proceeded to an abdominoperineal resection and colostomy. At a median follow-up of 20.3 months, there were no other local failures. Two-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and colostomy-free survival are: 91%, 65%, and 82% respectively. Conclusions: In this hypothesis-generating analysis, the acute toxicity and clinical outcome with IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer is encouraging. Compared with historical controls, local control is not compromised despite efforts to increase conformality and reduce normal structure dose

  4. The usefulness of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique in estimating radiation exposure and in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In bio dosimetry, cytogenetic methods are useful to assess the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation and to evaluate the induced damage. Analysis of dicentrics frequencies (DC), translocations by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and micronuclei (MN) in cytokinesis blocked lymphocytes are the commonly used cytogenetic endpoints. These techniques consume 3-4 days for a sample. The absorbed doses in the range of 100mGy to 6Gy can be detected. As compared to these, premature chromosome condensation (PCC) has less artifacts, retains maximum damage and offers a broad dose-estimate-window ranging 0.03 Gy to 20 Gy. Besides, it facilitates the visualization of the damaged chromosomes in just 4 hours in cells from any part of the body. During accidental- or medical- exposure, the rapidity and sensitivity of PCC commands supremacy over other techniques. Furthermore, a wider dose detection range is an additional advantage. Cell cycle position of the sample can also be understood. PCC is employed to understand the mechanism of DNA repair and the induction of chromosomal aberrations. It has a potential application in diagnosis of genetic defects including ataxia telangiectasia(AT) and genetic disorders involving DNA repair deficiency. The effectiveness of various drugs in treatment of cancer and prognosis can also be assessed by this method. Integrating PCC with FISH, there could be an opportunity of discerning mixed radiation exposure in accident situations. (author)

  5. Treatment with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marta, G.N.; Hanna, S.A.; Gadia, R.

    2014-11-15

    Through the development of four relevant clinical questions related with the proposed subject, we tried to present the main evidence for safety, toxicity and effectiveness using different radiotherapy techniques. The study population consisted of female patients of all ages with primary breast cancer treated with radiation therapy to the whole breast, regardless of histological type, staging, context of treatment (radical, adjuvant or palliative) and whether comorbidities were present or not. For this, a systematic review of the literature was performed in primary scientific research databases (Medline - Pubmed; Embase - Elsevier; Lilacs - Bireme; Cochrane Library - Central Register of Controlled Trials). All articles available until July 22, 2013, were included. The search strategy used for Medline research is described in Appendix. Articles were selected based on critical evaluation in search of the best available evidence. Recommendations were prepared based on discussion with the writing group, composed of three members of the Brazilian Society of Radiotherapy. The guideline was reviewed by an independent group specializing in evidence-based clinical guidelines. After completion, the guideline was made available for public consultation for 15 days and the suggestions forwarded to the writers for evaluation and consideration into the final text. Objective: to assess the most appropriate method of radiation therapy for treating patients with primary breast tumors. (author)

  6. Perceptions of Radiation Oncologists and Urologists on Sources and Type of Evidence to Inform Prostate Cancer Treatment Decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a national survey of radiation oncologists and urologists about the type of resources used and the level of evidence needed to change clinical practice in localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From a random sample, 1422 physicians were mailed a survey assessing the types of information used and what level of evidence could alter their clinical practice in prostate cancer. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify differences in physician characteristics for each outcome. Results: Survey response rates were similar for radiation oncologists and urologists (44% vs 46%; P=.46). Specialty-specific journals represented the most commonly used resource for informing the clinical practice for radiation oncologists (65%) and urologists (70%). Relative to radiation oncologists, urologists were less likely to report utilizing top-tier medical journals (25% vs 39%; adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.50; P=.01) or cancer journals (22% vs 51%; adjusted OR 0.50; P<.001) but more likely to rely on clinical guidelines (46% vs 38%; adjusted OR 1.6; P=.006). Both radiation oncologists and urologists most commonly reported large randomized, clinical trials as the level of evidence to change treatment recommendations for localized prostate cancer (85% vs 77%; P=.009). Conclusions: Both specialties rely on their own specialty-specific journals and view randomized, clinical trials as the level of evidence needed to change clinical practice. Our study provides a context on meaningful ways of disseminating evidence for localized prostate cancer

  7. Adaptive and innovative Radiation Treatment FOR improving Cancer treatment outcomE (ARTFORCE); a randomized controlled phase II trial for individualized treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failure of locoregional control is the main cause of recurrence in advanced head and neck cancer. This multi-center trial aims to improve outcome in two ways. Firstly, by redistribution of the radiation dose to the metabolically most FDG-PET avid part of the tumour. Hereby, a biologically more effective dose distribution might be achieved while simultaneously sparing normal tissues. Secondly, by improving patient selection. Both cisplatin and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) antibodies like Cetuximab in combination with Radiotherapy (RT) are effective in enhancing tumour response. However, it is unknown which patients will benefit from either agent in combination with irradiation. We will analyze the predictive value of biological markers and 89Zr-Cetuximab uptake for treatment outcome of chemoradiation with Cetuximab or cisplatin to improve patient selection. ARTFORCE is a randomized phase II trial for 268 patients with a factorial 2 by 2 design: cisplatin versus Cetuximab and standard RT versus redistributed RT. Cisplatin is dosed weekly 40 mg/m2 for 6 weeks. Cetuximab is dosed 250mg/m2 weekly (loading dose 400 mg/m2) for 6 weeks. The standard RT regimen consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to 70 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks. Redistributed adaptive RT consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a SIB between 64-80 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks with redistributed dose to the gross tumour volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV), and adaptation of treatment for anatomical changes in the third week of treatment. Patients with locally advanced, biopsy confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, oral cavity or hypopharynx are eligible. Primary endpoints are: locoregional recurrence free survival at 2 years, correlation of the median 89Zr-cetuximab uptake and biological markers with treatment specific outcome, and toxicity. Secondary endpoints are quality of life, swallowing function preservation

  8. Extended distance non-isocentric treatment in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT for lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Huang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To obtain the maximum differential non-coplanar beams angle for a faster dose dropping outside Plan Target Volume (PTV for lung cancer treated by Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT, an extended distance non-isocentric (EDNI treatment method was explored and developed.Methods: The EDNI requires delivering of the treatment beam at 120 cm or farther for sauce axial distance (SAD instead of standard 100 cm. This change provides a more compact dose distribution around PTV and the lower toxicity to organs at risk (OAR due to benefit of 120 cm SAD and more choice of beam and couch angle. A hand calculation formula for the translation between 100 SAD and EDNI was used to verify the treatment plan results. A phantom for end to end study based on this EDNI technique was used to compare with standard 100 SAD deliveries for SBRT. Three patients who underwent SBRT treatment were randomly chosen to demonstrate the benefits of EDNI technique. These treatment re-plans were applied to EDNI and evaluated for conformal index (CI of PTV, R50% of PTV, 2 cm distance (D2cm of PTV and Maximum dose (Dmaxof OARs to compare with original clinical plans.Results: All of the cases delivered by the EDNI technique satisfied dose requirements of RTOG 0263 and showed a faster dose dropping outside of PTV than standard SAD deliveries. The distance from PTV after 1.5 cm for the EDNI technique had a smaller maximum dose and much lower standard deviation for dose distribution. The EDNI applied plans for patients showed less R50% and D2cm of PTV (P≤ 0.05, also similar results for Dmax of esophagus, trachea and spinal cord.Conclusion: The EDNI method enhances the capabilities of linear accelerators as far as the increased gradient of dose drop-off outside of PTV is concerned. More angular separation between beams leads to more compact dose distributions, which allow decreasing volume of high dose exposure in SBRT treatments and better dose distribution on sensitive

  9. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  10. A case of radiation gastritis required surgical treatment in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagino, Daisuke; Arai, Yuko; Komatsu, Atsushi; Inoue, Kumiko; Takechi, Kimihiro [Ibaraki Prefectural Central Hospital, Tomobe (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of radiation gastritis in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer. A 61-year-old woman received irradiation of a metastatic lesion of the second lumbar vertebra. Six months later she complained of fatigue and presented with severe anemia, and her diagnosis was hemorrhagic radiation gastritis. She was treated endoscopically, but that failed to control the bleeding, making it necessary to resect surgically. The incidence of radiation gastritis is very low because the stomach is rarely within the treated field, but it is of importance to be aware that the stomach is by no means more radioresistant than other organs. (author)

  11. A case of radiation gastritis required surgical treatment in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of radiation gastritis in consequence of radiotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer. A 61-year-old woman received irradiation of a metastatic lesion of the second lumbar vertebra. Six months later she complained of fatigue and presented with severe anemia, and her diagnosis was hemorrhagic radiation gastritis. She was treated endoscopically, but that failed to control the bleeding, making it necessary to resect surgically. The incidence of radiation gastritis is very low because the stomach is rarely within the treated field, but it is of importance to be aware that the stomach is by no means more radioresistant than other organs. (author)

  12. Biologically effective dose and definitive radiation treatment for localized prostate cancer. Treatment gaps do affect the risk of biochemical failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is not clear if prolongation of definitive external radiation therapy for prostate cancer has an effect on biochemical failure. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the biologically effective dose (BED), and in particular the duration of radiotherapy, intended as overall treatment time, has an effect on biochemical failure rates and to develop a nomogram useful to predict the 6-year probability of biochemical failure. A total of 670 patients with T1-3 N0 prostate cancer were treated with external beam definitive radiotherapy, to a total dose of 72-79.2 Gy in 40-44 fractions. The computed BED values were treated with restricted cubic splines. Variables were checked for colinearity using Spearman's test. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate freedom from biochemical relapse (FFBR) rates. The Cox regression analysis was used to identify prognostic factors of biochemical relapse in the final most performing model and to create a nomogram. Concordance probability estimate and calibration methods were used to validate the nomogram. Neoadjuvant and concomitant androgen deprivation was administered to 475 patients (70 %). The median follow-up was 80 months (range 20-129 months). Overall, the 6-year FFBR rate was 88.3 %. BED values were associated with higher biochemical failure risk. Age, iPSA, risk category, and days of radiotherapy treatment were independent variables of biochemical failure. A prolongation of RT (lower BED values) is associated with an increased risk of biochemical failure. The nomogram may be helpful in decision making for the individual patient. (orig.)

  13. Chemotherapy-Induced and/or Radiation Therapy-Induced Oral Mucositis-Complicating the Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddireddy Umameshwar Rao Naidu

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The term mucositis is coined to describe the adverse effects of radiation and chemotherapy treatments. Mucositis is one of the most common adverse reactions encountered in radiation therapy for head and neck cancers, as well as in chemotherapy, in particular with drugs affecting DNA synthesis (Sphase-specific agents such as fluorouracil, methotrexate, and cytarabine. Mucositis may limit the patient's ability to tolerate chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and nutritional status is compromised. It may drastically affect cancer treatment as well as the patient's quality of life. The incidence and severity of mucositis will vary from patient to patient. It will also vary from treatment to treatment. It is estimated that there is 40% incidence of mucositis in patients treated with standard chemotherapy and this will not only increase with the number of treatment cycles but also with previous episodes. Similarly, patients who undergo bone marrow transplantation and who receive high doses of chemotherapy have a 76% chance of getting mucositis. Patients receiving radiation, in particular to head and neck cancers, have a 30% to 60% chance. The exact pathophysiology of development is not known, but it is thought to be divided into direct and indirect mucositis. Chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy will interfere with the normal turnover of epithelial, cells leading to mucosal injury; subsequently, it can also occur due to indirect invasion of Gram-negative bacteria and fungal species because most of the cancer drugs will cause changes in blood counts. With the advancement in cytology, a more precise mechanism has been established. With this understanding, we can select and target particular mediators responsible for the mucositis. Risk factors such as age, nutritional status, type of malignancy, and oral care during treatment will play important roles in the development of mucositis. Many treatment options are available to prevent and treat this

  14. Voice Quality After Treatment of Early Vocal Cord Cancer: A Randomized Trial Comparing Laser Surgery With Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Early laryngeal cancer is usually treated with either transoral laser surgery or radiation therapy. The quality of voice achieved with these treatments has not been compared in a randomized trial. Methods and Materials: Male patients with carcinoma limited to 1 mobile vocal cord (T1aN0M0) were randomly assigned to receive either laser surgery (n=32) or external beam radiation therapy (n=28). Surgery consisted of tumor excision with a CO2 laser with the patient under general anaesthesia. External beam radiation therapy to the larynx was delivered to a cumulative dose of 66 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions over 6.5 weeks. Voice quality was assessed at baseline and 6 and 24 months after treatment. The main outcome measures were expert-rated voice quality on a grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain (GRBAS) scale, videolaryngostroboscopic findings, and the patients' self-rated voice quality and its impact on activities of daily living. Results: Overall voice quality between the groups was rated similar, but voice was more breathy and the glottal gap was wider in patients treated with laser surgery than in those who received radiation therapy. Patients treated with radiation therapy reported less hoarseness-related inconvenience in daily living 2 years after treatment. Three patients in each group had local cancer recurrence within 2 years from randomization. Conclusions: Radiation therapy may be the treatment of choice for patients whose requirements for voice quality are demanding. Overall voice quality was similar in both treatment groups, however, indicating a need for careful consideration of patient-related factors in the choice of a treatment option

  15. Voice Quality After Treatment of Early Vocal Cord Cancer: A Randomized Trial Comparing Laser Surgery With Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, Leena-Maija, E-mail: leena-maija.aaltonen@hus.fi [Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, and University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Rautiainen, Noora; Sellman, Jaana [Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Saarilahti, Kauko [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, and University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Mäkitie, Antti; Rihkanen, Heikki [Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, and University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Laranne, Jussi; Kleemola, Leenamaija [Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, and University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); Wigren, Tuija [Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital, and University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); Sala, Eeva [Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Turku University Hospital, and University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Lindholm, Paula [Department of Oncology, Turku University Hospital, and University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Grenman, Reidar [Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Turku University Hospital, and University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Joensuu, Heikki [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, and University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-10-01

    Objective: Early laryngeal cancer is usually treated with either transoral laser surgery or radiation therapy. The quality of voice achieved with these treatments has not been compared in a randomized trial. Methods and Materials: Male patients with carcinoma limited to 1 mobile vocal cord (T1aN0M0) were randomly assigned to receive either laser surgery (n=32) or external beam radiation therapy (n=28). Surgery consisted of tumor excision with a CO{sub 2} laser with the patient under general anaesthesia. External beam radiation therapy to the larynx was delivered to a cumulative dose of 66 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions over 6.5 weeks. Voice quality was assessed at baseline and 6 and 24 months after treatment. The main outcome measures were expert-rated voice quality on a grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain (GRBAS) scale, videolaryngostroboscopic findings, and the patients' self-rated voice quality and its impact on activities of daily living. Results: Overall voice quality between the groups was rated similar, but voice was more breathy and the glottal gap was wider in patients treated with laser surgery than in those who received radiation therapy. Patients treated with radiation therapy reported less hoarseness-related inconvenience in daily living 2 years after treatment. Three patients in each group had local cancer recurrence within 2 years from randomization. Conclusions: Radiation therapy may be the treatment of choice for patients whose requirements for voice quality are demanding. Overall voice quality was similar in both treatment groups, however, indicating a need for careful consideration of patient-related factors in the choice of a treatment option.

  16. Effects of Swallowing Exercises on Patients Undergoing Radiation Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    Head and Neck Cancer; Stage I Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage I Laryngeal Cancer; Stage I Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage II Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage II Laryngeal Cancer; Stage II Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage III Laryngeal Cancer; Stage III Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage IV Laryngeal Cancer; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Cancer

  17. Case report of radiation-induced rectal cancer at the site of a rectal ulcer 33 years after radiation treatment for uterine cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The patient was a 79-year-old woman who presented with abnormal bowel movements as the chief complaint. Her medical history included radiation therapy (details including dose unclear) for uterine cancer at 46 years of age. At 64 years of age, she had undergone regular endoscopic examination of the lower digestive tract because of abnormal bowel movements. In the first biopsy of the rectal ulcer region, rectal cancer was diagnosed as a well-differentiated adenoma, and an abdominoperineal resection of the rectum was performed. The pathological findings indicated mucinous carcinoma (mp, ly1, v0). We report the case of radiation-induced rectal cancer. In the course of observations after radiation therapy, it is necessary to take secondary cancer into consideration and record the observations accordingly. (author)

  18. Combined Treatment Effects of Radiation and Immunotherapy: Studies in an Autochthonous Prostate Cancer Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Satoshi [Department of Oncology, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Harris, Timothy J.; Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Yoshimura, Kiyoshi [Department of Oncology, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Yen, Hung-Rong; Getnet, Derese; Grosso, Joseph F.; Bruno, Tullia C. [Department of Oncology, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); De Marzo, Angelo M. [Department of Pathology, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Urology, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To optimize the combination of ionizing radiation and cellular immunotherapy using a preclinical autochthonous model of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Transgenic mice expressing a model antigen under a prostate-specific promoter were treated using a platform that integrates cone-beam CT imaging with 3-dimensional conformal therapy. Using this technology we investigated the immunologic and therapeutic effects of combining ionizing radiation with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting cellular immunotherapy for prostate cancer in mice bearing autochthonous prostate tumors. Results: The combination of ionizing radiation and immunotherapy resulted in a significant decrease in pathologic tumor grade and gross tumor bulk that was not evident with either single-modality therapy. Furthermore, combinatorial therapy resulted in improved overall survival in a preventive metastasis model and in the setting of established micrometastases. Mechanistically, combined therapy resulted in an increase of the ratio of effector-to-regulatory T cells for both CD4 and CD8 tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Conclusions: Our preclinical model establishes a potential role for the use of combined radiation-immunotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer, which warrants further exploration in a clinical setting.

  19. Neutron radiation therapy: application of advanced technology to the treatment of cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Maughan, R L; Kota, C; Burmeister, J; Porter, A T; Forman, J D; Blosser, H G; Blosser, E; Blosser, G

    1999-01-01

    The design and construction of a unique superconducting cyclotron for use in fast neutron radiation therapy is described. The clinical results obtained in the treatment of adenocarcinoma of the prostate with this accelerator are presented. Future use of the boron neutron capture reaction as a means of enhancing fast neutron therapy in the treatment of patients with brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme) is also discussed.

  20. Reducing the Cost of Proton Radiation Therapy: The Feasibility of a Streamlined Treatment Technique for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Rui Zhang; Jones, Timothy G.; Annelise Giebeler; Taddei, Phillip J.; Robert D Stewart; Andrew Lee; Oleg Vassiliev

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiation therapy is an effective modality for cancer treatments, but the cost of proton therapy is much higher compared to conventional radiotherapy and this presents a formidable barrier to most clinical practices that wish to offer proton therapy. Little attention in literature has been paid to the costs associated with collimators, range compensators and hypofractionation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cost-saving modifications to the present standa...

  1. The median non-prostate cancer survival is more than 10 years for men up to age 80 years who are selected and receive curative radiation treatment for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment guidelines recommend that curative radiation treatment of prostate cancer be offered only to men whose life expectancy is greater than 10 years. The average life expectancy of North American males is less than 10 years after age 75, yet many men older than 75 years receive curative radiation treatment for prostate cancer. This study used the provincial cancer registry in British Columbia, Canada, to determine median non-prostate cancer survival for men who were aged 75 to 82 years at start of radiation treatment. Median survival was found to be greater than 10 years in men aged up to 80 years at the start of their radiation treatment. This finding suggests that radiation oncologists are able to appropriately select elderly men with greater than average life expectancy to receive curative radiation treatment

  2. A methodology for automatic intensity-modulated radiation treatment planning for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Pan, Xiaoning; Li, Yupeng

    2011-07-01

    In intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the quality of the treatment plan, which is highly dependent upon the treatment planner's level of experience, greatly affects the potential benefits of the radiotherapy (RT). Furthermore, the planning process is complicated and requires a great deal of iteration, and is often the most time-consuming aspect of the RT process. In this paper, we describe a methodology to automate the IMRT planning process in lung cancer cases, the goal being to improve the quality and consistency of treatment planning. This methodology (1) automatically sets beam angles based on a beam angle automation algorithm, (2) judiciously designs the planning structures, which were shown to be effective for all the lung cancer cases we studied, and (3) automatically adjusts the objectives of the objective function based on a parameter automation algorithm. We compared treatment plans created in this system (mdaccAutoPlan) based on the overall methodology with plans from a clinical trial of IMRT for lung cancer run at our institution. The 'autoplans' were consistently better, or no worse, than the plans produced by experienced medical dosimetrists in terms of tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing. We conclude that the mdaccAutoPlan system can potentially improve the quality and consistency of treatment planning for lung cancer.

  3. Dosimetric Studies of Mixed Energy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Abdul Haneefa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosimetric studies of mixed field photon beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for prostate cancer using pencil beam (PB and collapsed cone convolution (CCC algorithms using Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system (v. 4.3 are investigated in this study. Three different plans were generated using 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed beam (both 6 and 15 MV. Fifteen patients with two sets of plans were generated: one by using PB and the other by using CCC for the same planning parameters and constraints except the beam energy. For each patient’s plan of high energy photons, one set of photoneutron measurements using solid state neutron track detector (SSNTD was taken for this study. Mean percentage of V66 Gy in the rectum is 18.55±2.8, 14.58±2.1, and 16.77±4.7 for 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed-energy plans, respectively. Mean percentage of V66 Gy in bladder is 16.54±2.1, 17.42±2.1, and 16.94±41.9 for 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed-energy plans, respectively. Mixed fields neutron contribution at the beam entrance surface is 45.62% less than at 15 MV photon beam. Our result shows that, with negligible neutron contributions, mixed field IMRT has considerable dosimetric advantage.

  4. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this ... a combination of drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated ...

  5. An alternative method for using bipolar junction transistors as a radiation dosimetry detector in breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon photodetectors and MOSFETs (Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors) are frequently used devices for measuring ionizing radiation in health physics instrumentation. The Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) is not a typical device used as a detector for measuring some physical quantities in radiotherapy beams due to its loss of sensitivity to ionizing radiation, as a consequence of radiation damage in the silicon semiconductor substrate. Actually, the know-how of the BJT characteristic curves and its response to ionizing radiation leads us to suggest an alternative method to estimate the radiation dose value in breast cancer treatments. The BJT parameter to be evaluated before and after the irradiation procedure is the BJT amplification factor, also called DC gain β. In this work, the study was done using a BJT known as Darlington type, within an Alderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom. Darlington transistors have very high gain and this feature allowed that the BJT gain changes to be correlated with the dose of the radiation beam. The results indicate that this new method could be an alternative option to estimate the dose value in the phantom for measurements in breast cancer radiotherapy. - Highlights: • The method suggested for dosimetry in radiotherapy is innovative. • Bipolar junction transistors can provide low uncertainties in dosimetry. • The results provide perspectives for further studies to compare with numerical methods

  6. Application of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in radiation treatment planning for head and neck cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Musaddiq; J; Awan; Farzan; Siddiqui; David; Schwartz; Jiankui; Yuan; Mitchell; Machtay; Min; Yao

    2015-01-01

    18-fluorodeoxygluocose positron emission tomography/computed tomography(18FDG-PET/CT) provides significant information in multiple settings in the management of head and neck cancers(HNC). This article seeks to define the additional benefit of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning for squamous cell carcinomas(SCCs) of the head and neck through a review of relevant literature. By helping further define both primary and nodal volumes, radiation treatment planning can be improved using PET/CT. Special attention is paid to the independent benefit of PET/CT in targeting mucosal primaries as well as in detecting nodal metastases. The utility of PET/CT is also explored for treatment planning in the setting of SCC of unknown primary as PET/CT may help define a mucosal target volume by guiding biopsies for examination under anesthesia thus changing the treatment paradigm and limiting the extent of therapy. Implications of the use of PET/CT for proper target delineation in patients with artifact from dental procedures are discussed and the impact of dental artifact on CT-based PET attenuation correction is assessed. Finally, comment is made upon the role of PET/CT in the high-risk post-operative setting, particularly in the context of radiation dose escalation. Real case examples are used in these settings to elucidate the practical benefits of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning in HNCs.

  7. Cancer treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... focused beam of light to destroy cancer cells. Laser therapy can be used to: Destroy tumors and precancerous growths Shrink tumors that are blocking the stomach, colon, or esophagus Help treat cancer symptoms, such as bleeding Seal nerve endings after ...

  8. The Impact of Radiation Therapy on the Risk of Lymphedema After Treatment for Breast Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Laura E.G.; Miller, Cynthia L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Horick, Nora [Department of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Skolny, Melissa N.; Jammallo, Lauren S.; Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); O' Toole, Jean A. [Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle C. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective: Lymphedema after breast cancer treatment can be an irreversible condition with a negative impact on quality of life. The goal of this study was to identify radiation therapy-related risk factors for lymphedema. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively performed arm volume measurements on 1476 breast cancer patients at our institution using a Perometer. Treating each breast individually, 1099 of 1501 patients (73%) received radiation therapy. Arm measurements were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Lymphedema was defined as ≥10% arm volume increase occurring >3 months postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate risk factors for lymphedema. Results: At a median follow-up time of 25.4 months (range, 3.4-82.6 months), the 2-year cumulative incidence of lymphedema was 6.8%. Cumulative incidence by radiation therapy type was as follows: 3.0% no radiation therapy, 3.1% breast or chest wall alone, 21.9% supraclavicular (SC), and 21.1% SC and posterior axillary boost (PAB). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for regional lymph node radiation (RLNR) (SC ± PAB) was 1.7 (P=.025) compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. There was no difference in lymphedema risk between SC and SC + PAB (P=.96). Other independent risk factors included early postoperative swelling (P<.0001), higher body mass index (P<.0001), greater number of lymph nodes dissected (P=.018), and axillary lymph node dissection (P=.0001). Conclusions: In a large cohort of breast cancer patients prospectively screened for lymphedema, RLNR significantly increased the risk of lymphedema compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. When considering use of RLNR, clinicians should weigh the potential benefit of RLNR for control of disease against the increased risk of lymphedema.

  9. The Impact of Radiation Therapy on the Risk of Lymphedema After Treatment for Breast Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Lymphedema after breast cancer treatment can be an irreversible condition with a negative impact on quality of life. The goal of this study was to identify radiation therapy-related risk factors for lymphedema. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively performed arm volume measurements on 1476 breast cancer patients at our institution using a Perometer. Treating each breast individually, 1099 of 1501 patients (73%) received radiation therapy. Arm measurements were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Lymphedema was defined as ≥10% arm volume increase occurring >3 months postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate risk factors for lymphedema. Results: At a median follow-up time of 25.4 months (range, 3.4-82.6 months), the 2-year cumulative incidence of lymphedema was 6.8%. Cumulative incidence by radiation therapy type was as follows: 3.0% no radiation therapy, 3.1% breast or chest wall alone, 21.9% supraclavicular (SC), and 21.1% SC and posterior axillary boost (PAB). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for regional lymph node radiation (RLNR) (SC ± PAB) was 1.7 (P=.025) compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. There was no difference in lymphedema risk between SC and SC + PAB (P=.96). Other independent risk factors included early postoperative swelling (P<.0001), higher body mass index (P<.0001), greater number of lymph nodes dissected (P=.018), and axillary lymph node dissection (P=.0001). Conclusions: In a large cohort of breast cancer patients prospectively screened for lymphedema, RLNR significantly increased the risk of lymphedema compared with breast/chest wall radiation alone. When considering use of RLNR, clinicians should weigh the potential benefit of RLNR for control of disease against the increased risk of lymphedema

  10. A phase II trial for the optimisation of treatment position in the radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, L.; Armstrong, J.; Buckney, S.;

    2008-01-01

    . The published literature demonstrates variation in the use of the prone and supine position for prostate cancer radiation therapy. Previous investigators using different protocols for patient preparation, imaging and target volume definition have demonstrated changes in the calculated therapeutic...... cancer consented to participate in this study. All patients underwent a planning CT scan in both the prone and supine treatment positions. The PTV and OAR were drawn on each set of scans by one of the investigators. The PTV included the prostate and seminal vesicles with a 1 cm margin except posteriorly......Background: Patient immobilisation and position are important contributors to the reproducibility and accuracy of radiation therapy. In addition the choice of position can alter the external contour of the treated area and has the potential to alter the spatial relationship between internal organs...

  11. Reducing the Cost of Proton Radiation Therapy: The Feasibility of a Streamlined Treatment Technique for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton radiation therapy is an effective modality for cancer treatments, but the cost of proton therapy is much higher compared to conventional radiotherapy and this presents a formidable barrier to most clinical practices that wish to offer proton therapy. Little attention in literature has been paid to the costs associated with collimators, range compensators and hypofractionation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cost-saving modifications to the present standard of care for proton treatments for prostate cancer. In particular, we quantified the dosimetric impact of a treatment technique in which custom fabricated collimators were replaced with a multileaf collimator (MLC) and the custom range compensators (RC) were eliminated. The dosimetric impacts of these modifications were assessed for 10 patients with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and confirmed with corresponding Monte Carlo simulations. We assessed the impact on lifetime risks of radiogenic second cancers using detailed dose reconstructions and predictive dose-risk models based on epidemiologic data. We also performed illustrative calculations, using an isoeffect model, to examine the potential for hypofractionation. Specifically, we bracketed plausible intervals of proton fraction size and total treatment dose that were equivalent to a conventional photon treatment of 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions. Our results revealed that eliminating the RC and using an MLC had negligible effect on predicted dose distributions and second cancer risks. Even modest hypofractionation strategies can yield substantial cost savings. Together, our results suggest that it is feasible to modify the standard of care to increase treatment efficiency, reduce treatment costs to patients and insurers, while preserving high treatment quality

  12. Reducing the Cost of Proton Radiation Therapy: The Feasibility of a Streamlined Treatment Technique for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newhauser, Wayne D., E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Zhang, Rui [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Jones, Timothy G. [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Physics, Abilene Christian University, ACU Box 27963, Abilene, TX 79699 (United States); Giebeler, Annelise; Taddei, Phillip J. [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Stewart, Robert D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lee, Andrew [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Vassiliev, Oleg [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States)

    2015-04-24

    Proton radiation therapy is an effective modality for cancer treatments, but the cost of proton therapy is much higher compared to conventional radiotherapy and this presents a formidable barrier to most clinical practices that wish to offer proton therapy. Little attention in literature has been paid to the costs associated with collimators, range compensators and hypofractionation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cost-saving modifications to the present standard of care for proton treatments for prostate cancer. In particular, we quantified the dosimetric impact of a treatment technique in which custom fabricated collimators were replaced with a multileaf collimator (MLC) and the custom range compensators (RC) were eliminated. The dosimetric impacts of these modifications were assessed for 10 patients with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and confirmed with corresponding Monte Carlo simulations. We assessed the impact on lifetime risks of radiogenic second cancers using detailed dose reconstructions and predictive dose-risk models based on epidemiologic data. We also performed illustrative calculations, using an isoeffect model, to examine the potential for hypofractionation. Specifically, we bracketed plausible intervals of proton fraction size and total treatment dose that were equivalent to a conventional photon treatment of 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions. Our results revealed that eliminating the RC and using an MLC had negligible effect on predicted dose distributions and second cancer risks. Even modest hypofractionation strategies can yield substantial cost savings. Together, our results suggest that it is feasible to modify the standard of care to increase treatment efficiency, reduce treatment costs to patients and insurers, while preserving high treatment quality.

  13. The impact of three-dimensional radiation on the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with locally advanced unresectable disease have a grim prognosis. Radiotherapeutic strategies are necessary to improve the permanent eradication of thoracic disease. The poor results achieved with conventional external beam radiation therapy reflect in part, the inadequacy of such therapy in achieving its primary objective of achieving local control. The impact of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-DCRT) on local disease eradication and its potential role in improving survival is assessed. This review addresses aspects of the software and hardware technology of 3-DCRT, the clinical and technical aspects of target volume definition, the use of 3-DCRT to predict radiation pneumonitis, strategies for dose escalation in NSCLC, and analyses the clinical results to date. Initially investigators compared the best treatment techniques devised with conventional planning techniques to those devised with 3-DCRT. These analyses showed that 3-DCRT had the potential to deliver high dose radiation (>70 Gy) with minimal underdosing and with a concomitant relative sparing of normal tissues. This technical demonstration of enhanced therapeutic ratio is the basis for the evolving clinical utilization of 3-DCRT for NSCLC. Software and hardware developments continue to develop and have the potential to solve evolving clinical issues. Dose-volume-histograms have been used to accurately quantify lung dose and derived parameters have the potential to predict the risk of pneumonitis for individual patients before treatment. Initial clinical results have been promising and strategies for further dose escalation are emerging. Preliminary experience has resulted in promising survival following three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy alone for locally advanced NSCLC. More follow-up and experience will determine late toxicity, maximum dose, and efficacy of dose escalation with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy

  14. Accounting for competing risks is essential in comparing surgery and radiation treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The Kaplan-Meier (KM) product-limit method is frequently used incorrectly to estimate non-survival outcome measures in the medical literature. This method is based on the assumption that all censored patients will eventually fail, and therefore overestimates the probability of failure in the presence of competing risks. The higher the percentage of patients failing from extraneous (intercurrent death) causes prior to the occurrence of interest (biochemical failure), the larger the bias in the probability of failure. Cumulative incidence (CI) estimation is an alternative method that accommodates for patients who die of intercurrent disease prior to experiencing the event of interest. Although the erroneous application of the KM method has been previously reported, statisticians and clinicians continue to use it to estimate non-survival outcome measures for comparison purposes. Comparing KM results across treatment series with differing distributions of competing risks, as is true for radiation and prostatectomy patients, could easily lead to erroneous conclusions. We illustrate this problem by comparing biochemical control rates for men treated for prostate cancer obtained by KM and CI methods in two age cohorts. Methods and Materials: We report overall biochemical control (bNED) rates for 614 men treated for localized prostate cancer with radiotherapy alone between 11/85 and 11/94. Mean and median follow-up is 46 and 43 mos (2 to 133 mos) and mean and median age is 70 years (46 to 89 years). Because older patients are more likely to die of non-prostate cancer causes prior to biochemical failure than younger patients (14% versus 8%), KM failure rates are compared to CI failure rates for younger (≤65 years) and older men (>65 years). Standard errors for the KM estimates are based on Greenwood's formula and those for CI estimates are based on the delta method. Results: Overall bNED control rates for younger men at five years are 57% using KM's method and

  15. Comparison of 2 Common Radiation Therapy Techniques for Definitive Treatment of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Two choices are widely used for radiation delivery, 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). No randomized comparisons have been conducted in the setting of lung cancer, but theoretical concerns suggest that IMRT may negatively impact disease control. We analyzed a large cohort of limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) patients treated before and after institutional conversion from 3DCRT to IMRT to compare outcomes. Methods and Materials: Patients with LS-SCLC treated with definitive radiation at our institution between 2000 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Both multivariable Cox regression and propensity score matching were used to compare oncologic outcomes of 3DCRT and IMRT in the context of other clinically relevant covariables. Acute and chronic toxicities associated with the 2 techniques were compared using Fisher exact and log–rank tests, respectively. Results: A total of 223 patients were treated during the study period, with 119 receiving 3DCRT and 104 receiving IMRT. Their median age was 64 years (range, 39-90 years). Median follow-up times for 3DCRT and IMRT were 27 months (range, 2-147 months) and 22 months (range, 4-83 months), respectively. Radiation modality was not associated with differences in overall survival or disease-free survival in either multivariable or propensity score-matched analyses. IMRT patients required significantly fewer percutaneous feeding tube placements (5% vs 17%, respectively, P=.005). Conclusions: IMRT was not associated with worse oncologic outcomes than those of 3DCRT. IMRT was associated with a lower rate of esophagitis-related percutaneous feeding tube placements

  16. Treatment results and complications in clinical combinations of radiation and chemotherapy in the treatment of localized cancer in the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy, significant improvements were achieved in treatment results of localized non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, intraoral cancer, and carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. Administering chemotherapy with radiation was given sumultaneously in the patients with intraoral cancer (BLM iv) and with carcinoma of the maxillary sinus (5-FU ia). In the patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chemotherapy (1 or 2 cycles of COPP) was administered and followed by radiotherapy. If radiation dose were reduced by about 50% in the intraoral cancer, 20% in carcinoma of the maxillary sinus, and 10% in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute and/or chronic complications were within tolerable limits in this series of observations, although toxicity was dose-related for both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (author)

  17. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemotherapy - dry mouth; Radiation therapy - dry mouth; Transplant - dry mouth; Transplantation - dry mouth ... Some cancer treatments and medicines can cause dry mouth. Symptoms you may have include: Mouth sores Thick ...

  18. Treatment of pancreatic cancer xenografts with Erbitux (IMC-C225) anti-EGFR antibody, gemcitabine, and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate treatment of human pancreatic cancer cell lines and xenografts with combinations of Erbitux (IMC-C225) anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody, gemcitabine, and radiation. Methods and Materials: BxPC-3 and MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic carcinoma cells were treated in vitro for 24 h with IMC-C225 (5 μg/mL), then exposed to epidermal growth factor (EGF) (10 mM) for 5 min. Immunoblots were screened for EGFR expression and the ability of IMC-C225 to block EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR. Cells were treated with IMC-C225 (5 μg/mL) on Day 0, the IC50 dose of gemcitabine on Day 1 for 24 h, followed by 3 Gy 60Co irradiation on Day 2, or the combination of each agent. For cell proliferation, cells were counted on Day 4, and for apoptosis, cells were stained with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide, then analyzed by FACS. Cells were treated with the same single or multiple treatments and analyzed in a clonogenic cell survival assay. The effect of IMC-C225, gemcitabine, and radiation on the growth of BxPC-3 and MiaPaCa-2 tumor xenografts was determined. Athymic nude mice bearing established s.c. tumor xenografts of 6-8 mm diameter received 6 weeks of treatment with IMC-C225 (1 mg every 3 days x 6) alone or in combination with gemcitabine (120 mg/kg i.v. every 6 days x 6), and 6 weekly fractions of 3 Gy radiation on the days after gemcitabine administration. Tumor growth was measured with Vernier calipers. Results: BxPC-3 and MiaPaCa-2 cell lines expressed low levels of EGFR. IMC-C225 inhibited EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGF receptor on both cell lines. Treatment of cells with a combination of IMC-C225 + gemcitabine + radiation produced the highest induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in vitro. Combination treatment with IMC-C225, gemcitabine, and radiation produced 100% complete regression of MiaPaCa-2 tumors for more than 250 days, and the greatest growth inhibition of BxPC-3 tumors compared

  19. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from renal cell cancer: treatment attempt with radiation and sunitinib (case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haukland Ellinor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A case of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis in a patient with known brain and lung metastases from renal cell cancer without previous systemic therapy is presented. Neoplastic meningitis (NM developed 31 months after first diagnosis of simultaneous extra- and intracranial recurrence of kidney cancer and surgical resection of a cerebellar metastasis. In spite of local radiotherapy to the macroscopic NM lesions in the cervical and lumbar spine followed by initiation of sunitinib, the patient succumbed to his disease 4 months after the diagnosis of NM. The untreated lung metastases progressed very slowly during almost 3 years of observation. This case illustrates important issues around both biological behaviour and treatment approaches in metastatic renal cell cancer.

  20. Palliative treatment of advanced cancer using multiple nonconfluent pencil beam radiation. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the era of orthovoltage radiation, multiple nonconfluent pencil beam radiation (GRID) therapy was utilized to minimize superficial normal tissue damage while delivering tumorcidal doses at specified depths in tissues. The success of GRID therapy was based on the fact that small volumes of tissues could tolerate high doses of radiation. Since the development of megavoltage radiation and skin sparing, GRID therapy has been abandoned. In a pilot study, the authors adapted the principles of GRID therapy to megavoltage photon beams to treat patients with massive tumors or recurrent tumors after tolerance doses of radiation. Twenty-two patients have been entered in the study. All patients were symptomatic and had exhaustive conventional surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy approaches to treatment. A 50:50 GRID (open to closed areas) was utilized, and a prescribed dose of 1000 to 1500 cGy to the open areas was given using a single photon field. In four patients, a second GRID treated was delivered at a split course interval of 4 weeks. The follow-up in these patients ranges from 1 month to 18 months. The results of treatment have been remarkable with 20 of 22 patients achieving dramatic relief of severe symptoms, and several patients showing significant objective regression. No acute effects have been observed, including those patients having large volumes of the abdomen irradiated. No unusual skin or subcutaneous early or late damage has been observed in follow-up

  1. Use of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Radiation Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kezban Berberoğlu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays an important role in the treatment of lung cancer. Accurate diagnosis and staging are crucial in the delivery of RT with curative intent. Target miss can be prevented by accurate determination of tumor contours during RT planning. Currently, tumor contours are determined manually by computed tomography (CT) during RT planning. This method leads to differences in delineation of tumor volume between users. Given the change in RT tools and methods due to rapidly ...

  2. Randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of sildenafil citrate in the treatment of erectile dysfunction following external beam radiation treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) commonly affects the quality of life of men after treatment of prostate cancer. We conducted a placebo-controlled, crossover randomised trial to assess the efficacy and tolerability of sildenafil citrate in the treatment of ED developing after external beam radiation treatment (EBRT) of localized prostate cancer. Sixty-six patients who had developed ED following radiation treatment agreed to participate and were allocated to sildenafil or placebo to be taken prior to four sexual attempts. In the crossover period, subjects received the alternative tablet for a further four attempts. Allocation was centrally randomized, and researchers and patients were both blinded to the trial arm. Efficacy was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire and with a separate global efficacy question. Forty-three subjects completed the study. There was a significant increase in mean scores from baseline for all domains of the IIEF with sildenafil compared with placebo (P < 0.001). Affirmative response to the global efficacy question was more common after taking sildenafil compared with placebo. In approximately half of the patients, the improvement in the erectile function domain score corresponded to a moderate improvement in ED (e.g. success ‘sometimes’ to ‘most times’). Sildenafil was associated with mild flushing, nasal stuffiness or indigestion in 8–10% patients and moderate flushing in 10%. The current study adds to the evidence that phosphodiesterase inhibitors are an effective and well-tolerated treatment for ED after EBRT for prostate cancer.

  3. Intraoperative radiation therapy in combined treatment of gastric cancer (immediate and sport-term results of a randomized study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience of applying the intraoperative radiation therapy method (IORT) on the basis of the Medicinal radiological scientific centre is described. The study on the efficiency of the combined surgical treatment with the IORT was carried out on the patients with operable stomach cancer. The irradiation was accomplished on the Microtron-M accelerator. It is established that no complications were registered during transportation and IORT treatment of the patients. The early complication are similar to the those of the control group, which was subjected only to surgical treatment. Decrease in the frequency of developing postoperational pancreatitis by combined treatment is recorded. Inflammatory and functional changes in the operated stomach prevailed among the later complications

  4. Effects of smoking cessation on hypoxia and its potential impact on radiation treatment effects in lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: smoking cessation is often attempted in the context of a lung cancer diagnosis. If cessation causes slowly continuing changes of total lung capacity and vital capacity, this may have consequences for lung volume, results of dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis and targeting precision, in addition to changes in oxygenation, tumor biology (gene expression) and prognosis. Methods: to address the impact of smoking cessation on radiation treatment of lung cancer, a literature review was performed. Results: smoking cessation is associated with important benefits such as improved lung function and a better general health and performance status. In surgically and radiation treated patients, smoking cessation might lead to longer survival and reduced complications. Early data indicate that hypoxia in non-small cell lung cancer should be considered a poor prognostic factor. Yet, specific human data on how hypoxia is influenced by smoking status are not available. The influence of smoking history on the pneumonitis risk is not entirely clear. However, it appears that other factors outweigh the influence of smoking. The short-term effects of smoking cessation on lung function do not appear to cause relevant errors in treatment planning or targeting precision. Yet, no prospective study formally addressing this question was identified. Conclusion: smoking cessation appears to be prognostically beneficial. The role of hypoxia in this context requires more detailed evaluation. (orig.)

  5. Treatment of invasive bladder cancer by cisplatin and radiation in patients unsuited for surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventy patients with muscle-invading bladder carcinoma (clinical stages T2 to T4) who were not candidates for cystectomy were treated with combined cisplatin and full-dose external-beam radiation on a multi-institutional prospective protocol from 1980 through 1985. Thirty-six patients are alive, all but three without evidence of cancer. The complete response rate is 77% in the 62 patients completing planned irradiation and 70% for all patients. Among the complete responders, 73% are currently maintained, and this group has a significantly higher four-year survival than those not having a complete response and those with recurrence of disease - 57% vs 11%. The observed high complete response rates in patients in all stages and the high survival rates suggest irradiation plus cisplatin therapy offers an important therapeutic gain over radiation therapy alone for invasive cancer of the bladder. These results encourage further evaluation of combining cisplatin-based, multidrug chemotherapy with irradiation in patients with locally very-advanced bladder tumors who are not suited for surgery

  6. Biologically effective dose and definitive radiation treatment for localized prostate cancer. Treatment gaps do affect the risk of biochemical failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanpaolo, P.; Barbieri, V. [CROB, Rionero in Vulture (Italy). Radiation Oncology Dept.; Genovesi, D. [' ' G. D' Annunzio Univ., Chieti (Italy). Radiation Oncology Dept.

    2014-08-15

    It is not clear if prolongation of definitive external radiation therapy for prostate cancer has an effect on biochemical failure. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the biologically effective dose (BED), and in particular the duration of radiotherapy, intended as overall treatment time, has an effect on biochemical failure rates and to develop a nomogram useful to predict the 6-year probability of biochemical failure. A total of 670 patients with T1-3 N0 prostate cancer were treated with external beam definitive radiotherapy, to a total dose of 72-79.2 Gy in 40-44 fractions. The computed BED values were treated with restricted cubic splines. Variables were checked for colinearity using Spearman's test. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate freedom from biochemical relapse (FFBR) rates. The Cox regression analysis was used to identify prognostic factors of biochemical relapse in the final most performing model and to create a nomogram. Concordance probability estimate and calibration methods were used to validate the nomogram. Neoadjuvant and concomitant androgen deprivation was administered to 475 patients (70 %). The median follow-up was 80 months (range 20-129 months). Overall, the 6-year FFBR rate was 88.3 %. BED values were associated with higher biochemical failure risk. Age, iPSA, risk category, and days of radiotherapy treatment were independent variables of biochemical failure. A prolongation of RT (lower BED values) is associated with an increased risk of biochemical failure. The nomogram may be helpful in decision making for the individual patient. (orig.) [German] Es ist nicht geklaert, ob die Verlaengerung einer definitiven Strahlentherapie bei der Behandlung von Prostatakarzinompatienten einen Effekt auf das biochemische Versagen hat. Die vorliegende Studie hat das Ziel zu evaluieren, ob biologisch die effektive Dosis und insbesondere die Gesamtdauer der Behandlung eine Wirkung auf das biochemisches Rezidiv haben koennte. Ferner

  7. Radiation dose to the patient and the radiologist while performing on chest computed tomography: a program of early diagnosis of lung cancer, biopsy and treatment simulation guided radiation oncologist breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we determine the equivalent dose received by the operator and patient lung biopsies using thermoluminescence dosimeters, are established recommendations that this dose is as low as possible. It also reviews the acquisition protocols in both CT scans in early diagnosis program cited as the acquisition of CT for treatment planning dosimetric radiation oncologist in breast cancer.

