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Sample records for cancer previously treated

  1. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer patients previously treated with conventional radiotherapy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most prevalent malignancies worldwide and is the leading cause of death in both men and women. Presently, local control rates are quite poor. Improvements in imaging and radiation treatment delivery systems however have provided radiation oncologists with new tools to better target these tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is one such technique that has shown efficacy as upfront treatment for lung cancer. In addition, more recent studies have demonstrated some effectiveness in recurrent tumors in prior irradiated fields as well. This review summarizes seven recent studies of re-irradiation with SBRT in patients with thoracic recurrences treated previously with conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. Combined, 140 patients were included. The median initial thoracic radiation doses ranged from 50-87.5 Gy and median re-irradiation dose ranged from 40-80 Gy. Local control rates varied from 65-92%. Re-irradiation was well tolerated with few grade 4 and 5 complications (observed in one study). Currently, based on these published reports, re-irradiation with SBRT appears feasible for in-field thoracic recurrences, though caution must be taken in all cases of retreatment

  2. Open comparative trial of formestane versus megestrol acetate in postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer previously treated with tamoxifen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freue, M; Kjaer, M; Boni, C; Joliver, J; Janicke, F; Willemse, PHB; Coombes, RC; Van Belle, S; Perez-Carrion, R; Zieschang, J; de Palacios, PI; Rose, C

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the trial was to compare efficacy and safety of the aromatase inhibitor formestane (250 mg i.m. given every 2 weeks) with the progestin megestrol acetate (160 mg administered orally once daily), as second-line therapy in postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer previously treat

  3. [Bevacizumab in combination with mFOLFOX6 or FOLFIRI for previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Motoi; Murata, Akihiko; Kimura, Yutaka; Sakamoto, Yoshiyuki; Morohashi, Hajime; Kimura, Norihisa; Gasa, Fujihiko; Sato, Junya; Terui, Kazushi; Awatsu, Akemi; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2010-06-01

    We retrospectively investigated the safety and efficacy on outpatient chemotherapy including bevacizumab(BV)as secondline therapy for inoperable metastatic colorectal cancer. Analytical subjects were thirty patients treated with chemotherapy including BV as second-line therapy after first disease progression. All patients were treated with BV 5mg/kg. Concurrent therapy was given mFOLFOX6(2 patients)and FOLFIRI(28 patients). The BV treatment frequency and all course treatment frequency including the prior regimens averaged 20 and 37 times, respectively. The overall response rate was 24. 1%(PR, 7 patients; SD, 17 patients; PD, 5 patients), and the median duration of progression-free survival was 8. 0 months. The median duration of survival after addition of BV was 20. 3 months. The adverse events were 84%(>grade 3, 9%), BV-associated adverse events were GI perforation(1 patient), GI hemorrhage(1 patient), grade 3 hypertension(1 patient)and grade 2 epitaxis(2 patient). Although it is necessary to be careful about GI hemorrhage and GI perforation, we could safely continue the treatment with BV on outpatient chemotherapy. We confirmed that the chemotherapy including BV as second-line therapy had high antitumor effect and patient benefit. PMID:20567110

  4. Inflammatory breast cancer in a previously treated case of breast cancer: a diagnostic dilemma for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravind, Rahul; Kumar, Priyadarshini Venkatram; Prabaharan, Sasikala

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a relatively rare and aggressive subtype, accounting for nearly 2.5% of all diagnosed breast cancers worldwide. It is usually characterised by an acute onset, rapid clinical progression, poor prognosis and micrometastasis at the time of presentation. Prompt recognition of clinical symptoms and identification of warning signs are vital in diagnosing and appropriately treating a patient with IBC. PMID:27060073

  5. Mammographic breast cancer screening for women previously treated with high breast doses for diseases such as Hodgkin's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In screening of a general population for breast cancer, benefit/risk ratios are of the order of 100/1. For the very small subgroup of women treated by radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease below age 35, calculations of this type require different considerations, an overview of which is given in this text. It is concluded that although such previous exposures will increase their radiation risk, their increased risk of carrying an undetected breast cancer means that the potential benefit for them of screening is increased even more. In the United Kingdom, the Dept. of Health has recommended annual screening for these women. (authors)

  6. NIH-supported trial drug shows benefit in children with previously treated cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young patients with some types of advanced cancer, for whom standard treatment had failed, had their tumors disappear during treatment with a drug that both targets and blocks a protein associated with their disease. These findings are from a Phase I, mul

  7. Everolimus, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  8. Contralateral axillary disease in patients with previously treated breast cancer: manifestation of distant metastases or occult primary in contralateral breast?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contralateral axillary lymphadenopathy is occasionally seen in patients following disease in the ipsilateral breast. The aim of the study was to find out whether it might be a manifestation of an occult primary in the contralateral breast or manifestation of distant metastases from the previously treated carcinoma. A review of the records of 1331 breast cancer patients presented with recurrent disease and treated with surgery, radio-, chemo- or combined therapy showed that 36 patients presented with disease in the contralateral axilla during follow up. In 21 (1.6%) of them contralateral lymphadenopathy was the only symptom of the disease. 16 of them developed disease in the contralateral breast: in all cases the disease was locally advanced in nature indicative of diffuse involvement of the whole breast. In almost all 36 cases systemic disease developed soon after contralateral axillary disease was noted. These observations as well as pathological analysis suggested that contralateral axillary disease in our patients was an indication of metastases from the ipsilateral breast rather than manifestation of occult primary in the contralateral breast. (author)

  9. Gefitinib Plus Interleukin-2 in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Previously Treated with Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bersanelli, Melissa, E-mail: melissa.bersanelli@alice.it; Buti, Sebastiano; Camisa, Roberta [Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Brighenti, Matteo; Lazzarelli, Silvia [Oncology Unit, Azienda Istituti Ospitalieri di Cremona, Largo Priori, 1, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Mazza, Giancarlo [Radiology Division, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili,1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Passalacqua, Rodolfo, E-mail: melissa.bersanelli@alice.it [1Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14, 43126 Parma (Italy)

    2014-09-30

    The activation of lymphocytes by gefitinib treatment has been described. In this phase II pilot trial, we explored the possible synergism between IL-2 and gefitinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment. From September, 2003, to November, 2006, 70 consecutive patients with advanced, progressive NSCLC, previously treated with chemotherapy, received oral gefitinib 250 mg daily. The first 39 patients received gefitinib alone (G group). The other 31 also received subcutaneous IL-2 (GIL-2 group): 1 MIU/m{sup 2} (Million International Unit/m{sup 2})twice a day on Days 1 and 2, once a day on Days 3, 4, 5 every week for four consecutive weeks with a four-week rest period. Median follow-up was 25.2 months. Grade 3–4 toxicity of gefitinib was represented by skin rash (7%), asthenia/anorexia (6%) and diarrhea (7%); patients treated with IL-2 showed grade 2–3 fever (46%), fatigue (21%) and arthralgia (13%). In the GIL-2 group and G-group, we respectively observed: an overall response rate of 16.1% (6.4% complete response) and 5.1% (only partial response); a disease control rate of 41.9% and 41%; a median time to progression of 3.5 (CI 95% = 3.2–3.8) and 4.1 (CI 95% = 2.6–5.7) months; a median overall survival of 20.1 (CI 95% = 5.1–35.1) and 6.9 (CI 95% = 4.9–8.9) months (p = 0.002); and an actuarial one-year survival rate of 54% and 30%. Skin toxicity (p < 0.001; HR = 0.29; CI 95% = 0.16–0.54) and use of IL-2 (p < 0.001; HR = 0.33; CI 95% = 0.18–0.60) were independently associated with improvement of survival. In this consecutive, non-randomized, series of advanced NSCLC patients, the use of IL-2 increased the efficacy of gefitinib.

  10. Gefitinib Plus Interleukin-2 in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Previously Treated with Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bersanelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The activation of lymphocytes by gefitinib treatment has been described. In this phase II pilot trial, we explored the possible synergism between IL-2 and gefitinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment. From September, 2003, to November, 2006, 70 consecutive patients with advanced, progressive NSCLC, previously treated with chemotherapy, received oral gefitinib 250 mg daily. The first 39 patients received gefitinib alone (G group. The other 31 also received subcutaneous IL-2 (GIL-2 group: 1 MIU/m2 (Million International Unit/m2twice a day on Days 1 and 2, once a day on Days 3, 4, 5 every week for four consecutive weeks with a four-week rest period. Median follow-up was 25.2 months. Grade 3–4 toxicity of gefitinib was represented by skin rash (7%, asthenia/anorexia (6% and diarrhea (7%; patients treated with IL-2 showed grade 2–3 fever (46%, fatigue (21% and arthralgia (13%. In the GIL-2 group and G-group, we respectively observed: an overall response rate of 16.1% (6.4% complete response and 5.1% (only partial response; a disease control rate of 41.9% and 41%; a median time to progression of 3.5 (CI 95% = 3.2–3.8 and 4.1 (CI 95% = 2.6–5.7 months; a median overall survival of 20.1 (CI 95% = 5.1–35.1 and 6.9 (CI 95% = 4.9–8.9 months (p = 0.002; and an actuarial one-year survival rate of 54% and 30%. Skin toxicity (p < 0.001; HR = 0.29; CI 95% = 0.16–0.54 and use of IL-2 (p < 0.001; HR = 0.33; CI 95% = 0.18–0.60 were independently associated with improvement of survival. In this consecutive, non-randomized, series of advanced NSCLC patients, the use of IL-2 increased the efficacy of gefitinib.

  11. A technique to re-establish dose distributions for previously treated brain cancer patients in external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor recurrences or new tumors may develop after irradiation of local lesion(s) in the brain, and additional radiotherapy treatments are often needed for previously treated patients. It is critical to re-establish the dose distributions delivered during the previous treatment in the current patient geometry, so that the previous dose distributions can be accurately taken into consideration in the design of the current treatment plan. The difficulty in re-establishing the previous treatment dose distributions in the current patient geometry arises from the fact that the patient position at the time of reirradiation is different from that at the previous treatment session. Simple re-entry of the previous isocenter coordinates, gantry, and couch and collimator angles into the new treatment plan would result in incorrect beam orientations relative to the new patient anatomy, and therefore incorrect display of the previous dose distributions on the current patient anatomy. To address this issue, a method has been developed so that the previous dose distributions can be accurately re-established in the framework of the current brain treatment. The method involves 3 matrix transformations: (1) transformation of beams from machine coordinate system to patient coordinate system in the previous treatment; (2) transformation of beams from patient coordinate system in the previous treatment to patient coordinate system in the current treatment; and (3) transformation of beams from patient coordinate system in the current treatment to machine coordinate system. The transformation matrices used in the second transformation are determined by registration using a mutual information-based algorithm with which the old and new computed tomography (CT) scan sets are registered automatically without human interpretation. A series of transformation matrices are derived to calculate the isocenter coordinates, the gantry, couch, and collimator angles of the beams for the previous

  12. Biomarker-driven trial in metastatic pancreas cancer: feasibility in a multicenter study of saracatinib, an oral Src inhibitor, in previously treated pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Src tyrosine kinases are overexpressed in pancreatic cancers, and the oral Src inhibitor saracatinib has shown antitumor activity in preclinical models of pancreas cancer. We performed a CTEP-sponsored Phase II clinical trial of saracatinib in previously treated pancreas cancer patients, with a primary endpoint of 6-month survival. A Simon MinMax two-stage phase II design was used. Saracatinib (175 mg/day) was administered orally continuously in 28-day cycles. In the unselected portion of the study, 18 patients were evaluable. Only two (11%) patients survived for at least 6 months, and three 6-month survivors were required to move to second stage of study as originally designed. The study was amended as a biomarker-driven trial (leucine rich repeat containing protein 19 [LRRC19] > insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 [IGFBP2] “top scoring pairs” polymerase chain reaction [PCR] assay, and PIK3CA mutant) based on preclinical data in a human pancreas tumor explant model. In the biomarker study, archival tumor tissue or fresh tumor biopsies were tested. Biomarker-positive patients were eligible for the study. Only one patient was PIK3CA mutant in a 3′ untranslated region (UTR) portion of the gene. This patient was enrolled in the study and failed to meet the 6-month survival endpoint. As the frequency of biomarker-positive patients was very low (<3%), the study was closed. Although we were unable to conclude whether enriching for a subset of second/third line pancreatic cancer patients treated with a Src inhibitor based on a biomarker would improve 6-month survival, we demonstrate that testing pancreatic tumor samples for a biomarker-driven, multicenter study in metastatic pancreas cancer is feasible

  13. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  14. Biweekly cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line therapy in patients with gastro-esophageal cancer previously treated with platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoennemann, Katrine R; Bjerregaard, Jon K; Hansen, Tine P;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Until recently there has been no proven second-line therapy for patients with advanced gastro-esophageal cancer (GEC). Since 2004, Denmark has had a national health program where non-proven therapy can be offered to patients with advanced cancer, after approval by an expert panel...... appointed by the National Board of Health. This program has accelerated the introduction and implementation of new therapies in Denmark. Inspired by therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer, a combination of cetuximab and irinotecan (Cetiri) was chosen for second-line therapy in GEC patients. We report our...... day 1 every 2nd week until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Toxicity was prospectively evaluated according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE) version 3.0. RESULTS: From December 2007 to February 2009, 50 consecutive patients received Cetiri...

  15. Phase II activity of belinostat (PXD-101), carboplatin, and paclitaxel in women with previously treated ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dizon, Don S; Damstrup, Lars; Finkler, Neil J;

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical data show that belinostat (Bel) is synergistic with carboplatin and paclitaxel in ovarian cancer. To further evaluate the clinical activity of belinostat, carboplatin, and paclitaxel (BelCaP), a phase 1b/2 study was performed, with an exploratory phase 2 expansion planned specifically...

  16. Safety and efficacy of the addition of simvastatin to panitumumab in previously treated KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Jara M; Krens, Lisanne L; Bos, Monique M; Portielje, Johanneke E A; Batman, Erdogan; van Wezel, Tom; Morreau, Hans; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Gelderblom, Hans

    2015-09-01

    Panitumumab has proven efficacy in patients with metastatic or locally advanced colorectal cancer patients, provided that they have no activating KRAS mutation in their tumour. Simvastatin blocks the mevalonate pathway and thereby interferes with the post-translational modification of KRAS. We hypothesize that the activity of the RAS-induced pathway in patients with a KRAS mutation might be inhibited by simvastatin. This would theoretically result in increased sensitivity to panitumumab, potentially comparable with tumours with wild-type KRAS. A Simon two-stage design single-arm, phase II study was designed to test the safety and efficacy of the addition of simvastatin to panitumumab in colorectal cancer patients with a KRAS mutation after failing fluoropyrimidine-based, oxaliplatin-based and irinotecan-based therapy. The primary endpoint of this study was the proportion of patients alive and free from progression 11 weeks after the first administration of panitumumab, aiming for at least 40%, which is comparable with, although slightly lower than, that in KRAS wild-type patients in this setting. If this 40% was reached, then the study would continue into the second step up to 46 patients. Explorative correlative analysis for mutations in the KRAS and related pathways was carried out. One of 14 patients was free from progression at the primary endpoint time. The median progression-free survival was 8.4 weeks and the median overall survival status was 19.6 weeks. We conclude that the concept of mutant KRAS phenotype expression modulation with simvastatin was not applicable in the clinic. PMID:26053280

  17. Pemetrexed single agent chemotherapy in previously treated patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of second-line pemetrexed in Stage IIIB or IV NSCLC. Overall, 95 patients received pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 i.v. over Day 1 of a 21-day cycle. Patients also received oral dexamethasone, oral folic acid and i.m. vitamin B12 supplementation to reduce toxicity. NCI CTC 2.0 was used to rate toxicity. All the adverse events were graded in terms of severity and relation to study treatment. Dose was reduced in case of toxicity and treatment was delayed for up to 42 days from Day 1 of any cycle to allow recovering from study drug-related toxicities. Tumor response was measured using the RECIST criteria. Patients received a median number of 4 cycles and 97.8% of the planned dose. Overall, 75 patients (78.9% of treated) reported at least one adverse event: 34 (35.8%) had grade 3 as worst grade and only 5 (5.2%) had grade 4. Drug-related events occurred in 57.9% of patients. Neutropenia (8.4%) and leukopenia (6.3 %) were the most common grade 3/4 hematological toxicities. Grade 3 anemia and thrombocytopenia were reported in 3.2% and 2.1% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea (6.3%), fatigue (3.2%) and dyspnea (3.2%) were the most common grade 3/4 non-hematological toxicities. The most common drug-related toxicities (any grade) were pyrexia (11.6%), vomiting, nausea, diarrhea and asthenia (9.5%) and fatigue (8.4%). Tumor Response Rate (CR/PR) in treated patients was 9.2%. The survival at 4.5 months (median follow-up) was 79% and the median PFS was 3.1 months. Twenty patients (21.1%) died mainly because of disease progression. Patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC could benefit from second-line pemetrexed, with a low incidence of hematological and non-hematological toxicities

  18. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  19. Crizotinib as a personalized alternative for targeted anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement in previously treated patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo L

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Liting Guo,1,* Haijun Zhang,1,* Weiwei Shao,2 Baoan Chen1 1Department of Hematology and Oncology (Key Department of Jiangsu Medicine, The Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, 2Department of Pathology, the First People’s Hospital of Yancheng, Yancheng, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Crizotinib, the first clinically designed and synthesized as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting mesenchymal–epithelial transition factor, indicating marked anticancer activity in patients with advanced, anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small-cell lung cancer, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2011. In this review, we focus on the efficacy of crizotinib compared with chemotherapy in advanced anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive lung cancer and present the role of crizotinib as a personalized alternative in previously treated patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Keywords: crizotinib, anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement, non-small-cell lung cancer 

  20. Predictors for pneumonitis during local-regional radiotherapy in patients with advanced breast cancer previously treated with high dose chemotherapy and bone marrow transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: High dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow rescue (HDC) are being increasingly used in patients with advanced breast cancer. Pulmonary toxicity is common following HDC, and may be exacerbated by local-regional radiation therapy (RT). We evaluated potential predictors for pulmonary toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with RT following HDC, in an effort to reduce overall lung toxicity. Methods: Thirty eight patients with breast cancer involving 10 or more axillary lymph nodes and treated in two prospective trials (CALGB 8782 and 9082) entailing induction CAF chemotherapy plus HDC (cytoxan, cisplatin, carmustine) followed by local regional RT (chest wall, supraclavicular fossa, ± internal mammary and axillary lymph nodes) were evaluated. Thirteen patients (Group A) developed new or progressive lung toxicity during RT, while 25 did not (Group B). Lung toxicity was defined as progressive pulmonary symptoms requiring the initiation of corticosteroids. A variety of pre-RT pulmonary parameters were reviewed in an attempt to identify quantitative predictors for the development of lung toxicity during RT. Pulmonary function tests (PFT's: FEV1 and DLCO) were obtained in all patients prior to and following induction CAF, and at regular intervals after HDC. To measure the degree of recent improvement or decline in the pre-RT PFT's, we calculated the ratio of the most recent PFT to the previous minimum. Differences between the means of the pulmonary parameters were tested for significance using the Student T-test. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to the mean preCAF, preHDC, or preRT DLCO's, as shown in the figure. The mean preCAF and preHDC FEV1's were higher in Group B (109%, 96%, respectively) than in Group A (96%, 89%). The most significant difference between the two groups was in the direction of the DLCO immediately prior to RT. In (12(13)) patients in Group A (the group with lung

  1. Primary papillary thyroid carcinoma previously treated incompletely with radiofrequency ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency ablation (RFA recently has been applied to benign thyroid nodules, mainly for the cosmetic reasons, and limited cases of local recurrences or focal distant metastases of well-differentiated thyroid cancer, in the high-risk reoperative condition or for the palliative purpose. But no report has been made on the RFA for primary thyroid cancer to date. We report on a patient with primary papillary carcinoma of thyroid gland who had undergone RFA before the cytological diagnosis of malignancy, later referred and treated with robotic surgery successfully. We can learn the following lessons from our case; (1 the RFA for operable primary thyroid malignancy should be avoided, because of the possibility of remnant viable cancer and undetectable nodal metastasis, and (2 robotic or endoscopic thyroid surgery may be a feasible operative method for benign or malignant thyroid nodules previously treated with RFA.

  2. Freeze-Dried Black Raspberries in Preventing Oral Cancer Recurrence in High-Risk Appalachian Patients Previously Treated With Surgery For Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  3. Phase II of oral gimatecan in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer, previously treated with platinum and taxanes

    OpenAIRE

    Pecorelli, S; Ray-Coquard, I.; Tredan, O.; Colombo, N.; Parma, G.; Tisi, G.; Katsaròs, D.; Lhommé, C; Lissoni, A A; Vermorken, J. B.; du Bois, A.; Poveda, A; Frigerio, L; Barbieri, P; Carminati, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A prospective phase II study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of oral gimatecan in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer. Patients and methods: Patients had a maximum of three prior chemotherapy lines with no more than two prior platinum-containing regimens and a progression-free interval after the last dose of platinum

  4. Docetaxel plus nintedanib versus docetaxel plus placebo in patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (LUME-Lung 1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Martin; Kaiser, Rolf; Mellemgaard, Anders;

    2014-01-01

    , stratified by ECOG performance status, previous bevacizumab treatment, histology, and presence of brain metastases, were allocated (by computer-generated sequence through an interactive third-party system, in 1:1 ratio), to receive docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) by intravenous infusion on day 1 plus either nintedanib...... adenocarcinoma. FUNDING: Boehringer Ingelheim....

  5. A systematic review of salvage therapy to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer previously treated with fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and irinotecan +/- targeted therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Palshof, Jesper Andreas; Larsen, Finn Ole;

    2014-01-01

    third-line setting. We therefore performed a systematic review of the current literature on third or later lines of treatment to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer after the use of approved drugs or combinations. METHODS: A computer-based literature search was carried out using Pubmed and data...... capecitabine, mitomycin C, and gemcitabine have limited or no activity. Retreatment with oxaliplatin might be an option in selected patients. In addition, rechallenge with EGFR-directed therapy might be a valuable strategy. Data also suggest that angiogenetic drugs may postpone further progression and prolong...... survival. Lately, regorafinib has been approved. In conclusion, our current knowledge is based on many retrospective studies, some phase II studies and very few randomized clinical trials. Further prospective phase III trials comparing an investigational drug or combination with best supportive care in...

  6. Safety and radiation-enhancing effect of sodium glycididazole in loco regionally advanced laryngeal cancers previously treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy regimens: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the safety and radiation-enhancing effect of sodium glycididazole in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (stage T3-4,N0-3,M0) with conventional radiotherapy. Patients and methods: Patients with locoregional advanced laryngeal cancer (stage T3-4,N0-3,M0) were included: group 1(control, n = 30)were not administered of sodium glycididazole; group 2 (test, n = 30) received sodium glycididazole at a dose of 700 mg/m2 intravenous infusion 30 minutes before radiotherapy three times a week. Surrogate end-points of efficacy were tumor and nodal size. Safety parameters were vomiting, nausea, mucositis, laryngeal edema, esophagus and skin reaction, dysphagia, dyspnea, neurological deficit. Patients were evaluated weekly during treatment for 7 weeks and thereafter monthly for 3 months. Results: In the test, the overall response rate was 88.89% (95% CI, 71.00-97.00%) at 7 weeks and 92.59% (95% CI, 76.00 to 99.00%) at 1 month of follow-up. In the control, the overall response rate was 62.5% (95% CI, 41.00 to 81.00%) at 7 weeks and 58.33% (95% CI, 37.00 to 78.00%) at 1 month of follow-up. The short-term locoregional response rate was better in the test group at 7 weeks (p = 0.027) and at 1 month (p = 0.005) of follow-up. The test group had significantly more nausea and vomiting in weeks 1 (p = 0.047), 2 (p = 0.007), and 3 (p = 0.01) of treatment. Conclusions: The study indicates sodium glycididazole is an effective radiation-enhancing agent that improves short-term locoregional control and is well tolerated in patients with loco regionally advanced laryngeal cancer. (authors)

  7. Sargramostim and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Previous Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  8. Randomized Phase II Study of Docetaxel plus Personalized Peptide Vaccination versus Docetaxel plus Placebo for Patients with Previously Treated Advanced Wild Type EGFR Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Takayama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV combined with chemotherapy for patients with previously treated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Patients and Methods. Previously treated PS0-1 patients with IIIB/IV EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor wild genotype NSCLC were randomly assigned to docetaxel (60 mg/m2 on Day 1 plus PPV based on preexisting host immunity or docetaxel plus placebo. Docetaxel administration was repeated every 3 weeks until disease progression. Personalized peptides or placebo was injected subcutaneously weekly in the first 8 weeks and biweekly in subsequent 16 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS. Results. PPV related toxicity was grade 2 or less skin reaction. The median PFS for placebo arm and PPV arm was 52 days and 59 days, respectively. There was no significant difference between two arms by log-rank test (p=0.42. Interestingly, PFS and overall survival (OS in humoral immunological responder were significantly longer than those in nonresponder. Conclusion. PPV did not improve the survival in combination with docetaxel for previously treated advanced NSCLC. However, PPV may be efficacious for the humoral immunological responders and a further clinical investigation is needed.

  9. Randomized Phase II Study of Docetaxel plus Personalized Peptide Vaccination versus Docetaxel plus Placebo for Patients with Previously Treated Advanced Wild Type EGFR Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Koichi; Sugawara, Shunichi; Saijo, Yasuo; Maemondo, Makoto; Sato, Atsushi; Takamori, Shinzo; Harada, Taishi; Sasada, Tetsuro; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Kishimoto, Junji; Yamada, Akira; Noguchi, Masanori; Itoh, Kyogo; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) combined with chemotherapy for patients with previously treated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods. Previously treated PS0-1 patients with IIIB/IV EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) wild genotype NSCLC were randomly assigned to docetaxel (60 mg/m2 on Day 1) plus PPV based on preexisting host immunity or docetaxel plus placebo. Docetaxel administration was repeated every 3 weeks until disease progression. Personalized peptides or placebo was injected subcutaneously weekly in the first 8 weeks and biweekly in subsequent 16 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Results. PPV related toxicity was grade 2 or less skin reaction. The median PFS for placebo arm and PPV arm was 52 days and 59 days, respectively. There was no significant difference between two arms by log-rank test (p = 0.42). Interestingly, PFS and overall survival (OS) in humoral immunological responder were significantly longer than those in nonresponder. Conclusion. PPV did not improve the survival in combination with docetaxel for previously treated advanced NSCLC. However, PPV may be efficacious for the humoral immunological responders and a further clinical investigation is needed.

  10. A prospective evaluation of treatment with Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIR-spheres) in patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer previously treated with 5-FU based chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of selective internal radiation (SIR) spheres in patients with inoperable liver metastases from colorectal cancer who have failed 5FU based chemotherapy. Patients were prospectively enrolled at three Australian centres. All patients had previously received 5-FU based chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients were ECOG 0–2 and had liver dominant or liver only disease. Concurrent 5-FU was given at investigator discretion. Thirty patients were treated between January 2002 and March 2004. As of July 2004 the median follow-up is 18.3 months. Median patient age was 61.7 years (range 36 – 77). Twenty-nine patients are evaluable for toxicity and response. There were 10 partial responses (33%), with the median duration of response being 8.3 months (range 2–18) and median time to progression of 5.3 mths. Response rates were lower (21%) and progression free survival shorter (3.9 mths) in patients that had received all standard chemotherapy options (n = 14). No responses were seen in patients with a poor performance status (n = 3) or extrahepatic disease (n = 6). Overall treatment related toxicity was acceptable, however significant late toxicity included 4 cases of gastric ulceration. In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that have previously received treatment with 5-FU based chemotherapy, treatment with SIR-spheres has demonstrated encouraging activity. Further studies are required to better define the subsets of patients most likely to respond

  11. Classification and Regression Tree Analysis of Clinical Patterns that Predict Survival in 127 Chinese Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated by Gefitinib Who Failed to Previous Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziping WANG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that gefitinib produces only 10%-20% tumor regression in heavily pretreated, unselected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients as the second- and third-line setting. Asian, female, nonsmokers and adenocarcinoma are favorable factors; however, it is difficult to find a patient satisfying all the above clinical characteristics. The aim of this study is to identify novel predicting factors, and to explore the interactions between clinical variables and their impact on the survival of Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC who were heavily treated with gefitinib in the second- or third-line setting. Methods The clinical and follow-up data of 127 advanced NSCLC patients referred to the Cancer Hospital & Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences from March 2005 to March 2010 were analyzed. Multivariate analysis of progression-free survival (PFS was performed using recursive partitioning, which is referred to as the classification and regression tree (CART analysis. Results The median PFS of 127 eligible consecutive advanced NSCLC patients was 8.0 months (95%CI: 5.8-10.2. CART was performed with an initial split on first-line chemotherapy outcomes and a second split on patients’ age. Three terminal subgroups were formed. The median PFS of the three subsets ranged from 1.0 month (95%CI: 0.8-1.2 for those with progressive disease outcome after the first-line chemotherapy subgroup, 10 months (95%CI: 7.0-13.0 in patients with a partial response or stable disease in first-line chemotherapy and age <70, and 22.0 months for patients obtaining a partial response or stable disease in first-line chemotherapy at age 70-81 (95%CI: 3.8-40.1. Conclusion Partial response, stable disease in first-line chemotherapy and age ≥ 70 are closely correlated with long-term survival treated by gefitinib as a second- or third-line setting in advanced NSCLC. CART can be used to identify previously unappreciated patient

  12. Gastrointestinal obstruction in patients previously treated for malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budzyński Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bowel obstruction is a common condition in acute surgery. Among the patients, those with a history of cancer consist a particular group. Difficulties in preoperative diagnosis – whether obstruction is benign or malignant and limited treatment options in patients with reoccurrence or dissemination of the cancer are typical for this group.

  13. An open-label phase 2 trial of dabrafenib plus trametinib in patients with previously treated BRAF V600E–mutant metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchard, David; Besse, Benjamin; Groen, Harry J M; Souquet, Pierre-Jean; Quoix, Elisabeth; Baik, Christina S; Barlesi, Fabrice; Kim, Tae Min; Mazieres, Julien; Novello, Silvia; Rigas, James R; Upalawanna, Allison; D’Amelio, Anthony M; Zhang, Pingkuan; Mookerjee, Bijoyesh; Johnson, Bruce E

    2016-01-01

    Background BRAF mutations act as an oncogenic driver via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). BRAF inhibition has demonstrated antitumor activity in patients with BRAF V600E (Val600Glu)–mutant NSCLC. Dual MAPK pathway inhibition with BRAF and MEK inhibitors in BRAF V600E–mutant NSCLC may improve efficacy over BRAF-inhibitor monotherapy based on observations in BRAF V600–mutant melanoma. Methods In this phase 2, multicenter, nonrandomized, open-label study of patients with pretreated metastatic BRAF V600E–mutant NSCLC, antitumor activity and safety of oral dabrafenib (150 mg twice daily) plus oral trametinib (2 mg once daily) were evaluated. Adult patients (≥ 18 years) with documented progression following at least one prior platinum-based chemotherapy and no more than three prior systemic anticancer therapies were enrolled. Patients with prior BRAF or MEK inhibitor treatment were ineligible. Patients with brain metastases were permitted to enroll only if the lesions were asymptomatic, untreated (or stable > 3 weeks after local therapy if treated), and measured < 1 cm. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed overall response, which was assessed by intention-to-treat in the protocol-defined population (≥ second-line); safety was also assessed in this population. The study is ongoing but no longer recruiting patients. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01336634. Findings Fifty-seven patients previously treated with systemic chemotherapy for metastatic BRAF V600E–mutant NSCLC were enrolled. The investigator-assessed overall response was 63·2% (36 of 57; 95% CI 49·3–75·6). Serious adverse events were reported in 32 (56%) of 57 patients and included pyrexia (16%; 9 of 57), anemia (5%; 3 of 57), confusional state (4%; 2 of 57), decreased appetite (4%; 2 of 57), hemoptysis (4%; 2 of 57), hypercalcemia (4%; 2 of 57), nausea (4%; 2 of 57), and cutaneous squamous cell

  14. Advanced Pyoderma Gangrenosum Previously Treated as Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara Čuk Radović; Krešimir Kostović; Jaka Radoš; Zrinjka Paštar; Gordana Pavliša; Branka Marinović

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare, neutrophilic ulcerative skin disease of unknown etiology often associated with an underlying systemic disease. We present a case of a pyoderma gangrenosum that was initially misdiagnosed and treated as squamous cell carcinoma in another hospital. Multiple surgical treatments triggered postoperative exacerbations and further rapid progression of the lesions. History of pathergy, clinical findings, and histopathological features examined at our Department indicat...

  15. Cyclophosphamide or Denileukin Diftitox Followed By Expanding a Patient's Own T Cells in the Laboratory in Treating Patients With HER-2/Neu Overexpressing Metastatic Breast Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With HER-2/Neu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-07

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  16. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  17. Lung cancer in Hodgkin's disease: association with previous radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven cases of lung cancer were observed in patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) since 1970. The risk ratio for the development of lung cancer among HD patients was 5.6 times that expected in the general population. The pertinent clinical data from these patients are described and compared to 28 additional patients reported from other institutions. Small-cell lung cancer represented the predominant histologic type of lung cancer encountered in both smoking and nonsmoking patients with HD, accounting for 42% of cases overall and greater than 55% of cases reported in reviews of second malignancies. Tobacco use was noted in only 53% of patients. Twenty-eight (94%) of 30 patients developing metachronous lung cancer received supradiaphragmatic irradiation as primary therapy for HD. Nineteen (68%) of these patients received subsequent chemotherapy salvage. The median age at diagnosis of HD and lung cancer was 39 and 45 years, respectively. The interval between diagnosis of HD and metachronous lung cancer averaged seven years but appeared to vary inversely with age. HD patients treated with supradiaphragmatic irradiation or combined modality therapy may be at increased risk for developing lung cancer. The high frequency of in-field malignancies that the authors observed and the prevalence of small-cell lung cancer in both smoking and nonsmoking patients suggests that chest irradiation may influence the development of metachronous lung cancer in these patients. The finding of a mean latent interval in excess of seven years emphasizes the need for close long-term observation

  18. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His ... Read More "Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His ...

  19. Analysis of previous screening examinations for patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We wanted to improve the quality of subsequent screening by reviewing the previous screening of breast cancer patients. Twenty-four breast cancer patients who underwent previous screening were enrolled. All 24 took mammograms and 15 patients also took sonograms. We reviewed the screening retrospectively according to the BI-RADS criteria and we categorized the results into false negative, true negative, true positive and occult cancers. We also categorized the causes of false negative cancers into misperception, misinterpretation and technical factors and then we analyzed the attributing factors. Review of the previous screening revealed 66.7% (16/24) false negative, 25.0% (6/24) true negative, and 8.3% (2/24) true positive cancers. False negative cancers were caused by the mammogram in 56.3% (9/16) and by the sonogram in 43.7% (7/16). For the false negative cases, all of misperception were related with mammograms and this was attributed to dense breast, a lesion located at the edge of glandular tissue or the image, and findings seen on one view only. Almost all misinterpretations were related with sonograms and attributed to loose application of the final assessment. To improve the quality of breast screening, it is essential to overcome the main causes of false negative examinations, including misperception and misinterpretation. We need systematic education and strict application of final assessment categories of BI-RADS. For effective communication among physicians, it is also necessary to properly educate them about BI-RADS

  20. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkan, Erkan, E-mail: docdretopkan@gmail.com [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Pehlivan, Berrin [Koc University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul, and American Hospital, University of Texas MD Anderson Radiation Treatment Center, Istanbul (Turkey); Selek, Ugur [Medstar Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Antalya (Turkey)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  1. Breast cancer in patients previously irradiated for Hodgkin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer (BC) developing patients cured of Hodgkin disease (HD) has been only anecdotally reported. The authors identified 21 patients at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center who developed a total of 22 BCs since 1969 and had a history of cured HD. The median time interval between HD and BC was 14 years. All patients had modified or radical mastectomy with no complications. There was no unusual distribution of the lesions in the breasts. The course of BC did not differ from what is to be expected per stage of BC and length of follow-up. All patients had radiation treatment for their HD. Seven patients were also treated with chemotherapy. The radiation dose delivered was 2,000-3,000 cGy in six patients and 3,600-4,000 cGy in 12 patients. Nine patients were treated to the mantle field and nine to multiple components of a mantle-like field. The data show that BC developing in cured HD patients did not have unique characteristics. They did not identify an increased risk to develop BC attributable to technique, dose, or energy used in the radiation of these patients. It remains unclear whether HD and/or its treatment with radiation predisposes the patient to develop breast cancer

  2. Reirradiation, surgery and IORT for recurrent rectal cancer in previously irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 11 patients with recurrent rectal cancer who had been previously irradiated were treated with preoperative reirradiation (median dose 30 Gy), surgery and IORT. This treatment was related with high morbidity, a short pain-free survival (5 months) and poor local control (27% after 3 years), although some patients have long-term distant control and survival

  3. Classification and Regression Tree Analysis of Clinical Patterns that Predict Survival in 127 Chinese Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated by Gefitinib Who Failed to Previous Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ziping; Guo, Jihong; Wang, Yan; Yutao LIU; Juan YANG

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective It has been proven that gefitinib produces only 10%-20% tumor regression in heavily pretreated, unselected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients as the second- and third-line setting. Asian, female, nonsmokers and adenocarcinoma are favorable factors; however, it is difficult to find a patient satisfying all the above clinical characteristics. The aim of this study is to identify novel predicting factors, and to explore the interactions between clinical variable...

  4. Accelerated Degradation of Fenamiphos and Its Metabolites in Soil Previously Treated with Fenamiphos

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, R. F.; Johnson, A. W.; Wauchope, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    The degradation of fenamiphos, fenamiphos sulfoxide, and fenamiphos sulfone was determined in a greenhouse experiment using autoclaved and nonautoclaved soil from field plots treated or not treated with fenamiphos. Fenamiphos degradation and formation of fenamiphos sulfoxide was faster in uonautoclaved soil than in autoclaved soil. In nonautoclaved soil, previous exposure to fenamiphos was associated with increased rate of degradation of fenamiphos snlfoxide. Fenamiphos total toxic residue de...

  5. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  6. Children and adolescents previously treated with glucocorticoids display lower verbal intellectual abilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sara Krøis; Vestergaard, Martin; Madsen, Kathrine Skak;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Perinatal exposure to glucocorticoids has been associated with adverse cerebral effects, but little is known about their effect on cognitive development and exposure later in childhood. This study examined intellectual abilities, memory and behavioural problems in children previously treated...... equivalents was 158 mg/kg (range 21-723) and the mean time that had elapsed since treatment was three-and-a-half (standard deviation 2.2) years. Intellectual abilities were assessed with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children and memory performance and behavioural problems with a pattern recognition...... disease groups. There were no significant dose-response relationships regarding verbal intellectual abilities. CONCLUSION: Children and adolescents previously treated with glucocorticoids seemed to have lower intellectual verbal abilities than healthy controls....

  7. The visibility of cancer on previous mammograms in retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To study how many tumours were visible in restrospect on mammograms originally reported as normal or benign in patients coming to surgery with proven breast cancer. The effect of making the pre--operative mammogram available was also assessed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three hundred and twenty initial mammograms of consecutive new breast cancer cases were analysed by a group of radiologists in the knowledge that all patients were later diagnosed with breast cancer. The films were read twice, first without and then with the later (pre-operative) mammograms available. The parenchymal density in the location of the tumour was classified as fatty, mixed or dense, and the tumours were classified as visible or not visible. The reasons for the invisibility of the tumour in the earlier examination were analysed. RESULTS: Fourteen per cent (45) of cancers were retrospectively visible in earlier mammograms without the pre-operative mammograms having been shown, and 29% (95) when pre-operative mammograms were shown. Breast parenchymal density decreased with age and the visibility of tumours increased with age. When considered simultaneously, the effect of age (over 55 vs under 55) was greater (OR = 2.9) than the effect of density (fatty vs others) (OR = 1.5). The most common reasons for non-detection were that the lesion was overlooked (55%), diagnosed as benign (33%) or was visible only in one projection (26%). Growing density was the most common (37%) feature of those lesions originally overlooked or regarded as benign. CONCLUSIONS: Tumours are commonly visible in retrospect, but few of them exhibit specific signs of cancer, and are recognized only if they grow or otherwise change. It is not possible to differentiate most of them from normal parenchymal densities. Saaremaa, I. (2001)

  8. Cancer Incidence in Heart Transplant Recipients With Previous Neoplasia History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, J F; Alonso-Pulpón, L; Mirabet, S; Almenar, L; Villa, F P; González-Vílchez, F; Palomo, J; Blasco, T; Dolores García-Cosio, M; González-Costello, J; de la Fuente, L; Rábago, G; Lage, E; Pascual, D; Molina, B D; Arizón, J M; Muñiz, J; Crespo-Leiro, M G

    2016-05-01

    Neoplasm history increases morbidity and mortality after solid organ transplantation and has disqualified patients from transplantation. Studies are needed to identify factors to be considered when deciding on the suitability of a patient with previous tumor for heart transplantation. A retrospective epidemiological study was conducted in heart transplant (HT) recipients (Spanish Post-Heart Transplant Tumor Registry) comparing the epidemiological data, immu-nosuppressive treatments and incidence of post-HT tumors between patients with previous malignant noncardiac tumor and with no previous tumor (NPT). The impact of previous tumor (PT) on overall survival (OS) was also assessed. A total of 4561 patients, 77 PT and 4484 NPT, were evaluated. The NPT group had a higher proportion of men than the PT group (p < 0.001). The incidence of post-HT tumors was 1.8 times greater in the PT group (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.6; p < 0.001), mainly due to the increased risk in patients with a previous hematologic tumor (rate ratio 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-4.0, p < 0.004). OS during the 10-year posttransplant period was significantly lower in the PT than the NPT group (p = 0.048) but similar when the analysis was conducted after a first post-HT tumor was diagnosed. In conclusion, a history of PT increases the incidence of post-HT tumors and should be taken into account when considering a patient for HT. PMID:26613555

  9. Laser decontamination of zircaloy 4 fuel cans: oxidation behaviour of the material previously treated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present work is to study the feasibility of a laser treatment to decontaminate fuel cans. More particularly, the impact of the alteration on the oxidation behaviour of the material has been observed. Zircaloy 4 AFA 2G cans previously treated at 130 MW/ cm2 and oxidized 150 days under water-chemistry (PWR) at 360 degrees Celsius or 150 days under steam at 400 degrees Celsius and 100 bars have been studied. It has been shown that the facies induced by the lasers impacts and particularly the surface microcracks network is kept and that the microcracks do not seem to propagate in the oxide. (O.M.)

  10. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T 10 and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V10-V40 and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 ≤65% before SABR (P=.012), V20 ≥30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 ≤65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V20 ≥30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  11. I 123 MIBG positive pneumonia in a patient with previously treated stage 1V neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text:Background: A 15-month-old female presented to Sydney Children's hospital in May 2006 with stage IV neuroblastoma. At diagnosis she had a right adrenal primary with metastases to abdominal lymph nodes and bone. She was treated with surgical resection of the primary, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation in November 2006. She was well with no evidence of disease recurrence until early October 2007, when she developed chicken pox. Image Findings: In late October 2007 an 1123 MIBG scan revealed abnormal uptake in the mid zone of the right lung raising concern of recurrent neuroblastoma. On the basis of the scan findings a CT was performed and revealed consolidation in the anterior segment of the right upper lobe with air bronchograms. The patient was treated for infection with antibiotics and received no further therapy for neuroblastoma. A follow up MIBG scan performed 3.5 months later was normal and the CT scan at that time confirmed resolution of the previously demonstrated consolidation. Conclusion: This case study demonstrates 1123 MIBG uptake in phenomenon which has not been previously described. The diagnosis of pneumonia rather than recurrent neuroblastoma was confirmed on clinical follow-up. The only treatment given was antibiotic therapy.