  8. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  9. Rectum separation in patients with cervical cancer for treatment planning in primary chemo-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To proof feasibility of hydrogel application in patients with advanced cervical cancer undergoing chemo-radiation in order to reduce rectal toxicity from external beam radiation as well as brachytherapy. Under transrectal sonographic guidance five patients with proven cervical cancer underwent hydro gel (20 cc) instillation into the tip of rectovaginal septum adherent to posterior part of the visible cervical tumor. Five days after this procedure all patients underwent T2 weighted transversal and sagittal MRI for brachytherapy planning. MRI protocol included T2 weighted fast spin echo (FSE) imaging in sagittal, coronal and para-axial orientation using an 1.5 Tesla MRI. Separation of anterior rectal wall and cervix was documented. Hydrogel application was uneventful in all patients and no toxicity was reported. Separation ranged from 7 to 26 mm in width (median 10 mm). The length of the separation varied between 18 and 38 mm (median 32 mm). In all patients displacement was seen in the posterior vaginal fornix, and/or at the deepest part of uterine cervix depending on the extension of the cul-de-sac in correlation to the posterior wall of the uterus. In patients with bulky tumor and/or deep (vaginal) extend of peritoneal cavity tumour was seen mainly cranial from the rectovaginal space and therefore above the hydrogeI application. Only in the extra-peritoneal (lower) part of the cervix a good separation could be achieved between the rectum and cervix. Hydrgel instillation in patients with cervial cancer undergoing chemoradiation is safe and feasible. Because of the loose tissue of the cul-de-sac and its intra- and extraperitoneal part, hydrogel instillation of 20 cc did not result in a sufficient separation of the cervix from anterior wall

  10. Results of Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of a Solitary Sternal Relapse of Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the response and survival rate after three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of patients with a solitary sternal relapse of breast cancer. Seventeen patients between May 1996 and June 2005 were evaluated with the salvage 3D-CRT treatment of a solitary sternal relapse of breast cancer. The treatment fields included the gross tumor volume with 2 cm margins. The total radiation dose was 35.0 ∼61.5 Gy (biologic effective dose of 43.7 ∼76.9 Gy10 using an α/β ratio of 10 Gy), with a daily dose of 1.8∼3.0 Gy. The tumor response was evaluated by the change in maximum tumor size via follow up CT scans 1∼3 months after the completion of treatment. An objective tumor response was achieved in all patients, with a complete response in 5 patients and a partial response in 12 patients. The 5-year overall survival rate was 51.9% (median survival time: 27 months), and the most important factor affecting overall survival was the disease-free interval (interval from primary surgery of breast cancer to the development of sternal metastasis): The 5-year overall survival rate was 61.8% for patients with a disease-free interval ≥12 months and 0.0% for patients < with disease-free interval <12 months (p=0.03). The response to 3D-CRT was good in patients with solitary sternal relapse of breast cancer. Particularly, patients with long disease-free interval from primary surgery survived significantly longer than patients with short disease-free interval from primary surgery

  11. Record and Verify Systems for Radiation Treatment of Cancer: Acceptance Testing, Commissioning and Quality Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality assurance (QA) in the radiation therapy treatment planning and delivery process is essential to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient and to minimize the possibility of accidental exposure. To support this, computerized record and verify systems (RVSs) are now widely available in both industrialized and low and middle income countries. Recent publications of errors in radiation therapy have demonstrated that the lack of proper QA procedures for RVSs can result in severe accidents, including death, as a result of accidental exposure. Furthermore, the use of RVSs can have a higher risk of repeated errors due to a false sense of security out of belief that a computerized RVS will generate safer treatment procedures. It is widely acknowledged that there are very few reports in the peer reviewed literature and no guidance documents available that professionals can follow for a systematic verification of all functionalities of RVSs and their related interfaces with imaging systems, treatment planning computers and treatment delivery systems. The need to develop specific guidelines for acceptance testing, commissioning and quality control of RVSs has been identified through the increased interest of Member States in efficient and safe radiotherapy treatment. To meet this need, the IAEA has convened several consultants meetings to prepare a publication for establishing QA for RVSs. A draft report was generated by the consultants and was submitted for review by manufacturers of RVSs. Furthermore, the draft report was field tested at the General Hospital (Allgemeines Krankenhaus) in Vienna, Austria. The comments of the manufacturers and field testing were incorporated in the revised document where appropriate. This report is intended mainly for radiotherapy medical physicists, but the information is also useful for radiation oncologists and therapy radiographers working in radiotherapy hospitals. In addition, the guidance given in this report is highly

  12. Tolerance and efficiency of radiation therapy treatment of the pelvic lymph nodes in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolerance and efficiency of radiation therapy treatment of the pelvic lymph nodes were assessed in 122 patients with prostate cancer. With no severe observed late toxicity the incidence for lymph node metastases was between 3,0% (primarily irradiated patients without lymph node or distant metastases) and 100% (primarily irradiated patients with lymph node and distant metastases) after 3 years. As it seems, the following subgroups might possibly profit the most from a dose escalation in the pelvic lymph nodes: primarily irradiated patients with positive lymph nodes and postoperatively irradiated patients in adjuvant/additive situation, with a biochemical or a local/lymph node recurrence.

  13. Patterns of Disease Recurrence Following Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report mature results of a large cohort of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The database of patients irradiated at The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center was searched for patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer and treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2007. A retrospective review of outcome data was performed. Results: The cohort consisted of 776 patients. One hundred fifty-nine patients (21%) were current smokers, 279 (36%) former smokers, and 337 (43%) never smokers. T and N categories and American Joint Committee on Cancer group stages were distributed as follows: T1/x, 288 (37%); T2, 288 (37%); T3, 113 (15%); T4, 87 (11%); N0, 88(12%); N1/x, 140 (18%); N2a, 101 (13%); N2b, 269 (35%); N2c, 122 (16%); and N3, 56 (7%); stage I, 18(2%); stage II, 40(5%); stage III, 150(19%); and stage IV, 568(74%). Seventy-one patients (10%) presented with nodes in level IV. Median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and overall recurrence-free survival rates were 84%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. Primary site recurrence developed in 7% of patients, and neck recurrence with primary site control in 3%. We could only identify 12 patients (2%) who had locoregional recurrence outside the high-dose target volumes. Poorer survival rates were observed in current smokers, patients with larger primary (T) tumors and lower neck disease. Conclusions: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with IMRT have excellent disease control. Locoregional recurrence was uncommon, and most often occurred in the high dose volumes. Parotid sparing was accomplished in nearly all patients without compromising tumor coverage

  14. Use of lymphoscintigraphy in radiation treatment of primary breast cancer in the context of lymphedema risk reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of SPECT/CT scintigraphic method for mapping lymphatic drainage for radiation therapy of breast cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty-six patients were enrolled in a SPECT/CT lymphoscintigraphy study. 99mTc sulfur colloid (1 mCi) was injected intradermally in the ipsilateral arm. After 5-8 h post-injection, the SPECT/CT scans were taken and analyzed on a GE eNTRGRA system. The SPECT/CT images were co-registered in the treatment planning system (TPS). The original treatment plan was recreated for nodal dosimetry. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning was performed for reducing lymph node dose for reducing arm lymphedema. Results: The number of lymph nodes varied from 0 to 10 with a mean value of 3.4 ± 5.4 nodes. The location of nodes varied in the axillary, supraclavicular, and breast regions depending upon the surgical procedure and the extent of the disease. The prescribed radiation dose to the breast varied from 45 to 50.4 Gy depending on the disease pattern in 32 evaluated patients having CT data. The dose to lymph nodes varied from 0 to 61.8 Gy depending upon the location and the radiation technique used. SPECT/CT study in conjunction with IMRT plan showed that it is possible to decrease nodal dose and thereby potentially reduce the risk of developing arm lymphedema. Conclusions: The SPECT/CT device provides a novel method to map the lymph nodes in the radiation treatment fields that could be used to tailor the radiation dose.

  15. Brain irradiation for metastasis prevention and radiation treatment of small cell lung cancer metastases into the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents the results of cranial irradiation of 44 small cell lung cancer patients with clinically-identified intracranial metastases and 40 patients - for metastatic spread prevention. Whole brain irradiation was carried out with single doses of 2-4 Gy (total dose - 30-40 Gy) in both groups 5 times weekly. Patients irradiated for metastasis prevention revealed a 3.3 - fold decrease in intracranial metastasis frequency and a good post-treatment tolerance. In the other group, radiation failed to reach tumor lesions in 20%; treatment produced a poor effect in 30%. There was a correlation between survival time, initial expansion of process and tumor response to primary treatment. No relationship was observed between survival time and procedure and duration of cranial irradiation. Prophylactic irradiation may be beneficial in responders to therapy

  16. Microbeam radiation therapy. Physical and biological aspects of a new cancer therapy and development of a treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is a novel treatment strategy against cancer. Highly brilliant synchrotron radiation is collimated to parallel, a few micrometre wide, planar beams and used to irradiate malignant tissues with high doses. The applied peak doses are considerably higher than in conventional radiotherapy, but valley doses between the beams remain underneath the established tissue tolerance. Previous research has shown that these beam geometries spare normal tissue, while being effective in tumour ablation. In this work physical and biological aspects of the therapy were investigated. A therapy planning system was developed for the first clinical treatments at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble (France) and a dosimetry method based on radiochromic films was created to validate planned doses with measurements on a micrometre scale. Finally, experiments were carried out on a cellular level in order to correlate the physically planned doses with the biological damage caused in the tissue. The differences between Monte Carlo dose and dosimetry are less than 10% in the valley and 5% in the peak regions. Developed alternative faster dose calculation methods deviate from the computational intensive MC simulations by less than 15% and are able to determine the dose within a few minutes. The experiments in cell biology revealed an significant influence of intercellular signalling on the survival of cells close to radiation boundaries. These observations may not only be important for MRT but also for conventional radiotherapy.

  17. Microbeam radiation therapy. Physical and biological aspects of a new cancer therapy and development of a treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartzsch, Stefan

    2014-11-05

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is a novel treatment strategy against cancer. Highly brilliant synchrotron radiation is collimated to parallel, a few micrometre wide, planar beams and used to irradiate malignant tissues with high doses. The applied peak doses are considerably higher than in conventional radiotherapy, but valley doses between the beams remain underneath the established tissue tolerance. Previous research has shown that these beam geometries spare normal tissue, while being effective in tumour ablation. In this work physical and biological aspects of the therapy were investigated. A therapy planning system was developed for the first clinical treatments at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble (France) and a dosimetry method based on radiochromic films was created to validate planned doses with measurements on a micrometre scale. Finally, experiments were carried out on a cellular level in order to correlate the physically planned doses with the biological damage caused in the tissue. The differences between Monte Carlo dose and dosimetry are less than 10% in the valley and 5% in the peak regions. Developed alternative faster dose calculation methods deviate from the computational intensive MC simulations by less than 15% and are able to determine the dose within a few minutes. The experiments in cell biology revealed an significant influence of intercellular signalling on the survival of cells close to radiation boundaries. These observations may not only be important for MRT but also for conventional radiotherapy.

  18. Treatment modalities of oral mucositis after radiation of head and neck cancers; Prise en charge des mucites apres radiotherapie des cancers des voies aerodigestives superieures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapeyre, M.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Kaminsky, M.C.; Geoffrois, L.; Dolivet, G.; Pourel, N.; Marchal, C.; Bey, P.; Maire, F.; Simon, M. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Toussaint, B. [Hopital Central, Service de Chirurgie ORL, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2001-11-01

    Acute mucositis is common after radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. During the past 3 decades, there was a gradual evolution in the treatment modalities for locally advanced carcinomas (concomitant radio-chemotherapy, accelerated radiotherapy). These new strategies are accompanied by an increase in early mucosal reactions. At the present time, there is no widely accepted prophylaxis or effective treatment. Many traditional remedies or new agents seem ineffective (Sucralfate, Chlorhexidine, GM-CSF, Silver nitrate, Prostaglandin, anti-oxidants, Benzydamine hydrochloride), while others seem promising (Povidone-iodine, nonabsorbable antibiotic lozenges and anti-fungal, local GM-CSF, Glutamide, Low-energy laser, corticosteroids). Radioprotectors are controversial and should be only used in experimental protocols and not in routine practice. However, some recommendations can be proposed: general prevention and global care before cancer therapy should be systematic (oral hygiene, dental and periodontal treatment, advice to avoid the use of tobacco and alcohol); frequent oral rinsing with a bland mouthwash (Povidone-iodine or others) should be used at the start of treatment because there are significant modifications of the oral microflora increased by a disturbed salivary flow; these mouthwashes could be associated with nonabsorbable antibiotic lozenges or anti-fungal topical (bicarbonates, Amphotericine B); Systematic percutaneous fluoroscopic gastrostomy should be decided before any aggressive treatments (concomitant radio-chemotherapy, accelerated radiotherapy); pain should be controlled; finally, the radiation technique should be optimized (mucosal sparing block, conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy). (authors)

  19. Modeling positioning uncertainties of prostate cancer external beam radiation therapy using pre-treatment data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of treatment plan data and image guidance (IG) on positioning uncertainty during prostate cancer (PCa) radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Body mass index (BMI), planning target volume (PTV), bladder volume (BV), and rectal cross section area (RCS) were collected for 267 consecutive PCa patients undergoing daily IGRT. Radiographic isocenter corrections to intra-prostatic fiducials for 12,490 treatment fractions were used to derive random (RE) and systematic (SE) inter-fraction uncertainties for the cardinal axes. These data were used to simulate RE and SE for weekly IG and Action Level (AL)-IG treatment protocols. Results: SE and RE were 2–5 and 3–4 mm in the cardinal axes, respectively, during simulation of no IG. Without IG, positive correlations (p < 0.01) were noted for (1) anterior-posterior RE vs. RCS and BV and (2) cranio–caudal RE vs. RCS, BV and BMI. The RE increase was 3 mm for the highest quartile of RCS, BV and BMI. Daily IGRT eliminated this relationship. 3D IG corrections of 1 cm or more occured in 27% of treatment fractions and in 97% of patients. Conclusion: PCa patients with elevated pre-treatment BV, RCS and BMI have increased inter-fractionation positioning uncertainty and appear the primary candidates for daily IGRT

  20. Sequence of Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy as Adjuvant Treatment in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the work was to evaluate the prognostic importance of the sequence of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) as adjuvant treatment in women with breast cancer who were treated with modified radical mastectomy or total mastectomy and their correlation also with other known prognostic factors. Methods: In this retrospective study, 200 women with breast cancer were evaluated. The age ranged from 25 to 73 years, with the mean age of 44 years; 125 patients had stage II and 75 had stage III disease. All were subjected to mastectomy. The influence of the following prognostic factors were evaluated: Age, histological grade, nodal status, number of positive nodes, tumor size, estrogen receptor status, menstrual status and as well as the sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on 5-year locoregional disease free survival, 5-year systemic disease-free survival, and 5-year overall survival. Results: The 5-year locoregional disease free survival was 90.9% for the entire patient population. Nodal status, number of positive nodes and estrogen receptor status were prognostically significant for locoregional recurrence. The 5-year systemic disease-free survival was 67.6% for the whole group. On univariate analysis, the presence of positive axillary nodes, grade III tumor, ER-negative disease and radiotherapy first followed by chemotherapy, were independent poor risk factors for systemic recurrence. The 5-year overall survival was 71.8%. On univariate analysis, the presence of positive axillary nodes, grade III tumor, ER-negative disease and radiotherapy first followed by chemotherapy, were independent poor risk factors for death from breast cancer. Conclusions: In patients with breast cancer, a treatment protocol consisting of 6 cycles of CT followed by RT resulted in a better 5-year OS and DPS, and was easier to administer when compared with other treatment protocols. Ideal candidates are those with early-stage, age >35 years, low tumor grade, positive ER, and

  1. Hyperthermia in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role in ... but these effects are uncommon ( 1 , 3 , 7 ). Diarrhea , nausea, and vomiting ... a standard treatment for cancer ( 1 , 3 , 6 , 7 ). Many clinical trials are ...

  2. Impact of inhomogeneity corrections on dose coverage in the treatment of lung cancer using stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the real target dose coverage when radiation treatments were delivered to lung cancer patients based on treatment planning according to the RTOG-0236 Protocol. We compare calculated dosimetric results between the more accurate anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and the pencil beam algorithm for stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment planning in lung cancer. Ten patients with non-small cell lung cancer were given 60 Gy in three fractions using 6 and 10 MV beams with 8-10 fields. The patients were chosen in accordance with the lung RTOG-0236 protocol. The dose calculations were performed using the pencil beam algorithm with no heterogeneity corrections (PB-NC) and then recalculated with the pencil beam with modified Batho heterogeneity corrections (PB-MB) and the AAA using an identical beam setup and monitor units. The differences in calculated dose to 95% or 99% of the PTV, between using the PB-NC and the AAA, were within 10% of prescribed dose (60 Gy). However, the minimum dose to 95% and 99% of PTV calculated using the PB-MB were consistently overestimated by up to 40% and 36% of the prescribed dose, respectively, compared to that calculated by the AAA. Using the AAA as reference, the calculated maximum doses were underestimated by up to 27% using the PB-NC and overestimated by 19% using the PB-MB. The calculations of dose to lung from PB-NC generally agree with that of AAA except in the small high-dose region where PB-NC underestimates. The calculated dose distributions near the interface using the AAA agree with those from Monte Carlo calculations as well as measured values. This study indicates that the real minimum PTV dose coverage cannot be guaranteed when the PB-NC is used to calculate the monitor unit settings in dose prescriptions

  3. Discovery – Methotrexate: Chemotherapy Treatment for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the 1950s, treatment for the majority of cancers was limited to either surgery or the use of radiation. The discovery of the use of methotrexate in curing a rare cancer marked the first time a cancer had been cured. This led to the development of many of today’s common cancer treatments.

  4. Target splitting in radiation therapy for lung cancer: further developments and exemplary treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reporting further developments evolved since the first report about this conformal technique. Technical progress focused on optimization of the quality assurance (QA) program, especially regarding the required work input; and on optimization of beam arrangements. Besides performing the regular QA program, additional time consuming dosimetric measurements and verifications no longer have to be accomplished. 'Class solutions' of treatment plans for six patients with non-resected non-small cell lung cancer in locally advanced stages are presented. Target configurations comprise one central and five peripheral tumor sites with different topographic positions to hilus and mediastinum. The mean dose to the primary tumor is 81,9 Gy (range 79,2–90,0 Gy), to macroscopically involved nodes 61,2 Gy (range 55,8–63,0 Gy), to electively treated nodes 45,0 Gy. Treatments are performed twice daily, with fractional doses of 1,8 Gy at an interval of 11 hours. Median overall treatment time is 33 days. The set-up time at the linac does not exceed the average time for any other patient. Target splitting is a highly conformal and nonetheless non-expensive method with regard to linac and staff time. It enables secure accelerated high-dose treatments of patients with NSCLC

  5. Ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Deevya L; Saladi, Rao N; Fox, Joshua L

    2010-09-01

    Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in fair-skinned populations in many parts of the world. The incidence, morbidity and mortality rates of skin cancers are increasing and, therefore, pose a significant public health concern. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the major etiologic agent in the development of skin cancers. UVR causes DNA damage and genetic mutations, which subsequently lead to skin cancer. A clearer understanding of UVR is crucial in the prevention of skin cancer. This article reviews UVR, its damaging effects on the skin and its relationship to UV immunosuppression and skin cancer. Several factors influence the amount of UVR reaching the earth's surface, including ozone depletion, UV light elevation, latitude, altitude, and weather conditions. The current treatment modalities utilizing UVR (i.e. phototherapy) can also predispose to skin cancers. Unnecessary exposure to the sun and artificial UVR (tanning lamps) are important personal attributable risks. This article aims to provide a comprehensive overview of skin cancer with an emphasis on carefully evaluated statistics, the epidemiology of UVR-induced skin cancers, incidence rates, risk factors, and preventative behaviors & strategies, including personal behavioral modifications and public educational initiatives. PMID:20883261

  6. The Effect of High Dose Radioiodine Therapy on Formation of Radiation Retinopathy During Thyroid Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kaçar Güvel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-thyroidal complication of high-dose radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma might cause salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction, which may be transient or permanent in a dose-dependent manner. However, radiation retinopathy complicating 131I therapy, has not been previously well characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of retinal damage among patients who had received high doses of radioiodine treatment. Methods: Forty eyes of 20 patients (3 male, 17 female who received 250-1000 mCi during 131I therapy and on ophthalmological follow up for a year after the last treatment were included in the study. Mean age of the study group was 50 years (range 25-70 years. In ophthalmologic examination, visual acuity was measured in order to determine visual loss. Intraocular pressure was measured in all the patients. Then lens examination was carried out with slit lamp biomicroscopy in order to investigate cataract or partial lens opacities. Fundus observation was carried out through the dilated pupil with slit lamp biomicroscopy using 90 D noncontact lens. Result: The best corrected visual aquity with Snellen chart was found as 1.0 in 36 eyes (90% and between 0.6 and 0.9 (10% in 4 eyes (10%. At the biomicroscopic fundus examination, retinal hemorrhage consistent with radiation retinopathy, microaneurysm, microinfarction, edema or exudation, vitreus hemorrhage, partial or total optical disc pallor indicating papillopathy in the optic disc were not observed in any of the eyes. Conclusion: This result indicates that there is not any significant correlation between repeated high-dose radioiodine therapy and radiation retinopathy in differentiated thyroid carcinomas. Even though there is not a significant restriction in use of higher doses of radioiodine therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma, more extensive studies are needed in order to obtain more accurate data on possible occurrence of retinopathy.

  7. Case report of two patients having successful surgery for lung cancer after treatment for Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakajima

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: Surgery for lung cancer on patients with Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis should be deferred until the patients complete steroid therapy, and the clinical pneumonitis is cured. Moreover, it is believed that it is important to remove the resolved radiation pneumonitis without leaving any residual areas and not to cut into any areas of active radiation pneumonitis as much as possible.

  8. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy: the potential for imaging science research to improve cancer treatment outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jeffrey

    2008-03-01

    The role of medical imaging in the planning and delivery of radiation therapy (RT) is rapidly expanding. This is being driven by two developments: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and biological image-based planning (BIBP). IGRT is the systematic use of serial treatment-position imaging to improve geometric targeting accuracy and/or to refine target definition. The enabling technology is the integration of high-performance three-dimensional (3D) imaging systems, e.g., onboard kilovoltage x-ray cone-beam CT, into RT delivery systems. IGRT seeks to adapt the patient's treatment to weekly, daily, or even real-time changes in organ position and shape. BIBP uses non-anatomic imaging (PET, MR spectroscopy, functional MR, etc.) to visualize abnormal tissue biology (angiogenesis, proliferation, metabolism, etc.) leading to more accurate clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and more accurate targeting of high doses to tissue with the highest tumor cell burden. In both cases, the goal is to reduce both systematic and random tissue localization errors (2-5 mm for conventional RT) conformality so that planning target volume (PTV) margins (varying from 8 to 20 mm in conventional RT) used to ensure target volume coverage in the presence of geometric error, can be substantially reduced. Reduced PTV expansion allows more conformal treatment of the target volume, increased avoidance of normal tissue and potential for safe delivery of more aggressive dose regimens. This presentation will focus on the imaging science challenges posed by the IGRT and BIBP. These issues include: Development of robust and accurate nonrigid image-registration (NIR) tools: Extracting locally nonlinear mappings that relate, voxel-by-voxel, one 3D anatomic representation of the patient to differently deformed anatomies acquired at different time points, is essential if IGRT is to move beyond simple translational treatment plan adaptations. NIR is needed to map segmented and labeled anatomy from the

  9. How do radiation oncology health professionals inform breast cancer patients about the medical and technical aspects of their treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Radiation therapy patients need information to make treatment decisions, understand treatment and manage side effects. The purpose of this study was to (1) Identify information about radiation therapy routinely provided to breast cancer patients; (2) Determine which health professionals provide information; (3) Examine whether information is routinely provided at the same time points; and (4) Determine whether health professionals and patients place similar importance on specific information. Materials and methods: Health professionals in radiation therapy departments in Australia and New Zealand completed self-administered questionnaires. Results were analysed and compared to patient responses from a previous study. Results: Forty-one of 52 departments participated in this survey. Information provision was inconsistent between departments in terms of how and when information was given. Although the types of information provided to patients appeared to align with patients' needs, health professionals and patients placed different levels of importance on specific information. Conclusions: A wide range of information are provided to patients. However, the priority given to different information needs and the focus of information provision may not be optimal from the perspectives of patients. Further research needs to be conducted to determine patients' information needs and to develop specific information resources tailored to meet these needs

  10. RB1 status in triple negative breast cancer cells dictates response to radiation treatment and selective therapeutic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler J W Robinson

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC includes basal-like and claudin-low subtypes for which only chemotherapy and radiation therapy are currently available. The retinoblastoma (RB1 tumor suppressor is frequently lost in human TNBC. Knockdown of RB1 in luminal BC cells was shown to affect response to endocrine, radiation and several antineoplastic drugs. However, the effect of RB1 status on radiation and chemo-sensitivity in TNBC cells and whether RB1 status affects response to divergent or specific treatment are unknown. Using multiple basal-like and claudin-low cell lines, we hereby demonstrate that RB-negative TNBC cell lines are highly sensitive to gamma-irradiation, and moderately more sensitive to doxorubicin and methotrexate compared to RB-positive TNBC cell lines. In contrast, RB1 status did not affect sensitivity of TNBC cells to multiple other drugs including cisplatin (CDDP, 5-fluorouracil, idarubicin, epirubicin, PRIMA-1(met, fludarabine and PD-0332991, some of which are used to treat TNBC patients. Moreover, a non-biased screen of ∼3400 compounds, including FDA-approved drugs, revealed similar sensitivity of RB-proficient and -deficient TNBC cells. Finally, ESA(+/CD24(-/low/CD44(+ cancer stem cells from RB-negative TNBC lines were consistently more sensitive to gamma-irradiation than RB-positive lines, whereas the effect of chemotherapy on the cancer stem cell fraction varied irrespective of RB1 expression. Our results suggest that patients carrying RB-deficient TNBCs would benefit from gamma-irradiation as well as doxorubicin and methotrexate therapy, but not necessarily from many other anti-neoplastic drugs.

  11. Dosimetric Impact and Theoretical Clinical Benefits of Fiducial Markers for Dose Escalated Prostate Cancer Radiation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the impact of fiducial markers and daily kilovoltage imaging (FM-kV) on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for the rectum and bladder during prostate cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Two different setup scenarios were compared for 20 patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for localized prostate cancer to a total dose of 76 Gy: a traditional setup with planning target volume (PTV) margins associated with skin mark alignment vs. another setup using FM-kV. Various DVH parameters were compared, including Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) dose-volume constraints for the rectum and bladder. Analysis of NTCPs was also performed according to the Lyman model. Results: With the traditional setup, 85% of patients had rectal V70Gy >25% compared with 45% with FM-kV. Moreover, 30% of patients with traditional setup vs. 5% with FM-kV did not fulfill at least 3 RTOG constraint parameters for the rectum. Mean rectal and bladder dose were 4.7 Gy and 6.7 Gy less, respectively, with FM-kV. The NTCP for the rectum was 11.5% with the traditional setup and 9% with FM-kV. This indicates that with FM-kV, the prescription dose could be increased by 2.1 Gy while keeping the same level of late rectal toxicity as with the traditional setup. Conclusions: Use of FM-kV is an efficient way of lowering the proportion of patients not fulfilling RTOG rectal and bladder dose-volume constraints. The results of the NTCP analysis suggest that the PTV margin reduction allowed by FM-kV should decrease the rate of late rectal toxicities or may allow moderate dose escalation.

  12. High-dose radiation therapy alone for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer. Experience with prolonged overall treatment times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of overall treatment time on long-term survival after high-dose radiation therapy alone for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between 1978 and 1990, 229 patients with stage I-III disease and Karnofsky Performance Scores of 80-100 received a conventionally fractionated total dose of 70 Gy through a split-course technique. After a first treatment course of 40 or 50 Gy, a rest aging was performed and only patients without any contraindications, such as newly diagnosed distant metastases or serious deterioration of performance status, were given a second course. In 83% of patients this break lasted for 4-6 weeks. Overall treatment time ranged between 7 and 24 weeks (median 12 weeks). Median follow-up time was 6.6 years (range 4.0-9.3 years). Actuarial overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 28% and 7% respectively. Complete radiological tumor response was observed in 31% of patients, and was found to be the strongest positive predictor of survival with 2- and 5-year rates of 50% and 12% respectively compared with 17% and 4% for patients without complete response. Treatment duration was not found to be a significant prognostic factor in univariate or multivariate analysis. For overall treatment times of 7-11 weeks (n=50), 12 weeks (n=79) and >12 weeks (n=100), 5-year survival was 4%, 6%, and 8%, respectively (p=0.6). To conclude, in our experience and in contrast to other studies, prolonged overall treatment times in radiation therapy alone for inoperable NSCLC had no negative impact on long-term survival. It is hypothesized that accelerated tumor cell repopulation is absent in a significant number of these patients with the time-factor playing no apparent role for outcome of treatment. (orig.)

  13. HIV infection and invasive cervical cancers, treatment with radiation therapy: toxicity and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To determine the effect of radiotherapy in HIV seropositive cervical cancer patients, tumour response and toxicity and compliance of patients to the treatment. Patients and methods: This study is a retrospective review of 42 HIV seropositive patients diagnosed with carcinoma cervix, between 1997 and 2003 at the Tata Memorial Hospital. The age and symptoms of presentation, clinical stage, response, compliance and tolerance to radiotherapy were studied. Results: Mean age at presentation was 41 years. All patients presented with the symptoms of cervical disease. Of these patients 31(74%) patients had 'Karnofsky Performance Scale' (KPS) more than 80%. Twenty-one (50%) of the patients were of Stage IIIb-IVa. Thirty-two (76%) were started on radiotherapy with radical intent. Compliance to radiotherapy was poor with 24% patients discontinuing after few fractions of radiotherapy. Seven (17%) patients were given palliative radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients completed prescribed radical radiotherapy and 50% of these achieved complete response. Grade III-IV acute gastrointestinal toxicity was seen in 14% of the patients, and grade III acute skin toxicity was seen in 27% of patients, leading to treatment delays. There was good relief of symptoms in patients treated with palliative intent. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is effective in this set of patients. Palliative fractionation schedules are effective for patients with poor performance status and locally advanced cancers in relieving the symptoms related to carcinoma cervix. An emphasis should be given to the increased acute mucosal and skin toxicity and to improving compliance and clinical outcome of these patients

  14. Domestic comparison of radiation treatment techniques for breast cancer: 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to compare method in the treatment of breast cancer using dose index. And, it is to find the optimized treatment technique to the patient. The phantom filled with tissue-equivalent material were used simulation and treatment as techniques of 3D-CRT, IMRT, VMAT was planned using Eclipse v10. By using HI(homogeneity index), CI(Conformity index), OE (Organ equivalent dose), EAR(Excess Absolute Risk), were assessed for each treatment plans. HI and CI of 3D-CRT, IMRT, VMAT were calculated 16.89, 11.21, 9.55 and 0.59, 0.61, 0.83. The organ average doses of Lt lung, Rt lung, liver, heart, esophagus, cord, Lt breast, trachea and stomach were 0.01 ∼ 2.02 Gy, 0.36 ∼ 5.01 Gy, 0.25 ∼ 2.49 Gy, 0.14 ∼ 6.92 Gy, 0.03 ∼ 2.02 Gy, 0.01 ∼ 1.06 Gy, 0.25 ∼ 6.08 Gy, 0.08 ∼ 0.59 Gy, 0.01 ∼ 1.34 Gy, respectively. The OED, EAR of the IMRT and VMAT show higher than 3D-CRT. As the result of this study, we could confirm being higher dose index(HI, CI) in IMRT and VMAT than 3D-CRT, but doses of around normal organs was higher IMRT, VMAT than 3D-CRT

  15. Domestic comparison of radiation treatment techniques for breast cancer: 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Yoon, Myong Geun [Dept. of Bio-convergence Engineering, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yusung Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare method in the treatment of breast cancer using dose index. And, it is to find the optimized treatment technique to the patient. The phantom filled with tissue-equivalent material were used simulation and treatment as techniques of 3D-CRT, IMRT, VMAT was planned using Eclipse v10. By using HI(homogeneity index), CI(Conformity index), OE (Organ equivalent dose), EAR(Excess Absolute Risk), were assessed for each treatment plans. HI and CI of 3D-CRT, IMRT, VMAT were calculated 16.89, 11.21, 9.55 and 0.59, 0.61, 0.83. The organ average doses of Lt lung, Rt lung, liver, heart, esophagus, cord, Lt breast, trachea and stomach were 0.01 ∼ 2.02 Gy, 0.36 ∼ 5.01 Gy, 0.25 ∼ 2.49 Gy, 0.14 ∼ 6.92 Gy, 0.03 ∼ 2.02 Gy, 0.01 ∼ 1.06 Gy, 0.25 ∼ 6.08 Gy, 0.08 ∼ 0.59 Gy, 0.01 ∼ 1.34 Gy, respectively. The OED, EAR of the IMRT and VMAT show higher than 3D-CRT. As the result of this study, we could confirm being higher dose index(HI, CI) in IMRT and VMAT than 3D-CRT, but doses of around normal organs was higher IMRT, VMAT than 3D-CRT.

  16. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF Cancer Terms: After Treatment Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 08/2015 Cure: To fully restore health. This term is sometimes ... five years after treatment. However, the concept of “cure” is difficult to apply to cancer because undetected cancer cells can sometimes remain in ...

  17. Aggressive local treatment containing intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) for patients with isolated local recurrences of pancreatic cancer: a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the use of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in the multimodality treatment of patients with isolated local recurrences of pancreatic cancer. We retrospectively analyzed 36 patients with isolated local recurrences of pancreatic cancer who have been treated with a combination of surgery, IORT and EBRT. Median time from initial treatment to recurrence was 20 months. All patients were surgically explored. In 18 patients a gross total resection was achieved, whereas the other half received only debulking or no resection at all. All patients received IORT with a median dose of 15 Gy. Additional EBRT was applied to 31 patients with a median dose of 45 Gy, combined with concurrent, mainly gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. Median follow-up in surviving patients was 23 months. Local progression was found in 6 patients after a median time of 17 months, resulting in estimated 1- and 2-year local control rates of 91% and 67%, respectively. Distant failure was observed in 23 patients, mainly in liver or peritoneal space. The median estimated progression-free survival was 9 months with 1- and 2-year rates of 40% and 26%, respectively. We found an encouraging estimated median overall survival of 19 months, transferring into 1- and 2-year rates of 66% and 45%. Notably 6 of 36 patients (17%) lived for more than 3 years. Severe postoperative complications were found in 3 and chemoradiation-related grade III toxicity in 6 patients. No severe IORT related toxicity was observed. Combination of surgery, IORT and EBRT in patients with isolated local recurrences of pancreatic cancer resulted in encouraging local control and overall survival in our cohort with acceptable toxicity. Our approach seems to be superior to palliative chemotherapy or chemoradiation alone and should be further investigated in a prospective setting specifically addressing isolated local recurrences of pancreatic cancer

  18. Five Fractions of Radiation Therapy Followed by 4 Cycles of FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT < cT) and preoperative grade 3+ gastrointestinal morbidity equal to or better than that of historical controls. Results: 76 evaluable cases included 7 cT4 and 69 cT3; 59 (78%) cN+, and 7 cM1. Grade 3 preoperative GI morbidity occurred in 7 cases (9%) (no grade 4 or 5). Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed on 57 (75%) patients. At surgery, 53 patients (70%) had ypT0-2 residual disease, including 21 (28%) ypT0 and 19 (25%) ypT0N0 (complete response); 24 (32%) were ypN+. At 30 months, local control for all evaluable cases and freedom from disease for M0 evaluable cases were, respectively, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89%-100%) and 87% (95% CI: 76%-98%). Cases were subanalyzed by whether disease met requirements for the recently activated PROSPECT trial for intermediate-risk rectal cancer. Thirty-eight patients met PROSPECT eligibility and achieved 16 ypT0 (42%), 15 ypT0N0 (39%), and 33 ypT0-2 (87

  19. Five Fractions of Radiation Therapy Followed by 4 Cycles of FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myerson, Robert J., E-mail: rmyerson@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Tan, Benjamin [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hunt, Steven [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gao, Feng [Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hall, Lannis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Kodner, Ira [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Lockhart, A. Craig [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Mutch, Matthew [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Safar, Bashar [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Parikh, Parag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Background: Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT < cT) and preoperative grade 3+ gastrointestinal morbidity equal to or better than that of historical controls. Results: 76 evaluable cases included 7 cT4 and 69 cT3; 59 (78%) cN+, and 7 cM1. Grade 3 preoperative GI morbidity occurred in 7 cases (9%) (no grade 4 or 5). Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed on 57 (75%) patients. At surgery, 53 patients (70%) had ypT0-2 residual disease, including 21 (28%) ypT0 and 19 (25%) ypT0N0 (complete response); 24 (32%) were ypN+. At 30 months, local control for all evaluable cases and freedom from disease for M0 evaluable cases were, respectively, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89%-100%) and 87% (95% CI: 76%-98%). Cases were subanalyzed by whether disease met requirements for the recently activated PROSPECT trial for intermediate-risk rectal cancer. Thirty-eight patients met PROSPECT eligibility and achieved 16 ypT0 (42%), 15 ypT0N0 (39%), and 33 ypT0-2 (87

  20. Setup Variations in Radiotherapy of Anal Cancer: Advantages of Target Volume Reduction Using Image-Guided Radiation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To define setup variations in the radiation treatment (RT) of anal cancer and to report the advantages of image-guided RT (IGRT) in terms of reduction of target volume and treatment-related side effects. Methods and Materials: Twelve consecutive patients with anal cancer treated by combined chemoradiation by use of helical tomotherapy from March 2007 to November 2008 were selected. With patients immobilized and positioned in place, megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans were performed before each treatment and were automatically registered to planning CT scans. Patients were shifted per the registration data and treated. A total of 365 MVCT scans were analyzed. The primary site received a median dose of 55 Gy. To evaluate the potential dosimetric advantage(s) of IGRT, cases were replanned according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0529, with and without adding recommended setup variations from the current study. Results: Significant setup variations were observed throughout the course of RT. The standard deviations for systematic setup correction in the anterior–posterior (AP), lateral, and superior–inferior (SI) directions and roll rotation were 1.1, 3.6, and 3.2 mm, and 0.3°, respectively. The average random setup variations were 3.8, 5.5, and 2.9 mm, and 0.5°, respectively. Without daily IGRT, margins of 4.9, 11.1, and 8.5 mm in the AP, lateral, and SI directions would have been needed to ensure that the planning target volume (PTV) received ≥95% of the prescribed dose. Conversely, daily IGRT required no extra margins on PTV and resulted in a significant reduction of V15 and V45 of intestine and V10 of pelvic bone marrow. Favorable toxicities were observed, except for acute hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Daily MVCT scans before each treatment can effectively detect setup variations and thereby reduce PTV margins in the treatment of anal cancer. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IGRT provided favorable toxicities, except for

  1. Treatment results of radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langsenlehner, Tanja; Doeller, Carmen; Stranzl-Lawatsch, Heidi; Kapp, Karin S. [Univ. Clinic of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria); Quehenberger, Franz [Inst. for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Documentation, Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria); Langsenlehner, Uwe [Internal Outpatient Dept., Steiermaerkische GKK, Graz (Austria); Pummer, Karl [Dept. of Urology, Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess local control and survival rates in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with external-beam radiotherapy and to investigate prognostic factors. Patients and methods: Between 1997 and 2007, 75 patients (male, n = 58; female, n = 17, median age, 74.2 years) with localized transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (T2, n = 34; T3, n = 32; T4, n = 9) not suitable for radical surgery due to advanced age, comorbidity or inoperability underwent external-beam radiotherapy without simultaneous chemotherapy at the University Clinic of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical University of Graz, Austria. A conformal four-field technique was used in all patients to treat the tumor and regional lymph nodes with single daily fractions of 1.8-2 Gy to a total dose of 50-50.4 Gy, followed by a cone-down to encompass the empty bladder which was boosted to 70-70.4 Gy. All patients had undergone transurethral tumor resection prior to radiotherapy which was macroscopically incomplete in 62 patients. Results: Complete response was achieved in 65% of patients. Actuarial 3-year local control and metastases-free survival rates were 52.5% and 63.7%, 3-year local recurrence-free survival rate in complete responders was 71%. In univariate analysis, hydronephrosis, lymph vessel invasion, and macroscopic residual tumor were significantly predictive of disease progression. Hydronephrosis and lymph vessel invasion were also associated with a higher risk of local recurrence. The actuarial 3-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 40.1% and 56.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is an effective treatment option in terms of local control and survival even in elderly patients with locally advanced bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy. (orig.)

  2. Oncogenes, radiation and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of the oncogenic virus and the analysis of its nucleic acid, together with the development of new biochemical technology have permitted the partial knowledge of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the cellular neoplastic transformation. This work, besides describing the discovery of the first oncogenic virus and the experiments to demonstrate the existence of the oncogenes, summarizes its activation mechanisms and its intervention in cellular metabolisms. Ionizing radiation is among the external agents that induce the neoplastic process. Its participation in the genesis of this process and the contribution of oncogenes to the cellular radioresistance are among the topics, which are referred to another topic that makes reference. At the same time as the advancement of theoretical knowledge, lines of investigation for the application of the new concepts in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutical treatment, were developed. An example of this, is the study of the participation of the oncogen c-erbB-2 in human breast cancer and its implications on the anti tumoral therapy. (author)

  3. Radiation and thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An International Workshop on Radiation and Thyroid Cancer took place on 21-23 February 2014 in Tokyo, Japan, to support the efforts of the Fukushima Prefecture and the Japanese government in enhancing public health measures following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in March 2011. The workshop, which was designed to develop a state-of-the-art scientific understanding of thyroid cancer in children and of radiation-induced thyroid cancer (papillary carcinoma) in particular, was co-organised by the Japanese Ministry of the Environment (MOE), the Fukushima Medical University (FMU) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). It brought together the world's top experts in the field, including medical doctors, epidemiologists and radiological risk assessment specialists from ten countries. Although rare, thyroid cancer occurs naturally, with the risk of developing a thyroid cancer increasing with age. Cases are usually identified when a thyroid carcinogenic nodule grows enough to be felt with a patient's fingers, at which point the patient visits a medical doctor to identify the nature of the growth. In many countries around the world, the incidence rate of naturally occurring thyroid cancer is on the order of less than 1 per year per 100 000 children (from ages 0 to 18). Statistically, this rate appears to be increasing in many countries, with young girls slightly more at risk than young boys. A second but very different means of detecting thyroid cancer cases is through thyroid ultrasound screening examinations on subjects who do not demonstrate any symptoms. Ultrasound screening is a more sensitive approach that can detect very small nodules (< 5 mm) and cysts (< 20 mm) which would not normally be perceived through simple palpitation. However, because thyroid ultrasound screening examinations are much more effective, the number of thyroid cancer cases per examination will normally be larger than the number per capita found through national cancer

  4. Factors influencing incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in conformal and standard radiation treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The fundament hypothesis of conformal radiation therapy is that tumor control can be increased by using conformal treatment techniques that allow a higher tumor dose while maintaining an acceptable level of complications. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary first to estimate the incidence of morbidity for both standard and conformal fields. In this study, we examine factors that influence the incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in patients treated with conformal and standard radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred and forty-seven consecutive patients treated with conformal technique are combined with and compared to 162 consecutive patients treated with standard techniques. The conformal technique includes special immobilization by a cast, careful identification of the target volume in three dimensions, localization of the inferior border of the prostate using the retrograde urethrogram, and individually shaped portals that conform to the Planning Target Volume (PTV). Univariate analysis compares differences in the incidence of RTOG-EORTC grade two acute morbidity by technique, T stage, age, irradiated volume, and dose. Multivariate logistic regression includes these same variables. Results: In nearly all categories, the conformal treatment group experienced significantly fewer acute grade 2 complications than the standard treatment group. Only volume (prostate ± whole pelvis) and technique (conformal vs. standard) were significantly related to incidence of morbidity on multivariate analysis. When dose is treated as a continuous variable (rather than being dichotomized into two levels), a trend is observed on multivariate analysis, but it does not reach significant levels. The incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in patients 65 years or older is significantly reduced by use of the conformal technique. Conclusion: The conformal technique is associated with fewer grade 2 acute toxicities for all patients. This

  5. Perineural Invasion Predicts Increased Recurrence, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer Following Treatment With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of perineural invasion (PNI) for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 651 men treated for prostate cancer with EBRT to a minimum dose ≥75 Gy. We assessed the impact of PNI as well as pretreatment and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival. Results: PNI was present in 34% of specimens at biopsy and was significantly associated with higher Gleason score (GS), T stage, and prostate-specific antigen level. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the presence of PNI was associated with worse FFBF (hazard ratio = 1.7, p <0.006), FFM (hazard ratio = 1.8, p <0.03), and CSS (HR = 1.4, p <0.05) compared with absence of PNI; there was no difference in overall survival. Seven-year rates of FFBF, FFM, and CCS were 64% vs. 80%, 84% vs. 92%, and 91% vs. 95% for those patients with and without PNI, respectively. On recursive partitioning analysis, PNI predicted for worse FFM and CSS in patients with GS 8–10, with FFM of 67% vs. 89% (p <0.02), and CSS of 69% vs. 91%, (p <0.04) at 7 years for those with and without PNI, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of PNI in the prostate biopsy predicts worse clinical outcome for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy. Particularly in patients with GS 8 10 disease, the presence of PNI suggests an increased risk of metastasis and prostate cancer death.

  6. Perineural Invasion Predicts Increased Recurrence, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer Following Treatment With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Felix Y. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Qian Yushen; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Vance, Sean [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Cedars Sinai Medical System, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of perineural invasion (PNI) for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 651 men treated for prostate cancer with EBRT to a minimum dose {>=}75 Gy. We assessed the impact of PNI as well as pretreatment and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival. Results: PNI was present in 34% of specimens at biopsy and was significantly associated with higher Gleason score (GS), T stage, and prostate-specific antigen level. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the presence of PNI was associated with worse FFBF (hazard ratio = 1.7, p <0.006), FFM (hazard ratio = 1.8, p <0.03), and CSS (HR = 1.4, p <0.05) compared with absence of PNI; there was no difference in overall survival. Seven-year rates of FFBF, FFM, and CCS were 64% vs. 80%, 84% vs. 92%, and 91% vs. 95% for those patients with and without PNI, respectively. On recursive partitioning analysis, PNI predicted for worse FFM and CSS in patients with GS 8-10, with FFM of 67% vs. 89% (p <0.02), and CSS of 69% vs. 91%, (p <0.04) at 7 years for those with and without PNI, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of PNI in the prostate biopsy predicts worse clinical outcome for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy. Particularly in patients with GS 8-10 disease, the presence of PNI suggests an increased risk of metastasis and prostate cancer death.

  7. A comparison of delays in the treatment of cancer with radiation in Canada and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Waiting lists for medical care in Canada have been used as an argument against the single-payer option for health care reform in the United States, but there have been no direct comparisons of access to care in these two health care systems. The objective of this study was to compare how long cancer patients wait for radiotherapy in Canada and the USA. Methods and Materials: Heads of radiation oncology at all cancer centers listed by the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) in Canada and the United States were sent a questionnaire that asked how long their patients waited for radiotherapy, and how long they thought it was acceptable for patients to wait, in six clinical situations. Results: Ninety-two of 97 eligible centers responded (95%). Median waiting times to start of radiotherapy were as follows: carcinoma of the larynx (T2,N0,M0), 29 days in Canada, 10 days in the USA; carcinoma of the lung (Stage IIIb, squamous), 34 days in Canada, 9 days in the USA; carcinoma of the prostate (Stage B2), 40 days in Canada, 11 days in the USA; carcinoma of the breast (T2,N0,M0) referred 1 month after lumpectomy, 43 days in Canada, 10 days in the USA; carcinoma of the prostate with painful bone metastases, 17 days in Canada, 5 days in the USA; carcinoma of the prostate with spinal cord compression, < 1 day in Canada, < 1 day in the USA. The differences in waiting times between Canada and the USA were all statistically significant (p < 0.0001), except in the case of emergency treatment for cord compression. The majority of radiation oncologists in both Canada and the USA regarded the delays reported by Canadian departments as medically unacceptable. Conclusions: Patients almost everywhere in Canada wait longer for radiotherapy than they do almost anywhere in the United States

  8. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC) was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS), which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding) and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding). Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12–69 months). Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42%) observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%), although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62%) treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003) and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%). One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p < 0.001) and bleeding stopped in 5 (42%). After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories/enemas are expected to be effective. However, short

  9. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemoto Shinya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS, which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding. Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. Results The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12–69 months. Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42% observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%, although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62% treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003 and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%. One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p  Conclusions After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories

  10. Management of radiation therapy-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Part II: supportive treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cheong Ngeow

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal mucositis is the acute inflammatory and ulcerative reaction of the oral mucosa following radiation therapy to the head and neck region. It is such a common problem that nearly all head and neck cancer patients develop some degree of mucositis. This complication is usually transient in nature but it also represents an important clinical problem as it is a painful, debilitating, dose-dependent side effect for which there is no widely acceptable prophylaxis or effective treatment. As several authoritative groups have recently either undertaken systematic reviews or issued guidelines on the management of mucositis, it is the aim of this review instead, to provide an overview of all the remedies and pharmaceutical agents available, as well as highlighting to researchers the gaps that need to be filled.

  11. Cervix-to-rectum measuring device in a radiation applicator for use in the treatment of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischell, D. R.; Mazique, J. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cervix-to-rectum measuring device to be used in the treatment of cervical cancer is described. It includes a handle and a probe pivotably connected to the handle for insertion in the rectum. The measuring device further includes means for coupling the handle to an intrauterine radiation applicator when the latter is positioned in the uterine cervix and the probe is inserted in the rectum to pivot the handle about the probe. A gear is provided which is adapted to pivot with the probe. A pinion pivotably connected to the handle meshes with the gear. A pointer fixed to the pinion is displaced in response to the pivoting of the handle about the probe, and this displacement can be read from a scale on the handle, providing an indication of the cervix-to-rectum distance.

  12. Image-guided tumor ablation for the treatment of recurrent non-small cell lung cancer within the radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The treatment options for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that recurs after irradiation are limited. Image-guided percutaneous thermal ablation is an effective option in treating NSCLC that may provide an alternative to reirradiation. The purpose of this paper is to determine the survival and palliative benefit of image-guided percutaneous thermal ablation in the treatment of NSCLC that recurred within the treatment field of prior external beam radiation therapy. Methods: Twenty patients, median age 70, who had NSCLC recurrences following irradiation were treated with image-guided thermal ablation. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess survival benefit and subjective pain reports were used to investigate pain relief. Results: The median survival time was 13.1 ± SE 1.4 months and the median survival time without local recurrence was 8.5 ± 1.6 months. Eight patients (40%) recurred locally after a median of 3.3 months. Seven out of ten patients (70%) presenting with significant pain had decreased pain at initial post-ablation evaluation. Following the 25 ablations, there were no Grade IV or V, 1 Grade III, 3 Grade II, and 23 Grade I complications. Conclusion: Thermal ablation offers a potential survival benefit compared with other available modalities for the treatment of NSCLC recurring within a previously irradiated field. This promising technique has a good safety profile and may also be useful in providing symptomatic relief.

  13. Short course continuous, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiation therapy (CHART) as preoperative treatment for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, S.; Glynne-Jones, R.; Harrison, M.; Makris, A. [Mount Vernon Cancer Center, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Novell, R.; Brown, K. [Luton and Dunstable Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    Determine feasibility and toxicity of preoperative short course pelvic CHART (25 Gy in 15 fractions over 5 days) for treatment of clinically resectable primary rectal tumours. Between 1998 and 2004, 20 patients with clinically staged T3 resectable rectal carcinoma were treated in this prospective pilot study with preoperative short course CHART to their pelvis. The aim was for total mesorectal excision within 7 days. Radiation toxicity, surgical morbidity, locoregional control (LRC), overall (OS), cause specific (CSS) and disease free survival (DFS) outcomes were documented. Nineteen of the 20 patients completed planned radiotherapy. One discontinued radiotherapy due to toxicity. All patients underwent potentially curative radical surgery. One patient developed grade 3, and three patients grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity. With a median follow-up of 31 months (range 0.9-88), there is no grade 3, 4 or 5 late toxicity. Two patients experienced grade 2, and three patients grade 1 late bowel toxicity. Two patients died from postoperative complications, and two developed grade 2 abdominal wound infections. At 3 years LRC is 95% (95% CI 83-100), OS 72% (95% CI 51-94), CSS 86% (95% CI 68-100) and DFS 80% (95% CI 60-100). Two patients died from metastatic disease, one patient from a second primary and one patient is alive after successful resection of hepatic metastases. This small study suggests preoperative short course CHART for clinically resectable rectal carcinoma is feasible with acceptable compliance and tolerable side effects.

  14. Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combined Modality Treatment for Bladder Preservation in Elderly Patients With Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, Guy-Anne [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis, E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio L.; Faria, Sergio L.; Duclos, Marie [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sturgeon, Jeremy [Department of Medical Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To review our experience with bladder-preserving trimodality treatment (TMT) using hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of elderly patients treated with TMT using hypofractionated IMRT (50 Gy in 20 fractions) with concomitant weekly radiosensitizing chemotherapy. Eligibility criteria were as follows: age ≥70 years, a proven diagnosis of muscle-invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma, stage T2-T3N0M0 disease, and receipt of TMT with curative intent. Response rate was assessed by cystoscopic evaluation and bladder biopsy. Results: 24 patients with a median age of 79 years were eligible. A complete response was confirmed in 83% of the patients. Of the remaining patients, 1 of them underwent salvage cystectomy, and no disease was found in the bladder on histopathologic assessment. After a median follow-up time of 28 months, of the patients with a complete response, 2 patients had muscle-invasive recurrence, 1 experienced locoregional failure, and 3 experienced distant metastasis. The overall and cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years were 61% and 71%, respectively. Of the surviving patients, 75% have a disease-free and functioning bladder. All patients completed hypofractionated IMRT, and 19 patients tolerated all 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities occurred in only 4% of the patients, and acute grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities, liver toxicities, or both were experienced by 17% of the cohort. No patient experienced grade 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Hypofractionated IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy appears to be an effective and well-tolerated curative treatment strategy in the elderly population and should be considered for patients who are not candidates for cystectomy or who wish to avoid

  15. Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combined Modality Treatment for Bladder Preservation in Elderly Patients With Invasive Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective(s): To review our experience with bladder-preserving trimodality treatment (TMT) using hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of elderly patients treated with TMT using hypofractionated IMRT (50 Gy in 20 fractions) with concomitant weekly radiosensitizing chemotherapy. Eligibility criteria were as follows: age ≥70 years, a proven diagnosis of muscle-invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma, stage T2-T3N0M0 disease, and receipt of TMT with curative intent. Response rate was assessed by cystoscopic evaluation and bladder biopsy. Results: 24 patients with a median age of 79 years were eligible. A complete response was confirmed in 83% of the patients. Of the remaining patients, 1 of them underwent salvage cystectomy, and no disease was found in the bladder on histopathologic assessment. After a median follow-up time of 28 months, of the patients with a complete response, 2 patients had muscle-invasive recurrence, 1 experienced locoregional failure, and 3 experienced distant metastasis. The overall and cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years were 61% and 71%, respectively. Of the surviving patients, 75% have a disease-free and functioning bladder. All patients completed hypofractionated IMRT, and 19 patients tolerated all 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities occurred in only 4% of the patients, and acute grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities, liver toxicities, or both were experienced by 17% of the cohort. No patient experienced grade 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Hypofractionated IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy appears to be an effective and well-tolerated curative treatment strategy in the elderly population and should be considered for patients who are not candidates for cystectomy or who wish to avoid

  16. SU-E-J-90: MRI-Based Treatment Simulation and Patient Setup for Radiation Therapy of Brain Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Traditional radiation therapy of cancer is heavily dependent on CT. CT provides excellent depiction of the bones but lacks good soft tissue contrast, which makes contouring difficult. Often, MRIs are fused with CT to take advantage of its superior soft tissue contrast. Such an approach has drawbacks. It is desirable to perform treatment simulation entirely based on MRI. To achieve MR-based simulation for radiation therapy, bone imaging is an important challenge because of the low MR signal intensity from bone due to its ultra-short T2 and T1, which presents difficulty for both dose calculation and patient setup in terms of digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Current solutions will either require manual bone contouring or multiple MR scans. We present a technique to generate DRR using MRI with an Ultra Short Echo Time (UTE) sequence which is applicable to both OBI and ExacTrac 2D patient setup. Methods: Seven brain cancer patients were scanned at 1.5 Tesla using a radial UTE sequence. The sequence acquires two images at two different echo times. The two images were processed using in-house software. The resultant bone images were subsequently loaded into commercial systems to generate DRRs. Simulation and patient clinical on-board images were used to evaluate 2D patient setup with MRI-DRRs. Results: The majority bones are well visualized in all patients. The fused image of patient CT with the MR bone image demonstrates the accuracy of automatic bone identification using our technique. The generated DRR is of good quality. Accuracy of 2D patient setup by using MRI-DRR is comparable to CT-based 2D patient setup. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of DRR generation with single MR sequence. Further work will be needed on MR sequence development and post-processing procedure to achieve robust MR bone imaging for other human sites in addition to brain

  17. SU-E-J-90: MRI-Based Treatment Simulation and Patient Setup for Radiation Therapy of Brain Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, AA (United States); Cao, M; Han, F; Santhanam, A; Neylon, J; Gomez, C; Kaprealian, T; Sheng, K; Agazaryan, N; Low, D; Hu, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Traditional radiation therapy of cancer is heavily dependent on CT. CT provides excellent depiction of the bones but lacks good soft tissue contrast, which makes contouring difficult. Often, MRIs are fused with CT to take advantage of its superior soft tissue contrast. Such an approach has drawbacks. It is desirable to perform treatment simulation entirely based on MRI. To achieve MR-based simulation for radiation therapy, bone imaging is an important challenge because of the low MR signal intensity from bone due to its ultra-short T2 and T1, which presents difficulty for both dose calculation and patient setup in terms of digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Current solutions will either require manual bone contouring or multiple MR scans. We present a technique to generate DRR using MRI with an Ultra Short Echo Time (UTE) sequence which is applicable to both OBI and ExacTrac 2D patient setup. Methods: Seven brain cancer patients were scanned at 1.5 Tesla using a radial UTE sequence. The sequence acquires two images at two different echo times. The two images were processed using in-house software. The resultant bone images were subsequently loaded into commercial systems to generate DRRs. Simulation and patient clinical on-board images were used to evaluate 2D patient setup with MRI-DRRs. Results: The majority bones are well visualized in all patients. The fused image of patient CT with the MR bone image demonstrates the accuracy of automatic bone identification using our technique. The generated DRR is of good quality. Accuracy of 2D patient setup by using MRI-DRR is comparable to CT-based 2D patient setup. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of DRR generation with single MR sequence. Further work will be needed on MR sequence development and post-processing procedure to achieve robust MR bone imaging for other human sites in addition to brain.

  18. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from renal cell cancer : treatment attempt with radiation and sunitinib (case report)

    OpenAIRE

    Haukland Ellinor; Dalhaug Astrid; Nieder Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A case of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis in a patient with known brain and lung metastases from renal cell cancer without previous systemic therapy is presented. Neoplastic meningitis (NM) developed 31 months after first diagnosis of simultaneous extra- and intracranial recurrence of kidney cancer and surgical resection of a cerebellar metastasis. In spite of local radiotherapy to the macroscopic NM lesions in the cervical and lumbar spine followed by initiation of sunitinib, the pati...

  19. Treatment of tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively reviewed 52 tongue cancer patients who received definitive treatment at Shiga University Hospital between January 1993 and August 2004. In cases of T1 and early T2 (early T2: ≤3 cm), partial glossectomy was performed. Radical operation followed by reconstructive surgery was performed after pre-operative chemotherapy in cases of advanced T2 (advanced T2: >3 cm), T3 and T4. Post-operative radiation was performed in some cases to prevent local and cervical recurrence. The 5-year survival rates by the Kaplan-Meier method were 92% in stage I, 88% in stage II, 73% in stage III, 55% in stage IV, and 72% overall, respectively. The 5-year survival rates by the size in T2 cases were 90% in early T2 and 46% in advanced T2. Twelve cases were relapsed. Locoregional recurrence occurred in 11 patients (5 cases at the primary site, 6 in the neck), and distant metastasis in 4 patients. Long-term survivors after secondary treatment were 3 of 11 cases with recurrence at the primary site. The results of salvage treatment for recurrent cases were discouraging. Adjuvant chemotherapy and post-operative radiotherapy are recommended for advanced tongue cancer. (author)

  20. Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the doctors who oversee the care of each person undergoing radiation treatment. Other members of the treatment team include radiation therapists, radiation oncology nurses, medical physicists, dosimetrists, social workers ...

  1. Cancer Treatment Scams

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Related Items Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam Miracle Health Claims Discount Plan or Health Insurance? Cancer ... Talk to Your Doctor First. Tagged with: health , miracle claims , scam September 2008 You Might Also Like ...

  2. Delayed radiation effects of the skin - malignization and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    44 cases of radiation cancer are analyzed. The malignization is related to late radiation ulcera and other radiation-induced changes such as fibrosis and dermatitis. The types of malignization are described and treatment plans are discussed

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Anal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Anal Cancer Prevention Research Anal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Anal Cancer ... factors affect the prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Bladder Cancer Screening Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Colon Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  6. Effectiveness of adjuvant radiation therapy in conservative treatment of early stages breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randomized study was made of 254 women breast invasive dust (pT1N0M0). In 61 patients, organ sparing operation was followed by radiation therapy of either breast alone or zones of regional metastasizing (57 patients) as well, with or without adjuvant chemotherapy or hormone therapy (tamoxifen). It was found that radiation of mammary gland, with or without additional radiation exposure of zones of regional metastasizing, results in both decrease recurrence development (p ≤ 0.05) increase in recurrence-free survival in women who had tumor size within the range from 1 to 2 cm in diameter in contrast to patients with tumor size not exceeding 1 cm, whose survival was not positively influenced by radiation

  7. Effects of caffeine co-treatment with radiation on breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitizing effect of caffeine to carbon ion radiation was investigated and the change of BRCA1 expression was observed. The MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells were exposed to carbon ion beams with or without caffeine. The cell survival was automatically monitored by RT-CES system. Cell cycle distribution was assessed by flow cytometry. The levels of BRCA1 mRNA were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR.The expression of BRCA1 protein and its phosphorylation were examined by Western blot. The results show that caffeine increases the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to carbon ion radiation, and abrogates the radiation-induced G2 arrest. Caffeine inhibits radiation-induced BRCA1 expression both at mRNA and protein level. At the same time, caffeine specifically abolishes BRCA1 phosphorylation of Ser-1524. The data implicate that caffeine inhibits the expression of BRCA1 protein and its phosphorylation. (authors)

  8. Treatment of gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; MABILIA, ANDREA; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically...

  9. A prospective phase II trial of EGCG in treatment of acute radiation-induced esophagitis for stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Acute radiation-induced esophagitis (ARIE) is one of main toxicities complicated by thoracic radiotherapy, influencing patients’ quality of life and radiotherapy proceeding seriously. It is difficult to be cured rapidly so far. Our phase I trial preliminarily showed that EGCG may be a promising strategy in the treatment of ARIE. Materials and methods: We prospectively enrolled patients with stage III lung cancer from the Shandong Tumor Hospital & Institute in China from January 2013 to September 2014. All patients received concurrent or sequential chemo-radiotherapy, or radiotherapy only. EGCG was administrated once ARIE appeared. EGCG was given with the concentration of 440 μmol/L during radiotherapy and additionally two weeks after radiotherapy. RTOG score, dysphagia and pain related to esophagitis were recorded every week. Results: Thirty-seven patients with stage IIIA and IIIB lung cancer were enrolled in this trial. In comparison to the original, the RTOG score in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th week after EGCG prescription and the 1st, 2nd week after radiotherapy decreased significantly (P = 0.002, 0.000, 0.000, 0.001, 0.102, 0.000, 0.000, respectively). The pain score of each week was significantly lower than the baseline (P = 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.006, 0.000, 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: This trial confirmed that the oral administration of EGCG is an effective and safe method to deal with ARIE. A phase III randomized controlled trial is expected to further corroborate the consequence of EGCG in ARIE treatment

  10. Radiation therapy of cancer of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to present the principles of radiation therapy of cancer of the lung, according to the experience of the Institute of Oncology in Krakow. The text was designed primarily for the radiotherapists involved in the treatment of cancer of the lung, and may be used as an auxiliary textbook for those preparing for the examination in radiotherapy. (author)

  11. A randomized assessment of three quality of life (QOL) questionnaires for prostate cancer patients undergoing different radiation treatment modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The goal of this prospective, randomized study was to assess and compare compliance of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer to completing three different validated QOL instruments pre-treatment and six months later. Materials and Methods: Between April 2000 and April 2001, 124 patients were asked to fill out only one of three randomly selected QOL questionnaires (version A, B, C). Each addressed urinary and sexual function. One also addressed patients' physical, social, family, emotional, and functional well being. Study patients received External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) or Brachytherapy (BRACHY), according to departmental policy. Exclusion criteria included current/previous hormone therapy and prostatectomy. Patients were asked to return the questionnaire at their first treatment visit. The three tools were: A The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy for Prostate Patients (FACT-P), The Sexual Adjustments Questionnaire (SAQ), and The American Urological Association (AUA) Questionnaire. The Fact-P questionnaire elicits information about physical, social, family, emotional, and functional well being as they relate to prostate cancer. SAQ focuses on sexual function; the AUA on urinary symptoms. B SAQ and AUA only; identical to Version A, but does not address physical, social, family, emotional, and functional well-being. C The International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS) Questionnaire, which addresses urinary symptoms and Patient Sexual Function Questionnaire, which focuses on erectile function. Additionally, patients were asked to respond yes/no to four variables designed to evaluate these questionnaires: 1) ease of understanding, 2) too personal, 3)addresses concerns regarding urinary function and sexual potency and 4) willingness to complete questionnaire in six months. These variables were examined for any trends that may exist between the different questionnaires. Results: Fifteen (12%) of the 124 patients returned incomplete questionnaires

  12. In the field: exploiting the untapped potential of immunogenic modulation by radiation in combination with immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eKwilas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiation has long been the standard of care for many types of cancer. It is employed to locally eradicate tumor cells as well as alter tumor stroma with either curative or palliative intent. Radiation-induced cell damage is an immunologically active process in which danger signals are released that stimulate immune cells to phagocytose and present locally released tumor-associated antigens (TAAs. Recent studies have indicated that radiotherapy can also induce immunogenic modulation; an alteration in the phenotype of cancer cells that remain after treatment and renders these cells more sensitive to immune mediated attack.. These cells upregulate TAAs as well as markers, including MHC and costimulatory molecules, that make them much more immunostimulatory. As our understanding of the immunomodulatory effects of radiation has improved, interest in combining this type of therapy with immune-based therapies for the treatment of cancer has grown. Therapeutic cancer vaccines have been shown to initiate the dynamic process of host immune system activation, culminating in the recognition of host cancer cells as foreign. The environment created after radiotherapy can be exploited by active therapeutic cancer vaccines in order to achieve further, more robust immune system activation. This review highlights preclinical studies that have examined the alteration of the tumor microenvironment with regard to immunostimulatory molecules following different types of radiotherapy, including external beam radiation, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, bone-seeking radionuclides, and brachytherapy. We also emphasize how combination therapy with a cancer vaccine can exploit these changes to achieve improved therapeutic benefit. Lastly, we describe how these laboratory findings are translating into clinical benefit for patients undergoing combined radiotherapy and cancer vaccination.

  13. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended. PMID:27523418

  14. Radiation and SN38 treatments modulate the expression of microRNAs, cytokines and chemokines in colon cancer cells in a p53-directed manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Surajit; Meng, Wen-Jian; Nandy, Suman Kumar; Ping, Jie; Bisgin, Atil; Helmfors, Linda; Waldmann, Patrik; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2015-12-29

    Aberrant expression of miRNAs, cytokines and chemokines are involved in pathogenesis of colon cancer. However, the expression of p53 mediated miRNAs, cyto- and chemokines after radiation and SN38 treatment in colon cancer remains elusive. Here, human colon cancer cells, HCT116 with wild-type, heterozygous and a functionally null p53, were treated by radiation and SN38. The expression of 384 miRNAs was determined by using the TaqMan® miRNA array, and the expression of cyto- and chemokines was analyzed by Meso-Scale-Discovery instrument. Up- or down-regulations of miRNAs after radiation and SN38 treatments were largely dependent on p53 status of the cells. Cytokines, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, Il-4, IL-10, VEGF, and chemokines, IL-8, MIP-1α were increased, and IFN-γ expression was decreased after radiation, whereas, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, Il-4, IL-10, IL-8 were decreased, and VEGF and MIP-1α were increased after SN38 treatment. Bioinformatic analysis pointed out that the highly up-regulated miRNAs, let-7f-5p, miR-455-3p, miR-98, miR-155-5p and the down-regulated miRNAs, miR-1, miR-127-5p, miR-142-5p, miR-202-5p were associated with colon cancer pathways and correlated with cyto- or chemokine expression. These miRNAs have the potential for use in colon cancer therapy as they are related to p53, pro- or anti-inflammatory cyto- or chemokines after the radiation and SN38 treatment. PMID:26556872

  15. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with external beam radiation: influence of total dose, overall treatment time, and treatment interruption on local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate and eventually quantify a possible influence of tumor proliferation during the external radiation course on local control in muscle invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: The influence of total dose, overall treatment time, and treatment interruption has retrospectively been analyzed in a series of 379 patients with nonmetastasized, muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. All patients received external beam radiotherapy at the Netherlands Cancer Institute between 1977 and 1990. Total dose varied between 50 and 75 Gy with a mean of 60.5 Gy and a median of 60.4 Gy. Overall treatment time varied between 20 and 270 days with a mean of 49 days and a median of 41 days. Number of fractions varied between 17 and 36 with a mean of 27 and a median of 26. Two hundred and forty-four patients had a continuous radiation course, whereas 135 had an intended split course or an unintended treatment interruption. Median follow-up was 22 months for all patients and 82 months for the 30 patients still alive at last follow-up. A stepwise procedure using proportional hazard regression has been used to identify prognostic treatment factors with respect to local recurrence as sole first recurrence. Results: One hundred and thirty-six patients experienced a local recurrence and 120 of these occurred before regional or distant metastases. The actuarial local control rate was 40.3% at 5 years and 32.3% at 10 years. In a multivariate analysis total dose showed a significant association with local control (p 0.0039), however in a markedly nonlinear way. In fact only those patients treated with a dose below 57.5 Gy had a significant higher bladder relapse rate, whereas no difference in relapse rate was found among patients treated with doses above 57.5 Gy. This remained the case even after adjustment for overall treatment time and all significant tumor and patient characteristics. The Normalized Tumor Dose (NTD) (α/β = 10) and NTD (

  16. How Radiation Oncologists Evaluate and Incorporate Life Expectancy Estimates Into the Treatment of Palliative Cancer Patients: A Survey-Based Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Yolanda D., E-mail: ydtseng@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Krishnan, Monica S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sullivan, Adam J. [Department of Biostatistics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Jones, Joshua A. [Harvard Palliative Medicine Fellowship Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chow, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: We surveyed how radiation oncologists think about and incorporate a palliative cancer patient’s life expectancy (LE) into their treatment recommendations. Methods and Materials: A 41-item survey was e-mailed to 113 radiation oncology attending physicians and residents at radiation oncology centers within the Boston area. Physicians estimated how frequently they assessed the LE of their palliative cancer patients and rated the importance of 18 factors in formulating LE estimates. For 3 common palliative case scenarios, physicians estimated LE and reported whether they had an LE threshold below which they would modify their treatment recommendation. LE estimates were considered accurate when within the 95% confidence interval of median survival estimates from an established prognostic model. Results: Among 92 respondents (81%), the majority were male (62%), from an academic practice (75%), and an attending physician (70%). Physicians reported assessing LE in 91% of their evaluations and most frequently rated performance status (92%), overall metastatic burden (90%), presence of central nervous system metastases (75%), and primary cancer site (73%) as “very important” in assessing LE. Across the 3 cases, most (88%-97%) had LE thresholds that would alter treatment recommendations. Overall, physicians’ LE estimates were 22% accurate with 67% over the range predicted by the prognostic model. Conclusions: Physicians often incorporate LE estimates into palliative cancer care and identify important prognostic factors. Most have LE thresholds that guide their treatment recommendations. However, physicians overestimated patient survival times in most cases. Future studies focused on improving LE assessment are needed.

  17. How Radiation Oncologists Evaluate and Incorporate Life Expectancy Estimates Into the Treatment of Palliative Cancer Patients: A Survey-Based Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We surveyed how radiation oncologists think about and incorporate a palliative cancer patient’s life expectancy (LE) into their treatment recommendations. Methods and Materials: A 41-item survey was e-mailed to 113 radiation oncology attending physicians and residents at radiation oncology centers within the Boston area. Physicians estimated how frequently they assessed the LE of their palliative cancer patients and rated the importance of 18 factors in formulating LE estimates. For 3 common palliative case scenarios, physicians estimated LE and reported whether they had an LE threshold below which they would modify their treatment recommendation. LE estimates were considered accurate when within the 95% confidence interval of median survival estimates from an established prognostic model. Results: Among 92 respondents (81%), the majority were male (62%), from an academic practice (75%), and an attending physician (70%). Physicians reported assessing LE in 91% of their evaluations and most frequently rated performance status (92%), overall metastatic burden (90%), presence of central nervous system metastases (75%), and primary cancer site (73%) as “very important” in assessing LE. Across the 3 cases, most (88%-97%) had LE thresholds that would alter treatment recommendations. Overall, physicians’ LE estimates were 22% accurate with 67% over the range predicted by the prognostic model. Conclusions: Physicians often incorporate LE estimates into palliative cancer care and identify important prognostic factors. Most have LE thresholds that guide their treatment recommendations. However, physicians overestimated patient survival times in most cases. Future studies focused on improving LE assessment are needed

  18. Five-year Results of Whole Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer: The Fox Chase Cancer Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the 5-year outcomes using whole-breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of early-stage-breast cancer at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: A total of 946 women with early-stage breast cancer (stage 0, I, or II) were treated with IMRT after surgery with or without systemic therapy from 2003-2010. Whole-breast radiation was delivered via an IMRT technique with a median whole-breast radiation dose of 46 Gy and median tumor bed boost of 14 Gy. Endpoints included local-regional recurrence, cosmesis, and late complications. Results: With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 1-97 months), there were 12 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and one locoregional recurrence. The 5-year actuarial IBTR and locoregional recurrence rates were 2.0% and 2.4%. Physician-reported cosmestic outcomes were available for 645 patients: 63% were considered “excellent”, 33% “good”, and 900 cc, or boost volumes >34 cc were significantly associated with a “fair/poor” cosmetic outcome. Fibrosis, edema, erythema, and telangectasia were also associated with “fair/poor” physician-reported cosmesis; erythema and telangectasia remained significant on multivariate analysis. Patient-reported cosmesis was available for 548 patients, and 33%, 50%, and 17% of patients reported “excellent”, “good”, and “fair/poor” cosmesis, respectively. The use of a boost and increased boost volume: breast volume ratio were significantly associated with “fair/poor” outcomes. No parameter for patient-reported cosmesis was significant on multivariate analysis. The chances of experiencing a treatment related effect was significantly associated with a boost dose ≥16 Gy, receipt of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, large breast size, and electron boost energy. Conclusions: Whole-breast IMRT is associated with very low rates of local recurrence at 5 years, 83%-98% “good/excellent” cosmetic outcomes, and minimal

  19. Five-year Results of Whole Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer: The Fox Chase Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Lanea M.M., E-mail: Lanea.Keller@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sopka, Dennis M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Klayton, Tracy; Li Jinsheng; Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year outcomes using whole-breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of early-stage-breast cancer at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: A total of 946 women with early-stage breast cancer (stage 0, I, or II) were treated with IMRT after surgery with or without systemic therapy from 2003-2010. Whole-breast radiation was delivered via an IMRT technique with a median whole-breast radiation dose of 46 Gy and median tumor bed boost of 14 Gy. Endpoints included local-regional recurrence, cosmesis, and late complications. Results: With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 1-97 months), there were 12 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and one locoregional recurrence. The 5-year actuarial IBTR and locoregional recurrence rates were 2.0% and 2.4%. Physician-reported cosmestic outcomes were available for 645 patients: 63% were considered 'excellent', 33% 'good', and <1.5% 'fair/poor'. For physician-reported cosmesis, boost doses {>=}16 Gy, breast size >900 cc, or boost volumes >34 cc were significantly associated with a 'fair/poor' cosmetic outcome. Fibrosis, edema, erythema, and telangectasia were also associated with 'fair/poor' physician-reported cosmesis; erythema and telangectasia remained significant on multivariate analysis. Patient-reported cosmesis was available for 548 patients, and 33%, 50%, and 17% of patients reported 'excellent', 'good', and 'fair/poor' cosmesis, respectively. The use of a boost and increased boost volume: breast volume ratio were significantly associated with 'fair/poor' outcomes. No parameter for patient-reported cosmesis was significant on multivariate analysis. The chances of experiencing a treatment related effect was significantly associated with a boost dose {>=}16 Gy, receipt of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, large breast size, and electron boost energy

  20. Post-radiation malignant fibrous histiocytoma following treatment of breast cancer: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-radiation malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) of the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of post-radiation MFH that presented a rapidly growing mass in a 52-year-old woman who underwent breast-conserving therapy and adjuvant whole breast irradiation 6 years ago. To the best of our knowledge, only one case of primary MFH of the female breast have been reported with sonographic findings. We analyzed the sonographic and MRI findings with correlative histopathologic features, and then confirmed with surgical excision.

  1. Radiation and lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epidemiological data from the atomic bomb survivors and from different groups of Rn-exposed underground miners are so far the main sources of our knowledge on radiation-induced lung cancer. In the first part of this paper the results of these two different data sets are outlined and compared. This comparison concerns the following topics: Primary risk coefficients, the differences between both sexes, the influence of smoking and the variation of the excess relative risk with time since exposure. Of main concern for radiation protection is the possible lung cancer risk of the general population from indoor exposure to radon daughters. In the second part the results of two different types of approaches are discussed: The direct approach from miners data and the so-called dosimetric approach from LSS data. The approach from the atomic bomb survivors' data yields considerably higher risk values for this indoor exposure than the approach from miners. This is particularly valid for females. This difference between both approaches increases if the proposed new dosimetric model for inhaled radon daughters is applied. Possible reasons for this inconsistency and the consequences for radiation protection are outlined. (author)

  2. The role of FDG PET in management of neck metastasis from head-and-neck cancer after definitive radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The role of neck dissection after definitive radiation for head-and-neck cancer is controversial. We select patients for neck dissection based on postradiation therapy (post-RT), computed tomography (CT), and [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). We summarize the clinical outcomes of patients treated with this policy to further elucidate the role of FDG PET in decision making for neck dissection after primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between December 1999 and February 2004, 53 eligible patients were identified. These patients had stage N2A or higher head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma and had complete response of the primary tumor after definitive radiation with or without chemotherapy. PET or computed tomography (CT) scans were performed within 6 months after treatment. Neck dissection was performed in patients with residual lymphadenopathy (identified by clinical examination or CT) and a positive PET scan. Those without residual lymph nodes and a negative PET were observed without neck dissection. For patients with residual lymphadenopathy, but a negative PET scan, neck dissection was performed at the discretion of the attending surgeon and decision of the patient. There was a total of 70 heminecks available for analysis (17 patients had bilateral neck disease). Results: There were 21 heminecks with residual lymphadenopathy identified on CT imaging or clinical examination and negative PET. Of these, 4 had neck dissection and were pathologically negative. The remaining 17 were observed without neck dissection. There was a total of 42 heminecks without residual lymph nodes on post-RT CT imaging or clinical examination with a negative PET. They were also observed without neck dissection. Seven heminecks had a positive PET scan and residual lymphadenopathy. Six of them had neck dissection and 1 had fine-needle aspiration of a residual node; 3 contained residual viable cancer and 4 were pathologically negative. At

  3. Time management in radiation oncology. Development and evaluation of a modular system based on the example of rectal cancer treatment. The DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal was to develop and evaluate a modular system for measurement of the work times required by the various professional groups involved in radiation oncology before, during, and after serial radiation treatment (long-term irradiation with 25-28 fractions of 1.8 Gy) based on the example of rectal cancer treatment. Materials and methods A panel of experts divided the work associated with providing radiation oncology treatment into modules (from the preparation of radiotherapy, RT planning and administration to the final examination and follow-up). The time required for completion of each module was measured by independent observers at four centers (Rostock, Bamberg, Duesseldorf, and Offenbach, Germany). Results A total of 1,769 data sets were collected from 63 patients with 10-489 data sets per module. Some modules (informed consent procedure, routine treatments, CT planning) exhibited little deviation between centers, whereas others (especially medical and physical irradiation planning) exhibited a wide range of variation (e.g., 1 h 49 min to 6 h 56 min for physical irradiation planning). The mean work time per patient was 12 h 11 min for technicians, 2 h 59 min for physicists, and 7 h 6 min for physicians. Conclusion The modular system of time measurement proved to be reliable and produced comparable data at the different centers. Therefore, the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) decided that it can be extended to other types of cancer (head and neck, prostate, and breast cancer) with appropriate modifications. (orig.)

  4. Time management in radiation oncology. Development and evaluation of a modular system based on the example of rectal cancer treatment. The DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fietkau, R. [Erlangen Univ. Hospital, Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Budach, W. [Univ. of Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Zamboglou, N. [Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Thiel, H.J. [Sozialstiftung Bamberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Sack, H. [German Association for Radiooncology, Berlin (Germany); Popp, W. [Prime Networks AG, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-01-15

    The goal was to develop and evaluate a modular system for measurement of the work times required by the various professional groups involved in radiation oncology before, during, and after serial radiation treatment (long-term irradiation with 25-28 fractions of 1.8 Gy) based on the example of rectal cancer treatment. Materials and methods A panel of experts divided the work associated with providing radiation oncology treatment into modules (from the preparation of radiotherapy, RT planning and administration to the final examination and follow-up). The time required for completion of each module was measured by independent observers at four centers (Rostock, Bamberg, Duesseldorf, and Offenbach, Germany). Results A total of 1,769 data sets were collected from 63 patients with 10-489 data sets per module. Some modules (informed consent procedure, routine treatments, CT planning) exhibited little deviation between centers, whereas others (especially medical and physical irradiation planning) exhibited a wide range of variation (e.g., 1 h 49 min to 6 h 56 min for physical irradiation planning). The mean work time per patient was 12 h 11 min for technicians, 2 h 59 min for physicists, and 7 h 6 min for physicians. Conclusion The modular system of time measurement proved to be reliable and produced comparable data at the different centers. Therefore, the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) decided that it can be extended to other types of cancer (head and neck, prostate, and breast cancer) with appropriate modifications. (orig.)

  5. Surgical treatment of radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation enteritis is a progressive, disease process that causes intestinal fibrosis and obliterative endarteritis, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. The authors' clinical experience involving 20 patients over a 22-year period from 1967 through 1989 who underwent various surgical procedures to alleviate chronic symptoms secondary to radiation enteritis is described. Eight men and 12 women with a mean age of 52 years (24 to 81 years) underwent a total of 27 procedures for complications of radiation enteritis. Radiation therapy was delivered for treatment of gynecologic malignancies (55%), colorectal cancer (20%), prostate malignancies (10%), and others (15%). The mean average dose of radiation delivered was 5,514 rads with a range of 2,613 to 7,000 rads. The interval from radiation treatment to time of surgery averaged 9 years. Operative procedures consisted of 12 resection and primary anastomosis procedures and 15 resections with stoma creation. Formation of a stoma was used in patients with more severe disease. The 30-day operative mortality was 0% and morbidity was 55%. There were no anastomotic leaks or intra-abdominal abscesses. The authors conclude that resection and primary anastomosis can safely be performed in selected patients but that judicious use of stoma formation can avoid major mortality and morbidity associated with surgery in this setting

  6. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods and ... toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds , wires, or catheters ...

  7. Clinical validation of FDG-PET/CT in the radiation treatment planning for patients with oesophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijs, Christina T.; Beukema, Jannet C.; Woutersen, Dankert; Mul, Veronique E.; Berveling, Maaike J.; Pruim, Jan; van der Jagt, Eric J.; Hospers, Geke A. P.; Groen, Henk; Plukker, John Th.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to determine the proportion of locoregional recurrences (LRRs) that could have been prevented if radiotherapy treatment planning for oesophageal cancer was based on PET/CT instead of CT. Materials and methods: Ninety oesophageal cancer patients, elig

  8. The role of stem cells in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevens, Daan; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Xerostomia is an important complication following radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. Current treatment approaches are insufficient and can only temporarily relieve symptoms. New insights into the physiopathology of radiation-induced xerostomia might help us in this regard. This review discusses the current knowledge of salivary gland stem cells in radiation-induced xerostomia and their value in the prevention and treatment of this complication. Salivary gland stem cell transplantation, bone marrow-derived cell mobilization, molecular regulation of parotid stem cells, stem cell sparing RT, and adaptive RT are promising techniques that are discussed in this study. PMID:26880659

  9. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer June 15, 2009 Welcome to this “OR-Live” webcast presentation, premiering from Beth Israel Medical Center in New ... can have. My role is to deliver radiation therapy in these lung cancer patients. And what radiation therapy is is the ...

  10. Long-term Outcomes in Treatment of Invasive Bladder Cancer With Concomitant Boost and Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canyilmaz, Emine, E-mail: dremocan@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Yavuz, Melek Nur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz University, Antalya (Turkey); Serdar, Lasif [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Zengin, Ahmet Yasar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kanuni Research and Education Hospital, Trabzon (Turkey); Aynaci, Ozlem; Haciislamoglu, Emel; Bahat, Zumrut; Yoney, Adnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy and toxicity of concomitant boost and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (CBAHRT) in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and September 2012, 334 patients with diagnoses of invasive bladder cancer were selected. These patients received CBAHRT as a bladder-conserving approach. The treatment consisted of a dose of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the whole pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 1.5 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 67.5 Gy in 5 weeks. A total of 32 patients (10.3%) had a diagnosis of stage T1, 202 (64.3%) were at stage T2, 46 (14.6%) were at stage T3a, 22 (7%) were at stage T3b, and 12 (3.8%) were at stage T4a. Results: The follow-up period was 33.1 months (range, 4.3-223.3 months). Grade 3 late intestinal toxicity was observed in 9 patients (2.9%), whereas grade 3 late urinary toxicity was observed in 8 patients (2.5%). The median overall survival (OS) was 26.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.4-31.2). The 5-, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 32.1% (standard error [SE], ± 0.027), 17.9% (SE, ± 0.025) and 12.5% (SE, ± 0.028), respectively. The median cause-specific survival (CSS) was 42.1 months (95% CI: 28.7-55.5). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates were 43.2% (SE, ± 0.03), 30.3% (SE, ± 0.03), and 28% (SE, ± 0.04), respectively. The median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 111.8 months (95% CI: 99.6-124). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year RFS rates were 61.9% (SE, ± 0.03), 57.6% (SE, ± 0.04), and 48.2% (SE, ± 0.07), respectively. Conclusions: The CBAHRT technique demonstrated acceptable toxicity and local control rates in patients with invasive bladder cancer, and this therapy facilitated bladder conservation. In selected patients, the CBAHRT technique is a practical alternative treatment option with acceptable 5-, 10-, and 15-year results in patients undergoing cystectomy as well as concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  11. [Radiation-induced cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrillaux, B

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low dose range i.e., population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations of tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. PMID:9868399

  12. Short-Course Treatment With Gefitinib Enhances Curative Potential of Radiation Therapy in a Mouse Model of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the combination of radiation and an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) in preclinical models of human non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Sensitivity to an EGFR TKI (gefitinib) or radiation was assessed using proliferation assays and clonogenic survival assays. Effects on receptor signal transduction pathways (pEGFR, pAKT, pMAPK) and apoptosis (percentage of cleaved PARP Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)) were assessed by Western blotting. Radiation-induced DNA damage was assessed by γH2AX immunofluorescence. Established (≥100 mm3) EGFR-mutated (HCC287) or EGFR wild-type (A549) subcutaneous xenografts were treated with radiation (10 Gy, day 1) or gefitinib (50 mg/kg, orally, on days 1-3) or both. Results: In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines with activating EGFR mutations (PC9 or HCC827), gefitinib treatment markedly reduced pEGFR, pAKT, and pMAPK levels and was associated with an increase in cleaved PARP but not in γH2AX foci. Radiation treatment increased the mean number of γH2AX foci per cell but did not significantly affect EGFR signaling. In contrast, NSCLC cell lines with EGFR T790M (H1975) or wild-type EGFR (A549) were insensitive to gefitinib treatment. The combination of gefitinib and radiation treatment in cell culture produced additive cell killing with no evidence of synergy. In xenograft models, a short course of gefitinib (3 days) did not significantly increase the activity of radiation treatment in wild-type EGFR (A549) tumors (P=.27), whereas this combination markedly increased the activity of radiation (P<.001) or gefitinib alone (P=.002) in EGFR-mutated HCC827 tumors, producing sustained tumor regressions. Conclusions: Gefitinib treatment increases clonogenic cell killing by radiation but only in cell lines sensitive to gefitinib alone. Our data suggest additive rather than synergistic interactions between gefitinib and radiation and that a combination

  13. Short-Course Treatment With Gefitinib Enhances Curative Potential of Radiation Therapy in a Mouse Model of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokobza, Sivan M.; Jiang, Yanyan; Weber, Anika M.; Devery, Aoife M.; Ryan, Anderson J., E-mail: anderson.ryan@oncology.ox.ac.uk

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the combination of radiation and an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) in preclinical models of human non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Sensitivity to an EGFR TKI (gefitinib) or radiation was assessed using proliferation assays and clonogenic survival assays. Effects on receptor signal transduction pathways (pEGFR, pAKT, pMAPK) and apoptosis (percentage of cleaved PARP Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)) were assessed by Western blotting. Radiation-induced DNA damage was assessed by γH2AX immunofluorescence. Established (≥100 mm{sup 3}) EGFR-mutated (HCC287) or EGFR wild-type (A549) subcutaneous xenografts were treated with radiation (10 Gy, day 1) or gefitinib (50 mg/kg, orally, on days 1-3) or both. Results: In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines with activating EGFR mutations (PC9 or HCC827), gefitinib treatment markedly reduced pEGFR, pAKT, and pMAPK levels and was associated with an increase in cleaved PARP but not in γH2AX foci. Radiation treatment increased the mean number of γH2AX foci per cell but did not significantly affect EGFR signaling. In contrast, NSCLC cell lines with EGFR T790M (H1975) or wild-type EGFR (A549) were insensitive to gefitinib treatment. The combination of gefitinib and radiation treatment in cell culture produced additive cell killing with no evidence of synergy. In xenograft models, a short course of gefitinib (3 days) did not significantly increase the activity of radiation treatment in wild-type EGFR (A549) tumors (P=.27), whereas this combination markedly increased the activity of radiation (P<.001) or gefitinib alone (P=.002) in EGFR-mutated HCC827 tumors, producing sustained tumor regressions. Conclusions: Gefitinib treatment increases clonogenic cell killing by radiation but only in cell lines sensitive to gefitinib alone. Our data suggest additive rather than synergistic interactions between gefitinib and radiation and that a

  14. Assessment of organ dose reduction and secondary cancer risk associated with the use of proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treatment of neuroblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with conformal radiation therapy (CRT) in terms of their organ doses and ability to cause secondary cancer in normal organs. Five patients (median age, 4 years; range, 2–11 years) who underwent PBT for retroperitoneal neuroblastoma were selected for treatment planning simulation. Four patients had stage 4 tumors and one had stage 2A tumor, according to the International Neuroblastoma Staging System. Two patients received 36 Gy, two received 21.6 Gy, and one received 41.4 Gy of radiation. The volume structures of these patients were used for simulations of CRT and IMRT treatment. Dose–volume analyses of liver, stomach, colon, small intestine, pancreas, and bone were performed for the simulations. Secondary cancer risks in these organs were calculated using the organ equivalent dose (OED) model, which took into account the rates of cell killing, repopulation, and the neutron dose from the treatment machine. In all evaluated organs, the mean dose in PBT was 20–80% of that in CRT. IMRT also showed lower mean doses than CRT for two organs (20% and 65%), but higher mean doses for the other four organs (110–120%). The risk of secondary cancer in PBT was 24–83% of that in CRT for five organs, but 121% of that in CRT for pancreas. The risk of secondary cancer in IMRT was equal to or higher than CRT for four organs (range 100–124%). Low radiation doses in normal organs are more frequently observed in PBT than in IMRT. Assessments of secondary cancer risk showed that PBT reduces the risk of secondary cancer in most organs, whereas IMRT is associated with a higher risk than CRT

  15. SU-E-J-271: Correlation of CT Number Change with Radiation Treatment Response for Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It has been reported recently that radiation can induce CT number (CTN) change during radiation therapy (RT) delivery. In the effort to explore whether CTN can be used to assess RT response, we analyze the relationship between the pathological treatment response (PTR) and the changes of CTN, MRI, and PET before and after the neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCR) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods: The preand post-nCR CT, MRI, and PET data for a total of 8 patients with resectable, or borderline resectable pancreatic head adenocarcinoma treated with nCR were retrospectively analyzed. Radiographic characteristics were correlated to PTR data. The histograms, means and standard derivations (SD) of the CTNs in pancreatic head (CTNPH), the GTV defined by ADC (CTNGTV), and the rest of pancreatic head (CTNPH-CTNGTV) were compared. Changes before and after nCR were correlated with the corresponding changes of ADC, lean body mass normalized SUV (SUVlb), and PTR using Pearson’ s correlation coefficient test. Results: The average mean and SD in CTPH for all the patients analyzed were higher in post-nCR (53.17 ± 31.05 HU) compared to those at pre-nCR (28.09 ± 4.253 HU). The CTNGTV were generally higher than CTNPH and CTNPH-CTNGTV, though the differences were not significant. The post-nCR changes of mean CTN, ADC, and SUVlb values in pancreatic head were correlated with PTR (R=0.3273/P=0.5357, R=−0.5455/P<0.0001, and R=0.7638/P=0.0357, respectively). The mean difference in the maximum tumor dimension measured from CTN, ADC, and SUVlb as compared with pathological measurements was −2.1, −0.5, and 0.22 cm, respectively. Conclusion: The radiation-induced change of CTN in pancreas head after chemoradiation therapy of pancreatic cancer was observed, which may be related to treatment responses as assessed by biological imaging and pathology. More data are needed to determine whether the CTN can be used as a quantitative biomarker for response to neoadjuvant therapy

  16. SU-E-J-271: Correlation of CT Number Change with Radiation Treatment Response for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalah, E; Tai, A; Oshima, K; Hall, W; Knechtges, P; Erickson, B; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It has been reported recently that radiation can induce CT number (CTN) change during radiation therapy (RT) delivery. In the effort to explore whether CTN can be used to assess RT response, we analyze the relationship between the pathological treatment response (PTR) and the changes of CTN, MRI, and PET before and after the neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCR) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods: The preand post-nCR CT, MRI, and PET data for a total of 8 patients with resectable, or borderline resectable pancreatic head adenocarcinoma treated with nCR were retrospectively analyzed. Radiographic characteristics were correlated to PTR data. The histograms, means and standard derivations (SD) of the CTNs in pancreatic head (CTNPH), the GTV defined by ADC (CTNGTV), and the rest of pancreatic head (CTNPH-CTNGTV) were compared. Changes before and after nCR were correlated with the corresponding changes of ADC, lean body mass normalized SUV (SUVlb), and PTR using Pearson’ s correlation coefficient test. Results: The average mean and SD in CTPH for all the patients analyzed were higher in post-nCR (53.17 ± 31.05 HU) compared to those at pre-nCR (28.09 ± 4.253 HU). The CTNGTV were generally higher than CTNPH and CTNPH-CTNGTV, though the differences were not significant. The post-nCR changes of mean CTN, ADC, and SUVlb values in pancreatic head were correlated with PTR (R=0.3273/P=0.5357, R=−0.5455/P<0.0001, and R=0.7638/P=0.0357, respectively). The mean difference in the maximum tumor dimension measured from CTN, ADC, and SUVlb as compared with pathological measurements was −2.1, −0.5, and 0.22 cm, respectively. Conclusion: The radiation-induced change of CTN in pancreas head after chemoradiation therapy of pancreatic cancer was observed, which may be related to treatment responses as assessed by biological imaging and pathology. More data are needed to determine whether the CTN can be used as a quantitative biomarker for response to neoadjuvant therapy.