  12. Metastatic papillary carcinoma of the thyroid in a patient previously treated for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusa, Garba H; Kotze, Tessa; Brink, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Incidental papillary carcinoma of the thyroid in patients treated surgically for benign thyroid diseases including Graves' disease is a known phenomenon. However, the management of these patients remains an issue of concern and controversy for those who care for them. We report a case of metastatic papillary carcinoma of the thyroid in a patient previously treated for Graves' disease. The subject of this presentation is a 50-year-old lady who was diagnosed with Graves' disease at the age of 29, for which she had a subtotal thyroidectomy following failure of medical and radioactive iodine treatment. Three years later, the patient was referred to our nuclear medicine department with a clinical diagnosis of suspected metastatic lymph nodes presumably from a thyroid malignancy.She had an 123I diagnostic whole body scan that showed 123I avid areas in the thyroid bed as well as left cervical lymph nodes, which later turned out to be metastatic papillary carcinoma of the thyroid on histology. She was treated with therapeutic doses of 131I. Follow-up radioactive iodine scans and serum thyroglobulin assays showed no evidence of malignant thyroid tissue. The occurrence of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid after a subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease is hereby reported. The need for vigilance and regular follow-up in patients who receive all forms of treatment for benign thyroid diseases is emphasized. PMID:24705115

  13. Thyroid abnormalities in patients previously treated with irradiation for acne vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 1,203 patients who received radiation treatment for acne vulgaris between 1940 and 1968, 302 patients were recalled and examined, 121 at Geisinger Medical Center and the remainder by their local physicians. Radiation records were reviewed on all patients. Lead-rubber and cones had been used as shielding. Mean age at the time of exposure was 21 years and mean total exposure was 692 R. Palpable nodular thyroid disease was found in eight patients (2.6%). Of these, thyroid carcinoma was detected in two patients (0.66%). Although the number of patients examined was small, the incidence of carcinomas was unexpectedly high. We conclude that follow-up examination is worthwhile for patients previously treated by irradiation for acne vulgaris

  14. Thyroid abnormalities in patients previously treated with irradiation for acne vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 1203 patients who received radiation treatment for acne vulgaris between 1940 and 1968, 302 were recalled and examined, 121 at Geisinger Medical Center and the remainder by their local physicians. Radiation records were reviewed on all patients. Lead-rubber and cones had been used as shielding. Mean age at the time of exposure was 21 years and mean total exposure was 692 R. Palpable nodular thyroid disease was found in eight patients (2.6%). Of these, thyroid carcinoma was detected in two patients (0.66%). Although the number of patients examined was small, the incidence of carcinomas was unexpectedly high. The authors conclude that follow-up examination is worthwhile for patients previously treated by irradiation for acne vulgaris

  15. Oxaliplatin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent Solid Tumors That Have Not Responded to Previous Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Hepatoblastoma; Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer

  16. Automatic treatment planning implementation using a database of previously treated patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. A.; Evans, K.; Yang, W.; Herman, J.; McNutt, T.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Using a database of prior treated patients, it is possible to predict the dose to critical structures for future patients. Automatic treatment planning speeds the planning process by generating a good initial plan from predicted dose values. Methods: A SQL relational database of previously approved treatment plans is populated via an automated export from Pinnacle3. This script outputs dose and machine information and selected Regions of Interests as well as its associated Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) and Overlap Volume Histograms (OVHs) with respect to the target structures. Toxicity information is exported from Mosaiq and added to the database for each patient. The SQL query is designed to ask the system for the lowest achievable dose for a specified region of interest (ROI) for each patient with a given volume of that ROI being as close or closer to the target than the current patient. Results: The additional time needed to calculate OVHs is approximately 1.5 minutes for a typical patient. Database lookup of planning objectives takes approximately 4 seconds. The combined additional time is less than that of a typical single plan optimization (2.5 mins). Conclusions: An automatic treatment planning interface has been successfully used by dosimetrists to quickly produce a number of SBRT pancreas treatment plans. The database can be used to compare dose to individual structures with the toxicity experienced and predict toxicities before planning for future patients.

  17. Intraoperative irradiation for locally recurrent colorectal cancer in previously irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Information in the literature regarding salvage treatment for patients with locally recurrent colorectal cancer who have previously been treated with high or moderate dose external beam irradiation (EBRT) is scarce. A retrospective review was therefore performed in our institution to determine disease control, survival, and tolerance in patients treated aggressively with surgical resection and intraoperative electron irradiation (IOERT) ± additional EBRT and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1981 through 1994, 51 previously irradiated patients with recurrent locally advanced colorectal cancer without evidence of distant metastatic disease were treated at Mayo Clinic Rochester with surgical resection and IOERT ± additional EBRT. An attempt was made to achieve a gross total resection before IOERT if it could be safely accomplished. The median IOERT dose was 20 Gy (range, 10-30 Gy). Thirty-seven patients received additional EBRT either pre- or postoperatively with doses ranging from 5 to 50.4 Gy (median 25.2 Gy). Twenty patients received 5-fluorouracil ± leucovorin during EBRT. Three patients received additional cycles of 5-fluorouracil ± leucovorin as maintenance chemotherapy. Results: Thirty males and 21 females with a median age of 55 years (range 31-73 years) were treated. Thirty-four patients have died; the median follow-up in surviving patients is 21 months. The median, 2-yr, and 5-yr actuarial overall survivals are 23 months, 48% and 12%, respectively. The 2-yr actuarial central control (within IOERT field) is 72%. Local control at 2 years has been maintained in 60% of patients. There is a trend toward improved local control in patients who received ≥30 Gy EBRT in addition to IOERT as compared to those who received no EBRT or <30 Gy with 2-yr local control rates of 81% vs. 54%. Distant metastatic disease has developed in 25 patients, and the actuarial rate of distant progression at 2 and 4 years is 56% and 76%, respectively. Peripheral

  18. The Palliative Effect of Endobronchial Brachytherapy for Previously Irradiated Patients with Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the palliative effect of endobronchial brachytherapy (EBB) for patients with lung cancer that previously received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Materials and Methods: From July 1992 to May 2003, 29 patients with a recurrent or persistent lung cancer were treated with palliative EBB at our institute. EBB consisted of three fractions (once a week) of a dose of 5 Gy using the high dose-rate remote after loader. Symptomatic improvement was assessed subjectively, and patients were divided into two groups according to whether symptoms were improved or not. Factors such as age, performance status, duration from EBRT to EBB and the location of the tumor were compared between the improved and unimproved groups of patients. Results: Overall symptomatic improvement was found in 27 out of 52 symptoms (52%). Improvement as to the type of symptoms was seen in 41%, 50%, 82% and 33% of patients with cough, dyspnea, hemoptysis, and obstructive pneumonia respectively. The rate of improvement of hemoptysis was more than that of cough (p < 0.05). The median time to symptom relapse was 5 months. The improved patient group (n=17, 59%) had a better performance status and longer duration from EBRT to EBB than the unimproved patient group (p < 0.05). Lesions located in the distal trachea and/or main bronchus were found more frequently in the improved group of patients than in the unimproved group of patients, but the difference was not statistically significant (p =0.06). Fatal complications developed in two patients (7%), which were a hemoptysis and bronchopleural fistula respectively. Conclusion: Symptom improvement was found in 60% of patients after EBB and improvement was maintained for 5 months. Palliative EBB, even when EBRT was given previously, can be effective for a patient that has an endobronchial symptom, such as hemoptysis, and for a patient with good performance and a long duration from previous EBRT to EBB

  19. Can previous thyroid scan induce cytogenetic radio adaptive response in patients treated by radioiodine for hyperthyroidism?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Induction of radio adaptive responses in cells pretreated with a low dose radiation before exposure to a high dose is well documented by many in investigators. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of chromosomal aberration in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients treated by radioiodine (131 I) for hyperthyroidism, with or without previous thyroid scan with 99m Tc. Materials and methods: venous blood samples were obtained from 35 patients one month after radioiodine therapy and cytogenetic ally evaluated using analysis of metaphase in two groups. The first group (n=15, 13 females and 2 males, mean age=44.7±11.5 years and mean weight 74.4±7.9 Kg) received 5 mCi 99m Tc for thyroid scanning 38.6±19.9 days before radioiodine therapy with 10.4±3.4 mCi 131I. The second group (n=20, 14 females and 6 males, mean age=41.0±10.8 years and mean weight=68.1±9.2 Kg) didn't have history of thyroid scanning. We also studied a control group (n=29, 11 females and 8 males age=33.7±7.4 and mean weight=70.0±8.8 Kg) who didn't have any history of diagnostic or therapeutic and also occupational exposure. Results: The mean frequency of total chromosomal aberrations in the first and second groups and controls were 1.46±1.55, 1.65±1.62 and 0.93±0.92 respectively. Results also showed that the mean frequency of total chromosome aberration in two groups were higher than controls and significantly higher in patients who had not received 99m Tc compared those who had undertaken thyroid scan before radioiodine therapy (p=0.03). Conclusion: These findings may indicate the fact that the radiation dose received from 99m Tc could induce resistance to subsequent higher radiation dose of 131 I in peripheral blood lymphocytes and it might be due to cytogenetic radio adaptive response

  20. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Hui; Zhang Xu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T <4 cm, N0, M0, or Mx). Severe (grade {>=}3) RP and potential predictive factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. A scoring system was established to predict the risk of RP. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16 months after SABR (range, 4-56 months), 15 patients had severe RP (14 [18.9%] grade 3 and 1 [1.4%] grade 5) and 1 patient (1.4%) had a local recurrence. In univariate analyses, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) before SABR, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and previous planning target volume (PTV) location were associated with the incidence of severe RP. The V{sub 10} and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V{sub 10}-V{sub 40} and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 {<=}65% before SABR (P=.012), V{sub 20} {>=}30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 {<=}65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V{sub 20} {>=}30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  1. Lung cancer in Hodgkin's disease: association with previous radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    List, A.F.; Doll, D.C.; Greco, F.A.

    1985-02-01

    Seven cases of lung cancer were observed in patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) since 1970. The risk ratio for the development of lung cancer among HD patients was 5.6 times that expected in the general population. The pertinent clinical data from these patients are described and compared to 28 additional patients reported from other institutions. Small-cell lung cancer represented the predominant histologic type of lung cancer encountered in both smoking and nonsmoking patients with HD, accounting for 42% of cases overall and greater than 55% of cases reported in reviews of second malignancies. Tobacco use was noted in only 53% of patients. Twenty-eight (94%) of 30 patients developing metachronous lung cancer received supradiaphragmatic irradiation as primary therapy for HD. Nineteen (68%) of these patients received subsequent chemotherapy salvage. The median age at diagnosis of HD and lung cancer was 39 and 45 years, respectively. The interval between diagnosis of HD and metachronous lung cancer averaged seven years but appeared to vary inversely with age. HD patients treated with supradiaphragmatic irradiation or combined modality therapy may be at increased risk for developing lung cancer. The high frequency of in-field malignancies that the authors observed and the prevalence of small-cell lung cancer in both smoking and nonsmoking patients suggests that chest irradiation may influence the development of metachronous lung cancer in these patients. The finding of a mean latent interval in excess of seven years emphasizes the need for close long-term observation.

  2. Percutaneous pedicle screw placement into a spinal segment previously treated with vertebroplasty: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernsback, Joanna E; Wang, Michael Y

    2016-05-01

    Vertebral augmentation with cement has become a common procedure for the treatment of compression fractures, leading to a growing population who have had this procedure and are now in need of another spinal surgery. This technical note reports an undescribed method for placing pedicle screws through a previously cemented level. PMID:26771370

  3. Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients with previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer: single center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Ocvirk Janja; Moltara Maja Ebert; Mesti Tanja; Boc Marko; Rebersek Martina; Volk Neva; Benedik Jernej; Hlebanja Zvezdana

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is mainly a disease of elderly, however, geriatric population is underrepresented in clinical trials. Patient registries represent a tool to assess and follow treatment outcomes in this patient population. The aim of the study was with the help of the patients’ register to determine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients who had previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer.

  4. Is Cup Positioning Challenged in Hips Previously Treated With Periacetabular Osteotomy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartig-Andreasen, Charlotte; Stilling, Maiken; Søballe, Kjeld;

    2014-01-01

    After periacetabular osteotomy (PAO), some patients develop osteoarthritis with need of a total hip arthroplasty (THA). We evaluated the outcome of THA following PAO and explored factors associated with inferior cup position and increased polyethylene wear. Follow-up were performed 4 to 10years...... after THA in 34 patients (38 hips) with previous PAO. Computer analysis evaluated cup position and wear rates. No patient had dislocations or revision surgery. Median scores were: Harris hip 96, Oxford hip 38 and WOMAC 78. Mean cup anteversion and abduction angles were 22(o) (range 7°-43°) and 45......° (range 28°-65°). Outliers of cup abduction were associated with persisting dysplasia (CE...

  5. Seasonal changes in serum melatonin in women with previous breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Holdaway, I. M.; Mason, B. H.; Gibbs, E. E.; Rajasoorya, C.; Hopkins, K.D.

    1991-01-01

    A seasonal variation in the month of initial detection of breast cancer has been previously observed in pre-menopausal women, and it has been proposed that this may be due to cyclic changes in tumour growth mediated by the effects of melatonin on ovarian function. To investigate this possibility serum melatonin concentrations have been measured every 2 h for 24 h at the summer and winter solstice in 20 pre-menopausal women with previous breast cancer and nine controls. Twelve women had detect...

  6. Previous imaging findings of breast cancers that occurred in combined screening negatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Boo-Kyung, E-mail: bkhan@skku.ed [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Hahn, Soo Yeon; Ko, Eun Young; Shin, Jung Hee; Kang, Seok Seon [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate previous imaging findings of breast cancers that occurred in women whose combined screening using both mammography and ultrasonography was negative. Materials and methods: A search of the institutional database identified 65 patients with breast cancers who had comparable previous negative screening mammography and ultrasonography (BI-RADS category 1 or 2) within 2 years. We classified each case as true or false negative. The previous imaging findings and the final outcome were analyzed. Results: Among 65 cases, 42 (65%) were true negatives, 23 (35%) were false negatives. The abnormalities of false negatives were underestimated in 16 (70%) and unrecognized in 7 (30%). The findings were calcifications (n = 8) or a mass (n = 6) on mammography, a mass (n = 5) or a non-mass (n = 3) on ultrasonography and a density on mammography correlated with non-mass on ultrasonography (n = 1). Ductal carcinoma in situ among false and true negatives accounted for 5 (22%) and 7 (17%), respectively. Symptomatic cancers among false and true negatives were 6 (26%) and 13 (31%), respectively. Conclusion: Breast cancers that rarely occurred in combined screening negatives are often retrospectively seen as minimal abnormalities on previous imaging studies.

  7. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer ... because of timely detection and treatment of his prostate cancer. He participated in an NIH-sponsored clinical trial. ...

  8. Factors Associated with Unfavorable Treatment Outcomes in New and Previously Treated TB Patients in Uzbekistan: A Five Year Countrywide Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Gadoev

    Full Text Available TB is one of the main health priorities in Uzbekistan and relatively high rates of unfavorable treatment outcomes have recently been reported. This requires closer analysis to explain the reasons and recommend interventions to improve the situation. Thus, by using countrywide data this study sought to determine trends in unfavorable outcomes (lost-to-follow-ups, deaths and treatment failures and describe their associations with socio-demographic and clinical factors.A countrywide retrospective cohort study of all new and previously treated TB patients registered in the National Tuberculosis programme between January 2006 and December 2010.Among 107,380 registered patients, 67% were adults, with smaller proportions of children (10%, adolescents (4% and elderly patients (19%. Sixty per cent were male, 66% lived in rural areas, 1% were HIV-infected and 1% had a history of imprisonment. Pulmonary TB (PTB was present in 77%, of which 43% were smear-positive and 53% were smear-negative. Overall, 83% of patients were successfully treated, 6% died, 6% were lost-to-follow-up, 3% failed treatment and 2% transferred out. Factors associated with death included being above 55 years of age, HIV-positive, sputum smear positive, previously treated, jobless and living in certain provinces. Factors associated with lost-to-follow-up were being male, previously treated, jobless, living in an urban area, and living in certain provinces. Having smear-positive PTB, being an adolescent, being urban population, being HIV-negative, previously treated, jobless and residing in particular provinces were associated with treatment failure.Overall, 83% treatment success rate was achieved. However, our study findings highlight the need to improve TB services for certain vulnerable groups and in specific areas of the country. They also emphasize the need to develop unified monitoring and evaluation tools for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant TB, and call for better TB

  9. Once-daily reirradiation for rectal cancer in patients who have received previous pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy and toxicity using once-daily reirradiation for patients with rectal cancer having received previous pelvic radiotherapy. Between June 1997 and June 2008, 56 patients were identified having received previous pelvic radiotherapy and received reirradiation for rectal cancer. Reirradiation intent was palliative in 43 patients, and preoperative/postoperative in 13 patients. Eighty per cent of patients received concurrent chemotherapy (n=45). The median dose-fractionation reirradiation schedule was 39.6Gy in 22 fractions once daily (range 20–39.6Gy), and the median cumulative radiation dose was 87.3Gy. Seven patients experienced a grade 3 acute toxicity, with no grade 4 event. Fifty-one patients (91%) completed the treatment and five patients required a treatment break. The overall symptomatic response rate was 88% at three months post-reirradiation. There was one late effect of skin ulceration among patients reirradiated palliatively. Median overall survival was 39 months in patients undergoing radical surgery versus 15 months in patients reirradiated palliatively (P<0.001). Once-daily reirradiation to a total dose of ≤39.6Gy is relatively safe in the treatment of patients with rectal cancer after previous pelvic radiotherapy. It is effective in symptom control and provides an additional option in management of local recurrence.

  10. Identification and Pathway Analysis of microRNAs with No Previous Involvement in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollar-Vega, Rosa; Quintanar-Jurado, Valeria; Maffuz-Aziz, Antonio; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Bautista-Piña, Veronica; Arellano-Llamas, Rocio; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    microRNA expression signatures can differentiate normal and breast cancer tissues and can define specific clinico-pathological phenotypes in breast tumors. In order to further evaluate the microRNA expression profile in breast cancer, we analyzed the expression of 667 microRNAs in 29 tumors and 21 adjacent normal tissues using TaqMan Low-density arrays. 130 miRNAs showed significant differential expression (adjusted P value = 0.05, Fold Change = 2) in breast tumors compared to the normal adjacent tissue. Importantly, the role of 43 of these microRNAs has not been previously reported in breast cancer, including several evolutionary conserved microRNA*, showing similar expression rates to that of their corresponding leading strand. The expression of 14 microRNAs was replicated in an independent set of 55 tumors. Bioinformatic analysis of mRNA targets of the altered miRNAs, identified oncogenes like ERBB2, YY1, several MAP kinases, and known tumor-suppressors like FOXA1 and SMAD4. Pathway analysis identified that some biological process which are important in breast carcinogenesis are affected by the altered microRNA expression, including signaling through MAP kinases and TP53 pathways, as well as biological processes like cell death and communication, focal adhesion and ERBB2-ERBB3 signaling. Our data identified the altered expression of several microRNAs whose aberrant expression might have an important impact on cancer-related cellular pathways and whose role in breast cancer has not been previously described. PMID:22438871

  11. Preventing and Treating Prostate Cancer Spread to Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... options Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones If prostate cancer spreads to other parts of the body, it ... a vein and settle in areas of damaged bones (like those containing cancer spread). Once there, they give off radiation that ...

  12. Detecting and treating breast cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moonlee, Sun-Young; Bissell, Mina J.; Furuta, Saori; Meier, Roland; Kenny, Paraic A.

    2016-04-05

    The application describes therapeutic compositions and methods for treating cancer. For example, therapeutic compositions and methods related to inhibition of FAM83A (family with sequence similarity 83) are provided. The application also describes methods for diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors. For example, a method of diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors by detecting increased FAM83A levels is described.

  13. Analysis of over 10,000 Cases finds no association between previously reported candidate polymorphisms and ovarian cancer outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Kristin L; Vierkant, Robert A; Fogarty, Zachary C;

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death among women. In an effort to understand contributors to disease outcome, we evaluated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) previously associated with ovarian cancer recurrence or survival, specifically in angiogenesis, inflammation, mitosis...

  14. FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in its class of drugs, called PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors, approved to treat this type of cancer. " ... these patients with a new therapy targeting the PD-L1 pathway," Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the office ...

  15. Types of Stem Cell Transplants for Treating Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sources of stem cells for transplant Types of stem cell transplants for treating cancer In a typical stem ... come from your identical twin or triplet Autologous stem cell transplants These stem cells come from you alone. ...

  16. Treating Male Breast Cancer by Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ductal carcinoma in situ) Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is considered a pre-cancer because it has ... therapy to the remaining breast tissue. If the DCIS is estrogen receptor-positive, tamoxifen might be given ...

  17. Infection Prophylaxis and Management in Treating Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-03

    ; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult

  18. Sexual dysfunctions in men treated for testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Susanne; Kristensen, Ellids; Giraldi, Annamaria G E

    2008-01-01

    Patients treated for testicular cancer have increased risk of ejaculatory, orgasmic and erectile dysfunction compared with healthy men. The underlying relations are unclear. This review describes sexual dysfunctions that are associated with various treatment modalities. One meta-analysis and 11...... understanding sexual dysfunctions in patients with testicular cancer....

  19. Staging the Axilla with selective sentinel node biopsy in patients with previous excision of non-palpable and palpable breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruano, R.; Garcia-Talavera, J.R.; Arriba, A. de [University Hospital of Salamanca, Nuclear Medicine, Salamanca (Spain); Ramos, M.; Gonzalez-Orus, J.; Iglesias, M. [University Hospital of Salamanca, General Surgery, Salamanca (Spain); Serrano, E.; Macias, M.C. [University Hospital of Salamanca, Pathology, Salamanca (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    To present our experience in the therapeutic approach of the sentinel node biopsy (SNB) in patients with previous excision of the breast cancer, divided in non-palpable and palpable lesions, in comparison with time treatment and stagement of breast cancer. In the period 2001-2006, 138 patients with prior diagnostic excisional biopsy (96 non-palpable and 42 palpable breast cancer) and 328 without previous surgery (32 non-palpable; 296 palpable cancer) were treated. The combined technique ({sup 99m}Tc-colloidal rhenium and isosulfan blue dye) was the approach for sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection. Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was completed only when the SLN was positive for metastasis or not located. Detection rate, if there was prior surgery, was 95% for non-palpable and 98% for palpable cancer, and 99% for one-time treatment group. Metastasis rate in the SLN was 15% in non-palpable cancer (14/91), significantly smaller than in palpable breast cancer (39% if prior surgery and 37% in one-time surgery). According to tumoral size, ALND metastasis rate was similar for T1 and T2 tumors (43-44%). In the follow-up of the groups with prior diagnostic biopsy or surgery of the breast cancer we have not found any false negative in the axilla. The detection of the SLN is also feasible in patients with previous surgery of breast cancer. Because SLN metastasis rates are significantly smaller in non-palpable lesions, the effort in screening programs for early detection of breast cancer and also in improving histopathological confirmation of malignancy with ultrasound or stereotactic guided core biopsies must continue. (orig.)

  20. Exploiting replicative stress to treat cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobbelstein, Matthias; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication in cancer cells is accompanied by stalling and collapse of the replication fork and signalling in response to DNA damage and/or premature mitosis; these processes are collectively known as 'replicative stress'. Progress is being made to increase our understanding of the mechanisms...

  1. Etoposide, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide and vincristine in previously untreated patients with small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J F; Kefford, R; Raghavan, D; Zalcberg, J; Stuart-Harris, R; Ball, D; Olver, I N; Friedlander, M; Bull, C; Yuen, K

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy and toxicity of 120 mg/m2 etoposide and 100 mg/m2 carboplatin given i.v. daily x 3 together with 750 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide and 1.4 mg/m2 vincristine given i.v. on day 1 (ECCO) in a regimen given every 28 days for 6 courses was assessed in 90 (40 limited stage, 50 extensive stage) previously untreated patients with small-cell lung cancer. Mediastinal irradiation using 50 Gy in 25 fractions was given to limited-stage patients without progression after 3 courses of chemotherapy. Cranial irradiation with 30 Gy in 10 fractions was given to all patients attaining a complete response (CR). Objective responses were seen in 83% [CR, 60%; partial response (PR), 23%] of patients with limited and 76% (CR, 22%; PR, 54%) of those with extensive disease. The median relapse-free survival for objective responders with limited disease was 13.4 months, with a median of 8.0 months for extensive-stage patients. The median relapse-free survival for patients achieving a CR was 13.4 months, with a median of 7.8 months for those undergoing a PR. The median survival was 13.3 months for patients with limited disease, with a median of 9.6 months for those with extensive disease. The median survival following a CR was 18.2 months, with a median survival of 9.9 months for those showing a PR. The combination was well tolerated, with either no nausea or nausea only (WHO grade 0 or 1) in 56% of patients and minimal mucositis, renal toxicity, neurotoxicity or ototoxicity. Neutropenia measuring less than 1.0 x 10(9) WBC/l (WHO grade 3 or 4) was seen in 74% of patients, with two deaths due to infection occurring during neutropenia. Thrombocytopenia of less than 50 x 10(9) platelets/l (WHO grade 3 or 4) occurred in 24% of patients. ECCO is a new, active, well-tolerated program for previously untreated patients with small-cell lung cancer. PMID:2155064

  2. Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase) are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category) and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value < 0.05 in EPICOLON stage 1 [rs698 in ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive), rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive), rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant), and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive). In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs3803185 (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1

  3. Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Victor

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. Methods CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. Results None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive, rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive, rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant, and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive. In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs3803185 (OR = 1

  4. Aflibercept and FOLFOX6 Treatment for Previously Untreated Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  5. A novel schedule of erlotinib/capecitabine (7/7) as salvage therapy in previously treated advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiezhong; Kaley, Kristin; Garcon, Marie Carmel; Rodriguez, Teresa; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to report a case series on the efficacy and safety of capecitabine 7/7 schedule combined with erlotinib (CAP-ERL) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) who have failed prior therapies. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 13 patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer previously treated with gemcitabine or oxaliplatin–irinotecan-based first-line regimens. Treatment consisted of capecitabine (Xeloda) at a flat dose of 1000 mg orally twice daily on days 1–7 out of 14 days (7/7 schedule) and erlotinib (Tarceva) 100 mg orally once daily until unacceptable toxicity or disease progression. Tumor assessments were repeated every two cycles (8 weeks) and serum tumor markers were measured every 4 weeks. Results: All patients (median age: 63 years; 7 female/3 male) had various previous lines of treatments of chemotherapies. Median number of cycles with CAP-ERL was 4 (range 2–12). The overall response rate was 20%. CA19-9 was reduced more than 25% in 40% patients. The median overall survival and progression-free survival from the start of CAP-ERL were 4.5 months (range 3–7.5) and 2 months (range 1.5–4), respectively. The most common grade 3 toxicities included hand–foot syndrome, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, and fatigue. Conclusions: Our result suggests that the combination of a fixed low dose of CAP-ERL 7/7 schedule was tolerated with manageable toxicity and showed encouraging activity as salvage treatment in patients with refractory APC with ECOG performance status 0–2. Further prospective studies are warranted to evaluate this combination. PMID:26929778

  6. One case treated bladder cancer with Immunity-herbal acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Suk Kim

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available In oriental medicine bladder cancer had been called '溺血(Hematuria', 血淋(Blood Stranguria', 濕熱河注(Downward Flow of Damp-heat' and so on. The symptoms are Hematuria, Oliguria, Lower abdomen pain, febrile sensation and Anemia etc. These are similar to the symptoms of bladder cancer by modem medicine. I have experienced a bladder cancer patient who was diagnosed as stage Ⅲ. She has been treated bladder cancer with Immunity herbal acupuncture and Her clinical and objective symptoms have been better. Therefore I report this results.

  7. Incidence of thyroid cancer among children of the Ukraine in 1996 as compared to previous post-Chernobyl years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996 a high incidence rate of thyroid cancer has persisted in Ukraine among children aged under 15 years, which averaged, according to preliminary data, 0.44 case per 100 thousand children's population. The geographical distribution of thyroid cancer cases in children of Ukraine is mainly related, as in previous years, with the most affected regions following the Chernobyl accident. The highest incidence of thyroid cancer (over 80%) was observed in those patients who were aged under 5 years at the moment of the accident, being the most radiosensitive age group. Among thyroid tumors removed in 1996, as in previous years, papillary carcinomas prevail, which are characterized by marked invasive properties. (author)

  8. New modalities to treat laryngeal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Prgomet, Drago

    2012-01-01

    Early laryngeal cancer comprises T1 and T2 stages of the disease. Open functional operations achieve local control of the disease in 90–95% of T1 patients and in 70–90% of T2 patients. Primary RT achieves local control in 85–94% of T1 tumors and in 70–80% of patients with T2 tumors. Introduction of endoscopic laser surgery resulted in further popularization of preservation laryngeal surgery, whereby equally successful treatment results are achieved with minimal invasiveness. Quality of voice ...

  9. Radioimmunotherapy with Y-90-epratuzumab in patients with previously treated B-cell lymphoma. A fractionated dose-escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Fractionated RIT may improve outcome by decreasing heterogeneity in absorbed dose and by increasing therapeutic window. The humanised anti-CD22 antibody, Epratuzumab, (Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ) can be given repeatedly with minimal risk of neutralising Ab (HAHA), making fractionated treatment with 90Y-labelled epratuzumab possible. Materials and Methods: Patients with previously treated B-cell lymphoma received increasing number (2-4) of weekly infusions of 90Y-epratuzumab. Patients received either 185 MBq/m2 per infusion (group A), or, if they had a history of high-dose chemotherapy with stem-cell rescue, 92.5 MBq/m2 per infusion (group B). The first infusion included 150 MBq of 111Indium for scintigraphic verification of tumour targeting and dosimetry. 1.5 mg/kg epratuzumab was administered with each infusion. The treatment could be repeated once after 3 m. Results: Of 23 patients, 16 in group A and 6 in group B were evaluable for response. The RR in group A was 62% objective response (OR) and 25% CR/CRu. One patient in group B showed OR. OR was seen in aggressive and indolent lymphoma. Response was also long-lasting and event-free survival of patients showing CR/CRu was 14 to 25+ months. In group A all seven patient, receiving three infusions, showed less than grade 3 platelet and neutrophil toxicity, except for two patients suffering grade 3 neutropenia. Of five patients with 4 weekly infusions there were two patients with dose-limiting haematological toxicity (DLT), both recently treated with high dose cytosar before RIT. With criteria used the maximal tolerated dose was three infusions 185 MBq/m2. In group B no patient suffered DLT and one patient exhibited OR. Seven patients were retreated after 3 months with minor toxicity, but improvement in OR in two cases. No patient has developed HAHA. CD22 expression on tumour cells, as assessed by flow cytometry, is available in 18 of 22 patients. In group A, seven of eight patients with unequivocal

  10. Stromal reengineering to treat pancreas cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; DelGiorno, Kathleen E; Greenberg, Philip D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma co-opts multiple cellular and extracellular mechanisms to create a complex cancer organ with an unusual proclivity for metastasis and resistance to therapy. Cell-autonomous events are essential for the initiation and maintenance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, but recent studies have implicated critical non-cell autonomous processes within the robust desmoplastic stroma that promote disease pathogenesis and resistance. Thus, non-malignant cells and associated factors are culprits in tumor growth, immunosuppression and invasion. However, even this increasing awareness of non-cell autonomous contributions to disease progression is tempered by the conflicting roles stromal elements can play. A greater understanding of stromal complexity and complicity has been aided in part by studies in highly faithful genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Insights gleaned from such studies are spurring the development of therapies designed to reengineer the pancreas cancer stroma and render it permissive to agents targeting cell-autonomous events or to reinstate immunosurveillance. Integrating conventional and immunological treatments in the context of stromal targeting may provide the key to a durable clinical impact on this formidable disease. PMID:24908682

  11. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  12. Enzalutamide Antitumour Activity Against Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Previously Treated with Docetaxel and Abiraterone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Thomsen, Frederik B; Schrader, Andres J;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The degree of antitumour activity of enzalutamide following disease progression on docetaxel and abiraterone remains controversial. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of enzalutamide in patients progressing following taxane-based chemotherapy and abiraterone. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTIC...

  13. Topotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Children With Meningeal Cancer That Has Not Responded to Previous Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Leptomeningeal Metastases; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. Treating childhood cancer in Rwanda: the nephroblastoma example

    OpenAIRE

    Kanyamuhunga, Aimable; Tuyisenge, Lisine; Stefan, Daniela Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Wilms tumor (WT) or nephroblastoma is the commonest childhood cancer in Rwanda. Nephroblastoma is regarded as one of the successes of pediatric oncology with long-term survival approaching 90%. The Objectives to evaluate the feasibilityof treating childhood cancer using the nephroblastoma example and to calculate its cost of treatment in Rwanda. Methods Prospective study over a 2 year period: 01 Jan 2010- 31 December 2011. A questionnaire was completed by all participants in the ...

  15. Treating Cancer with Strong Magnetic Fields and Ultrasound

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Dr Friedwardt

    2009-01-01

    It is proposed to treat cancer by the combination of a strong magnetic field with intense ultrasound. At the low electrical conductivity of tissue the magnetic field is not frozen into the tissue, and oscillates against the tissue which is brought into rapid oscillation by the ultrasound. As a result, a rapidly oscillating electric field is induced in the tissue, strong enough to disrupt cancer cell replication. Unlike radio frequency waves, which have been proposed for this purpose, ultrasound can be easily focused onto the regions to be treated. This method has the potential for the complete eradication of the tumor.

  16. The value of oncolysis virus in treating liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of traditional therapy is limited for liver cancer, gene therapy gets more and more recognition in recent years. Oncolysis virus is a kind of conditionally replicating virus, with special reproductivity in cancer cells, and then kills them. Gene agents are usually introduced into tumor tissue by intra-tumor and intra-arterial injection, and the technique of interventional therapy is able to satisfy the demand excellently. So, some breakthrough is expected in treating liver cancer by skillfully combining oncolysis virus and interventional technique. (authors)

  17. Evaluation of QOL in cancer patients treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients is an important theme. However, we do not have an established method to assess QOL in cancer patients during radiotherapy in Japan. We evaluated both the changes of QOL and the factors affecting QOL in radiotherapy patients. Three hundred fifty-five cancer patients, who filled in a questionnaire at the beginning, middle, and end of radiotherapy between 1998 and 2001, were studied. We used The QOL Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs (QOL-ACD)'' devised by Kurihara et al, the Ministry of Health and Welfare. The QOL Questionnaire had five categories: physical activity, physical condition, mental state, social interaction, and face scale. The total score, sum of the score of five categories, were established synthetically (maximum score is 110). The mean of total QOL scores were 75.8, 77.6, and 78.2 at the beginning, middle, and end of radiotherapy respectively. Patients with symptoms related to cancer had apparent improvement of QOL score. Patients receiving chemotherapy had a decreased QOL score at the end of radiotherapy. The score of physical condition was reduced improvement. It was suggested that radiotherapy could be performed without losing QOL of cancer patients, including older patients. However, patients receiving chemotherapy and those with head and neck cancer may lose their QOL, therefore, we should treat such patients carefully. (author)

  18. Everolimus in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma previously treated with bevacizumab: a prospective multicenter study CRAD001LRU02T⃰

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tsimafeyeu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Everolimus is an orally administered inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR recommended for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC who progressed on previous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Efficacy of everolimus in patients who progressed on anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab is unknown. We did a multicenter prospective trial of everolimus in patients with mRCC whose disease had progressed on bevacizumab ± interferon alpha (IFN. Patients with clear-cell mRCC which had progressed on bevacizumab ± IFN received everolimus 10 mg once daily. The primary end point was the proportion of patients remaining progression-free for 56 days, and a two-stage Simon design was used, with 80 % power and an alpha risk of 5 %. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02056587. From December 2011 to October 2013, a total of 37 patients (28 M, 9 F were enrolled. Median age was 60.5 years (range 41-66, 11 % had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG PS > 2, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC favorable/intermediate risk was 38/62 %. Five (14 % patients had a confirmed partial response and 26 (70 % patients had a stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 11.5 months (95 % CI, 8.8–14.2. Median overall survival was not reached. No grade 3 or 4 treatment-related toxicities were observed. The most common grade 2 adverse events were fatigue (19 % and pneumonitis (8 %. Everolimus demonstrated a favorable toxicity profile and promising anti-tumor activity as a second-line therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC patients previously treated with bevacizumab ± IFN.

  19. Autophagy Inhibition to Augment mTOR Inhibition: A Phase I/II Trial of RAD001 and Hydroxychloroquine in Patients With Previously Treated Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-07

    Histological Evidence of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; That Has Been Previously Treated With 1-3 Prior Regimens. Phase 1 Only, Any Number of Prior Regimens; With Evidence of Progressive Disease on or Within 6 Months; of Discontinuing Sunitinib, Sorafenib or Pazopanib. Previous; Therapy With Bevacizumab, IL2, or Interferon Are Permitted.

  20. Inhibition of radiographic progression with combination etanercept and methotrexate in patients with moderately active rheumatoid arthritis previously treated with monotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    van der Heijde, D.; Burmester, G.; Melo-Gomes, J.; Codreanu, C; Martin Mola, E.; Pedersen, R.; Robertson, D; Chang, D; A. Koenig; Malaise, Michel; Freundlich, B

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of changing from etanercept or methotrexate monotherapy to etanercept plus methotrexate combination therapy on radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. METHODS: Patients enrolled in this 1-year open-label study previously completed a 3-year blinded study in which they received methotrexate or etanercept monotherapy or the combination of both. All patients received the combination of etaner...

  1. Considering GH replacement for GH-deficient adults with a previous history of cancer: a conundrum for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Kevin C J; Heaney, Anthony P; Popovic, Vera

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that GH and IGF-I may enhance tumorigenesis, metastasis, and cell proliferation in humans and animals. Evidence supporting this notion is derived from animal model studies, epidemiological studies, experience from patients with acromegaly, molecular therapeutic manipulation of GH and IGF-I actions, and individuals with GH receptor and congenital IGF-I deficiencies. Prior exposure to radiation therapy, aging, family history of cancer, and individual susceptibility may also contribute to increase this risk. Therefore, the use of GH replacement in patients with a history of cancer raises hypothetical safety concerns for patients, caregivers, and providers. Studies of GH therapy in GH-deficient adults with hypopituitarism and childhood cancer survivors have not convincingly demonstrated an increased cancer risk. Conversely, the risk of occurrence of a second neoplasm (SN) in childhood cancer survivors may be increased, with meningiomas being the most common tumor; however, this risk appears to decline over time. In light of these findings, if GH replacement is to be considered in patients with a previous history of cancer, we propose this consideration to be based on each individual circumstance and that such therapy should only be initiated at least 2 years after cancer remission is achieved with the understanding that in some patients (particularly those with childhood cancers), GH may potentially increase the risk of SNs. In addition, close surveillance should be undertaken working closely with the patient's oncologist. More long-term data are thus needed to determine if GH replacement in GH-deficient adults with a history of cancer is associated with the development of de novo tumors and tumor recurrence. PMID:26732039

  2. GENE TECHNOLOGY: A NEW WAY TO TREAT CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajapati P M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is the process of introducing genetic material RNA or DNA into a person's cells to fight disease. Gene therapy treats disease by either replacing damaged or missing genes with normal ones, or by providing new genes. The concept of gene therapy was born more than thirty years ago; however, new technology is opening the door to dramatically new possibilities in the treatment of cancers of all kinds. The long-term goal of cancer gene therapy is to develop treatments that attack only cancer cells, thereby eliminating adverse effects on the body and improving the possibility to cure disease. Gene therapy may someday soon make cancer a manageable disease with nominal side effects to the patients. Furthermore, since gene therapy has potential for other diseases such as cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, sickle-cell anemia, muscular dystrophy and Parkinson's, the value of research and discovery has broad applications.

  3. Treating cancer stem cells and cancer metastasis using glucose-coated gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu C

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chenxia Hu,1 Martin Niestroj,2,3 Daniel Yuan,4 Steven Chang,5 Jie Chen5,6 1Faculty of Chinese Pharmaceutical Science, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; 3Physics Department, Bonn University, Bonn, Germany; 4Biomedical Engineering Department, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 5Faculty of Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 6Canadian National Research Council/National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Cancer ranks among the leading causes of human mortality. Cancer becomes intractable when it spreads from the primary tumor site to various organs (such as bone, lung, liver, and then brain. Unlike solid tumor cells, cancer stem cells and metastatic cancer cells grow in a non-attached (suspension form when moving from their source to other locations in the body. Due to the non-attached growth nature, metastasis is often first detected in the circulatory systems, for instance in a lymph node near the primary tumor. Cancer research over the past several decades has primarily focused on treating solid tumors, but targeted therapy to treat cancer stem cells and cancer metastasis has yet to be developed. Because cancers undergo faster metabolism and consume more glucose than normal cells, glucose was chosen in this study as a reagent to target cancer cells. In particular, by covalently binding gold nanoparticles (GNPs with thio-PEG (polyethylene glycol and thio-glucose, the resulting functionalized GNPs (Glu-GNPs were created for targeted treatment of cancer metastasis and cancer stem cells. Suspension cancer cell THP-1 (human monocytic cell line derived from acute monocytic leukemia patients was selected because it has properties similar to cancer stem cells and has been used as a metastatic cancer cell model for in vitro studies. To take advantage of cancer cells’ elevated glucose consumption

  4. Previous bacterial infection affects textural quality parameters of heat-treated fillets from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Hyldig, Grethe; Przybylska, Dominika Alicja;

    2012-01-01

    Sensory quality of fish meat is influenced by many parameters prior to slaughter. In the present study, it was examined if previous infections or damages in the muscle tissue influence product quality parameters in fish. Fillets from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) reared in seawater at a com......-smoked instead of being sold as raw meat. The established correlation between disease history stresses the importance of disease prevention in aquaculture production, e.g., vaccination of the fish....... commercial fish farm were sensory evaluated for more than a year after recovery following physical tissue damage or infection by the bacterial pathogens Yersinia ruckeri and Vibrio anguillarum. The effect of vaccination was also included as some fish were vaccinated before bacterial challenge. The fish...

  5. Improved compliance and patient satisfaction with estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women previously treated with another local estrogen therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkin MJ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mary Jane Minkin,1 Ricardo Maamari,2 Suzanne Reiter31Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Menopause, Temple Medical Center, New Haven, CT, 2Hormone Therapy, Novo Nordisk Inc, Princeton, NJ, 3Mid-County Health Center, Largo, FL, USAAbstract: Up to half of all postmenopausal women will experience changes in the genitourinary tract induced by the hypoestrogenic state, collectively known as vaginal atrophy. Vaginally administered local estrogen therapy (LET is the standard of care for symptoms of vaginal atrophy that do not respond to nonhormonal interventions. Several LET formulations are available, and choice of therapy is based largely on patient needs and preferences. This online survey of postmenopausal LET users was conducted to investigate reasons for switching to vaginal estradiol tablets from other formulations and to evaluate factors associated with patient preference for and compliance with use of LET. Data was analyzed from 73 respondents currently using estradiol vaginal tablets who have previously used the estradiol vaginal ring, estradiol vaginal cream, and/or conjugated estrogen vaginal cream. Patients in this survey rated vaginal symptoms of vaginal atrophy as being more bothersome than urinary symptoms. Respondents preferred their current treatment with the vaginal tablet to their previous treatment with a cream or ring. The preference for tablets over creams was mainly related to formulation and application rather than to any perceived safety issues. Tablets were perceived as efficacious, convenient, and neat to apply. The study participants also reported a longer duration of tablet use compared with creams or rings, and greater compliance with vaginal tablets than with vaginal cream. This study provides new insights into reasons for patient noncompliance with estrogen cream or ring therapy that can be used to maximize patient adherence with LET.Keywords: vaginal atrophy, local estrogen therapy, estradiol, vaginal ring, vaginal tablet

  6. SPATIAL DISTRUBITON OF CHILDREN TREATED BY CANCER IN ZONGULDAK, TURKEY

    OpenAIRE

    TOPAN, Aysel; Bayram, Dilek; Özendi, Mustafa; Cam, Ali; Öztürk, Cam; Kuzlu Ayyıldız, Tülay; Kulakçı, Hülya; Veren, Funda

    2016-01-01

    This research is focused on the examination of child cancer cases in Zonguldak (Turkey) descriptively in epidemiological aspect thanks to GIS. Universe of the study is composed of 60 children between 0-19 years old, treated in Children Oncology Clinic of Health Application and Research Center in BEU. Whole universe was reached without selecting a sample in the study. Data were collected by using a form prepared by obtaining expert advice and they were applied to children and their parents at ...

  7. New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ömer Acar; Tarık Esen; Lack, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation The ScientificWorld Journal Volume 2013, Article ID 379641, 8 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/379641 Review Article New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer Ömer Acar,1 TarJk Esen,1,2 and Nathan A. Lack1 1 VKF American Hospital, Guzelbahce sokak, Nisantasi, Istanbul 34365, Turkey 2 School of Medicine, Koc¸ University, Rumelifeneri Yolu, Sariyer, Istanbul 34450, Turkey Correspondence should be addressed to Natha...

  8. Efficacy of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder previously treated with methylphenidate: a post hoc analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Rakesh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a common neurobehavioral psychiatric disorder that afflicts children, with a reported prevalence of 2.4% to 19.8% worldwide. Stimulants (methylphenidate [MPH] and amphetamine are considered first-line ADHD pharmacotherapy. MPH is a catecholamine reuptake inhibitor, whereas amphetamines have additional presynaptic activity. Although MPH and amphetamine can effectively manage ADHD symptoms in most pediatric patients, many still fail to respond optimally to either. After administration, the prodrug stimulant lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX is converted to l-lysine and therapeutically active d-amphetamine in the blood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of LDX in children with ADHD who remained symptomatic (ie, nonremitters; ADHD Rating Scale IV [ADHD-RS-IV] total score > 18 on MPH therapy prior to enrollment in a 4-week placebo-controlled LDX trial, compared with the overall population. Methods In this post hoc analysis of data from a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, forced-dose titration study, we evaluated the clinical efficacy of LDX in children aged 6-12 years with and without prior MPH treatment at screening. ADHD symptoms were assessed using the ADHD-RS-IV scale, Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised short form (CPRS-R, and Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale, at screening, baseline, and endpoint. ADHD-RS-IV total and CPRS-R ADHD Index scores were summarized as mean (SD. Clinical response for the subgroup analysis was defined as a ≥ 30% reduction from baseline in ADHD-RS-IV score and a CGI-I score of 1 or 2. Dunnett test was used to compare change from baseline in all groups. Number needed to treat to achieve one clinical responder or one symptomatic remitter was calculated as the reciprocal of the difference in their proportions on active treatment and placebo at endpoint. Results Of 290 randomized participants enrolled, 28

  9. Improvement of endothelial function after switching previously treated HIV-infected patients to an NRTI-sparing bitherapy with maraviroc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Bernal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI is associated with endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory effects. Maraviroc (MVC is an antagonist of CCR5 receptor. CCR5 is the receptor of RANTES (Regulated on Activation, Normal T Cell Expressed and Secreted, a mediator of chronic inflammation and endothelial function. Our aim was to evaluate the maintenance of viral suppression and improvement of endothelial function in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients switched to an NRTI-sparing combined antiretroviral therapy (cART with MVC. Materials and Methods: This observational, non-interventional, multicenter study was performed at the Infectious Diseases Service of Santa Lucia, Morales Meseguer, Virgen de la Arrixaca and Reina Sofía University Hospital (Murcia, Spain. The selection criteria were to be asymptomatic on a regimen with undetectable viral load (<50 HIV-RNA copies/mL for at least six months, no previous treatment with R5 antagonists, no evidence of previous protease inhibitor (PI failure and available R5 tropism test. Twenty-one HIV-infected patients were selected after the treatment regimen was changed to Maraviroc 150 mg/once daily plus ritonavir-boosted PI therapy. Endothelial function was prospectively evaluated through flow-mediated dilatation (FMD of the brachial artery at baseline and at weeks 24. Results: We included 21 patients on treatment with PI in combination with 2 NRTI. The mean cART exposition was 133±68.9 months. Fourteen (66.6% were males, aged 49±9 years, 15 (71.4% smokers, 4 (19.04% family history of coronary heart disease, 1 (5.76% type 2 diabetes and 3 (14.28% hypertensive, mean total cholesterol was 185.5±35 mg/dL, c-LDL 100.2±37 mg/dL, tryglicerides 170.42±92.03 mg/dL, cHDL 52.6±15.5 mg/dL, CD4 779,5±383.28 cells/mL, nadir CD4 187,96±96 cells/mL. After 24 weeks of follow-up of a switch to an NRTI-sparing regimen, 95.2% of HIV-patients on viral suppressive cART maintained

  10. Second cancers in children treated with modern radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: The scattered radiation from the treatment volume might be more significant for children than for adults and, as a consequence, modern radiotherapy treatment techniques such as IMRT and passive proton therapy could potentially increase the number of secondary cancers. In this report, secondary cancer risk resulting from new treatment technologies was estimated for an adult prostate patient and a child. Material and methods: The organ equivalent dose (OED) concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau and a linear dose-response curve was applied to dose distributions of an adult prostate patient and a child with a rhabdomyosarcoma of the prostate. Conformal radiotherapy, IMRT with 6 MV photons and proton therapy were planned. OED (cancer risk) was estimated for the whole body, the rectum and the bladder. In addition, relative cumulative risk was calculated. Results: Secondary cancer risk in the adult is not more than 15% it increased when IMRT or passive proton therapy was compared to conventional treatment planning. In the child, risk remains practically constant or was even reduced for proton therapy. The cumulative risk in the child relative to that in the adult can be as large as 10-15. Conclusions: By a comparison between an adult patient and a child treated for a disease of the prostate, it was shown that modern radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT and proton therapy (active and passive) do not increase the risk for secondary cancers

  11. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelian, Jason M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Callister, Matthew D., E-mail: Callister.matthew@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Ashman, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Young-Fadok, Tonia M. [Division of Colorectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Borad, Mitesh J. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  12. Motexafin Gadolinium and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Colorectal Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Leukemia; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Diseases; Prostate Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. Computer-aided detection system performance on current and previous digital mammograms in patients with contralateral metachronous breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The computer-aided detection (CAD) system is widely used for screening mammography. The performance of the CAD system for contralateral breast cancer has not been reported for women with a history of breast cancer. Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the performance of a CAD system on current and previous mammograms in patients with contralateral metachronous breast cancer. Material and Methods: During a 3-year period, 4945 postoperative patients had follow-up examinations, from whom we selected 55 women with contralateral breast cancers. Among them, 38 had visible malignant signs on the current mammograms. We analyzed the sensitivity and false-positive marks of the system on the current and previous mammograms according to lesion type and breast density. Results: The total visible lesion components on the current mammograms included 27 masses and 14 calcifications in 38 patients. The case-based sensitivity for all lesion types was 63.2% (24/38) with false-positive marks of 0.71 per patient. The lesion-based sensitivity for masses and calcifications was 59.3% (16/27) and 71.4% (10/14), respectively. The lesion-based sensitivity for masses in fatty and dense breasts was 68.8% (11/16) and 45.5% (5/11), respectively. The lesion-based sensitivity for calcifications in fatty and dense breasts was 100.0% (3/3) and 63.6% (7/11), respectively. The total visible lesion components on the previous mammograms included 13 masses and three calcifications in 16 patients, and the sensitivity for all lesion types was 31.3% (5/16) with false-positive marks of 0.81 per patient. On these mammograms, the sensitivity for masses and calcifications was 30.8% (4/13) and 33.3% (1/3), respectively. The sensitivity in fatty and dense breasts was 28.6% (2/7) and 33.3% (3/9), respectively. Conclusion: In the women with a history of breast cancer, the sensitivity of the CAD system in visible contralateral breast cancer was lower than in most previous reports using the same CAD

  14. FDG-PET and CT patterns of bone metastases and their relationship to previously administered anti-cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel, Ora; Bar-Shalom, Rachel; Keidar, Zohar [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, B. Rappaport School of Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Goldberg, Anat [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Nachtigal, Alicia; Militianu, Daniela [Rambam Health Care Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Haifa (Israel); Fogelman, Ignac [Guy' s, King' s and St Thomas' School of Medicine, Division of Imaging Sciences, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-15

    To assess {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in bone metastases in patients with and without previous treatment, and compare positive positron emission tomography (PET) with osteolytic or osteoblastic changes on computed tomography (CT). One hundred and thirty-one FDG-PET/CT studies were reviewed for bone metastases. A total of 294 lesions were found in 76 patients, 81 in untreated patients and 213 in previously treated patients. PET was assessed for abnormal FDG uptake localised by PET/CT to the skeleton. CT was evaluated for bone metastases and for blastic or lytic pattern. The relationship between the presence and pattern of bone metastases on PET and CT, and prior treatment was statistically analysed using the chi-square test. PET identified 174 (59%) metastases, while CT detected 280 (95%). FDG-avid metastases included 74/81 (91%) untreated and 100/213 (47%) treated lesions (p<0.001). On CT there were 76/81 (94%) untreated and 204/213 (96%) treated metastases (p NS). In untreated patients, 85% of lesions were seen on both PET and CT (26 blastic, 43 lytic). In treated patients, 53% of lesions were seen only on CT (95 blastic, 18 lytic). Of the osteoblastic metastases, 65/174 (37%) were PET positive and 98/120 (82%), PET negative (p<0.001). The results of the present study indicate that when imaging bone metastases, prior treatment can alter the relationship between PET and CT findings. Most untreated bone metastases are PET positive and lytic on CT, while in previously treated patients most lesions are PET negative and blastic on CT. PET and CT therefore appear to be complementary in the assessment of bone metastases. (orig.)

  15. Potential use of custirsen to treat prostate cancer

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    Higano CS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Celestia S Higano Department of Medicine, University of Washington, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Over the last few years, five agents have demonstrated a survival benefit over a comparator treatment or placebo in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration: sipuleucel-T (a dendritic cell immunotherapy; cabazitaxel; abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide (both hormonal agents; and radium 223 (an alpha emitter. The development of these agents pivoted on whether patients had been treated with docetaxel, which remains the first-line chemotherapy of choice. To date, no combination of docetaxel and another active agent has demonstrated superiority to docetaxel alone despite numerous Phase III trials. Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is upregulated in response to various anticancer therapies. When overexpressed, clusterin interferes with apoptotic signaling, thereby promoting cell survival and conferring broad-spectrum resistance in cancer cell lines. Custirsen (OGX-011 is a second-generation 2´-methoxyethyl modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits expression of clusterin. This review presents the preclinical and clinical data that provided the rationale for the combination of custirsen with chemotherapy in ongoing Phase III trials. Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, clusterin, custirsen, OGX-011, antisense, OGX-427, apoptosis

  16. Psychological distress and intervention in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Common side effects of treatment with radiation therapy (RT) often cause psychophysical distress in cancer patients. Anxiety, adjustment disorders and depression (which are according to many studies experienced in about half of the oncological population) might originate some serious psychiatric forms of mood disorders and can even culminate in suicide, if not treated appropriately. There are some groups of cancer patients who are especially vulnerable and among them are cancer patients undergoing RT - they should receive special attention from medical staff. The purpose of this review is to present a variety of psychosocial interventions and illustrate some methods that are (or could be) used in psycho-oncology practice. Conclusions. A large body of literature suggests that the first intervention step should be effective screening for patients in distress. In regard to these proposals the development of (computerized) screening programmes is the first measure that ought to be taken. Moreover, further systematical research of traditional, non-traditional and complementary intervention strategies in cancer patients in distress would be necessary in order to provide reliable empirical results about the effectiveness of different approaches. (author)

  17. Spatial Distrubiton of Children Treated by Cancer in Zonguldak, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topan, Aysel; Bayram, Dilek; Özendi, Mustafa; Cam, Ali; Öztürk, Cam; Kuzlu Ayyıldız, Tülay; Kulakçı, Hülya; Veren, Funda

    2016-06-01

    This research is focused on the examination of child cancer cases in Zonguldak (Turkey) descriptively in epidemiological aspect thanks to GIS. Universe of the study is composed of 60 children between 0-19 years old, treated in Children Oncology Clinic of Health Application and Research Center in BEU. Whole universe was reached without selecting a sample in the study. Data were collected by using a form prepared by obtaining expert advice and they were applied to children and their parents at study dates. Results were expressed as percentages. Chi-Square test was used in intergroup comparisons, results were assessed within 95% confidence interval and pcases was produced in this context. This is the first research subjecting the distribution of cancer cases for Zonguldak province.

  18. Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Resistance among New and Previously Treated Sputum Smear-Positive Tuberculosis Patients in Uganda: Results of the First National Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Lukoye, Deus; Adatu, Francis; Musisi, Kenneth; Kasule, George William; Were, Willy; Odeke, Rosemary; Kalamya, Julius Namonyo; Awor, Ann; Date, Anand; Joloba, Moses L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistant and extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) have become major threats to control of tuberculosis globally. The rates of anti-TB drug resistance in Uganda are not known. We conducted a national drug resistance survey to investigate the levels and patterns of resistance to first and second line anti-TB drugs among new and previously treated sputum smear-positive TB cases. Methods Sputum samples were collected from a nationally representative sample of new and...

  19. Second Primary Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Three Years After Successfully Treated Index Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Nandy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Development of a second primary malignancy after an index esophageal cancer is a rare event, primarily due to short survival of patients with esophageal cancer. However, the number of long-term esophageal cancer survivors has been increasing due to advances in early detection and therapy. Case report We report herein a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma that developed three years after a successfully treated early-stage adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. A 70-year-old Caucasian male presented with vague complaints of nausea, vomiting and abdominal distention, with subsequent development of jaundice. A computed tomography scan of abdomen revealed a 2.9 cm soft tissue mass in the head of the pancreas and the patient underwent a Whipple’s procedure, with pathology confirming the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Three years previously, the patient was successfully treated for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus via minimally invasive esophagogastrectomy. Despite chemoradiotherapy for localized disease and subsequent systemic chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer, the patient eventually succumbed to his illness. Conclusion We discuss the association between esophageal cancer and subsequent second malignancies, along with implications for surveillance and therapy.

  20. Frequency and Clinical Significance of Previously Undetected Incidental Findings Detected on Computed Tomography Simulation Scans for Breast Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Naoki, E-mail: naokinak@luke.or.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tsunoda, Hiroko [Department of Radiology, St. Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, Osamu [Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, St. Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kikuchi, Mari; Honda, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, St. Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka (Japan); Akahane, Keiko; Sekiguchi, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of previously undetected incidental findings found on computed tomography (CT) simulation images for breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: All CT simulation images were first interpreted prospectively by radiation oncologists and then double-checked by diagnostic radiologists. The official reports of CT simulation images for 881 consecutive postoperative breast cancer patients from 2009 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Potentially important incidental findings (PIIFs) were defined as any previously undetected benign or malignancy-related findings requiring further medical follow-up or investigation. For all patients in whom a PIIF was detected, we reviewed the clinical records to determine the clinical significance of the PIIF. If the findings from the additional studies prompted by a PIIF required a change in management, the PIIF was also recorded as a clinically important incidental finding (CIIF). Results: There were a total of 57 (6%) PIIFs. The 57 patients in whom a PIIF was detected were followed for a median of 17 months (range, 3-26). Six cases of CIIFs (0.7% of total) were detected. Of the six CIIFs, three (50%) cases had not been noted by the radiation oncologist until the diagnostic radiologist detected the finding. On multivariate analysis, previous CT examination was an independent predictor for PIIF (p = 0.04). Patients who had not previously received chest CT examinations within 1 year had a statistically significantly higher risk of PIIF than those who had received CT examinations within 6 months (odds ratio, 3.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-9.50; p = 0.01). Conclusions: The rate of incidental findings prompting a change in management was low. However, radiation oncologists appear to have some difficulty in detecting incidental findings that require a change in management. Considering cost, it may be reasonable that routine interpretations are given to those who have not

  1. Epidemiology and outcomes of previously undiagnosed diabetes in older women with breast cancer: an observational cohort study based on SEER-Medicare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffiths Robert I

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In breast cancer, diabetes diagnosed prior to cancer (previously diagnosed is associated with advanced cancer stage and increased mortality. However, in the general population, 40% of diabetes is undiagnosed until glucose testing, and evidence suggests one consequence of increased evaluation and management around breast cancer diagnosis is the increased detection of previously undiagnosed diabetes. Biological factors – for instance, higher insulin levels due to untreated disease - and others underlying the association between previously diagnosed diabetes and breast cancer could differ in those whose diabetes remains undiagnosed until cancer. Our objectives were to identify factors associated with previously undiagnosed diabetes in breast cancer, and to examine associations between previously undiagnosed diabetes and cancer stage, treatment patterns, and mortality. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare, we identified women diagnosed with breast cancer and diabetes between 01/2001 and 12/2005. Diabetes was classified as previously diagnosed if it was identified within Medicare claims between 24 and 4 months before cancer diagnosis, and previously undiagnosed if it was identified from 3 months before to ≤ 3 months after cancer. Patients were followed until 12/2007 or death, whichever came first. Multivariate analyses were performed to examine risk factors for previously undiagnosed diabetes and associations between undiagnosed (compared to previously diagnosed diabetes, cancer stage, treatment, and mortality. Results Of 2,418 patients, 634 (26% had previously undiagnosed diabetes; the remainder had previously diagnosed diabetes. The mean age was 77.8 years, and 49.4% were diagnosed with in situ or stage I disease. Age > 80 years (40% of the cohort and limited health system contact (primary care physician and/or preventive services prior to cancer were associated with higher adjusted odds of

  2. Phase II trial of isoflavone in prostate-specific antigen recurrent prostate cancer after previous local therapy

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    Hou Wei

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Data exist that demonstrate isoflavones' potent antiproliferative effects on prostate cancer cells. We evaluated the efficacy of isoflavone in patients with PSA recurrent prostate cancer after prior therapy. We postulated that isoflavone therapy would slow the rate of rise of serum PSA. Methods- Twenty patients with rising PSA after prior local therapy were enrolled in this open-labeled, Phase II, nonrandomized trial (Trial registration # NCT00596895. Patients were treated with soy milk containing 47 mg of isoflavonoid per 8 oz serving three times per day for 12 months. Serum PSA, testosterone, lipids, isoflavone levels (genistein, daidzein, and equol, and quality of life (QOL were measured at various time points from 0 to 12 months. PSA outcome was evaluated. Results- Within the mixed regression model, it was estimated that PSA had increased 56% per year before study entry and only increased 20% per year for the 12-month study period (p = 0.05. Specifically, the slope of PSA after study entry was significantly lower than that before study entry in 6 patients and the slope of PSA after study entry was significantly higher than before study entry in 2 patients. For the remaining 12 patients, the change in slope was statistically insignificant. Nearly two thirds of the patients were noted to have significant levels of free equol in their serum while on therapy. Conclusion- Dietary intervention with isoflavone supplementation may have biologic activity in men with biochemical recurrent prostate cancer as shown by a decline in the slope of PSA. This study may lend support to the literature that nutritional supplements have biologic activity in prostate cancer and therefore, further studies with these agents in randomized clinical trials should be encouraged.

  3. The mechanisms of photodynamic action for treating of cancer patients

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    A. L. Akopov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current views on mechanisms of therapeutic effect of photodynamic therapy for treating of cancer patients are represented. The history of formation and development of the method is described. The main requirements for agents used as photosensitizers are listed. Detailed review of main photosensitizers used in clinical practice in Russia and in foreign countries with their chemical structure, main spectral characteristics was performed. Methods of its application, therapeutic dose ranges, indications, specifi c pharmacokinetic properties and side-effects are briefl y outlined. Advantages and disadvantages of the most popular modern photosensitizers, main mechanisms of entry of photosensitizers of different chemical structure into cancer cells are observed. Three main possible component of anti-tumor effect: direct damage of cancer cells, impairment of vascular stroma of tumor and elimination of tumor due to immune cells are shown and closely discussed. Necrosis and apotosis of neovascular net which are main development trends of anti-tumor action for photodynamic therapy are noticed. 

  4. Case Study of Cancer Patients Treated with Herbal Acupuncture Therapy

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    Hwa-Seung Yoo

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was aimed to validate the Herbal Acupuncture Therapies(HAT for cancer patients. Patients and methods : This retrospective study was performed on 8 patients who were diagnosed as cancer in Korea and treated with HAT in the oriental hospital of Daejeon University, from January 2003 to January 2004. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 8 patients for improvement of symptoms, toxic effects of liver and kidney, myelosupression and changes of Quality of Life(QOL. Results : Analysis of change of chief complaints showed that 75% patients replied moderate relief and 25% replied complete relief in Likert scale. Analysis of Liver Function Test(LFT, Renal Function Test(RFT level showed that HAT does not have toxic effects on liver and kidney. Analysis of Complete Blood Count(CBC level showed that HAT does not have myelosuppression effects on bone marrow. Analysis of QOL showed that 100% patients replied improvement in Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status(ECOG status. Conclusion : Our findings suggest that HAT offer potential benefits for cancer patients.

  5. Value and reliability of findings from previous epidemiologic studies in the assessment of radiation-related cancer risks. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theories put forward here are predominantly based on pooled data from previous studies in a number of cohorts made up by mostly non-average individuals. These studies were carried out by various researchers and differed in procedures and aims. Factors of major importance to the validity and reliability of the conclusions drawn from this study are pointed out. In one chapter some light is thrown on factors known to bear a relation to the incidence of radiation-induced cancer of the breast, even though at present this can only very vaguely be described on a quantitative basis. These factors include fractionated dose regimens, pregnancies and parturitions, menarche, menopause, synergisms as well as secondary cancer of the breast. The available body of evidence suggests that exposure of each of 1 million women to a dose of 10 mGy (rad) can be linked with approx. 3 additional cases of mammary cancer reported on an average per year after the latency period. The fact that there is some statistical scatter around this value is chiefly attributable to age-related causes at the beginning of exposure. Differences in ethnic and cultural characteristics between the populations investigated appeared to be less important here. (orig./MG)

  6. Biweekly cetuximab and irinotecan in advanced colorectal cancer patients progressing after at least one previous line of chemotherapy: results of a phase II single institution trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Martorell, P; Roselló, S; Rodríguez-Braun, E; Chirivella, I; Bosch, A; Cervantes, A

    2008-01-01

    This is a phase II institutional exploratory trial of biweekly irinotecan and cetuximab administration regimen in metastatic colorectal cancer patients progressing to at least one previous chemotherapy line. A total of 40 patients were treated between November 2005 and November 2007 with irinotecan 180 mg m−2 and cetuximab 500 mg m−2 q2w (every 2 weeks), in every 21-day cycles, until unacceptable toxicity or progressive disease. An overall response rate of 22.5% was obtained (two complete and seven partial responses). The disease control rate was 60%. The time to progression was 3.4 months and the overall survival was 8 months. The toxicity compared very favourably to weekly cetuximab combination schedules. Grade 3/4 adverse effects were observed in 12 patients. Overall, our results turn up very similar both in terms of toxicity and efficacy to those obtained by weekly and biweekly administration regimens. PMID:18665167

  7. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-18

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  8. TiO2 photocatalytic inactivation under simulated solar light of bacterial consortia in domestic wastewaters previously treated by UASB, duckweed and facultative ponds

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    Julián Andrés Rengifo-Herrera

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, TiO2 photocatalysis was used to disinfect domestic wastewaters previously treated by different biological treatment systems: Upward-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB, facultative pond, and duckweed pond. The microorganisms monitored were E. coli, total coliforms, Shigella species, and Salmonella species. Photocatalytic experiments were carried out using two light sources: a solar simulator (UV intensity: 68-70 W m-2 and black-light lamps (BLL UV intensity: 17-20 W m-2. Samples were taken after each treatment stage. Results indicate that bacterial photocatalytic inactivation is affected by characteristics of the effluent, including turbidity, concentration of organic matter, and bacterial concentration, which depend of the type of biological pretreatment previously used.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of abiraterone treatment in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer who previously received docetaxel therapy

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    A. V. Rudakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Therapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is a serious problem that requires significant public health care expenditures.Objective: to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of abiraterone treatment in patients with metastatic CRPC who previously received docetaxel under the conditions of the budgetary public health system of the Russian Federation.Material and methods. Markovian simulation based on the COU-AA-301 randomized placebo-controlled Phase III study was used. Survival analysis was made in 70-year-old patients. The cost of abiraterone therapy corresponded to that of the 2013 auctions.Results. Abiraterone therapy in patients who have previously received docetaxel therapy causes an increase in average life expectancy by an average of 4.6 months and progression-free survival by 2.0 months. Moreover, the cost calculated with reference to one year of additional life will account for about 3.6 million rubles and that to one additional quality-adjusted life year will be about 5.45 million rubles.Conclusion. The cost-effectiveness of abiraterone therapy for metastatic CRPC in patients who have previously received docetaxel therapy is similar to that of other medicaments used in oncological practice under the conditions of the budgetary public health system of the Russian Federation. In this connection, abiraterone may be considered as an economically acceptable medical intervention in this clinical situation.

  10. A Prospective Study of the Associations Between Treated Diabetes and Cancer Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Visvanathan, Kala; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Brancati, Frederick L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To quantify the association of treated diabetes with cancer incidence and cancer mortality as well as cancer case fatality and all-cause mortality in adults who subsequently develop cancer and to calculate attributable fractions due to diabetes on various cancer outcomes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Prospective data on 599 diabetic and 17,681 nondiabetic adults from the CLUE II (Give Us a Clue to Cancer and Heart Disease) cohort in Washington County, Maryland, were analyzed. Diabete...

  11. Hormone profiles in women treated for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some investigators believe that the protective effect of radiotherapy is hormonally mediated. To determine whether ovarian radiation affects serum hormone levels differently from surgical removal of the ovaries, serum estradiol, estrone, testosterone and androstenedione were evaluated by radioimmunoassay in 320 women (203 irradiated and 117 nonirradiated) from six US clinics participating in a large international cohort study of women treated for cervical cancer since the 1960's. Overall, estradiol levels were similar for both treatment groups, while estrone, testosterone and androstenedione levels were somewhat lower in irradiated women than in nonirradiated women after adjustment for year of birth. Notably, among women in both groups whose treatment included bilateral oophorectomy, irradiated women consistently had lower levels of androstenedione, testosterone and estrone but similar levels of estradiol

  12. Ipilimumab After Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Persistent or Progressive Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Malignant Neoplasm; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Immature Teratoma; Ovarian Mature Teratoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Monodermal and Highly Specialized Teratoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Seminoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Teratoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular

  13. Indium In 111 Pentetreotide in Treating Patients With Refractory Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Head and Neck Cancer; Intraocular Melanoma; Islet Cell Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Lung Cancer; Melanoma (Skin); Neoplastic Syndrome; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Pheochromocytoma

  14. UGT2B4 previously implicated in the risk of breast cancer is associated with menarche timing in Ukrainian females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermachenko, Anna; Dvornyk, Volodymyr

    2016-09-15

    Age at menarche (AAM) is a multifactorial trait that is regulated by dozens environmental and genetic factors. Recent meta-analysis of GWAS showed significant association of 106 loci with AAM. These polymorphisms need replicating in different ethnic populations in order to confirm their association with menarche timing. This study was aimed to replicate 53 polymorphisms that were previously associated with AAM. DNA samples were collected from 416 Ukrainian young females for further genotyping. After data quality control 47 polymorphisms remained for the association analysis using the linear regression model. SNP rs13111134 located in UGT2B4 showed the most significant association with AAM (0.431years per allele A, padj=0.044 after the Bonferroni correction). Polymorphisms rs7589318 in POMC, rs11724758 in FABP2, rs7753051 in IGF2R, rs2288696 in FGFR1 and rs12444979 in GPRC5B may also contribute to menarche timing. However, none of these associations remained significant after the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. The obtained results provide evidence that UGT2B4, which was previously associated with predisposition to breast cancer, may play a role in the onset of menarche. PMID:27282283

  15. Comorbidity-Adjusted Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Y. Do

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the influence of comorbidity on survival in early-stage lung cancer patients treated with proton radiotherapy, using the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Study Design and Setting. Fifty-four non-small-cell lung cancer patients, treated prospectively in a phase II clinical trial with hypofractionated proton therapy, were analyzed retrospectively to assess their burden of comorbid disease as expressed by Charlson Comorbidity Index. Using the Charlson Comorbidity Index method, a predicted survival curve based on comorbidity was formulated and compared to the observed mortality from causes other than lung cancer in the study population. Results. The study population had an average age score of 2.8 and an average Charlson Comorbidity Index of 4.7. Predicted survival was calculated to be 67% and 50% at 2 and 4 years, respectively. Actual comorbidity-specific survival at 2 and 4 years was 64% and 45%, respectively. The observed survival fell within the 95% confidence intervals of the predicted survival at all time points up to 5 years. Conclusion. Predicted mortality from concurrent disease, based on Charlson Comorbidity Index, correlated well with observed comorbidity-specific mortality. This helps substantiate the accuracy of the data coding in cause of death and strengthens previously reported disease-specific survival rates.

  16. Aerobic biological treatment of olive mill wastewater previously treated by an ozonization stage; Tratamiento biologico aerobico del alpechin depurado previamente con ozono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran de Heredia Alonso, J.; Torregrosa Anton, J.; Garcia Rodriguez, J.; Ramos Viseas, M. P.; Dominguez Vargas, J. R. [Universidad de Extremadura. Badajoz (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    In the present work, the degradation of olive mill wastewaters previously treated by an ozonation stage has been studied by an aerobic biological oxidation. The substrate evolution (based on chemical oxygen demand), biomass (measured as volatile suspended solids) and total polyphenolic contents were followed during each experiment. A kinetic study is performed by using the Contois model, which applied to the experimental data, provides the specific kinetic parameters of this model. The deduced kinetic equation for the consume of substrate is q=17.0 S/(18.2 X + So X) g COD/ gVSS day. Moreover, others interesting biological parameters like the cellular yied coefficient and the kinetic rate constant for the endogenous metabolism were determined, obtaining a values of 0.214 g VSS/g COD and 0.167 day''-1, respectively. (Author) 29 refs.

  17. Effect of advanced oxidation processes on the micropollutants and the effluent organic matter contained in municipal wastewater previously treated by three different secondary methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakis, Stefanos; Gamarra Vives, Franco Alejandro; Grandjean, Dominique; Magnet, Anoys; De Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Pulgarin, César

    2015-11-01

    In this study, wastewater from the output of three different secondary treatment facilities (Activated Sludge, Moving Bed Bioreactor and Coagulation-Flocculation) present in the municipal wastewater treatment plant of Vidy, Lausanne (Switzerland), was further treated with various oxidation processes (UV, UV/H2O2, solar irradiation, Fenton, solar photo-Fenton), at laboratory scale. For this assessment, 6 organic micropollutants in agreement with the new environmental legislation requirements in Switzerland were selected (Carbamazepine, Clarithromycin, Diclofenac, Metoprolol, Benzotriazole, Mecoprop) and monitored throughout the treatment. Also, the overall removal of the organic load was assessed. After each secondary treatment, the efficiency of the AOPs increased in the following order: Coagulation-Flocculation Bioreactor, in almost all cases. From the different combinations tested, municipal wastewater subjected to biological treatment followed by UV/H2O2 resulted in the highest elimination levels. Wastewater previously treated by physicochemical treatment demonstrated considerably inhibited micropollutant degradation rates. The degradation kinetics were determined, yielding: k (UV) photo-Fenton). Finally, the evolution of global pollution parameters (COD & TOC elimination) was followed and the degradation pathways for the effluent organic matter are discussed. PMID:26255127

  18. External validation of nomograms for predicting cancer-specific mortality in penile cancer patients treated with definitive surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Yao Zhu; Wei-Jie Gu; Ding-Wei Ye; Xu-Dong Yao; Shi-Lin Zhang; Bo Dai; Hai-Liang Zhang; Yi-Jun Shen

    2014-01-01

    Using a population-based cancer registry, Thuret et al. developed 3 nomograms for estimating cancer-specific mortality in men with penile squamous cell carcinoma. In the initial cohort, only 23.0% of the patients were treated with inguinal lymphadenectomy and had pN stage. To generalize the prediction models in clinical practice, we evaluated the performance of the 3 nomograms in a series of penile cancer patients who were treated with definitive surgery. Clinicopathologic information was obt...

  19. Mortality of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with observation for 10 years or longer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Friis, S; Juel, K;

    1999-01-01

    We studied the outcome in patients with early and probably organ confined prostate cancer who were considered candidates for curative therapy and treated expectantly.......We studied the outcome in patients with early and probably organ confined prostate cancer who were considered candidates for curative therapy and treated expectantly....

  20. Multiple sclerosis-like diagnosis as a complication of previously treated malaria in an iron and vitamin D deficient Nigerian patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, Susan J; van Toorn, Ronald; Moremi, Kelebogile E; Peeters, Armand V; Oguniyi, Adesola; Kotze, Maritha J

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to malaria, multiple sclerosis (MS) is infrequently found in Black Africans. We describe a 29 year old Nigerian female who developed an MS-like condition with symptoms similar to relapsing-remitting MS following malaria infection, leading to a diagnosis of MS. However, absence of hyperintense lesions in the brain and spinal cord presented a conundrum since not all the diagnostic criteria for MS were met. Pathology supported genetic testing (PSGT) was applied to combine family and personal medical history, lifestyle factors, and biochemical test results for interpretation of genetic findings. This approach provides a means of identifying risk factors for different subtypes of demyelinating disease. The patient was subsequently treated according to an individualised intervention program including nutritional supplementation as well as a change in diet and lifestyle. Deficiencies of vitamin B12, iron and vitamin D were addressed. Genetic analysis revealed absence of the HLA DRB1*1501 allele, considered to be the most prominent genetic risk factor for MS. Extended mutation analysis identified variations in three genes in the folate-vitamin B12 metabolic pathway, which could have increased the patient's sensitivity to the antifolate drugs used to treat the malaria. A glutathione-S-transferase GSTM1 null allele, previously associated with neurological complications of malaria, was also detected. Furthermore, a heterozygous variation in the iron-related transmembrane protease serine 6 (TMPRSS6) gene, rs855791 was found, which could have impacted the patient's iron status following two successive blood donations and exposure to malaria preceding the MS diagnosis. PSGT identifies relevant risk factors for demyelinating disorders resembling MS and uses the data for individualised treatment programs, and to systematically build a database that can provide evidence in large patient cohorts. Follow-up investigations may be suggested, such as whole exome sequencing

  1. 177Lu-octreotate, alone or with radiosensitising chemotherapy, is safe in neuroendocrine tumour patients previously treated with high-activity 111In-octreotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether patients with previous peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using high-activity 111In-pentetreotide can be safely treated with 177Lu-octreotate and whether addition of radiosensitising chemotherapy increases the toxicity of this agent. Records of 27 patients (aged 17-75) who received 69 (median 3 per patient) 177Lu-octreotate administrations, including 29 in conjunction with radiosensitising infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (n = 27), or capecitabine (n = 2), between October 2005 and July 2007 subsequent to 1-8 prior cycles of 111In-pentetreotide therapy were analysed. Toxicity was assessed during and at 8-12 weeks post-treatment, with further long-term assessments including survival status reviewed till death or study close-out date of 1 November 2009. Reduction in blood counts was most marked following the first dose of 177Lu-octreotate but at early follow-up the only major haematological toxicity was a single case of grade 4 lymphopaenia. Both the presence of bone metastases and the administration of chemotherapy tended to result in greater reduction in blood counts, but these differences did not reach statistical significance. On long-term follow-up, 16 patients (59%) are alive with median overall survival of 36 months (32-44 months from first 177Lu-octreotate therapy). None of the recorded deaths was directly related to treatment toxicity. One patient had late grade 4 anaemia and thrombocytopaenia secondary to bone marrow failure from progressive infiltration by tumour. No other significant long-term haematological toxicities were recorded and no leukaemia was observed. No renal toxicity was observed on serial serum creatinine or radionuclide glomerular filtration rate (GFR) determination on initial or long-term follow-up. 177Lu-octreotate is a safe and well-tolerated therapy for patients who have previously been treated with 111In-pentetreotide and can be safely combined with radiosensitising

  2. {sup 177}Lu-octreotate, alone or with radiosensitising chemotherapy, is safe in neuroendocrine tumour patients previously treated with high-activity {sup 111}In-octreotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubble, Daniel; Kong, Grace; Michael, Michael; Johnson, Val; Ramdave, Shakher; Hicks, Rodney John [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether patients with previous peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using high-activity {sup 111}In-pentetreotide can be safely treated with {sup 177}Lu-octreotate and whether addition of radiosensitising chemotherapy increases the toxicity of this agent. Records of 27 patients (aged 17-75) who received 69 (median 3 per patient) {sup 177}Lu-octreotate administrations, including 29 in conjunction with radiosensitising infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (n = 27), or capecitabine (n = 2), between October 2005 and July 2007 subsequent to 1-8 prior cycles of {sup 111}In-pentetreotide therapy were analysed. Toxicity was assessed during and at 8-12 weeks post-treatment, with further long-term assessments including survival status reviewed till death or study close-out date of 1 November 2009. Reduction in blood counts was most marked following the first dose of {sup 177}Lu-octreotate but at early follow-up the only major haematological toxicity was a single case of grade 4 lymphopaenia. Both the presence of bone metastases and the administration of chemotherapy tended to result in greater reduction in blood counts, but these differences did not reach statistical significance. On long-term follow-up, 16 patients (59%) are alive with median overall survival of 36 months (32-44 months from first {sup 177}Lu-octreotate therapy). None of the recorded deaths was directly related to treatment toxicity. One patient had late grade 4 anaemia and thrombocytopaenia secondary to bone marrow failure from progressive infiltration by tumour. No other significant long-term haematological toxicities were recorded and no leukaemia was observed. No renal toxicity was observed on serial serum creatinine or radionuclide glomerular filtration rate (GFR) determination on initial or long-term follow-up. {sup 177}Lu-octreotate is a safe and well-tolerated therapy for patients who have previously been treated with {sup 111}In-pentetreotide and can

  3. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle t...

  4. Successful management of elderly breast cancer patients treated without radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson John FR

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer in the elderly may follow a less aggressive course. There are data suggesting that radiotherapy (RT following breast conserving surgery (BCS for invasive carcinoma may not be necessary in some elderly patients. The addition of RT to surgery might constitute an imposition to such patients due to age-related factors. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of BCS without adjuvant RT in this group of patients. Patients and methods A retrospective review of 92 elderly (median age 75 years; range: 70 – 87 years patients (analysed as 93 'patients' due to one patient having bilateral cancers managed in a dedicated breast clinic and who underwent BCS for invasive carcinoma was carried out. Eighty-three patients did not receive postoperative RT to the breast (no-RT group whereas the remaining 10 had RT (RT-group. Results The median age in this group was 75 (range 70 – 87 years. The mean tumour size was 18 mm with a median follow-up of 37 (range 6 – 142 months. In the no RT group, adjuvant endocrine therapy with tamoxifen was given to 40/53 patients. No patients in the oestrogen receptor (ER negative group received tamoxifen. The local recurrence (LR rate in this group was 8.4% (2.4% per year, n = 7/83, with median time to LR of 17 months. In this no-RT group LR was correlated to ER status (2/53 ER+, 5/26ER-, p = 0.024 and margins of excision (n = 1/54 >5 mm, 2/17 1–5 mm, 4/12 Conclusion It would appear that omission of RT following successful BCS in elderly patients with ER positive tumours receiving adjuvant tamoxifen may be acceptable. The LR rate as shown in this retrospective study is highly comparable to that of younger patients treated by conventional therapy. This concept is now being evaluated prospectively following a change in treatment practice.

  5. Gastrointestinal permeability in ovarian cancer and breast cancer patients treated with paclitaxel and platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tichá Alena

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combination of platinum derivatives with paclitaxel is currently the standard front line regimen for patients with epithelial ovarian carcinoma, and represents also an active regimen in patients with metastatic breast or unknown primary carcinomas. Measurement of intestinal permeability represents one of the potential methods of noninvasive laboratory assessment of gastrointestinal mucositis induced by chemotherapy, but little is known about intestinal permeability in patients treated with paclitaxel or platinum. Methods Intestinal permeability was assessed in 36 breast and ovarian cancer patients treated with paclitaxel/platinum combination by measuring, using capillary gas chromatography, urinary sucrose, lactulose, xylose and mannitol after oral challenge. The significance of differences during the therapy compared to pre-treatment values was studied by Wilcoxon paired test. The differences between groups of patient were studied by Mann-Whitney U test. Fisher exact test was used to compare the frequency in different subgroups. Results After administration of the first dose, a significant (p Conclusion A transient significant increase in lactulose/monosaccharide and sucrose/monosaccharide ratios was observed in ovarian and breast cancer patients treated with paclitaxel and platinum. Increased lactulose absorption, lactulose/mannitol, sucrose/mannitol and lactulose/xylose ratios were evident in patients with grade 3 or 4 toxicity, and increased baseline lactulose/mannitol ratio predicted serious toxicity.

  6. Salmonella Typhi-Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  7. Study on Tongkuaixiao Babu Plaster(痛块消巴布剂)in Treating Cancer Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万冬桂; 李佩文

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the efficacy of Tongkuaixiao Babu plaster (痛块消巴剂, TKXBBP)in treating cancer pain. Methods: In the clinical observation, sixty-five patients with moderate or severe cancer pain were randomly divided into two groups: 32 in the treated group (TKXBBP group) and 33 in the control group (Bucinnazine group). The therapeutic effects in relieving pain, improving quality of life (QOL),and the rate of satisfaction the patients felt of the two groups were compared respectively. Results: TKXBBP was effective in treating cancer pain. There wasn't any statistically significant difference in total effective rate (P>0.05), but the statistical difference was significant in obvious remission rate (P<0.05) between the treated and control group, and the effect on serious pain shown in the treated group was better than that of the control group (P<0.05). The difference in the initiation time of relieving cancer pain was insignificant (P>0.05), while in the remission period, the treated group showed its treatment was obviously superior to that of the control group (P<0.05). TKXBBP showed better effect in the improvement of QOL (P<0.05)and satisfaction rate, with significant difference between the treated and the control groups (P<0.01). Conclusion: TKXBBP's effect in treating cancer pain was obvious, its application was safe and convenient. It was shown that the external treatment with this kind of Chinese medicine had great advantage in treating cancer pain.

  8. Pilot study of bone mineral density in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, J. A.; Theriault, R. L.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Vassilopoulou-Sellin, R.; Hortobagyi, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) in breast cancer patients previously treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Sixteen of 27 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy became permanently amenorrheic as a result of chemotherapy. BMD was measured at the lumbar spine using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Chemotherapy drugs and dosages along with a history of risk factors for reduced bone density including activity level, tobacco and/or alcohol use, metabolic bone disease, family history, and hormone exposure were identified. Results showed that women who became permanently amenorrheic as a result of chemotherapy had BMD 14% lower than women who maintained menses after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-treated women who maintained ovarian function had normal BMD. This study suggests that women who have premature menopause as a result of chemotherapy for breast cancer are at increased risk of bone loss and may be at risk for early development of osteoporosis. Women who maintain menses do not appear to be at risk for accelerated trabecular bone loss.