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Tumor Size on CT Scan Versus Pathologic Specimen: Implications for Radiation Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancer primary tumor size measurements are often discordant between computed tomography (CT) and pathologic specimen after resection. Dimensions of the primary tumor are increasingly relevant in an era of highly conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 97 consecutive patients with resected pancreatic cancer at two Boston hospitals. All patients had CT scans before surgical resection. Primary endpoints were maximum dimension (in millimeters) of the primary tumor in any direction as reported by the radiologist on CT and by the pathologist for the resected gross fresh specimen. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings were analyzed if available. Results: Of the patients, 87 (90%) had preoperative CT scans available for review and 46 (47%) had EUS. Among proximal tumors (n = 69), 40 (58%) had pathologic duodenal invasion, which was seen on CT in only 3 cases. The pathologic tumor size was a median of 7 mm larger compared with CT size for the same patient (range, -15 to 43 mm; p < 0.0001), with 73 patients (84%) having a primary tumor larger on pathology than CT. Endoscopic ultrasound was somewhat more accurate, with pathologic tumor size being a median of only 5 mm larger compared with EUS size (range, -15 to 35 mm; p = 0.0003). Conclusions: Computed tomography scans significantly under-represent pancreatic cancer tumor size compared with pathologic specimens in resectable cases. We propose a clinical target volume expansion formula for the primary tumor based on our data. The high rate of pathologic duodenal invasion suggests a risk of duodenal undercoverage with highly conformal radiotherapy.

  18. Adjuvant radiation therapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer: experience with combination of external radiation therapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To review the results of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) combined with high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) for the treatment of endometrial carcinoma. Materials and methods: We retrospectively evaluated 141 patients treated with EBRT and HDR-BT after surgery between January 1993 and January 2001. EBRT was performed with a median dose of 45 Gy, and HDR-BT was performed with a median dose of 24 Gy, with four weekly insertions of 6 Gy. The median age of the patients was 63 years and the disease stage distribution was: CS I (FIGO), 52.4%; CS II, 13.5%; CS III, 29.8%; CS IV, 4.3%. Results: With a median follow-up of 53.7 months, the disease free survival (DFS) at five years was: CS I, 88.0%; CS II, 70.8%; CS III, 55.1%; CS IV, 50.0% (p = 0.0003). Global survival after five years was: CS I, 79.6%; CS II, 74.0%; CS III, 53.6%; CS IV, 100.0% (p = 0.0062). Factors affecting the DFS were histological grade and serous-papillary histology. Recurrence of the disease was observed in 33 cases, 13 (9.2%) of these occurred in the pelvis, vagina or vaginal vault. EBRT + HDR-BT of the vaginal vault allowed disease control in 90.8% of the cases. Conclusion: Radiation therapy is essential for loco-regional control of endometrial cancer and can achieve excellent cure rates in the initial stages. In more advanced stages, therapeutic failure frequently appears as distant metastases suggesting the need for complementary systemic therapy using new treatment modalities, particularly chemotherapy. (author)

  19. Effect of CT-based treatment planning on portal field size and outcome in radiation treatment of localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mens, JWM; Slotman, BJ; Meijer, OWM; Langendijk, HA

    2000-01-01

    The portal field sizes of 361 consecutive patients treated with curative radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer were measured. The introduction of CT-based information resulted in a significant increase of field sizes, leading to an almost doubling of the treated volume, some increase in late re

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery) depends on ...

  1. Can FDG PET predict radiation treatment outcome in head and neck cancer? Results of a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinagl, D.A.X.; Span, P.N.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: In head and neck cancer (HNC) various treatment strategies have been developed to improve outcome, but selecting patients for these intensified treatments remains difficult. Therefore, identification of novel pretreatment assays to predict outcome is of interest. In HNC there are indication

  2. Cancer and electromagnetic radiation therapy: Quo Vadis?

    CERN Document Server

    Makropoulou, Mersini

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, treating cancer with a beam of photons is a well established therapeutic technique, developed over 100 years, and today over 50% of cancer patients will undergo traditional X-ray radiotherapy. However, ionizing radiation therapy is not the only option, as the high-energy photons delivering their cell-killing radiation energy into cancerous tumor can lead to significant damage to healthy tissues surrounding the tumor, located throughout the beam's path. Therefore, in nowadays, advances in ionizing radiation therapy are competitive to non-ionizing ones, as for example the laser light based therapy, resulting in a synergism that has revolutionized medicine. The use of non-invasive or minimally invasive (e.g. through flexible endoscopes) therapeutic procedures in the management of patients represents a very interesting treatment option. Moreover, as the major breakthrough in cancer management is the individualized patient treatment, new biophotonic techniques, e.g. photo-activated drug carriers, help...

  3. Adaptive Radiation for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Gomez

    2011-01-01

    need to spare surrounding critical structures. Evolving radiotherapy technologies, such as four-dimensional (4D image-based motion management, daily on-board imaging and adaptive radiotherapy based on volumetric images over the course of radiotherapy, have enabled us to deliver higher dose to target while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. The image-guided radiotherapy adapted to changes of motion and anatomy has made the radiotherapy more precise and allowed ablative dose delivered to the target using novel treatment approaches such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, and proton therapy in lung cancer, techniques used to be considered very sensitive to motion change. Future clinical trials using real time tracking and biological adaptive radiotherapy based on functional images are proposed.

  4. Treatment of gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Mabilia, Andrea; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically resected gastric cancer patients relapse locally or with distant metastases, or receive the diagnosis of gastric cancer when tumor is disseminated; therefore, median survival rarely exceeds 12 mo, and 5-years survival is less than 10%. Cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, with addition of trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients, is the widely used treatment in stage IV patients fit for chemotherapy. Recent evidence supports the use of second-line chemotherapy after progression in patients with good performance status PMID:24587643

  5. Treatment of high-risk uterine cancer with whole abdominopelvic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcomes in patients with optimally debulked Stage III and IV endometrial adenocarcinoma (ACA) or Stages I-IV uterine papillary serous (UPSC) or clear cell (CCC) carcinoma of the uterus, treated postoperatively with whole abdominopelvic irradiation (WAPI). Methods and Materials: Between 1979 and 1998, 48 patients received postoperative WAPI at our institution. Twenty-two patients had FIGO Stage III or Stage IV ACA and 26 patients had FIGO Stages I-IV UPSC or CCC. The median dose was 30 Gy to the upper abdomen and 49.8 Gy to the pelvis. Mean follow-up was 37 months (2.4-135 months). Results: The 3-year estimated disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates for the entire group were 60% and 77%, respectively. Patients with ACA had 3-year DFS and OS of 79% and 89%, respectively, compared with 47% and 68% in the UPSC/CCC group. Early-stage patients (I and II) with UPSC/CCC had 3-year DFS and OS of 87% compared with 32% and 61% in those with advanced (Stage III and IV) disease. The 3-year actuarial major complication rate was 7%, with no treatment-related deaths. All 4 failures in the ACA group were extra-abdominal and 6 of the 11 in the UPSC/CCC group had an extra-abdominal component. Age and UPSC/CCC histology were significant prognostic factors for DFS and OS. In addition, stage and number of extrauterine sites of disease were significant predictors for DFS in UPSC/CCC. Conclusion: WAPI is a safe, effective treatment for patients with optimally debulked advanced-stage uterine ACA or early-stage UPSC/CCC. Survival was significantly worse in advanced-stage UPSC/CCC patients. We recommend future trials of WAPI with concurrent, or subsequent systemic therapy in patients with advanced-stage UPSC or CCC

  6. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of nightly sildenafil citrate to preserve erectile function after radiation treatment for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common adverse event associated with treatment for prostate cancer. This study aimed to identify whether early, regular use of sildenafil after radiation treatment for prostate cancer is effective at reducing the rate of ED at 2 years. A randomised controlled trial with 27 men planned for radiation treatment for localised prostate cancer recruited from a single radiotherapy centre in Australia. Men were randomised to receive daily sildenafil, or a placebo tablet, for 6 months. The primary end-point was erectile function, as measured by the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) score, at 2-year follow-up. The abridged IIEF-5 survey was also used during the treatment period, and could be derived from the full IIEF at other time-points. Two-sided Student's t-tests and Mann–Whitney U-tests were used for the analysis of continuous outcomes, with Fisher's exact test for dichotomous outcomes. No difference was seen at 2 years in the primary end-point, and IIEF scores did not differ significantly between groups during the study. Men in the sildenafil group exhibited significantly better IIEF-5 scores at 4 weeks (P=0.02) and 6 months (P=0.02). There was no difference in erectile function scores between the two groups throughout the treatment period. No significant difference in adverse events was identified between the two groups. There was no evidence from this trial that sildenafil provides long-term erectile function for patients while on medication. Regular use of sildenafil may improve short-term sexual function for patients while on medication. Larger trials are required to examine the effectiveness of implementing sildenafil for prostate cancer patients undergoing radiation treatment.

  7. Two cases with radiation-induced cancers after radiation therapy for cancer of the maxillary sinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experienced 2 patients with malignant non-epithelial tumors that developed following an incubation stage of 10 years or more after radiation therapy for cancer of the maxillary sinus. In Patient 1, the primary cancer was unclear, but it was speculated that this patient had been treated for cancer of the maxillary sinus. In patient 2, cancer of the maxillary sinus had been treated in our hospital. In patient 1, the secondary cancer was a malignant histiocytoma of the parapharyngeal space. In patient 2, the secondary cancer was a spindle cell sarcoma in the maxillary sinus. According to the classification of the probability of radiation-induced cancer after treatment for malignant tumors, the probability was evaluated as A in Patient 2, and B or higher in Patient 1. In the two patients, radiation-induced cancer was strongly suggested. For treatment, extended surgery was indicated, as a rule. In Patient 1, radical neck dissection was performed. In patient 2, tumorectomy was performed several times. Concerning the prognosis, Patient 1 is alive without cancer, but Patient 2 died of intracranial invasion by tumor. The invasion of the tumor and histological type may have influenced the prognosis. The incidence of radiation-induced cancer is considered to be 1% or less. However, radiation therapy-related late disorder must be considered. (author)

  8. Radiological scenario modeling using the Hotspot code and potential financial impact of treatment of radiation induced cancer to the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work aims to develop a methodology that is able to estimate the financial impact in a radiological emergency events, considering the radiation induced cancer, particularly leukemia. Considering a RDD - Radiological Dispersive Device, consisting of explosives and cesium-137 as radioactive material, a scenario building on the Rio de Janeiro was modeled. The convergence of a risk modeling platform (HotSpot 3.0), the analysis of excess relative risks for humans (BEIR V-Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation V), considering scenarios composed of contaminated areas, are secondary goals

  9. Relationship between prostate volume changes and treatment duration of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation during intensity-modulated radiation therapy for Japanese patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomida, Masashi; Okudaira, Kuniyasu; Kamomae, Takeshi; Oguchi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Yoshikazu; Yoneda, Kazuo; Itoh, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    The application of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (NAD) in prostate cancer leads to a reduction in prostate volume, and the trends in volume reduction differ according to the treatment duration of NAD. A reduction in volume during external beam radiation therapy may lead to the exposure of normal tissues to an unexpected dose. In fact, prostate volume reductions have primarily been reported in European and American institutions. Although the prostate volume of Japanese patients is known to be small, the trends in prostate volume change during radiation therapy remain unclear. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the changes in prostate volume of Japanese patients during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with NAD. Nineteen Japanese patients with prostate cancer underwent IMRT with NAD. Kilovoltage computed tomography (CT) images were obtained for treatment planning and verification of the treatment position for each treatment fraction. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the duration of NAD, as follows: NAD prostate volume reductions at the 36th treatment fraction, relative to the planning CT, were 7.8%, 2.0%, and 1.7% for the S-NAD, M-NAD, and L-NAD groups, respectively. Prostate volume shrunk greater in the S-NAD group than in the M-NAD and L-NAD groups; this finding was consistent with those of previous studies. The prostate volume changes in Japanese patients were smaller compared to those in European and American patients. PMID:27578915

  10. Factors related to late GI and GU complications in conformal and conventional radiation treatment of cancer of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the factors that predict for late GI and GU morbidity in radiation treatment of the prostate. Materials and Methods: Six hundred sixteen consecutive prostate cancer patients treated between 1985 and 1994 with conformal or conventional techniques were included in the analysis. All patients had at least 3 months followup (median 26 months) and received at least 65 Gy. Late GI morbidity was rectal bleeding (requiring more than 2 procedures) or proctitis. Late GU morbidity was cystitis or stricture. Univariate analysis compared the differences in the incidence of RTOG-EORTC grade 3 and 4 late morbidity by age (<60 versus ≥ 60 years), peracute side effects ≥ grade 1 (during treatment), subacute side effects ≥ grade 1 (0 to 90 days after treatment), irradiated volume parameters, and dose. Multivariate proportional hazards analysis includes these same variables in a model of time to complication. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze incidence of peracute and subacute GI and GU side effects by GI and GU comorbidities, performance status, pretreatment procedures (biopsy, TURP, etc.), age, treatment volume parameters, and peracute responses. Results: Peracute GI and GU side effects were noted in 441 and 442 patients, respectively. Subacute GI and GU side effects were noted in 34 and 54 patients, respectively. Subacute GI side effects were highly correlated with subacute GU side effects (p<0.00001). Late morbidities were not correlated with peracute side effects but were correlated with subacute side effects (both GI and GU). Thirteen of the 616 patients expressed grade 3 or 4 GI injuries 3 to 32 months after the end of treatment, with a mean of 13 months. The 6 GU morbidities occurred significantly later (9 - 52 months) with a mean of 33 months. Central axis dose and age less than 60 years were the only independent variables significantly related to the incidence of late GI morbidity on multivariate analysis. Subacute and peracute

  11. Radiation treatment of keloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme of external beam therapy with different schedules for the treatment of keloid has been presented. The basic correlation of activity of the Keloid, as the guidelines of alloting a schedule appears reasonable in this regional experience. The combination with surgery and intratumoral drug application is not included in this study, nor the brachytherapy used in the clinical material. It is suggested that further observations on the activity of fibroblasts morphologically and the exploration of the dose-fractionation would open up newer dimension in the radiation treatment of keloid. (auth.)

  12. Nanotechnology for cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Gmeiner, William H.; Ghosh, Supratim

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the potential to increase the selectivity and potency of chemical, physical, and biological approaches for eliciting cancer cell death while minimizing collateral toxicity to nonmalignant cells. Materials on the nanoscale are increasingly being targeted to cancer cells with great specificity through both active and passive targeting. In this review, we summarize recent literature that has broken new ground in the use of nanotechnology for cancer treatment with an emphasis o...

  13. Evaluation of Rotational Errors in Treatment Setup of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Liver Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of rotational setup errors in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment of liver tumors and to investigate whether translational shifts can compensate for rotation. Methods and Materials: The positioning accuracy in 20 patients with liver malignancies treated with SBRT was reevaluated offline by matching the patients' cone-beam computed tomography (CT) scans (n=75) to the planning CT scans and adjusting the 3 rotational angles (pitch, roll, and yaw). Systematic and random setup errors were calculated. The dosimetric changes caused by rotational setup errors were quantified for both simulated and observed patient rotations. Dose distributions recalculated on the rotated CT scans were compared with the original planned doses. Translational corrections were simulated based on manual translational registration of the rotated images to the original CT scans. The correction efficacy was evaluated by comparing the recalculated plans with the original plans. Results: The systematic rotational setup errors were −0.06° ± 0.68°, −0.29° ± 0.62°, and −0.24° ± 0.61°; the random setup errors were 0.80°, 1.05°, and 0.61° for pitch, roll, and yaw, respectively. Analysis of CBCT images showed that 56.0%, 14.7%, and 1.3% of treated fractions had rotational errors of >1°, >2°, and >3°, respectively, in any one of the rotational axes. Rotational simulations demonstrated that the reduction of gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage was <2% when rotation was <3°. Recalculated plans using actual patient roll motions showed similar reduction (<2%) in GTV coverage. Translational corrections improved the GTV coverage to within 3% of the original values. For organs at risk (OAR), the dosimetric impact varied case by case. Conclusion: Actual rotational setup errors in SBRT for liver tumors are relatively small in magnitude and are unlikely to affect GTV coverage significantly. Translational corrections can be optimized to

  14. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities in long-term survivors of childhood cancer: effects of treatment with chemotherapy and radiation to the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, N.; Toth, B.B.; Hoar, R.E.; Ried, H.L.; Sullivan, M.P.; McNeese, M.D.

    1984-06-01

    Sixty-eight long-term survivors of childhood cancer were evaluated for dental and maxillofacial abnormalities. Forty-five patients had received maxillofacial radiation for lymphoma, leukemia, rhabdomyosarcoma, and miscellaneous tumors. Forty-three of the 45 patients and the remaining 23 who had not received maxillofacial radiation also received chemotherapy. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities were detected in 37 of the 45 (82%) radiated patients. Dental abnormalities comprised foreshortening and blunting of roots, incomplete calcification, premature closure of apices, delayed or arrested tooth development, and caries. Maxillofacial abnormalities comprised trismus, abnormal occlusal relationships, and facial deformities. The abnormalities were more severe in those patients who received radiation at an earlier age and at higher dosages. Possible chemotherapeutic effects in five of 23 patients who received treatment for tumors located outside the head and neck region comprised acquired amelogenesis imperfecta, microdontia of bicuspid teeth, and a tendency toward thinning of roots with an enlarged pulp chamber. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities should be recognized as a major consequence of maxillofacial radiation in long-term survivors of childhood cancer, and attempts to minimize or eliminate such sequelae should involve an effective interaction between radiation therapists, and medical and dental oncologists.

  15. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities in long-term survivors of childhood cancer: effects of treatment with chemotherapy and radiation to the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty-eight long-term survivors of childhood cancer were evaluated for dental and maxillofacial abnormalities. Forty-five patients had received maxillofacial radiation for lymphoma, leukemia, rhabdomyosarcoma, and miscellaneous tumors. Forty-three of the 45 patients and the remaining 23 who had not received maxillofacial radiation also received chemotherapy. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities were detected in 37 of the 45 (82%) radiated patients. Dental abnormalities comprised foreshortening and blunting of roots, incomplete calcification, premature closure of apices, delayed or arrested tooth development, and caries. Maxillofacial abnormalities comprised trismus, abnormal occlusal relationships, and facial deformities. The abnormalities were more severe in those patients who received radiation at an earlier age and at higher dosages. Possible chemotherapeutic effects in five of 23 patients who received treatment for tumors located outside the head and neck region comprised acquired amelogenesis imperfecta, microdontia of bicuspid teeth, and a tendency toward thinning of roots with an enlarged pulp chamber. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities should be recognized as a major consequence of maxillofacial radiation in long-term survivors of childhood cancer, and attempts to minimize or eliminate such sequelae should involve an effective interaction between radiation therapists, and medical and dental oncologists

  16. After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grains, and a moderate amount of low-fat meat and dairy products. Limit the fat and sugar in your diet. A healthy diet will help your body get better after cancer treatment. It's also important for you to get ...

  17. Lasers in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are used in cancer treatment? What are the advantages of laser therapy? What are the disadvantages of ... the drugs used in PDT. What are the advantages of laser therapy? Lasers are more precise than ...

  18. Radiation treatment of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report deals with an estimation of the volume of radiation treatment of benign diseases in Norway and gives a survey of the subjective opinion of patients regarding the result of the treatment. Reported subjective recovery after radiation treatment seems to be at the same level as recovery without treatment. For an indication of the objective effect of radiation treatment of benign diseases, the subjective effect of this treatment has to be compared with objective findings

  19. Does electron and proton therapy reduce the risk of radiation induced cancer after spinal irradiation for childhood medulloblastoma? A comparative treatment planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiangkui Mu; Zackrisson, Bjoern [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Sciences; Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas; Johansson, Lennart; Karlsson, Mikael [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe [DKFZ-Heidelberg, (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics; Johansson, Karl-Axel [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiation Physics; Gagliardi, Giovanna [Radiumhemmet, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Hospital Physics

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this treatment planning comparison study was to explore different spinal irradiation techniques with respect to the risk of late side-effects, particularly radiation-induced cancer. The radiotherapy techniques compared were conventional photon therapy, intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT), conventional electron therapy, intensity/energy modulated electron therapy (IMET) and proton therapy (IMPT). CT images for radiotherapy use from five children, median age 8 and diagnosed with medulloblastoma, were selected for this study. Target volumes and organs at risk were defined in 3-D. Treatment plans using conventional photon therapy, IMXT, conventional electron therapy, IMET and IMPT were set up. The probability of normal tissue complication (NTCP) and the risk of cancer induction were calculated using models with parameters-sets taken from published data for the general population; dose data were taken from dose volume histograms (DVH). Similar dose distributions in the targets were achieved with all techniques but the absorbed doses in the organs-at-risk varied significantly between the different techniques. The NTCP models based on available data predicted very low probabilities for side-effects in all cases. However, the effective mean doses outside the target volumes, and thus the predicted risk of cancer induction, varied significantly between the techniques. The highest lifetime risk of secondary cancers was estimated for IMXT (30%). The lowest risk was found with IMPT (4%). The risks associated with conventional photon therapy, electron therapy and IMET were 20%, 21% and 15%, respectively. This model study shows that spinal irradiation of young children with photon and electron techniques results in a substantial risk of radiation-induced secondary cancers. Multiple beam IMXT seems to be associated with a particularly high risk of secondary cancer induction. To minimise this risk, IMPT should be the treatment of choice. If proton therapy is not

  20. Breast cancer biology for the radiation oncologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first textbook of its kind devoted to describing the biological complexities of breast cancer in a way that is relevant to the radiation oncologist. Radiation Oncology has long treated breast cancer as a single biological entity, with all treatment decisions being based on clinical and pathologic risk factors. We are now beginning to understand that biological subtypes of breast cancer may have different risks of recurrence as well as different intrinsic sensitivity to radiotherapy. Multi-gene arrays that have for years been used to predict the risk of distant recurrence and the value of systemic chemotherapy may also have utility in predicting the risk of local recurrence. Additionally, the targeted agents used to treat breast cancer may interact with radiotherapy in ways that can be beneficial or undesirable. All of these emerging issues are extensively discussed in this book, and practical evidence-based treatment recommendations are presented whenever possible.

  1. Breast cancer biology for the radiation oncologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Jonathan [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Small, William [Loyola Univ. Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States). Stritch School of Medicine, Cardianl Bernardin Cancer Center; Woloschak, Gayle E. (ed.) [Northwestern Univ. Feinberg, Chicago, IL (United States). School of Medicine

    2015-10-01

    This is the first textbook of its kind devoted to describing the biological complexities of breast cancer in a way that is relevant to the radiation oncologist. Radiation Oncology has long treated breast cancer as a single biological entity, with all treatment decisions being based on clinical and pathologic risk factors. We are now beginning to understand that biological subtypes of breast cancer may have different risks of recurrence as well as different intrinsic sensitivity to radiotherapy. Multi-gene arrays that have for years been used to predict the risk of distant recurrence and the value of systemic chemotherapy may also have utility in predicting the risk of local recurrence. Additionally, the targeted agents used to treat breast cancer may interact with radiotherapy in ways that can be beneficial or undesirable. All of these emerging issues are extensively discussed in this book, and practical evidence-based treatment recommendations are presented whenever possible.

  2. Encounters in cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2014-01-01

    Based on extensive ethnographic material from in-depth interviews with Danish cancer patients after treatment, this study analyzes their stories to explore how interactions with the physician configures and situates a need for rehabilitation. We identify three themes in the illness stories: (1...... this encounter. The significance of the social encounters in cancer treatment is elucidated through this analysis, and we demonstrate how the need for recognition of the complex effects of cancer on one's life is central to counter experiences of objectification and dehumanization....

  3. Treatment planning study comparing proton therapy, RapidArc and intensity modulated radiation therapy for a synchronous bilateral lung cancer case

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh Rana; Shyam Pokharel; Yuanshui Zheng; Li Zhao; Dina Risalvato; Carlos Vargas; Nancy Cersonsky

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to perform a treatment planning study on a synchronous bilateral non-small cell lung cancer case using three treatment modalities: uniform scanning proton therapy, RapidArc, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: The maximum intensity projection (MIP) images obtained from the 4 dimensional-computed tomography (4DCT) scans were used for delineation of tumor volumes in the left and right lungs. The average 4D-CT was used for the tre...

  4. Pretreatment Staging Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Patients With Inflammatory Breast Cancer Influences Radiation Treatment Field Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasingly being utilized for staging of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The purpose of this study was to define how pretreatment PET/CT studies affected postmastectomy radiation treatment (PMRT) planning decisions for IBC. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 62 patients diagnosed with IBC between 2004 and 2009, who were treated with PMRT in our institution and who had a staging PET/CT within 3 months of diagnosis. Patients received a baseline physical examination, staging mammography, ultrasonographic examination of breast and draining lymphatics, and chest radiography; most patients also had a bone scan (55 patients), liver imaging (52 patients), breast MRI (46 patients), and chest CT (25 patients). We compared how PET/CT findings affected PMRT, assuming that standard PMRT would target the chest wall, level III axilla, supraclavicular fossa, and internal mammary chain (IMC). Any modification of target volumes, field borders, or dose prescriptions was considered a change. Results: PET/CT detected new areas of disease in 27 of the 62 patients (44%). The areas of additional disease included the breast (1 patient), ipsilateral axilla (1 patient), ipsilateral supraclavicular (4 patients), ipsilateral infraclavicular (1 patient), ipsilateral IMC (5 patients), ipsilateral subpectoral (3 patients), mediastinal (8 patients), other distant/contralateral lymph nodes (15 patients), or bone (6 patients). One patient was found to have a non-breast second primary tumor. The findings of the PET/CT led to changes in PMRT in 11 of 62 patients (17.7%). These changes included additional fields in 5 patients, adjustment of fields in 2 patients, and higher doses to the supraclavicular fossa (2 patients) and IMC (5 patients). Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed IBC, pretreatment PET/CT provides important information concerning involvement of locoregional lymph nodes

  5. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones Vaccine treatment for prostate cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  6. Antimatter cancer treatment

    CERN Multimedia

    Van Noorden, Richard

    2006-01-01

    "The idea that antimatter beams could treat cancer might seem ridiculous. But researchers working at Cerns particle accelerator laboratory in Geneva don't think so. They have just reported a successful first experiment into the biological effects of antiprotons radiation on living cells."

  7. Radiation treatment of polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural changes in polypropylene resulting from high energy electron beam irradiation have been examined. Polymer irradiated in a nitrogen atmosphere is characterized as containing long chain branch structures. A branching index, defined as the ratio of intrinsic viscosity of irradiated polymer to the intrinsic viscosity of linear polymer of equivalent molecular weight, is used to quantify the extent of branching. Polymer crystallization and solution properties undergo significant changes as a result of radiation treatment. Treated polypropylene is highly nucleated. Nucleation density is several orders of magnitude greater than linear polypropylene. Temperature rising elution fractionation (TREF) indicates that the long-chain branched structure contributes to increasing the solubility of polypropylene without greatly reducing the crystallizability and melting point of the solubilized fractions. The presence of long chain branching has a pronounced effect on the polymers extensional rheology in the molten state. Radiation treated polymer exhibits strain hardening elongational viscosity

  8. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy with Noncoplanar Beams for Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Patients with Bilateral Hip Prosthesis-A Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megavoltage photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is typically used in the treatment of prostate cancer at our institution. Approximately 1% to 2% of patients with prostate cancer have hip prostheses. The presence of the prosthesis usually complicates the planning process because of dose perturbation around the prosthesis, radiation attenuation through the prosthesis, and the introduction of computed tomography artifacts in the planning volume. In addition, hip prostheses are typically made of materials of high atomic number, which add uncertainty to the dosimetry of the prostate and critical organs in the planning volume. When the prosthesis is bilateral, treatment planning is further complicated because only a limited number of beam angles can be used to avoid the prostheses. In this case study, we will report the observed advantages of using noncoplanar beams in the delivery of IMRT to a prostate cancer patient with bilateral hip prostheses. The treatment was planned for 75.6 Gy using a 7-field coplanar approach and a noncoplanar arrangement, with all fields avoiding entrance though the prostheses. Our results indicate that, compared with the coplanar plan, the noncoplanar plan delivers the prescribed dose to the target with a slightly better conformality and sparing of rectal tissue versus the coplanar plan.

  9. Radiation-induced cancer in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Shoji; Sekizuka, Eiichi [National Saitama Hospital, Wako (Japan); Yamashita, Hisao [Keio Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Takami, Akira [Yamawaki Coll., Tokyo (Japan); Kubo, Atsushi [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-12-01

    , and cancer of the skin, oral cavity, rectum, and pharynx. Of the secondary malignant tumors considered to have been induced by radiation, tumors developing in patients with uterine cancer were the most frequent, followed by tumors in patients with tumors of the breast, larynx, and pharynx. A correlation between primary malignant tumors and secondary malignant tumors was seen in the following: oral cavity and oral cavity (13); larynx and larynx (8); larynx and pharynx (7); maxilla and maxilla (6); breast and soft tissue (9), skin (7), and esophagus (6); uterus and soft tissue (26), rectum (13), vagina (8), and external genitalia (skin, 7). Among malignancies of the head and neck, the highest O/E ratio was for cancer of the pharynx (9.5), followed by cancer of the tongue (5.4) and soft tissue (4.8). In the chest, the ratio for soft tissue tumors was 15.5 and that for skin cancer was 5.1. In the abdomen, the ratio was highest for vaginal cancer (30.3) followed by soft tissue tumors (28.6) and skin cancer (3.5). The O/E ratios of cancer of the rectum and of the bladder were almost the same (1.1 and 1.2, respectively). Overall, the number of radiation treatments applied for benign disease decreased during the period of the survey, while the number applied for malignant tumors increased markedly. The incidence of secondary malignant tumors following radiation therapy was lower among patients with malignant tumors than with benign disease, although much larger doses of radiation were administered to the former than the latter. The authors concluded that radiation therapy for benign tumors should be considered very carefully and that radiation to malignant tumors should be managed with due consideration to tumor site, patient age, and radiation dosage. (K.H.)

  10. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  11. Physical treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trend of physical treatment and its outcome of lung cancer are described together with authors' experience. In locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCC) at stages IIIA and B, radiotherapy, chemotherapy (CT) and their combined therapy (RCT) have been major mainly in US since 1980s. After phase I/II trials of RCT by Okayama Lung Cancer Study Group where 5-year survival with nondisease is shown to be 31% (2003), phase III trial has been performed with results to be reported in 2008. A similar study by West Japan Oncology Group is now in summary. The secondary carcinogenesis not by radiation post RCT has become a problem: 10 years after, reportedly 61% incidence. Concerning the choice and regimen of CT medicals, there are many discussions. In recurrent/advanced NSCC, inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) (gefitinib and recently, erlotinib) will be further useful, and molecular target medicals like an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody (bevacizumab) and other novel RTK inhibitors will be also promising. In small cell lung cancer (SCC), efficacy 50% of amrubicin has been reported in a phase II trial recently. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in the extensive cases has been recognized effective also recently. CT studies with a large dose of anti-cancer drugs of SCC are still under progress. Along with the introduction of many molecular target drugs, physical treatment of lung cancer is to be bright in future. (R.T.)

  12. Sodium butyrate enemas in the treatment of acute radiation-induced proctitis in patients with prostate cancer and the impact on late proctitis. A prospective evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hille, Andrea; Herrmann, Markus K.A.; Kertesz, Tereza; Christiansen, Hans; Hermann, Robert M.; Hess, Clemens F. [University Hospital, Goettingen (Germany). Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Pradier, Olivier [University Hospital, Brest (France). Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Schmidberger, Heinz [University Hospital, Mainz (Germany). Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate prospectively the effect of sodium butyrate enemas on the treatment of acute and the potential influence on late radiation-induced proctitis. 31 patients had been treated with sodium butyrate enemas for radiation-induced acute grade II proctitis which had developed after 40 Gy in median. During irradiation the toxicity was evaluated weekly by the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and subsequently yearly by the RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) and LENT-SOMA scale. 23 of 31 patients (74%) experienced a decrease of CTC grade within 8 days on median. A statistical significant difference between the incidence and the severity of proctitis before start of treatment with sodium butyrate enemas compared to 14 days later and compared to the end of irradiation treatment course, respectively, was found. The median follow-up was 50 months. Twenty patients were recorded as suffering from no late proctitis symptom. Eleven patients suffered from grade I and 2 of these patients from grade II toxicity, too. No correlation was seen between the efficacy of butyrate enemas on acute proctitis and prevention or development of late toxicity, respectively. Sodium butyrate enemas are effective in the treatment of acute radiation-induced proctitis in patients with prostate cancer but have no impact on the incidence and severity of late proctitis. (orig.)

  13. Supportive treatment in weight-losing cancer patients due to the additive adverse effects of radiation treatment and/or chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reversal of anorexia and weight loss especially in patients with advanced cancer suffering from radiation treatment (RT) -related complications and debilitated further during RT would be a welcome relief. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of supportive treatment with megestrol acetate (MA) in the weight-losing cancer patients increasingly experiencing anorexia, smell, taste, and weight loss due to the additive adverse effects of RT plus or minus chemotherapy and how MA changes the additive role of the severity of RT reactions on such patients. From June 1997 to October 1998, 100 eligible patients were enrolled on a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Of the 100 patients, 46 received MA during RT and 4 after the end of the RT, and 50 received placebo for 3 months. Subjective parameters were assessed by a brief questionnaire form based on scoring from 1 to 5, according to the degree of the loss or change for each parameter of malnutrition, appetite, taste and smell developed by the researchers. At the end of the study a statistically significant weight gain was achieved in the patient group receiving MA compared to the placebo group (+ 3 to + 5 kg versus -3.7 to -5.9 kg, p=0.000). Significant improvements were seen in performance status p=0.000), appetite (p=0.000), malnutrition (p=0.000), loss of taste (p=0.000) and smell qualities (p=0.02) in the MA group compared to the placebo group. In the MA group there was no statistically significant difference related to the weight changes according to the grade of either the acute or late RT effects (p=0.65 and 0.07, respectively). Whereas, in the placebo group a statistically significant additive effect of the acute and late RT effects was detected on weight loss (p=0.008 and 0.007, respectively). It was observed no side-effects of MA in a 3-month time follow-up. The use of MA 480 mg/day during RT was effective in reversing anorexia and weight loss in spite of the acute RT effects, and

  14. Supportive treatment in weight-losing cancer patients due to the additive adverse effects of radiation treatment and/or chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkurt, E.; Tunali, C. [Cukurova University Medical Faculty, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Balcali-Adana (Turkey); Erkisi, M. [Cukurova University Medical Faculty, Dept. of Medical Oncology (Turkey)

    2000-12-01

    The reversal of anorexia and weight loss especially in patients with advanced cancer suffering from radiation treatment (RT) -related complications and debilitated further during RT would be a welcome relief. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of supportive treatment with megestrol acetate (MA) in the weight-losing cancer patients increasingly experiencing anorexia, smell, taste, and weight loss due to the additive adverse effects of RT plus or minus chemotherapy and how MA changes the additive role of the severity of RT reactions on such patients. >From June 1997 to October 1998, 100 eligible patients were enrolled on a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Of the 100 patients, 46 received MA during RT and 4 after the end of the RT, and 50 received placebo for 3 months. Subjective parameters were assessed by a brief questionnaire form based on scoring from 1 to 5, according to the degree of the loss or change for each parameter of malnutrition, appetite, taste and smell developed by the researchers. At the end of the study a statistically significant weight gain was achieved in the patient group receiving MA compared to the placebo group (+ 3 to + 5 kg versus -3.7 to -5.9 kg, p=0.000). Significant improvements were seen in performance status (p=0.000), appetite (p=0.000), malnutrition (p=0.000), loss of taste (p=0.000) and smell qualities (p=0.02) in the MA group compared to the placebo group. In the MA group there was no statistically significant difference related to the weight changes according to the grade of either the acute or late RT effects (p=0.65 and 0.07, respectively). Whereas, in the placebo group a statistically significant additive effect of the acute and late RT effects was detected on weight loss (p=0.008 and 0.007, respectively). It was observed no side-effects of MA in a 3-month time follow-up. The use of MA 480 mg/day during RT was effective in reversing anorexia and weight loss in spite of the acute RT effects

  15. Tumor marker CYFRA 21-1 in assessment of radiation treatment efficacy at local non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of radiation therapy (RT) at various fractionation modes with Etopiside and Cysplatin modification in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are analyzed. The objective effect of accelerated RT was accompanied by statistically significant reduction of blood serum CYFRA 21-1 level (an index of proteolytic tumor degradation). It was established that the dynamics of blood serum CYFRA 21-1 expression coincided with the clinical findings and could be used for prognosis and monitoring of chemoradiation therapy efficacy in patients with NSCLC.

  16. Acupuncture for radiation or combined treatment induced edema in arms and legs of breast and cervical cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acupuncture was carried out in 141 sufferers from delayed radiation injuries to skin and soft tissues. 122 patients (86%) revealed clinical manifestations of edema of varying gravity in arms and legs, while 19 (14%) suffered radiation-induced neufritis or plexitis unaccompanied by edema. Radionuclide and rheographic studies as well as evaluation of hemostatic function showed acupuncture to be an effective treatment for edema and pain. it also improved lymph flow, rheovasographic indexes and normalized hemostasis. The best results were obtained in cases of stage 1-2 edema

  17. Assessment of the Radiation-Equivalent of Chemotherapy Contributions in 1-Phase Radio-chemotherapy Treatment of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate the radiation equivalent of the chemotherapy contribution to observed complete response rates in published results of 1-phase radio-chemotherapy of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: A standard logistic dose–response curve was fitted to data from radiation therapy-alone trials and then used as the platform from which to quantify the chemotherapy contribution in 1-phase radio-chemotherapy trials. Two possible mechanisms of chemotherapy effect were assumed (1) a fixed radiation-independent contribution to local control; or (2) a fixed degree of chemotherapy-induced radiosensitization. A combination of both mechanisms was also considered. Results: The respective best-fit values of the independent chemotherapy-induced complete response (CCR) and radiosensitization (s) coefficients were 0.40 (95% confidence interval −0.07 to 0.87) and 1.30 (95% confidence interval 0.86-1.70). Independent chemotherapy effect was slightly favored by the analysis, and the derived CCR value was consistent with reports of pathologic complete response rates seen in neoadjuvant chemotherapy-alone treatments of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The radiation equivalent of the CCR was 36.3 Gy. Conclusion: Although the data points in the analyzed radio-chemotherapy studies are widely dispersed (largely on account of the diverse range of chemotherapy schedules used), it is nonetheless possible to fit plausible-looking response curves. The methodology used here is based on a standard technique for analyzing dose-response in radiation therapy-alone studies and is capable of application to other mixed-modality treatment combinations involving radiation therapy

  18. Intestinal microflora in patients with cancer of the pancreas and duodenal papilla in the combined treatment using intensive gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes were examined in the microbiocenosis of the intestine of 26 patients with cancer of the pancreas and duodenal papilla, in 19 of them at stages of combined treatment. The frequency of dybacteriosis during admission to the clinic was 92.3%. The characteristic feature of postirradiation dysbacterioses was an increase of escherichiae, appearance of hemolysin-producing forms of bacteriae and ''variegated'' composition of microbes

  19. Early results of prostate cancer radiation therapy: an analysis with emphasis on research strategies to improve treatment delivery and outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is scant data regarding disease presentation and treatment response among black men living in Africa. In this study we evaluate disease presentation and early clinical outcomes among Ghanaian men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). A total of 379 men with prostate cancer were referred to the National Center for Radiotherapy, Ghana from 2003 to 2009. Data were collected regarding patient-and tumor-related factors such as age, prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score (GS), clinical stage (T), and use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). For patients who received EBRT, freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF) was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Of 379 patients referred for treatment 69.6% had initial PSA (iPSA) > 20 ng/ml, and median iPSA was 39.0 ng/ml. A total of 128 men, representing 33.8% of the overall cohort, were diagnosed with metastatic disease at time of referral. Among patients with at least 2 years of follow-up after EBRT treatment (n=52; median follow-up time: 38.9 months), 3- and 5-year actuarial FFbF was 73.8% and 65.1% respectively. There was significant association between higher iPSA and GS (8–10 vs. ≤7, p < 0.001), and T stage (T3/4 vs. T1/2, p < 0.001). This is the largest series reporting on outcomes after prostate cancer treatment in West Africa. That one-third of patients presented with metastatic disease suggests potential need for earlier detection to permit curative-intent therapy. Data from this study will aid in the strategic development of prostate cancer research roadmap in Ghana

  20. Management of neuropathic pain following treatment for breast cancer in the absence of recurrence: a challenge for the radiation oncologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews various management options for treatment-induced neuropathic pain in breast cancer. First-line options include tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsant drugs. Opioids should be prescribed according to published guidelines. Second-line treatments include lignocaine, mexiletine and ketamine. Sympatholytic therapies are available to patients with features of chronic regional pain syndrome. Anti-inflammatory agents are used for neurogenic inflammation. Surgical interventions are considered for refractory neuropathic pain. Interdisciplinary management is appropriate when persisting pain causes physical and psychosocial disabilities. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  1. Hazard of the radiation induced thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level of thyroid cancer in Belarus before Chernobyl accident was low and made in different age and sex groups 0,03-2,5 (male) and 0,1-3,9 (female) per 100000 correspondingly. Different risk factors, which can influence the thyroid cancer development, are being taken into account. They are the factors of environment (strong external irradiation, long-time irradiation for medical purposes or in result of disaster), endo gen factors (hormonal, reproductive, genetic predisposition), some medicinal preparations and other. The protective effect of vegetable and fish consumption was found out. Among the factors of thyroid cancer development one of the most important is radiation. There is a point of view, which assumes that one of the reasons of thyroid cancer cases increase among the population of developed countries is increase of radiation induced thyroid cancer. The results of first research testify the influence of radiation factor on thyroid cancer development. During the period 1920 -1960 in the USA X-ray therapy was applied for the treatment of different good-quality diseases. Thyroid got in the zone of irradiation during the complex treatment with using of radiation. The results of the research of 1970 revealed that 70% of children with thyroid cancer were exposed to radiation in children's age. The subsequent researches of by-effects from the side of a thyroid at beam therapy of various diseases alongside with the results of the estimation of consequences of inhabitants of Hiroshima and Nagasaki irradiation owing to nuclear bombardment have shown the influence of irradiation of a thyroid on cancer development. High quantity of radio-epidemiological researches was directed to the studying of the consequences of thyroid external irradiation at young age. In all carried out researches the quantity of observed thyroid cancer cases among irradiated people has exceeded number of expected. The influence of thyroid internal irradiation by I-131 at young age was

  2. Nanotechnology in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironidou-Tzouveleki, Maria; Imprialos, Konstantinos; Kintsakis, Athanasios

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current evolutions on nanotechnology and its applications on cancer theragnostics.Rapid advances and emerging technologies in nanotechnology are having a profound impact on cancer treatment. Applications of nanotechnology, which include liposomes, nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, nanocantilever, carbon nanotubes and quantum dots have significantly revolutionized cancer theragnostics. From a pharmaceutical viewpoint, it is critical that the biodistribution of active agents has to be controlled as much as possible. This aspect is vital in order to assure the proper efficiency and safety of the anticancer agents. These biocompatible nanocomposites provide specific biochemical interactions with receptors expressed on the surface of cancer cells. With passive or active targeting strategies, an increased intracellular concentration of drugs can be achieved in cancer cells , while normal cells are being protected from the drug simultaneously. Thus, nanotechnology restricts the extent of the adverse effects of the anticancer therapy. Treatment for metastatic breast cancer, sarcoma in AIDS patients, ovarian and lung cancer is already on market or under final phases of many clinical trials, showing remarkable results. As nanotechnology is perfected, side effects due to normal cell damage will decrease, leading to better results and lengthening patient's survival.

  3. Accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy compared to conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While conventionally fractionated radiation therapy alone is an acceptable option for poor prognostic patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC, we hypothesized that accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy will have similar efficacy without increasing toxicity. This is a retrospective analysis of 300 patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC treated between 1993 and 2009. Patients included in the study were medically or surgically inoperable, were free of metastatic disease at initial workup and did not receive concurrent chemotherapy. Patients were categorized into three groups. Group 1 received 45 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks (Accelerated Radiotherapy (ACRT)) while group 2 received 60-63 Gy (Standard Radiation Therapy 1 (STRT1)) and group 3 received > 63 Gy (Standard Radiation Therapy (STRT2)). There were 119 (39.7%) patients in the ACRT group, 90 (30.0%) in STRT1 and 91 (30.3%) in STRT2. More patients in the ACRT group had KPS ≤ 60 (p < 0.001), more commonly presented with weight loss > 5% (p = 0.002), and had stage 3B disease (p < 0.001). After adjusting for clinical variables, there were no differences in the radiation groups in terms of the patterns of local or distant tumor control or overall survival. Some benefit in relapse free survival was seen in the STRT1 group as compared to ACRT (HR = 0.65, p = 0.011). Acute toxicity profiles in the ACRT were significantly lower for grade ≥ 2 radiation dermatitis (p = 0.002), nausea/vomiting (p = 0.022), and weight loss during treatment (p = 0.020). Despite the limitations of a retrospective analysis, our experience of accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy with 45 Gy in 15 fractions appears to be an acceptable treatment option for poor performance status patients with stage III inoperable tumors. Such a treatment regimen (or higher doses in 15 fractions) should be prospectively evaluated using modern radiation technologies with the addition of sequential high dose chemotherapy in stage III NSCLC

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  5. The rush to judgment: does the evidence support the enthusiasm over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and dose escalation in the treatment of prostate cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To discuss the assumptions behind and current clinical evidence on three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and dose escalation in the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: We first define 3D-CRT in comparison to standard radiation therapy and discuss the assumptions on which the technology of 3D-CRT and dose escalation are based. We then examine the evidence on the benefits and limitations from the current most commonly cited studies on dose-escalation trials to treat prostate cancer. Results: The assumption that 3D-CRT can provide a tighter margin around the tumor area to allow for dose escalation is not yet proven by studies that show continual difficulty in defining the planning treatment volume because of extrinsic and intrinsic difficulties, such as imaging variabilities and patient and organ movement. Current short-term dose-escalation studies on the use of 3D-CRT to treat prostate cancer are limited in their ability to prove that increasing dose improves survival and does not incur potential long-term complications to normal tissue. Conclusion: Although 3D-CRT is a promising technology that many radiation oncologists and clinics are quickly adopting to treat such tumors as prostate cancer, the long-term evidence on the benefits and limitations of this technology is still lacking. Until we have solid long-term evidence on the true clinical potential of this new technology, let us not rush to judgment, but exercise caution, diligence, and thoughtfulness in using this new technology to treat our patients

  6. A comparative study between the effectiveness of chemoendocrine therapy and chemoendocrine therapy combined with radiation for the treatment of advanced and/or recurrent breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The members of the Surgical and Radiation Oncology Group for Breast Cancers have conducted a controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of chemoendocrine therapy alone or combined with radiotherapy for advanced and/or recurrent breast cancers. The subjects were divided into two groups, based on the therapeutic regimen: Group A, 18 lesions, received an alternating TAM/MPA plus 5-FU chemotherapy, and Group B, 15 lesions, received this same chemoendocrine therapy combined with radiation (45 to 60 Gy for 4 to 6 weeks). In Group A, 4 out of 18 lesions (22.2%) responsed to the treatment, whereas in Group B, 10 out of 15 (66.7%) responded to the treatment (p=0.0265). Further, in Group A, only 2 lesions (11.1%) achieved a complete remission (CR), whereas in Group B, 9 lesions (60%) achieved a CR (p=0.0094). The incidence of leukopenia, however, was higher in Group B, but this did not affect the continuance of therapy. It was thus concluded that the combined therapy was more effective and contributed to the improvement of a greater number of the advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer cases. (author)

  7. Effective treatment of the brachial plexus syndrome in breast cancer patients by early detection and control of loco-regional metastases with radiation or systemic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In breast cancer (BC) patients the brachial plexus syndrome (BPS) has been reported to be due to loco-regional metastases or radiation plexopathy. Associated arm edema is considered more suggestive of the latter. Radiation therapy is the only effective treatment for BPS reported. The charts of all BC patients who presented to our clinic from 1982 to 2006 with homolateral arm pain and neurological deficits, without humerus, cervical spine, or brain metastases, were reviewed. There were 28 patients fulfilling these criteria for BPS. Supraclavicular, axillary or chest wall metastases developed synchronously with the BPS in 26 patients; in 21 they were recurrences, found 6-94 months (median 34 months) after primary BC treatment, while in 5 others they were progressing inoperable primary tumors and nodes. Arm edema first occurred at the same time as loco-regional metastases in 19 patients. Treatment for the BPS was administered to 22 patients; it was directed at their loco-regional metastases. The BPS was initially treated with radiation (8 patients) or chemo- or endocrine therapy (14 patients); 19 (86%) had partial or complete remission of pain and neurologic deficits, with an 8-month median duration. The BPS in BC patients is due to loco-regional metastases and is often associated with arm edema. Chemo- or endocrine therapy induced the remission of pain and deficits as frequently as radiation therapy. (author)

  8. Multimodality treatment including postoperative radiation and concurrent chemotherapy with weekly docetaxel is feasible and effective in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: to examine the feasibility and efficacy of weekly docetaxel with concurrent radiation as postoperative treatment in a multimodality approach to oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Patients and methods: 94 patients (Table 1) with primary resectable squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx (UICC stage I 14%, II 15%, III 18%, IV 53%; Table 2) were treated with a multimodality therapy program consisting of neoadjuvant intra-arterial high-dose chemotherapy (cisplatin 150 mg/m2 with parallel systemic sodium thiosulfate 9 g/m2 for neutralization), followed by surgery of the primary and neck, and postoperative concurrent radiation and chemotherapy with weekly docetaxel (20-30 mg/m2; Table 3). Chronic toxicities were followed over a period of 5 years. Results: at a median follow-up of 4 years, the 5-year survival rate for all 94 patients was 80%, and disease-free survival was 73% (Figures 1 and 2). Among patients with advanced disease (stage III and IV), survival was 83 and 59%, respectively (Figure 4). Grade 3 and 4 mucositis was the main acute toxicity necessitating supportive care. Long-term toxicity appears to be moderate (Table 4). The maximum tolerated dose of weekly docetaxel was 25 mg/m2. Conclusions: concurrent radiation and chemotherapy with weekly docetaxel is a feasible postoperative treatment in a multimodality approach to oral and oropharyngeal cancer, resulting in high overall and disease-free survival. This approach warrants further evaluation in prospective randomized trials. (orig.)

  9. Application and possible mechanisms of combining LLLT (low level laser therapy), infrared hyperthermia and ionizing radiation in the treatment of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Edward H.; Woo, Van H.; Harlin-Jones, Cheryl; Heselich, Anja; Frohns, Florian

    2014-02-01

    Benefit of concomitant infrared hyperthermia and low level laser therapy and ionizing radiation is evaluated in this study. The purpose/objectives: presentation with locally advanced bulky superficial tumors is clinically challenging. To enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy and IMRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy) and/or electron beam therapy we have developed an inexpensive and clinically effective infrared hyperthermia approach that combines black-body infrared radiation with halogen spectrum radiation and discrete wave length infrared clinical lasers LLLT. The goal is to produce a composite spectrum extending from the far infrared to near infrared and portions of the visible spectrum with discrete penetrating wavelengths generated by the clinical infrared lasers with frequencies of 810 nm and/or 830 nm. The composite spectrum from these sources is applied before and after radiation therapy. We monitor the surface and in some cases deeper temperatures with thermal probes, but use an array of surface probes as the limiting safe thermal constraint in patient treatment while at the same time maximizing infrared entry to deeper tissue layers. Fever-grade infrared hyperthermia is produced in the first centimeters while non-thermal infrared effects act at deeper tissue layers. The combination of these effects with ionizing radiation leads to improved tumor control in many cancers.

  10. Increased incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following breast cancer treatment with radiation alone or combined with chemotherapy: a registry cohort analysis 1990-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to measure myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) risk associated with radiation and/or chemotherapy breast cancer (BC) treatment. Our study cohort was composed of BC patients diagnosed from 1990 to 2005 and followed up for blood disorders, mean length of follow up = 7.17 years, range 2-18 years. 5790 TNM stage 0-III patients treated with surgery alone, radiation and/or chemotherapy were included. Patients without surgery (n = 111), with stem cell transplantation (n = 98), unknown or non-standard chemotherapy regimens (n = 94), lost to follow up (n = 66) or 'cancer status unknown' (n = 67) were excluded. Rates observed at our community based cancer care institution were compared to SEER incidence data for rate ratio (RR) calculations. 17 cases of MDS/AML (10 MDS/7 AML) occurred during the follow up period, crude rate .29% (95% CI = .17, .47), SEER comparison RR = 3.94 (95% CI = 2.34, 6.15). The RR of MDS in patients age < 65 comparing our cohort incidence to SEER incidence data was 10.88 (95% CI = 3.84, 24.03) and the RR of AML in patients age < 65 was 5.32 (95% CI = 1.31, 14.04). No significant increased risk of MDS or AML was observed in women ≥ 65 or the surgery/chemotherapy-only group. A RR of 3.32 (95% CI = 1.42, 6.45) was observed in the surgery/radiation-only group and a RR of 6.32 (95% CI = 3.03, 11.45) in the surgery/radiation/chemotherapy group. 3 out of 10 MDS cases died of disease at an average 3.8 months post diagnosis and five of seven AML cases died at an average 9 months post diagnosis. An elevated rate of MDS and AML was observed among breast cancer patients < 65, those treated with radiation and those treated with radiation and chemotherapy compared to available population incidence data. Although a small number of patients are affected, leukemia risk associated with treatment and younger age is significant

  11. Accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy compared to conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amini Arya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While conventionally fractionated radiation therapy alone is an acceptable option for poor prognostic patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC, we hypothesized that accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy will have similar efficacy without increasing toxicity. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of 300 patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC treated between 1993 and 2009. Patients included in the study were medically or surgically inoperable, were free of metastatic disease at initial workup and did not receive concurrent chemotherapy. Patients were categorized into three groups. Group 1 received 45 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks (Accelerated Radiotherapy (ACRT while group 2 received 60-63 Gy (Standard Radiation Therapy 1 (STRT1 and group 3 received > 63 Gy (Standard Radiation Therapy (STRT2. Results There were 119 (39.7% patients in the ACRT group, 90 (30.0% in STRT1 and 91 (30.3% in STRT2. More patients in the ACRT group had KPS ≤ 60 (p 5% (p = 0.002, and had stage 3B disease (p Conclusions Despite the limitations of a retrospective analysis, our experience of accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy with 45 Gy in 15 fractions appears to be an acceptable treatment option for poor performance status patients with stage III inoperable tumors. Such a treatment regimen (or higher doses in 15 fractions should be prospectively evaluated using modern radiation technologies with the addition of sequential high dose chemotherapy in stage III NSCLC.

  12. cExternal beam radiation results in minimal changes in post void residual urine volumes during the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the impact of external beam radiation therapy (XRT) on weekly ultrasound determined post-void residual (PVR) urine volumes in patients with prostate cancer. 125 patients received XRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. XRT was delivered to the prostate only (n = 66) or if the risk of lymph node involvement was greater than 10% to the whole pelvis followed by a prostate boost (n = 59). All patients were irradiated in the prone position in a custom hip-fix mobilization device with an empty bladder and rectum. PVR was obtained at baseline and weekly. Multiple clinical and treatment parameters were evaluated as predictors for weekly PVR changes. The mean patient age was 73.9 years with a mean pre-treatment prostate volume of 53.3 cc, a mean IPSS of 11.3 and a mean baseline PVR of 57.6 cc. During treatment, PVR decreased from baseline in both cohorts with the absolute difference within the limits of accuracy of the bladder scanner. Alpha-blockers did not predict for a lower PVR during treatment. There was no significant difference in mean PVR urine volumes or differences from baseline in either the prostate only or pelvic radiation groups (p = 0.664 and p = 0.458, respectively). Patients with a larger baseline PVR (>40 cc) had a greater reduction in PVR, although the greatest reduction was seen between weeks one and three. Patients with a small PVR (<40 cc) had no demonstrable change throughout treatment. Prostate XRT results in clinically insignificant changes in weekly PVR volumes, suggesting that radiation induced bladder irritation does not substantially influence bladder residual urine volumes

  13. Radiation ulcer of the thoracic wall and its surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Examples of successful application of the method of plastic closure of antirior thoracic wall radiation defects are presented. Radiation ulcers were observed as a delayed radiation effects of radiotherapy against breast cancer and thymus gland tumor. Efficiency of the application of the given method in surgical treatment of patients with radiation ulcers of the thoracic wall is shown

  14. Invasive bladder cancer: treatment strategies using transurethral surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy with selection for bladder conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Combined modality therapy has become the standard oncologic approach to achieve organ preservation in many malignancies. Methods and Materials: Although radical cystectomy has been considered as standard treatment for invasive bladder carcinoma in the United States, good results have been recently reported from several centers using multimodality treatment, particularly in patients with clinical T2 and T3a disease who do not have a ureter obstructed by tumor. Results: The components of the combined treatment are usually transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Following an induction course of therapy a histologic response is evaluated by cystoscopy and rebiopsy. Clinical 'complete responders' (tumor site rebiopsy negative and urine cytology with no tumor cells present) continue with a consolidation course of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation. Those patients not achieving a clinical complete response are recommended to have an immediate cystectomy. Individually the local monotherapies of radiation, TURBT, or multidrug chemotherapy each achieve a local control rate of the primary tumor of from 20 to 40%. When these are combined, clinical complete response rates of from 65 to 80% can be achieved. Seventy-five to 85% of the clinical complete responders will remain with bladders free of recurrence of an invasive tumor. Conclusions: Bladder conservation trials using combined modality treatment approaches with selection for organ conservation by response of the tumor to initial treatment report overall 5-year survival rates of approximately 50%, and a 40-45% 5-year survival rate with the bladder intact. These modern multimodality bladder conservation approaches offer survival rates similar to radical cystectomy for patients of similar clinical stage and age. Bladder-conserving therapy should be offered to patients with invasive bladder carcinoma as a realistic alternative to radical

  15. Treatment concepts of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredell, M; Rordorf, T; Studer, G

    2012-11-01

    The mortality of oral cancer (OC) has shown only moderate improvement over recent decades. Treatment of OC remains mainly surgical with increasing contributions from radio- and chemotherapy. Early diagnosis and adequate management improves patient prognosis whilst lymphatic spread worsens the prognosis significantly. Copious extirpation of the tumour achieving tumour-free margins, as well as the effective removal of affected or suspect lymph nodes are vital steps to ensure long-term survival. Reconstructive ablities have improved to such an extent that many patients can be fully integrated in society after treatment. New modalities such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) ensures selective radiation and significantly contributes to improved quality of life. Photodynamic therapy and other targeted therapy options will play an increasingly important role in the future. PMID:23957099

  16. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V18 Gy), stomach (mean and V20 Gy), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V18 Gy), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V20 Gy and mean dose), and small bowel (V15 Gy absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose escalation and combining with radiosensitizing chemotherapy

  17. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.avery@uphs.upenn.edu

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  18. Phytosphingosine can overcome resistance to ionizing radiation in ionizing radiation-resistant cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Moon Taek; Choi, Jung A; Kim, Min Jeong; Bae, Sang Woo; Kang, Chang Mo; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yun Sil; Lee, Su Jae [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seong Man [Graduate School of Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hee Yong [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Although the majority of cancer cells are killed by inonizing radiation, certain types show resistance to it. We previously reported that phytosphingosine also induces apoptotic cell death in caspase dependent pathway in human cancer cells. In the present study, we examined whether phytosphingosine could overcome radiation resistance in the variant Jurkat clones. We first selected radiation-resistant Jurkat clones and examined cross-responsiveness of the clones between radiation and phytosphingosine. Treatment with phytosphingosine significantly did not affect apoptosis in all the clones, indicating that there seemed to be cross-resistance between radiation and phytosphingosine. Nevertheless, combined treatment of phytosphingosine with radiation synergistically enhanced killing of radiation-resistant cells, compared to radiation or phytosphingosine alone. The pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not completely inhibit the synergistic cell killing induced by combined treatment of ionizing radiation and phytosphingosine. These results demonstrated that apoptosis induced by combined treatment of radiation and phytosphingosine in radiation-resistant cells was associated with caspase independent pathway. We also found that apoptotic cell death induced by combined treatment of ionizing radiation and phytosphingosine correlated to the increases of ROS. The enhancement of ROS generation induced the loss of mitochondria transmembrane potential. In conclusion, ROS generation in combined treatment of phytosphingosine with radiation significantly induced the translocation of AIF to nucleus from mitochondria, suggesting a potential clinical application of combination treatment of radiation and phytosphingosine to radiation-resistant cancer cells.

  19. Feasibility of high-dose three-dimensional radiation therapy in the treatment of localised non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/ Chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment of inoperable and/or non-resectable IIIA/B non-small-cell lung cancer (N.S.C.L.C.). Aware of the necessity to increase local control in locally advanced N.S.C.L.C., we analyzed the feasibility of high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-C.R.T.) in the treatment of localised N.S.C.L.C. Patients and methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with non-resectable N.S.C.L.C. treated with high-dose (74 Gy) standard-fractionation 3D-C.R.T., with particular attention to the relationship between lung and heart radiation-induced toxicities. Results: Fifty patients (41 males, 9 females) were included. A total of 35 (70%) patients received the planned total dose of 74 Gy. Patients irradiated to inferior doses interrupted the treatment because of limiting toxicities. Induction and concurrent chemotherapy was delivered to 39 (78%) and 14 (28%) patients, respectively. Eight (16%) patients experienced grade 3-4 acute lung toxicity, all of them having a history of pulmonary disease, a FEV1 below 1.6 L, and a lung V20 of at least 25%. Three (6%) patients were deemed to experience radiation-induced cardiac toxicity. Conclusions: This study assesses the feasibility of delivering a total dose of 74 Gy combined with chemotherapy in locally advanced N.S.C.L.C.. High lung and heart V20 increases the risk of radiation-induced lung and cardiac toxicity, the later being highly difficult to precisely assess, as late deaths are rarely documented, and responsibility of the treatment might be often underestimated. The precise evaluation of cardiac condition may be helpful to spare fragile patients from potentially toxic effects of high-dose radiation, especially in controlled trials. (authors)

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Age and family history can affect the risk of rectal cancer. Anything ... to flow from the body to a collection bag. After the cancer is removed, the surgeon will ...

  1. Cancer treatment: preventing infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are safe. DO NOT eat fish, eggs, or meat that is raw or undercooked. And DO NOT ... During or right after cancer treatment, call your health care provider right away if you have any of the signs of infection mentioned above. Getting ...

  2. Liver cancer and selective internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver cancer is the biggest cancer-related killer of adults in the world. Liver cancer can be considered as two types: primary and secondary (metastatic). Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a revolutionary treatment for advanced liver cancer that utilises new technologies designed to deliver radiation directly to the site of tumours. SIRT, on the other hand, involves the delivery of millions of microscopic radioactive spheres called SIR-Spheres directly to the site of the liver tumour/s, where they selectively irradiate the tumours. The anti-cancer effect is concentrated in the liver and there is little effect on cancer at other sites such as the lungs or bones. The SIR-Spheres are delivered through a catheter placed in the femoral artery of the upper thigh and threaded through the hepatic artery (the major blood vessel of the liver) to the site of the tumour. The microscopic spheres, each approximately 35 microns (the size of four red blood cells or one-third the diameter of a strand of hair), are bonded to yttrium-90 (Y-90), a pure beta emitter with a physical half-life of 64.1 hours (about 2.67 days). The microspheres are trapped in the tumour's vascular bed, where they destroy the tumour from inside. The average range of the radiation is only 2.5 mm, so it is wholly contained within the patient's body; after 14 days, only 2.5 percent of the radioactive activity remains. The microspheres are suspended in water for injection. The vials are shipped in lead shields for radiation protection. Treatment with SIR-Spheres is generally not regarded as a cure, but has been shown to shrink the cancer more than chemotherapy alone. This can increase life expectancy and improve quality of life. On occasion, patients treated with SIR-Spheres have had such marked shrinkage of the liver cancer that the cancer can be surgically removed at a later date. This has resulted in a long-term cure for some patients. SIRTeX Medical Limited has developed three separate cancer

  3. cExternal beam radiation results in minimal changes in post void residual urine volumes during the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallner Kent E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the impact of external beam radiation therapy (XRT on weekly ultrasound determined post-void residual (PVR urine volumes in patients with prostate cancer. Methods 125 patients received XRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. XRT was delivered to the prostate only (n = 66 or if the risk of lymph node involvement was greater than 10% to the whole pelvis followed by a prostate boost (n = 59. All patients were irradiated in the prone position in a custom hip-fix mobilization device with an empty bladder and rectum. PVR was obtained at baseline and weekly. Multiple clinical and treatment parameters were evaluated as predictors for weekly PVR changes. Results The mean patient age was 73.9 years with a mean pre-treatment prostate volume of 53.3 cc, a mean IPSS of 11.3 and a mean baseline PVR of 57.6 cc. During treatment, PVR decreased from baseline in both cohorts with the absolute difference within the limits of accuracy of the bladder scanner. Alpha-blockers did not predict for a lower PVR during treatment. There was no significant difference in mean PVR urine volumes or differences from baseline in either the prostate only or pelvic radiation groups (p = 0.664 and p = 0.458, respectively. Patients with a larger baseline PVR (>40 cc had a greater reduction in PVR, although the greatest reduction was seen between weeks one and three. Patients with a small PVR ( Conclusion Prostate XRT results in clinically insignificant changes in weekly PVR volumes, suggesting that radiation induced bladder irritation does not substantially influence bladder residual urine volumes.

  4. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yartsev Slav

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. Methods 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. Results When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p dose, 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p Conclusion dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies.

  5. Combination External Beam Radiation and Brachytherapy Boost With Androgen Suppression for Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: An Initial Report of CALGB 99809

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy (TPPB) can be used with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to provide a high-dose conformal boost to the prostate. The results of a multicenter Phase II trial assessing safety of combination of EBRT and TPPB boost with androgen suppression (AST) in treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer are present here. Materials and Methods: Patients had intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Six months of AST was administered. EBRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles was administered to 45Gy followed by TPPB using either 125I or 103Pd to deliver an additional 100Gy or 90Gy. Toxicity was graded using the National Cancer Institute CTC version 2 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring systems. Results: Sixty-three patients were enrolled. Median follow-up was 38 months. Side effects of AST including sexual dysfunction and vasomotor symptoms were commonly observed. Apart from erectile dysfunction, short-term Grade 2 and 3 toxicity was noted in 21% and 7%, primarily genitourinary related. Long-term Grade 2 and 3 toxicities were noted in 13% and 3%. Two patients had Grade 3 dysuria that resolved with longer follow-up. The most common Grade 2 long-term toxicity was urinary frequency (5%). No biochemical or clinical evidence of progression was noted for the entire cohort. Conclusions: In a cooperative group setting, combination EBRT and TPPB boost with 6 months of AST was generally well tolerated with expected genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities. Further follow-up will be required to fully assess long-term toxicity and cancer control

  6. Results of high dose radiation and surgery in the treatment of advanced cancer of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred nineteen patients with stage III or IV cancer of the oral cavity or laryngopharynx were treated with combined radiation therapy and surgery at the University of Kentucky and the New Jersey Medical School since 1962. In the University of Kentucky series, the three year postoperative survival figures in patients with stage III or IV lesions were 43 percent for lesions of the laryngopharynx and 39 percent for lesions of the oral cavity. Of great interest are the survival figures for patients with stage IV lesions: 50 percent for those with lesions of the laryngopharynx and 11 percent for those with lesions of the oral cavity. Although the New Jersey Medical School series is still young, the results (by actuarial projection) approached those of the University of Kentucky series and will be interesting to follow. (U.S.)

  7. Prostate Cancer: Current Treatment and Prevention Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Fang-zhi; Zhao, Xiao-kun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is one of the life threatening disorders of male. Although, over the last two decades, a high rate of overdiagnosis, and overtreatment has lowered the incidence rate of prostate cancer, the treatment or prevention strategies are not enough to control the high rate of disease related mortality. Current medical treatment approaches include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, cryosurgery and other methods. These approaches are more or less effecti...

  8. Radiation Exposure and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Compensation Programs for People Exposed to Radiation as Part of Nuclear Weapons Testing Between 1945 and 1962, several countries tested nuclear weapons in the open air. The US government has passed several laws to ... radiation as part of nuclear testing programs who later develop certain ...

  9. Treatment Success in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Kumar, Ambuj; Soares, Heloisa P.; Hozo, Iztok; Bepler, Gerold; Clarke, Mike; Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The evaluation of research output, such as estimation of the proportion of treatment successes, is of ethical, scientific, and public importance but has rarely been evaluated systematically. We assessed how often experimental cancer treatments that undergo testing in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) result in discovery of successful new interventions. Methods We extracted data from all completed (published and unpublished) phase 3 RCTs conducted by the National Cancer Institute cooperative groups since their inception in 1955. Therapeutic successes were determined by (1) assessing the proportion of statistically significant trials favoring new or standard treatments, (2) determining the proportion of the trials in which new treatments were considered superior to standard treatments according to the original researchers, and (3) quantitatively synthesizing data for main clinical outcomes (overall and event-free survival). Results Data from 624 trials (781 randomized comparisons) involving 216 451 patients were analyzed. In all, 30% of trials had statistically significant results, of which new interventions were superior to established treatments in 80% of trials. The original researchers judged that the risk-benefit profile favored new treatments in 41% of comparisons (316 of 766). Hazard ratios for overall and event-free survival, available for 614 comparisons, were 0.95 (99% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-0.98) and 0.90 (99% CI, 0.87- 0.93), respectively, slightly favoring new treatments. Breakthrough interventions were discovered in 15% of trials. Conclusions Approximately 25% to 50% of new cancer treatments that reach the stage of assessment in RCTs will prove successful. The pattern of successes has become more stable over time. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the ethical principle of equipoise defines limits of discoverability in clinical research and ultimately drives therapeutic advances in clinical medicine. PMID:18362256

  10. Evaluation of patient preferences towards treatment during extended hours for patients receiving radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer: A time trade-off study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: To reduce the waiting time between diagnosis and the start of radiation therapy, some departments have introduced appointments outside of conventional working hours, but the inconvenience this may cause to patients is unknown. We examined, from the patient's perspective, whether reduced waiting times to treatment would be sufficient to trade off against potentially inconvenient appointment times. Method: We interviewed patients receiving radiation therapy at a major teaching hospital between January and May 2005. Two patient groups were considered: those treated during conventional working hours (8.30 am to 4.30 pm), and those treated outside these hours. Patients were asked to trade a reduction in waiting time to the start of treatment against treatment outside conventional working hours. Results: Of 129 patients interviewed, 77 were treated during conventional working hours and 52 outside these hours. Fifty-seven (44%) were male and 52 (40%) were aged over 60 years. To prefer treatment out of working hours, patients being treated during conventional working hours required a larger reduction in waiting time (odds ratio 2.36, 95% CI 0.97-5.76). Patients with curable disease and those who had made few changes in their lifestyle throughout the treatment were more likely to accept treatment outside of conventional working hours. Conclusion: It is impractical to satisfy the treatment-time preferences of all patients. However, many patients prefer treatment outside of normal treatment times if this would reduce the time until the start of radiation therapy. Evaluating the effect of waiting times on patients' perceptions of their disease control provides important information in allocating treatment hours and appointment times

  11. Intra-arterial administration of carboplatin plus lower dosage radiation of 60CO as induction treatment in advanced oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional pre-operative chemoradiotherapy often causes severe side effects, which may result in interruption of the treatment and delay of decided operation. Carboplatin (CBDCA) is one of the effective chemotherapeutants for head and neck cancer. We treated 23 patients with advanced oral cancers by a combination of intra-arterial administration of Carboplatin and 60CO radiotherapy. The dosage of Carboplatin was between 20 mg and 35 mg per square meter of body surface. The dosage of external 60CO irradiation was 2 Gy per day and 30 to 60 Gy in total. We evaluated clinical response, toxicity and survival of this therapy of all the patients. Histologic response was also evaluated in some of them. All cancers responded to the regional chemoradiotherapy and demonstrated remission. Two (8%) completed response rate (CR) and 16 (69%) partial response rate (PR) were achieved. The accumulated five-year overall survival rate by Kaplan-Meier method was 73.9%. Fourteen patients (60.8%) showed no evidence of disease (NED) within five years after the therapy. All patients had stomatitis, but most of them were not so severe. The major hematological toxicity was leukopenia, but it was from mild to moderate and reversible. Our study showed that this therapy provided low toxicity, high clinical and histological response rate. (author)

  12. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk to your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  13. Clinical validation of FDG-PET/CT in the radiation treatment planning for patients with oesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to determine the proportion of locoregional recurrences (LRRs) that could have been prevented if radiotherapy treatment planning for oesophageal cancer was based on PET/CT instead of CT. Materials and methods: Ninety oesophageal cancer patients, eligible for high dose (neo-adjuvant) (chemo)radiotherapy, were included. All patients underwent a planning FDG-PET/CT-scan. Radiotherapy target volumes (TVs) were delineated on CT and patients were treated according to the CT-based treatment plans. The PET images remained blinded. After treatment, TVs were adjusted based on PET/CT, when appropriate. Follow up included CT-thorax/abdomen every 6 months. If LRR was suspected, a PET/CT was conducted and the site of recurrence was compared to the original TVs. If the LRR was located outside the CT-based clinical TV (CTV) and inside the PET/CT-based CTV, we considered this LRR possibly preventable. Results: Based on PET/CT, the gross tumour volume (GTV) was larger in 23% and smaller in 27% of the cases. In 32 patients (36%), >5% of the PET/CT-based GTV would be missed if the treatment planning was based on CT. The median follow up was 29 months. LRRs were seen in 10 patients (11%). There were 3 in-field recurrences, 4 regional recurrences outside both CT-based and PET/CT-based CTV and 3 recurrences at the anastomosis without changes in TV by PET/CT; none of these recurrences were considered preventable by PET/CT. Conclusion: No LRR was found after CT-based radiotherapy that could have been prevented by PET/CT. The value of PET/CT for radiotherapy seems limited

  14. [18F]fluoroethylcholine-PET/CT imaging for radiation treatment planning of recurrent and primary prostate cancer with dose escalation to PET/CT-positive lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present there is no consensus on irradiation treatment volumes for intermediate to high-risk primary cancers or recurrent disease. Conventional imaging modalities, such as CT, MRI and transrectal ultrasound, are considered suboptimal for treatment decisions. Choline-PET/CT might be considered as the imaging modality in radiooncology to select and delineate clinical target volumes extending the prostate gland or prostate fossa. In conjunction with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and imaged guided radiotherapy (IGRT), it might offer the opportunity of dose escalation to selected sites while avoiding unnecessary irradiation of healthy tissues. Twenty-six patients with primary (n = 7) or recurrent (n = 19) prostate cancer received Choline-PET/CT planned 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiotherapy. The median age of the patients was 65 yrs (range 45 to 78 yrs). PET/CT-scans with F18-fluoroethylcholine (FEC) were performed on a combined PET/CT-scanner equipped for radiation therapy planning. The majority of patients had intermediate to high risk prostate cancer. All patients received 3D conformal or intensity modulated and imaged guided radiotherapy with megavoltage cone beam CT. The median dose to primary tumours was 75.6 Gy and to FEC-positive recurrent lymph nodal sites 66,6 Gy. The median follow-up time was 28.8 months. The mean SUVmax in primary cancer was 5,97 in the prostate gland and 3,2 in pelvic lymph nodes. Patients with recurrent cancer had a mean SUVmax of 4,38. Two patients had negative PET/CT scans. At 28 months the overall survival rate is 94%. Biochemical relapse free survival is 83% for primary cancer and 49% for recurrent tumours. Distant disease free survival is 100% and 75% for primary and recurrent cancer, respectively. Acute normal tissue toxicity was mild in 85% and moderate (grade 2) in 15%. No or mild late side effects were observed in the majority of patients (84%). One patient had a severe bladder shrinkage (grade 4) after a

  15. Radiation as a cause of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible role of radiation as a factor in the causation of breast cancer was investigated. Some variables said to be associated with a high risk of breast cancer include genetic factors, pre-existing breast disease, artificial menopause, family history of breast cancer, failure to breast feed, older than usual age at time of first pregnancy, high socioeconomic status, specific blood groups, fatty diet, obesity, and hormonal imbalances. To this list we must add ionizing radiation as an additional and serious risk factor in the causation of breast cancer. Among the irradiated groups which have an increase in the incidence of cancer of the breast are: tuberculous women subjected to repeated fluoroscopy; women who received localized x-ray treatments for acute post-partum mastitis; atom-bomb survivors; other x-ray exposures involving the breast, including irradiation in children and in experimental animals; and women who were treated with x rays for acne or hirsuitism. The dose of radiation received by the survivors of the atom bomb who subsequently developed cancer of the breast ranged from 80 to 800 rads, the tuberculous women who were fluoroscoped received an estimated 50 to 6,000 rads, the women who were treated for mastitis probably were exposed to 30 to 700 rads, and the patients with acne received 100 to 6,000 rads. These imprecise estimates are compared with mammographic doses in the range of 10s of rads to the breast at each examination, an imprecise estimate depending on technique and equipment. However imprecise these estimates may be, it is apparent that younger women are more likely than older women to develop cancer from exposure to radiation. It is pointed out that the American Cancer Society advises that women under 35 years should have mammography only for medical indication, not for so-called screening

  16. Radiation as a cause of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, N.; Silverstone, S.M.

    1976-09-01

    The possible role of radiation as a factor in the causation of breast cancer was investigated. Some variables said to be associated with a high risk of breast cancer include genetic factors, pre-existing breast disease, artificial menopause, family history of breast cancer, failure to breast feed, older than usual age at time of first pregnancy, high socioeconomic status, specific blood groups, fatty diet, obesity, and hormonal imbalances. To this list we must add ionizing radiation as an additional and serious risk factor in the causation of breast cancer. Among the irradiated groups which have an increase in the incidence of cancer of the breast are: tuberculous women subjected to repeated fluoroscopy; women who received localized x-ray treatments for acute post-partum mastitis; atom-bomb survivors; other x-ray exposures involving the breast, including irradiation in children and in experimental animals; and women who were treated with x rays for acne or hirsuitism. The dose of radiation received by the survivors of the atom bomb who subsequently developed cancer of the breast ranged from 80 to 800 rads, the tuberculous women who were fluoroscoped received an estimated 50 to 6,000 rads, the women who were treated for mastitis probably were exposed to 30 to 700 rads, and the patients with acne received 100 to 6,000 rads. These imprecise estimates are compared with mammographic doses in the range of 10s of rads to the breast at each examination, an imprecise estimate depending on technique and equipment. However imprecise these estimates may be, it is apparent that younger women are more likely than older women to develop cancer from exposure to radiation. It is pointed out that the American Cancer Society advises that women under 35 years should have mammography only for medical indication, not for so-called screening.

  17. Behavior and awareness of thyroid cancer patients in Korea having non-hospitalized low-dose radioiodine treatment with regard to radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the recent increase in incidence of thyroid cancer, non-hospitalized low-dose (NH-LD) radioiodine treatment (RIT) has also increased rapidly. The radioactivity limit that is allowed to be administered without hospitalization depends on individual calculation, based partly on patients' behavior. In this study, Korean patients' behavior in relation to radiation safety in NHLD RIT was surveyed. A total of 218 patients who underwent NH-LD RIT of 1.1 GBq 131I in a single center were surveyed. The patients underwent RIT with a standard protocol and the survey was performed by interview when they visited subsequently for a whole-body scan. The survey questionnaire included three parts of questions: general information, behavior relating to isolation during RIT, and awareness of radiation safety. After administration of radioiodine, 40% of patients who returned home used mass transportation, and another 47% went home by taxi or in car driven by another person. Isolation at home was generally sufficient. However, 7% of patients did not stay in a separate room. Among the 218 patients, 34% did not go home and chose self-isolation away from home, mostly due to concerns about radiation safety of family members. However, the places were mostly public places, including hotels, resorts, and hospitals. About half of the patients replied that access to radiation safety information was not easy and their awareness of radiation safety was not satisfactory. As a result, 45% of patients wanted hospitalized RIT. In many countries, including Korea, RIT is continuously increasing. Considering the radiation safety of patients' family members or the public and the convenience of patients, the pretreatment education of patients should be enhanced. In addition, the hospitalization of patients having low-dose therapy is recommended to be seriously considered and expanded, with the expansion of dedicated treatment facilities

  18. Strategies for Imaging Androgen Receptor Signaling Pathway in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Hormonal Manipulation and Radiation Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gravina Giovanni Luca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (Pca is a heterogeneous disease; its etiology appears to be related to genetic and epigenetic factors. Radiotherapy and hormone manipulation are effective treatments, but many tumors will progress despite these treatments. Molecular imaging provides novel opportunities for image-guided optimization and management of these treatment modalities. Here we reviewed the advances in targeted imaging of key biomarkers of androgen receptor signaling pathways. A computerized search was performed to identify all relevant studies in Medline up to 2013. There are well-known limitations and inaccuracies of current imaging approaches for monitoring biological changes governing tumor progression. The close integration of molecular biology and clinical imaging could ease the development of new molecular imaging agents providing novel tools to monitor a number of biological events that, until a few years ago, were studied by conventional molecular assays. Advances in translational research may represent the next step in improving the oncological outcome of men with Pca who remain at high risk for systemic failure. This aim may be obtained by combining the anatomical properties of conventional imaging modalities with biological information to better predict tumor response to conventional treatments.

  19. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C.-M.; Ding, M.; Li, J. S.; Lee, M. C.; Pawlicki, T.; Deng, J.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer.

  20. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer

  1. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival

  2. Ayahuasca and cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Schenberg, Eduardo E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Comprehensively review the evidence regarding the use of ayahuasca, an Amerindian medicine traditionally used to treat many different illnesses and diseases, to treat some types of cancer. Methods: An in-depth review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, books, institutional magazines, conferences and online texts in nonprofessional sources regarding the biomedical knowledge about ayahuasca in general with a specific focus in its possible relations to the treatment of canc...

  3. Therapeutic response to a novel enzyme-targeting radiosensitization treatment (Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas) in patients with recurrent breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    AOYAMA, NOBUTAKA; OGAWA, YASUHIRO; YASUOKA, MIKI; TAKAHASHI, MASAO; IWASA, HITOMI; MIYATAKE, KANA; YAMANISHI, TOMOAKI; HAMADA, NORIHIKO; TAMURA, TAIJI; NISHIOKA, AKIHITO; YAMAGAMI, TAKUJI

    2016-01-01

    Linear accelerator-based radiotherapy has little effect on the majority of locally advanced neoplasms. Thus, the novel radiosensitizer Kochi Oxydol Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II), which contains hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate, was developed. The effectiveness of KORTUC II for the treatment of chemotherapy-resistant supraclavicular lymph node metastases has been previously demonstrated. The present study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of KORTUC II in patients with recurrent breast cancer. A total of 20 patients (age range, 39–84 years) were enrolled in the study. The majority of patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) examinations prior to and 1–7 months following KORTUC II treatment, and every 6 months thereafter when possible. The radiotherapy regimen was 2.75 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week, for 16–18 fractions, with a total radiation dose of 44.00–49.50 Gy (X-ray irradiation), or 4.00 Gy/fraction, 3 fractions/week, for 10–12 fractions, with a total radiation dose of 40.00–48.00 Gy (electron beam irradiation). The injection of 3–6 ml of the KORTUC II agent was initiated at the fifth radiotherapy fraction, and was performed twice/week under ultrasonographic guidance. The therapeutic effects were evaluated by PET-CT examinations prior and subsequent to KORTUC II treatment, which was observed to be well tolerated with minimal adverse effects. Of the 24 lesions presented by the 20 patients, 18 exhibited complete response, 5 partial response, 0 stable disease and 1 progressive disease. The overall survival rate was 100% at 1 year and 95% at 2 years. The mean duration of follow-up at the end of June 2014 was 51 months. Based on the results of the PET-CT studies conducted, KORTUC II treatment demonstrated marked therapeutic effects, with satisfactory treatment outcomes and acceptable adverse events.

  4. Hypoxia imaging with [F-18] FMISO-PET in head and neck cancer: Potential for guiding intensity modulated radiation therapy in overcoming hypoxia-induced treatment resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with [F-18] fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) has been validated as a hypoxic tracer . Head and neck cancer exhibits hypoxia, inducing aggressive biologic traits that impart resistance to treatment. Delivery of modestly higher radiation doses to tumors with stable areas of chronic hypoxia can improve tumor control . Advanced radiation treatment planning (RTP) and delivery techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver higher doses to a small volume without increasing morbidity. We investigated the utility of co-registered FMISO-PET and CT images to develop clinically feasible RTPs with higher tumor control probabilities (TCP). Materials and methods: FMISO-PET images were used to determine hypoxic sub-volumes for boost planning. Example plans were generated for 10 of the patients in the study who exhibited significant hypoxia. We created an IMRT plan for each patient with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the hypoxic sub-volumes. We also varied the boost for two patients. Result: A significant (mean 17%, median 15%) improvement in TCP is predicted when the modest additional boost dose to the hypoxic sub-volume is included. Conclusion: Combined FMISO-PET imaging and IMRT planning permit delivery of higher doses to hypoxic regions, increasing the predicted TCP (mean 17%) without increasing expected complications.

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Penile Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation therapy . Mohs microsurgery . A clinical trial of laser therapy . Check the list of NCI-supported cancer clinical ... nodes in the groin ). External or internal radiation therapy followed by ... clinical trial of laser surgery . Check the list of NCI-supported cancer ...

  6. Kinetic analysis of dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole PET correlates with radiation treatment outcome in head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia compromises local control in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). In order to determine the value of [18F]-fluoromisonidazole (Fmiso) with regard to tumor hypoxia, a patient study with dynamic Fmiso PET was performed. For a better understanding of tracer uptake and distribution, a kinetic model was developed to analyze dynamic Fmiso PET data. For 15 HNC patients, dynamic Fmiso PET examinations were performed prior to radiotherapy (RT) treatment. The data was analyzed using a two compartment model, which allows the determination of characteristic hypoxia and perfusion values. For different parameters, such as patient age, tumor size and standardized uptake value, the correlation to treatment outcome was tested using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney U-test. Statistical tests were also performed for hypoxia and perfusion parameters determined by the kinetic model and for two different metrics based on these parameters. The kinetic Fmiso analysis extracts local hypoxia and perfusion characteristics of a tumor tissue. These parameters are independent quantities. In this study, different types of characteristic hypoxia-perfusion patterns in tumors could be identified. The clinical verification of the results, obtained on the basis of the kinetic analysis, showed a high correlation of hypoxia-perfusion patterns and RT treatment outcome (p = 0.001) for this initial patient group. The presented study established, that Fmiso PET scans may benefit from dynamic acquisition and analysis by a kinetic model. The pattern of distribution of perfusion and hypoxia in the tissue is correlated to local control in HNC

  7. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-12-10

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  8. Differences between pulmonologists, thoracic surgeons and radiation oncologists in deciding on the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer: A binary choice experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Surgery is the standard of care in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is increasingly used to treat patients at high-risk for surgical complications. We studied which patient- and clinician-related characteristics influenced treatment recommendations. Material and methods: A binary choice experiment with hypothetical cases was conducted. Cases varied on five patient-related characteristics: patient age, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD GOLD) score, Charlson co-morbidity index, World Health Organization performance status (WHO-PS) and patient treatment preference (surgery/SABR). Clinician characteristics were recorded. Responses were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models. Results: 126 clinicians completed the survey. All patient-related characteristics, the clinician speciality, and whether clinicians considered outcomes of surgery comparable to SABR, significantly influenced treatment recommendations. Pulmonologists were most influenced by WHO-PS and comorbidity, whereas comorbidity and age had greatest influence on radiation oncologists and surgeons. Clinicians were less influenced by stated patient preference and COPD GOLD score. Limited consistency was observed in treatment recommendations. Conclusions: This study suggests that more efforts are needed to develop uniform approaches for making treatment recommendations, and also to incorporate patient preferences when making treatment decisions for stage I NSCLC

  9. Radiation-Induced Cardiac Toxicity After Therapy for Breast Cancer: Interaction Between Treatment Era and Follow-Up Duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cardiac toxicity after breast radiotherapy (RT) has been widely described in 'older' RT trials (i.e., using larger fraction sizes, wide RT fields, and orthovoltage energy). The results from more 'modern' RT trials have shown less cardiac toxicity. The comparisons between the 'older' and 'modern' trials are confounded by the longer follow-up time in the 'older' trials. We systematically assessed the effect of treatment era and follow-up duration on the reported rates of cardiac toxicity associated with RT. Methods and Materials: The published data were surveyed using PubMed to identify studies using 'breast cancer,' 'irradiation/radiotherapy,' 'cardiac/heart,' and 'toxicity/morbidity/mortality' in a keyword search. Relevant data were extracted from the identified trials. The trials were defined as 'older' (patient accrual start year before 1980) and 'modern' (patient accrual start year in or after 1980) to segregate the trials and assess the treatment era effect. A 10-year follow-up duration was used as a cutoff to segregate and analyze trials with varying lengths of follow-up. Results: We analyzed 19 published reports of patients treated between 1968 and 2002 (5 randomized controlled trials, 5 single- or multi-institutional studies, and 9 national cancer registry database reviews). In the reviewed trials, all the older trials reported excess cardiac toxicity, typically with a median of >10-15 years of follow-up. However, the vast majority of modern RT trials had shorter median follow-up durations, typically ≤10 years and did not report an excess toxicity risk. The modern studies lacked longer follow-up. Conclusion: Additional follow-up is needed to ensure that modern methods effectively reduce cardiac toxicity. Continued diligence to minimize cardiac exposure remains prudent

  10. Personalized treatment planning with a model of radiation therapy outcomes for use in multiobjective optimization of IMRT plans for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To build a new treatment planning approach that extends beyond radiation transport and IMRT optimization by modeling the radiation therapy process and prognostic indicators for more outcome-focused decision making. An in-house treatment planning system was modified to include multiobjective inverse planning, a probabilistic outcome model, and a multi-attribute decision aid. A genetic algorithm generated a set of plans embodying trade-offs between the separate objectives. An influence diagram network modeled the radiation therapy process of prostate cancer using expert opinion, results of clinical trials, and published research. A Markov model calculated a quality adjusted life expectancy (QALE), which was the endpoint for ranking plans. The Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm (MOEA) was designed to produce an approximation of the Pareto Front representing optimal tradeoffs for IMRT plans. Prognostic information from the dosimetrics of the plans, and from patient-specific clinical variables were combined by the influence diagram. QALEs were calculated for each plan for each set of patient characteristics. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to explore changes in outcomes for variations in patient characteristics and dosimetric variables. The model calculated life expectancies that were in agreement with an independent clinical study. The radiation therapy model proposed has integrated a number of different physical, biological and clinical models into a more comprehensive model. It illustrates a number of the critical aspects of treatment planning that can be improved and represents a more detailed description of the therapy process. A Markov model was implemented to provide a stronger connection between dosimetric variables and clinical outcomes and could provide a practical, quantitative method for making difficult clinical decisions

  11. Quantitative analysis of tumor shrinkage due to chemotherapy and its implication for radiation treatment planning in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal timing of chemoradiotherapy in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) hasn’t been established, although evidence from studies supported that patients can benefit from early radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to quantify tumor shrinkage in response to induction chemotherapy (IC), evaluate the impact of tumor shrinkage on radiation dosimetric parameters and determine its implication for the timing of radiation therapy for patients with LS-SCLC. Twenty patients with LS-SCLC who were treated with IC followed by concomitant radiation therapy were investigated retrospectively. Ten patients received 1 cycle of IC, and 10 patients received 2 cycles of IC. Pre-IC CT imaging was coregistered with a simulation CT, and virtual radiation plans were created for pre- and post-IC thoracic disease in each case. The changes in the gross target volume (GTV), planning target volume (PTV) and dosimetric factors associated with the lungs, esophagus and heart were analyzed. The mean GTV and PTV for all of the patients decreased by 60.9% and 40.2%, respectively, which resulted in a significant reduction in the radiation exposure to the lungs, esophagus and heart. Changes in the PTV and radiation exposure of normal tissue were not significantly affected by the number of chemotherapy cycles delivered, although patients who received 2 cycles of IC had a greater decrease in GTV than those who received only 1 cycle of IC (69.6% vs. 52.1%, p = 0.273). Our data showed that targeting the tumor post-IC may reduce the radiation dose to normal tissue in patients with LS-SCLC. However, the benefit to the normal tissue was not increased by an additional cycle of IC. These findings suggest that the first cycle of chemotherapy is very important for tumor shrinkage and that initiating thoracic radiation therapy at the second cycle of chemotherapy may be a reasonable strategy for timing of radiation therapy in LS-SCLC treatment

  12. Multimodality treatment including postoperative radiation and concurrent chemotherapy with weekly docetaxel is feasible and effective in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, A.F.; Bitter, K. [Dept. of Maxillofacial Plastic Surgery, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Mose, S.; Boettcher, H.D. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Background: to examine the feasibility and efficacy of weekly docetaxel with concurrent radiation as postoperative treatment in a multimodality approach to oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Patients and methods: 94 patients (Table 1) with primary resectable squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx (UICC stage I 14%, II 15%, III 18%, IV 53%; Table 2) were treated with a multimodality therapy program consisting of neoadjuvant intra-arterial high-dose chemotherapy (cisplatin 150 mg/m{sup 2} with parallel systemic sodium thiosulfate 9 g/m{sup 2} for neutralization), followed by surgery of the primary and neck, and postoperative concurrent radiation and chemotherapy with weekly docetaxel (20-30 mg/m{sup 2}; Table 3). Chronic toxicities were followed over a period of 5 years. Results: at a median follow-up of 4 years, the 5-year survival rate for all 94 patients was 80%, and disease-free survival was 73% (Figures 1 and 2). Among patients with advanced disease (stage III and IV), survival was 83 and 59%, respectively (Figure 4). Grade 3 and 4 mucositis was the main acute toxicity necessitating supportive care. Long-term toxicity appears to be moderate (Table 4). The maximum tolerated dose of weekly docetaxel was 25 mg/m{sup 2}. Conclusions: concurrent radiation and chemotherapy with weekly docetaxel is a feasible postoperative treatment in a multimodality approach to oral and oropharyngeal cancer, resulting in high overall and disease-free survival. This approach warrants further evaluation in prospective randomized trials. (orig.)