  9. XK469R in Treating Patients With Refractory Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Incidence of thyroid cancer in women in relation to previous exposure to radiation therapy and history of thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Female residents of 13 counties of Western Washington, in whom papillary, follicular, or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid carcinomas had been diagnosed between 1974 and 1979 were interviewed regarding their medical and reproductive histories and past exposure to radiation treatments. For comparison, a random sample of women from the same population was interviewed. Women who had received radiation treatments to the head or neck prior to 5 years before interview were 16.5 times (95% confidence interval . 8.1-33.5) more likely than unexposed women to develop cancer. The relative risk (RR) was highest for papillary cancer (19.4) but also was elevated substantially for follicular and mixed papillary-follicular tumors. Women first irradiated at age 19 years or younger had a much higher RR than did women irradiated at age 20 or older. Regardless of prior radiation exposure, women who ever had had a goiter were at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer. Women who had ever developed a goiter had 17 times the risk of developing follicular cancer and almost 7 times the risk of developing papillary cancer as compared with women who never had had a goiter. Risk of thyroid cancer was elevated even among women who had had a history of goiter many years prior to diagnosis. A history of thyroid nodules was also a risk factor for papillary and mixed thyroid cancer. Neither a history of hypothyroidism nor hyperthyroidism was found to increase the risk of thyroid cancer

  11. One month after diagnosis : quality of life, coping and previous functioning in siblings of children with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtzager, BA; Grootenhuis, MA; Hoekstra-Weebers, JEHM; Last, BF

    2005-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study is to describe the quality of life (QoL) of siblings of children with cancer and to predict it according to their health before the diagnosis of cancer in the ill child and their ways of coping with the illness. Methods Participants were 83 siblings from 56 fa

  12. Efficacy and tolerability of brinzolamide/brimonidine suspension and prostaglandin analogs in patients previously treated with dorzolamide/timolol solution and prostaglandin analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo JS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan S Lo,1 Pierre M Pang,2 Samuel C Lo3 1John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, 2MD-Pacific Eye Surgery Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, 3MD-Laser and Eye Surgery Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA Objective: Fixed combination glaucoma medication is increasingly used in glaucoma treatment. There is a lack of comparative study in the literature of non-beta blocker combination agents used adjunctively with a glaucoma agent in a different class. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of intraocular pressure (IOP control and tolerability of non-beta blocker combination suspension with prostaglandin analogs (PGA in patients with open angle glaucoma who were previously treated with beta blocker combination solution with PGA. Design: Open-label retrospective review of patient records. Patients and methods: This study looked at patients with open angle glaucoma taking dorzolamide/timolol solution with PGA that were switched to brinzolamide/brimonidine combination suspension with PGA. This study reviewed the charts of all patients who were at least 21 years old with a clinical diagnosis of open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension in at least one eye. Patients needed to have been treated with concomitant use of PGA and dorzolamide/timolol solution for at least one month. Patients using dorzolamide/timolol solution plus PGA with medication related ocular irritation were switched to brinzolamide/brimonidine suspension with the same PGA. Best-corrected visual acuity, ocular hyperemia grading, slit lamp biomicroscopy and Goldmann applanation tonometry measurements, and patient medication preferences were assessed at baseline, 1 month and 3 months. Results: Forty eyes with open angle glaucoma. The mean age of the patients was 68 and 60% were females. The IOP before the switch was 17.2 and 16.5 (P=0.70 following the switch at 3 months. We found a decreasing trend of ocular hyperemia (P=0.064 and strong preference (P

  13. Design of a nanoplatform for treating pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manawadu, Harshi Chathurangi

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the USA. Asymptomatic early cancer stages and late diagnosis leads to very low survival rates of pancreatic cancers, compared to other cancers. Treatment options for advanced pancreatic cancer are limited to chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, as surgical removal of the cancerous tissue becomes impossible at later stages. Therefore, there's a critical need for innovative and improved chemotherapeutic treatment of (late) pancreatic cancers. It is mandatory for successful treatment strategies to overcome the drug resistance associated with pancreatic cancers. Nanotechnology based drug formulations have been providing promising alternatives in cancer treatment due to their selective targeting and accumulation in tumor vasculature, which can be used for efficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumors and metastases. The research of my thesis is following the principle approach to high therapeutic efficacy that has been first described by Dr. Helmut Ringsdorf in 1975. However, I have extended the use of the Ringsdorf model from polymeric to nanoparticle-based drug carriers by exploring an iron / iron oxide nanoparticle based drug delivery system. A series of drug delivery systems have been synthesized by varying the total numbers and the ratio of the tumor homing peptide sequence CGKRK and the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin at the surfaces of Fe/Fe3O 4-nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity of these nanoformulations was tested against murine pancreatic cancer cell lines (Pan02) to assess their therapeutic capabilities for effective treatments of pancreatic cancers. Healthy mouse fibroblast cells (STO) were also tested for comparison, because an effective chemotherapeutic drug has to be selective towards cancer cells. Optimal Experimental Design methodology was applied to identify the nanoformulation with the highest therapeutic activity. A statistical analysis method known as response

  14. Prevalence and predictors of cognitive dysfunction in opioid-treated patients with cancer: a multinational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana P; Sjøgren, Per; Ekholm, Ola; Kaasa, Stein; Loge, Jon H; Poviloniene, Irena; Klepstad, Pål

    2011-01-01

    .9% of patients. Patients with lung cancer had higher odds (adjusted odds ratio, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.95) for having lower MMSE scores compared with patients with other cancer diagnoses. Patients receiving daily opioid doses of 400 mg or more (oral morphine equivalents) had 1.75 (95% CI, 1.25 to 2...... opioid-treated patients with cancer had possible or definite cognitive dysfunction. Lung cancer, daily opioid doses of 400 mg or more (oral morphine equivalents), older age, low KPS, shorter time since cancer diagnosis, and absence of BTP were predictors for cognitive dysfunction.......PURPOSE To identify prevalence and associated factors of cognitive dysfunction in opioid-treated patients with cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS EPOS (European Pharmacogenetic Opioid Study) is a prospective cross-sectional multicenter study in which adult patients with cancer who received treatment with...

  15. Gefitinib versus docetaxel in previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (INTEREST): a randomised phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, E.S.; Hirsh, V.; Mok, T.;

    2008-01-01

    %]); whereas in the docetaxel group, neutropenia (35 [5%] vs 514 [74%]), asthenic disorders (182 [25%] vs 334 [47%]), and alopecia (23 [3%] vs 254 [36%]) were most common. INTERPRETATION: INTEREST established non-inferior survival of gefitinib compared with docetaxel, suggesting that gefitinib is a valid...

  16. Asthma Control in Asthmatic Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsing Hsieh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The balance of the Th1 and Th2 immune response plays an important role inthe regulation of the immune system and in general health. Tumor bearinghosts are supposed to have a balance shifting to the Th2 pathway, while afavorable Th1 anti-tumor pathway is induced in tumor-resected hosts. Theclinical impacts of a tumor-related Th2 environment have not been clearlystudied. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that nonsmallcell lung cancer (NSCLC has an impact on control of asthma, a wellknownTh2-predominant inflammatory disease.Method: Thirty-eight patients with the diagnoses of both asthma and lung cancer wereretrospectively enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups according totheir response to lung cancer treatment, the responder group (completeregression, partial regression and stable disease and non-responder group(progression of disease. Asthma control test (ACT scores were analyzedone year before diagnosis, at the time of diagnosis of lung cancer, and at thetime of re-staging after cancer treatment.Results: All the asthmatics with lung cancer had worsening of their symptomsaccording to their ACT scores at the time of diagnosis of lung cancer comparedto scores in the preceding year (21.6

  17. Understanding and Managing Erectile Dysfunction in Patients Treated for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annam, Kiran; Voznesensky, Maria; Kreder, Karl J

    2016-04-01

    Cancer can cause sexual adverse effects by direct and indirect pathways. It can involve sexual organs, indirectly affect body image, or cause fatigue or depression with subsequent effects on libido. Erectile dysfunction (ED), the inability to obtain or maintain an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse, can also result from adverse effects of cancer treatment, such as fatigue, pain, or anxiety about therapy. In addition, depressed feelings about having cancer can affect sexuality, causing a range of signs and symptoms that can lead to ED. Chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation can all cause sexual adverse effects. Additional factors that play a role include patient age and degree of ED before starting cancer treatment. In this article, we discuss how chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation affect erectile function as well as possible treatment options for ED. PMID:27072383

  18. Advances in using PARP inhibitors to treat cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kummar Shivaani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP family of enzymes plays a critical role in the maintenance of DNA integrity as part of the base excision pathway of DNA repair. PARP1 is overexpressed in a variety of cancers, and its expression has been associated with overall prognosis in cancer, especially breast cancer. A series of new therapeutic agents that are potent inhibitors of the PARP1 and PARP2 isoforms have demonstrated important clinical activity in patients with breast or ovarian cancers that are caused by mutations in either the BRCA1 or 2 genes. Results from such studies may define a new therapeutic paradigm, wherein simultaneous loss of the capacity to repair DNA damage may have antitumor activity in itself, as well as enhance the antineoplastic potential of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents.

  19. Combination Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adding the drug everolimus (Afinitor®) to exemestane helped postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer had stopped responding to hormonal therapy live about 4 months longer without the disease progressing than women who received exemestane alone.

  20. A three-field arc technique (3-fat) for treating prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We have previously designed two external beam radiotherapy techniques for treating prostate cancer. The seven-field, coplanar fixed beam technique resulted in dose distributions that were superior to other coplanar plans studied. The other technique using bilateral blocked arcs produced slightly higher doses to normal tissues but was far simpler to execute. We combined aspects of both these plans to produce a technique that was less complicated yet resulted in an improved dose distribution, i.e., to improve dose delivery to the clinical target volume (CTV) while minimizing doses to the rectum, bladder, and femoral heads. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients, previously treated at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) with radiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate, were studied. Each patient was treated with an immobilizer, urethrogram, and a preplanning CT scan. A previously employed, seven-field, coplanar, fixed beam technique was compared with a newly designed three-field, arc technique (3-FAT). This 3-FAT was designed using two equally weighted rotational beams, with nonuniform blocks, beginning in the lateral gantry position and spanning anteriorly 35 deg. . The two beams became noncoplanar by turning the table 20 deg. , bringing the patient's feet toward the gantry (inferior oblique arcs). An anterior inferior oblique (AIO), angled 20 deg. to the inferior of anterior was included for 10% of the daily treatment. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to evaluate doses to adjacent critical structures. The dose to each critical structure was averaged and tabulated for the 20 patients. In addition, we compared normalized doses to adjacent structures using 3-FAT and seven-coplanar, fixed beams vs. a technique using four noncoplanar, fixed beams. Results: The three-field arc technique produced favorable dose distributions for the rectum, bladder, and femoral heads. Compared to the seven-field plan, employing the 3-FAT resulted in a 13

  1. Dr. Wu Liangcun's Experience in Treating Primary Liver Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Having been engaged in clinical treatment of tumors and cancers for more than 40 years, Dr. Wu Liangcun (吴良村),professor of Zhejiang Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, has put forward a unique method for treatment of liver cancer. His academic thought is to nourish yin, clear away heat, soothe the liver and strengthen the spleen, and clinically, he has obtained good therapeutic results as introduced in the following.

  2. Integrative Nanomedicine: Treating Cancer With Nanoscale Natural Products

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Iris R; Sarter, Barbara; Koithan, Mary; Banerji, Prasanta; Banerji, Pratip; Jain, Shamini; Ives, John

    2014-01-01

    Finding safer and more effective treatments for specific cancers remains a significant challenge for integrative clinicians and researchers worldwide. One emerging strategy is the use of nanostructured forms of drugs, vaccines, traditional animal venoms, herbs, and nutraceutical agents in cancer treatment. The recent discovery of nanoparticles in traditional homeopathic medicines adds another point of convergence between modern nanomedicine and alternative interventional strategies. A way in ...

  3. An Experience with Managing Cancer Patients Reportedly Previously Informed of the Absence of Additional Available Antineoplastic Therapeutic Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George River

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 5 years, a small group of cancer patients who stated their physicians had determined there were no additional available antineoplastic therapeutic options (including potential investigational strategies were seen for a ‘second opinion' in a cancer hospital-based oncology program and subsequently experienced what can reasonably be characterized as having achieved meaningful ‘clinical benefit' (functioning at a fairly high level for a minimum 1 year in the work, home, and/or family environments following the further delivery of a variety of treatment approaches. While recognized to be limited (or even simply ‘anecdotal', this experience emphasizes several clinically relevant conclusions, including the overall utility of a ‘second-opinion' strategy and the potential that the reported statement of an individual practitioner or cancer program that all rational options have been attempted may be inaccurate.

  4. Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann;

    2013-01-01

    Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil......Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil...

  5. Chronic fatigue in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue is one of the most prevalent and profound symptoms related to both malignancy and anti-neoplastic treatment. It is being reported in 60% to 80% of cancer patients. We review the correlation between the cancer-related fatigue syndrome and radiotherapy. In patients undergoing radiotherapy, fatigue is often cumulative and may reach its peak during the last weeks of treatment. The presence of fatigue prior to therapy initiation is the most important predictive factor of the occurrence of radiotherapy-related cancer fatigue syndrome. Occasionally, fatigue persists for a prolonged period of months and even years beyond radiotherapy. Anemia may be one of major causative factors responsible for the development of the cancer-related fatigue syndrome. Fatigue has an enormous physical, mental, emotional, and economic impact on cancer patients, their families and care-providers. The treatment of radiation-related fatigue remains unknown. The initial approach should cover efforts aimed at the correction of potential etiologies, especially anemia. Education concerning fatigue greatly benefits some patients. It seems that exercise may be beneficial in relieving fatigue, bearing in mind that the exercise program for cancer patients should be initiated gradually and significantly individualized. (author)

  6. MR images of oral cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to evaluate the relationship between the effect of preoperative radiotherapy for oral cancer and the changes of signal intensity with MR images. T2-weighted images were compared before and after radiotherapy in 18 patients with primary oral cancer, and the effect on the lesions was histologically evaluated in surgically resected specimens obtained four weeks after the therapy. The MR images showed significantly decreased signal intensity of the lesions. The decrease of signal intensity was remarkable starting at two weeks after completion of the radiotherapy, compared with the decrease at less than two weeks after the therapy. The change of signal intensity was more obvious in tongue cancer than in other oral cancers. There was no significant difference in the change of the signal intensity between cancers with histologically poor response to the therapy and those with good response. These results suggested that signal intensity of oral cancer on T2-weighted images showed a significant decrease after preoperative radiotherapy, and that the intensity could be affected by duration after radiotherapy and primary sites. (author)

  7. Interventions for treating oral mucositis for patients with cancer receiving treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Clarkson, Jan E; Worthington, Helen V; Furness, Susan; McCabe, Martin; Khalid, Tasneem; Meyer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of cancer is increasingly effective but associated with short and long term side effects. Oral side effects, including oral mucositis (mouth ulceration), remain a major source of illness despite the use of a variety of agents to treat them. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of interventions for treating oral mucositis or its associated pain in patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy or both. SEARCH STRATEGY: Electronic searches of Cochrane Oral ...

  8. Survival of cancer patients treated with mistletoe extract (Iscador): a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Büssing Arndt; Raak Christa; Ostermann Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In Europe, extracts from Viscum album (VA-E), the European white-berry mistletoe, are widely used to treat patients with cancer. Methods We searched several databases such as Cochrane, EMBASE, NCCAM, NLM, DIMDI, CAMbase, and Medline. Inclusion criteria were controlled clinical studies on parameters associated with survival in cancer patients treated with Iscador. Outcome data were extracted as they were given in the publication, and expressed as hazard ratios (HR), their l...

  9. Altered resting state functional brain network topology in chemotherapy-treated breast cancer survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno, Jennifer; Hosseini, SM Hadi; Kesler, Shelli

    2012-01-01

    Many women with breast cancer, especially those treated with chemotherapy, experience cognitive decline due in part to neurotoxic brain injury. Recent neuroimaging studies suggest widespread brain structural abnormalities pointing to disruption of large-scale brain networks. We applied resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and graph theoretical analysis to examine the connectome in breast cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy relative to healthy comparison women. Compared t...

  10. Accelerated induction of skin cancers by ultraviolet radiation in hairless mice treated with immunosuppressive agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increased incidence of cancer is well recognized in organ transplant recipients treated with immunosuppressive agents. Skin cancers are the most common lesions encountered. To investigate a possible relationship between the immunosuppressive agents and ultraviolet radiation (UVR), several groups of hairless mice were treated with ultraviolet light, azathioprine, or prednisone, or the three in various combination. The two latter drugs are the immunosuppressive agents most frequently used in organ transplant recipients

  11. Accelerated induction of skin cancers by ultraviolet radiation in hairless mice treated with immunosuppressive agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koranda, F.C.; Loeffler, R.T.; Koranda, D.M.; Penn, I.

    1975-01-01

    An increased incidence of cancer is well recognized in organ transplant recipients treated with immunosuppressive agents. Skin cancers are the most common lesions encountered. To investigate a possible relationship between the immunosuppressive agents and ultraviolet radiation (UVR), several groups of hairless mice were treated with ultraviolet light, azathioprine, or prednisone, or the three in various combination. The two latter drugs are the immunosuppressive agents most frequently used in organ transplant recipients.

  12. Prediction of Candidate Drugs for Treating Pancreatic Cancer by Using a Combined Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Yanfen; Hu, Jian; Zhang, Ning; Dong, Xinran; Li, Ying; Yang, Bo; Tian, Weidong; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the leading cause of death from solid malignancies worldwide. Currently, gemcitabine is the only drug approved for treating pancreatic cancer. Developing new therapeutic drugs for this disease is, therefore, an urgent need. The C-Map project has provided a wealth of gene expression data that can be mined for repositioning drugs, a promising approach to new drug discovery. Typically, a drug is considered potentially useful for treating a disease if the drug-induced differe...

  13. Rates of asthma attacks in patients with previously inadequately controlled mild asthma treated in clinical practice with combination drug therapy: an exploratory post-hoc analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sazonov Vasilisa; Fan Tao; Zhang Qiaoyi; Borderias Luis; Dal Negro Robert W; Guilera Magda; Taylor Stephanie D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Differences could exist in the likelihood of asthma attacks in patients treated with inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), long-acting beta-agonist (LABA), and montelukast (MON) (ICS/LABA/MON) and patients treated with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and montelukast (MON) (ICS/MON). Methods This was a post-hoc analysis of a pretest-posttest retrospective cohort study. Patients with mild persistent asthma and allergic rhinitis, who were taking an ICS either alone or in combination ...

  14. DEMOGRAPHIC AND CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY BREAST CANCER TREATED BETWEEN 1997 AND 2010: A SINGLE INSTITUTION EXPERIENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žitnjak, Daniela; Soldić, Željko; Kust, Davor; Bolanća, Ante; Kusić, Zvonko

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer accounted for 28% of all new cancers and 18% of female cancer deaths in Europe in 2010. It is the most common type of cancer in women in Croatia, with an incidence rate of 56.9/100 000 in the year 2010, and the highest number of newly diagnosed women aged between 60 and 64. Multiple factors are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer: advancing age, family history, exposure to endogenous and exogenous reproductive hormones, dietary factors, benign breast disease, and environmental factors. To assess demographic and clinicopathologic features of primary breast cancer, we retrospectively analyzed 870 patients treated in our institution between 1997 and 2010. Data were obtained from medical documentation and a printed questionnaire regarding life habits. Most of our patients presented with a breast lump and were self-diagnosed by breast examination. This fact highlights the need of regular breast self-examination, although it should also be taken into account that most of our patients did not attend regular mammography screening (only 31%). One of the most concerning facts is that the mean time from observing the first symptom to visiting a physician was 4 months. Previous studies have identified ignorance, fear and fatalistic attitudes, poor socioeconomic conditions, and illiteracy as important factors resulting in delay. Considering these facts, education and raising awareness about the disease in the general population is one of the key weapons for lowering breast cancer mortality. PMID:26666098

  15. Prostate Cancer Detection and Dutasteride : Utility and Limitations of Prostate-Specific Antigen in Men with Previous Negative Biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Pim J.; Koelble, Konrad; Huland, Hartwig; Hambrock, Thomas; Barentsz, Jelle; Schroder, Fritz H.

    2011-01-01

    Context: We addressed the question whether the change of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in men who use 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor (5-ARI) dutasteride is sensitive for the detection of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa). Objective: The case of a man using dutasteride diagnosed with Gleason 7 tr

  16. Associations between voice quality and swallowing function in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Marieke J.; Rinkel, Rico N. P. M.; Cnossen, Ingrid C.; Witte, Birgit I.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. Ren; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between voice quality and swallowing function in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Recordings of speech and videofluoroscopy of 51 patients after treatment for oral or oropharyngeal cancer were analysed. Acoustic voice parame

  17. Prognostic nomogram for nonresectable pancreatic cancer treated with gemcitabine-based chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, T; Nakai, Y.; Yasunaga, H.; Isayama, H; Matsui, H; Takahara, N; Sasaki, T.; Takagi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Yagioka, H; Kogure, H; Arizumi, T.; N Yamamoto; Ito, Y.; Hirano, K

    2014-01-01

    Background: A nomogram is progressively being used as a useful predictive tool for cancer prognosis. A nomogram to predict survival in nonresectable pancreatic cancer treated with chemotherapy has not been reported. Methods: Using prospectively collected data on patients with nonresectable pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine-based chemotherapy at five Japanese hospitals, we derived a predictive nomogram and internally validated it using a concordance index and calibration plots. Results: ...

  18. Offspring of patients treated for cancer in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, F.P. (Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare Bethesda, MD); Fine, W.; Jaffe, N.; Holmes, G.E.; Holmes, F.F.

    1979-05-01

    Genetic effects of cancer in childhood were examined among offspring of patients enrolled in the tumor registries of the Sidney Farber Cancer Institute and the Kansas University Medical Center. For 146 patients, 84 women and 62 men, 293 pregnancies were reported after cessation of treatment of diverse neoplasms. The outcomes of 286 completed pregnancies were as follows: 242 live births (1 set of twins), 1 stillbirth, 25 spontaneous abortions, and 19 therapeutic abortions. Seven live-born infants died during the first 2 years of life, a frequency in accord with expectation. Two offspring have developed cancer. One girl and her father had bilateral hereditary retinoblastoma. A second girl developed acute myelocytic leukemia; her mother had received radiotherapy during childhood for a brain tumor. Compared with their cousins and with published figures for the general population, the study progeny had no excess of congenital anomalles or other diseases. Chromosome and immunoglobulin studies of a few offspring did not reveal damage from preconception exposure to cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Findings indicated that large collaborative studies are needed to monitor the offspring of childhood cancer survivors for inherited traits associated with the parental tumors and for mutagenic effects of therapy, particularly intense multimodality treatments.

  19. Robotic Radiosurgery. Treating prostata cancer and related genitourinary applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponsky, Lee E. (ed.) [Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States). University Hospitals Case Medical Center

    2012-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among North American and European men, but its treatment continues to be problematic owing to serious side-effects, including erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, and potential lower GI complications. Robotic radiosurgery offers a novel, rapid, non-invasive outpatient treatment option for prostate cancer that combines robotics, advanced image-guided motion detection, and automated real-time corrective spatial positioning with submillimeter precision. This book examines all aspects of the treatment of prostate cancer with robotic radiosurgery. After introductory sections on radiosurgery as a multidisciplinary practice and specific issues relating to prostate cancer, the important challenge posed by prostate motion when administering radiation therapy is examined in depth, with detailed discussion as to how image-guided robotic radiosurgery overcomes this problem by continously identifying the precise location of the prostate throughout the course of treatment. A further major section is devoted to a discussion of techniques and potential radiobiological and clinical advantages of hypofractionated radiation delivery by means of robotic radiosurgery systems. The book closes by discussing other emerging genitourinary applications of robotic radiosurgery. All of the authors are experts in their field who present a persuasive case for this fascinating technique. (orig.)

  20. Robotic Radiosurgery. Treating prostata cancer and related genitourinary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among North American and European men, but its treatment continues to be problematic owing to serious side-effects, including erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, and potential lower GI complications. Robotic radiosurgery offers a novel, rapid, non-invasive outpatient treatment option for prostate cancer that combines robotics, advanced image-guided motion detection, and automated real-time corrective spatial positioning with submillimeter precision. This book examines all aspects of the treatment of prostate cancer with robotic radiosurgery. After introductory sections on radiosurgery as a multidisciplinary practice and specific issues relating to prostate cancer, the important challenge posed by prostate motion when administering radiation therapy is examined in depth, with detailed discussion as to how image-guided robotic radiosurgery overcomes this problem by continously identifying the precise location of the prostate throughout the course of treatment. A further major section is devoted to a discussion of techniques and potential radiobiological and clinical advantages of hypofractionated radiation delivery by means of robotic radiosurgery systems. The book closes by discussing other emerging genitourinary applications of robotic radiosurgery. All of the authors are experts in their field who present a persuasive case for this fascinating technique. (orig.)

  1. Offspring of patients treated for cancer in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic effects of cancer in childhood were examined among offspring of patients enrolled in the tumor registries of the Sidney Farber Cancer Institute and the Kansas University Medical Center. For 146 patients, 84 women and 62 men, 293 pregnancies were reported after cessation of treatment of diverse neoplasms. The outcomes of 286 completed pregnancies were as follows: 242 live births (1 set of twins), 1 stillbirth, 25 spontaneous abortions, and 19 therapeutic abortions. Seven live-born infants died during the first 2 years of life, a frequency in accord with expectation. Two offspring have developed cancer. One girl and her father had bilateral hereditary retinoblastoma. A second girl developed acute myelocytic leukemia; her mother had received radiotherapy during childhood for a brain tumor. Compared with their cousins and with published figures for the general population, the study progeny had no excess of congenital anomalles or other diseases. Chromosome and immunoglobulin studies of a few offspring did not reveal damage from preconception exposure to cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Findings indicated that large collaborative studies are needed to monitor the offspring of childhood cancer survivors for inherited traits associated with the parental tumors and for mutagenic effects of therapy, particularly intense multimodality treatments

  2. Observational cohort study focused on treatment continuity of patients administered XELOX plus bevacizumab for previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kotaka, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Masahito Kotaka,1 Fusao Ikeda,2 Masaki Tsujie,3 Shinichi Yoshioka,4 Yoshihiko Nakamoto,5 Takaaki Ishii,6 Takahisa Kyogoku,7 Takeshi Kato,8 Akihito Tsuji,9 Michiya Kobayashi101Gastrointestinal Cancer Center, Sano Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo, 2Department of Surgery, Kohka Public Hospital, Koka, Shiga, 3Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sakai City Medical Center, Sakai, Osaka, 4Department of Surgery, Hyogo Prefectural Nishinomiya Hospital, Nishinomiya, Hyogo, 5Department of Surgery, Seikei-kai Chiba M...

  3. Gastrointestinal permeability in ovarian cancer and breast cancer patients treated with paclitaxel and platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combination of platinum derivatives with paclitaxel is currently the standard front line regimen for patients with epithelial ovarian carcinoma, and represents also an active regimen in patients with metastatic breast or unknown primary carcinomas. Measurement of intestinal permeability represents one of the potential methods of noninvasive laboratory assessment of gastrointestinal mucositis induced by chemotherapy, but little is known about intestinal permeability in patients treated with paclitaxel or platinum. Intestinal permeability was assessed in 36 breast and ovarian cancer patients treated with paclitaxel/platinum combination by measuring, using capillary gas chromatography, urinary sucrose, lactulose, xylose and mannitol after oral challenge. The significance of differences during the therapy compared to pre-treatment values was studied by Wilcoxon paired test. The differences between groups of patient were studied by Mann-Whitney U test. Fisher exact test was used to compare the frequency in different subgroups. After administration of the first dose, a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in xylose absorption and increased lactulose/mannitol, sucrose/mannitol, lactulose/xylose and sucrose/xylose ratios were observed, but these parameters returned subsequently to pre-treatment levels. Patients who experienced serious (grade 3 or 4) toxicity had at baseline significantly lower percentages of xylose, mannitol and sucrose, and higher lactulose/mannitol ratio. Nine of 13 (69%) patients with baseline lactulose/mannitol ratio 0.070 or above experienced serious toxicity compared to 4 out of 23 patients (17%) with the ratio below 0.070 (p = 0.002). Post-treatment lactulose, lactulose/mannitol, sucrose/mannitol and lactulose/xylose ratios were significantly increased in patients with serious toxicity. A transient significant increase in lactulose/monosaccharide and sucrose/monosaccharide ratios was observed in ovarian and breast cancer patients treated with paclitaxel

  4. Radiation port cutaneous metastases: Reports of two patients whose recurrent visceral cancers presented as skin lesions at the site of previous radiation and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Spencer Hoyt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is associated with a variety of complications, including the development of primary skin cancers in the radiated region. However, it is rare for patients with visceral cancers who are treated with radiation therapy to subsequently develop cutaneous metastasis within the radiation port. We describe two patients with internal malignancies who developed cutaneous metastases within their radiation ports following radiotherapy. In addition, we used PubMed to perform an extensive literature review and identify additional reports of cutaneous metastasis within a radiation port. We excluded patients who developed melanoma or primary skin cancers in the radiation port. We also excluded patients with non-solid organ malignancies. Herein, we summarize the characteristics of 23 additional patients who experienced radiation port cutaneous metastases and explore possible mechanisms for the occurrence of radiation port cutaneous metastases.

  5. Rituximab plus fludarabine and cyclophosphamide prolongs progression-free survival compared with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide alone in previously treated chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robak, Tadeusz; Dmoszynska, Anna; Solal-Céligny, Philippe;

    2010-01-01

    Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody that targets the CD20 cell surface antigen, has clinical activity in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and other B-lymphocyte disorders when administered alone or in combination with chemotherapy. Promising results have previously been reported in nonrandomized...

  6. Current lifestyle of young adults treated for cancer in childhood.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, S E; Radford, M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look at the current lifestyle of young adult survivors of childhood cancer between the ages of 16 and 30 years to document their achievements and expose any psychosocial problems. Sixty six young adult survivors were contacted and asked if they and their siblings (16-30 years) would take part in a lifestyle study; 48 patients and 38 sibling controls were interviewed. This took the form of a structured lifestyle questionnaire, a self esteem questionnaire (Oxford Ps...

  7. Synchronous lung and gastric cancers successfully treated with carboplatin and pemetrexed: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lung and gastric cancers are the first and second leading causes of death from cancer worldwide, and are especially prevalent in Eastern Asia. Relatively few reports are available in relation to the treatment and outcome of synchronous lung and gastric cancers, although there are increasing numbers of patients with these cancers. Efforts to develop more effective drugs for the treatment of synchronous cancers, without serious adverse effects, have been intensifying. Pemetrexed, a multi-targeted antifolate enzyme inhibitor, was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as a first-line chemotherapy for advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer in 2007. Although clinical activity against several tumor types of adenocarcinoma, including gastric cancer, has been demonstrated, the efficacy of pemetrexed for gastric cancer remains to be fully evaluated. Case presentation We report a case involving a 62-year-old Japanese woman with synchronous locally-advanced poorly-differentiated lung adenocarcinoma and poorly-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma, containing signet-ring cells distinguished by immunohistochemical profiles. She had been treated with carboplatin and pemetrexed as a first-line chemotherapy for lung cancer, and had achieved partial responses for both lung and gastric cancers. These responses led to a favorable 12-month progression-free survival after the initiation of chemotherapy, and the patient is still alive more than 33 months after diagnosis. Conclusions This case suggests a new chemotherapeutic regimen for patients with synchronous multiple primary cancers that have an adenocarcinoma background.

  8. Current lifestyle of young adults treated for cancer in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S E; Radford, M

    1995-05-01

    The aim of this study was to look at the current lifestyle of young adult survivors of childhood cancer between the ages of 16 and 30 years to document their achievements and expose any psychosocial problems. Sixty six young adult survivors were contacted and asked if they and their siblings (16-30 years) would take part in a lifestyle study; 48 patients and 38 sibling controls were interviewed. This took the form of a structured lifestyle questionnaire, a self esteem questionnaire (Oxford Psychologists Press), and an unstructured interview. Fifty five per cent of patients achieved five or more A-C grades at 'O' level/GCSE compared with 62% of siblings and a national average of 30%. Despite that these patients were significantly less likely to go on to higher education than their siblings. The two groups were equally employable and earning similar salaries. There were three cases of known employer prejudice. A slightly higher percentage of patients than siblings had their driving licence. Seventeen patients felt their appearance had changed and eight felt that they had a residual physical mobility problem. Both groups were socially active and equally likely to partake in competitive sports. There was no overall difference in the self esteem of the two groups. In general the survivors of childhood cancer were coping well in their young adult life and achieving the same lifestyle goals as their siblings. However, significant problems have been identified. PMID:7618909

  9. Plants Against Cancer: A Review on Natural Phytochemicals in Preventing and Treating Cancers and Their Druggability

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hu; Khor, Tin Oo; Shu, Limin; Su, Zhengyuen; Fuentes, Francisco; Lee, Jong-Hun; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2012-01-01

    Cancer remains to be one of the leading causes of death in the United States and around the world. The advent of modern drug-targeted therapies has undeniably improved cancer patients’ cares. However, advanced metastasized cancer remains untreatable. Hence, continued searching for a safer and more effective chemoprevention and treatment is clearly needed for the improvement of the efficiency and to lower the treatment cost for cancer care. Cancer chemoprevention with natural phytochemical com...

  10. Intracranial hemorrhage in cancer patients treated with anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Matthew J; Uhlmann, Erik J; Zwicker, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-01

    Both venous thromboembolism and intracranial metastases are common complications in the setting of primary brain tumors and metastatic malignancies. Anticoagulation is indicated in the presence of cancer-associated thrombosis in order to limit the risk of pulmonary embolism; however, there is reluctance to initiate anticoagulation in the setting of intracranial metastatic disease due to potential for intracranial hemorrhage. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutic anticoagulation can be safely administered in the setting of metastatic brain tumors. This review examines the current understanding of the pathophysiology of intracranial hemorrhage in malignancy, describes the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of brain tumors with therapeutic anticoagulation, and outlines management strategies relevant to the treatment of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of anticoagulation. PMID:27067980

  11. Bilateral breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and definitive irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess whether patients with early stage bilateral breast cancer can be treated with definitive irradiation following breast-conserving surgery with acceptable survival, local control, complication rates, and cosmetic outcomes. Material and Methods: We reviewed 55 cases of patients with synchronous or sequential bilateral breast cancer treated with definitive irradiation following breast-conserving surgery at our institution from 1977 to 1992. Analysis of cases was limited to women who were AJCC clinical Stage 0, I, and II. The records of these 55 patients with 110 treated breasts were reviewed for tumor size, histology, AJCC stage, pathologic axillary lymph nodes status, first and overall site(s) of failure, and adjuvant chemotherapy or hormonal therapy. Analysis regarding matching technique, cosmetic outcome, and complication rate was also performed. The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS), no evidence of disease (NED) survival, relapse-free survival (RFS), and local control rates were evaluated. Twelve women (22%) presented with synchronous bilateral carcinoma, and 43 women (78%) had sequential bilateral carcinoma. Of the 12 patients with synchronous cancer, 5 received adjuvant chemotherapy, 2 received Tamoxifen, and 1 received both adjuvant therapies. Of the 43 patients with sequential cancer, 6 received chemotherapy, 1 received Tamoxifen, and 1 received both adjuvant therapies for the first cancer treatment; seven received chemotherapy and 6 received Tamoxifen for the second cancer treatment. Results: The median age at the time of treatment of the first cancer was 56 years (range 26-86 years). For the 12 patients with synchronous cancer, the median follow-up was 48 months (range 9-164). For the 43 patients with sequential cancer, the median follow-up was 112 months (range 52-188 months) after the first cancer, and 59 months (range 11-153 months) after the second. The median dose delivered was 64 Gy (range 42-72 Gy) using a combination of

  12. Prognostic Value of MicroRNAs in Preoperative Treated Rectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Azadeh Azizian; Ingo Epping; Frank Kramer; Peter Jo; Markus Bernhardt; Julia Kitz; Gabriela Salinas; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Marian Grade; Tim Beißbarth; B. Michael Ghadimi; Jochen Gaedcke

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer are treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection. Despite similar clinical parameters (uT2-3, uN+) and standard therapy, patients’ prognoses differ widely. A possible prediction of prognosis through microRNAs as biomarkers out of treatment-naïve biopsies would allow individualized therapy options. Methods: Microarray analysis of 45 microdissected preoperative biopsies from patients with rectal cancer was pe...

  13. Differential Expression of Gene Profiles in MRGX-treated Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon Yong-Kyun; Lee Seung-Yeul; Kang Hwan-Soo; Sung Jung-Suk; Cho Chong-Kwan; Yoo Hwa-Seung; Shin Seungjin; Choi Jong-Soon; Lee Yeon-Weol; Jang Ik-Soon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Modified regular ginseng extract (MRGX) has stronger anti-cancer activity-possessing gensenoside profiles. Methods: To investigate changes in gene expression in the MRGX-treated lung cancer cells (A549), we examined genomic data with cDNA microarray results. After completing the gene-ontology-based analysis, we grouped the genes into up-and down-regulated profiles and into ontology-related regulated genes and proteins through their interaction network. Results: One hundred n...

  14. Clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Fawad; Shafi, Azhar; Ali, Sheeraz; Siddiqui, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 200 patients undergoing first line chemotherapy with minimum of two cycles at inpatient department and chemotherapy bay of Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre Pakistan. Anticipatory nausea and vomiting develops before administration of chemotherapy. Clinical signs and symp...

  15. Body composition changes in females treated for breast cancer: a review of the evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Sheean, Patricia M.; Hoskins, Kent; Stolley, Melinda

    2012-01-01

    Body composition changes cannot be precisely captured using body weight or body mass index measures. Therefore, the primary purpose of this review was to characterize the patterns of body composition change in females treated for breast cancer including only studies that utilize imaging technologies to quantify adipose tissue and lean body mass (LBM). We reviewed PubMed for studies published between 1971–2012 involving females diagnosed with breast cancer where computed axial tomography (CAT)...

  16. Advances in Treating Metastatic Bone Cancer: Summary Statement for the First Cambridge Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Lipton, Allan; Berenson, James R; Body, Jean-Jacques; Boyce, Brendan F.; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Carducci, Michael A; Cleeland, Charles S.; Clohisy, Denis R.; Coleman, Robert E.; Cook, Richard J.; Guise, Theresa A.; Pearse, Roger N.; Powles, Trevor J; Rogers, Michael J; Roodman, G. David

    2006-01-01

    The First Cambridge Conference on Advances in Treating Metastatic Bone Cancer, a symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 28 to 29, 2005, was convened to discuss recent advances and research related to the natural history of bone metastases and skeletal complications, bone cancer biology, treatment of myeloma and other solid tumors, and treatment-induced bone loss. The conference format combined brief presentations with extended periods of discussion. The conclusions reached during...

  17. Swallowing assessment in early laryngeal cancer patients treated either with surgery or radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swallowing is a complex neuromuscular process that requires anatomical indemnity and an adequate coordination of several organs. Laryngeal cancer treatment may cause swallowing disorders. Traditionally, a high frequency of this type of disorder after surgery has been reported, but no actual data concerning its incidence in patients undergoing radiotherapy for early laryngeal cancer has been published. Aim. To compare swallowing disorders frequency posterior to treatment in early laryngeal cancer patients. Material and Method. Two groups of early laryngeal cancer patients were transversally studied, one treated with vertical partial surgery (CP), and the other treated exclusively with radiotherapy. Each patient had otorhinolaryngological, nasofibroscopic and video fluoroscopic evaluations after treatment. Differences between groups were compared using the -square test. Results. Twenty patients per group were entered in this study, predominantly males of similar age. Both groups presented a high incidence of aspiration symptoms (55% in RT and 35% in CP). There were no significant differences between both groups. Discussion and Conclusion. A high incidence of swallowing disorders in patients treated for early laryngeal cancer was found. It should then be considered as a frequent alteration in this group of patients, either treated with RT or CP

  18. A Case of Metastatic Bladder Cancer in Both Lungs Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Seong, Shin; Woo, Chang-Ryoul; Han, Jae-Bok

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This case report is aimed to investigate the effects of Korean medicine therapy (KMT) including oral herbal medicine and herb nebulizer therapy in treating metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs in August 2013. He refused any chemotherapy and was admitted to our hospital in a much progressed state on January 11, 2014. Since then, he was treated with KMT until May 17, 2014. The main oral herbal medicines wer...

  19. A Combination of Targeted Sunitinib Liposomes and Targeted Vinorelbine Liposomes for Treating Invasive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ji-Feng; Sun, Meng-Ge; Li, Xiu-Ying; Zhao, Yao; Ju, Rui-Jun; Mu, Li-Min; Yan, Yan; Li, Xue-Tao; Zeng, Fan; Lu, Wan-Liang

    2015-09-01

    Regular chemotherapy cannot eradicate invasive breast cancer cells and the residual cancer cells will form vasculogenic mimicry (VM) channels under hypoxic conditions to provide nutrients for cancer masses prior to angiogenesis. This phenomenon is a major reason for the recurrence of invasive breast cancer after treatment. In this study, a novel type of targeted liposomes was developed by modifying a mitochondria-tropic material, D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate- triphenylphosphine conjugate (TPGS1000-TPP), to encapsulate sunitinib and vinorelbine separately and a combination of the two targeted drug liposomes was used to treat invasive breast cancer as well as VM channels. Evaluations were performed in breast cancer MCF-7 cells and highly invasive breast cancer MDA-MB-435S cells in vitro and in mice. The results determined that the functional material (TPGS1000-TPP) and suitable size of the liposomes (90-100 nm) resulted in prolonged blood circulation, an enhanced permeability retention (EPR) effect in cancer tissue, and a mitochondrial targeting effect. Targeted drug liposomes were internalized via cellular uptake and accumulated in the mitochondria of invasive breast cancer cells or VM channel-forming cancer cells to induce acute cytotoxic injury and apoptosis. Activated apoptotic enzymes caspase 9 and caspase 3 as well as down-regulated VM channel-forming indicators (MMP-9, EphA2, VE-Cadherin, FAK and HIF-1α) contributed to significantly enhanced efficacy. Therefore, a combination of targeted sunitinib liposomes and targeted vinorelbine liposomes may provide an effective strategy for treating invasive breast cancer and prevent relapse arising from VM channels. PMID:26485927

  20. Higher caseload improves cervical cancer survival in patients treated with brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased caseload has been associated with better patient outcomes in many areas of health care, including high-risk surgery and cancer treatment. However, such a positive volume vs. outcome relationship has not yet been validated for cervical cancer brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between physician caseload and survival rates in cervical cancer treated with brachytherapy using population-based data. Between 2005 and 2010, a total of 818 patients were identified using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model and propensity scores was used to assess the relationship between 5-year survival rates and physician caseloads. As the caseload of individual physicians increased, unadjusted 5-year survival rates increased (P = 0.005). Using a Cox proportional hazard model, patients treated by high-volume physicians had better survival rates (P = 0.03), after adjusting for comorbidities, hospital type, and treatment modality. When analyzed by propensity score, the adjusted 5-year survival rate differed significantly between patients treated by high/medium-volume physicians vs. patients treated by low/medium-volume physicians (60% vs. 54%, respectively; P = 0.04). Provider caseload affected survival rates in cervical cancer patients treated with brachytherapy. Both Cox proportional hazard model analysis and propensity scores showed association between high/medium volume physicians and improved survival

  1. Paliperidone palmitate in non-acute patients with schizophrenia previously unsuccessfully treated with risperidone long-acting therapy or frequently used conventional depot antipsychotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmans, P; Cherubin, P; Keim, S; Llorca, P-M; Cosar, B; Petralia, A; Corrivetti, G; Hargarter, L

    2015-01-01

    PALMFlexS, a prospective multicentre, open-label, 6-month, phase IIIb interventional study, explored tolerability, safety and treatment response in adults (n = 231) with non-acute but symptomatic schizophrenia switching to flexibly dosed paliperidone palmitate (PP) after unsuccessful treatment with risperidone long-acting injectable therapy (RLAT) or conventional depot antipsychotics (APs). Treatment response was measured by change in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score from baseline (BL) to last-observation-carried-forward (LOCF) endpoint (EP). Safety and tolerability assessments included Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale (ESRS) total score and treatment-emergent adverse events. Significant reductions in mean PANSS total score were observed for all groups (−7.5 to −10.6; p ⩽ 0.01 [BL to LOCF EP]). After switching to PP, more than 50% of all patients achieved ⩾20% and one-third of RLAT-treated patients even achieved ⩾50% improvement in PANSS total score. Across groups, there were significant improvements (p < 0.05) in symptom severity as measured by Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S; trend for improvement with RLAT; p = 0.0568), subjective well-being, medication satisfaction, and patient functioning with PP. PP was generally well tolerated. Clinically relevant benefits were observed in non-acute patients with schizophrenia switched from RLAT or conventional depot APs to PP. PMID:25999398

  2. Paliperidone palmitate in non-acute patients with schizophrenia previously unsuccessfully treated with risperidone long-acting therapy or frequently used conventional depot antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, A; Bergmans, P; Cherubin, P; Keim, S; Llorca, P-M; Cosar, B; Petralia, A; Corrivetti, G; Hargarter, L

    2015-08-01

    PALMFlexS, a prospective multicentre, open-label, 6-month, phase IIIb interventional study, explored tolerability, safety and treatment response in adults (n = 231) with non-acute but symptomatic schizophrenia switching to flexibly dosed paliperidone palmitate (PP) after unsuccessful treatment with risperidone long-acting injectable therapy (RLAT) or conventional depot antipsychotics (APs). Treatment response was measured by change in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score from baseline (BL) to last-observation-carried-forward (LOCF) endpoint (EP). Safety and tolerability assessments included Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale (ESRS) total score and treatment-emergent adverse events. Significant reductions in mean PANSS total score were observed for all groups (-7.5 to -10.6; p ⩽ 0.01 [BL to LOCF EP]). After switching to PP, more than 50% of all patients achieved ⩾20% and one-third of RLAT-treated patients even achieved ⩾50% improvement in PANSS total score. Across groups, there were significant improvements (p < 0.05) in symptom severity as measured by Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S; trend for improvement with RLAT; p = 0.0568), subjective well-being, medication satisfaction, and patient functioning with PP. PP was generally well tolerated. Clinically relevant benefits were observed in non-acute patients with schizophrenia switched from RLAT or conventional depot APs to PP. PMID:25999398

  3. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Metastasis to the Orbit in a Coinfected HIV+ HBV+ Patient Previously Treated with Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guerriero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma rarely metastasizes to the orbit. We report a 45-year-old male, HBV+, HIV+, with a past history of a liver transplant for ELSD (end-stage liver disease with hepatocellular carcinoma and recurrent HCC, who presented with proptosis and diplopia of the left eye. CT scans of the head revealed a large, irregular mass in the left orbit causing superior and lateral destruction of the orbital bone. Biopsy specimens of the orbital tumor showed features of metastatic foci of hepatocellular carcinoma. Only 16 other cases of HCC metastasis to the orbit have been described in literature, and this is the first case in a previously transplanted HIV+, HBV+ patient.