  13. Curative radiation therapy in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has experienced an extremely rapid development in recent years. Important improvements such as the introduction of multileaf collimators and computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning software have enabled three dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3DCRT). The development of treatment planning systems and technology for brachytherapy has been very rapid as well. Development of accelerators with integrated on-board imaging equipment and technology, for example image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has further improved the precision with reduced margins to adjacent normal tissues. This has, in turn, led to the possibility to administer even higher doses to the prostate than previously. Although radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy have been used for the last decades as curative treatment modalities, still there are no randomized trials published comparing these two options. Outcome data show that the two treatment modalities are highly comparable when used for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer

  14. Anal cancer: current and future treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin JY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Joanna Y Chin, Theodore S Hong, Jennifer Y WoDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Anal cancer is a relatively rare malignancy, accounting for approximately 2% of gastrointestinal cancers. Concurrent chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin remains the standard of care for the treatment of anal cancer. There is currently no proven role for platinum-based induction or adjuvant chemotherapy in anal cancer, even in cases of bulky disease. Multiple trials have shown that radiosensitization with concurrent chemotherapy is beneficial over radiation alone, and in particular, efforts to remove or substitute mitomycin from the chemoradiation regimen have been unsuccessful. Because local-regional control remains a challenge in the management of anal cancer, future studies will need to focus on radiation dose-escalation and/or addition of further chemotherapy or targeted agents. Patient selection, eg, with PET-CT or with biomarkers including HPV status, may be necessary to define patients who need more aggressive local treatment, ie, for patients with bulky disease, or to de-escalate treatment in others, ie, patients with early-stage, localized cancer.Keywords: anal cancer, chemoradiation, IMRT

  15. External beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. -- The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. -- Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. -- The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachytherapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. -- Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. -- The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  16. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated

  17. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, H [IU School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zhang, H [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated

  18. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Guidelines for the Delineation of the Clinical Target Volume in the Postoperative Treatment of Pancreatic Head Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines to be used in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0848, a Phase III randomized trial evaluating the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiation in patients with resected head of pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: A consensus committee of six radiation oncologists with expertise in gastrointestinal radiotherapy developed stepwise contouring guidelines and an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) in the postoperative treatment of pancreas cancer, based on identifiable regions of interest and margin expansions. Areas at risk for subclinical disease to be included in the CTV were defined, including nodal regions, anastomoses, and the preoperative primary tumor location. Regions of interest that could be reproducibly contoured on postoperative imaging after a pancreaticoduodenectomy were identified. Standardized expansion margins to encompass areas at risk were developed after multiple iterations to determine the optimal margin expansions. Results: New contouring recommendations based on CT anatomy were established. Written guidelines for the delineation of the postoperative CTV and normal tissues, as well as a Web-based atlas, were developed. Conclusions: The postoperative abdomen has been a difficult area for effective radiotherapy. These new guidelines will help physicians create fields that better encompass areas at risk and minimize dose to normal tissues.

  19. Radiation treatment and radiation reactions in dermatology. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panizzon, Renato G. [Univ. Hospital CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Dermatology; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich (ed.) [Strahlenzentrum Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Explains the use of radiation treatment in the full range of skin cancers and precancerous lesions. Covers physical and radiobiological principles, dose definitions, radiation reactions, and risk assessments. Revised and updated edition that includes new chapters and numerous additional figures. In this book, leading experts in the dermatological and oncological field describe the use of radiation therapy for the treatment of the full range of dermatological malignancies - including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, cutaneous lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcoma, melanoma, and Merkel cell tumor - as well as those precancerous lesions and non-malignant dermatological disorders which are amenable to radiation therapy. In each case the specific indications for the use of radiotherapy and its application are clearly explained with the aid of numerous high-quality illustrations. In addition, the book provides a concise introduction to physical and radiobiological principles, selection of radiation factors, dose definitions, radiation reactions, and risk assessments. The new edition has been thoroughly revised and updated to reflect advances in practical knowledge and clinical practice. It will be an invaluable source of information on the management of skin tumors and related non-malignant disorders for both dermatologists, oncologists and radiation oncologists.

  20. Radiation treatment and radiation reactions in dermatology. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Explains the use of radiation treatment in the full range of skin cancers and precancerous lesions. Covers physical and radiobiological principles, dose definitions, radiation reactions, and risk assessments. Revised and updated edition that includes new chapters and numerous additional figures. In this book, leading experts in the dermatological and oncological field describe the use of radiation therapy for the treatment of the full range of dermatological malignancies - including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, cutaneous lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcoma, melanoma, and Merkel cell tumor - as well as those precancerous lesions and non-malignant dermatological disorders which are amenable to radiation therapy. In each case the specific indications for the use of radiotherapy and its application are clearly explained with the aid of numerous high-quality illustrations. In addition, the book provides a concise introduction to physical and radiobiological principles, selection of radiation factors, dose definitions, radiation reactions, and risk assessments. The new edition has been thoroughly revised and updated to reflect advances in practical knowledge and clinical practice. It will be an invaluable source of information on the management of skin tumors and related non-malignant disorders for both dermatologists, oncologists and radiation oncologists.

  1. Treatment of acute radiodermatitis with an oil-in-water emulsion following radiation therapy for breast cancer. A controlled, randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A side effect of radiotherapy for breast cancer is acute radiodermatitis. It is a common practice to keep irradiated skin dry on account of data from the 1950s that suggested this regimen limits dermatitis. However, severe dryness of the skin induced by irradiation results in itching and discomfort. Dry skin is characterized by scaliness, epidermal barrier dysfunction, and reduced stratum corneum hydration, and these signs and symptoms are reduced by treatment with an emulsion. We performed a randomized, controlled, open-label study with 66 patients (ITT population), treating the irradiated skin in one group (n = 34) with an oil-in-water emulsion (WO1932), while leaving the other group untreated (n = 32). Clinical scoring (ONS radiation skin reaction scoring, pruritus) and biophysical measurements (stratum corneum hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL), as a marker of skin barrier function) were determined at day 1 (directly after termination of the radiation therapy), day 8, and day 47 (± 7). Irradiation increased the ONS score and pruritus, whereas skin hydration and TEWL were reduced. The primary hypothesis that the increase in skin hydration was significantly greater in the emulsion-treated compared to the untreated group as early as after 8 days of treatment could not be confirmed. At the end of the study (day 47 ± 7), however, normalization of stratum corneum hydration was more advanced in the treatment group compared to the untreated group and nearly reached the values of the contralateral healthy breast skin. ONS score and pruritus also revealed an advantage for the emulsion-treated group. TEWL did not show significant changes during emulsion treatment. No adverse events were caused by the treatment regimens. Treatment of radiodermatitis with an oil-in-water emulsion was well tolerated, enhanced stratum corneum hydration, improved clinical indicators, and provided relief from itching. (orig.)

  2. Radiation dose to the patient and the radiologist while performing on chest computed tomography: a program of early diagnosis of lung cancer, biopsy and treatment simulation guided radiation oncologist breast cancer; Dosis de radiacion al paciente y al radiologo durante la realizacion de tomografia computarizada en torax: progrma de diagnostico precoz del cancer de pulmon, biopsia guiada y simulacion del tratamiento oncologo radioterapico del cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor Sanchis, V.; Martinez Sanchez, J. M.; Palma Copete, J. D.; Crispin Contreras, V.; Casal Zamorano, E.; Dolores Alemany, V. de los; Gonzalez Perez, V.; Gimeno Olmo, J.; Guardino de la Flor, C.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we determine the equivalent dose received by the operator and patient lung biopsies using thermoluminescence dosimeters, are established recommendations that this dose is as low as possible. It also reviews the acquisition protocols in both CT scans in early diagnosis program cited as the acquisition of CT for treatment planning dosimetric radiation oncologist in breast cancer.

  3. Radiation-induced proctitis: Symptoms, pathophysiology and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is a major treatment of pelvic tumours. It exposes to the risk of acute and long-term side effects, such as radiation proctitis. Radiation proctitis is a complex disease requiring support ranging from initial contact with the patient until several years after completion of radiotherapy. This care includes preventive measures (clinical and dosimetric factors), detection and medical and surgical treatments. This article aims to make a review of radiation proctitis induced during the treatment of pelvic cancers. (authors)

  4. Concurrent pelvic radiation with weekly low-dose cisplatin and gemcitabine as primary treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer: A phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hend EL-Hadaad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was done to evaluate response, compliance and survival of weekly low dose cisplatin (20 mg/m2 and gemcitabine (125 mg/m2 concurrently with pelvic radiation as primary treatment of stage IIB-IIIB cervical cancer.Methods: External radiation consisted of 50 Gy/25 fractions using 6-10 MV photon followed by 600 cGy boost to parametrium if it was still felt thickened. Then, intracavitary radiotherapy to deliver 60 Gy at point A. Chemotherapy consisted of gemcitabine at a dose of 125 mg/ m2 was given by i.v infusion over 30 minutes immediately after cisplatin 20 mg/ m2 weekly for 5 weeks during EBRT. Forty–five eligible patients received the treatment protocol. Results: Toxicity was tolerable and manageable. No grade 4 toxicity while grade 3 was recorded in hematologic one only. In order of frequency; diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, and anemia (50%, 40%, 35.5% were most common adverse events. Overall clinical response rate was 93.4% with pathological complete response of 62.2%. After median follow-up of 20 months, 2-year survival and progression-free survival rates were 90.5% and 81% respectively. Conclusion: Weekly combination of low- dose cisplatin and gemcitabine given concurrently with pelvic radiotherapy in primary treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer resulted in a high response rate with a good compliance. Further exploration is needed for the use of this approach prior to incorporating it into routine clinical care through phase III clinical trial.

  5. Radiation related basic cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Yoo, Young Do; Hong, Seok Il [and others

    2000-04-01

    We studied the mechanism of radiation-induced apoptosis, the factors involved signaling, and the establishment of radiation-resistant cell lines in this study. During the TGF beta-stimulated epithelial mesenchymal transition(EMT), actin rearrangement occurred first and fibronectin matrix assembly followed. These two events were considered independent since cytochalasin-D did not inhibit TGF stimulated matrix assembly and fibronectin supplementation did not induce EMT. During EMT, alpha 5 beta 1 integrin and alpha v integrin have increased but MMP activation was not accompanied, which suggest that induction of extracellular matrix and activation of integrins may be main contributor for the EMT. Serum depriving induced apoptosis of HUVECs was prevented by vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) and PMA. The apoptosis prevention by VEGF and PMA were conformed by DNA fragmentation assay. The p53 expression level was down regulated by VEGF and PMA compared with serum deprived HUVECs. However, VEGF and PMA induces c-Myc expression level on these cells. We made the 5 radiation-resistant clones from breast, lung and cervical cancer cells. More than 70%, 100% and 50% increased resistance was detected in breast cancer cells, lung cancer cells, and cervical cells, respectively. We carried out differential display-PCR to clone the radiation-resistant genes. 9 out of 10 genes were analyzed their sequence.

  6. Radiation related basic cancer research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the mechanism of radiation-induced apoptosis, the factors involved signaling, and the establishment of radiation-resistant cell lines in this study. During the TGF beta-stimulated epithelial mesenchymal transition(EMT), actin rearrangement occurred first and fibronectin matrix assembly followed. These two events were considered independent since cytochalasin-D did not inhibit TGF stimulated matrix assembly and fibronectin supplementation did not induce EMT. During EMT, alpha 5 beta 1 integrin and alpha v integrin have increased but MMP activation was not accompanied, which suggest that induction of extracellular matrix and activation of integrins may be main contributor for the EMT. Serum depriving induced apoptosis of HUVECs was prevented by vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) and PMA. The apoptosis prevention by VEGF and PMA were conformed by DNA fragmentation assay. The p53 expression level was down regulated by VEGF and PMA compared with serum deprived HUVECs. However, VEGF and PMA induces c-Myc expression level on these cells. We made the 5 radiation-resistant clones from breast, lung and cervical cancer cells. More than 70%, 100% and 50% increased resistance was detected in breast cancer cells, lung cancer cells, and cervical cells, respectively. We carried out differential display-PCR to clone the radiation-resistant genes. 9 out of 10 genes were analyzed their sequence

  7. Effectiveness of pranayama on cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jyothi Chakrabarty; M S Vidyasagar; Donald Fernandes; Ganapathi Joisa; Prabha Varghese; Sreemathi Mayya

    2015-01-01

    Context: Incidence of breast cancer is very high among women around the world. Breast cancer patients experience cancer-related fatigue at some points during the treatment for breast cancer. Since cancer-related fatigue is of multifactorial origin, there are no evidence-based treatment strategies for fatigue. This study tested the effectiveness of certain pranayama techniques in reducing cancer-related fatigue among breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Aims: The objective of t...

  8. Comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy vs. intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of a stomach cancer treatment;Comparacion dosimetrica de radioterapia conformal 3D versus radioterapia de intensidad modulada (IMRT) de un tratamiento de cancer de estomago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernui de V, Maria Giselle; Cardenas, Augusto; Vargas, Carlos [Hospital Nacional Carlos Alberto Seguin Escobedo (ESSALUD), Arequipa (Peru). Servicio de Radioterapia

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the dosimetry in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in a treatment of stomach cancer. For this comparison we selected a patient who underwent subtotal gastrectomy and D2 dissection for a T3N3 adenocarcinoma Mx ECIIIB receiving treatment under the scheme Quimio INT 0116 - in adjuvant radiotherapy. In the treatment plan was contouring the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) and the Planning Target Volume (PTV) was generated from the expansion of 1cm of the CTV, the risky organs contouring were: the liver, kidneys and spinal cord, according to the consensus definition of volumes in gastric cancer. The 3D Conformal Radiotherapy planning is carried out using 6 half beams following the Leong Trevol technique; for the IMRT plan was used 8 fields, the delivery technique is step-and-shoot. In both cases the fields were coplanar, isocentric and the energy used was 18 MV. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), in this case has proved to be a good treatment alternative to the technique of 3D Conformal Radiotherapy; the dose distributions with IMRT have better coverage of PTV and positions of the hot spots, as well as the kidneys volume that received higher doses to 2000 cGy is lower, but the decrease in dose to the kidneys is at the expense of increased dose in other organs like the liver. (author)

  9. Radiation Therapy of Maxillary Sinus Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Maxillary sinus cancers usually are locally advanced and involve the structures around sinus. It is uncommon for this cancer to spread to the regional lymphnodes. For this reason, local control is of paramount important for cure. A policy of combined treatment is generally accepted as the most effective means of enhancing cure rates. This paper reports our experience of a retrospective study of 31 patients treated with radiation therapy alone and combination therapy of surgery and radiation. Materials and Methods: Between July 1974 and January 1992, 47 patients with maxillary sinus cancers underwent either radiation therapy alone or combination therapy of surgery and radiation. Of these, only 31 patients were eligible for analysis. The distribution of clinical stage by the AJCC system was 26%(8/31) for T2 and 74%(23/31) for T3 and T4. Eight patients had palpable lymphadenopathy at diagnosis. Primary site was treated by Cobalt-60 radiation therapy using through a 45 .deg. wedge-pair technique. Elective neck irradiation was not routinely given. Of these 8 patients, the six who had clinically involved nodes were treated with definite radiation therapy. The other two patients had received radical neck dissection. The twenty-two patients were treated with radiation alone and 9 patients were treated with combination radiation therapy. The RT alone patients with RT dose less than 60 Gy were 9 and those above 60 Gy were 13. Results: The overall 5 year survival rate was 23.8%. The 5 year survival rate by T-stage was 60.5% and 7.9% for T2 and T3, 4 respectively. Statistical significance was found by T-stage (p30.1). The 5 year survival rate for RT alone and combination RT was 22.5% and 27.4%, respectively. The primary local control rate was 65%(20/31). Conclusion: This study did not show significant difference in survival between RT alone and combination RT. There is still much controversy with regard to which treatment is optimum. Improved RT technique and

  10. Impact of tumor extent and location on treatment outcome in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of treatment of 141 patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive radiation therapy at Gunma University Hospital between 1976 and 1989 were retrospectively analyzed. Radiation was given with standard fractionation for a planned prophylactic dose of 40 Gy over 4 weeks and a definitive dose of 60 Gy over 6 weeks or more. The two- and five-year survival rates were 27% and 12% for stage IIIA, and 18% and 8% for stage IIIB, respectively (P=0.052). By univariate analysis, a primary tumor less than 5 cm in diameter was also an important predictor of survival (P=0.008). As for tumor location, the patients with primary tumors in the upper lobes or the superior segment of the lower lobes of the lung lived longer than those with primary tumors at any other site (P=0.032). Patients with epidermoid carcinoma had a higher survival rate at 5 years than those with other histologic types (14% vs 3%, P=0.074). Multivariate analysis showed that among tumor characteristics, the site of the primary tumor, the pattern of tumor spread and N stage were significantly associated with overall survival. Among the patients with stage III NSCLC, those with stage IIIA epidermoid carcinoma in the upper lobe or the superior segment of the lower lobe of the lung were considered to be the most favorable candidates for definitive radiation therapy. (author)

  11. Cancer treatment: dealing with pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000827.htm Cancer treatment: dealing with pain To use the sharing features on this page, ... health care provider about your options. What Causes Pain The pain from cancer can have a few ...

  12. SU-D-18A-01: Tumor Motion Tracking with a Regional Deformable Registration Model for Four Dimensional Radiation Treatment of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, M; Lo, Y; Yuan, Y; Sheu, R; Rosenzweig, K [The Mount Sinai Medical Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a tumor motion model from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) of thoracic patients and demonstrate its impact on 4D radiation therapy simulation. Methods: A regional deformable image registration algorithm was introduced to extract tumor motion out of patient's breathing cycle. The gross target volume (GTV) was manually delineated on a selected phase of 4DCT and a subregion with 10mm margin supplemented to the GTV was created on the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Together with 4DCT the structures were exported into an inhouse research platform. A free form B-Spline deformable registration was carried out to map the subregion to other respiratory phases. The displacement vector fields were employed to propagate GTV contours with which the center of mass (CoM) of the GTV was computed for each breathing phase of 4DCT. The resultant GTV motion and its volumetric shape are utilized to facilitate 4D treatment planning. Five lung cancer patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy were enrolled and their 4DCT sets were included in the study. Results: Application of the algorithm to five thoracic patients indicates that clinically satisfactory outcomes were achievable with a spatial accuracy better than 2mm for GTV contour propagation between adjacent phases, and 3mm between opposite phases. The GTV CoM was found to be in the range of 2.0mm through 2.5cm, depending upon the tumor location. Compared to the traditional whole image based registration, the computation of the regional model was found to be an order of magnitude more efficient. Conclusion: A regional deformable registration model was implemented to extract tumor motion. It will have widespread application in 4D radiation treatment planning in the future to maximally utilize the available spatial-tempo information.

  13. SU-D-18A-01: Tumor Motion Tracking with a Regional Deformable Registration Model for Four Dimensional Radiation Treatment of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a tumor motion model from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) of thoracic patients and demonstrate its impact on 4D radiation therapy simulation. Methods: A regional deformable image registration algorithm was introduced to extract tumor motion out of patient's breathing cycle. The gross target volume (GTV) was manually delineated on a selected phase of 4DCT and a subregion with 10mm margin supplemented to the GTV was created on the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Together with 4DCT the structures were exported into an inhouse research platform. A free form B-Spline deformable registration was carried out to map the subregion to other respiratory phases. The displacement vector fields were employed to propagate GTV contours with which the center of mass (CoM) of the GTV was computed for each breathing phase of 4DCT. The resultant GTV motion and its volumetric shape are utilized to facilitate 4D treatment planning. Five lung cancer patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy were enrolled and their 4DCT sets were included in the study. Results: Application of the algorithm to five thoracic patients indicates that clinically satisfactory outcomes were achievable with a spatial accuracy better than 2mm for GTV contour propagation between adjacent phases, and 3mm between opposite phases. The GTV CoM was found to be in the range of 2.0mm through 2.5cm, depending upon the tumor location. Compared to the traditional whole image based registration, the computation of the regional model was found to be an order of magnitude more efficient. Conclusion: A regional deformable registration model was implemented to extract tumor motion. It will have widespread application in 4D radiation treatment planning in the future to maximally utilize the available spatial-tempo information

  14. Sexual dysfunctions after prostate cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexual dysfunctions are a quality of life main concern following prostate cancer treatment. After both radiotherapy and brachytherapy, sexual function declines progressively, the onset of occurrence of erectile dysfunction being 12-18 months after both treatments. The pathophysiological pathways by which radiotherapy and brachytherapy cause erectile dysfunction are multi-factorial, as patient co-morbidities, arterial damage, exposure of neurovascular bundle to high levels of radiation, and radiation dose received by the corpora cavernosa at the crurae of the penis may be important in the aetiology of erectile dysfunction. Diagnosis and treatment of postradiation sexual dysfunctions must integrate pre-therapeutic evaluation and information to provide to the patient and his partner a multidisciplinary sexual medicine management. (authors)

  15. Improvement of internal tumor volumes of non-small cell lung cancer patients for radiation treatment planning using interpolated average CT in PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Ching Wang

    Full Text Available Respiratory motion causes uncertainties in tumor edges on either computed tomography (CT or positron emission tomography (PET images and causes misalignment when registering PET and CT images. This phenomenon may cause radiation oncologists to delineate tumor volume inaccurately in radiotherapy treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to analyze radiology applications using interpolated average CT (IACT as attenuation correction (AC to diminish the occurrence of this scenario. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients were recruited for the present comparison study. Each patient had full-inspiration, full-expiration CT images and free breathing PET images by an integrated PET/CT scan. IACT for AC in PET(IACT was used to reduce the PET/CT misalignment. The standardized uptake value (SUV correction with a low radiation dose was applied, and its tumor volume delineation was compared to those from HCT/PET(HCT. The misalignment between the PET(IACT and IACT was reduced when compared to the difference between PET(HCT and HCT. The range of tumor motion was from 4 to 17 mm in the patient cohort. For HCT and PET(HCT, correction was from 72% to 91%, while for IACT and PET(IACT, correction was from 73% to 93% (*p<0.0001. The maximum and minimum differences in SUVmax were 0.18% and 27.27% for PET(HCT and PET(IACT, respectively. The largest percentage differences in the tumor volumes between HCT/PET and IACT/PET were observed in tumors located in the lowest lobe of the lung. Internal tumor volume defined by functional information using IACT/PET(IACT fusion images for lung cancer would reduce the inaccuracy of tumor delineation in radiation therapy planning.

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Anal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Anal Cancer Prevention Research Anal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Anal Cancer ... factors affect the prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Bladder Cancer Screening Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  18. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT) planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate) and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets) in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes) and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures) were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p < 0.001), similar nodal coverage (8/8 t-test comparisons; p = ns), higher and more homogenous pelvic tissue dose (6/6 t-test comparisons; p < 0.03), at the cost of slightly higher critical structure dose (Ddose, 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p < 0.03). The dIMRT/HT approaches were superior to 3DCRT in sparing organs at risk (22/24 t-test comparisons; p < 0.05). dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies

  19. State of the art of radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy has a critical role in the treatment of esophageal cancer. To improve the treatment outcome of radiotherapy, not only strengthening the treatment intensity but also decreasing the long term toxicity is needed. To reduce the long term cardiopulmonary toxicity of chemoradiation, JCOG is now running a clinical trial which combines three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and mild irradiation dose. New techniques of radiation therapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or particle therapy are also promising in both treatment intensity and decreased toxicity. (author)

  20. Inhalative steroids as an individual treatment in symptomatic lung cancer patients with radiation pneumonitis grade II after radiotherapy – a single-centre experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess efficacy of our single-centre experience with inhalative steroids (IS) in lung cancer patients with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) grade II. Between 05/09 and 07/10, 24 patients (female, n = 8; male, n = 16) with lung cancer (non-small cell lung carcinoma [NSCLC]: n = 19; small cell lung cancer [SCLC]: n = 3; unknown histology: n = 2) and good performance status (ECOG ≤1) received definitive radiotherapy to the primary tumour site and involved lymph nodes with concurrent chemotherapy (n = 18), sequential chemotherapy (n = 2) or radiation only (n = 4) and developed symptomatic RP grade II during follow-up. No patient presented with oxygen requiring RP grade III. The mean age at diagnosis was 66 years (range: 50–82 years). Nine patients suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) before treatment, and 18 patients had a smoking history (median pack years: 48). The mean lung dose was 15.5 Gy (range: 3.0–23.1 Gy). All patients were treated with IS. If a patient’s clinical symptoms did not significantly improve within two weeks of IS therapy initiation, their treatment was switched to oral prednisolone. All 24 patients were initially treated with a high dose IS (budesonide 800 μg 1-0-1) for 14 days. Of the patients, 18 showed a significant improvement of clinical symptoms and 6 patients did not show significant improvement of clinical symptoms and were classified as non-responders to IS. Their treatment was switched to oral steroids after two weeks (starting with oral prednisolone, 0.5 mg/kg bodyweight; at least 50 mg per day). All of these patients responded to the prednisolone. None of non-responders presented with increased symptoms of RP and required oxygen and / or hospitalization (RP grade III). The median follow-up after IS treatment initiation was 18 months (range: 4–66 months). The median duration of IS treatment and prednisolone treatment was 8.2 months (range: 3.0–48.3 months) and 11.4 months (range: 5.0–44

  1. First report of a permanent breast 103Pd seed implant as adjuvant radiation treatment for early-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A new technique of adjuvant partial breast irradiation using 103Pd permanent breast seed implants (PBSI) is presented. The procedure is performed in a single 1-hour session under local anesthesia. Methods and Materials: Patients referred to a single institution for adjuvant radiotherapy after lumpectomy for an infiltrating ductal carcinoma ≤3 cm in diameter, surgical margin ≥2 mm, no extensive in situ carcinoma, no lymphovascular invasion, and minimal or negative lymph node involvement were offered a PBSI. Results: Between May and December 2004, 31 eligible patients underwent CT scan and ultrasound simulations assessing PBSI feasibility. Fifteen were excluded because of feasibility issues, and 16 received PBSI. A minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the planning target volume corresponding to the clinical target volume identified on the CT scan plus a margin of 1 cm. The procedure was well tolerated; 56% of the patients reported no pain during the procedure, and 46% of the patients developed National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 1 acute reaction. None experienced toxicity Grade 2 or 3. Conclusions: Permanent breast seed implantation seems feasible and well tolerated on these preliminary clinical data and represents an ultimate step in the reduction of treatment fraction for partial breast irradiation

  2. Efforts for improvement in radiotherapy of cancer using metronidazole with special regard to head and neck. Part of a coordinated programme on improvement of cancer therapy by the combination treatment of conventional radiation and physical and chemical means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A great effort has been expended in the search for means which would be of immediate practical interest to the radiotherapist in order to achieve improvement of the result of cancer treatment. These means include modifiers which are sensitizers to potentiate radiation effects on tumour cells without affecting normal tissue. We started a controlled therapeutic trial on locally advanced head and neck carcinomas using metronidazole. There was good tolerance to metronidazole although improvement of local tumour control with this drug was not observed. We also observed that irradiation with fractions daily gave a better tumour control than single fractions a day

  3. Dosimetric feasibility of stereotactic body radiation therapy as an alternative to brachytherapy for definitive treatment of medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to evaluate the dosimetric feasibility of definitive stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer. CT simulation scans from 10 medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer patients previously treated with high dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy were used to generate Helical Tomotherapy (HT) plans using the IMRT mode with clinical target volumes (CTVs) that included the uterus plus cervix. A prescription dose of 34 Gy in 4 fractions was used. The SBRT dosimetry was compared to the 10 prior intracavitary brachytherapy plans normalized to a standard dose. Organs at risk (OARs) evaluated were the bladder, rectum, sigmoid, femoral heads, and other bowel, including both large and small bowel. The simulation CT and daily image guidance for 4 patients treated with this technique were evaluated to assess for interfraction variation in the uterine position and effects on dosimetry. Compared to intracavitary brachytherapy, HT SBRT produced significantly greater overall target coverage to the uterus, boost CTV, and PTV, with exception of the V150% of the uterus. HT SBRT significantly increased dose to the rectum, bowel, and femoral heads compared to intracavitary brachytherapy, though not outside of dose tolerance limits. Review of daily image guidance for patients treated with this technique demonstrated good reproducibility with a mean overlap index of 0.87 (range, 0.74 – 0.99). Definitive SBRT for medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer appears to be a feasible treatment option. Future studies are warranted to evaluate long-term clinical outcomes with this technique, compared to HDR intracavitary brachytherapy

  4. Phase impact factor: a novel parameter for determining optimal CT phase in 4D radiation therapy treatment planning for mobile lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yulin; Huang, Xiaolei; Mueller, Boris; Mychalczak, Borys

    2008-03-01

    Due to respiratory motion, lung tumor can move up to several centimeters. If respiratory motion is not carefully considered during the radiation treatment planning, the highly conformal dose distribution with steep gradients could miss the target. To address this issue, the common strategy is to add a population-derived safety margin to the gross tumor volume (GTV). However, during a free breathing CT simulation, the images could be acquired at any phase of a breathing cycle. With such a generalized uniform margin, the planning target volume (PTV) may either include more normal lung tissue than required or miss the GTV at certain phases of a breathing cycle. Recently, respiration correlated CT (4DCT) has been developed and implemented. With 4DCT, it is now possible to trace the tumor 3D trajectories during a breathing cycle and to define the tumor volume as the union of these 3D trajectories. The tumor volume defined in this way is called the internal target volume (ITV). In this study, we introduced a novel parameter, the phase impact factor (PIF), to determine the optimal CT phase for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning for lung cancer. A minimum PIF yields a minimum probability for the GTV to move out of the ITV during the course of an IMRT treatment, providing a minimum probability of a geometric miss. Once the CT images with the optimal phase were determined, an IMRT plan with three to five co-planner beams was computed and optimized using the inverse treatment planning technique.

  5. External-beam radiation therapy should be given with androgen deprivation treatment for intermediate-risk nrnstate cancer: new confirmatory evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew R Cooperberg

    2012-01-01

    Anewly published study, RadiationTherapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trial94-08,has demonstrated that a short-course ofneoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) given together with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) improves outcomes for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer compared with EBRT alone.

  6. Treatment planning study comparing proton therapy, RapidArc and intensity modulated radiation therapy for a synchronous bilateral lung cancer case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to perform a treatment planning study on a synchronous bilateral non-small cell lung cancer case using three treatment modalities: uniform scanning proton therapy, RapidArc, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. Methods: The maximum intensity projection (MIP images obtained from the 4 dimensional-computed tomography (4DCT scans were used for delineation of tumor volumes in the left and right lungs. The average 4D-CT was used for the treatment planning among all three modalities with identical patient contouring and treatment planning goal. A proton therapy plan was generated in XiO treatment planning system (TPS using 2 fields for each target. For a comparative purpose, IMRT and RapidArc plans were generated in Eclipse TPS. Treatment plans were generated for a total dose of 74 CGE or Gy prescribed to each planning target volume (PTV (left and right with 2 CGE or Gy per fraction. In IMRT and RapidArc plans, normalization was done based on PTV coverage values in proton plans. Results: The mean PTV dose deviation from the prescription dose was lower in proton plan (within 3.4%, but higher in IMRT (6.5% to 11.3% and RapidArc (3.8% to 11.5% plans. Proton therapy produced lower mean dose to the total lung, heart, and esophagus when compared to IMRT and RapidArc. The relative volume of the total lung receiving 20, 10, and 5 CGE or Gy (V20, V10, and V5, respectively were lower using proton therapy than using IMRT, with absolute differences of 9.71%, 22.88%, and 39.04%, respectively. The absolute differences in the V20, V10, and V5 between proton and RapidArc plans were 4.84%, 19.16%, and 36.8%, respectively, with proton therapy producing lower dosimetric values. Conclusion: Based on the results presented in this case study, uniform scanning proton therapy has a dosimetric advantage over both IMRT and RapidArc for a synchronous bi-lateral NSCLC, especially for the normal lung tissue, heart, and

  7. Impact of intensity-modulated radiation therapy as a boost treatment on the lung-dose distributions for non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as a method of boost radiotherapy after the initial irradiation by the conventional anterior/posterior opposed beams for centrally located non-small-cell lung cancer through the evaluation of dose distributions according to the various boost methods. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with T3 or T4 lung cancer and mediastinal node enlargement who previously received radiotherapy were studied. All patients underwent virtual simulation retrospectively with the previous treatment planning computed tomograms. Initial radiotherapy plans were designed to deliver 40 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodal regions with the conventional anterior/posterior opposed beams. Two radiation dose levels, 24 and 30 Gy, were used for the boost radiotherapy plans, and four different boost methods (a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy [3DCRT], five-, seven-, and nine-beam IMRT) were applied to each dose level. The goals of the boost plans were to deliver the prescribed radiation dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) and minimize the volumes of the normal lungs and spinal cord irradiated above their tolerance doses. Dose distributions in the PTVs and lungs, according to the four types of boost plans, were compared in the boost and sum plans, respectively. Results: The percentage of lung volumes irradiated >20 Gy (V20) was reduced significantly in the IMRT boost plans compared with the 3DCRT boost plans at the 24- and 30-Gy dose levels (p 0.007 and 0.0315 respectively). Mean lung doses according to the boost methods were not different in the 24- and 30-Gy boost plans. The conformity indexes (CI) of the IMRT boost plans were lower than those of the 3DCRT plans in the 24- and 30-Gy plans (p = 0.001 in both). For the sum plans, there was no difference of the dose distributions in the PTVs and lungs according to the boost methods. Conclusions: In the boost plans the V20s and CIs were

  8. Radiation exposure and infant cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical exposures accompanied by an increase in radiation use in the field of pediatrics were described. Basic ideas and countermeasures to radiation injuries were outlined. In order to decrease the medical exposure, it is necessary for the doctor, x-ray technician and manufacturer to work together. The mechanism and characteristics of radio carcinogenesis were also mentioned. Particularly, the following two points were described: 1) How many years does it take before carcinogenesis appears as a result of radiation exposure in infancy 2) How and when does the effect of fetus exposure appear. Radiosensitivity in infants and fetuses is greater than that of an adult. The occurrence of leukemia caused by prenatal exposure was reviewed. The relation between irradiation for therapy and morbidity of thyroid cancer was mentioned. Finally, precautions necessary for infants, pregnant women and nursing mothers when using radioisotopes were mentioned. (K. Serizawa)

  9. Feasibility of high-dose three-dimensional radiation therapy in the treatment of localised non-small-cell lung cancer; Irradiation conformationelle de haute dose dans les cancers bronchiques non a petites cellules localement evolues: etude de faisabilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belliere, A.; Girard, N.; Chapet, O.; Khodri, M.; Kubas, A.; Mornex, F. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Dept. de Radiotherapie-Oncologie, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Souquet, P.J. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Dept. de Medecine Respiratoire, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France)

    2009-07-15

    Purpose/ Chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment of inoperable and/or non-resectable IIIA/B non-small-cell lung cancer (N.S.C.L.C.). Aware of the necessity to increase local control in locally advanced N.S.C.L.C., we analyzed the feasibility of high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-C.R.T.) in the treatment of localised N.S.C.L.C. Patients and methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with non-resectable N.S.C.L.C. treated with high-dose (74 Gy) standard-fractionation 3D-C.R.T., with particular attention to the relationship between lung and heart radiation-induced toxicities. Results: Fifty patients (41 males, 9 females) were included. A total of 35 (70%) patients received the planned total dose of 74 Gy. Patients irradiated to inferior doses interrupted the treatment because of limiting toxicities. Induction and concurrent chemotherapy was delivered to 39 (78%) and 14 (28%) patients, respectively. Eight (16%) patients experienced grade 3-4 acute lung toxicity, all of them having a history of pulmonary disease, a FEV1 below 1.6 L, and a lung V20 of at least 25%. Three (6%) patients were deemed to experience radiation-induced cardiac toxicity. Conclusions: This study assesses the feasibility of delivering a total dose of 74 Gy combined with chemotherapy in locally advanced N.S.C.L.C.. High lung and heart V20 increases the risk of radiation-induced lung and cardiac toxicity, the later being highly difficult to precisely assess, as late deaths are rarely documented, and responsibility of the treatment might be often underestimated. The precise evaluation of cardiac condition may be helpful to spare fragile patients from potentially toxic effects of high-dose radiation, especially in controlled trials. (authors)

  10. Impact of Pretreatment Combined {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Staging on Radiation Therapy Treatment Decisions in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Sweet Ping, E-mail: sweet.ng@petermac.org [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); David, Steven [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Alamgeer, Muhammad; Ganju, Vinod [Monash Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and its impact on radiation therapy treatment decisions in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Methods and Materials: Patients with LABC with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 and no contraindication to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant radiation therapy were enrolled on a prospective trial. All patients had pretreatment conventional imaging (CI) performed, including bilateral breast mammography and ultrasound, bone scan, and CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis scans performed. Informed consent was obtained before enrolment. Pretreatment whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed on all patients, and results were compared with CI findings. Results: A total of 154 patients with LABC with no clinical or radiologic evidence of distant metastases on CI were enrolled. Median age was 49 years (range, 26-70 years). Imaging with PET/CT detected distant metastatic disease and/or locoregional disease not visualized on CI in 32 patients (20.8%). Distant metastatic disease was detected in 17 patients (11.0%): 6 had bony metastases, 5 had intrathoracic metastases (pulmonary/mediastinal), 2 had distant nodal metastases, 2 had liver metastases, 1 had pulmonary and bony metastases, and 1 had mediastinal and distant nodal metastases. Of the remaining 139 patients, nodal disease outside conventional radiation therapy fields was detected on PET/CT in 15 patients (10.8%), with involvement of ipsilateral internal mammary nodes in 13 and ipsilateral level 5 cervical nodes in 2. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT provides superior diagnostic and staging information in patients with LABC compared with CI, which has significant therapeutic implications with respect to radiation therapy management. Imaging with PET/CT should be considered in all patients undergoing primary

  11. Impact of Pretreatment Combined 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Staging on Radiation Therapy Treatment Decisions in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of pretreatment 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) and its impact on radiation therapy treatment decisions in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Methods and Materials: Patients with LABC with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 and no contraindication to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant radiation therapy were enrolled on a prospective trial. All patients had pretreatment conventional imaging (CI) performed, including bilateral breast mammography and ultrasound, bone scan, and CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis scans performed. Informed consent was obtained before enrolment. Pretreatment whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed on all patients, and results were compared with CI findings. Results: A total of 154 patients with LABC with no clinical or radiologic evidence of distant metastases on CI were enrolled. Median age was 49 years (range, 26-70 years). Imaging with PET/CT detected distant metastatic disease and/or locoregional disease not visualized on CI in 32 patients (20.8%). Distant metastatic disease was detected in 17 patients (11.0%): 6 had bony metastases, 5 had intrathoracic metastases (pulmonary/mediastinal), 2 had distant nodal metastases, 2 had liver metastases, 1 had pulmonary and bony metastases, and 1 had mediastinal and distant nodal metastases. Of the remaining 139 patients, nodal disease outside conventional radiation therapy fields was detected on PET/CT in 15 patients (10.8%), with involvement of ipsilateral internal mammary nodes in 13 and ipsilateral level 5 cervical nodes in 2. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT provides superior diagnostic and staging information in patients with LABC compared with CI, which has significant therapeutic implications with respect to radiation therapy management. Imaging with PET/CT should be considered in all patients undergoing primary staging for LABC

  12. Computerized radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a general introduction, a chain consisting of three computer programs which has been developed for treatment planning of external beam radiotherapy without manual intervention is described. New score functions used for determination of optimal incidence directions are presented and the calculation of the position of the isocentre for each optimum combination of incidence directions is explained. A description of how a set of applicators, covering fields with dimensions of 4 to 20 cm, for the 6 to 20 MeV electron beams of a MEL SL75-20 linear accelerator was developed, is given. A computer program for three dimensional electron beam treatment planning is presented. A microprocessor based treatment planning system for the Selectron remote controlled afterloading system for intracavitary radiotherapy is described. The main differences in treatment planning procedures for external beam therapy with neutrons instead of photons is discussed. A microprocessor based densitometer for plotting isodensity lines in film dosimetry is described. A computer program for dose planning of brachytherapy is presented. Finally a general discussion about the different aspects of computerized treatment planning as presented in this thesis is given. (Auth.)

  13. Fertility treatment in male cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kirsten Louise Tryde; Carlsen, Elisabeth; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2007-08-01

    The present study reviews the use of assisted reproductive technology in male cancer survivors and their partners. As antineoplastic treatment with chemotherapy or radiation therapy, has the potential of inducing impairment of spermatogenesis through damage of the germinal epithelium, many male cancer survivors experience difficulties in impregnating their partners after treatment. The impairment can be temporary or permanent. While many cancer survivors regain spermatogenesis months to years after treatment, some become infertile with a-, oligo- or azoospermia. An option to secure the fertility potential of young cancer patients is to cryopreserve semen before cancer treatment for later use. A desired pregnancy may be obtained in couples where the husband has a history of cancer, using assisted reproductive technology with either fresh or cryopreserved/thawed semen. Successful outcomes have been obtained with intrauterine insemination (IUI) as well as in vitro fertilization (IVF) with or without the use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). In conclusion, male cancer survivors and their partners who have failed to obtain a pregnancy naturally within a reasonable time frame after end of treatment should be referred to a fertility clinic. PMID:17573855

  14. Online external beam radiation treatment simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is an effective and widely accepted form of treatment for many types of cancer that requires extensive computerized planning. Unfortunately, current treatment planning systems have limited or no visual aid that combines patient volumetric models extracted from patient-specific CT data with the treatment device geometry in a 3D interactive simulation. We illustrate the potential of 3D simulation in radiation therapy with a web-based interactive system that combines novel standards and technologies. We discuss related research efforts in this area and present in detail several components of the simulator. An objective assessment of the accuracy of the simulator and a usability study prove the potential of such a system for simulation and training. (orig.)

  15. Radiation treatment planning system verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimum radiotherapy requires accurate and consistent radiation doses. To fulfil this requirement, it is necessary to make quality checks of the equipment and software included in the planning process. Treatment planning system is used to calculate monitor units required to deliver prescribed dose to a designated volume with acceptable distribution of radiation dose. The aim of this study was to verify the Theraplan Plus treatment program used in our Department to calculate treatment times for radiation therapy with 60Co unit. To run a Theraplan Plus system, it is necessary to input data describing mechanical and radiation aspects of treatment unit. One of the checks included a comparison of the measured depth doses and off-axis ratios with those calculated using the treatment program. The second step included the measurement of the dose using ionisation chamber and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), which was then compared with calculated values for several treatment scenarios (central axis dose on specified depth of square fields, elongated fields, under the block and wedges etc.). The third step involved the comparison between the dose calculated for a specific treatment plan with the doses measured with TLD dosimeters in the Alderson phantom.(author)

  16. Treatment outcomes of extended-field radiation therapy and the effect of concurrent chemotherapy on uterine cervical cancer with para-aortic lymph node metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To review the clinical outcomes of extended-field radiation therapy (EFRT) and to analyze prognostic factors significant for survival in patients receiving EFRT for uterine cervical carcinoma with para-aortic node (PAN) metastasis. We retrospectively reviewed 90 patients with stage IB-IVA cervical cancer and PAN metastasis between 1987 and 2012. Median age was 50 (range, 24–77). Patients received median 70.2 Gy (range, 56–93) to point A and median 50.4 Gy (range, 45–60.4) to PAN over median 69 elapsed days (range, 43–182). Forty-six patients (51.1%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. We analyzed prognostic factors for overall actuarial survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) using a Cox regression method. The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 55 months (range, 3–252). Seventy patients (77.8%) had complete remission. Forty-six patients experienced treatment failure as follows: 11 patients (12.2%) as local recurrence, 19 (21%) as regional recurrence and 33 (36.7%) as distant metastasis. The 5-yr OS and PFS were 62.6% and 43.9%, respectively. Treatment response was the only statistically independent prognostic factors for OS (p= 0.04) and PFS (p< 0.001) on multivariate analysis. Grade 3 or 4 hematologic gastrointestinal and urogenital toxicities were observed in about 10% of patients. Our institutional experiences showed that EFRT was an effective treatment for cervical cancer patients with PAN metastasis. The addition of chemotherapy to EFRT seems to have uncertain survival benefit with higher hematologic toxicity. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-014-0320-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  17. Radiation Therapy in Elderly Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To evaluate the long term results (local control, survival, failure, and complications) after radiation therapy for skin cancer in elderly patients. The study spanned from January 1990 to October 2002. Fifteen elderly patients with skin cancer were treated by radiotherapy at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The age distribution of the patients surveyed was 72 to 95 years, with a median age of 78.8 years. The pathologic classification of the 15 patients included squamous cell carcinoma (10 patients), basal cell carcinoma (3 patients), verrucous carcinoma (1 patient) and skin adnexal origin carcinoma (1 patient). The most common tumor location was the head (13 patients). The mean tumor diameter was 4.9 cm (range 2 to 9 cm). The radiation dose was delivered via an electron beam of 6 to 15 MeV. The dose range was adjusted to the tumor diameter and depth of tumor invasion. The total radiation dose ranged from 50{approx}80 Gy (mean: 66 Gy) with a 2 Gy fractional dose prescribed to the 80% isodose line once a day and 5 times a week. One patient with lymph node metastasis was treated with six MV photon beams boosted with electron beams. The length of the follow-up periods ranged from 10 to 120 months with a median follow-up period of 48 months. The local control rates were 100% (15/15). In addition, the five year disease free survival rate (5YDFS) was 80% and twelve patients (80%) had no recurrence and skin cancer recurrence occurred in 3 patients (20%). Three patients have lived an average of 90 months (68{approx}120 months) without recurrence or metastasis. A total of 9 patients who died as a result of other causes had a mean survival time of 55.8 months after radiation therapy. No severe acute or chronic complications were observed after radiation therapy. Only minor complications including radiation dermatitis was treated with supportive care. The results suggest that radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment method for the treatment of skin

  18. Albendazole sensitizes cancer cells to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain metastases afflict approximately half of patients with metastatic melanoma (MM) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and represent the direct cause of death in 60 to 70% of those affected. Standard of care remains ineffective in both types of cancer with the challenge of overcoming the blood brain barrier (BBB) exacerbating the clinical problem. Our purpose is to determine and characterize the potential of albendazole (ABZ) as a cytotoxic and radiosensitizing agent against MM and SCLC cells. Here, ABZ's mechanism of action as a DNA damaging and microtubule disrupting agent is assessed through analysis of histone H2AX phosphorylation and cell cyle progression. The cytotoxicity of ABZ alone and in combination with radiation therapy is determined though clonogenic cell survival assays in a panel of MM and SCLC cell lines. We further establish ABZ's ability to act synergistically as a radio-sensitizer through combination index calculations and apoptotic measurements of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. ABZ induces DNA damage as measured by increased H2AX phosphorylation. ABZ inhibits the growth of MM and SCLC at clinically achievable plasma concentrations. At these concentrations, ABZ arrests MM and SCLC cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle after 12 hours of treatment. Exploiting the notion that cells in the G2/M phase are the most sensitive to radiation therapy, we show that treatment of MM and SCLC cells treated with ABZ renders them more sensitive to radiation in a synergistic fashion. Additionally, MM and SCLC cells co-treated with ABZ and radiation exhibit increased apoptosis at 72 hours. Our study suggests that the orally available antihelminthic ABZ acts as a potent radiosensitizer in MM and SCLC cell lines. Further evaluation of ABZ in combination with radiation as a potential treatment for MM and SCLC brain metastases is warranted

  19. Stem cell technology and engineering for cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sinh Truong Nguyen; Phuc Van Pham

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are not only widely used for regenerative medicine, but are also considered as a useful tool for cancer treatment. For a long time, stem cells have been utilized to renew the immune system for radiation or chemotherapy treated patients. Recently, stem cells are being engineered to carry therapeutic reagents to target tumor sites. Cancer vaccines based on the knowledge of cancer stem cells have been studied and applied for cancer treatment. Induced pluripotent stem cells have been u...

  20. A phase I study of paclitaxel as a radiation sensitizer for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer and mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective Paclitaxel exposure of cancer cells in vitro results in a G2/M block in the cell cycle. Paclitaxel also has independent activity against a wide variety of tumors. We report here a phase I study of patients with non-small cell lung cancer and malignant pleural mesothelioma treated with radiation therapy and concurrent paclitaxel. Objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of paclitaxel when delivered as a 5-day continuous infusion with concurrent radiotherapy, to assess tumor response and toxicity, and to evaluate the biological effects of paclitaxel in tumor biopsy specimens. Materials and Methods 19 patients (pts.) were enrolled on study. 17 pts. were male and 2 were female. 18 pts. had mesothelioma and 1 had non-small cell lung cancer. Mean age was 59 yrs with a range of 47 to 72 years. One patient did not complete treatment due to progressive disease. Patients who completed treatment received from 5760 to 6300 cGy. Dose volume histography and multiple non-coplanar and non-coaxial fields were used. Patients received a continuous infusion of paclitaxel for 120 hours every three weeks during radiation therapy. The Results MTD of paclitaxel was determined to be 105 mg/m2 delivered as a 120-hour continuous infusion. The dose-limiting toxicity of paclitaxel was neutropenia at 120 mg/m2 given over 120 hrs. 13 patients were assessable for local control; 4 pts. are too early to evaluate and 2 pts. did not return for follow-up. (11(13)) pts. achieved local control. 3 of 13 patients are free of disease. 10 tumor biopsies were taken from 4 mesothelioma pts. Biopsies were taken prior to the paclitaxel infusion and then during the infusion. A modest G2/M block was observed in only 1 of the 5 specimens taken during the paclitaxel infusion. Conclusions This study demonstrates that paclitaxel can be safely delivered as a 120-hour continuous infusion at 105 mg/m2 with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. However, the biologic effect of paclitaxel

  1. Concurrent weekly docetaxel and concomitant boost radiation therapy in the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In a Phase I/II trial, we investigated concurrent weekly docetaxel and concomitant boost radiation in patients with locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN) after induction chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: Patients presented with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III/IV and were treated initially with induction chemotherapy using cisplatinum/5-fluorouracil (PF), carboplatinum-5-FU, or docetaxel-PF. Patients then received docetaxel four times weekly with concomitant boost (CB) radiation (1.8 Gy once-daily X20, 1.8/1.5 Gy twice a day). Fifteen patients each received 20 mg/M2 and 25 mg/M2. Results: Thirty-one patients were enrolled and 30 were evaluable for response and toxicity. Median follow-up was 42 months (range, 27-63 months). Primary sites were: oropharynx 19, oral cavity 2, larynx/hypopharynx 5, and unknown primary 4. Eighty-seven percent of patients had N2/N3 disease; 60% had T3/T4 disease. Twenty percent of patients had a complete response (CR) to induction chemotherapy. After chemoradiotherapy, 21 of 30 patients had a CR, 2 had progressive disease, and 7 had partial response (PR). Nineteen of 26 patients presenting with neck disease had neck dissections, and 7 of 19 were positive. Ninety-three percent of all patients were rendered disease-free after all planned therapy. Treatment failed in 8 patients, and 7 have died of disease. An additional patient died with no evidence of disease. Twenty-one patients (70%) are currently alive with no evidence of disease. No acute dose-limiting toxicity was observed at either dose level. Conclusions: This intensive treatment regimen of concurrent docetaxel/concomitant boost radiation and surgery after induction chemotherapy in poor prognosis patients yields good local regional control and survival. Docetaxel/CB chemoradiotherapy represents an aggressive alternative regimen to platinum-based chemoradiotherapy or surgery in patients who have a poor response to induction

  2. Current treatments for radiation retinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliari, Gian Paolo; Simpson, E. Rand (Princess Margaret Hospital, Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Toronto (Canada)), e-mail: gpgiuliari@gmail.com; Sadaka, Ama (Schepens Eye Research Inst., Boston, MA (United States)); Hinkle, David M. (Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution, Cambridge, MA (United States))

    2011-01-15

    Background. To review the currently available therapeutic modalities for radiation retinopathy (RR), including newer investigational interventions directed towards specific aspects of the pathophysiology of this refractory complication. Methods. A review of the literature encompassing the pathogenesis of RR and the current therapeutic modalities available was performed. Results. RR is a chronic and progressive condition that results from exposure to any source of radiation. It might be secondary to radiation treatment of intraocular tumors such as choroidal melanomas, retinoblastomas, and choroidal metastasis, or from unavoidable exposure to excessive radiation from the treatment of extraocular tumors like cephalic, nasopharyngeal, orbital, and paranasal malignancies. After the results of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study, most of the choroidal melanomas are being treated with plaque brachytherapy increasing by that the incidence of this radiation complication. RR has been reported to occur in as many as 60% of eyes treated with plaque radiation, with higher rates associated with larger tumors. Initially, the condition manifests as a radiation vasculopathy clinically seen as microaneurysms and telangiectasis, with posterior development of retinal hard exudates and hemorrhages, macular edema, neovascularization and tractional retinal detachment. Regrettably, the management of these eyes remains limited. Photodynamic therapy, laser photocoagulation, oral pentoxyphylline and hyperbaric oxygen have been attempted as treatment modalities with inconclusive results. Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor such as bevacizumab, ranibizumab and pegaptanib sodium have been recently used, also with variable results. Discussion. RR is a common vision threatening complication following radiation therapy. The available therapeutic options are limited and show unsatisfactory results. Further large investigative studies are required for developing

  3. Current treatments for radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. To review the currently available therapeutic modalities for radiation retinopathy (RR), including newer investigational interventions directed towards specific aspects of the pathophysiology of this refractory complication. Methods. A review of the literature encompassing the pathogenesis of RR and the current therapeutic modalities available was performed. Results. RR is a chronic and progressive condition that results from exposure to any source of radiation. It might be secondary to radiation treatment of intraocular tumors such as choroidal melanomas, retinoblastomas, and choroidal metastasis, or from unavoidable exposure to excessive radiation from the treatment of extraocular tumors like cephalic, nasopharyngeal, orbital, and paranasal malignancies. After the results of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study, most of the choroidal melanomas are being treated with plaque brachytherapy increasing by that the incidence of this radiation complication. RR has been reported to occur in as many as 60% of eyes treated with plaque radiation, with higher rates associated with larger tumors. Initially, the condition manifests as a radiation vasculopathy clinically seen as microaneurysms and telangiectasis, with posterior development of retinal hard exudates and hemorrhages, macular edema, neovascularization and tractional retinal detachment. Regrettably, the management of these eyes remains limited. Photodynamic therapy, laser photocoagulation, oral pentoxyphylline and hyperbaric oxygen have been attempted as treatment modalities with inconclusive results. Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor such as bevacizumab, ranibizumab and pegaptanib sodium have been recently used, also with variable results. Discussion. RR is a common vision threatening complication following radiation therapy. The available therapeutic options are limited and show unsatisfactory results. Further large investigative studies are required for developing

  4. Natural health products and cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Doreen Oneschuk; Jawaid Younus

    2011-01-01

    Complementary therapies, notably natural health products such as herbs and vitamins, are frequently used by cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. There is much controversy as to whether these natural health products should be taken during conventional cancer treatments. Supporters of this practice cite beneficial effects of the antioxidant properties, while opponents are concerned about the potential for natural health product-chemotherapy/radiation related negative in...

  5. An observational study of cancer treatment-induced dental abnormalities in paediatric cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kaberi Das; Munlima Hazarika; Manigreeva Krishnatreya; Amal Chandra Kataki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric cancer patients who receive radiation and chemotherapy (CT) suffer from various risks of oral complications and odontogenesis. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted at a regional cancer centre of North East India from 2010 to 2013. The impact of cancer treatment by CT and radiation on orodental health was studied on a total of 100 paediatric cancer patients. Results: The common dental abnormalities were microdontia, hypodontia, root abnormalities, abnorm...

  6. Adjuvant Treatment for Ampullary Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Kim; John Chabot; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2011-01-01

    Ampullary cancer is an uncommon tumor and tends to have a better prognosis than pancreatic cancer. However, one half of patients will die from recurrent disease suggesting the need for effective adjuvant therapy. Currently, there is lack of randomized trials to guide the use of adjuvant therapy in ampullary cancer. At the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, the largest trial (Abstract #4006) evaluating adjuvant treatment of ampullary cancer was presented.

  7. Adjuvant Treatment for Ampullary Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ampullary cancer is an uncommon tumor and tends to have a better prognosis than pancreatic cancer. However, one half of patients will die from recurrent disease suggesting the need for effective adjuvant therapy. Currently, there is lack of randomized trials to guide the use of adjuvant therapy in ampullary cancer. At the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Annual Meeting, the largest trial (Abstract #4006 evaluating adjuvant treatment of ampullary cancer was presented.

  8. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lessening (palliation) of symptoms associated with an incurable cancer. If cure is unlikely, then potential risks associated with treatment ... plan is modified. However, if the likelihood of cure is significantly greater than the risk ... To detect recurrent cancer and possibly try further treatment, such as an ...

  9. Radiation treatment of molasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molasses are a by-product of the sugar industry. Their annual production in Mexico is around 1 million tons and they are mainly used as a complement for animal feeding and for the production of alcohols. Their value is relatively low compared with other chemicals. When molasses are irradiated with gamma radiation or accelerated electrons in the presence of nitric acid and oxygen, oxalic acid and several polymeric compounds are obtained. The same products are obtained in both cases, but the yield is greater with electrons. The effect of dose and dose rate on the yields has been studied. As example, when mixtures of molasses-nitric acid, with an initial concentration of 26% of total sugar reductors, are irradiated with 1.0 MeV electrons, in a continuous flow reactor, at 0.11 Gy/sec to a total dose of 30 KGy, the oxalic acid yield is around 44% of the total chemical reductors used. The separations of the radiolytic products were made by successive decantations and concentrations, and purified by recrystallizations. From the analytical information, the minimal formulae were calculated for the acid product and the polymeric compounds. (author)

  10. Knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) treatment planning versus planning by experts: validation of a KBRT algorithm for prostate cancer treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) treatment planning algorithm was recently developed. The purpose of this work is to investigate how plans that are generated with the objective KBRT approach compare to those that rely on the judgment of the experienced planner. Thirty volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were randomly selected from a database of prostate plans that were generated by experienced planners (expert plans). The anatomical data (CT scan and delineation of organs) of these patients and the KBRT algorithm were given to a novice with no prior treatment planning experience. The inexperienced planner used the knowledge-based algorithm to predict the dose that the OARs receive based on their proximity to the treated volume. The population-based OAR constraints were changed to the predicted doses. A KBRT plan was subsequently generated. The KBRT and expert plans were compared for the achieved target coverage and OAR sparing. The target coverages were compared using the Uniformity Index (UI), while 5 dose-volume points (D10, D30, D50, D70 and D90) were used to compare the OARs (bladder and rectum) doses. Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test was used to check for significant differences (p < 0.05) between both datasets. The KBRT and expert plans achieved mean UI values of 1.10 ± 0.03 and 1.10 ± 0.04, respectively. The Wilcoxon test showed no statistically significant difference between both results. The D90, D70, D50, D30 and D10 values of the two planning strategies, and the Wilcoxon test results suggests that the KBRT plans achieved a statistically significant lower bladder dose (at D30), while the expert plans achieved a statistically significant lower rectal dose (at D10 and D30). The results of this study show that the KBRT treatment planning approach is a promising method to objectively incorporate patient anatomical variations in radiotherapy treatment planning

  11. Treatment Options by Stage (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery) depends on ...

  12. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  13. CAPIRI-IMRT: a phase II study of concurrent capecitabine and irinotecan with intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the local effect and acute toxicity of irinotecan and capecitabine with concurrent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer without prior pelvic irradiation. Seventy-one patients diagnosed with recurrent rectal cancer who did not previously receive pelvic irradiation were treated in our hospital from October 2009 to July 2012. Radiotherapy was delivered to the pelvis, and IMRT of 45 Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction), followed by a boost of 10 Gy to 16 Gy (2 Gy per fraction), was delivered to the recurrent sites. The concurrent chemotherapy regimen was 50 mg/m2 irinotecan weekly and 625 mg/m2 capecitabine twice daily (Mon-Fri). Radical surgery was recommended for medically fit patients without extra-pelvic metastases. The patients were followed up every 3 months. Tumor response was evaluated using CT/MRIs according to the RECIST criteria or postoperative pathological findings. NCI-CTC 3.0 was used to score the toxicities. Forty-eight patients (67.6%) had confirmed recurrent rectal cancer without extra pelvic metastases, and 23 patients (32.4%) had extra pelvic metastases. Fourteen patients (19.7%) underwent radical resections (R0) post-chemoradiation. A pathologic complete response was observed in 7 of 14 patients. A clinical complete response was observed in 4 patients (5.6%), and a partial response was observed in 22 patients (31.0%). Only 5 patients (7.0%) showed progressive disease during or shortly after treatment. Of 53 symptomatic patients, clinical complete and partial symptom relief with chemoradiation was achieved in 56.6% and 32.1% of patients, respectively. Only 2 patients (2.8%) experienced grade 4 leukopenia. The most common grade 3 toxicity was diarrhea (16 [22.5%] patients). The median follow-up was 31 months. The cumulative local progression-free survival rate was 74.2% and 33.9% at 1 and 3 years after chemoradiation, respectively. The cumulative total survival rate was 80.1% and 36

  14. Prostate Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Winter ... Read More "Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His ...

  15. What Happens After Treatment for Liver Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Liver Cancer » Detailed Guide » Living as a liver cancer ... Lifestyle changes after liver cancer Living as a liver cancer survivor Completing treatment can be both stressful and ...

  16. Radiation-induced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concern is expressed over a recent U.K. newspaper report (The Times, 21 January 1977, 5) on the possible hazards of mammography, as women may over-react to the extent of refusing mammography. The problems of radiation risk estimates, particularly at low dose levels, are very briefly reviewed. Recent improvements in mammography techniques have minimised the radiation hazard. Conflicting reports of the mortality rates following mammography screening programmes are discussed. In England and Wales, breast cancer is the commonest cause of death in women aged 35 to 54, and it would be unfortunate if the possible benefits of screening were denied to this age group before the latest mammographic techniques have been fully evaluated. (U.K.)

  17. On ionising radiation and breast cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cohort of 3,090 women with clinical diagnosis of benign breast disease (BBD) was studied. Of these, 1,216 were treated with radiation therapy during 1925-54 (median age 40 years). The mean dose to the breasts was 5.8 Gy (range 0-50 Gy). Among other organs the lung received the highest scattered dose (0.75 Gy; range 0.004-8.98 Gy) and the rectum the lowest (0.008 Gy; range 0-0.06 Gy). A pooled analysis of eight breast cancer incidence cohorts was done, including: tumour registry data on breast cancer incidence among women in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors; women in Massachusetts who received repeated chest fluoroscopic during lung collapse treatment for tuberculosis; women who received x-ray therapy for acute post-partum mastitis; women who were irradiated in infancy for enlarged thymus glands ; two Swedish cohorts of women who received radiation treatments during infancy for skin hemangioma; and the BBD) cohort. Together the cohorts included almost 78,000 women (-35,000 were exposed), around 1.8 million woman-years and 1500 cases. The breast cancer incidence rate as a function of breast dose was analysed using linear-quadratic Poisson regression models. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive (EAR) and multiplicative (ERR) models were compared in estimating the age-at-exposure patterns and time related excess. The carcinogenic risks associated with radiation in mammographic mass screening is evaluated. Assessment was made in terms of breast cancer mortality and years of life. Effects were related to rates not influenced by a mammographic mass screening program and based on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 40-year old women with no history of breast cancer being followed to 100 years of age. Two radiation risk assumptions were compared. The dose-response relationship is linear with little support in data for an upward curvature at low to medium doses. The competing effect

  18. On ionising radiation and breast cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Anders

    1999-05-01

    A cohort of 3,090 women with clinical diagnosis of benign breast disease (BBD) was studied. Of these, 1,216 were treated with radiation therapy during 1925-54 (median age 40 years). The mean dose to the breasts was 5.8 Gy (range 0-50 Gy). Among other organs the lung received the highest scattered dose (0.75 Gy; range 0.004-8.98 Gy) and the rectum the lowest (0.008 Gy; range 0-0.06 Gy). A pooled analysis of eight breast cancer incidence cohorts was done, including: tumour registry data on breast cancer incidence among women in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors; women in Massachusetts who received repeated chest fluoroscopic during lung collapse treatment for tuberculosis; women who received x-ray therapy for acute post-partum mastitis; women who were irradiated in infancy for enlarged thymus glands ; two Swedish cohorts of women who received radiation treatments during infancy for skin hemangioma; and the BBD cohort. Together the cohorts included almost 78,000 women (-35,000 were exposed), around 1.8 million woman-years and 1500 cases. The breast cancer incidence rate as a function of breast dose was analysed using linear-quadratic Poisson regression models. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive (EAR) and multiplicative (ERR) models were compared in estimating the age-at-exposure patterns and time related excess. The carcinogenic risks associated with radiation in mammographic mass screening is evaluated. Assessment was made in terms of breast cancer mortality and years of life. Effects were related to rates not influenced by a mammographic mass screening program and based on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 40-year old women with no history of breast cancer being followed to 100 years of age. Two radiation risk assumptions were compared. The dose-response relationship is linear with little support in data for an upward curvature at low to medium doses. The competing effect

  19. Radiation-induced DNA Double Strand Breaks and Their Modulations by Treatments with Moringa oleifera Lam. Leaf Extracts: A Cancer Cell Culture Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma radiation brings deleterious effects upon human cells by inducing oxidative stress and DNA damages. Antioxidants have been shown to confer protective effects on irradiated normal cells. Moringa oleifera Lam. is a widely used nutritional supplement with antioxidant activities. This report showed that antioxidant-containing supplements, in addition to protecting normal cells, could protect cancer cells against genotoxic effects of gamma radiation. γ-H2AX immunofluorescent foci were utilized as an indicator of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells were irradiated with 2-8 Gy gamma radiation. A linear relationship between the formation of γ-H2AX foci and radiation dose was observed with an average of 10 foci per cell per Gy. A 30-minute pretreatment of the cells with either the aqueous or the ethanolic extract of M. oleifera leaves could partially protect the cells from radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. A pretreatment with 500 µg/mL aqueous extract reduced the number of foci formed by 15% when assayed at 30 minutes post-irradiation. The ethanolic extract was more effective; 500 µg/mL of its concentration reduced the number of foci among irradiated cells by 30%. The results indicated that irradiated cancer cells responded similarly to nutritional supplements containing antioxidants as irradiated normal cells. These natural antioxidants could confer protective effects upon cancer cells against gamma radiation. (author)

  20. Radiation-induced DNA Double Strand Breaks and Their Modulations by Treatments with Moringa oleifera Lam. Leaf Extracts: A Cancer Cell Culture Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Boonsirichai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gamma radiation brings deleterious effects upon human cells by inducing oxidative stress and DNA damages. Antioxidants have been shown to confer protective effects on irradiated normal cells. Moringa oleifera Lam. is a widely used nutritional supplement with antioxidant activities. This report showed that antioxidant-containing supplements, in addition to protecting normal cells, could protect cancer cells against genotoxic effects of gamma radiation. -H2AX immunofluorescent foci were utilized as an indicator of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells were irradiated with 2-8 Gy gamma radiation. A linear relationship between the formation of -H2AX foci and radiation dose was observed with an average of 10 foci per cell per Gy. A 30-minute pretreatment of the cells with either the aqueous or the ethanolic extract of M. oleifera leaves could partially protect the cells from radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. A pretreatment with 500 µg/mL aqueous extract reduced the number of foci formed by 15% when assayed at 30 minutes post-irradiation. The ethanolic extract was more effective; 500 µg/mL of its concentration reduced the number of foci among irradiated cells by 30%. The results indicated that irradiated cancer cells responded similarly to nutritional supplements containing antioxidants as irradiated normal cells. These natural antioxidants could confer protective effects upon cancer cells against gamma radiation

  1. Radiation therapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy has been used extensively in the management of patients with cancer of the esophagus. It has demonstrated an ability to cure a small minority of patients. Cure is likely to be limited to patients who have lesions less than 5 cm in length and have minimal, if any, involvement of lymph nodes. Esophagectomy is likely to cure a similar, small percentage of patients with the same presentation of minimal disease but has a substantial acute postoperative mortality rate and greater morbidity than irradiation. Combining surgery and either preoperative or postoperative irradiation may cure a small percentage of patients beyond the number cured with either modality alone. Radiation has demonstrated benefit as an adjuvant to surgery following the resection of minimal disease. However, radiation alone has never been compared directly with surgery for the highly select, minimal lesions managed by surgery. Radiation provides good palliation of dysphagia in the majority of patients, and roughly one third may have adequate swallowing for the duration of their illness when ''radical'' doses have been employed. Surgical bypass procedures have greater acute morbidity but appear to provide more reliable, prolonged palliation of dysphagia. Several approaches to improving the efficacy of irradiation are currently under investigation. These approahces include fractionation schedules, radiosensitizers, neutron-beam therapy, and helium-ion therapy

  2. [A Case of Pathologically Complete Response of a Rectal Cancer after Preoperative Treatment with mFOLFOX6 and Radiation Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Note, Hiromasa; Shimizu, Shinichiro; Ariga, Takashi; Suzuki, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Naoto; Kanada, Yoko; Senba, Yoshihide; Yoshioka, Takafumi; Sato, Yayoi; Miyazaki, Akinari; Natsume, Toshiyuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hajime; Maruyama, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    A 60-year-old man who had bloody stools after sigmoid colonoscopy was admitted to our hospital. A digital examination and sigmoid colonoscopy showed a type 2 circular tumor at location Rb with incomplete mobility and tumor hemorrhage, and the result of a biopsy was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (tub2). Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging suggested a possibility of invasion of the primary rectal tumor to the sacrum. The clinical stage was cT4bN0M0H0P0, cStage Ⅱ, which is generally not treatable by surgery. Sigmoid colostomy was performed, and a central venous port was implanted. After a preoperative treatment consisting of 3 courses of mFOLFOX6 and radiation therapy, the clinical stage changed to ycT2N0M0H0P0, ycStageⅠ. Super-low anterior resection and covering ileostomy were performed 46 days after the preoperative treatment. A pathological examination revealed no residual cancer cells in the primary lesion and lymph node (Grade 3, pCR). The patient has been disease-free for 4 years and 9 months after the operation. PMID:26805067

  3. MRI versus {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT for gross tumour volume delineation in radiation treatment planning of primary prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Kirste, Simon; Fechter, Tobias; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); Wieser, Gesche [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Hennies, Steffen [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Rempel, Irene; Soschynski, Martin; Langer, Mathias [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Rischke, Hans Christian [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Jilg, Cordula A. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Urology, Freiburg (Germany); Meyer, Philipp T. [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Bock, Michael [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) is widely used in radiation treatment planning of primary prostate cancer (PCA). Focal dose escalation to the dominant intraprostatic lesions (DIPL) may lead to improved PCA control. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in most PCAs. {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA inhibitors have demonstrated promising results in detection of PCA with PET/CT. The aim of this study was to compare {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT with MRI for gross tumour volume (GTV) definition in primary PCA. This retrospective study included 22 patients with primary PCA analysed after {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT and mpMRI. GTVs were delineated on MR images by two radiologists (GTV-MRIrad) and two radiation oncologists separately. Both volumes were merged leading to GTV-MRIint. GTVs based on PET/CT were delineated by two nuclear medicine physicians in consensus (GTV-PET). Laterality (left, right, and left and right prostate lobes) on mpMRI, PET/CT and pathological analysis after biopsy were assessed. Mean GTV-MRIrad, GTV-MRIint and GTV-PET were 5.92, 3.83 and 11.41 cm{sup 3}, respectively. GTV-PET was significant larger then GTV-MRIint (p = 0.003). The MRI GTVs GTV-MRIrad and GTV-MRIint showed, respectively, 40 % and 57 % overlap with GTV-PET. GTV-MRIrad and GTV-MRIint included the SUVmax of GTV-PET in 12 and 11 patients (54.6 % and 50 %), respectively. In nine patients (47 %), laterality on mpMRI, PET/CT and histopathology after biopsy was similar. Ga-PSMA PET/CT and mpMRI provided concordant results for delineation of the DIPL in 47 % of patients (40 % - 54 % of lesions). GTV-PET was significantly larger than GTV-MRIint. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT may have a role in radiation treatment planning for focal radiation to the DIPL. Exact correlation of PET and MRI images with histopathology is needed. (orig.)

  4. Treatment-Related Morbidity in Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy With and Without Image Guidance Using Implanted Fiducial Markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jasmeet, E-mail: drsingh.j@gmail.com [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); White, Martin A. [School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Parker, Joel; Patterson, Jackie [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Tang, Colin I.; Capp, Anne; Wratten, Christopher; Denham, James W. [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of rectal and urinary dysfunctional symptoms using image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) with fiducials and magnetic resonance planning for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: During the implementation stages of IGRT between September 2008 and March 2010, 367 consecutive patients were treated with prostatic irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with and without IGRT (non-IGRT). In November 2010, these men were asked to report their bowel and bladder symptoms using a postal questionnaire. The proportions of patients with moderate to severe symptoms in these groups were compared using logistic regression models adjusted for tumor and treatment characteristic variables. Results: Of the 282 respondents, the 154 selected for IGRT had higher stage tumors, received higher prescribed doses, and had larger volumes of rectum receiving high dosage than did the 128 selected for non-IGRT. The follow-up duration was 8 to 26 months. Compared with the non-IGRT group, improvement was noted in all dysfunctional rectal symptoms using IGRT. In multivariable analyses, IGRT improved rectal pain (odds ratio [OR] 0.07 [0.009-0.7], P=.02), urgency (OR 0.27 [0.11-0.63], P=<.01), diarrhea (OR 0.009 [0.02-0.35], P<.01), and change in bowel habits (OR 0.18 [0.06-0.52], P<.010). No correlation was observed between rectal symptom levels and dose-volume histogram data. Urinary dysfunctional symptoms were similar in both treatment groups. Conclusions: In comparison with men selected for non-IGRT, a significant reduction of bowel dysfunctional symptoms was confirmed in men selected for IGRT, even though they had larger volumes of rectum treated to higher doses.

  5. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells than in normal cells. For skin cancer, laser light is shined onto the skin and the drug becomes active and kills the cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy causes little damage to healthy tissue. Biologic therapy ...

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Oncology overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiological diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Biopsy and cytology in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Pathology and morphology of pancreatic cancer; Staging and prognosis of pancreatic cancer; Biological and immunological markers in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer; Drug therapy of pancreatic cancer; Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer; Selected studies on the epidemiology of pancreatic cancer; Clinical correlates and syndromes associated with pancreatic neoplasia

  7. Neoadjuvant Sandwich Treatment With Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine Administered Prior to, Concurrently With, and Following Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yuan-Hong [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Jun-Zhong [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); An, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Luo, Jie-Lin [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Cai, Mu-Yan [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Cai, Pei-Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Kong, Ling-Heng; Liu, Guo-Chen; Tang, Jing-Hua; Chen, Gong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Ding, Pei-Rong, E-mail: dingpr@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consisting of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen

  8. Neoadjuvant Sandwich Treatment With Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine Administered Prior to, Concurrently With, and Following Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consisting of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen

  9. Anal Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  10. Is Short-Interval Mammography Necessary After Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiation Treatment in Breast Cancer Patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The optimum timing and frequency of mammography in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) are controversial. The American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends the first posttreatment mammogram 1 year after diagnosis but no earlier than 6 months after completion of radiotherapy. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends annual mammography. Intermountain Healthcare currently follows a more frequent mammography schedule during the first 2 years in BCT patients. This retrospective study was undertaken to determine the cancer yield mammography during the first 2 years after BCT. Methods and Materials: 1,435 patients received BCT at Intermountain Healthcare between 2003 and 2007, inclusive. Twenty-three patients had bilateral breast cancer (1,458 total breasts). Patients were followed up for 24 months after diagnosis. The 1- and 2-year mammography yields were determined and compared with those of the general screening population. Results: 1,079 breasts had mammography at less than 1 year, and two ipsilateral recurrences (both noninvasive) were identified; 1,219 breasts had mammography during the second year, and nine recurrences (three invasive, six noninvasive) were identified. Of the 11 ipsilateral recurrences during the study, three presented with symptoms and eight were identified by mammography alone. The mammography yield was 1.9 cancers per 1,000 breasts the first year and 4.9 per 1,000 the second year. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the mammography yield during the first 2 years after BCT is not greater than that in the general population, and they support the policy for initiating followup mammography at 1 year after BCT.

  11. Is Short-Interval Mammography Necessary After Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiation Treatment in Breast Cancer Patients?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hymas, Richard V.; Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Parkinson, Brett T.; Belnap, Thomas W. [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Sause, William T., E-mail: william.sause@imail.org [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The optimum timing and frequency of mammography in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) are controversial. The American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends the first posttreatment mammogram 1 year after diagnosis but no earlier than 6 months after completion of radiotherapy. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends annual mammography. Intermountain Healthcare currently follows a more frequent mammography schedule during the first 2 years in BCT patients. This retrospective study was undertaken to determine the cancer yield mammography during the first 2 years after BCT. Methods and Materials: 1,435 patients received BCT at Intermountain Healthcare between 2003 and 2007, inclusive. Twenty-three patients had bilateral breast cancer (1,458 total breasts). Patients were followed up for 24 months after diagnosis. The 1- and 2-year mammography yields were determined and compared with those of the general screening population. Results: 1,079 breasts had mammography at less than 1 year, and two ipsilateral recurrences (both noninvasive) were identified; 1,219 breasts had mammography during the second year, and nine recurrences (three invasive, six noninvasive) were identified. Of the 11 ipsilateral recurrences during the study, three presented with symptoms and eight were identified by mammography alone. The mammography yield was 1.9 cancers per 1,000 breasts the first year and 4.9 per 1,000 the second year. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the mammography yield during the first 2 years after BCT is not greater than that in the general population, and they support the policy for initiating followup mammography at 1 year after BCT.

  12. Radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic radiation therapy for lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hideomi; Yamashita; Wataru; Takahashi; Akihiro; Haga; Keiichi; Nakagawa

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy(SBRT)has a locacontrol rate of 95%at 2 years for non-small cell lungcancer(NSCLC)and should improve the prognosis oinoperable patients,elderly patients,and patients withsignificant comorbidities who have early-stage NSCLCThe safety of SBRT is being confirmed in internationalmulti-institutional PhaseⅡtrials for peripheral lungcancer in both inoperable and operable patients,bureports so far have found that SBRT is a safe and effective treatment for early-stage NSCLC and early metastatic lung cancer.Radiation pneumonitis(RP)is oneof the most common toxicities of SBRT.Although mospost-treatment RP is Grade 1 or 2 and either asymptomatic or manageable,a few cases are severe,symptomatic,and there is a risk for mortality.The reportedrates of symptomatic RP after SBRT range from 9%to28%.Being able to predict the risk of RP after SBRT isextremely useful in treatment planning.A dose-effecrelationship has been demonstrated,but suggesteddose-volume factors like mean lung dose,lung V20and/or lung V2.5 differed among the reports.We foundthat patients who present with an interstitial pneumo-nitis shadow on computed tomography scan and high levels of serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 and surfactant protein D have a high rate of severe radiation pneumo-nitis after SBRT.At our institution,lung cancer patients with these risk factors have not received SBRT since 2006,and our rate of severe RP after SBRT has de-creased significantly since then.

  13. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 ± 0.3 Gy and 43.9 ± 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 ± 0.3 Gy and 49.1 ± 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 ± 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 ± 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 ± 0.1 vs 7.4 ± 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 ± 0.05 vs 3.7 ± 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  14. Prediction of critical weight loss during radiation treatment in head and neck cancer patients is dependent on BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønbro, Simon; Petersen, Gry Bjerg; Andersen, Jens Rikardt;

    2016-01-01

    loss above 5 % in patients with BMI >25 were 3.00 ± 0.64 times higher compared with patients with BMI <25 (p < 0.0001). Patients with pharyngeal, oral cavity, or supraglottic tumors had 3.12 ± 0.80 times higher odds of weight loss above 5 % compared with glottic cancer patients (p < 0.0001), and the...

  15. Radiation treatment of wastewater, (11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-energy electron treatment of wastewaters from dyeing factories (in Kiryu city, Gunma Prefecture) was investigated in a series on wastewater treatment by radiation. Experiments were made on decoloration f printing and dip dyeing wastewaters using a dual-tube bubbling column reactor. Changes in absorption spectra and pH of irradiated solutions and influence of dissolved oxygen on decoloration were examined. Water soluble dyes were decolored at low doses, but disperse dyes were not easily decolored. Although the wastewaters included number of different additives such as sizing stuff, surfactant and other chemicals, the decoloration was not influenced by these substances under the experimental conditions. The irradiation cost by electron beams was estimated as a function of plant capacity. A hybrid system of biological and radiation processes to reduce BOD and color in the wastewaters is presented, with this treatment cost also estimated. (author)

  16. A radiobiological approach to cancer treatment. Possible chemical and physical agents modifying radiosensitivity in comparison with high LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological characteristics of high LET radiations are summarized to be low oxygen enhancement ratio, high RBE, low repair and low cell cycle dependency of radiosensitivity. Various chemical modifiers of radiosensitivity and radiological effect of hyperthermia are classified into these four properties. It is evident that we have now various means to mimic high LET radiations as far as biological response is concerned though some of them are still in experimental stage. Among them, the means to cope with hypoxia and repair which are assumed to be the most important causes of radioresistance of human tumors are discussed in some detail. It is expected that through the present seminar we would have consensus to concentrate our effort of development for new modifying means available and useful in developing countries. (author)

  17. The Role of Postmastectomy Radiation in the Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer: Back to the Future

    OpenAIRE

    Kuske, Robert R.

    2000-01-01

    Oncologists once downplayed the adjuvant role of radiotherapy after mastectomy. A decade ago, lacking a survival benefit, studies demonstrating late fatal myocardial infarctions nearly put a stop to any referrals of postoperative high-risk women to radiation oncology. The potential survival benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy may be overshadowed by inadequate technique leading to late cardiac deaths. Is it possible to cover the chest wall, internal mammary lymph chain, supraclavicular, and, whe...

  18. Cancer risk as a radiation detriment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential radiation detriment means a risk of cancer or other somatic disease, genetic damage of fetal injury. Quantative information about the relation between a radiation dose and cancer risk is needed to enable decision-making in radiation protection. However, assessment of cancer risk by means of the radiation dose is controversial, as epidemiological and biological information about factors affecting the origin of cancers show that risk assessment is imprecise when the radiation dose is used as the only factor. Focusing on radiation risk estimates for breast cancer, lung cancer and leukemia, the report is based on the models given in the Beir V report, on sources of radiation exposure and the uncertainty of risk estimates. Risk estimates are assessed using the relative risk model and the cancer mortality rates in Finland. Cancer incidence and mortality rates for men and women are shown in graphs as a function of age and time. Relative risks are shown as a function of time after exposure and lifetime risks as a function of age at exposure. Uncertainty factors affecting the radiation risk are examined from the point of view of epidemiology and molecular biology. (orig.)

  19. Treatment of Recurrent Ovarian Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neville F. Hacker

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent ovarian cancer is a common clinical problem and the management of eachpatient must be individualized. Diagnosis is usually based on a progressively rising CA-125titre, and a CT scan of the pelvis and abdomen, together with a chest X-ray should be performed.Although there is no study to support immediate treatment in the asymptomaticpatient, our approach is to commence such patients on Tamoxifen. Chemotherapy isreserved for asymptomatic patients or those who progress on Tamoxifen. The longer thetreatment-free interval of 18-24 months. The choice of non-platinum second or subsequentline chemotherapy is based on many factors including likelihood of benefit, potential toxicity,schedule and convenience to the patient, as well as organ function and residual toxicityfrom prior treatment. Aggressive secondary cytoreductive surgery can significantly prolongsurvival in those with a disease-free interval of 24 months or more and in those in whom allmacroscopic disease can be removed. Radiation therapy to the tumour bed following resectionof localized disease may be beneficial in selected patients. Quality of life issues are particularlyimportant for this group of patients and have not been adequately studies.Communication regarding the objectives of therapy is important, and the multidisciplinaryapproach should include palliative care and psycho-social support, in addition to the moretraditional medical options.

  20. Plasma for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that grew from research in application of low-temperature (or cold) atmospheric plasmas in bioengineering. One of the most promising applications of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is cancer therapy. Convincing evidence of CAP selectivity towards the cancer cells has been accumulated. This review summarizes the state of the art of this emerging field, presenting various aspects of CAP application in cancer such as the role of reactive species (reactive oxygen and nitrogen), cell cycle modification, in vivo application, CAP interaction with cancer cells in conjunction with nanoparticles, and computational oncology applied to CAP.

  1. Gemstone enhancement by radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the discovery of radioactivity, investigations on the effects of atomic rays on precious stones began and Crookes established that alpha rays from radium produced green colour in diamonds. Gamma rays, x-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons etc. are effective in producing colour in precious stone like topaz and corundum. Some of these also produce considerable amount of radioactivity which is not acceptable if the radioactivity exceeds permissible limits. Colour enhancement by radiation treatment, different radiations, safety of irradiated gem stones and market related aspects are discussed. (author)

  2. Study on Computerized Treatment Plan of Field-in-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Conventional Radiation Therapy according to PBC Algorithm and AAA on Breast Cancer Tangential Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) provides more accurate dose calculation regarding impact on scatter and tissue inhomogeneity in comparison to Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) algorithm. This study tries to analyze the difference of dose distribution according to PBC algorithm and dose calculation algorithm of AAA on breast cancer tangential plan. Computerized medical care plan using Eclipse treatment planning system (version 8.9, VARIAN, USA) has been established for the 10 breast cancer patients using 6 MV energy of Linac (CL-6EX, VARIAN, USA). After treatment plan of Conventional Radiation Therapy plan (Conventional plan) and Field-in-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy plan (FiF plan) using PBC algorithm has been established, MU has been fixed, implemented dose calculation after changing it to AAA, and compared and analyzed treatment plan using Dose Volume Histogram (DVH). Firstly, as a result of evaluating PBC algorithm of Conventional plan and the difference according to AAA, the average difference of CI value on target volume has been highly estimated by 0.295 on PBC algorithm and as a result of evaluating dose of lung, V47 Gy and has been highly evaluated by 5.83% and 4.04% each, Mean dose, V20, V5, V3 Gy has been highly evaluated 0.6%, 0.29%, 6.35%, 10.23% each on AAA. Secondly, in case of FiF plan, the average difference of CI value on target volume has been highly evaluated on PBC algorithm by 0.165, and dose on ipsilateral lung, V47, V45 Gy, Mean dose has been highly evaluated 6.17%, 3.80%, 0.15% each on PBC algorithm, V20, V5, V3 Gy has been highly evaluated 0.14%, 4.07%, 4.35% each on AAA. When calculating with AAA on breast cancer tangential plan, compared to PBC algorithm, Conformity on target volume of Conventional plan, FiF plan has been less evaluated by 0.295, 0.165 each. For the reason that dose of high dose region of ipsilateral lung has been showed little amount, and dose of low dose region has been showed much amount, features

  3. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, J F; Ulbak, Kaare; Dreyer, L; Pukkala, E; Osterlind, A

    1997-01-01

    estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120 cancers at various sites. For all types of ionizing radiation, the annual total will be 4420 cancer cases, or 3.9% of all......Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our...... estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all...

  4. Development and validation of automatic tools for interactive recurrence analysis in radiation therapy: optimization of treatment algorithms for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiation oncology recurrence analysis is an important part in the evaluation process and clinical quality assurance of treatment concepts. With the example of 9 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer we developed and validated interactive analysis tools to support the evaluation workflow. After an automatic registration of the radiation planning CTs with the follow-up images, the recurrence volumes are segmented manually. Based on these volumes the DVH (dose volume histogram) statistic is calculated, followed by the determination of the dose applied to the region of recurrence and the distance between the boost and recurrence volume. We calculated the percentage of the recurrence volume within the 80%-isodose volume and compared it to the location of the recurrence within the boost volume, boost + 1 cm, boost + 1.5 cm and boost + 2 cm volumes. Recurrence analysis of 9 patients demonstrated that all recurrences except one occurred within the defined GTV/boost volume; one recurrence developed beyond the field border/outfield. With the defined distance volumes in relation to the recurrences, we could show that 7 recurrent lesions were within the 2 cm radius of the primary tumor. Two large recurrences extended beyond the 2 cm, however, this might be due to very rapid growth and/or late detection of the tumor progression. The main goal of using automatic analysis tools is to reduce time and effort conducting clinical analyses. We showed a first approach and use of a semi-automated workflow for recurrence analysis, which will be continuously optimized. In conclusion, despite the limitations of the automatic calculations we contributed to in-house optimization of subsequent study concepts based on an improved and validated target volume definition

  5. Cancer and electromagnetic radiation therapy: Quo Vadis?

    OpenAIRE

    Makropoulou, Mersini

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, treating cancer with a beam of photons is a well established therapeutic technique, developed over 100 years, and today over 50% of cancer patients will undergo traditional X-ray radiotherapy. However, ionizing radiation therapy is not the only option, as the high-energy photons delivering their cell-killing radiation energy into cancerous tumor can lead to significant damage to healthy tissues surrounding the tumor, located throughout the beam's path. Therefore, in nowadays, adv...

  6. Optimisation of colorectal cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, Colette Bernadine Maria-Theresia van den

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Although there have been several improvements in screening, staging, and treatment in the past decades, survival differences remain. For example among certain subgroups of patients, such as elderly patients and patients with comorbiditie

  7. Safe eating during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pasteurized on the container. DO NOT eat raw honey. Eat only heat-treated honey. Avoid sweets that have creamy fillings. Cook Foods ... 2016. www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/side-effects/appetite-loss/nutrition-hp-pdq . Accessed March 20, ...

  8. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT as a guide to radiation treatment planning of lymph-node relapses in prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picchio, M.; Busnardo, E.; Giovacchini, G.; Incerti, E.; Gianolli, L. [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Milan (Italy); Berardi, G.; Fodor, A.; Di Muzio, N. [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Radiotherapy Unit, Milan (Italy); Crivellaro, C. [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Monza (Italy); Fiorino, C. [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Medical Physics Unit, Milan (Italy); Kirienko, M. [University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Messa, C. [University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); National Research Council (IBFM-CNR), Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate, in prostate cancer (PCa) patients the potential of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT as a guide to helical tomotherapy (HTT) of lymph-node (LN) relapses with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). The efficacy and feasibility of HTT in terms of acute toxicity were assessed. We enrolled 83 PCa patients (mean age 68 years, range 51 - 82 years) with biochemical recurrence after radical primary treatment (mean serum PSA 7.61 ng/ml, range 0.37 - 187.00 ng/ml; PSA{sub 0}) who showed pathological findings on {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT only at the LN site. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT was performed for restaging and then for radiation treatment planning (PET/CT{sub 0}). Of the 83 patients, 8 experienced further LN relapse, of whom 5 were retreated once and 3 were retreated twice (total 94 radiotherapy treatments). All pelvic and/or abdominal LNs positive on PET/CT{sub 0} were treated with high doses using SIB. Doses were in the range 36 - 74 Gy administered in 28 fractions. After the end of HTT (mean 83 days, range 16 - 365 days), serum PSA was measured in all patients (PSA{sub 1}) and compared with PSA{sub 0} to evaluate early biochemical response. In 47 patients PET/CT was repeated (PET/CT{sub 1}) to assess metabolic responses at the treated areas. Toxicity criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) were used to assess acute toxicity. PET/CT{sub 0} revealed pathological LNs in the pelvis in 49 patients, pathological LNs in the abdomen in 15 patients pathological LNs in both the pelvis and abdomen in 18 patients, and pathological LNs in the pelvis or abdomen and other sites in 12 patients. All these sites were treated with HTT. With respect to PSA{sub 0}, PSA{sub 1} (mean 6.28 ng/ml, range 0.00 - 220.46 ng/ml) showed a complete biochemical response after 66 of the 94 HTT treatments, a partial response after 12 treatments, stable disease after 1 treatment and progression of disease after 15 treatments. Of the 47 patients receiving PET/CT{sub 1}, 20 showed a

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Vaginal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miscarriage (premature birth of a fetus that cannot survive). Women who were exposed to DES before birth ... to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life . Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Locally Advanced or Inflammatory Breast Cancer Treatment of locally advanced ... NIH). NIH is the federal government’s center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an ...