  4. Acupuncture in Treating Dry Mouth Caused By Radiation Therapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Acupuncture may help relieve dry mouth caused by radiation therapy. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying to see how well one set of acupuncture points work in comparison to a different set of acupuncture points or standard therapy in treating dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. |

  5. A genomic and transcriptomic approach for a differential diagnosis between primary and secondary ovarian carcinomas in patients with a previous history of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distinction between primary and secondary ovarian tumors may be challenging for pathologists. The purpose of the present work was to develop genomic and transcriptomic tools to further refine the pathological diagnosis of ovarian tumors after a previous history of breast cancer. Sixteen paired breast-ovary tumors from patients with a former diagnosis of breast cancer were collected. The genomic profiles of paired tumors were analyzed using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Mapping 50 K Xba Array or Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 (for one pair), and the data were normalized with ITALICS (ITerative and Alternative normaLIzation and Copy number calling for affymetrix Snp arrays) algorithm or Partek Genomic Suite, respectively. The transcriptome of paired samples was analyzed using Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays, and the data were normalized with gc-Robust Multi-array Average (gcRMA) algorithm. A hierarchical clustering of these samples was performed, combined with a dataset of well-identified primary and secondary ovarian tumors. In 12 of the 16 paired tumors analyzed, the comparison of genomic profiles confirmed the pathological diagnosis of primary ovarian tumor (n = 5) or metastasis of breast cancer (n = 7). Among four cases with uncertain pathological diagnosis, genomic profiles were clearly distinct between the ovarian and breast tumors in two pairs, thus indicating primary ovarian carcinomas, and showed common patterns in the two others, indicating metastases from breast cancer. In all pairs, the result of the transcriptomic analysis was concordant with that of the genomic analysis. In patients with ovarian carcinoma and a previous history of breast cancer, SNP array analysis can be used to distinguish primary and secondary ovarian tumors. Transcriptomic analysis may be used when primary breast tissue specimen is not available

  6. Evaluating predictive pharmacogenetic signatures of adverse events in colorectal cancer patients treated with fluoropyrimidines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Jennings

    Full Text Available The potential clinical utility of genetic markers associated with response to fluoropyrimidine treatment in colorectal cancer patients remains controversial despite extensive study. Our aim was to test the clinical validity of both novel and previously identified markers of adverse events in a broad clinical setting. We have conducted an observational pharmacogenetic study of early adverse events in a cohort study of 254 colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. Sixteen variants of nine key folate (pharmacodynamic and drug metabolising (pharmacokinetic enzymes have been analysed as individual markers and/or signatures of markers. We found a significant association between TYMP S471L (rs11479 and early dose modifications and/or severe adverse events (adjusted OR = 2.02 [1.03; 4.00], p = 0.042, adjusted OR = 2.70 [1.23; 5.92], p = 0.01 respectively. There was also a significant association between these phenotypes and a signature of DPYD mutations (Adjusted OR = 3.96 [1.17; 13.33], p = 0.03, adjusted OR = 6.76 [1.99; 22.96], p = 0.002 respectively. We did not identify any significant associations between the individual candidate pharmacodynamic markers and toxicity. If a predictive test for early adverse events analysed the TYMP and DPYD variants as a signature, the sensitivity would be 45.5 %, with a positive predictive value of just 33.9 % and thus poor clinical validity. Most studies to date have been under-powered to consider multiple pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variants simultaneously but this and similar individualised data sets could be pooled in meta-analyses to resolve uncertainties about the potential clinical utility of these markers.

  7. Eight-year survival after advanced gastric cancer treated with S-1 followed by surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susumu; Hijioka; Keisho; Chin; Yasuyuki; Seto; Noriko; Yamamoto; Kiyohiko; Hatake

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of advanced gastric cancer, with cervical, axillary, and abdominal paraaortic lymph node metastases, that was successfully treated with chemotherapy and surgery. The disease was initially considered unresectable, and the patient was treated with orally administered S-1. Chemotherapy was effective, and all lymph node metastases disappeared after 6 courses. After 27 mo of chemotherapy, the patient underwent curative surgery, with subtotal gastrectomy and lymph node dissection. Histopathologic...

  8. Radiotherapy in the cavum cancer: analysis of 30 cases treated in our institution in Beirut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe the results obtained for nasopharyngeal cancers treated by irradiation, exclusively or in combination with chemotherapy. They also assess the impact of the different pathological and clinic variables on survival without relapse. The study is based on a sample of 30 patients treated between 1999 and 2009. Local control, metastatic dissemination, and toxicity are analysed and discussed. A ganglionary extension seems to be the worst prognostic factor. Short communication

  9. Gene expression profile of colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, A; Francis, P; Nilbert, M; Svanvik, J; Sun, X-F

    2010-01-01

    the incidence in fact has increased. To improve chemotherapy and enable personalised treatment, the need of biomarkers is of great significance. In this study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of the colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38, the active metabolite of topoisomerase-1......Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the industrial countries. Due to advances regarding the treatments, primarily development of improved surgical methods and the ability to make the earlier diagnosis, the mortality has remained constant during the past decades even though...

  10. Gene expression profile of colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, A; Francis, P; Nilbert, M;

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the industrial countries. Due to advances regarding the treatments, primarily development of improved surgical methods and the ability to make the earlier diagnosis, the mortality has remained constant during the past decades even though...... the incidence in fact has increased. To improve chemotherapy and enable personalised treatment, the need of biomarkers is of great significance. In this study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of the colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38, the active metabolite of topoisomerase-1...

  11. External validation of nomograms for predicting cancer-specific mortality in penile cancer patients treated with definitive surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Zhu; Wei-Jie Gu; Ding-Wei Ye; Xu-Dong Yao; Shi-Lin Zhang; Bo Dai; Hai-Liang Zhang; Yi-Jun Shen

    2014-01-01

    Using a population-based cancer registry, Thuret et al. developed 3 nomograms for estimating cancer-specific mortality in men with penile squamous cell carcinoma. In the initial cohort, only 23.0% of the patients were treated with inguinal lymphadenectomy and had pN stage. To generalize the prediction models in clinical practice, we evaluated the performance of the 3 nomograms in a series of penile cancer patients who were treated with definitive surgery. Clinicopathologic information was obtained from 160 M0 penile cancer patients who underwent primary tumor excision and regional lymphadenectomy between 1990 and 2008. The predicted probabilities of cancer-specific mortality were calculated from 3 nomograms that were based on different disease stage definitions and tumor grade. Discrimination, calibration, and clinical usefulness were assessed to compare model performance. The discrimination ability was similar in nomograms using the TNM classification or American Joint Committee on Cancer staging (Harrell’s concordance index = 0.817 and 0.832, respectively), whereas it was inferior for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results staging (Harrel ’s concordance index = 0.728). Better agreement with the observed cancer-specific mortality was shown for the model consisting of TNM classification and tumor grade, which also achieved favorable clinical net benefit, with a threshold probability in the range of 0 to 42%. The nomogram consisting of TNM classification and tumor grading was shown to have better performance for predicting cancer-specific mortality in penile cancer patients who underwent definitive surgery. Our data support the integration of this model in decision-making and trial design.

  12. Analysis of oral cancer treated by preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-eight patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral region, treated by preoperative radiotherapy between January 1988 and December 1993, were reviewed to evaluate the relation between prognosis and pathological findings after preoperative radiotherapy. All patients underwent external radiotherapy of up to 40 Gy in 16 fractions (2.5 Gy a day, 4 fractions a week) before surgery, and the average term from the end of preoperative radiotherapy to surgery were 27.3 days. According to pathological findings during surgery, the patients were divided into a radiation effective group and a radiation noneffective group. There was a significant difference in the survival rates of the two groups, but there was no difference in local control rates. After surgery, regional lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis were more common in the radiation noneffective group than in the radiation effective group. It was considered that regional lymph node metastasis after treatment in the noneffective group is the determining factor in the progress. (author)

  13. Yttrium-90 used to treat colon cancer: Awaiting investigational new drug approval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new radiation treatment takes just 14 to 21 days to shrink colorectal tumors in laboratory mice, is under review for clinical trials with human cancer patients. The treatment has succeeded in reducing the size of tumors by up to 95%. Colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the US, is extremely difficult to treat unless it is detected early enough for surgical procedures. In laboratory tests over the last 5 years, a team of researchers has developed the treatment using yttrium-90. The yttrium-90 is transported to the tumors by attaching it to monoclonal antibodies that seek out the cancer cells. Once the radioisotope has been targeted to the tumor, the radiation destroys many of the cells, dramatically reducing the size of the tumor. Since this treatment usually does not completely eliminate all the cancer cells, it cannot be called a cure, but it does seem to be an effective method of shrinking colorectal tumors

  14. Predictive value of bcl-2 immunoreactivity in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Recent experimental evidence suggests that overexpression of bcl-2, a protein functioning by blocking apoptosis, may influence the treatment outcome in human tumours, including prostate cancer. To test the clinical implications of this hypothesis, tumours from patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were investigated for bcl-2 immunoreactivity (IR) and correlated with prognosis and treatment outcome. Materials and methods: Bcl-2 IR was evaluated in archival tumour specimens obtained through transurethral resection from 42 patients with localized prostate cancer (T0-T4, N0 and M0). Bcl-2 IR expression was related to stage, grade and cancer-specific survival. Specimens were obtained prior to administrating routine radiotherapy for all patients. Results: Bcl-2 IR was present in 19/42 (45%) tumours. The bcl-2-positive patients had a significantly longer cancer-specific survival than the bcl-2-negative patients (10.3 versus 3.4 years, P<0.04). At follow-up (7-19 years), nine patients were still alive, 26 patients had died of prostate cancer and seven patients had died of other causes. Conclusions: This study indicates that pre-treatment bcl-2 overexpression is related to a favourable outcome in prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy. Low bcl-2 along with a high stage may be a predictor of poor prognosis and these patients might benefit from additional treatment. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. A novel combination of Chinese medicines to treat advanced cancers and lymphomas in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waterhouse Dawn N

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chinese medicine often targets more than one system and as such comprises several compounds, often in non-purified form, with treatments therefore consisting of whole extracts of herbs rather than isolated compounds. The additive and synergistic effects of the phytochemicals in OMN54, a novel mixture of extracts from three commonly used Chinese medicine components; Ganoderma lucidum, Salvia miltiorrhiza and Scutellaria barbata, were previously demonstrated to have potent anti-cancer activity. This study aims to test whether this heterogeneous, multifunctional and multitargeted agent has an acceptable toxicity profile. Methods We conducted preliminary and formal preclinical tolerability determination of OMN54 in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the preliminary study rats were given OMN54 by oral feeding daily for 14 days at doses of 1000 mg/kg, 1750 mg/kg, 2500 mg/kg or 3000 mg/kg per day. A subsequent daily dosing (x 28, 60, 120 or 180 formal toxicology study was conducted in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at a dose of single dose of 2000 mg/kg/day. Results Significant body weight loss was noted in one of the rats treated at 3000 mg/kg/day, with decline beginning study day 11. This animal experienced mild GI toxicity in the form of diarrhoea. Gross observation indicated kidney damage (pale kidneys in both this group and in one rat treated at 2500 mg/kg/day. For the later studies, no body weight loss was noted over the course of the study. Blood counts and chemistry were not substantially altered following administration of OMN54, nor were there any findings on histological assessment of organs. Conclusion OMN54 was found to be well tolerated in rat models. OMN54 did not cause any microscopic, anatomic or pathologic changes in exposed animals at the concentrations and under the conditions employed in this study.

  16. Risk for second primary non-breast cancer in pre- and postmenopausal women with breast cancer not treated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or endocrine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langballe, Rikke; Olsen, Hans Jørgen; Andersson, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the risk for a second primary cancer in pre- and postmenopausal women with breast cancer treated by surgery alone, to assess the importance of non-treatment factors and menopausal status.......We investigated the risk for a second primary cancer in pre- and postmenopausal women with breast cancer treated by surgery alone, to assess the importance of non-treatment factors and menopausal status....

  17. Accelerated hyperfractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent/unresectable rectal cancer in patients with previous pelvic irradiation: results of a phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to investigate the local effects and toxicity of accelerated hyperfractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent/unresectable rectal cancer in patients with previous pelvic irradiation. Twenty-two patients with recurrent/unresectable rectal cancer who previously received pelvic irradiation were enrolled in our single-center trial between January 2007 and August 2012. Reirradiation was scheduled for up to 39 Gy in 30 fractions using intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose was delivered via a hyperfractionation schedule of 1.3 Gy twice daily. Patient follow-up was performed by clinical examination, CT/MRI, or PET/CT every 3 months for the first 2 years and every 6 months thereafter. Tumor response was evaluated 1 month after reirradiation by CT/MRI based on the RECIST criteria. Adverse events were assessed using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) common toxicity criteria (version 3.0). The median time from the end of the initial radiation therapy to reirradiation was 30 months (range, 18-93 months). Overall local responses were observed in 9 patients (40.9%). None of the patients achieved a complete response (CR), and 9 patients (40.9%) had a partial response (PR). Thirteen patients failed to achieve a clinical response: 12 (54.5%) presented with stable disease (SD) and 1 (4.5%) with progressive disease (PD). Among all the patients who underwent reirradiation, partial or complete symptomatic relief was achieved in 6 patients (27.3%) and 13 patients (59.1%), respectively. Grade 4 acute toxicity and treatment-related deaths were not observed. The following grade 3 acute toxicities were observed: diarrhea (2 patients, 9.1%), cystitis (1 patient, 4.5%), dermatitis (1 patient, 4.5%), and intestinal obstruction (1 patient, 4.5%). Late toxicity was infrequent. Chronic severe diarrhea, small bowel obstruction, and dysuria were observed in 2 (9.1%), 1 (4.5%) and 2 (9.1%) of the patients, respectively. This study showed that

  18. CDC25A Protein Stability Represents a Previously Unrecognized Target of HER2 Signaling in Human Breast Cancer: Implication for a Potential Clinical Relevance in Trastuzumab Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Brunetto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The CDC25A-CDK2 pathway has been proposed as critical for the oncogenic action of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 in mammary epithelial cells. In particular, transgenic expression of CDC25A cooperates with HER2 in promoting mammary tumors, whereas CDC25A hemizygous loss attenuates the HER2-induced tumorigenesis penetrance. On the basis of this evidence of a synergism between HER2 and the cell cycle regulator CDC25A in a mouse model of mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated the role of CDC25A in human HER2-positive breast cancer and its possible implications in therapeutic response. HER2 status and CDC25A expression were assessed in 313 breast cancer patients and we found statistically significant correlation between HER2 and CDC25A (P = .007. Moreover, an HER2-positive breast cancer subgroup with high levels of CDC25A and very aggressive phenotype was identified (P = .005. Importantly, our in vitro studies on breast cancer cell lines showed that the HER2 inhibitor efficacy on cell growth and viability relied also on CDC25A expression and that such inhibition induces CDC25A down-regulation through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway and DNA damage response activation. In line with this observation, we found a statistical significant association between CDC25A overexpression and trastuzumab-combined therapy response rate in two different HER2-positive cohorts of trastuzumab-treated patients in either metastatic or neoadjuvant setting (P = .018 for the metastatic cohort and P = .021 for the neoadjuvant cohort. Our findings highlight a link between HER2 and CDC25A that positively modulates HER2- targeted therapy response, suggesting that, in HER2-positive breast cancer patients, CDC25A overexpression affects trastuzumab sensitivity.

  19. Evaluation of response from axitinib per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors versus Choi criteria in previously treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Nott, Louise; Joshi, Abhishek; Kannourakis, George; Tarazi, Jamal; Alam, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    efficacy profiles of axitinib were consistent with reports from previous studies in patients with mRCC, and patients generally maintained QoL. The sizeable difference observed in objective response rate by RECIST versus Choi criteria merits further research.

  20. Gemcitabine and capecitabine for heavily pre-treated metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke F;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: We investigated the efficacy and safety of capecitabine and gemcitabin (GemCap) in heavily pre-treated, therapy-resistant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients and the clinical importance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) measurement. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients' inclusion criteria included...

  1. Delayed biological effects of radiotherapy in 500 patients treated for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of cancer of the uterine cervix is high in Ecuador, accounting for 45% of all cancer cases and 60% of cancer cases in women. This study considers the delayed biological effects of radiotherapy in 500 patients out of 3200 treated between 1957 and 1972. In spite of the large number of patients treated, it was possible to follow up only 500 cases because a large proportion were in stage IV of the disease and many did not return for clinical check-up. Therefore a report is made on a study of 500 cases, considering a survival of at least five years. The study shows what were the delayed biological effects of radiation treatment and also the frequency and chronology of the appearance of lesions. The following sequelae are studied: severe sclerosis of the skin and subcutaneous cell tissue, whether or not followed by necrosis; chronic oedema of the lower extremities which is conducive to the recurring phenomena of infection in those organs; damage to the pelvic girdle; coxo-femoral osteoarthrosis and necrosis of the femur head; fracture of the neck of the femur and the pubis; serious lesions in the bladder and in the rectosigmoid; radiation cancer. The patients in question were treated regularly and always by the same technique; it is therefore possible to know the relation between these lesions and the following factors: tumour dose administered; radiation quality; mode of treatment (radiation therapy, alone or associated, before or after surgery); age of the patients treated. (author)

  2. TheraBite exercises to treat trismus secondary to head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Beurskens, Carien H. G.; Reintsema, Harry; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of TheraBite exercises on mouth opening and to analyze factors influencing this effect in a patient record evaluation. Effect of exercises with a TheraBite to treat trismus was evaluated in 69 head and neck cancer patients of two university medical ce

  3. Neurodevelopmental Outcome of Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated at the Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, D; Bodkyn, C; Ramcharan, J

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the neurodevelopmental outcome of childhood cancer survivors treated at the Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex (EWMSC). Methods: Study participants were children treated at EWMSC from January 2003 to March 31, 2012 for various childhood cancers. All had completed treatment and were in remission. The McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities (MSCA) was administered. The study was conducted from December 2011 to March 31, 2012. Results: Twenty-six children were evaluated, a response rate of 74%. There were 12 males and 14 females. Ages ranged from 3.25 to 9.00 years. Four (15.4%) children scored a general cognitive index (GCI) 132. The children's mean estimated mental age was found to be significantly lower than their mean actual age (p = 0.0086). Children treated for solid tumours had the least difference between their actual ages and estimated mental ages (p = 0.0301). The mean GCI for the genders was 97.4 for females and 81.0 for males; this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0302). Age at diagnosis, type and length of treatment were not found to significantly affect development. Conclusion: The paediatric cancer survivors in this survey were found to have delays in their development. This group of children should have their development closely monitored. This would ensure that any delays in development can be discovered early and appropriate interventions instituted, so that childhood cancer survivors are adequately prepared for adult life beyond cancer. PMID:25803371

  4. Breast Retraction Assessment: an objective evaluation of cosmetic results of patients treated conservatively for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast Retraction Assessment (BRA) is an objective evaluation of the amount of cosmetic retraction of the treated breast in comparison to the untreated breast in patients who receive conservative treatment for breast cancer. A clear acrylic sheet supported vertically and marked as a grid at 1 cm intervals is employed to perform the measurements. Average BRA value in 29 control patients without breast cancer was 1.2 cm. Average BRA value in 27 patients treated conservatively for clinical Stage I or II unilateral breast cancer was 3.7 cm. BRA values in breast cancer patients ranged from 0.0 to 8.5 cm. Patients who received a local radiation boost to the primary tumor bed site had statistically significantly less retraction than those who did not receive a boost. Patients who had an extensive primary tumor resection had statistically significantly more retraction than those who underwent a more limited resection. In comparison to qualitative forms of cosmetic analysis, BRA is an objective test that can quantitatively evaluate factors which may be related to cosmetic retraction in patients treated conservatively for breast cancer

  5. Progress in Using Combination of Chinese Drug with Chemotherapy to Treat Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺用和

    2004-01-01

    @@ Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat diseases including cancer in China for several thousand years. TCM holds that the pathogenesis of cancer lies mainly in deficiency of vital qi, accumulation of cold, stagnation of qi, obstruction of phlegm, blood stasis, retention of toxic heat, and that the therapeutic principles for cancer should be mainly to strengthen body resistance and restore normal function (mainly by strengthening the spleen and nourishing the kidney), to warm yang and disperse cold, to soothe the liver and regulate qi circulation, to resolve phlegm and dispel retained water, to promote blood circulation and remove blood stasis, to clear away heat and remove toxicity, to resolve hard mass and to treat malignant or poisoning diseases with poisonous drugs.

  6. The Application of Nuclear Technologies to Detect and Treat Cancer and Other Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobacco is a Weapon of Mass Destruction. It is arguable that, as smoking is by far the major cause of cancer, the most effective action in the fight against it would be to prosecute the chief executives of the major tobacco companies with charges of genocide, mass extermination and crimes against humanity. But there are also other cancers which are not related to addiction. These deserve our best technical and scientific skills to detect and treat. This talk will detail recent advances in the use of nuclear and radiation technologies to both detect and to treat cancer and other malignancies. The examples given will mostly be from current clinical practice in our iThemba LABS near Cape Town, South Africa and from plans we are currently promoting for new facilities

  7. Defining AML and MDS second cancer risk dynamics after diagnoses of first cancers treated or not with radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radivoyevitch, T; Sachs, R K; Gale, R P; Molenaar, R J; Brenner, D J; Hill, B T; Kalaycio, M E; Carraway, H E; Mukherjee, S; Sekeres, M A; Maciejewski, J P

    2016-02-01

    Risks of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and/or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are known to increase after cancer treatments. Their rise-and-fall dynamics and their associations with radiation have, however, not been fully characterized. To improve risk definition we developed SEERaBomb R software for Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results second cancer analyses. Resulting high-resolution relative risk (RR) time courses were compared, where possible, to results of A-bomb survivor analyses. We found: (1) persons with prostate cancer receiving radiation therapy have increased RR of AML and MDS that peak in 1.5-2.5 years; (2) persons with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), lung and breast first cancers have the highest RR for AML and MDS over the next 1-12 years. These increased RR are radiation specific for lung and breast cancer but not for NHL; (3) AML latencies were brief compared to those of A-bomb survivors; and (4) there was a marked excess risk of acute promyelocytic leukemia in persons receiving radiation therapy. Knowing the type of first cancer, if it was treated with radiation, the interval from first cancer diagnosis to developing AML or MDS, and the type of AML, can improve estimates of whether AML or MDS cases developing in this setting are due to background versus other processes. PMID:26460209

  8. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of indomethacin-treated human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Li Cheng; Gui-Ying Zhang; Zhi-Qiang Xiao; Fa-Qing Tang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To establish the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) profiles of indomethacin (IN)-treated human colon cancer cell line HCT116, and to provide a new way to study its anti-tumor molecular mechanism through analyzing a variety of protein maps.METHODS: Two-DE profiles of HCT116 were established in IN-treated and untreated groups. Total proteins were separated by immobilized pH gradient-based 2-DE. The gels were stained by silver, scanned by ImageScanner,and analyzed with Image Master software.RESULTS: Clear background, well-resolved and reproducible 2-DE patterns of HCT116 cells were acquired in IN-treated and untreated group. The average deviation of spot position was 0.896±0.177 mm in IEF direction and 1.106±0.289 mm in SDS-PAGE direction respectively. In IN-treated group,1 169±36 spots were detected and 1 061±32 spots were matched, the average matching rate was 90.6% in three gels. In untreated group, 1 256±50 spots were detected and 1 168±46 spots were matched, the average matching rate was 93.0% in three gels. Forty-five differential protein spots were displayed between IN-treated and untreated groups. Of which, 34 protein spots decreased and 9showed higher expression in IN-treated group, and only two protein spots showed an expression in untreated cells.CONCLUSION: Two-DE profiles of IN-treated and untreated HCT116 cells were established. Apparent 45 different protein spots were detected in IN-treated and untreated HCT116 cells. The analysis on differential protein spots may serve as a new way to study the molecule mechanism of IN-treated colon cancer.

  9. A peptide against soluble guanylyl cyclase α1: a new approach to treating prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Gao

    Full Text Available Among the many identified androgen-regulated genes, sGCα1 (soluble guanylyl cyclase α1 appears to play a pivotal role in mediating the pro-cancer effects of androgens and androgen receptor. The classical role for sGCα1 is to heterodimerize with the sGCβ1 subunit, forming sGC, the enzyme that mediates nitric oxide signaling by catalyzing the synthesis of cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Our published data show that sGCα1 can drive prostate cancer cell proliferation independent of hormone and provide cancer cells a pro-survival function, via a novel mechanism for p53 inhibition, both of which are independent of sGCβ1, NO, and cGMP. All of these properties make sGCα1 an important novel target for prostate cancer therapy. Thus, peptides were designed targeting sGCα1 with the aim of disrupting this protein's pro-cancer activities. One peptide (A-8R was determined to be strongly cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells, rapidly inducing apoptosis. Cytotoxicity was observed in both hormone-dependent and, significantly, hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells, opening the possibility that this peptide can be used to treat the usually lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer. In mouse xenograft studies, Peptide A-8R was able to stop tumor growth of not only hormone-dependent cells, but most importantly from hormone-independent cells. In addition, the mechanism of Peptide A cytotoxicity is generation of reactive oxygen species, which recently have been recognized as a major mode of action of important cancer drugs. Thus, this paper provides strong evidence that targeting an important AR-regulated gene is a new paradigm for effective prostate cancer therapy.

  10. Evaluation of quality of life and psychological response in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the quality of life (QOL) and mental condition of patients being treated for cancer is now recognized. In this study, we evaluated QOL and mental condition in patients with cancer before and after radiotherapy. The subjects were 170 patients who had undergone radiotherapy. The examination of QOL was performed using the quality of life questionnaire for cancer patients treated with anticancer drugs (QOL-ACD), and mental condition (anxiety and depression) was examined using the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). These examinations were performed at the start of radiotherapy and immediately after radiotherapy. The QOL score was slightly higher in all patients after the completion of radiotherapy than before the start of radiotherapy. In the palliative radiotherapy group, QOL score was significantly improved by treatment. Anxiety and depression were improved after radiotherapy. There was a correlation between the degrees of improvement of the HADS and QOL score. We could treat cancer patients by radiotherapy without reducing their QOL, and improvement in QOL was significant in the palliative radiotherapy group. Mental condition was also improved after radiotherapy. (author)

  11. Physician response to financial incentives when choosing drugs to treat breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Andrew J; Johnson, Scott J

    2012-12-01

    This paper considers physician agency in choosing drugs to treat metastatic breast cancer, a clinical setting in which patients have few protections from physicians' rent seeking. Physicians have explicit financial incentives attached to each potential drug treatment, with profit margins ranging more than a hundred fold. SEER-Medicare claims and Medispan pricing data were formed into a panel of 4,503 patients who were diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer and treated with anti-cancer drugs from 1992 to 2002. We analyzed the effects of product attributes, including profit margin, randomized controlled trial citations, FDA label, generic status, and other covariates on therapy choice. Instruments and drug fixed effects were used to control for omitted variables and possible measurement error associated with margin. We find that increasing physician margin by 10% yields between an 11 and 177% increase in the likelihood of drug choice on average across drugs. Physicians were more likely to use drugs with which they had experience, had more citations, and were FDA-approved to treat breast cancer. Oncologists are susceptible to financial incentives when choosing drugs, though other factors play a large role in their choice of drug. PMID:23124970

  12. Differential Expression of Gene Profiles in MRGX-treated Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Yong-Kyun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Modified regular ginseng extract (MRGX has stronger anti-cancer activity-possessing gensenoside profiles. Methods: To investigate changes in gene expression in the MRGX-treated lung cancer cells (A549, we examined genomic data with cDNA microarray results. After completing the gene-ontology-based analysis, we grouped the genes into up-and down-regulated profiles and into ontology-related regulated genes and proteins through their interaction network. Results: One hundred nine proteins that were up- and down-regulated by MRGX were queried by using IPA. IL8, MMP7 and PLAUR and were found to play a major role in the anti-cancer activity in MRGX-treated lung cancer cells. These results were validated using a Western blot analysis and a semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis. Conclusions: Most MRGX-responsive genes are up-regulated transiently in A549 cells, but down-regulated in a sustained manner in lung cancer cells.

  13. Gene expression signatures that predict outcome of tamoxifen-treated estrogen receptor-positive, high-risk, primary breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Maria B; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Tan, Qihua;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tamoxifen significantly improves outcome for estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer, but the 15-year recurrence rate remains 30%. The aim of this study was to identify gene profiles that accurately predicted the outcome of ER+ breast cancer patients who received adjuvant...... Tamoxifen mono-therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Post-menopausal breast cancer patients diagnosed no later than 2002, being ER+ as defined by >1% IHC staining and having a frozen tumor sample with >50% tumor content were included. Tumor samples from 108 patients treated with adjuvant Tamoxifen were......-parametric bootstrap (1000x re-sampling). The optimal profiles were further examined in 5 previously-reported datasets containing similar patient populations that were either treated with Tamoxifen or left untreated (n = 623). Three gene signatures were identified, the strongest being a 2-gene combination of BCL2-CDKN...

  14. Analysis of 5-year survivors of esophageal cancer treated with radiation and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1967 to 1980, 240 cases of esophageal cancer, consisting of 153 curative and 87 palliative cases, were treated with a combination of radiation and chemotherapy. The five-year survival rate in 124 curative cases given a dose of more than 50 Gy was 12.9 %, and 17 cases survived more than 5 years. In the 5-year survivors, T1 in the advancement of tumors, less than 7 cm in length, and cancer of both the serrated and tumorous types were characteristic factors, indicating a good prognosis. These cases were irradiated with a dose of 60 - 70 Gy and the tumors showed a high response to irradiation. (author)

  15. Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten Riis; Bødtger, Uffe

    Introduction: Compared to incidentally found lung cancer, the presence of symptoms (eg. cough, haemoptysis, pain, weight loss) at diagnosis is associated with a 50% reduction in median survival. In surgically treated patients, it is unknown whether presence of symptoms has prognostic significance...... higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (23% vs. 12%), and in patients with former malignancy compared to patients with no former cancer (17% vs. 16%). Discussion: Symptoms at diagnosis per se appear unrelated to mortality in patients with NSCLC referred for surgery. Asymptomatic patients were...

  16. Efficacy of a preservative-free formulation of fixed-combination bimatoprost and timolol (Ganfort PF in treatment-naïve patients vs previously treated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordeiro MF

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available M Francesca Cordeiro,1 Ivan Goldberg,2 Rhett Schiffman,3 Paula Bernstein,3 Marina Bejanian31Western Eye Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK; 2Discipline of Ophthalmology, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USAPurpose: To evaluate, using subgroup analysis, the effect of treatment status on the intraocular pressure (IOP-lowering efficacy of a preservative-free formulation of fixed-combination bimatoprost 0.03%/timolol 0.5% (FCBT PF.Methods: A primary, multicenter, randomized, double-masked, 12-week study compared the efficacy and safety of FCBT PF with preserved FCBT (Ganfort® in 561 patients diagnosed with glaucoma or ocular hypertension. For this analysis, eligible patients were treatment-naïve or had inadequate IOP lowering and underwent a washout of previous treatment. IOP (8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm was measured at baseline and weeks 2, 6, and 12. Subgroup analysis of the FCBT PF arm assessed changes in average eye IOP from baseline in treatment-naïve vs previously treated patients. To evaluate the effect of treatment status at baseline (treatment-naïve vs previously treated on IOP reduction in the FCBT PF treatment group, an analysis of covariance model was used with treatment status and investigator as fixed effects, and baseline average eye IOP, age, glaucoma diagnosis, and baseline average eye corneal thickness as covariates. P-values and the 95% confidence intervals were determined using the model.Results: In the FCBT PF arm, IOP mean changes from baseline ranged from -8.7 mmHg to -9.8 mmHg in treatment-naïve patients (N=50, compared with -7.3 mmHg to -8.5 mmHg in previously treated patients (N=228. Baseline IOP, age, glaucoma diagnosis, and corneal thickness significantly affected IOP reduction in the FCBT PF group. Adjusting for these covariates, FCBT PF had a greater IOP-lowering effect (0.8–1.7 mmHg in treatment-naïve patients than previously treated patients

  17. Epidemiological analysis of patients with prostate cancer treated with proton beams at LLUMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The James M. Slater, M.D. Proton Therapy Treatment and Research Center of the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) has treated more than 15,000 patients with proton beams since its inception in 1990, and it is responsible for the majority of patients treated with protons in a hospital setting. Moreover, it is one of only a few institutions with approval by the Federal Drug Administration to treat patients with dynamically scanned proton beams with such beams available presently for experimentation at LLUMC. These features place LLUMC in a unique position for determining improved estimates of outcomes and risks associated with proton therapy including more precise risk estimates for second cancers in patients treated with active or passive proton delivery systems An ancillary benefit in the context of establishing the risks of doses in medical applications is that it would provide a much more solid basis for the estimation of effective doses and the application of microdosimetric spectral analyses to such risk estimations. Such results are important as both the number of institutions treating with protons and the number of patients treated with protons will be increasing rapidly over the next few years. The LLUMC prostate cancer group is the largest and most homogeneously treated proton patient group at the facility and has the potential for yielding risk estimates of secondary cancers with reasonable uncertainty, as will be discussed in this presentation. The total dose and dose per fraction for all patients treated to date have a relatively restricted range from 74 Gy to 81 Gy. In addition, the primary treatment planning and delivery technique (opposing laterals with one field treated per day, proton energy range 225–250 MeV) has not been changed from inception. In particular, this group represents a single-institution homogeneous cohort in terms of treatment parameters important for, for example, secondary neutron dose outside the treatment volume. The

  18. Treating gastrointestinal cancer by intervention, intraperitoneal hyperthermic perfusion chemotherapy, intravenous micro-pump chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    157 cases of gastrointestinal cancer patients after resection were randomly divided into treated group and control group. The treated group (intraperitoneal hyperthermic perfusion chemotherapy combined with postoperative continuous intraarterial infusion and intravenous micro-pump chemotherapy) consisted of 72 cases, the control group (Intravenous chemotherapy), 85 cases. The peritoneal and hepatic metastasis rates and 3 a survival rate were studied. The intraperitoneal hyperthermic perfusion chemotherapy combined with the postoperative continuous intraarterial infusion and intravenous micro-pump chemotherapy is an effective way to control the recurrence on the peritoneal and hepatic metastasis of advanced gastrointestinal neoplasms after operation. (authors)

  19. The pitfalls of treating anorectal conditions after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thornhill, J A

    2012-03-01

    We present a salutary lesson learned from three cases with significant complications that followed anorectal intervention in the presence of radiation proctitis due to prior radiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. After apparent routine rubber band ligation for painful haemorrhoids, one patient developed a colo-cutaneous fistula. Following laser coagulation for radiation proctitis, one patient required a pelvic exenteration for a fistula, while another developed a rectal stenosis. Those diagnosing and treating colonic conditions should be mindful of the increased prevalence of patients who have had radiotherapy for prostate cancer and the potential for complications in treating these patients.

  20. Persistent PORT-a-CATH ®-related fistula and fibrosis in a breast cancer patient successfully treated with local ozone application

    OpenAIRE

    B. Clavo; López Silva, Sonnia María; Robaina, F.

    2012-01-01

    Persistent and delayed healing of fistulae and local infection in previously irradiated areas can increase the risk of systemic complications and complicated clinical management. Cancer patients have impaired immune systems secondary to the tumor or oncology treatments; this impairment decreases spontaneous healing. Surgical options are often associated with adverse side effects together with an increased risk of further delay in wound healing. Hyperbaric chambers have been used to treat dela...

  1. Pulmonary Function in Patients With Germ Cell Cancer Treated With Bleomycin, Etoposide, and Cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Bandak, Mikkel; Mortensen, Mette Saksø; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Mortensen, Jann; Daugaard, Gedske

    2016-01-01

    significantly influenced baseline PFT results. Pulmonary surgery, pulmonary embolism, IGCCCG poor prognosis, and smoking influenced PFT during follow-up. Mediastinal primary, pulmonary metastases, age, or doses of cisplatin and etoposide had no influence on follow-up PFT, and renal function did not influence...... PFT. CONCLUSION: After 5 years of follow-up, pulmonary impairment in patients with germ cell cancer who were treated with BEP was limited. Exceptions were patients treated with pulmonary surgery, those who suffered pulmonary embolism, and those in the IGCCCG poor prognostic group.......PURPOSE: For patients with germ cell cancer, various pulmonary toxicity risk factors have been hypothesized for treatment with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). Because existing studies have shortcomings, we present a large, unselected cohort of patients who have undergone close monitoring...

  2. Effects of bestatin on the host immunity in patients treated for urogenital cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine effects of bestatin on the host immunity of patients with urogenital cancer, 54 patients were randomized into 2 groups: bestatin treated and controls. In each group, the patients were divided into 2 subgroups: one which received basic treatment expected to greatly affect host immunity ('invasive treatment') while the other one received other types of basic treatment ('non-invasive treatment'). Peripheral lymphocyte, OKT 4/8 ratio and purified protein derivative (PPD) skin reaction were used as immunological markers. There were significant differences in the 'invasive' treatment group between bestatin treated patients and controls concerning lymphocyte counts and PPD skin reactions and in the 'non-invasive' group concerning lymphocyte counts and OKT 4/8 ratios. These results suggest that bestatin may potentiate host immunity in patients with urogenital cancer. Further studies on larger materials are, however, needed before more definite conclusions can be drawn. (orig.)

  3. IMRT technique in patients with breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy - obstacles and advantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring type of malignant tumour in women in Poland. About 12 thousand new cases of breast cancer are registered annually, among which the greater part (70-80%) is represented by women in the early phase of the disease. Conserving therapy is the standard approach in early breast cancer. The role of radiotherapy as a supplement to surgical treatment is also underlined. For over 100 years radiotherapy has been one of the basic methods to treat patients with malignant tumour of the breast. Nowadays the use of ionizing radiation has become an integral method of the multidisciplinary and modern treatment of patients with breast cancer after conserving surgery. Within the last few years the improvement of radiotherapy techniques has been observed to correct the therapeutic index of radiation. The modulation of the intensity of the beam (intensity modulated radiation therapy, IMRT) is a new method of radiotherapy which assures delivery of the highest possible radiation dose into the area of the tumour with the simultaneous maximum protection of healthy tissues. The purpose of this study is to set out the present state of knowledge on possibilities of using the technique of IMRT on patients with breast cancer after conserving therapy. In the article available literature is reviewed and an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of using IMRT in breast cancer compared to standard conformal techniques is presented. (authors)

  4. Properties of resistant cells generated from lung cancer cell lines treated with EGFR inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling plays an important role in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and therapeutics targeted against EGFR have been effective in treating a subset of patients bearing somatic EFGR mutations. However, the cancer eventually progresses during treatment with EGFR inhibitors, even in the patients who respond to these drugs initially. Recent studies have identified that the acquisition of resistance in approximately 50% of cases is due to generation of a secondary mutation (T790M) in the EGFR kinase domain. In about 20% of the cases, resistance is associated with the amplification of MET kinase. In the remaining 30-40% of the cases, the mechanism underpinning the therapeutic resistance is unknown. An erlotinib resistant subline (H1650-ER1) was generated upon continuous exposure of NSCLC cell line NCI-H1650 to erlotinib. Cancer stem cell like traits including expression of stem cell markers, enhanced ability to self-renew and differentiate, and increased tumorigenicity in vitro were assessed in erlotinib resistant H1650-ER1 cells. The erlotinib resistant subline contained a population of cells with properties similar to cancer stem cells. These cells were found to be less sensitive towards erlotinib treatment as measured by cell proliferation and generation of tumor spheres in the presence of erlotinib. Our findings suggest that in cases of NSCLC accompanied by mutant EGFR, treatment targeting inhibition of EGFR kinase activity in differentiated cancer cells may generate a population of cancer cells with stem cell properties

  5. Meta-analysis of second cancer risk among childhood cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Second cancer risks of childhood cancer survivors following radiotherapy have not been well characterized in terms of radiation dose. Before we have conducted a meta-analysis of studies on the excess relative risk per Gy (ERR) of second malignant neoplasm (SMN) among childhood cancer survivors, but the small number of eligible studies restricted quantitative evaluations. To solve this problem, we developed a statistical method to calculate an ERR estimate from other estimates, and conducted a meta-analysis again. We searched the PubMed database, and 26 studies were identified. ERR estimates were available in 15 studies, and for the rest of 11 studies, we used the regression model to calculate a ERR estimate from other estimates. The overall ERR was 0.60 [95% CI: 0.31, 1.15]. Cochran's Q statistic was 319.7 (P<0.001), indicating a significant heterogeneity among studies. The heterogeneity was attributed partly to the sites of second cancer, the design of studies, the region of the study, and the age at radiotherapy. Especially, we focused on the dependence in ERR on age at radiotherapy, and it was suggested that the second cancer risk is decreased by 11 percent in terms of ERR per one year increase in the ageradiotherapy (p=0.01). (author)

  6. Acetylsalicylic Acid Compared to Placebo in Treating High-Risk Patients With Subsolid Lung Nodules | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This randomized phase II trial studies acetylsalicylic acid compared to placebo in treating high-risk patients with subsolid lung nodules. A nodule is a growth or lump that may be malignant (cancer) or benign (not cancer). Chemoprevention is the use of drugs to keep cancer from forming or coming back. The use of acetylsalicylic acid may keep cancer from forming in patients with subsolid lung nodules. |

  7. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. The value of prognostic factors for uterine cervical cancer patients treated with irradiation alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of our study was to investigate and evaluate the prognostic value of and correlations between preclinical and clinical factors such as the stage of the disease, blood Hb level before treatment, size of cervix and lymph nodes evaluated by CT, age, dose of irradiation and duration of radiotherapy related to overall survival, disease-free survival, local control and metastases-free survival in cervical cancer patients receiving radiotherapy alone. 162 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIA-IIIB cervical carcinoma treated with irradiation were analysed. Univariate and multivariate analyses using the Cox regression model were performed to determine statistical significance of some tumor-related factors. The Hb level before treatment showed significant influence on overall survival (p = 0.001), desease free survival (p = 0.040) and local control (p = 0.038). The lymph node status (>10 mm) assessed on CT had impact on overall survival (p = 0,030) and local control (p = 0,036). The dose at point A had impact on disease free survival (p = 0,028) and local control (p = 0,021) and the radiotherapy duration had showed significant influence on overall survival (p = 0,045), disease free survival (p = 0,006) and local control (p = 0,033). Anemia is a significant and independent prognostic factor of overall survival, disease-free survival and local control in cervical cancer patients treated with irradiation. The size of lymph nodes in CT is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival and local control in cervical cancer patients. The size of cervix uteri evaluated by CT has no prognostic significance in cervical cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. The prognostic value of FIGO stage of cervical cancer is influenced by other factors, analyzed in this study and is not an independent prognostic factor

  9. High cyclooxygenase-2 expression is related with distant metastasis in cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 enzyme has been shown to have an important role in carcinogenesis and apoptosis in various types of cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between local recurrence or distant metastasis and COX-2 expression and apoptosis in cervical cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients who were diagnosed with cervical cancer were enrolled in this study. All patients were treated with radical RT (external beam RT plus brachytherapy) at Seoul National University Hospital. The formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of 11 patients who developed local recurrence (n=3) or distant metastasis (n=8) were compared with those of other patients who were disease free. Prognostic factors, including tumor size, lymph node metastatic status, and stage, were well balanced between the two groups. COX-2 expression was determined immunohistochemically, and apoptosis was assessed using in situ DNA nick end labeling (TUNEL)-based methods. Results: COX-2 expression was stronger in the local recurrence and distant metastasis patients than in those free of disease. COX-2 expression was shown to have a statistically significant influence on treatment failure by the Mann-Whitney U test (p=0.015) and the Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test (p=0.015), but its distribution did not correlate with apoptosis. Among the clinicopathologic factors, including stage, lymph node metastatic status, and tumor size, lymph node metastatic status was found to closely correlate with COX-2 expression by the Mann-Whitney U test (p=0.045) and Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test (p=0.065). Conclusion: COX-2 is believed to be one of the important factors associated with lymph node involvement and treatment failure. Our results suggest that inhibiting COX-2 may decrease treatment failure in cervical cancer treated with RT, and that COX-2 inhibitor administration may play an adjuvant role in cervical cancer

  10. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m2, and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade ≥3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade ≥3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  11. Concurrent Chemotherapy for Cervical Cancer Patients Primarily Treated with Radiotherapy: Is It Necessary for All?

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    Ji-Hong Hong

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been strongly recommended in womenwith cervical cancer requiring radiotherapy (RT. However, our studies have shown a subsetof patients can achieve good treatment outcome by RT alone and the benefit of treating themwith concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT is questionable. On the other hand, patients withpositive lymph node, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-ag level > 10 or stage III/IVAdisease have a higher risk of distant metastasis and weekly single-agent cis-platinum mightbe ineffective in reducing systemic relapse. This review will present our rationales and suggestionsfor the selection of cervical cancer patients who should receive different forms ofCCRT or RT alone. We believe the intensity of CCRT for cervical cancer should varybetween patients based on their individual risk for local and distant relapse.

  12. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  13. Chromosome inversions in lymphocytes of prostate cancer patients treated with X-rays and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To investigate the cytogenetic damage of the intrachange type in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients treated for prostate cancer with different radiation qualities. Material and methods: Prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a clinical trial based at the Heidelberg University Hospital and at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in 2006. Patients were treated either with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) alone or with a carbon-ion boost followed by IMRT. Blood samples were collected at the end of the therapy and the mBAND technique was used to investigate the cytogenetic damage of the inter and intrachange types. Moreover, the mBAND analysis was performed on healthy donor cells irradiated in vitro with X-rays or C-ions. Results: Our results show no statistically significant differences in the yield and the spectrum of chromosome aberrations among patients treated only with IMRT and patients receiving the combined treatment when similar target volumes and doses to the target are compared. Conclusion: The study suggests that the risks of normal tissue late effects and second malignancies in prostate cancer patients are comparable when heavy ions or IMRT radiotherapy are applied

  14. A case of metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs treated with korean medicine therapy alone.

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    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Seong, Shin; Woo, Chang-Ryoul; Han, Jae-Bok

    2014-05-01

    This case report is aimed to investigate the effects of Korean medicine therapy (KMT) including oral herbal medicine and herb nebulizer therapy in treating metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs in August 2013. He refused any chemotherapy and was admitted to our hospital in a much progressed state on January 11, 2014. Since then, he was treated with KMT until May 17, 2014. The main oral herbal medicines were Hyunamdan made of heat-processed ginseng, Hangamdan S made of Cordyceps militaris, Panax ginseng radix, Commiphora myrrha, calculus bovis, margarita, Boswellia carteri, Panax notoginseng radix and Cremastra appendiculata tuber, and nebulizer therapy with Soram nebulizer solution made of wild ginseng and Cordyceps sinensis distillate. Their effect was evaluated considering the change of the main symptoms and using serial chest X-ray. The size and number of multiple metastatic nodules in both lungs were markedly decreased and the symptoms had disappeared. These results suggest that KMT can be an effective method to treat metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. PMID:25232323

  15. A Case of Metastatic Bladder Cancer in Both Lungs Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

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    Dong-Hyun Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This case report is aimed to investigate the effects of Korean medicine therapy (KMT including oral herbal medicine and herb nebulizer therapy in treating metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs in August 2013. He refused any chemotherapy and was admitted to our hospital in a much progressed state on January 11, 2014. Since then, he was treated with KMT until May 17, 2014. The main oral herbal medicines were Hyunamdan made of heat-processed ginseng, Hangamdan S made of Cordyceps militaris, Panax ginseng radix, Commiphora myrrha, calculus bovis, margarita, Boswellia carteri, Panax notoginseng radix and Cremastra appendiculata tuber, and nebulizer therapy with Soram nebulizer solution made of wild ginseng and Cordyceps sinensis distillate. Their effect was evaluated considering the change of the main symptoms and using serial chest X-ray. The size and number of multiple metastatic nodules in both lungs were markedly decreased and the symptoms had disappeared. These results suggest that KMT can be an effective method to treat metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs.

  16. Clinical–Pathologic Stage Discrepancy in Bladder Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Cystectomy: Results From the National Cancer Data Base

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    Gray, Phillip J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lin, Chun Chieh; Jemal, Ahmedin [Surveillance and Health Services Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Shipley, William U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fedewa, Stacey A. [Surveillance and Health Services Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Kibel, Adam S. [Division of Urology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenberg, Jonathan E. [Genitourinary Oncology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kamat, Ashish M. [Division of Surgery, Department of Urology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Virgo, Katherine S. [Department of Health Policy and Management, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Blute, Michael L. [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the accuracy of clinical staging and its effects on outcome in bladder cancer (BC) patients treated with radical cystectomy (RC), using a large national database. Methods and Materials: A total of 16,953 patients with BC without distant metastases treated with RC from 1998 to 2009 were analyzed. Factors associated with clinical–pathologic stage discrepancy were assessed by multivariate generalized estimating equation models. Survival analysis was conducted for patients treated between 1998 and 2004 (n=7270) using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: At RC 41.9% of patients were upstaged, whereas 5.9% were downstaged. Upstaging was more common in females, the elderly, and in patients who underwent a more extensive lymphadenectomy. Downstaging was less common in patients treated at community centers, in the elderly, and in Hispanics. Receipt of preoperative chemotherapy was highly associated with downstaging. Five-year overall survival rates for patients with clinical stages 0, I, II, III, and IV were 67.2%, 62.9%, 50.4%, 36.9%, and 27.2%, respectively, whereas those for the same pathologic stages were 70.8%, 75.8%, 63.7%, 41.5%, and 24.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, upstaging was associated with increased 5-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.80, P<.001), but downstaging was not associated with survival (HR 0.88, P=.160). In contrast, more extensive lymphadenectomy was associated with decreased 5-year mortality (HR 0.76 for ≥10 lymph nodes examined, P<.001), as was treatment at an National Cancer Institute–designated cancer center (HR 0.90, P=.042). Conclusions: Clinical–pathologic stage discrepancy in BC patients is remarkably common across the United States. These findings should be considered when selecting patients for preoperative or nonoperative management strategies and when comparing the outcomes of bladder sparing approaches to RC.

  17. Clinical–Pathologic Stage Discrepancy in Bladder Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Cystectomy: Results From the National Cancer Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the accuracy of clinical staging and its effects on outcome in bladder cancer (BC) patients treated with radical cystectomy (RC), using a large national database. Methods and Materials: A total of 16,953 patients with BC without distant metastases treated with RC from 1998 to 2009 were analyzed. Factors associated with clinical–pathologic stage discrepancy were assessed by multivariate generalized estimating equation models. Survival analysis was conducted for patients treated between 1998 and 2004 (n=7270) using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: At RC 41.9% of patients were upstaged, whereas 5.9% were downstaged. Upstaging was more common in females, the elderly, and in patients who underwent a more extensive lymphadenectomy. Downstaging was less common in patients treated at community centers, in the elderly, and in Hispanics. Receipt of preoperative chemotherapy was highly associated with downstaging. Five-year overall survival rates for patients with clinical stages 0, I, II, III, and IV were 67.2%, 62.9%, 50.4%, 36.9%, and 27.2%, respectively, whereas those for the same pathologic stages were 70.8%, 75.8%, 63.7%, 41.5%, and 24.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, upstaging was associated with increased 5-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.80, P<.001), but downstaging was not associated with survival (HR 0.88, P=.160). In contrast, more extensive lymphadenectomy was associated with decreased 5-year mortality (HR 0.76 for ≥10 lymph nodes examined, P<.001), as was treatment at an National Cancer Institute–designated cancer center (HR 0.90, P=.042). Conclusions: Clinical–pathologic stage discrepancy in BC patients is remarkably common across the United States. These findings should be considered when selecting patients for preoperative or nonoperative management strategies and when comparing the outcomes of bladder sparing approaches to RC

  18. Needs of cancer patients treated in rural and urban cancer departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Literature indicates that cancer patients experience high levels of unmet needs, particularly in relation to health information, psychological requirements and physical and daily living needs. It suggests that the needs of patients living in rural areas are likely to be higher than those of urban patients due to geographical factors and health service accessibility issues. This paper will explore the needs of cancer patients with particular focus on the impact of location (rural vs. urban), present the basis of these needs and identify strategies that address the needs expressed, by reviewing current literature. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Radiography

  19. The prognostic value of molecular marker analysis in patients treated with trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpole, D H; Moore, M B; Herndon, J E; Aloia, T; D'Amico, T A; Sporn, T; Parr, A; Linoila, I; Allegra, C

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the prognostic value of a group of molecular tumor markers in a well-staged population of patients treated with trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer. The original pretreatment paraffin-embedded endoscopic esophageal tumor biopsy material was obtained from 118 patients treated with concurrent cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) + 45 Gy radiation followed by resection from 1986 until 1997 at the Duke University Comprehensive Cancer Center. Three markers of possible platinum chemotherapy association [metallothionein (MT), glutathione S-transferase-pi (GST-pi), P-glycoprotein (P-gp or multidrug resistance)] and one marker of possible 5-FU association [thymidylate synthase (TS)] were measured using immunohistochemistry. The median cancer-free survival was 25.0 months, with a significantly improved survival for the 38 patients who had a complete response (P GST-pi, P-gp, and TS were associated with a decreased survival. MT was not significant in this population. Multivariate analysis identified high-level expression in two of the platinum markers (GST-pi and P-gp) and the 5-FU marker TS as independent predictors of early recurrence and death. In conclusion, this investigation measured three possible markers associated with platinum and one possible marker associated with 5-FU in a cohort of esophageal cancer patients. Independent prognostic significance was observed, which suggests that it may be possible to predict which patients may benefit most from trimodality therapy. These data need to be reproduced in a prospective investigation. PMID:11297249

  20. An in vivo molecular response analysis of colorectal cancer treated with Astragalus membranaceus extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ailun; Yang, Chih-Hsueh; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Chang-Han; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Lee, Hoong-Chien; Su, Li-Jen

    2016-02-01

    The fact that many chemotherapeutic drugs cause chemoresistance and side effects during the course of colorectal cancer treatment necessitates development of novel cytotoxic agents aiming to attenuate new molecular targets. Here, we show that Astragalus membranaceus (Fischer) Bge. var. mongolicus (Bge.) Hsiao (AM), a traditional Chinese medicine, can inhibit tumor growth in vivo and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. The antitumor effect of AM was assessed on the subcutaneous tumors of human colorectal cancer cell line HCT116 grafted into nude mice. The mice were treated with either water or 500 mg/kg AM once per day, before being sacrificed for extraction of tumors, which were then subjected to microarray expression profiling. The gene expression of the extraction was then profiled using microarray analysis. The identified genes differentially expressed between treated mice and controls reveal that administration of AM suppresses chromosome organization, histone modification, and regulation of macromolecule metabolic process. A separate analysis focused on differentially expressed microRNAs revealing involvement of macromolecule metabolism, and intracellular transport, as well as several cancer signaling pathways. For validation, the input of the identified genes to The Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures led to many chemopreventive agents of natural origin that produce similar gene expression profiles to that of AM. The demonstrated effectiveness of AM suggests a potential therapeutic drug for colorectal cancer. PMID:26719057

  1. Patient profile and treatment outcome of rectal cancer patients treated with multimodality therapy at a regional cancer center

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    Deo Suryanarayana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Incidence of rectal cancer has wide geographical variation. Disease pattern in developing countries is different from developed countries as majority of the patients present in advanced stage because of delayed referral and lack of uniform treatment practices. AIMS : Present study describes the patient profile and treatment results from a tertiary care cancer center in India. SETTING AND DESIGN : Tertiary care Regional cancer center. Retrospective analysis 89 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma treated between 1995 and 2002 were analyzed. METHODS: Patients with adenocarcinoma rectum were evaluated in a G.I. Oncology clinic and were treated using multimodality protocols involving surgery, radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS : A descriptive analysis of patient and disease profile,treatment patterns and out come was performed. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS : Mean age of the patients was 45.4 years and majority of them had tumor in lower third of rectum with evidence of extrarectal spread. Seventy five percent of the patients underwent curative resection with abdominoperineal resection being the commonest procedure. Forty seven percent of patients were given short course preoperative radiotherapy and the remaining received postoperative radiotherapy. Sixty four percent of patients could complete planned adjuvant chemotherapy. Operative mortality was 2% and 23% had morbidity. Local recurrence rate was 8.9%. 5-year disease free and overall survival was 54% and 58% respectively. CONCLUSION : Majority of rectal cancer patients present with locally advanced and low rectal growths leading to low sphincter salvage rates. Despite the advanced stage of presentation optimal oncologic results can be obtained by using a good surgical techniques in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Short course preoperative radiotherapy seems to be more feasible in Indian context

  2. Survival of cancer patients treated with mistletoe extract (Iscador: a systematic literature review

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    Büssing Arndt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Europe, extracts from Viscum album (VA-E, the European white-berry mistletoe, are widely used to treat patients with cancer. Methods We searched several databases such as Cochrane, EMBASE, NCCAM, NLM, DIMDI, CAMbase, and Medline. Inclusion criteria were controlled clinical studies on parameters associated with survival in cancer patients treated with Iscador. Outcome data were extracted as they were given in the publication, and expressed as hazard ratios (HR, their logarithm, and the respective standard errors using standard formulas. Results We found 49 publications on the clinical effects of Iscador usage on survival of cancer patients which met our criteria. Among them, 41 studies and strata provided enough data to extract hazard ratios (HR and their standard errors (Iscador versus no extra treatment. The majority of studies reported positive effects in favour of the Iscador application. Heterogeneity of study results was moderate (I2 = 38.3%, p Conclusions Pooled analysis of clinical studies suggests that adjuvant treatment of cancer patients with the mistletoe extract Iscador is associated with a better survival. Despite obvious limitations, and strong hints for a publication bias which limits the evidence found in this meta-analysis, one can not ignore the fact that studies with positive effects of VA-E on survival of cancer patients are accumulating. Future studies evaluating the effects of Iscador should focus on a transparent design and description of endpoints in order to provide greater insight into a treatment often being depreciated as ineffective, but highly valued by cancer patients.

  3. A survey of patients with inflammatory skin recurrence corresponding to the area of previous irradiation after postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the unusual patterns of local recurrence in breast cancer patient is an inflammatory skin recurrence (ISR) sharply demarcating the area of previous radiation fields. To clarify the characteristics of this recurrence, we conducted a nationwide survey. We sent a survey to radiation oncologists at 200 institutions in Japan and received answers from 92. Of these, 24 institutions had some experience with patients who developed ISR affecting the previously irradiated area. The case details of 16 patients from 11 institutions were available and analyzed in this study. Eight patients experienced ISR after breast conservative therapy (groupA) and 8 patients experienced ISR after post-mastectomy radiotherapy (groupB). The postoperative pathological examination of groups A and B showed positive axillary lymph-nodes in 7/8 and 8/8 patients, positive lymphatic invasion in 4/7 and 7/8 patients, and estrogen receptor (ER) status negative in 7/8 and 6/7 patients respectively. Median survival period was 266 days in groupA and 1105 days in groupB (p=0.0001). Patients who developed the ISR tended to have several characteristics, including positive lymph-node metastases, intensive lymphatic invasion, and ER status negative. Physicians should contemplate the diagnosis of ISR next to radiation recall or radiation dermatitis, especially when the aforementioned risk factors are present. (author)

  4. Cancer related fatigue: A ubiquitous problem yet so under reported, under recognized and under treated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer related fatigue (CRF is a problem that is highly under reported, under recognized and thus, under treated. About 80% of patients receiving chemotherapy/radiotherapy experience CRF, making it the most common side effect of cancer treatment. Functional assessment of chronic illness therapy fatigue (FACIT-F version-4 is a 13 item questionnaire that has been used to measure the level of fatigue of cancer patients during their daily activities over the past 7 days. Materials and Methods: 92 patients of age 18 years and above attending the oncology Out Patient Department (OPD of a regional cancer center were recruited in this study and were given FACIT-F questionnaire. The relevant sociodemographic parameters were obtained from the medical records of the patients. The internal consistency of the 13 items was measured using the Cronbach′s alpha. Results: The Cronbach alpha coefficient for FACIT-F scale in our study was found to be 0.74. Kendall′s coefficient of concordance was estimated to be 0.080. The correlation between Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG performance status and mean score of FACIT-F was studied, Pearson correlation coefficient was estimated to be 0.271 (P = 0.009. Conclusions: FACIT-F is a brief, simple, easy to administer and patient friendly tool to measure the fatigue in last 7 days. CRF should be given adequate attention from the beginning of the treatment to improve the quality of life of cancer patients.

  5. Inhalable self-assembled albumin nanoparticles for treating drug-resistant lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Ho; Byeon, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Ji Su; Thao, Lequang; Kim, Insoo; Lee, Eun Seong; Shin, Beom Soo; Lee, Kang Choon; Youn, Yu Seok

    2015-01-10

    Direct pulmonary delivery of anti-cancer agents is viewed as an effective way of treating lung cancer. Here, we fabricated inhalable nanoparticles made of human serum albumin (HSA) conjugated with doxorubicin and octyl aldehyde and adsorbed with apoptotic TRAIL protein (TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP). The octyl aldehyde and doxorubicin endowed HSA with significant hydrophobicity that facilitated self-assembly. TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP was found to have excellent particle size (~340nm), morphology, dispersability, and aerosolization properties. TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP displayed synergistic cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity in H226 lung cancer cells vs. HSA-NP containing TRAIL or Dox alone. TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP was well deposited in the mouse lungs using an aerosolizer, and TRAIL and Dox-HSA were found to be gradually released over 3days. The anti-tumor efficacy of pulmonary administered TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP was evaluated in BALB/c nu/nu mice bearing H226 cell-induced metastatic tumors. It was found that the tumors of H226-implanted mice treated with TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP were remarkably smaller and lighter than those of mice treated with TRAIL or Dox HSA-NP alone (337.5±7.5; 678.2±51.5; and 598.9±24.8mg, respectively). Importantly, this improved anti-tumor efficacy was found to be due to the synergistic apoptotic effects of Dox and TRAIL. In the authors' opinion, TRAIL/Dox HSA-NP offers a potential inhalable anti-lung cancer drug delivery system. Furthermore, the synergism displayed by combined use of Dox and TRAIL could be used to markedly reduce doxorubicin doses and minimize its side effects. PMID:25445703

  6. Raman confocal microscopy and AFM combined studies of cancerous cells treated with Paclitaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derely, L.; Collart Dutilleul, P.-Y.; Michotte de Welle, Sylvain; Szabo, V.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2011-03-01

    Paclitaxel interferes with the normal function of microtubule breakdown, induces apoptosis in cancer cells and sequesters free tubulin. As this drug acts also on other cell mechanisms it is important to monitor its accumulation in the cell compartments. The intracellular spreading of the drug was followed using a WITEC 300R confocal Raman microscope equipped with a CCD camera. Hence Atomic force microscopy (an MFP3D- Asylum Research AFM) in imaging and force mode was used to determine the morphological and mechanical modifications induced on living cells. These studies were performed on living epithelial MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Paclitaxel was added to cell culture media for 3, 6 and 9 hours. Among the specific paclitaxel Raman bands we selected the one at 1670 cm-1 because it is not superposed by the spectrum of the cells. Confocal Raman images are formed by monitoring this band, the NH2 and the PO4 band. Paclitaxel slightly accumulates in the nucleus forming patches. The drug is also concentrated in the vicinity of the cell membrane and in an area close to the nucleus where proteins accumulate. Our AFM images reveal that the treated cancerous MCF-7 cells keep the same size as the non treated ones, but their shape becomes more oval. Cell's elasticity is also modified: a difference of 2 kPa in the Young Modulus characterizes the treated MCF-7 mammary cancerous cell. Our observations demonstrate that paclitaxel acts not only on microtubules but accumulates also in other cell compartments (nucleus) where microtubules are absent.

  7. Determination of the risk of a second cancer in patients treated for a first cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A paradoxical effect of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for cancer is that some of these treatments can themselves cause new cancers. Most epidemiologic methods can be applied successfully to the investigation of this problem and this paper reviews various approaches that have already been used by various researchers. The more traditional methods, i.e., cohort and case-control studies are first reviewed and then designs that have been proposed more recently, such as case-cohort studies are described. A distinction is established between internal comparisons, carried out within the study population, and external comparisons, in which a general population external to the population under study is used as the reference category. This presentation is mainly aimed at investigators using tumor registry data. However, the general principles formulated here are easily generalized to contexts other than that of registries

  8. Lenalidomide and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck

  9. Impact of comorbidity in elderly prostate cancer patients treated with brachytherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Costanza Chiumento; Alba Fiorentino; Mariella Cozzolino; Rocchina Caivano; Stefania Clemente; Piernicola Pedicini; Vincenzo Fusco

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the correlations among comorbidity and overall survival (OS),biochemical progression-free survival (b-PFS) and toxicity in elderly patents with localized prostate cancer treated with 125I brachytherapy.Methods:Elderly men,aged ≥65 years,with low-intermediate risk prostate cancer,were treated with permanent 125I brachytherapy as monotherapy.Comorbidity data were obtained from medical reports using age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index (a-CCI).The patients were categorized into two age groups (<75and ≥75 years old),and two comorbidity score groups (a-CCI ≤3 and >3).Toxicity was scored with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale.Results:From June 2003 to October 2009,a total of 92 elderly patients underwent prostate brachytherapy,including 57 men (62%) with low-risk prostate cancer,and 35 men (38%) with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.The median age of patients was 75 years (range,65-87 years).Forty-seven patients (51%) had a-CCI ≤3 and 45 patients (49%) a-CCI >3.With a median follow-up period of 56 months (range,24-103 months),the 5-year actuarial OS and b-PFS were 91.3% and 92.4% respectively,without statistical significance between two Charlson score groups.Toxicity was mild.None of the patients experienced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity,and only 4 patiens (4%) experienced late genitourinary (GU) grade-3 (G3) toxicity.No correlation between acute GU and GI toxicity and comorbidity was showed (P=0.50 and P=0.70,respectively).Conclusions:Our data suggest that elderly men with low-intermediate risk prostate cancer and comorbidity can be considered for a radical treatment as 125I low-dose rate brachytherapy.

  10. Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Patients With Rare Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Head and Neck Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lymphoma; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Retinoblastoma; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  11. Preoperative Biliary Drainage in Cases of Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomofumi Tsuboi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To elucidate the optimum preoperative biliary drainage method for patients with pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC. Material and Methods. From January 2010 through December 2014, 20 patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer underwent preoperative biliary drainage and NAC with a plastic or metallic stent and received NAC at Hiroshima University Hospital. We retrospectively analyzed delayed NAC and complication rates due to biliary drainage, effect of stent type on perioperative factors, and hospitalization costs from diagnosis to surgery. Results. There were 11 cases of preoperative biliary drainage with plastic stents and nine metallic stents. The median age was 64.5 years; delayed NAC occurred in 9 cases with plastic stent and 1 case with metallic stent (p=0.01. The complication rates due to biliary drainage were 0% (0/9 with metallic stents and 72.7% (8/11 with plastic stents (p=0.01. Cumulative rates of complications determined with the Kaplan-Meier method on day 90 were 60% with plastic stents and 0% with metallic stents (log-rank test, p=0.012. There were no significant differences between group in perioperative factors or hospitalization costs from diagnosis to surgery. Conclusions. Metallic stent implantation may be effective for preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer treated with NAC.

  12. Preoperative Biliary Drainage in Cases of Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Tomofumi; Sasaki, Tamito; Serikawa, Masahiro; Ishii, Yasutaka; Mouri, Teruo; Shimizu, Akinori; Kurihara, Keisuke; Tatsukawa, Yumiko; Miyaki, Eisuke; Kawamura, Ryota; Tsushima, Ken; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To elucidate the optimum preoperative biliary drainage method for patients with pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Material and Methods. From January 2010 through December 2014, 20 patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer underwent preoperative biliary drainage and NAC with a plastic or metallic stent and received NAC at Hiroshima University Hospital. We retrospectively analyzed delayed NAC and complication rates due to biliary drainage, effect of stent type on perioperative factors, and hospitalization costs from diagnosis to surgery. Results. There were 11 cases of preoperative biliary drainage with plastic stents and nine metallic stents. The median age was 64.5 years; delayed NAC occurred in 9 cases with plastic stent and 1 case with metallic stent (p = 0.01). The complication rates due to biliary drainage were 0% (0/9) with metallic stents and 72.7% (8/11) with plastic stents (p = 0.01). Cumulative rates of complications determined with the Kaplan-Meier method on day 90 were 60% with plastic stents and 0% with metallic stents (log-rank test, p = 0.012). There were no significant differences between group in perioperative factors or hospitalization costs from diagnosis to surgery. Conclusions. Metallic stent implantation may be effective for preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer treated with NAC. PMID:26880897

  13. Microsatellite Instability Predicts Clinical Outcome in Radiation-Treated Endometrioid Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To elucidate whether microsatellite instability (MSI) predicts clinical outcome in radiation-treated endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC). Methods and Materials: A consecutive series of 93 patients with EEC treated with extrafascial hysterectomy and postoperative radiotherapy was studied. The median clinical follow-up of patients was 138 months, with a maximum of 232 months. Five quasimonomorphic mononucleotide markers (BAT-25, BAT-26, NR21, NR24, and NR27) were used for MSI classification. Results: Twenty-five patients (22%) were classified as MSI. Both in the whole series and in early stages (I and II), univariate analysis showed a significant association between MSI and poorer 10-year local disease-free survival, disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival. In multivariate analysis, MSI was excluded from the final regression model in the whole series, but in early stages MSI provided additional significant predictive information independent of traditional prognostic and predictive factors (age, stage, grade, and vascular invasion) for disease-free survival (hazard ratio [HR] 3.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-10.49; p = 0.048) and cancer-specific survival (HR 4.20, 95% CI 1.23-14.35; p = 0.022) and was marginally significant for local disease-free survival (HR 3.54, 95% CI 0.93-13.46; p = 0.064). Conclusions: These results suggest that MSI may predict radiotherapy response in early-stage EEC.

  14. Double-blinded, Controlled, Randomized Study of Dihydrocodeine Tartrate vs Codeine Phosphate in Treating Cancer Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJiejun; ZOUJianjun; GAOYong; XUQing; CAOChuanwu; QIANJianxin; XUDefeng; PANHuijun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects and adverse reactions of dihydrocodeine tartrate and codeine phosphate in treating moderate cancer pain. Methods: Sixty-nine cases of cancer patients with moderate pain were treated with dihydrocodeine tartrate or codeine phosphate respectively by double-blind,controlled randomized methods and the effects and adverse reactions were observed. Results: After administration of dihydrocodeine tartrate or codeine phosphate, in treatment group or control group, the total effective rate was 86.6% and 93.6%, and common adverse symptoms included constipation (31.3%/12.9%),nausea (18.8%/19.7%), gastric trouble (18.8%/19.7%), skin pruritus (12.5%/10%), vomit (9.3% and 6.5%) with the difference being not significant. Conclusion: The effects of dihydrocodeine tartrate in treating moderate cancer pain are similar to codeine phosphate. Both them can be used to treat moderate cancer pain.

  15. A very rare case of HPV-53-related cervical cancer, in a 79-year-old woman with a previous history of negative Pap cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zappacosta R

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Roberta Zappacosta,1 Giuseppe Lattanzio,2 Patrizia Viola,2 Manuel Maria Ianieri,3 Daniela Maria Pia Gatta,1 Sandra Rosini11Cytopathology Unit, Experimental and Clinical Sciences Department, Gabriele d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy; 2Surgical Pathology Unit, 3Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit, SS Annunziata Hospital, Chieti, ItalyAbstract: The introduction of organized cervical cancer (CC screening programs has drastically reduced the prevalence of CC. However the incidence is still too high, especially among elderly women. All guidelines strongly recommend a regular Papanicolaou (Pap testing for young and middle-aged patients. On the other hand, many international professional societies no longer advise screening in women who have undergone hysterectomy, and in women aged 65 years and above, who have a previous history of regular Pap smears. Here we report the case of poorly differentiated CC, involving the pelvic lymph nodes and urinary bladder, occurring in a 79-year-old woman who regularly underwent Pap tests, with no reported cytological abnormalities. In this very rare case, the CC cells, as well as cells from metastatic lymph nodes and cells from urinary specimens, molecularly showed human papilloma virus (HPV-53. With the limitations of a single case, this report brings important information to prevent CC in elderly patients: the utility of molecular tests to increase sensitivity of Pap smears in postmenopausal women; the importance of HPV-53 as one of the four “emergent” genotypes having a possible role in oncogenesis; and the presence of HPV-53 in lymph node metastases from cervical carcinoma, which would support the role of this virus in the maintenance of malignant status.Keywords: old women, molecular tests, cervical cancer screening, HPV-DNA test, HPV genotyping

  16. Outcome analysis of 300 prostate cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and hypofractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy is an established treatment for localized prostate carcinoma. This study sought to analyze the outcomes of patients treated with relatively low-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred patients with T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated between 1996 and 2001. Patients were prescribed 3 months of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation before receiving 5250 cGy in 20 fractions. Patients' case notes and the oncology database were used to retrospectively assess outcomes. Median follow-up was 58 months. Results: Patients presented with prostate cancer with poorer prognostic indicators than that reported in other series. At 5 years, the actuarial cause-specific survival rate was 83.2% and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse rate was 57.3%. Metastatic disease had developed in 23.4% of patients. PSA relapse continued to occur 5 years from treatment in all prognostic groups. Independent prognostic factors for relapse included treatment near the start of the study period, neoadjuvant oral anti-androgen monotherapy rather than neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone releasing hormone therapy, and diagnosis through transurethral resection of the prostate rather than transrectal ultrasound. Conclusion: This is the largest reported series of patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and hypofractionated radiotherapy in the United Kingdom. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy did not appear to adequately compensate for the relatively low effective radiation dose used

  17. Primary non-small cell lung cancer in a transplanted lung treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first case of primary lung cancer in a transplanted lung was described in 2001. Since then, only 5 cases of lung cancer in donated lung have been reported. We present one more patient with non-small cell cancer in the transplanted lung treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. In most cases of primary lung cancer in transplanted lung, rapid progression of the cancer was reported. Occurrence of the locoregional failure in our case could be explained by factors related to the treatment protocol and also to underlying immunosuppression.

  18. Quality of Life in Men Treated With Carbon Ion Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prospectively assess patient quality of life (QOL) after carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for prostate cancer, using established questionnaires. Methods and Material: The subjects were 150 patients who underwent C-ion RT. Of these, 25 patients with low-risk prostate cancer received C-ion RT alone, whereas the remaining 125 patients with a high-risk tumor also received androgen deprivation therapy. Quality of life was assessed using the self-administered Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) questionnaire in all patients three times. In addition, University of California-Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) was conducted in the low-risk patients. Results: The FACT-General (FACT-G) and FACT-P scores at 12 months after treatment averaged over all 150 patients showed no significant change compared with those before C-ion RT. In FACT-P subscales, emotional well-being increased significantly just after and 12 months after treatment. In contrast, physical well-being (PWB) and social/family well-being (S/FWB) decreased significantly at 12 months, whereas the prostate cancer subscale (PCS) decreased significantly just after treatment. Average scores for FACT-G, FACT-P, PWB, S/FWB, and PCS for the 125 patients receiving hormone therapy showed substantial detrimental changes at 12 months. In contrast, those of the 25 low-risk patients who had no hormone therapy showed no significant change. Similarly no significant change in the average of the UCLA-PCI scores in the low-risk patients was seen at 12 months. Conclusions: Average QOL parameters reported by patients with localized prostate cancer treated with C-ion RT, in the absence of hormone therapy, showed no significant decrease 12 months after C-ion RT

  19. Mortality from breast cancer after irradiation during fluoroscopic examinations in patients being treated for tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing use of mammography to screen asymptomatic women makes it important to know the risk of breast cancer associated with exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. We examined the mortality from breast cancer in a cohort of 31,710 women who had been treated for tuberculosis at Canadian sanatoriums between 1930 and 1952. A substantial proportion (26.4 percent) had received radiation doses to the breast of 10 cGy or more from repeated fluoroscopic examinations during therapeutic pneumothoraxes. Women exposed to greater than or equal to 10 cGy of radiation had a relative risk of death from breast cancer of 1.36, as compared with those exposed to less than 10 cGy (95 percent confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.67; P = 0.001). The data were most consistent with a linear dose-response relation. The risk was greatest among women who had been exposed to radiation when they were between 10 and 14 years of age; they had a relative risk of 4.5 per gray, and an additive risk of 6.1 per 10(4) person-years per gray. With increasing age at first exposure, there was substantially less excess risk, and the radiation effect appeared to peak approximately 25 to 34 years after the first exposure. Our additive model for lifetime risk predicts that exposure to 1 cGy at the age of 40 increases the number of deaths from breast cancer by 42 per million women. We conclude that the risk of breast cancer associated with radiation decreases sharply with increasing age at exposure and that even a small benefit to women of screening mammography would outweigh any possible risk of radiation-induced breast cancer

  20. Targeting Alternative Sites on the Androgen Receptor to Treat Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Rennie

    2013-06-01

    arsenal to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  1. Nulliparity enhances the risk of second primary malignancy of the breast in a cohort of women treated for thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milazzo Francesca

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have reported an increased risk of developing a second primary malignancy (SPM of the breast in women treated for thyroid cancer. In this study, we investigated several potential risk factors for this association. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to identify a subgroup of women surgically treated for papillary thyroid cancer that may benefit from more careful breast cancer screening. Methods A total of 101 women surgically treated for papillary thyroid cancer from 1996 to 2009 with subsequent follow-up were interviewed by phone regarding personal risk factors and lifestyle habits. Only 75 questionnaires could be evaluated due to a 25.7% rate of patients not retrieved or refusing the interview. Data analysis was performed using a multivariate logistic model. Results The standardised incidence ratio (SIR for breast cancer was 3.58 (95% IC 1.14 - 8.37. Our data suggest a protective effect of multiparity on the development of a SPM of the breast (O.R. 0.15; 95% IC 0.25 - 0.86. Significant associations were not found with other known risk factors including Body Mass Index (BMI, age at first tumour, concurrent metabolic diseases, smoking, physical activity and familiarity. Conclusions This study confirms that a higher incidence of SPM of the breast is observed in women treated for papillary thyroid cancer. Additionally, this risk is increased by nulliparity, thus a strict breast screening program for nulliparous women treated for thyroid cancer may be advisable.

  2. Gene expression analysis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with recombinant bromelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouz, Nour; Amid, Azura; Hashim, Yumi Zuhanis Has-Yun

    2014-08-01

    The contributing molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis of breast cancer need to be better characterized. The principle of our study was to better understand the genetic mechanism of oncogenesis for human breast cancer and to discover new possible tumor markers for use in clinical practice. We used complimentary DNA (cDNA) microarrays to compare gene expression profiles of treated Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) with recombinant bromelain and untreated MCF-7. SpringGene analysis was carried out of differential expression followed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), to understand the underlying consequence in developing disease and disorders. We identified 1,102 known genes differentially expressed to a significant degree (pbromelain produces a unique signature affecting different pathways, specific for each congener. The microarray results give a molecular mechanistic insight and functional effects, following recombinant bromelain treatment. The extent of changes in genes is related to and involved significantly in gap junction signaling, amyloid processing, cell cycle regulation by BTG family proteins, and breast cancer regulation by stathmin1 that play major roles. PMID:24928548

  3. Exploring cell apoptosis and senescence to understand and treat cancer: an interview with Scott Lowe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Scott W. Lowe is currently principal investigator at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. After beginning his studies in chemical engineering, he decided to take another path and became fascinated by biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology, which ultimately led to an interest in human disease, particularly cancer. During his PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, Scott had the opportunity to benefit from the exceptional mentorship of Earl Ruley, David Housman and Tyler Jacks, and contributed to elucidating how the p53 (TP53 tumor suppressor gene limits oncogenic transformation and modulates the cytotoxic response to conventional chemotherapy. This important work earned him a fellowship from the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, which helped to launch his independent career. Scott is now a leading scientist in the cancer field and his work has helped to shed light on mechanisms of cell apoptosis and senescence to better understand and treat cancer. In this interview, he talks about this incredible scientific journey.

  4. Scintigraphic study of salivary gland dysfunction in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to determine the degree of scintigraphic salivary gland dysfunction in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated with radioiodine. Patients were divided in two groups: null or mild dysfunction (grade I-II), moderate-severe dysfunction (grade III-IV) and statistical Mann-Whitney U test was applied. The radioiodine dose ranged between 80 and 200 mCi. Nineteen patients were found to be less affected (group 1), corresponding to grades I and II, and 11 patients were more affected (group 2), with grade III involvement. The severity of involvement of the salivary glands was not related with the dose of radioiodine used in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer and the sex of the patients had no clear influence either. Other factors are possibly related to the severity of salivary gland involvement

  5. Incidence of symptomatic salivary disease in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated with radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The radioactive iodine therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer can produce severe and frequent salivary symptoms, during the treatment or later. Aim: To analyze the incidence, severity and characteristics of the salivary signs and symptoms in these patients. Patients and Method: Retrospective and descriptive anal isis of 106 patients with confirmed diagnosis of differentiated thyroid cancer, treated with surgery and radioactive iodine, that completed a telephonic survey for the evaluation of salivary symptoms. Results: 26 (24.52%) patients presented with salivary symptoms or signs after the radioactive iodine therapy (mean 5 months). The average doses of I 131 was 128,5 mCi. Xerostomy, pain, xeroftalmy, inflammation, sialoadenitis and dysgeusia, were the most frequent clinical symptoms. Conclusions: After radioactive iodine therapy the salivary symptoms and signs incidence is high. We conclude that the indication for this treatment must be selective, but in accordance with the oncological risk of each patient

  6. Prognostic value of pretherapy platelet elevation in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoultz-Henley, Sara; Garden, Adam S; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Sheu, Tommy; Kroll, Michael H; Rosenthal, David I; Gunn, G Brandon; Hayes, Amos J; French, Chloe; Eichelberger, Hillary; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Smith, Blaine D; Phan, Jack; Ayoub, Zeina; Lai, Stephen Y; Pham, Brian; Kies, Merrill; Gold, Kathryn A; Sturgis, Erich; Fuller, Clifton D

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate potential associations between increased platelets and oncologic outcomes in oropharyngeal cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation. A total of 433 oropharyngeal cancer patients (OPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy between 2002 and 2012 were included under an approved IRB protocol. Complete blood count (CBC) data were extracted. Platelet and hemoglobin from the last phlebotomy (PLTpre-chemoRT, Hgbpre-chemoRT ) before start of treatment were identified. Patients were risk-stratified using Dahlstrom-Sturgis criteria and were tested for association with survival and disease-control outcomes. Locoregional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis (FDM) and overall survival (OS) were decreased (p nomograms predicting 3-, 5- and 10-year OS. In conclusion, pretreatment platelet elevation is a promising predictor of prognosis, and further work should be done to elucidate the utility of antiplatelets in modifying risk in OPC patients. PMID:26414107

  7. Genetic variation and cognitive dysfunction in opioid-treated patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Ekholm, Ola; Kaasa, Stein;

    2016-01-01

    candidate genes, high opioid dose, and cognitive dysfunction. METHODS: Cross-sectional multicenter study (European Pharmacogenetic Opioid Study, 2005-2008); 1586 patients; 113 SNPs from 41 genes. Inclusion criteria: cancer, age ≥18 year, opioid treatment, and available genetic data. Cognitive assessment by......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the cognitive function of opioid-treated patients with cancer until now have not been explored, but they could potentially be related to poor functioning. This study aimed at identifying associations between SNPs of...... Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Analyses: SNPs were rejected if violation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P < 0.0005), or minor allele frequency <5%; patients were randomly divided into discovery sample (2/3 for screening) and validation sample (1/3 for confirmatory test); false discovery rate of...

  8. Pain management of opioid-treated cancer patients in hospital settings in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorff, L.; Peuckmann, V.; Sjøgren, Per

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance and quality of cancer pain management in hospital settings. METHODS: Anaesthesiologists specialised in pain and palliative medicine studied pain management in departments of oncology and surgery. Study days were randomly chosen and patients treated with oral opioids...... were included. Information regarding pain aetiology and mechanisms, pain medications and opioid side effects were registered from the medical records and by examining patients. Pain intensity was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. RESULTS: In total, 59 cancer patients were included. In 49 (83...... according to the duration of action. In 88% of the patients supplemental short-acting oral opioids were given on demand and the median supplemental oral dose was 16.5% of the daily dose. Seven patients with neuropathic pain received adjuvant drugs, whereas six patients with non-neuropathic pain received...

  9. Nursing of advanced colorectal cancer patients treated with Cetuximab combined with chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoping Zhu; Chunli Wu

    2008-01-01

    Cetuximab is a new medication that has recently been approved for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. To date we have had tittle experience in using this targeted agent. Eleven patients in our hospital with advanced colorectal cancer were treated with cetuximab and chemotherapy. Based on the curative effect of this combination therapy, we have concluded that the following nursing practices make an important contribution to the patients' prognosis and wellbeing: to establish a good nurse-patient relationship, to increase patient understanding of the side effects, to standardize the medications, to observe and to deal with the side effects of the medications(for example skin reaction, neutropenia, and diarrhea), and to provide continuous mental health care support and education.

  10. An analysis of discrepancies between United Kingdom cancer research funding and societal burden and a comparison to previous and United States values

    OpenAIRE

    Ashley J. R. Carter; Delarosa, Beverly; Hur, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Background Ideally, the allocation of research funding for each specific type of cancer should be proportional to its societal burden. This burden can be estimated with the metric ‘years of life lost’ (YLL), which combines overall mortality and age at death. Methods Using United Kingdom data from 2010, we compared research funding from the National Cancer Research Institute to this YLL burden metric for 26 types of cancers in order to identify the discrepancies between cancer research funding...

  11. Micelle Mixtures for Coadministration of Gemcitabine and GDC-0449 To Treat Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Melek; Dutta, Rinku; Ozsoy, Yildiz; Mahato, Ram I

    2016-06-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays an important role in the development and metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Although gemcitabine (GEM) has been used as a first-line therapy for PDAC, its rapid metabolism and short plasma half-life restrict its use as a single chemotherapy. Combination therapy with more than one drug is a promising approach for treating cancer. Herein, we report the use of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(2-methyl-2-carboxyl-propylene carbonate)-graft-dodecanol (mPEG-b-PCC-g-DC) copolymer for conjugating GEM and encapsulating a Hh inhibitor, vismodegib (GDC-0449), into its hydrophobic core for treating PDAC. Our objective was to determine whether the micelle mixtures of these two drugs could show better response in inhibiting Hh signaling pathway and restraining the proliferation and metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The in vivo stability of GEM significantly increased after conjugation, which resulted in its increased antitumor efficacy. Almost 80% of encapsulated GDC-0449 and 19% conjugated GEM were released in vitro at pH 5.5 in 48 h in a sustained manner. The invasion, migration, and colony forming features of MIA PaCa-2 cells were significantly inhibited by micelle mixture carrying GEM and GDC-0449. Remarkable increase in PARP cleavage and Bax proved increased apoptosis by this combination formulation compared to individual micelles. This combination therapy efficiently inhibited tumor growth, increased apoptosis, reduced Hh ligands PTCH-1 and Gli-1, and lowered EMT-activator ZEB-1 when injected to athymic nude mice bearing subcutaneous tumor generated using MIA PaCa-2 cells compared to monotherapy as observed from immunohistochemical analysis. In conclusion, micelle mixtures carrying GEM and GDC-0449 have the potential to treat pancreatic cancer. PMID:26981724

  12. A long-term survival pattern for breast cancer treated in a single institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Gokce

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This paper presents a 14-year retrospective study evaluating the survival rates and prognostic factors of breast carcinoma patients treated in private treatment center in the west coast of Turkey. Materials and Methods: The survival rates of breast cancer patients (n = 1746 who have been treated from 1995 until 2008 were analyzed. The clinical data include age, menopausal stage, oestrogen (ER and progesterone (PR receptor status, and C-erbB-2 status as well as histopathological evaluation. AJCC (2002 was used for clinical tumor staging. Survival rates were computed using standard Kaplan-Meier methods, and the difference in survival curves was analyzed with the log-rank test. Results: The 14-year overall survival, disease-free survival, local failure-free survival, and distant failure-free survival rates were 77%, 95%, 77%, and 94%, respectively. Early-stage patients had higher overall survival rates compared to advanced-stage patients (stage IIIb and IIIc, AJCC 2002, and early-stage patients had higher survival rates than advanced-stage patients for disease-free survival, local failure-free survival, and distant failure-free survival. The risk for cancer development increases significantly for advanced-stage patients with positive ER and PR receptor as well as C-erbB-2 receptor. Conclusions: The incidence of breast cancer in Turkey is smaller compared to other European countries. Low advanced-stage patient numbers compared to high early-stage patient numbers; and very high median survival times could possibly be the result of the improvement of detection and treatment of breast cancer over the years.