  11. Contemporary state of laryngeal cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of laryngeal cancer treatment is outlined on the basis of an analysis of morbidity and other statistical data. Measures which can be taken to considerably improve the effectiveness of treatment are discussed. The importance of a complex of diagnostic procedures to be employed in therapy planning is shown. Preoperative HBO-mediated gammatherapy and mean fractionation of radiation were used to improve combined treatment. The following function - saving procedures were suggested for radical removal of stage 3 laryngeal malignancies: and endoprosthetic procedure, improved modifications of horizontal resection, and lower larynx resection. A randomized study suggested that prophylactic surgery be performed on the lymphatics of the neck for cancer (T4) of the vestibular area involving the laryngopharynx. The report discusses the good functional and oncological results saving operations carried out after preoperative gammatherapy conducted as a component of combined treatment. The study also established a high effectiveness of traheoesophageal shunting as a postlaryngoectomy voice rehabilitation device

  12. Natural health products and cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Oneschuk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Complementary therapies, notably natural health products such as herbs and vitamins, are frequently used by cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and radiation therapy. There is much controversy as to whether these natural health products should be taken during conventional cancer treatments. Supporters of this practice cite beneficial effects of the antioxidant properties, while opponents are concerned about the potential for natural health product-chemotherapy/radiation related negative interactions. This involves understanding the role and effect on metabolizing enzymes. This review will highlight the present evidence for both the beneficial and negative consequences of the use of natural health products during chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  13. Multidisciplinary Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Varkey, Prashanth; Liu, Yi-Tien; Tan, Ngian Chye

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck cancer remains a significant cause of morbidity worldwide. Multimodality treatment is often the only way to achieve improved function, quality of life, and survival, calling for a multidisciplinary team approach, particularly in view of the rapid advances being made in various fields. The roles of the head and neck surgeon and reconstructive surgeon are discussed, together with the input afforded by specialists in areas such as diagnostic imaging, radiation therapy, medical onco...

  14. Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Arora, Shruthi; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for early stage lung cancer is a promising modality. It has been traditionally used in patients not considered candidates for standard surgical resection. However, its role has been changing rapidly since the introduction of new and advanced technology, especially in tumor tracking, image guidance, and radiation delivery. Stereotactic radiation therapy is one such advancement that has shown excellent local control rates and promising survival in early stage lung cancer. In a...

  15. Accelerated repopulation as a cause of radiation treatment failure in non-small cell lung cancer: review of current data and future clinical strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom, Sue S

    2015-04-01

    Despite convincing evidence that the principles of accelerated repopulation would open up additional therapeutic opportunities in the treatment of advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer, this strategy has been generally underexplored. The implementation of accelerated radiotherapy schedules has been hampered by logistical barriers, concerns about acute toxicity, and the prioritization of integrating concurrent chemotherapy into the standard treatment platform. At present, it is unclear to what extent accelerated fractionation will influence future treatment paradigms in non-small cell lung cancer, although technical advances in radiotherapy, allowing higher dose delivery with reduced toxicity, could permit the development of more convenient and tolerable forms of accelerated schedules. PMID:25771413

  16. Late radiation induced laryngeal oedema in the treatment of vocal cord cancer: analysis using the linear quadratic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of late complications for different size of dose per fraction is analysed in 208 cases with squamous cell carcinoma of the vocal cord. The series compromised 156 cases with Tl and 52 cases with T2 lesions. Radical radiotherapy was given with three different regimes having dose per fraction as 3.33, 2.5 and 2.25 Gy. There were 46 cases with persisting radiation induced laryngeal oedema. Using two different statistical methods, an alpha/beta value of 2.38 Gy of linear quadratic model was estimated for late complications of vocal cord. The analysis indicates the increased incidence of late complications with size of dose per fraction. Relevance of linear quadratic model for the prediction of late complication is demonstrated in the present study. (author). 34 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  17. Treatment outcome of maxillary sinus cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hyoung Kang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The standard treatment in the early stage of maxillary sinus cancer is surgical resection followed by postoperative radiation therapy. However, for locally advanced maxillary sinus cancer, a multimodality treatment approach is strongly recommended to improve the survival rate and quality of life of the patient. We determined the treatment outcomes of induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and surgical resection for locally advanced maxillary sinus cancer. Forty-four patients with locally advanced maxillary sinus cancer, who had been treated between January 1990 and April 2008 at Kangnam St. Mary's Hospital, were retrospectively analyzed. The objective response rates were 70%, 53%, and 57% in the intra-arterial induction chemotherapy, intravenous induction chemotherapy, and concurrent chemoradiation therapy groups, respectively. The orbital preservation rates were 83%, 100%, and 75% in the intra-arterial induction chemotherapy, intravenous induction chemotherapy, and surgical resection groups, respectively. In seven of nine patients in whom the orbit could be preserved after induction chemotherapy, the primary tumors were removed completely. However, although the orbits were preserved in three patients who underwent surgical resection as a primary treatment, all three cases were confirmed to be incomplete resections. We found that active induction chemotherapy for locally advanced cancer of the maxillary sinus increased the possibility of complete resection with orbital preservation as well as tumor down-staging.

  18. Radiation treatment of sewage effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water demand of the past several years increased rapidly. Recycling of municipal wastewater is the effective means of coping with water shortage in Tokyo. We studied the radiation treatment method of further purification of the effluent from sewage treatment plant. By gamma irradiation the refractory organic substances in effluent were decomposed. The COD values decreased and the light brown color faded with increasing dose. The high molecular weight components in effluent were degraded to lower molecular weight substances and were decomposed finally to carbon dioxide. Recent attention has been given to the disadvantages of using chlorine as a disinfectant of municipal wastewater effluents. It has been shown that the chlorination of organic substances in water may produce chlorinated hydrocarbons with carcinogenic properties. So a development of the effective sterilization method for the effluent has been needed instead of chlorine. The radiation sterilization of coliforms and total bacteria in primary effluent, secondary effluent and rapid sand filtered effluent were studied. Coliforms were very sensitive to radiation treatment in comparison with total bacteria. Especially, coliforms in secondary and rapid sand filtered effluents were disinfected to 10 % of initial at 0.1 kGy. (author)

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  20. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of cancer-related deaths in this country. It far exceeds breast cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer, ... enough information to give patients good advice as far as what sort of treatments they need for ...

  1. Classification of the 16,471 patients treated by radiation therapy from 1962 to 1986, and crude five-year survival rates of patients in each category of radiotherapy treatment from 1962 to 1978 in the National Cancer Center Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The summation and classification of patients registered for planned radiation therapy in the 24-year period from 1962 to 1986, in the Department of Radiation Therapy, National Cancer Center Hospital, are reported. Patients numbered 16,471, and total sessions of treatment were 26,175. The ratio of the two figures, 1.58, is the average number of treatment sessions per patient. Peak age was 61 - 65 years' old and 56 - 60 years old, respectively for males and females. The most frequent primary site of disease for radiation therapy was the head and neck, followed by trachea, bronchus and lung, crevix uteri, breast, and esophagus. Frequency of squamous cell carcinoma was 38.0 %; that of adenocarcinoma was 20.9 %. Radical treatment was performed in 32.0 % of patients in the first session, but this figure decreased to 24.7 % for all sessions. There were many cases of secondary and primary palliative treatment, i.e., 31.8 %. Radiotherapy was done in 70 % of patients by megavoltage X-ray, with 9.4 % treated by electron beam. Crude 5-year survival rates for each classification of malignant disease respective to the category of treatment policy from 1962 to 1978 were obtained. Among the radical treatment group, head and neck tumors, skin cancer, and Hodgkin's disease showed 5-year survival rates greater than 50 %. (author)

  2. Eribulin in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang Swami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Halichondrin B is a complex, natural, polyether macrolide derived from marine sponges. Eribulin is a structurally-simplified, synthetic, macrocyclic ketone analogue of Halichondrin B. Eribulin was approved by United States Food and Drug Administration in 2010 as a third-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer patients who have previously been treated with an anthracycline and a taxane. It has a unique microtubule dynamics inhibitory action. Phase III studies have either been completed or are currently ongoing in breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and non-small cell lung cancer. Phase I and II studies in multiple cancers and various combinations are currently ongoing. This article reviews the available information on eribulin with respect to its clinical pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, mechanism of action, metabolism, preclinical studies, and with special focus on clinical trials.

  3. Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and x-rays ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. Certain factors ...

  4. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers should ...

  5. Treatment of radiation burns, 1987 [videorecording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the accident at Chernobyl, patients with various degrees of radiation burns were given treatment at Moscow hospital No. 6. The video shows the radiation injuries as well as therapy and treatment in detail

  6. Hepatic toxicity resulting from cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), often called radiation hepatitis, is a syndrome characterized by the development of anicteric ascites approximately 2 weeks to 4 months after hepatic irradiation. There has been a renewed interest in hepatic irradiation because of two significant advances in cancer treatment: three dimensional radiation therapy treatment planning and bone marrow transplantation using total body irradiation. RILD resulting from liver radiation can usually be distinguished clinically from that resulting from the preparative regime associated with bone marrow transplantation. However, both syndromes demonstrate the same pathological lesion: veno-occlusive disease. Recent evidence suggests that elevated transforming growth factor β levels may play a role in the development of veno-occlusive disease. Three dimensional treatment planning offers the potential to determine the radiation dose and volume dependence of RILD, permitting the safe delivery of high doses of radiation to parts of the liver. The chief therapy for RILD is diuretics, although some advocate steroids for severe cases. The characteristics of RILD permit the development of a grading system modeled after the NCI Acute Common Toxicity Criteria, which incorporates standard criteria of hepatic dysfunction

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Laryngeal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may work better in patients who have stopped smoking before beginning treatment. External radiation therapy to the thyroid or the pituitary gland may change the way the thyroid gland works. The doctor may test the thyroid gland before and after ...

  8. Radiation dose response simulation for biomechanical-based deformable image registration of head and neck cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomechanical-based deformable image registration is conducted on the head and neck region. Patient specific 3D finite element models consisting of parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SG), tumor, vertebrae (VB), mandible, and external body are used to register pre-treatment MRI to post-treatment MR images to model the dose response using image data of five patients. The images are registered using combinations of vertebrae and mandible alignments, and surface projection of the external body as boundary conditions. In addition, the dose response is simulated by applying a new loading technique in the form of a dose-induced shrinkage using the dose-volume relationship. The dose-induced load is applied as dose-induced shrinkage of the tumor and four salivary glands. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) is calculated for the four salivary glands, and tumor to calculate the volume overlap of the structures after deformable registration. A substantial improvement in the registration is found by including the dose-induced shrinkage. The greatest registration improvement is found in the four glands where the average DSC increases from 0.53, 0.55, 0.32, and 0.37 to 0.68, 0.68, 0.51, and 0.49 in the left PG, right PG, left SG, and right SG, respectively by using bony alignment of vertebrae and mandible (M), body (B) surface projection and dose (D) (VB+M+B+D). (paper)

  9. Combined conservative surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treatment of the breast cancer patient: the influence of the interval between surgery and start of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze our experience treating breast cancer patients with combined breast conserving surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy in the light of considerable discussion on the role of the interval between surgery and radiation therapy (S-RT). Materials and Methods: Between 1985 and 1992, 100 patients with invasive breast cancer underwent radiation treatment at our institution after conservative surgery with axillary dissection and some form of chemotherapy. Criteria for inclusion in this retrospective analysis were: Stage M0, no simultaneous malignancies, gross total resection of primary and involved lymph nodes, at least three cycles of postoperative polychemotherapy, complete radiation treatment, complete follow-up information. Seventy-four patients fulfilling these criteria form the basis of this report. For patients alive at last observation date, median follow-up time was five years (i.e., 59 months; range, 36-112 months). Age at diagnosis ranged between 20 and 69 years (median, 48 years). Fifty-four patients were pre- or perimenopausal (73%) and 20 were postmenopausal (27%). Tumors were staged using the AJCC-system. Distribution of T-Stage was: T1 (n=36), T2 (n=37), T3 (n=1). In 95% of patients, axillary lymph nodes were positive: 1-3 nodes (n=50), ≥ 4 nodes (n=20), and 0 nodes (n=3). Thus, 91% of patients were Stage II. In 65% of patients, final pathological margins were negative. Margins showed invasive and intraductal carcinoma in 5 and 11% of cases, respectively (margins unknown in 19%). Chemotherapy regimens and doses varied according to the referring physicians as well as during the study period. Seventy percent of patients received six cycles of chemotherapy (predominan CMF) before onset of irradiation. The median S-RT interval was 20.5 weeks (range, 8.4-31.9 weeks). Usually, the breast was treated to 50 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction, five fractions per week, using Cobalt-60 (n=66) or 5 MeV photons (n=8). Then the tumor bed was boosted with

  10. Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following: Head and neck surgeon . Radiation oncologist . Dentist . Speech therapist . Dietitian . Psychologist . Rehabilitation specialist . Plastic surgeon . ... use this content on your website or other digital platform? Our syndication services page shows you how. ...

  11. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are available to help. HELPFUL WEB SITES ON LUNG CANCER American Lung Association www.lung.org Lungcancer.org www.lungcancer.org Lung Cancer Alliance www.lungcanceralliance.org Lung Cancer Online www. ...

  12. A case of radiation-induced cancer of the hypopharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kouji; Shimizu, Yukio; Yura, Jirou; Itoh, Yasufumi; Ikeda, Tsuneko [Matsunami General Hospital, Kasamatsu, Gifu (Japan); Outsubo, Toshio; Saitou, Hitoshi

    2001-06-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced cancer of the hypopharynx in a 65-year-old woman. The patient had received radiation treatment for Basedow's disease for several years starting at the age of 10 years. On June 26, 1993, she was examined at our hospital because of hoarseness and dysphagia. On July 22, right lobectomy was performed for suspected thyroid cancer. During this operation, endoscopy revealed hypopharyngeal cancer. Twenty-two days after surgery, total pharyngolaryngectomy and total esophagectomy were performed and a pharyngogastrostomy and a permanent tracheostomy were created. Histologic examination revealed moderately differentiated squamous cell cancer. This case was diagnosed as radiation-induced caner according to the diagnostic criteria of Sakai. (author)

  13. Radiation response in prostate cancer stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full text of the publication follows. Introduction: Currently, there is no successful treatment for secondary prostate cancer. Resistance of secondary tumours and metastases to radiotherapy and chemotherapy might be explained by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Prostate (P) CSCs are rare cells defined by cell surface markers, CD133+, a2b1integrinhi and CD44+, and are capable of self-renewal, differentiation and invasion in vitro and tumour initiation in vivo. Hypothesis: PCSCs have an alternative DNA damage response following radiation and are resistant to radiation treatment. Methods: Primary prostate (benign and cancer) epithelial stem (SC) transit amplifying (TA, CD133-/a2b1integrinhi/CD44+) and committed basal (CB, CD133-/a2b1integrinlo/CD44+) cells were exposed to 2 Gy of radiation (IR) to induce a DNA damage response. Immunofluorescence was used to quantify nuclear foci, representative of DNA damage response proteins (g-H2AX, 53BP1, phosphorylated ATM/ATR substrates, phospho-Chk2Th68). Immunofluorescence was also used to co-stain for heterochromatin and DNA damage markers. Comet assays (neutral and alkaline) were used to directly assess DNA damage. Results: In benign and cancer cells, the SCs had a lower percentage of cells containing initial foci (30 min post-IR), compared to the TA and CB cells. At 24 h post-IR there was a reduced percentage of cells positive for foci in TA and CB cells suggesting repair. Whilst there were also signs of repair in benign SCs, in the PCSCs there was an increase in percentage of cells positive for foci at 24 h, indicative of a delayed damage response. Comet assays indicated that SCs sustain different kinds of DNA damage to TA and CB cells. Heterochromatin staining indicated that DNA damage foci preferentially formed in euchromatin. Future work: Further studies will include apoptosis and clonogenic assays to measure PCSC survival. In addition, PCSC chromatin status will be examined to elucidate DNA repair kinetics. If we are able

  14. Molecular imaging in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of cancer therapy can be difficult to predict, as its efficacy is often predicated upon characteristics of the cancer, treatment, and individual that are not fully understood or are difficult to ascertain. Monitoring the response of disease to treatment is therefore essential and has traditionally been characterized by changes in tumor volume. However, in many instances, this singular measure is insufficient for predicting treatment effects on patient survival. Molecular imaging allows repeated in vivo measurement of many critical molecular features of neoplasm, such as metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, hypoxia, and apoptosis, which can be employed for monitoring therapeutic response. In this review, we examine the current methods for evaluating response to treatment and provide an overview of emerging PET molecular imaging methods that will help guide future cancer therapies. (orig.)

  15. Radiation-induced lung injury outside the irradiated area after radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organizing pneumonia (OP) and eosinophilic pneumonia (EP) are known as lung injuries after radiation therapy for breast cancer. In this study, we reported nine cases of OP and a case of EP after radiation therapy. All 10 women (62±10 years of age) were nonsmokers. Nine patients received endocrine therapy after radiation therapy. The mean intervals from completion of radiation therapy to occurrence of any symptoms were 119 days. All the patients have symptoms, but none are severe. Seven patients were treated with corticosteroids, and three were without treatment. All patients improved, but a relapse occurred in three (two treated with corticosteroid, one without treatment). Because of our findings and the previous studies, tobacco smoke may have played a suppressive role in the occurrence of lung injury in nonirradiated areas after radiation therapy in breast cancer patients, and endocrine therapy may have played a promotive role. (author)

  16. Parathyroid Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around it. Sometimes lymph nodes , half of the thyroid gland on the same side of the body as the cancer, and muscles, tissues , and a nerve in the neck are also removed. Tumor debulking : A surgical procedure in which as much ...

  17. Treatment of Urethral Strictures from Irradiation and Other Nonsurgical Forms of Pelvic Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Iyad Khourdaji; Jacob Parke; Avinash Chennamsetty; Frank Burks

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT), external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), brachytherapy (BT), photon beam therapy (PBT), high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and cryotherapy are noninvasive treatment options for pelvic malignancies and prostate cancer. Though effective in treating cancer, urethral stricture disease is an underrecognized and poorly reported sequela of these treatment modalities. Studies estimate the incidence of stricture from BT to be 1.8%, EBRT 1.7%, combined EBRT and BT 5.2%, an...

  18. Adaptive Radiation: application in lung cancer; Radioterapia adaptativa: aplicacion en cancer de pulmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Mazon, J.; Raba Diez, J. I.; Vazquez Rodriguez, J. a.; Pacheco Baldor, M. T.; Mendiguren Santiago, M. A.; Menendez Garcia, J. C.

    2011-07-01

    The previous updates are a form of adaptive radiation that can be used to account for changes in the size, shape and location of both the tumor and healthy tissue. Are especially useful in the case of lung cancer which typically is associated with significant anatomical changes due to the response to treatment.In the present study, the variation in tumor volume and dosimetric effects from a new CT and replanning during the course of treatment in patients with lung cancer.

  19. Radiation-induced breast cancer: the question of early breast cancer screening in Hodgkin's lymphoma survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Hilal, Talal; Rudy, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Chest irradiation is associated with numerous early and late complications that arise from ionizing radiation-induced damage to cellular structures within the field of therapy. In patients exposed to chest irradiation at an early age as part of the treatment of childhood cancer, specifically Hodgkin's lymphoma, the increased risk of breast cancer in the long run should be considered. A case of a 35-year-old woman who exposed to chest irradiation as part of the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma ...

  20. Fully Automated Simultaneous Integrated Boosted-Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning Is Feasible for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Binbin, E-mail: binbin.wu@gunet.georgetown.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC (United States); McNutt, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zahurak, Marianna [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Simari, Patricio [Autodesk Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pang, Dalong [Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC (United States); Taylor, Russell [Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Sanguineti, Giuseppe [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively determine whether overlap volume histogram (OVH)-driven, automated simultaneous integrated boosted (SIB)-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning for head-and-neck cancer can be implemented in clinics. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was designed to compare fully automated plans (APs) created by an OVH-driven, automated planning application with clinical plans (CPs) created by dosimetrists in a 3-dose-level (70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy), head-and-neck SIB-IMRT planning. Because primary organ sparing (cord, brain, brainstem, mandible, and optic nerve/chiasm) always received the highest priority in clinical planning, the study aimed to show the noninferiority of APs with respect to PTV coverage and secondary organ sparing (parotid, brachial plexus, esophagus, larynx, inner ear, and oral mucosa). The sample size was determined a priori by a superiority hypothesis test that had 85% power to detect a 4% dose decrease in secondary organ sparing with a 2-sided alpha level of 0.05. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression model was used for statistical comparison. Results: Forty consecutive patients were accrued from July to December 2010. GEE analysis indicated that in APs, overall average dose to the secondary organs was reduced by 1.16 (95% CI = 0.09-2.33) with P=.04, overall average PTV coverage was increased by 0.26% (95% CI = 0.06-0.47) with P=.02 and overall average dose to the primary organs was reduced by 1.14 Gy (95% CI = 0.45-1.8) with P=.004. A physician determined that all APs could be delivered to patients, and APs were clinically superior in 27 of 40 cases. Conclusions: The application can be implemented in clinics as a fast, reliable, and consistent way of generating plans that need only minor adjustments to meet specific clinical needs.

  1. Biomedical Engineering 2008. New methods for cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanninen, J.; Koskelainen, A.; Ilmoniemi, R.J. (eds.)

    2008-07-01

    The report consists of 11 student papers presented in 2008 at the Seminar on Biomedical Engineering at Helsinki University of Technology (Finland). The topics of the seminar included: cancer risk factors and diagnosis, radiation therapy, boron neutron capture treatment (BNCT), chemotherapy, cooling and heating therapy, immunotherapy, angiogenesis inhibition approaches, gene therapy and ablation therapy of liver cancer

  2. Retinoic acid and cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Mei-Chih; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Lin, Ho; Yang, Tsung-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid which belongs to the retinoid class of chemical compounds is an important metabolite of vitamin A in diets. It is currently understood that retinoic acid plays important roles in cell development and differentiation as well as cancer treatment. Lung, prostate, breast, ovarian, bladder, oral, and skin cancers have been demonstrated to be suppressed by retinoic acid. Our results also show that low doses and high doses of retinoic acid may respectively cause cell cycle arrest and a...

  3. Surgical treatments for esophageal cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Allum, William H; Bonavina, Luigi; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Felix, Valter Nilton; Figueredo, Edgar; Gatenby, Piers A.C.; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ibraev, Maksat A.; Krasna, Mark J.; Lambert, René; Langer, Rupert; Lewis, Michael P.N.; Nason, Katie S.

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on the role of the nurse in preparation of esophageal resection (ER); the management of patients who develop high-grade dysplasia after having undergone Nissen fundoplication; the trajectory of care for the patient with esophageal cancer; the influence of the site of tumor in the choice of treatment; the best location for esophagogastrostomy; management of chylous leak after esophagectomy; the ...

  4. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that ... not stop or delay their conventional treatment. Category: Scam Watch Health Download File Related Videos More Videos ...

  5. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product ... and should not stop or delay their conventional treatment. Category: Scam Watch Health Download File Related Videos ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  7. Treatment Options for Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  8. Preventing Infections During Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Angela; Tai, Eric; Nielsen, Danielle Beauchesne; Shropshire, Sonya; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in oncology care, infections from both community and healthcare settings remain a major cause of hospitalization and death among patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Neutropenia (low white blood cell count) is a common and potentially dangerous side effect in patients receiving chemotherapy treatments and may lead to higher risk of infection. Preventing infection during treatment can result in significant decreases in morbidity and mortality for patients with cancer. As part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients public health campaign, a public-private partnership was formed between the CDC Foundation and Amgen, Inc. The CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control developed and launched an interactive website, www.PreventCancerInfections.org, designed for patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The site encourages patients to complete a risk assessment for developing neutropenia during their treatment. After completing the assessment, patients receive information about how to lower the risk for infection and keep themselves healthy while receiving chemotherapy. PMID:25095295

  9. Radiation dose and subsequent risk for stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A; Smith, Susan A; Holowaty, Eric;

    2013-01-01

    To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer.......To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer....

  10. Treatment Options by Stage (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  11. Radiation-induced cancer: a modern view

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, D J; Sachs, R. K.; Wilson, D J

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic medical radiation has been the most rapidly increasing component of population background radiation exposure in Western countries over the past decade. This trend is set to increase as CT scanning is readily available with burgeoning use in everyday clinical practice. Consequently, the issue of cancer induction from the doses received during diagnostic medical exposures is highly relevant. In this review we explain current understanding of potential cancer induction at low doses of...

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in advanced lung cancer after chemotherapy with/within radiation therapy: Can it predict treatment responsiveness of the tumor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the contrast enhancement patterns of lung cancer after chemotherapy using a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT and to determine whether the enhancement patterns of tumors at early stages of treatment can predict treatment responses. Forty-two patients with advanced lung cancers underwent DCE-CT and follow-up CT after chemotherapy. We evaluated peak and net enhancement (PE and NE, respectively) and time-density curves (TDCs) (type A, B, C, and D) on DCE-CT images. Treatment responses were evaluated using revised Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor criteria. NE and PE values were significantly higher in the progressive disease (PD) groups than in the stable disease (SD) or partial response (PR) groups (p < 0.05). Types B, C, and D on TDCs were observed mostly in the PR and SD groups (96.0%), whereas type A was most frequent in the SD and PD groups (97.2%), which were significantly different in terms of PE and NE. Contrast enhancement pattern regarding the response of treatment on DCE-CT images could be helpful in predicting treatment response of advanced lung cancer after treatment.

  13. Unproven methods in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, S P

    1993-07-01

    The nature-based and nontoxic image makes application of unproven methods in oncology attractive in contrast to application of a mechanized scientific medicine. The application frequency of these treatments ranges from 10% to greater than 60%. Increasingly, the promoters try to create a scientific impression through a pseudologic cancer theory, a harmless diagnostic test, and a holistic treatment of every cancer. Of the big variety of unproven methods, which are summarized in 11 groups in this review, the following are discussed: anthroposophic and other mistletoe preparations; homeopathy; Maharishi Ayur-Veda; unproven anticancer diets; orthomolecular medicine, including ascorbic acid; and methods supposedly stimulating unspecific and specific defense mechanisms. In conclusion, physicians should beware of and have knowledge of currently used unproven cancer treatments for epidemiologic, social, economic, and scientific reasons. PMID:8364081

  14. Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, J F; Ulbak, Kaare; Dreyer, L;

    1997-01-01

    countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and......Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our...... estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all...

  15. Pregnancy after successful cancer treatment: what needs to be considered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, Barbara; Henes, Melanie; Neunhoeffer, Eva; Fehm, Tanja; Huebner, Stephanie; Kanz, Lothar; Marini, Patricia; Mayer, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, advances in oncology led to improved treatment results and increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors. Fulfilling the desire to have children is important for many patients after cancer treatment. Consequently, oncologists, gynecologists and obstetricians are seeing more patients who wish to conceive after treatment. The necessary prerequisites that should be considered when supporting a planned pregnancy after cancer treatment are discussed in this article. The possible consequences of chemotherapy and radiotherapy on the course of pregnancy and the health of the offspring, as well as the interactions between cancer and pregnancy, are reviewed with the focus on childhood cancer, malignant lymphomas, and breast cancer. Despite chemo- or radiotherapy, neither the teratogenic risk nor the risk of adventitious cancers appears to be increased for the offspring of cancer survivors. However, there is a slightly higher risk of miscarriage after chemotherapy. In case of radiation to the uterus, there is a higher risk of premature birth, intrauterine growth retardation, and increased perinatal mortality. The effect is more pronounced after prepubertal radiation than for postpubertal radiation. The former cancer patient's desire to conceive can nevertheless be supported, given that pregnancy and birth are closely monitored. PMID:22414979

  16. Radiation-Induced Notch Signaling in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagadec, Chann [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California (United States); Vlashi, Erina [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Alhiyari, Yazeed; Phillips, Tiffany M.; Bochkur Dratver, Milana [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California (United States); Pajonk, Frank, E-mail: fpajonk@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To explore patterns of Notch receptor and ligand expression in response to radiation that could be crucial in defining optimal dosing schemes for γ-secretase inhibitors if combined with radiation. Methods and Materials: Using MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines, we used real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to study the Notch pathway in response to radiation. Results: We show that Notch receptor and ligand expression during the first 48 hours after irradiation followed a complex radiation dose–dependent pattern and was most pronounced in mammospheres, enriched for breast cancer stem cells. Additionally, radiation activated the Notch pathway. Treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor prevented radiation-induced Notch family gene expression and led to a significant reduction in the size of the breast cancer stem cell pool. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, if combined with radiation, γ-secretase inhibitors may prevent up-regulation of Notch receptor and ligand family members and thus reduce the number of surviving breast cancer stem cells.

  17. Radiation-Induced Notch Signaling in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To explore patterns of Notch receptor and ligand expression in response to radiation that could be crucial in defining optimal dosing schemes for γ-secretase inhibitors if combined with radiation. Methods and Materials: Using MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines, we used real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to study the Notch pathway in response to radiation. Results: We show that Notch receptor and ligand expression during the first 48 hours after irradiation followed a complex radiation dose–dependent pattern and was most pronounced in mammospheres, enriched for breast cancer stem cells. Additionally, radiation activated the Notch pathway. Treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor prevented radiation-induced Notch family gene expression and led to a significant reduction in the size of the breast cancer stem cell pool. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, if combined with radiation, γ-secretase inhibitors may prevent up-regulation of Notch receptor and ligand family members and thus reduce the number of surviving breast cancer stem cells

  18. Interaction between radiation and other breast cancer risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A follow-up study was conducted of 1764 women institutionalized for pulmonary tuberculosis between 1930 and 1954. Among 1047 women exposed to fluoroscopic chest X-rays during air collapse therapy of the lung, an excess of breast cancer was observed and previously reported (41 cases observed versus 23.3 expected). Among 717 comparison patients who received other treatments, no excess breast cancer risk was apparent (15 cases observed versus 14.1 expected). To determine whether breast cancer risk factors modify the carcinogenic effect of radiation, analyses were performed evaluating the interaction of radiation with indicators of breast cancer risk. The greatest radiation risk was found when radiation exposure occurred just before and during menarche. Similarly, exposures during first pregnancy appeared substantially more hazardous than exposures occurring before or after first pregnancy, suggesting that the condition of the breast at the time of pregnancy modifies the effect of radiation in such a way as to enhance the risk. Age at menopause did not appear to influence the risk of radiation exposure. Other than radiation, benign breast disease was the most significant breast cancer risk indicator. Benign breast disease was not seen to modify the effect of radiation exposure; however, excessive radiation exposure might have increased the incidence of benign breast disease, complicating the interaction analysis. Because of the uncertainty due to small-number sampling variation, these study results will require confirmation by a larger series. They do, however, suggest that stages when breast tissue undergoes high mitotic activity, e.g. menarche and pregnancy, are times of special vulnerability to the harmful effects of ionizing radiation

  19. Particle beam. Cancer treatment in next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This feature article summarizes the present and future aspects of particle therapy of cancers in Japan. It contains the Interview article for carbon particle therapy by HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba); Facilities for the therapy-present and future for diffusion; History of the carbon beam treatment in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba); Plans for a facility unit for proton beam therapy of cancer in Fukui Pref. for the regional diffusion; a Center of Excellence program in Gunma University for forefront cancer therapy; and Technology of equipments supporting the particle beam therapy in manufacturers of Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Toshiba Japan, Hitachi, and Mitsubishi Electric Corp. There are 6 facilities in total for the particle beam therapy of cancer in Japan. Although the diffusion of radiation therapy in Japan is as low as less than 30% in the whole cancer treatments, the particle beam therapy, an advanced form of radiotherapy, is on the top of the world. (T.I.)

  20. Relationship Between Low Hemoglobin Levels and Outcomes After Treatment With Radiation or Chemoradiation in Patients With Cervical Cancer: Has the Impact of Anemia Been Overstated?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Previous reports have suggested that anemia increases rates of recurrence after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. However, these studies may not have fully corrected for confounding risk factors. Using a well-characterized cohort of cervical cancer patients, we examined the association between anemia and outcomes before and after the introduction of chemoradiation as standard of care. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 2454 patients who underwent definitive radiation therapy from 1980 through 2011. Minimum hemoglobin level (Hgbmin) was recorded for 2359 patients (96%). Endpoints included freedom from central recurrence (FFCR), freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), and disease-specific survival (DSS). Results: For the entire cohort, hemoglobin concentrations of 9, 10, and 12 g/dL before and during radiation were all significantly associated with FFCR, FFDM, and DSS (all P<.001) on univariate analysis. However, on multivariate analysis, only Hgbmin less than 10 g/dL during RT (RT-Hgb<10) remained significant, and it was correlated with lower DSS (P=.02, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.28) and FFDM (P=.03, HR = 1.33) but not with FFCR. In a subset analysis of patients receiving chemoradiation (n=678), RT-Hgb<10 was associated only with DSS (P=.008, HR = 1.49), not with FFCR or FFDM. In this subgroup, despite an association between RT-Hgb<10 and DSS, the use of transfusion was not correlated with benefit. Conclusions: No evidence was found supporting anemia as an independent predictor of central recurrence in patients treated with definitive radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy. Less emphasis on correcting anemia in cervical cancer patients may be warranted

  1. Relationship Between Low Hemoglobin Levels and Outcomes After Treatment With Radiation or Chemoradiation in Patients With Cervical Cancer: Has the Impact of Anemia Been Overstated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Klopp, Ann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Meyer, Larissa A. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eifel, Patricia J., E-mail: peifel@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Previous reports have suggested that anemia increases rates of recurrence after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. However, these studies may not have fully corrected for confounding risk factors. Using a well-characterized cohort of cervical cancer patients, we examined the association between anemia and outcomes before and after the introduction of chemoradiation as standard of care. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 2454 patients who underwent definitive radiation therapy from 1980 through 2011. Minimum hemoglobin level (Hgb{sub min}) was recorded for 2359 patients (96%). Endpoints included freedom from central recurrence (FFCR), freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), and disease-specific survival (DSS). Results: For the entire cohort, hemoglobin concentrations of 9, 10, and 12 g/dL before and during radiation were all significantly associated with FFCR, FFDM, and DSS (all P<.001) on univariate analysis. However, on multivariate analysis, only Hgb{sub min} less than 10 g/dL during RT (RT-Hgb{sub <10}) remained significant, and it was correlated with lower DSS (P=.02, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.28) and FFDM (P=.03, HR = 1.33) but not with FFCR. In a subset analysis of patients receiving chemoradiation (n=678), RT-Hgb{sub <10} was associated only with DSS (P=.008, HR = 1.49), not with FFCR or FFDM. In this subgroup, despite an association between RT-Hgb{sub <10} and DSS, the use of transfusion was not correlated with benefit. Conclusions: No evidence was found supporting anemia as an independent predictor of central recurrence in patients treated with definitive radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy. Less emphasis on correcting anemia in cervical cancer patients may be warranted.

  2. Stereotactic body radiation therapy versus conventional radiation therapy in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan S; Schytte, Tine; Jensen, Henrik R;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now an accepted and patient friendly treatment, but still controversy exists about its comparability to conventional radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this single...... SBRT predicted improved prognosis. However, staging procedure, confirmation procedure of recurrence and technical improvements of radiation treatment is likely to influence outcomes. However, SBRT seems to be as efficient as conventional RT and is a more convenient treatment for the patients....

  3. Treatment Modification in Young Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharl, Anton; Salterberg, Annette; Untch, Michael; Liedtke, Cornelia; Stickeler, Elmar; Papathemelis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Patients not older than 40 years are referred to as young patients. These women benefit from chemo-, endocrine and anti-HER2 therapy to a similar degree as older women. Surgery and radiation therapy also follow the same recommendations. This manuscript deals with the following topics that need special consideration in young women: endocrine therapy and ovarian suppression; fertility protection and family planning; and genetic counselling. There is an on-going debate on whether tamoxifen is sufficient as an endocrine treatment in young patients with endocrine-responsive tumours or whether suppression of ovarian function in combination with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor should be preferred. Recent data suggest a benefit from ovarian suppression plus exemestane in women of 35 years or younger with high-risk breast cancer. However, increased side effects bear the risk of lesser compliance, which eventually results in higher mortality. Child bearing is nowadays frequently postponed to the 4th decade of life, thereby increasing the number of women who have not yet finished their reproductive desires when diagnosed with breast cancer. These patients are in urgent need of counselling for fertility protection. Breast cancer diagnosis at young age is an indication for a possible mutation in breast cancer susceptibility genes. This has an impact on the cancer risk of the whole family, especially the offspring. Drugs that are specifically targeted to cancer cells with genetic alterations that impair DNA repair are already entering the arsenal of oncologists. PMID:27031253

  4. Thyroid cancer following exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to ionising radiations during childhood increases the risk of thyroid cancer. Similar risk factors have been found after external radiation exposure or internal contamination with radioactive iodine isotopes. In case of contamination with radio-iodines, administration of potassium iodide can prevent thyroid irradiation. (authors)

  5. Second primary oesophageal cancer following radiation for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of 12 women who presented with a second primary oesophageal cancer following radiotherapy for breast cancer was reviewed. It was concluded that nine cases fitted the classical description of a radiation-induced malignancy. Most cases were successfully managed with combined modality therapy in spite of their previous radiotherapy

  6. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incidence and mortality rates of cancer are currently on the top of disease pattern and the number is increasing and increasing worldwide. The impact of screening program for early diagnosis has been proved their important roles in the war against cancer because it helps increase the cure rates, decrease the mortality and morbidity rates, and therefore reduces the economic-social burden. Advances in diagnostic imaging techniques, especially the hybrid imaging (X-ray and Nuclear Medicine) such as PET/CT, SPECT/CT, PET/MRI, is important in accurate staging and these help choose the optimized treatment options to prolong survival while improve the quality of life. The treatment outcomes of cancer has certain remarkable advances based on variety of research to modify, promote and strengthen the traditional treatments (surgery-chemotherapy-radiation) such as laparoscopic surgery, combined chemo-regimens, intensity modulated radiation therapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy, stereotactic radiation therapy, radio surgery, PET/CT simulation, radioactive seeds implant, selective internal radiation therapy, intra-operative radiation therapy, etc. as well as the emerge of new methods such as targeted therapy, immune therapy, radio immunotherapy, proton therapy and heavy ion. Treatment of cancer is now the “individualized treatment” with the advances of biochemistry and histopathology. To achieve the most optimal outcomes, cancer should be approached by a multi professional team including biochemistry, immunology, histopathology, surgical oncology, medical oncology and radiation oncology. (author)

  7. Ionizing Radiation Promotes the Migratory and Invasive Potential of Lung Cancer Cells by Different Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Jin Nyoung; Kang, Ga Young; Um, Hong Duck [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Although radiation therapy is a major therapeutic modality for cancer treatment, previous reports have suggested that ionizing radiation (IR) can promote the invasive and metastatic potential of cancer cells. It was consistently reported that IR can induce certain types of matrix metalloproteinases, which are critical to the degradation of extracellular matrix. Given that the motility of cancer cells is an additional requirement for their metastasis, this study investigated whether IR can also influence the migratory potential of cancer cells.

  8. [Medical treatment of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, B; Cipolla, B; Labrador, J

    1994-03-01

    Hormone dependence of prostate cancer is well known. In 80% of cases with metastases, hormone suppression leads to the reduction of tumour volume and related disorders. However the treatment is generally palliative because malignant process recurs after about around 16 months. Mean survival is less than 3 years in these forms. Lack of response come always together with a poor prognosis, and there is 90% mortality at 2 years. Advanced prostatic cancer should not be treated with hormones if the patient has few symptoms and his quality of life is satisfactory. Symptomatic forms require hormone manipulation. Orchidectomy or LH-RH are recommended. Total androgen ablation (combined treatment) leads rapidly to more relief of symptoms, but its drawbacks and especially high cost indicate that its use should be weighed individually. Estramustine is not a first-lune treatment. Presently, there is no criteria to predict response to treatment. PMID:8066398

  9. Movement of the diaphragm during radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movement of the target volume during the exposure to radiation results in decreased accuracy in radiotherapy. We carried out the quantitative evaluation of the movement of the diaphragm during the radiation therapy. Seventy seven patients, who received radiation therapy for lung cancer from December 1988 to February 1990 at the Osaka-prefectural Habikino Hospital, were studied. The movement was recorded with a sonoprinter at the time of treatment planning for radiotherapy, and the length of movement was evaluated at 6 points on the diaphragm. In a study of 402 points in 77 patients, the average movement was 12 mm, and the maximum movement was 40 mm. At the 17% of the points, the movement exceeded 20 mm. The largest movement was observed at the outer point of the right lung. Movement was greater in men than in women. Performance status was not related to the degree of movement. We concluded that in chest and abdominal irradiation, movement caused by respiration is not negligible, and synchronized radiotherapy should be developed in the future. (author)

  10. Investigation of skin cancer treatment efficiency by raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. S.; Kim, D. W. [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    From the successful perform of the molecular structures of various kinds of human skin cancer. We can predict the types of cancer when a small abnormal change change occurs on skin by raman spectrum. When we applied the cancer causing chemicals, bezopyrene, to nude mouse, it did not develop to cancer. But we had radiated UV light after developed to skin cancer in a few days. We can deduce the development of human skin cancer from the result of nude mouse skin cancer, because the two skin are structurally very similar to each other. From the results of own research we could conform the UV light is essential for the development of skin cancer. The results of own research can be directly apply to early detection and proper treatment of skin cancer in hospital. 32 refs., 40 figs., 16 tabs. (Author)

  11. Treatment of primary cancer of the penis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of treatment of 252 cases of cancer of the penis were evaluated. Indications for available methods of treatment with regard to patient's age, stage and size of primary tumor were worked out. Conservative treatment should be given to cases of T1 and T2 tumors, combined treatmemt-T3, and palliative therapy-T4 neoplasms. An experience with cryodestruction of tumor in combination with chemotherapy is discussed. More advantage seems to be offered by application of radiation treatment in such cases. Three- and five-year survival rates for stage 1 tumors were 98.6 and 97.5%, stage 2-84.5 and 83.3% stage 3-26.2 and 24.9% irrespective of the procedure. Not a single patient with stage 4 tumor survived over one year

  12. Cholelithiasis after treatment for childhood cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, H.; Schell, M.; Pui, C.H. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA))

    1991-03-01

    The authors evaluated the risk of development of cholelithiasis in 6050 patients treated at a single hospital for various childhood cancers with different therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy, and bone marrow transplantation, from 1963 to 1989. Patients with underlying chronic hemolytic anemia or preexisting gallstones were excluded. Nine female and seven male patients with a median age of 12.4 years (range, 1.2 to 22.8 years) at diagnosis of primary cancer had gallstones develop 3 months to 17.3 years (median, 3.1 years) after therapy was initiated. Cumulative risks of 0.42% at 10 years and 1.03% at 18 years after diagnosis substantially exceed those reported for the general population of this age group. Treatment-related factors significantly associated with an increased risk of cholelithiasis were ileal conduit, parenteral nutrition, abdominal surgery, and abdominal radiation therapy (relative risks and 95% confidence intervals = 61.6 (27.9-135.9), 23.0 (9.8-54.1), 15.1 (7.1-32.2), and 7.4 (3.2-17.0), respectively). There was no correlation with the type of cancer, nor was the frequency of conventional predisposing features (e.g., family history, obesity, use of oral contraceptives, and pregnancy) any higher among the affected patients in this study than in the general population. Patients with cancer who have risk factors identified here should be monitored for the development of gallstones.

  13. Cholelithiasis after treatment for childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors evaluated the risk of development of cholelithiasis in 6050 patients treated at a single hospital for various childhood cancers with different therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy, and bone marrow transplantation, from 1963 to 1989. Patients with underlying chronic hemolytic anemia or preexisting gallstones were excluded. Nine female and seven male patients with a median age of 12.4 years (range, 1.2 to 22.8 years) at diagnosis of primary cancer had gallstones develop 3 months to 17.3 years (median, 3.1 years) after therapy was initiated. Cumulative risks of 0.42% at 10 years and 1.03% at 18 years after diagnosis substantially exceed those reported for the general population of this age group. Treatment-related factors significantly associated with an increased risk of cholelithiasis were ileal conduit, parenteral nutrition, abdominal surgery, and abdominal radiation therapy (relative risks and 95% confidence intervals = 61.6 [27.9-135.9], 23.0 [9.8-54.1], 15.1 [7.1-32.2], and 7.4 [3.2-17.0], respectively). There was no correlation with the type of cancer, nor was the frequency of conventional predisposing features (e.g., family history, obesity, use of oral contraceptives, and pregnancy) any higher among the affected patients in this study than in the general population. Patients with cancer who have risk factors identified here should be monitored for the development of gallstones

  14. How far is cancer cured by radiation sensitization?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some types of cancer are not cured by radiation alone in view of histology, location, and size. In facing so-called radioresistant cancer, antineoplastic agents, hypoxic cell sensitizers, biological response modifiers, or hyperthermia are used in combination with radiation, with the aim of cancer cure. First of all, this chapter discusses the subject of 'what is tumor cure by radiation therapy'. Current conditions of the aforementioned combined modalities and the future perspectives are presented. The following subjects are covered: (1) tumor control - significance of the number of stem cells; (2) biological evaluation of chemo-radiotherapy with cisplatin; (3) clinical results and experience with combination of radiotherapy and radiosensitizers; (4) radiosensitization with hypoxic cell radiosensitizers - present status (5) hypoxic cell radiosensitizers - present status and problems from the viewpoint of clinical radiotherapy; (6) thermal radiosensitization in vitro and its implications for radiotherapy; (7) clinical assessment of thermoradiotherapy for breast cancer and cancer of the urinary bladder; (8) interactions of radiation and biological response modifiers in the treatment of malignant tumor; (9) improvement in the effects of radiation therapy with biological response modifiers. (N.K.)

  15. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related deaths in this country. It far exceeds breast cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer, and, in fact, ... when detected, you know, and when patients get treatment. Okay. So it’s very important, you know, to ...

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Age and family history can affect the risk of rectal cancer. Anything ... to flow from the body to a collection bag. After the cancer is removed, the surgeon will ...

  17. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and prostate cancer, and, in fact, if you add up the mortalities from those three cancers alone, ... for this patient or in other cases a combined approach of radiation, with or without chemotherapy, in ...