  13. Predictive value of MSH2 gene expression in colorectal cancer treated with capecitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars H; Danenberg, Kathleen D; Danenberg, Peter V; Jakobsen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the gene expression of the DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2 as a predictive marker in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) treated with first-line capecitabine. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Microdissection of paraffin-embedded tumor tissue, RNA...... extraction, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were performed on tumors obtained from 37 patients with advanced CRC. RESULTS: The median relative gene expression of MSH2 was 0.65 (quartiles 0.5-0.8) in nonresponders and 1.25 (quartiles 0.92-1.38) for responders (P = 0.038). High expression of MSH2...

  14. The effect of 131I on salivary glands function in 131I treated thyroid cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salivary glands can accumulate 131I and may damage its function during 131I treated thyroid cancer. The purpose of this study is to understand the extent of the injury and its relation with dosage after high-dose radioiodine therapy. Radionuclide dynamic imaging is used to quantitatively calculate the absorption rate and excretion rate of salivary glands. There was no significant difference between patients group and normal controls in absorption rate (P > 0.05), but there existed difference in excretion rate (P 37 MBq but among the groups with dosage 131I treatment

  15. Sunitinib Malate in Treating HIV-Positive Patients With Cancer Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-14

    -transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Radiation bronchitis in lung cancer patient treated with stereotactic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of chronic radiation bronchitis that developed in a patient with lung cancer treated with fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy. A 73-year-old woman with a medically inoperable T1N0M0 adenocarcinoma of the lung was treated with stereotactic radiation therapy. By using eight non-coplanar ports, 50 Gy/5 fractions was delivered in two weeks. At four weeks, a partial response was obtained with no acute adverse reaction. She developed severe cough at six months. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed thick circumferentially coated bronchial mucosa in close proximity to the tumor site. At 12 months, follow-up study confirmed marked stenotic change in the B6 segmental bronchus without tumor progression. (author)

  17. 17 cases of advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with paclitaxel liposome plus nedaplatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Suo; Wei Ge; Jinzhong Zhang; Yongfa Zheng; Shunxiang Luo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the recent efficacy and adverse reactions of paclitaxel liposome plus nedaplatin in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).Methods: Seventeen cases of NSCLC treated with paclitaxel liposome and nedaplatin for 2 to 6 cycles, by infusing paclitaxel liposome 135 mg/m2 for 3 h on d1 and nedaplatin 80 mg/m2 as infusion on d2.Results: Among 17 patients being evaluated for response to treatment, 1 achieved complete response (CR), 4 achieved partial response (PR), 3 achieved stable disease (SD), 9 achieved progress disease (PD).The main adverse reaction was haematological toxicities, especially leukopenia and thrombocytopenia.The non-haematological toxicities included nausea, vomiting, mild hepatic dysfunction, alopecia and so on.Conclusion: Paclitaxel liposome plus nedaplatin was effective and well tolerated for treating patients with advanced NSCLC.

  18. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-06

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  19. Combination Chemotherapy Plus Amifostine in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-06

    Bladder Cancer; Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Head and Neck Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Lung Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Sunitinib Malate and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Kidney Cancer or Advanced Solid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Are Cancer Survivors/Patients Knowledgeable about Osteoporosis? Results from a Survey of 285 Chemotherapy-Treated Cancer Patients and Their Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Heidi; Looker, Sherry; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Hayman, Suzanne R.; Kaur, Judith S.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Peethambaram, Prema P.; Stahl, Jean F.; Jatoi, Aminah

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed osteoporosis knowledge deficits among cancer patients and their spouses/partners. Design: Single-institution survey (modified version of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Assessment Tool). Setting: The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Participants: Consecutive chemotherapy-treated cancer patients (n = 285) with their…

  2. Oral vinorelbine: its role in advanced breast cancer pre-treated with anthracycline and taxane chemotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Petrelli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic breast cancer (BC remains an incurable disease and clinical benefit and prolongation of time to progression are the main end-points in advanced setting. A safe and feasible schedule of administration is the principal option in pre-treated and symptomatic patients, as in the elderly too. Oral vinorelbine represents a good choice for its toxicity profile and activity in anthracycline and taxane-pre-treated BC patients. A 20–30% response rate (RR can be obtained when used as single agent. In phase II trials, involving fit patients, and when oral vinorelbine is used in combination with other agents (e.g., capecitabine a RR of 50-60% has been observed. In HER2-positive BC a combination of oral vinorelbine and trastuzumab has a dramatic activity in first-line therapy and is a reasonable choice in trastuzumab pre-treated patients. In conclusion, oral vinorelbine represents a pivotal choice in advanced and pre-treated BC both as single agent and in combination with others.

  3. Stereotactic radiotherapy with CyberKnife on a previously irradiated area; Radiotherapie stereotaxique par CyberKnife en territoire anterieurement irradie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taste-George, H.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report and discuss data and results obtained on thirty two patients treated by irradiation in stereotactic conditions on previously irradiated areas at the Alexis-Vautrin Centre. These patients have been treated for different types of relapses (ganglion cancer, bronchial cancer, ORL sphere cancer, microscopically incomplete surgery). CyberKnife seems to be an adapted solution for these cases. Short communication

  4. Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer With mTOR Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Advanced Malignant Neoplasm; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Carcinoma; Malignant Uterine Neoplasm; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Bladder Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Bladder Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number in 101 advanced colorectal cancer patients treated with chemotherapy plus cetuximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeuli Massimo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Responsiveness to Cetuximab alone can be mediated by an increase of Epidermal Growth factor Receptor (EGFR Gene Copy Number (GCN. Aim of this study was to assess the role of EGFR-GCN in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC patients receiving chemotherapy plus Cetuximab. Methods One hundred and one advanced CRC patients (43 untreated- and 58 pre-treated were retrospectively studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to assess EGFR-GCN and by immunohistochemistry (IHC to determine EGFR expression. Sixty-one out of 101 patients were evaluated also for k-ras status by direct sequencing. Clinical end-points were response rate (RR, progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS. Results Increased EGFR-GCN was found in 60/101 (59% tumor samples. There was no correlation between intensity of EGFR-IHC and EGFR-GCN (p = 0.43. Patients receiving chemotherapy plus Cetuximab as first line treatment had a RR of 70% (30/43 while it was 18% (10/56 in the group with previous lines of therapy (p Conclusion In metastatic CRC patients treated with chemotherapy plus Cetuximab number of chemotherapy lines and increased EGFR-GCN were significantly associated with a better clinical outcome, independent of k-ras status.

  6. Oncologic and functional outcome of base of tongue cancer treated with external-beam radiation and I-192 implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assesses tumor control and functional outcome for squamous cancer of the base of the tongue managed with external irradiation plus Ir-192 implant. Between January 1981 and June 1990, 36 previously untreated patients were treated with 5,000-5,400 cGy of external-beam radiation plus a 2,000-3,000 cGy boost to the base of tongue with an Ir-192 implant. Negative necks were irradiated alone, and positive necks were treated with irradiation followed by neck dissection. Crude local control by T stage are as follows: T1, 10 of 11; T2, 13 of 14; T3, 8 of 10; and T4 1 of 1. Actuarial local control is 87.5%. Of the four local failures, two were salvaged by surgery. Neck control was achieved in 35 of 36 patients. Complications occurred in 25%. When implantation was done with the nonlooping technique, the injury rate was statistically higher than when done with the looping technique (6 of 12 = 50% vs 3 of 24 = 12.5%, P = .02)

  7. Modern oncologic and operative outcomes for oesophageal cancer treated with curative intent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reynolds, J V

    2011-09-01

    The curative approach to oesophageal cancer carries significant risks and a cure is achieved in approximately 20 per cent. There has been a recent trend internationally to observe improved operative and oncological outcomes. This report audits modern outcomes from a high volume centre with a prospective database for the period 2004-08. 603 patients were referred and 310 (52%) were treated with curative intent. Adenocarcinoma represented 68% of the cohort, squamous cell cancer 30%. Of the 310 cases, 227 (73%) underwent surgery, 105 (46%) underwent surgery alone, and 122 (54%) had chemotherapy or combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The postoperative mortality rate was 1.7%. The median and 5-year survival of the 310 patients based on intention to treat was 36 months and 36%, respectively, and of the 181 patients undergoing R0 resection, 52 months and 42%, respectively. An in-hospital postoperative mortality rate of less than 2 per cent, and 5-year survival of between 35 and 42% is consistent with benchmarks from international series.

  8. The effects of radiotherapy and surgery on the sexual function of women treated for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study investigated the short- and medium-term effects of pelvic radiotherapy and surgery on the sexual function of women treated for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixteen women with Stages I, II, or III disease referred for radiotherapy treatment were assessed. Six had undergone prior hysterectomy. The women were assessed with questionnaires prior to radiotherapy, at completion of radiotherapy, and at 6 weeks and 14 weeks after radiotherapy treatment. The clinical findings at routine follow-up were noted. Results: The study showed significant changes in sexual activity and satisfaction as a result of treatment. This was due to a number of physical and psychological factors. The level of sexual activity was lowest at completion of radiotherapy treatment. A feeling of vaginal shortening was the most frequent reason and was more common in women who were treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Dyspareunia, bleeding, and concern of bleeding and/or recurrence were all significant factors. Conclusions: The questionnaires were an effective way of assessing women's sexual function. Radiotherapy caused sexual dysfunction in one-half of women. Combined treatment with radiotherapy and surgery results in a higher risk than radiotherapy alone. Women with cervical cancer and undergoing radiotherapy treatment require considerable counseling and support

  9. Acute toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated with and without image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) increases the accuracy of treatment delivery through daily target localisation. We report on toxicity symptoms experienced during radiotherapy treatment, with and without IGRT in prostate cancer patients treated radically. Between 2006 and 2009, acute toxicity data for ten symptoms were collected prospectively onto standardized assessment forms. Toxicity was scored during radiotherapy, according to the Common Terminology Criteria Adverse Events V3.0, for 275 prostate cancer patients before and after the implementation of a fiducial marker IGRT program and dose escalation from 74Gy in 37 fractions, to 78Gy in 39 fractions. Margins and planning constraints were maintained the same during the study period. The symptoms scored were urinary frequency, cystitis, bladder spasm, urinary incontinence, urinary retention, diarrhoea, haemorrhoids, proctitis, anal skin discomfort and fatigue. Analysis was conducted for the maximum grade of toxicity and the median number of days from the onset of that toxicity to the end of treatment. In the IGRT group, 14228 toxicity scores were analysed from 249 patients. In the non-IGRT group, 1893 toxicity scores were analysed from 26 patients. Urinary frequency ≥G3 affected 23% and 7% in the non-IGRT and IGRT group respectively (p = 0.0188). Diarrhoea ≥G2 affected 15% and 3% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0174). Fatigue ≥G2 affected 23% and 8% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0271). The median number of days with a toxicity was higher for ≥G2 (p = 0.0179) and ≥G3 frequency (p = 0.0027), ≥G2 diarrhoea (p = 0.0033) and ≥G2 fatigue (p = 0.0088) in the non-IGRT group compared to the IGRT group. Other toxicities were not of significant statistical difference. In this study, prostate cancer patients treated radically with IGRT had less severe urinary frequency, diarrhoea and fatigue during treatment compared to patients treated with non-IGRT. Onset of these

  10. Acute toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated with and without image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Scott

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT increases the accuracy of treatment delivery through daily target localisation. We report on toxicity symptoms experienced during radiotherapy treatment, with and without IGRT in prostate cancer patients treated radically. Methods Between 2006 and 2009, acute toxicity data for ten symptoms were collected prospectively onto standardized assessment forms. Toxicity was scored during radiotherapy, according to the Common Terminology Criteria Adverse Events V3.0, for 275 prostate cancer patients before and after the implementation of a fiducial marker IGRT program and dose escalation from 74Gy in 37 fractions, to 78Gy in 39 fractions. Margins and planning constraints were maintained the same during the study period. The symptoms scored were urinary frequency, cystitis, bladder spasm, urinary incontinence, urinary retention, diarrhoea, haemorrhoids, proctitis, anal skin discomfort and fatigue. Analysis was conducted for the maximum grade of toxicity and the median number of days from the onset of that toxicity to the end of treatment. Results In the IGRT group, 14228 toxicity scores were analysed from 249 patients. In the non-IGRT group, 1893 toxicity scores were analysed from 26 patients. Urinary frequency ≥G3 affected 23% and 7% in the non-IGRT and IGRT group respectively (p = 0.0188. Diarrhoea ≥G2 affected 15% and 3% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0174. Fatigue ≥G2 affected 23% and 8% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0271. The median number of days with a toxicity was higher for ≥G2 (p = 0.0179 and ≥G3 frequency (p = 0.0027, ≥G2 diarrhoea (p = 0.0033 and ≥G2 fatigue (p = 0.0088 in the non-IGRT group compared to the IGRT group. Other toxicities were not of significant statistical difference. Conclusions In this study, prostate cancer patients treated radically with IGRT had less severe urinary frequency, diarrhoea and fatigue during treatment

  11. FR901228 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Progressive Small Cell Lung Cancer or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  12. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuddin, A. Yusof; Rahman, I. Abdul; Siah, N. J.; Mohamed, F.; Saadc, M.; Ismail, F.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60rectum, rectal mean dose and NTCPrectum with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

  13. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60rectum, rectal mean dose and NTCPrectum with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy

  14. Two cases of intrapelvic recurrence after radical resection of rectal cancer, treated with carbon ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report two cases of intrapelvic recurrence after radical resection of rectal cancer, which were successfully treated with Carbon Ion Radiotherapy (C-ion RT). The first case is of a 71-year-old man who underwent abdominoperineal resection (APR) with D2 lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer in December 2010, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 plus oxaliplatin. The patient was diagnosed with a recurrence on the left pelvic wall in August 2012, and underwent C-ion RT (73.6 Gray equivalent) for this lesion in October 2012. Three months after this treatment, the lesion had regressed significantly, as ascertained by computed tomography (CT). He remains alive with no signs of recurrence. The second case is of a 63-year-old man who underwent APR with D3 lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with uracil-tegafur (UFT). The patient was diagnosed with a recurrence on the right pelvic wall in January 2013, and underwent C-ion RT(73.6 Gray equivalent) for this lesion in March 2013. Three months after this treatment, the lesion reduced significantly, and the patient is alive with no signs of recurrence. Although the long-term outcomes need to be assessed, C-ion RT could be a safe and effective therapy. (author)

  15. Prognostic factors for patients with esophageal cancer treated with radiation therapy in PCS. A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the prognostic factors, with special reference to age, for esophageal cancer patients, who did not receive surgery but were treated with radiation in the context of a Patterns of Care Study (PCS) in Japan. The fifth PCS database format employed in the United States was used to collect information on 455 esophageal cancer patients by external audit. The data of patients who had not received surgery (n=252) were further selected and divided into two age groups, patients 75 years old or older (n=90) and patients younger than 75 years (n=162). Cox's proportional hazards model was used for the statistical analysis, with crude survival as the endpoint. Variables tested were age; Karnofsky performance status (KPS); history of pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes; AJCC stage; external dose; treatment period; combination with chemotherapy; utilization of brachytherapy, and stratification of institutions. Statistically significant prognostic factors for all patients in the non-surgery group were KPS (p=.0001), stage (p=.0001), and utilization of brachytherapy (p=.0102). For younger patients, KPS (p=.0001), stage (p=.0007), external dose (p=.0001), and utilization of brachytherapy (p=.0034) were significant, and for the elderly, stage (p=.0001) and external dose (p=.0006). Although this was a preliminary study, age was not a significant prognostic factor for esophageal cancer patients in the non-surgery group, and making the external dose more than 60 Gy appears to be effective for improving survival of elderly as well as younger patients. (author)

  16. Synchronous HPV-associated cancer of the cervix and anal canal in a non-HIV infected patient treated simultaneously

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synchronous malignancies are uncommon. The oncogenic viruses like Human Papilloma Virus (HPV 16 and 18 have been implicated in the development of cancers of the cervix and anal canal and an increased risk occurs in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-infected (HIV individuals. Though cervical screening for HPV infection is recommended in female patients with anal cancers, synchronous presentation of cancer cervix and anal canal is rare. We present a case of a 72-year-old lady with synchronous cancer cervix and anal canal with HPV 16 positivity by polymerase chain reaction (PCR treated with external radiotherapy, followed by brachytherapy to both the sites.

  17. Biological Therapy Following Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  18. Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancers or Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-09

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  19. Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Relapsed Cancer After Bone Marrow or Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  20. Prognosis for Mammographically Occult, Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conservation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare mammographically occult (MamOcc) and mammographically positive (MamPos) early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT), to analyze differences between the two cohorts. Methods and Materials: Our two cohorts consisted of 214 MamOcc and 2168 MamPos patients treated with BCT. Chart reviews were conducted to assess mammogram reports and method of detection. All clinical-pathologic and outcome parameters were analyzed to detect differences between the two cohorts. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. There were no differences in final margins, T stage, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, or 'triple-negative' status. Significant differences included younger age at diagnosis (p o histology (p < 0.0001). At 10 years, the differences in overall survival, cause-specific survival, and distant relapse between the two groups did not differ significantly. The MamOcc cohort had more breast relapses (15% vs. 8%; p = 0.0357), but on multivariate analysis this difference was not significant (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.993-1.007, p = 0.9296). Breast relapses were mammographically occult in 32% of the MamOcc and 12% of the MamPos cohorts (p = 0.0136). Conclusions: Although our study suggests that there are clinical-pathologic variations for the MamOcc cohort vs. MamPos patients that may ultimately affect management, breast relapse after BCT was not significantly different. Breast recurrences were more often mammographically occult in the MamOcc cohort; consideration should be given to closer follow-up and alternative imaging strategies (ultrasound, breast MRI) for routine posttreatment examination. To our knowledge, this represents the largest series addressing the prognostic significance of MamOcc cancers treated with BCT.

  1. Dying after cure: A case of suicide in an adolescent treated for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Veneroni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although suicide among childhood cancer survivors is rare, there is still a significantly higher risk in this population than in healthy adolescents. A 17-year-old girl cured of Burkitt lymphoma committed suicide after completing her treatment. She had never previously shown signs of psychological suffering and was in good general health. This case made the operators wonder how this tragic possibility might be prevented. It is essential for the ongoing monitoring of the psychological and social suffering of young people during follow-up programs to be assured by a multidisciplinary team involved in the patient′s global care.

  2. Measurement of radiation exposure in attendants of thyroid cancer patients treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients treated with 131I for differentiated thyroid cancer present radiological risk to relatives, occupational exposed workers and general public. Recently, the IAEA issued document K-9010241, 2010, which recommends that patient discharge from hospital must be based on the particular status of each patient, unlike the current criteria applied in Mexico based on the exposure rate at a 1 m distance. In this work thermoluminescent dosimeters were used during a 15 day period to measure the effective dose received by 40 family caregivers of patients treated with 131I, after their release from hospital 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia', Mexico. Relatives were classified in two groups, ambulatory (outpatients) and hospitalized (inpatients), according to the release mode of the patient. Measurements were performed for 20 family caregivers in each group. The effective dose received by all family members of outpatient and inpatient groups was found to be smaller that 5 mSv. In addition, 70 and 90% of inpatient and outpatient groups, respectively, received doses lower than 1 mSv. These data provide information which allow to give recommendations of possible modifications to current regulations in Mexico regarding discharge from hospital of patients treated with radiopharmaceuticals. (Author)

  3. Common toxicities and objective response rate in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with irinotecan based regimens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Huang; Xin Liao; Qianqian Yu; Qiang Fu; Kai Qin; Huanlei Wu; Lihong Zhang; Xianglin Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to investigate if common toxicities are correlated to objective response rate (ORR) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated by irinotecan based regimens. Methods: Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate correlations between common toxicities and binary ORR in 106 mCRC patients from a prospective cohort treated with irinotecan based regimens. Results: The most frequent severe toxicities (Grade 3/4) were as follows: neutropenia (27.4%), diarrhea (16.9%), leucopenia (12.6%), vomiting (3.2%) and thrombocytopenia (2.1%). Thrombocytosis was observed in 25 (26.3%) patients. ORR was 25.3%. Thrombocytopenia (P = 0.014), line of chemotherapy (P = 0.028) and thrombocytosis (P = 0.033) were correlated with ORR in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, thrombocytopenia (odds ratio [OR] = 8.600, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.705–43.385, P = 0.009) and first line chemotherapy (OR = 5.155, 95% CI = 1.153–23.256, P = 0.032) positively related to ORR. Conclusion: Throm-bocytopenia may be an indicator of ORR in mCRC patients treated by irinotecan plus 5-fluorouracil/capecitabine. Evidence is not strong enough to prove that irinotecan based regimens-induced diarrhea, leucopenia, neutropenia or vomiting is associ-ated with ORR.

  4. PD-L1 Expression and Survival among Patients with Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Filskov Sorensen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent clinical trial results have suggested that programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1 expression measured by immunohistochemistry may predict response to anti–programmed cell death 1 (PD-1 therapy. Results on the association between PD-L1 expression and survival among patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with chemotherapy are inconsistent. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We evaluated the relationship between PD-L1 expression and overall survival (OS among 204 patients with advanced NSCLC treated at Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, from 2007 to 2012. PD-L1 expression was measured using a prototype immunohistochemistry assay with the anti–PD-L1 22C3 antibody (Merck. PD-L1 strong positivity and weak positivity were defined to be traceable to the clinical trial version of the assay. RESULTS: Twenty-five percent of patients had PD-L1 strong-positive tumors, and 50% had PD-L1 weak-positive tumors. No statistically significant association was found between PD-L1 expression and survival; adjusted hazard ratio of 1.34 (95% confidence interval, 0.88-2.03; median OS, 9.0 months for the PD-L1 strong-positive group and 1.07 (0.74-1.55; median OS, 9.8 months for the PD-L1 weak-positive group compared with the PD-L1–negative group (median OS, 7.5 months. No association was seen between PD-L1 expression and OS when PD-L1 expression levels were stratified by median or tertiles. CONCLUSIONS: In concordance with previous studies, we found PD-L1 measured by immunohistochemistry to be frequently expressed in patients with advanced NSCLC. However, PD-L1 expression is not a strong prognostic marker in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with chemotherapy.

  5. Body composition changes in females treated for breast cancer: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheean, Patricia M; Hoskins, Kent; Stolley, Melinda

    2012-10-01

    Body composition changes cannot be precisely captured using body weight or body mass index measures. Therefore, the primary purpose of this review was to characterize the patterns of body composition change in females treated for breast cancer including only studies that utilize imaging technologies to quantify adipose tissue and lean body mass (LBM). We reviewed PubMed for studies published between 1971 and 2012 involving females diagnosed with breast cancer where computed axial tomography , dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, or magnetic resonance imaging were employed for body composition assessment. Of the initial 440 studies, 106 papers were evaluated and 36 papers met all eligibility criteria (15 observational and 21 intervention trials). Results of these studies revealed that body weight did not consistently increase. Importantly, studies also showed that body weight did not accurately depict changes in lean or adipose tissues. Further findings included that sarcopenic obesity as a consequence of breast cancer treatment was not definitive, as menopausal status may be a substantial moderator of body composition. Overall, the behavioral interventions did not exhibit consistent or profound effects on body composition outcomes; approximately half showed favorable influence on adiposity while the effects on LBM were not apparent. The use of tamoxifen had a clear negative impact on body composition. The majority of studies were conducted in predominantly white survivors, highlighting the need for trials in minority populations. Collectively, these studies were limited by age, race, and/or menopause status matched control groups, overall size, and statistical power. Very few studies simultaneously collected diet and exercise data-two potential factors that impact body composition. Future breast cancer trials should prioritize precise body composition methodologies to elucidate how these changes impact recurrence, prognosis, and mortality, and to provide clinicians

  6. Thallium-201 perfusion scintigraphy in the evaluation of late myocardial damage in left-side breast cancer treated with adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate late myocardial damage after adjuvant radiotherapy using a mixed-beam (photons plus electrons) technique to treat the internal mammary lymph nodes in left-side breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A bicycle ergometer stress test coupled with thallium-201 perfusion scintigraphy and analysis by single-photon computed tomography (CT) was performed on 19 patients treated with left-side breast/chest wall and internal mammary radiation for breast cancer between 1987 and 1993. To be sure that we would evaluate late toxicity caused by the irradiation, patients had to fulfill the following eligibility criteria: left-side breast cancer, treatment between 1987 and 1993 and no recurrence during follow-up, age ≤75 years, no known risk for coronary artery disease, no previous chemotherapy, internal mammary field treated with an association of photons and electrons, and CT scan-based treatment planning. Results: Median age at scintigraphy was 59 years. Two patients did not reach optimal exercise level and were not evaluable. Among the 17 evaluable patients representing 91.6 patient years of follow-up, there were no perfusion defects by visual or quantitative analysis. Conclusion: The mixed-beam technique seemed to spare the heart from harmful irradiation and to protect the myocardium. Results need to be confirmed on the long-term use of this technique

  7. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer

  8. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  9. HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-08

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  10. Salinomycin sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells by increasing apoptosis via the prevention of G2 arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Yoo, Hye-In; Kang, Han Sung; Ro, Jungsil [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sungpil, E-mail: yoons@ncc.re.kr [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes them by prevention of G2 arrest and reduced cyclin D1 levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal also sensitizes them by increasing DNA damage and reducing p21 level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low concentration of Sal effectively sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether Sal could sensitize cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. We demonstrated that Sal sensitized paclitaxcel (PAC)-, docetaxcel (DOC)-, vinblastin (VIN)-, or colchicine (COL)-treated cancer cell lines, suggesting that Sal has the ability to sensitize the cells to any form of microtubule-targeting drugs. Sensitization to the antimitotic drugs could be achieved with very low concentrations of Sal, suggesting that there is a possibility to minimize Sal toxicity associated with human cancer patient treatments. Sensitization by Sal increased apoptosis, which was observed by C-PARP production. Sal sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by preventing G2 arrest, suggesting that Sal contributes to the induction of mitotic catastrophe. Sal generally reduced cyclin D1 levels in PAC-, DOC-, and VIN-treated cells. In addition, Sal treatment increased pH2AX levels and reduced p21 levels in antimitotic drugs-treated cells. These observations suggest that the mechanisms underlying Sal sensitization to DNA-damaging compounds, radiation, and microtubule-targeting drugs are similar. Our data demonstrated that Sal sensitizes cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by increasing apoptosis through the prevention of G2 arrest via conserved Sal-sensitization mechanisms. These results may contribute to the development of Sal-based chemotherapy for cancer patients treated with antimitotic drugs.

  11. Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity analysis of mammographic patterns in assessing breast cancer risk related to HRT treated population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Nielsen, Mads

    2009-01-01

      Structural texture measures are used to address the aspect of breast cancer risk assessment in screening mammograms. The current study investigates whether texture properties characterized by local Fractal Dimension (FD) and Lacunarity contribute to asses breast cancer risk. FD represents the....... It was found that there were no differences between cancer and control group for FD (P=0.8) and Lacunarity (P=0.8) in cross-sectional study whereas earlier published heterogeneity examination of radiographs (BC-HER) breast cancer risk score separated groups (p=0.002). In the longitudinal study, FD...... cancer population but marginally varying in HRT treated population. This study yields no evidence that lacunarity or FD are suitable surrogate markers of mammographic heterogeneity as they neither pick up breast cancer risk, nor show good sensitivity to HRT....

  12. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  13. Treatment Outcome and Quality of Life in Patients With Pediatric Extra-Cranial Germ Cell Tumors Previously Treated on Clinical Trial CCLG-GC-1979-01 or CCLG-GC-1989-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Gastrointestinal Complications; Infertility; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity; Ovarian Cancer; Pulmonary Complications; Sexual Dysfunction; Urinary Complications

  14. Genetic dissection of apoptosis and cell cycle control in response of colorectal cancer treated with preoperative radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous analyses we identified therapy-induced upregulation of the CDK inhibitor p21CIP/WAF-1 and consequently decreased tumor cell proliferation or loss of Bax as adverse factors for survival in rectal cancer treated with radiochemotherapy. Here, we address the individual role of p53 and its transcriptional targets, p21CIP/WAF-1 and Bax, on apoptosis induced by individual components of multimodal anticancer therapy, i.e. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), ionising γ-radiation (IR) and heat shock/hyperthermia. We analysed tumor samples 66 patients with rectal carcinoma treated by a neoadjuvant approach with radiochemotherapy ± heat shock/hyperthermia for the expression and mutation of p53 and the expression of p21CIP/WAF-1 and Bax. These data were correlated with the tumor response. The functional relevance of p53, p21CIP/WAF-1 and Bax was investigated in isogeneic HCT116 cell mutants treated with 5-FU, IR and heat shock. Rectal carcinoma patients who received an optimal heat shock treatment showed a response that correlated well with Bax expression (p = 0.018). Local tumor response in the whole cohort was linked to expression of p21CIP/WAF-1 (p < 0.05), but not p53 expression or mutation. This dichotomy of p53 pathway components regulating response to therapy was confirmed in vitro. In isogeneic HCT116 cell mutants, loss of Bax but not p53 or p21CIP/WAF-1 resulted in resistance against heat shock. In contrast, loss of p21CIP/WAF-1 or, to a lesser extent, p53 sensitized predominantly for 5-FU and IR. These data establish a different impact of p53 pathway components on treatment responses. While chemotherapy and IR depend primarily on cell cycle control and p21, heat shock depends primarily on Bax. In contrast, p53 status poorly correlates with response. These analyses therefore provide a rational approach for dissecting the mode of action of single treatment modalities that may be employed to circumvent clinically relevant resistance mechanisms in rectal cancer

  15. Incidences of overall and site specific cancers in TNFα inhibitor treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other arthritides - a follow-up study from the DANBIO Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Lene; Mellemkjær, Lene; Andersen, Anne Rødgaard;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the incidence of cancer in arthritis patients treated with or without TNFα inhibitors (TNF-I). METHODS: Arthritis patients from the DANBIO database were followed-up for cancer in the Danish Cancer Registry during 2000-2008. RESULTS: Hazard ratio for cancer overall was 1...... with an overall excess of cancer in arthritis patients, but observed increased risks of colon and ovarian cancer need further investigation....

  16. Clinical evaluation of parotid function of head and neck cancer patients treated with IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We presented our preliminary results of initial experience by Helical TomoTherapy held at the 23rd annual meeting of Japanese Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JASTRO) on October 2010. In this analysis, 82 parotid glands from 41 patients, who were treated with definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) combined with or without systemic chemotherapy, were assessed for the correlation of radiation dose with parotid function evaluated by salivary scintigraphy. Acquired results of salivary scintigraphy are well correlated with grade of xerostomia after IMRT. Initial experience of IMRT in our institute for head and neck cancer is thought to be promising at the viewpoint of both clinical efficacy and less toxicity. (author)

  17. Fluoroscopy guided double-guidewire tube placement in treating anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical application of double-guidewire tube placement under fluoroscopy in treating the anastomotic leakage alter esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. Methods: Naso- intestinal feeding tube and gastrointestinal decompression tube were placed through double-guidewire under fluoroscopic guidance for 12 patients with anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy. The technical success rate, average time for the procedure, complications and the cure rate of leakage were evaluated. Results: All tubes were placed successfully in 100% technically, together with procedure time from 5 to 8 min (mean 6 min) for each patients. Complications related to procedure and tube placement such as arrhythmia, malpositioning, aspiration pneumonia and epiglottic dysfunction did not occur. Of the 12 patients, 10 were cured at 17-37d (mean 28 d) and 2 died. Conclusion: Fluoroscopy guided double-guidewire tube placement is easy and safe; promoting the cure rate of anastomotic leakage after esophageetomy. (authors)

  18. Early-stage bilateral breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and definitive irradiation: the university of Pennsylvania experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with early-stage bilateral breast cancer can be treated with definitive irradiation following breast-conserving surgery with acceptable survival, local control, complications, and cosmesis. Methods and Materials: During the period 1977-1992, 55 women with Stage 0, I, or II concurrent (n = 12) or sequential (n = 43) bilateral breast cancer were treated with definitive irradiation following breast-conserving surgery. The records of these 55 patients with 110 treated breasts were reviewed for tumor size, histology, pathologic axillary lymph node status, first and overall site(s) of failure, and adjuvant chemotherapy or hormonal therapy. Curves for survival, local control, and regional control were determined. Cosmetic outcome, complication rates, and matching technique were analyzed. The median total radiation dose delivered was 64 Gy (range 42-72) using tangential whole-breast irradiation followed by an electron or iridium implant boost. The tangential fields were matched with no overlap in 40 patients (73%); there was overlap on skin of up to 4 cm in 14 patients (25%); and the matching technique was unknown in 1 patient (2%). The median follow-up for the 12 women with concurrent bilateral breast cancer was 4.0 years. The median follow-up for the other 43 women with sequential cancer was 9.3 and 4.9 years, respectively, after the first and second cancers. Results: For the overall group of 55 patients, the 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 96% and 94%, respectively, after treatment of the first cancer, and 96% and 92%, respectively, after treatment of the second cancer. The 5- and 10-year actuarial relapse-free survival rates were 90% and 75%, respectively, after treatment of the first cancer, and 83% and 72%, respectively, after treatment of the second cancer. For the 110 treated breast cancers, the 5- and 10-year actuarial local failure rates were 5% and 15%, respectively. Complication rates were: 28% breast edema, 8

  19. Prognostic Significance of p16 Expression in Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of 126 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stages Ib1–IVb cervical cancer treated with radiation. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was given to 108 patients. A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed from the paraffin-embedded diagnostic biopsy specimens. Immunoperoxidase staining was performed on the TMA and a p16 monoclonal antibody was utilized. IHC p16 extent was evaluated and scored in quartiles: 0 = no staining, 1 = 1–25% of cells staining, 2 = 26 to 50%, 3 = 51 to 75%, and 4 = 76 to 100%. Results: The p16 IHC score was 4 in 115 cases, 3 in 1, 2 in 3 and 0 in 7. There was no relationship between p16 score and tumor histology. Patients with p16-negative tumors were older (mean age at diagnosis 65 vs. 52 years for p16-positive tumors; p = 0.01). The 5-year cause-specific survivals were 33% for p16-negative cases (score = 0) compared with 63% for p16-positive cases (scores 1, 2, 3 or 4; p = 0.07). The 5-year recurrence-free survivals were 34% for those who were p16-negative vs. 57% for those who were p16-positive (p = 0.09). In addition, patients with p16-positive tumors (score > 0) were more likely to be complete metabolic responders as assessed by the 3-month posttherapy 18 [F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomograph compared with patients with p16-negative tumors (p = 0.03). Conclusion: p16 expression is predictive of improved survival outcome after chemoradiation therapy for advanced-stage invasive cervical carcinoma. Further testing will be needed to evaluate p16-negative cervical tumors.

  20. Is neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy beneficial in prostate cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Keun Yong; Ha, Sung W.; Lee, Eun Sik; Kwak, Cheol [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Eun [Dept.of Urology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To determine whether neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (NADT) improves clinical outcomes in patients with prostate cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 201 patients with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy between January 1991 and December 2008. Of these, 156 patients with more than 3 years of follow-up were the subjects of this study. The median duration of follow-up was 91.2 months. NADT was given in 103 patients (66%) with median duration of 3.3 months (range, 1.0 to 7.7 months). Radiation dose was escalated gradually from 64 Gy to 81 Gy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique. Biochemical relapse-free survival (BCRFS) and overall survival (OS) of all patients were 72.6% and 90.7% at 5 years, respectively. BCRFS and OS of NADT group were 79.5% and 89.8% at 5 years and those of radiotherapy alone group were 58.8% and 92.3% at 5 years, respectively. Risk group (p = 0.010) and radiation dose > or =70 Gy (p = 0.017) affected BCRFS independently. NADT was a significant prognostic factor in univariate analysis, but not in multivariate analysis (p = 0.073). Radiation dose > or =70 Gy was only an independent factor for OS (p = 0.007; hazard ratio, 0.261; 95% confidence interval, 0.071-0.963). NADT prior to definitive radiotherapy did not result in significant benefit in terms of BCRFS and OS. NADT should not be performed routinely in the era of dose-escalated radiotherapy.

  1. A Statistical Evaluation of Rules for Biochemical Failure After Radiotherapy in Men Treated for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The 'PSA nadir + 2 rule,' defined as any rise of 2 ng/ml above the current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir, has replaced the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) rule, defined as three consecutive PSA rises, to indicate biochemical failure (BF) after radiotherapy in patients treated for prostate cancer. We propose an original approach to evaluate BF rules based on the PSAdt as the gold standard rule and on a simulation process allowing us to evaluate the BF rules under multiple settings (different frequency, duration of follow-up, PSA doubling time [PSAdt]). Methods and Materials: We relied on a retrospective, population-based cohort of individuals identified by the Connecticut Tumor Registry and treated for localized prostate cancer with radiotherapy. We estimated the 470 underlying true PSA trajectories, including the PSAdt, using a Bayesian hierarchical changepoint model. Next, we simulated realistic, sophisticated data sets that accurately reflect the systematic and random variations observed in PSA series. We estimated the sensitivity and specificity by comparing the simulated PSA series to the underlying true PSAdt. Results: For follow-up of more than 3 years, the specificity of the PSA nadir + 2 rule was systematically greater than that of the ASTRO criterion. In few settings, the nadir + 2 rule had a lower sensitivity than the ASTRO. The PSA nadir + 2 rule appeared less dependent on the frequency and duration of follow-up than the ASTRO. Conclusions: Our results provide some refinements to earlier findings as the BF rules were evaluated according to various parameters. In most settings, the PSA nadir + 2 rule outperforms the ASTRO criterion.

  2. Analysis of micronuclei in peripheral lymphocytes of patients treated for thyroid cancer with iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The micronucleus test in human peripheral lymphocytes is a frequently applied assay for biological dosimetry. In the present study, the dose-effect relationship was assessed between the radiation doses received by patients treated with iodine-131 for thyroid cancer and the frequency of micronuclei (Mn) in circulating lymphocytes of these patients. The aim of the study was to verify the sensitivity of the Mn assay to detect a putative accidental overexposure to radioactive iodine. Material and Methods: Frequencies of micronuclei in binucleated cells (BNC) obtained from venous blood were estimated in 29 patients with various forms of thyroid cancer who received between 166 MBq and 6.5 GBq of I-131. Blood was collected on day 4 following the administration of the iodine. The frequencies of Mn were compared to those detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 34 control donors, who were age- and sex-matched to the patients. Results: The mean Mn frequency in the patients' lymphocytes (32.8 per 1000 BNC) was significantly higher than in the lymphocytes of the control donors (19.4 per 1000 BNC; p<0,001, two-tailed t-test). In the patients, a strong inter-individual variability in Mn frequency was found. Due to this, only a weak correlation (r=0.19) was detected between the Mn frequency and the activity of I-131. In both groups of the donors, the Mn frequency increased with age. Conclusion: Although a significant difference in the Mn frequency was observed between the I-131-treated and control donors, the weak dose-effect relationship indicates that the Mn assay is not sensitive enough to detect an overexposure to this isotope, at least in the tested activity range

  3. Incidence, Natural History, and Patterns of Locoregional Recurrence in Gastric Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the incidence and patterns (in-field, marginal, or out-of-field) of locoregional gastric cancer recurrence in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy and to determine the outcome in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2004, 149 patients with gastric carcinoma were treated according to institutional protocols with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Ultimately, 105 patients had an R0 resection. Of these 105 patients, 65 received preoperative chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and 40 received preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Most (96%) of these patients received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy during radiotherapy, and the median radiation dose was 45 Gy. We retrospectively identified and classified the patterns of locoregional recurrence. Results: The 3-year actuarial incidence of locoregional recurrence was 13%, with locoregional disease recurring as any part of the failure pattern in 14 patients. Most (64%) of the evaluable locoregional recurrences were in-field. Of the 4 patients with a marginal recurrence, 2 had had inadequate coverage of the regional nodal volumes on their oblique fields. The pathologic complete response rate was 23%. A pathologic complete response was the only statistically significant predictor of locoregional control. Conclusion: Patients with gastric cancer who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy had low rates of locoregional recurrence. This strategy merits prospective multi-institutional and randomized evaluation

  4. Prediction of outcome in buccal cancers treated with radical radiotherapy based on the early tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G V Giri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: Aim was to assess the clinical significance of the rate of tumor regression in carcinoma buccal mucosa undergoing radical radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Sixty six patients were enrolled in the study with proven buccal cancers requiring radical radiotherapy, from 1990 to 1996. Radiotherapy was delivered using a combination of external beam and brachytherapy with preloaded cesium 137 needles. The response to the radiation was assessed at the completion of external beam radiation and 6 weeks after brachytherapy. An analysis correlating various parameters influencing the long term disease free survival and overall survival was done. Results: Response assessed at the end of external beam radiation correlated strongly with the overall survival and the disease free interval (P=0.000. No other factor influenced the survival. Conclusion: The rate of the tumor regression can predict the overall outcome in patients with buccal cancers treated with radiation. Completion of the planned course of radiation in patients who do not show a substantial reduction in size by 4.5 weeks of conventional radiation does not improve the results.

  5. Evaluation of Diabetic Patients with Breast Cancer Treated with Metformin during Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Ferro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate acute locoregional toxicity in patients with breast cancer receiving concurrent metformin plus radiation therapy. Methods and Materials. Diabetic breast cancer patients receiving concurrent metformin and radiation therapy were matched with nondiabetic patients and diabetic patients using an alternative diabetes medication. Primary endpoints included the presence of a treatment break and development of dry or moist desquamation. Results. There was a statistically significant increase in treatment breaks for diabetic patients receiving concurrent metformin when compared to the nondiabetic patients (P value = 0.02 and a trend toward significance when compared to diabetic patients receiving an alternate diabetes medication (P value = 0.08. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated concurrent metformin use as being associated with a trend toward the predictive value of determining the incidence of developing desquamation in diabetic patients receiving radiation therapy compared to diabetic patients receiving an alternate diabetes medication (P value = 0.06. Conclusions. Diabetic patients treated with concurrent metformin and radiation therapy developed increased acute locoregional toxicity in comparison with diabetic patients receiving an alternate diabetes medication and nondiabetic patients. Further clinical investigation should be conducted to determine the therapeutic ratio of metformin in combination with radiation therapy.

  6. Outcomes in Patients With Early-Stage Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome in patients with early-stage hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) who were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between February 1988 and February 2007, 77 patients with Stage I or Stage II HPC underwent definitive RT in the Division of Radiation Oncology at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Eleven of the patients received local irradiation, and the other 66 patients received elective bilateral neck irradiation and booster irradiation to the primary lesion. The median follow-up period for all the patients was 33 months from the start of RT, ranging from 3 to 229 months. Results: The rates of overall survival, HPC-specific survival, HPC recurrence-free survival, and local control with laryngeal voice preservation for the 77 patients at 5 years were 47%, 74%, 57%, and 70%, respectively. The survival rates were not affected by the patient characteristics or treatment factors, but the RT field was significantly correlated with local control in a multivariate analysis. Seven of the patients had Grade 3 or greater complications, but these complications occurred after salvage surgery in 6 of the patients. Of the 77 patients, 83% had synchronous or metachronous malignancies, but these malignancies did not influence the survival of the patients if the malignancies were detected at an early stage. Conclusion: RT is an appropriate treatment method for early-stage HPC. However, because synchronous or metachronous malignancies occur at a relatively high frequency, careful follow-up and the early detection of such malignancies are critical.

  7. Five-year cure of cervical cancer treated using californium-252 neutron brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Female pelvic carcinoma is one of the common malignancies seen at the University of Kentucky Medical Center and often presents in an advanced stage. In 1976, the authors began to test californium-252 neutron brachytherapy (NT) for its efficacy for control of primary and recurrent advanced uterine, cervix, and vaginal cancers. The first protocol used was 5000-5500 rad of whole pelvis irradiation followed by 1-2 Cf-252 insertions using a single tandem placed in the utero-cervico-vaginal region. Of 27 patients with primary carcinomas treated, 10 are alive and well 5 year later (37%). Two of two recurrent tumors were locally controlled but failed later. These patients had advanced cervical, vaginal, or endometrial carcinomas. In 1977, a transitional year, treatment of only unfavorable stages and presentations with NT was initiated. Similar results were obtained with NT as compared to conventional photon therapy (PT). Further improvement in treatment results can be anticipated as NT brachytherapy is used for advanced cancer therapy by more effective treatment schedules and radiation doses. Cf-252 can be used as a radium substitute and achieved similar rates of tumor control and 5-year survivals. 21 references, 2 tables

  8. Xeroderma pigmentosum group D 751 polymorphism as a predictive factor in resected gastric cancer treated withchemo-radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zarate, R; F. Arias; Bandres, E; Cubedo, E.; Malumbres, R.; Garcia-Foncillas, J

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the potential association of xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) codon 751 variant with outcome after chemo-radiotherapy in patients with resected gastric cancer. METHODS: We used PCR-RFLP to evaluate the genetic XPD Lys751Gln polymorphisms in 44 patients with stage III (48%) and IV (20%) gastric cancer treated with surgery following radiation therapy plus 5-fluorouracil/ leucovorin based chemotherapy. RESULTS: Statistical analysis showed that 75% (...

  9. Dose-volume analysis for respiratory toxicity in intrathoracic esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy using extended fields

    OpenAIRE

    Tanabe, Satoshi; Myojin, Miyako; Shimizu, Shinichi; Fujino, Masaharu; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Shirato, Hiroki; Ito, Yoichi M.; Ishikawa, Masayori; Hosokawa, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the relationship between dosimetric parameters (DPs) and the incidence of radiation pneumonitis (RP) and investigated the feasibility of a proposed treatment planning technique with the potential of reducing RP in esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy using extended fields. Patients and Methods: A total of 149 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer were prospectively enrolled for extended-field radiotherapy (EFRT) to three-field r...

  10. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, not 3D conformal, is the preferred technique for treating locally advanced lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Joe Y.

    2014-01-01

    When used to treat lung cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can deliver higher dose to the targets and spare more critical organs in lung cancer than can 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). However, tumor-motion management and optimized radiotherapy planning based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scanning are crucial to maximize the benefit of IMRT and to eliminate or minimize potential uncertainties. This article summarizes these strategies and reviews published fin...

  11. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jingmei; Lindström, Linda; Foo, Jia; Rafiq, Meena; Schmidt, Marjanka; Pharoah, Paul; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet; Wang, Qing; Veer, Laura; Cornelissen, Sten; Rutgers, Emiel; Southey, Melissa; Apicella, Carmel

    2014-01-01

    textabstractLarge population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological G...

  12. Standardized Method for Quantification of Developing Lymphedema in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a simple and practical formula for quantifying breast cancer-related lymphedema, accounting for both the asymmetry of upper extremities' volumes and their temporal changes. Methods and Materials: We analyzed bilateral perometer measurements of the upper extremity in a series of 677 women who prospectively underwent lymphedema screening during treatment for unilateral breast cancer at Massachusetts General Hospital between August 2005 and November 2008. Four sources of variation were analyzed: between repeated measurements on the same arm at the same session; between both arms at baseline (preoperative) visit; in follow-up measurements; and between patients. Effects of hand dominance, time since diagnosis and surgery, age, weight, and body mass index were also analyzed. Results: The statistical distribution of variation of measurements suggests that the ratio of volume ratios is most appropriate for quantification of both asymmetry and temporal changes. Therefore, we present the formula for relative volume change (RVC): RVC = (A2U1)/(U2A1) - 1, where A1, A2 are arm volumes on the side of the treated breast at two different time points, and U1, U2 are volumes on the contralateral side. Relative volume change is not significantly associated with hand dominance, age, or time since diagnosis. Baseline weight correlates (p = 0.0074) with higher RVC; however, baseline body mass index or weight changes over time do not. Conclusions: We propose the use of the RVC formula to assess the presence and course of breast cancer-related lymphedema in clinical practice and research.

  13. KRAS and BRAF mutations in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: KRAS and BRAF are mutated in 35% and 10% of colorectal cancers, respectively. However, data specifically for locally advanced rectal cancers are scarce, and the frequency of KRAS mutations in codons 61 and 146 remains to be established. Materials and methods: DNA was isolated from pre-therapeutic biopsies of 94 patients who were treated within two phase-III clinical trials receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Mutation status of KRAS exons 1-3 and BRAF exon 15 was established using the ABI PRISM Big Dye Sequencing Kit and subsequently correlated with clinical parameters. Results: Overall, KRAS was mutated in 45 patients (48%). Twenty-nine mutations (64%) were located in codon 12, 10 mutations (22%) in codon 13, and 3 mutations (7%) in codons 61 and 146. No V600E BRAF mutation was detected. The presence of KRAS mutations was correlated neither with tumor response or lymph node status after preoperative chemoradiotherapy nor with overall survival or disease-free survival. When KRAS exon 1 mutations were separated based on the amino-acid exchange, we again failed to detect significant correlations (p = 0.052). However, G12V mutations appeared to be associated with higher rates of tumor regression than G13D mutations (p = 0.012). Conclusion: We are the first to report the mutation status of KRAS and BRAF in pre-therapeutic biopsies from locally advanced rectal cancers. The high number of KRAS mutations in codons 61 and 146 emphasizes the importance to expand current mutation analyses, whereas BRAF mutations are not relevant for rectal carcinogenesis. Although the KRAS mutation status was not correlated with response, the subtle difference between G12V and G13D mutations warrants analysis of a larger patient population.

  14. Incidence rate of prostate cancer in men treated for erectile dysfunction with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors: retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chavez, Anthony H; Scott Coffield, K; Hasan Rajab, M; Jo, Chanhee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence rate of prostate cancer among men with erectile dysfunction (ED) treated with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE-5i) over a 7-year period vs. men with ED of the same age and with similar risk factors who were not treated with PDE-5i. In a retrospective review of electronic medical records and billing databases between the years 2000 and 2006, men with ED between the ages of 50 and 69 years and no history of prostate cancer prior t...

  15. The Cancer Cow: A study of the risks associated with milk from rbGH treated cows

    OpenAIRE

    Malawa, Zea

    2002-01-01

    In 1993 the FDA approved the commercial sale of milk from rbGH treated cows. Despite this approval, there are a number of public health concerns that have arisen about the safety of this milk. Specifically, there is concern that this milk may increase the risk and rate of cancer. Milk from rbGH treated cows has elevated levels of IGF-1. Furthermore, some amount of IGF-1 from the milk is orally active in humans. IGF-1 has a strong association with a number of cancers including breast, prostate...

  16. Genital tuberculosis in a tamoxifen-treated postmenopausal woman with breast cancer and bloody vaginal discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maraki Sofia

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Female genital tuberculosis is an uncommon disease that is rarely diagnosed in developed countries. Case presentation A 61-year-old postmenopausal woman who had undergone surgery and treated with adjuvant chemotherapy for infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast five years ago, presented with bloody vaginal discharge, fatigue, weight loss, and low grade fevers at night for two months. Histological examination of the endometrium, done based on the suspicion of a second primary cancer due to the tamoxifen therapy, revealed a granulomatous reaction. Liquid and solid mycobacterial cultures of the tissues were performed. Although the acid fast staining was negative, the liquid culture was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Involvement of other systems was not detected. The patient was treated with a three-drug antituberculosis regimen for 9 months and recovered fully. Conclusion Female genital tuberculosis is a rare but curable disease that should be included in the differential diagnosis of women with menstrual problems. Early diagnosis is important and may prevent unnecessary invasive procedures for the patient.

  17. Intestinal Malabsorption in Long-Term Survivors of Cervical Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the associations between pelvic radiotherapy (RT) and markers of intestinal absorption in cervical cancer survivors (CCSs). We compared patient data with normative data from a reference population and explored the associations between cobalamin status and clinically significant diarrhea and depression. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five CCSs treated with RT in 1994-1999 were included in 2005 in a follow-up questionnaire study exploring physical and psychological symptoms. Blood tests, including serum (S)-vitamin B12, S-methylmalonic acid, S-folate, erythrocyte-folate, and plasma homocysteine, were analyzed. Differences in median values between CCSs and reference populations were evaluated by using Wilcoxon tests. Associations between variables were examined by means of multiple regression analyses. Results: Median S-vitamin B12 level was significantly lower and median S-methylmalonic acid level was significantly higher in CCSs compared with the reference population (p 12 level is recommended, and regular intake of cobalamin should be considered in CCSs treated with RT

  18. Frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of women with breast cancer treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study proposes to obtain information about the behavior of the frequency and distribution of radiation induced lymphocyte dicentric chromosome aberrations with therapeutic doses in women with breast cancer treated only with radiotherapy, about which there are no existing works in Chile. Blood samples were taken from 6 women volunteers included in the study, with their informed consent, treated in the Fundacion Arturo Lopez Perez, aged 24 to 65 years old, without prior or parallel chemotherapy, nor prior radiotherapy. Three peripheral blood samples were taken from each patient in 0, 16.2 and 43.2 Gy doses. The lymphocytes obtained from each sample were cultivated using the micro-culture technique following the protocol in IAEA Technical Report No. 405, 2001. The samples were evaluated under a microscope and the unstable chromosome aberrations for lymphocytes were counted. A total of 500 cells per sample was evaluated in most cases, which were distributed depending on the number of aberrations that they had. The results were analyzed by treatment dose for each of the study patients, using the Papworth u test, Dolphin's 'Contaminated Poisson' method and Sasaki's 'QDR'. Great variations were observed in the frequency distribution of aberrations among the patients studied, which could be due to the influence of factors related to the patients' partial irradiations (C.Wood)

  19. CT findings in non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with gefitinib or erlotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Im Il Na

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We performed this study to explore the association of computed tomography (CT findings with outcomes of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with tyrosin kinase inhibitor (TKI such as gefitinib or erlotinib. Materials and Methods: We analyzed outcomes for 240 patients according to primary tumor (T, regional nodal (N staging and diffuse small pulmonary metastases (DSPM at the initial presentation. Tests for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation were performed in 92 patients. Results: On multivariate analysis for tumor response, the N3 stage was predictive of a poor response (P < 0.001, whereas DSPM was a favorable factor (P = 0.007. Multivariate analysis for progression-free survival showed that the T3-4 stage (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.5, P < 0.001, in addition to the N3 stage (HR: 2.1, P < 0.001, was predictive of a poor outcome, whereas DSPM (HR: 0.6, P = 0.006 was a favorable factor. Notably, the multivariate model that included the EGFR mutational status revealed that the T3-4 stage predicted poor progression-free survival (HR: 2.2, P = 0.017 and poor overall survival (HR: 4.1, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Our data suggest that, in addition to EGFR mutational status, T-stage based on CT is predictive of outcomes of TKI-treated NSCLC patients.

  20. Histologic analysis of rabbit liver cancer treated by bulk ultrasound ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Chandra Priya; Rudich, Steven M.; Alqadah, Amel; Burgess, Mark T.; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2012-10-01

    VX2 rabbit liver cancer, treated in vivo using bulk ultrasound ablation by miniaturized image-ablate arrays, was histologically analyzed using TTC vital stain and DAPI nucleic acid stain. VX2 cells were implanted into rabbit liver lobes and allowed to grow for 11-21 days. Liver lobes containing solid VX2 tumors were then treated with 4.8 MHz, 22.5-38.5 W/cm2 in situ intensity, unfocused ultrasound for exposure times of 20-120 s. After animal sacrifice, thermal lesions were bisected along the imaging/treatment plane, one face stained with TTC, and the other with DAPI. Levels of TTC uptake (no uptake, partial uptake, and complete uptake) in liver parenchyma corresponded to three discrete regions of tan, pink and red color. By processing images of DAPI-stained parenchymal tissue from these three regions, cellular damage was quantified. A viability index parameter incorporating the size and shape of DAPI-stained nuclei correlated significantly with levels of TTC uptake, and thus with local tissue viability. For ablation of normal liver, viability indices for parenchymal regions of no TTC uptake and partial TTC uptake were significantly different from those for viable tissue. For ablation of VX2 tumor, differences in viability index between regions of no TTC uptake and complete TTC uptake were smaller, but significant overall.

  1. Can GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms predict clinical outcomes of chemotherapy in gastric and colorectal cancers? A result based on the previous reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Haixia Liu,1,* Wei Shi,2,* Lianli Zhao,3 Dianlu Dai,4 Jinghua Gao,5 Xiangjun Kong6 1Department of Ultrasound, 2Office of Medical Statistics, 3Human Resource Department, 4Department of Surgical Oncology, 5Department of Medical Oncology, 6Central Laboratory, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Yunhe District, Cangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this study and should be considered cofirst authors Background: Gastric and colorectal cancers remain the major causes of cancer-related death. Although chemotherapy improves the prognosis of the patients with gastrointestinal cancers, some patients do not benefit from therapy and are exposed to the adverse effects. The polymorphisms in genes including GSTM1 and GSTT1 have been explored to predict therapeutic efficacy; however, the results were inconsistent and inconclusive. Materials and methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching relevant studies about the association between the GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms and chemotherapy efficacy in gastrointestinal cancers in databases such as PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang database up to January 10, 2016. Subgroup analyses were also performed according to ethnicity, cancer type, evaluation criteria, study type, chemotherapy type, and age. Results: A total of 19 articles containing 3,217 cases were finally included. Overall analysis suggested that no significance was found between overall toxicity, neurotoxicity, neutropenia, gastrointestinal toxicity, tumor response, and progression-free survival, and the polymorphisms in GSTM1 and GSTT1, while GSTM1 polymorphism associated with overall survival (OS; hazard ratio =1.213, 95% confidence interval =1.060–1.388, P=0.005. Subgroup analyses suggested that neurotoxicity was associated with GSTM1 polymorphism in the Asian population, neutropenia was associated with GSTM1 polymorphism in palliative

  2. Influence of radiotherapy on node-positive prostate cancer treated with androgen ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Patients with node-positive prostate cancer that is regionally localized (T1-4, N1-3, M0) have a relatively poor prognosis when a single-treatment modality such as radical surgery, definitive radiotherapy, or androgen ablation is used. While promising results using radical surgery and androgen ablation have been reported, there are no data to support an analogous approach using local radiotherapy and androgen ablation. In this retrospective review, the outcome after local radiotherapy and early androgen ablation (XRT/HORM) was compared to early androgen ablation alone (HORM). Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 1992 there were 181 patients treated with HORM and 27 patients treated with XRT/HORM at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The nodal status of all patients was established pathologically by lymph node dissection, which was terminated after frozen section confirmation of involvement. In the majority of cases androgen ablation was by orchiectomy. The median dose to the prostate in XRT/HORM group was 66 Gy. The median follow-up was 45 months; 49 months for the HORM group and 25 months for the XRT/HORM group. Results: The distribution of prognostic factors between the HORM and XRT/HORM groups was similar, with the exception of tumor grade. There was a significantly larger proportion of high grade tumors in the HORM group. In terms of actuarial disease outcome, at 4 years the results of patients in the HORM group were significantly worse, including a rising prostate specific antigen (PSA) of 53%, any disease progression of 32%, a rising PSA or disease progression of 55%, and local progression of 22%. None of the patients in the XRT/HORM group failed biochemically or clinically. To determine the impact of grade on these findings, the analyses were repeated, using only those with grade 2 tumors. A similar pattern was evidenced with significantly worse actuarial outcome at 4 years for the HORM group using the endpoints of a rising PSA

  3. Pulmonary fibrosis in youth treated with radioiodine for juvenile thyroid cancer and lung metastases after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project was to systematically determine the prevalence and consequences of pulmonary fibrosis in youth with thyroid carcinoma and lung metastases from Belarus who were treated with radioiodine (131I). A total of 69 patients treated for juvenile thyroid carcinoma and lung metastasis with 131I were assessed. A group of 29 patients without lung metastases and prior 131I treatment served as controls. The assessments included a CT scan of the lungs, extensive pulmonary function testing and an incremental cycle test to volitional fatigue with measurements of oxygen uptake (V. O2), oxygen saturation and alveolar-arterial difference in oxygen partial pressure (ΔaaO2). Five patients with lung metastases showed advanced pulmonary fibrosis on CT scans and also had poorer lung functions compared with the 62 patients with none or minor signs of fibrosis and the 29 controls. Furthermore, these five patients showed lower peak V.O2, lower oxygen saturation at peak exercise and higher exercise ΔaaO2. They were younger at the time of cancer diagnosis and had received chemotherapy more frequently than youth with pulmonary metastases who did not develop fibrosis. One of the five patients subsequently died from pulmonary fibrosis. Following the Chernobyl catastrophe, about 7% of children treated with radioiodine for thyroid carcinoma and lung metastases displayed pulmonary fibrosis which was associated with functional impairments. Based on the characteristics of affected individuals, the number of radioiodine courses may have to be limited, especially in young children, and chemotherapy should be avoided. (orig.)

  4. Pulmonary fibrosis in youth treated with radioiodine for juvenile thyroid cancer and lung metastases after Chernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebestreit, Helge; Burkhardt, Antje [University Children' s Hospital, Wuerzburg (Germany); Biko, Johannes; Reiners, Christoph [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Drozd, Valentina [International Belarussian-German Foundation, Minsk (Belarus); Demidchik, Yuri [Thyroid Cancer Centre, Minsk (Belarus); Trusen, Andreas [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johanniter-Krankenhaus, Genthin-Stendal gGmbH, Stendal (Germany); Beer, Meinrad [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    The objective of this project was to systematically determine the prevalence and consequences of pulmonary fibrosis in youth with thyroid carcinoma and lung metastases from Belarus who were treated with radioiodine ({sup 131}I). A total of 69 patients treated for juvenile thyroid carcinoma and lung metastasis with {sup 131}I were assessed. A group of 29 patients without lung metastases and prior {sup 131}I treatment served as controls. The assessments included a CT scan of the lungs, extensive pulmonary function testing and an incremental cycle test to volitional fatigue with measurements of oxygen uptake (V. O{sub 2}), oxygen saturation and alveolar-arterial difference in oxygen partial pressure ({delta}aaO{sub 2}). Five patients with lung metastases showed advanced pulmonary fibrosis on CT scans and also had poorer lung functions compared with the 62 patients with none or minor signs of fibrosis and the 29 controls. Furthermore, these five patients showed lower peak V.O{sub 2}, lower oxygen saturation at peak exercise and higher exercise {delta}aaO{sub 2}. They were younger at the time of cancer diagnosis and had received chemotherapy more frequently than youth with pulmonary metastases who did not develop fibrosis. One of the five patients subsequently died from pulmonary fibrosis. Following the Chernobyl catastrophe, about 7% of children treated with radioiodine for thyroid carcinoma and lung metastases displayed pulmonary fibrosis which was associated with functional impairments. Based on the characteristics of affected individuals, the number of radioiodine courses may have to be limited, especially in young children, and chemotherapy should be avoided. (orig.)

  5. Outcome in recurrent head neck cancer treated with salvage-IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recurrent head neck cancer (rHNC) is a known unfavourable prognostic condition. The purpose of this work was to analyse our rHNC subgroup treated with salvage-intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for curable recurrence after initial surgery alone. Between 4/2003–9/2008, 44 patients with squamous cell rHNC were referred for IMRT, mean/median 33/21 (3–144) months after initial surgery. None had prior head neck radiation. 41% underwent definitive, 59% postoperative IMRT (66–72.6 Gy). 70% had simultaneous chemotherapy. Retrospective analysis of the outcome following salvage IMRT in rHNC patients was performed. After mean/median 25/21 months (3–67), 22/44 (50%) patients were alive with no disease; 4 (9%) were alive with disease. 18 patients (41%) died of disease. Kaplan Meier 2-year disease specific survival (DSS), disease free survival (DFS), local and nodal control rates of the cohort were 59/49/56 and 68%, respectively. Known risk factors (advanced initial pTN, marginal initial resection, multiple recurrences) showed no significant outcome differences. Risk factors and the presence of macroscopic recurrence gross tumor volume (rGTV) in oral cavity patients vs others resulted in statistically significantly lower DSS (30 vs 70% at 2 years, p = 0.03). With respect to the assessed unfavourable outcome following salvage treatment, numbers needed to treat to avoid one recurrence with initial postoperative IMRT have, in addition, been calculated. A low salvage rate of only ~50% at 2 years was found. Calculated numbers of patients needed to treat with postoperative radiation after initial surgery, in order to avoid recurrence and tumor-specific death, suggest a rather generous use of adjuvant irradiation, usually with simultaneous chemotherapy

  6. Outcome in recurrent head neck cancer treated with salvage-IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graetz Klaus W

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recurrent head neck cancer (rHNC is a known unfavourable prognostic condition. The purpose of this work was to analyse our rHNC subgroup treated with salvage-intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for curable recurrence after initial surgery alone. Patients Between 4/2003–9/2008, 44 patients with squamous cell rHNC were referred for IMRT, mean/median 33/21 (3–144 months after initial surgery. None had prior head neck radiation. 41% underwent definitive, 59% postoperative IMRT (66–72.6 Gy. 70% had simultaneous chemotherapy. Methods Retrospective analysis of the outcome following salvage IMRT in rHNC patients was performed. Results After mean/median 25/21 months (3–67, 22/44 (50% patients were alive with no disease; 4 (9% were alive with disease. 18 patients (41% died of disease. Kaplan Meier 2-year disease specific survival (DSS, disease free survival (DFS, local and nodal control rates of the cohort were 59/49/56 and 68%, respectively. Known risk factors (advanced initial pTN, marginal initial resection, multiple recurrences showed no significant outcome differences. Risk factors and the presence of macroscopic recurrence gross tumor volume (rGTV in oral cavity patients vs others resulted in statistically significantly lower DSS (30 vs 70% at 2 years, p = 0.03. With respect to the assessed unfavourable outcome following salvage treatment, numbers needed to treat to avoid one recurrence with initial postoperative IMRT have, in addition, been calculated. Conclusion A low salvage rate of only ~50% at 2 years was found. Calculated numbers of patients needed to treat with postoperative radiation after initial surgery, in order to avoid recurrence and tumor-specific death, suggest a rather generous use of adjuvant irradiation, usually with simultaneous chemotherapy.

  7. Clinical outcome and cosmetics in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness and the cosmetics result of radiotherapy after conservative surgery for early breast cancer. Methods: Altogether 109 patients were treated by post-operative whole-breast irradiation and a tumor bed boost from May, 1995 to December, 2002. Among them 79 cases received a brachytherapy boost (192Ir HDR implant Nucletron ) of 10-12 Gy(DB) by single plan of implantation with 1.5 cm between the needles for T1 and double plan for T2-4 tumors, and 30 cases received an electron beam boost with 15 Gy. External beam irradiation was applied to the whole breast with 45-52 Gy(mean 48.6 Gy) in 25 fractions over 5 weeks followed or concurrently with chemotherapy (CMF or CEF) and hormonotherapy. The cosmetic result was scored by a doctor and patients via questionnaire. Results: The median follow-up time was 52 months. The actuarial 5-year overall survival rate was 93.8% using Kaplan-Meier method and the within breast recurrence rate was 6.5%. No radiation- induced ulcer in the breast occurred except acute inflammation of skin around the pinholes in 5 patients. Cosmetic results were scored to be good by patients and the doctor (81% and 87%, respectively) for 75 followed-up cases, and good cosmetic rate was reported by the doctor for 82% (39/48) of the cases treated with brachytherapy boost and 85.2%(23/27) for those treated with external beam boost. There was no difference in cosmetic results between these two groups(P>0.05). Conclusion: In patients at high risk for local recurrence, tumor-bed boost with brachytherapy or electron beam carried out after limited surgery and external radiotherapy can provide satisfactory local control without morbidity. Cosmetic result may not be influenced by the boost technique. (authors)

  8. Medical care costs incurred by patients with smoking-related non-small cell lung cancer treated at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Arrieta, Oscar; Quintana-Carrillo, Roger Humberto; Ahumada-Curiel, Gabriel; Corona-Cruz, Jose Francisco; Correa-Acevedo, Elma; Zinser-Sierra, Juan; de la Mata-Moya, Dolores; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Reynales-Shigematsu, Luz Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Background Smoking is a public health problem in Mexico and worldwide; its economic impact on developing countries has not been well documented. The aim of this study was to assess the direct medical costs attributable to smoking incurred by lung cancer patients treated at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico (INCan). Methods The study was conducted at INCan in 2009. We carried out a cost of illness (COI) methodology, using data derived from an expert panel consensus and from medical chart...

  9. Survival of dental implants in patients with oral cancer treated by surgery and radiotherapy: a retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Pompa, Giorgio; Saccucci, Matteo; Di Carlo, Gabriele; Brauner, Edoardo; Valentini, Valentino; Di Carlo, Stefano; Gentile, Tina; Guarino, Giorgio; Polimeni, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the survival of dental implants placed after ablative surgery, in patients affected by oral cancer treated with or without radiotherapy. Methods We collected data for 34 subjects (22 females, 12 males; mean age: 51 ± 19) with malignant oral tumors who had been treated with ablative surgery and received dental implant rehabilitation between 2007 and 2012. Postoperative radiation therapy (less than 50 Gy) was delivered before implan...

  10. Transcriptional profiling of human breast cancer cells cultured under microgravity conditions revealed the key role of genetic gravity sensors previously detected in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Lavan, David; Diego Orihuela-Tacuri, M.; Sanabria, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Currently, studies in Drosophila melanogaster has shown emerging evidence that microgravity stimuli can be detected at the genetic level. Analysis of the transcriptome in the pupal stage of the fruit flies under microgravity conditions versus ground controls has suggested the presence of a few candidate genes as "gravity sensors" which are experimentally validated. Additionally, several studies have shown that microgravity causes inhibitory effects in different types of cancer cells, although the genes involved and responsible for these effects are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the genes suggested as the sensors of gravitational waves in Drosophila melanogaster and their human counterpart (orthologous genes) are highly involved in carcinogenesis, proliferation, anti-apoptotic signals, invasiveness, and metastatic potential of breast cancer cell tumors. The transcriptome analyses suggested that the observed inhibitory effect in cancer cells could be due to changes in the genetic expression of these candidates. These results encourage the possibility of new therapeutic targets managed together and not in isolation.

  11. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    OpenAIRE

    Leppert, Wojciech; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Forycka, Maria; Mess, Eleonora; Zdun-Ryzewska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study To assess quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU), and at a day care center (DCC). Patients and methods QoL was assessed in advanced cancer patients at baseline and after 7 days of symptomatic treatment using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative Care (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Karnofsky Perfor...

  12. Pain, PSA flare, and bone scan response in a patient with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with radium-223, a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radium-223 has been shown to improve overall survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases. The bone scan response to radium-223 has only been described in one single center trial of 14 patients, none of whom achieved the outstanding bone scan response presented in the current case. In this case report, we describe a 75 year-old white man with extensively pre-treated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases who experienced a flare in pain and prostate-specific antigen, followed by dramatic clinical (pain), biochemical (prostate-specific antigen), and imaging (bone scan) response. The flare phenomena and bone scan response we observed have not previously been described with radium-223. This case suggests that the degree and duration of bone scan response may be predictive of overall survival benefit

  13. Dysfunction of major salivary glands in patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction. The fundamental methods of treatment of head and neck cancer are surgery and radiation therapy. The common side effect of radiation therapy for head and neck cancer is dryness of the mucous membranes (xerostomy) of the oral cavity as a consequence of salivary gland dysfunction. Xerostomy is a combined result of direct and indirect (peripheral) mechanisms. Aim of the study. To evaluate the mechanism of dysfunction of major salivary glands and to analyze of its intensity and the connection between xerostomy and selected clinical features and to determine the risk factors of xerostomy in patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiation therapy. Method. Patients with pathologically proven head and neck cancer were eligible for the study if they were qualified for radical radiotherapy. Patients were divided into two groups depending on the volume of major salivary glands included to treatment volume. Patients with a high risk of xerostomy (treatment volume contained 60-100% of parotid gland volume) were assigned to group I and the rest (treatment volume contained 20-30% of parotid gland volume) were assigned to group II. Potential factors (age, personal status, treatment method, intensity of mucositis, volume of major salivary gland included to treatment volume) affecting the intensity of salivary gland dysfunction were defined. Tests of secretion (dynamic scintigraphy with technetium) were carried out before treatment and then after 30-36 Gy and 3, 6 and 12 months on completion of radiation therapy. Patients characteristics. Seventy patients were included in the study group between April 2001 and February 2003. Only 52 of them completed all the designed secretion tests. The rest of patients (n=18) were excluded from the study due to persistent disease, early recurrence, distant metastases, secondary malignant tumor or death resulted from other cause. Results. Analysis revealed a statistically significant relationship between salivary gland

  14. Intraperitoneal radioimmunotherapy in treating peritoneal carcinomatosis of colon cancer in mice compared with systemic radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peritoneal spread is one of major causes of mortality in colorectal cancer patients. In the current investigation, the efficacy of radio-immunotherapy (RIT) with intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of an anti-colorectal cancer IgG1, 131I-A7, was compared to that with intravenous (i.v.) administration in BALB/c female mice bearing peritoneal nodules of LS180 human colon cancer cells, at the same toxicity level. Distribution of either i.p. or i.v. administered 131I-A7 and i.p. administered irrelevant 131I -HPMS-1 was assessed. Based on the results of toxicity determination at increments of 2 MBq and estimated dosimetry, an i.p. dose of 11 MBq and an i.v. dose of 9 MBq were chosen for treatment. Mice were monitored for long-term survival: untreated mice (n=11), mice undergoing i.p. RIT with 131I-A7 (n=11), mice undergoing i.v. RIT with 131I-A7 (n=11) and mice undergoing non-specific i.p. RIT with 131I-HPMS-1 (n=5). Intraperitoneal injection of 131I-A7 produced faster and greater tumor accumulation than i.v. injection: 34.2±16.5% of the injected dose per g (% ID/g) and 11.1±3.6% ID/g at 2 h, respectively (P131I-HPMS-1 did not show specific accumulation. Non-specific RIT with 131I-HPMS-1 (mean survival, 26.0±2.5 days) did not affect the survival as compared to no treatment (26.7±1.9 days). Intravenous RIT with 131I-A7 prolonged the survival of mice to 32.8±1.8 days (P131I-A7 improved the survival more significantly and attained cure in 2 of 11 mice (P<0.05 vs. i.v. RIT). In conclusion, i.p. RIT is more beneficial in treating peritoneal carcinomatosis of colon cancer than i.v. RIT in a murine model. (author)

  15. A suicide gene therapy approach to treat epidermolysis bullosa-associated skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an inherited disease causing extensive blister formation within the basal membrane zone (BMZ) of the skin and mucous membranes. It is caused by premature STOP mutations in the COL7A1 gene, which is indispensable for proper skin assembling. RDEB is associated with the development of a highly malignant skin cancer (squamous cell carcinoma, SCC) in early adulthood that displays a life threatening complication within this patient group. To date, neither chemo- nor radiotherapies showed successful results and due to the high metastatic potential of RDEB SCC wide surgical excision is still favoured. In this study we could reveal a new promising cancer treatment using spliceosome mediated RNA trans-splicing (SMaRT) using a suicide gene therapy approach. First we identified the tumour marker gene MMP-9 expressed by RDEB SCC cells in cell culture which was used to generate various pre-mRNA trans-splicing molecules (PTM). PTMs are able to facilitate trans-splicing between a tumour target gene and a cell death inducing peptide/toxin, encoded by the PTM. As a consequence the toxin is expressed in cancer cells leading to the induction of cell death. This technique offers high specificity in cancer cell targeting compared to other conventional cDNA expression studies. Various trans-splicing molecules were pre-evaluated in a fluorescence screening model for their best trans-splicing efficiency with the target molecule. Herein we identified two potent PTMs (PTM BD0 and PTM BD6), that were further adapted for endogenous suicide studies by inserting the toxin streptolysin O. In two independent in vitro cell culture assays we were able to confirm that the trans-splicing molecules are able to induce expression of the toxin resulting in cell membrane permeabilization and increased cell death induction. The results indicate that SMaRT technology offers a new platform for a suicide gene therapy approach to treat malignant squamous cell

  16. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-11

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  17. A Study Evaluating INIPARIB in Combination With Chemotherapy to Treat Triple Negative Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER-Negative) Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Negative (PR-Negative) Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Negative (HER2-Negative) Breast Cancer; Brain Metastases

  18. A 10-year follow up of reproductive function in women treated for childhood cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Nygaard; Andersen, A N; Schmidt, Kirsten Louise Tryde; Rechnitzer, C; Schmiegelow, K.; Bentzen, J G; Larsen, E C

    2013-01-01

    Previously, this study group found that female childhood cancer survivors could be at risk of early cessation of fertility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate reproductive function in the same group of survivors 10 years after the initial study. Of the original cohort of 100, 71 were re......-examined. Thirty-six survivors reported regular menstrual cycles. When they were compared with 210 controls, they differed significantly in antral follicle count (AFC) (median 15 versus 18, P=0.047) but not in anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) (median 13.0 versus 17.8pmol/l). Survivors cured with minimal gonadotoxic...... treatment had significantly higher AMH and AFC compared with survivors cured with either potentially gonadotoxic treatment or treatment including alkylating chemotherapy and ovarian irradiation (20.0, 5.8 and...

  19. Problems seen in long-term follow-up of tongue cancer cases treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 23 years between 1962 and 1984, 343 cases received radiotherapy for previously untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue in the National Cancer Center Hospital. The three-year local control rate was 82.0% and the five-year survival rate was 64.7%. Of 218 patients followed up more than five years, 27 cases (12.4%) developed second malignancies in the oral cavity and/or oropharynx more than five years after the first radiation therapy. The second malignancies were most frequent from five to ten years after the initial treatment and on the same side of the tongue as the first radiotherapy. Radiation damage was observed in 28 cases (47%) out of 60 cases who had received interstitial radiotherapy between 1978 and 1984 and had been followed up more than five years. Five cases with sever ulcer and/or osteoradionecrosis required surgery. (author)

  20. Phase II study of a 3-day schedule with topotecan and cisplatin in patients with previously untreated small cell lung cancer and extensive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M.; Lassen, U.; Jensen, Peter Buhl; Østerlind, Kell Erik; Jeppesen, Nina; Jensen, Britta Bjerregaard; Mellemgaard, Anders; Rytter, Carsten; Langer, Seppo Wang

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment with a topoisomerase I inhibitor in combination with a platinum results in superior or equal survival compared with etoposide-based treatment in extensive disease small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Five-day topotecan is inconvenient and therefore shorter schedules of topotecan...

  1. A single-arm, investigator-initiated study of the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of intravitreal aflibercept injection in subjects with exudative age-related macular degeneration previously treated with ranibizumab or bevacizumab (ASSESS study: 12-month analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh RP

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rishi P Singh, Sunil K Srivastava, Justis P Ehlers, Fabiana Q Silva, Rumneek Bedi, Andrew P Schachat, Peter K Kaiser Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Summary statement: In subjects with active exudative age-related macular degeneration, treating with a fixed intravitreal aflibercept injection dosing regimen for 12 months demonstrated improved anatomic and vision endpoints from baseline.Purpose: Switching therapies in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD may offer an advantage for some patients. This study evaluates the efficacy of intravitreal aflibercept injection (IAI in subjects previously treated with ranibizumab and/or bevacizumab.Methods: Subjects (n=26 were given monthly 2 mg of IAI for 3 months, followed by 2 mg once in every 2 months for up to 12 months. The mean absolute change from baseline in central subfield thickness (CST measured by optical coherence tomography and the mean change from baseline in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA early treatment in diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS letter score were obtained. Additionally, the percentage of subjects who gained or lost ≥15 letters of vision and the percentage of subjects who are 20/40 or better or 20/200 or worse were evaluated.Results: There was a mean decrease in CST of -50.3  µm (P<0.001 and a mean increase in ETDRS BCVA of +9.2 letters (P<0.001. Twenty-seven percent of subjects experienced a  ≥15-letter improvement in visual acuity, and no subject lost ≥3 lines of vision from baseline. Fifty percent of subjects were 20/40 or better, and 11.5% of subjects were 20/200 or worse at month 12.Conclusion: Fixed IAI dosing regimen for 12 months demonstrated improved anatomic and vision endpoints in subjects with active exudative AMD. Keywords: aflibercept, age-related macular degeneration, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, vascular endothelial growth factors

  2. Imetelstat Sodium in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-03

    Childhood Hepatoblastoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma

  3. Bone fractures among postmenopausal patients with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer treated with 5 years of letrozole or tamoxifen in the BIG 1-98 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabaglio, M; Sun, Z; Price, K N;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To compare the incidence and timing of bone fractures in postmenopausal women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen or letrozole for endocrine-responsive early breast cancer in the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial. METHODS: We evaluated 4895 patients allocated to 5 years...... of letrozole or tamoxifen in the BIG 1-98 trial who received at least some study medication (median follow-up 60.3 months). Bone fracture information (grade, cause, site) was collected every 6 months during trial treatment. RESULTS: The incidence of bone fractures was higher among patients treated...... with letrozole [228 of 2448 women (9.3%)] versus tamoxifen [160 of 2447 women (6.5%)]. The wrist was the most common site of fracture in both treatment groups. Statistically significant risk factors for bone fractures during treatment included age, smoking history, osteoporosis at baseline, previous...

  4. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-11

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  5. Baseline Serum Testosterone in Men Treated With Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: It is believed that men diagnosed with prostate cancer and a low baseline serum testosterone (BST) may have more aggressive disease, and it is frequently recommended they forgo testosterone replacement therapy. We used two large Phase III trials involving androgen deprivation therapy and external beam radiation therapy to assess the significance of a BST. Methods and Materials: All patients with a BST and complete data (n = 2,478) were included in this analysis and divided into four categories: 'Very Low BST' (VLBST) ≤16.5th percentile of BST (≤248 ng/dL; n = 408); 'Low BST' (LBST) >16.5th percentile and ≤33rd percentile (>248 ng/dL but ≤314 ng/dL; n = 415); 'Average BST' (ABST) >33rd percentile and ≤67th percentile (314-437 ng/dL; n = 845); and 'High BST' (HBST) >67th percentile (>437 ng/dL; n = 810). Outcomes included overall survival, distant metastasis, biochemical failure, and cause-specific survival. All outcomes were adjusted for the following covariates: treatment arm, BST, age (<70 vs. ≥70), prostate-specific antigen (PSA; <10 vs. 10 ≤ PSA <20 vs. 20 ≤), Gleason score (2-6 vs. 7 vs. 8-10); T stage (T1-T2 vs. T3-T4), and Karnofsky Performance Status (60-90 vs. 100). Results: On multivariable analysis age, Gleason score, and PSA were independently associated with an increased risk of biochemical failure, distant metastasis and a reduced cause-specific and overall survival (p < 0.05), but BST was not. Conclusions: BST does not affect outcomes in men treated with external beam radiation therapy and androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.

  6. Outcomes in Black Patients With Early Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The race-specific impact of prognostic variables for early breast cancer is unknown for black patients undergoing breast conservation. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 1,231 consecutive patients ≥40 years of age with Stage I-II invasive breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and radiation therapy at the University of Chicago Hospitals and affiliates between 1986 and 2004. Patients were classified as either black or nonblack. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model the effects of known prognostic factors and interactions with race. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 82 months. Thirty-four percent of patients were black, and 66% were nonblack (Caucasian, Hispanic, and Asian). Black patients had a poorer 10-year overall survival (64.6% vs. 80.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-2.06) and 10-year disease-free survival (58.1% vs. 75.4%; HR 1.49; 95% CI, 1.18-1.89) compared with nonblack patients. Tumor sizes were similar between nonblack and black patients with mammographically detected tumors (1.29 cm vs. 1.20 cm, p = 0.20, respectively). Tumor size was significantly associated with overall survival (HR 1.48; 95% CI, 1.12-1.96) in black patients with mammographically detected tumors but not in nonblack patients (HR 1.09; 95% CI, 0.78-1.53), suggesting that survival in black patients depends more strongly on tumor size in this subgroup. Tests for race-size method of detection interactions were statistically significant for overall survival (p = 0.049), locoregional control (p = 0.036), and distant control (p = 0.032) and borderline significant for disease-free survival (p = 0.067). Conclusion: Despite detection at comparable sizes, the prognostic effect of tumor size in patients with mammographically detected tumors is greater for black than in nonblack patients.

  7. Early Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postoperative Proton Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report dosimetry and early toxicity data in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From March 2013 to April 2014, 30 patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer and no history of prior radiation were treated with proton therapy at a single proton center. Patient characteristics and dosimetry were obtained through chart review. Patients were seen weekly while on treatment, at 1 month after radiation therapy completion, and at 3- to 6-month intervals thereafter. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Frequencies of toxicities were tabulated. Results: Median dose delivered was 50.4 Gy (relative biological equivalent [RBE]) in 5 weeks. Target volumes included the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes including the internal mammary lymph nodes (in 93%). No patients required a treatment break. Among patients with >3 months of follow-up (n=28), grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 20 patients (71.4%), with 8 (28.6%) experiencing moist desquamation. Grade 2 esophagitis occurred in 8 patients (28.6%). Grade 3 reconstructive complications occurred in 1 patient. The median planning target volume V95 was 96.43% (range, 79.39%-99.60%). The median mean heart dose was 0.88 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.01-3.20 Gy (RBE)] for all patients, and 1.00 Gy (RBE) among patients with left-sided tumors. The median V20 of the ipsilateral lung was 16.50% (range, 6.1%-30.3%). The median contralateral lung V5 was 0.34% (range, 0%-5.30%). The median maximal point dose to the esophagus was 45.65 Gy (RBE) [range, 0-65.4 Gy (RBE)]. The median contralateral breast mean dose was 0.29 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.03-3.50 Gy (RBE)]. Conclusions: Postoperative proton therapy is well tolerated, with acceptable rates of skin toxicity. Proton therapy favorably spares normal tissue without compromising target coverage. Further follow-up is necessary to assess for clinical outcomes and cardiopulmonary

  8. Recommendations for dose calculations of lung cancer treatment plans treated with stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate dose distributions computed with 5 different dose algorithms for patients with lung cancers treated using stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). Treatment plans for 133 lung cancer patients, initially computed with a 1D-pencil beam (equivalent-path-length, EPL-1D) algorithm, were recalculated with 4 other algorithms commissioned for treatment planning, including 3-D pencil-beam (EPL-3D), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), collapsed cone convolution superposition (CCC), and Monte Carlo (MC). The plan prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions normalized to the 95% isodose line. Tumors were classified according to location: peripheral tumors surrounded by lung (lung-island, N=39), peripheral tumors attached to the rib-cage or chest wall (lung-wall, N=44), and centrally-located tumors (lung-central, N=50). Relative to the EPL-1D algorithm, PTV D95 and mean dose values computed with the other 4 algorithms were lowest for 'lung-island' tumors with smallest field sizes (3-5 cm). On the other hand, the smallest differences were noted for lung-central tumors treated with largest field widths (7-10 cm). Amongst all locations, dose distribution differences were most strongly correlated with tumor size for lung-island tumors. For most cases, convolution/superposition and MC algorithms were in good agreement. Mean lung dose (MLD) values computed with the EPL-1D algorithm were highly correlated with that of the other algorithms (correlation coefficient =0.99). The MLD values were found to be ∼10% lower for small lung-island tumors with the model-based (conv/superposition and MC) vs. the correction-based (pencil-beam) algorithms with the model-based algorithms predicting greater low dose spread within the lungs. This study suggests that pencil beam algorithms should be avoided for lung SABR planning. For the most challenging cases, small tumors surrounded entirely by lung tissue (lung-island type

  9. Recommendations for dose calculations of lung cancer treatment plans treated with stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devpura, S.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chen, D.; Liu, D.; Li, H.; Kumar, S.; Gordon, J.; Ajlouni, M.; Movsas, B.; Chetty, I. J.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate dose distributions computed with 5 different dose algorithms for patients with lung cancers treated using stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). Treatment plans for 133 lung cancer patients, initially computed with a 1D-pencil beam (equivalent-path-length, EPL-1D) algorithm, were recalculated with 4 other algorithms commissioned for treatment planning, including 3-D pencil-beam (EPL-3D), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), collapsed cone convolution superposition (CCC), and Monte Carlo (MC). The plan prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions normalized to the 95% isodose line. Tumors were classified according to location: peripheral tumors surrounded by lung (lung-island, N=39), peripheral tumors attached to the rib-cage or chest wall (lung-wall, N=44), and centrally-located tumors (lung-central, N=50). Relative to the EPL-1D algorithm, PTV D95 and mean dose values computed with the other 4 algorithms were lowest for "lung-island" tumors with smallest field sizes (3-5 cm). On the other hand, the smallest differences were noted for lung-central tumors treated with largest field widths (7-10 cm). Amongst all locations, dose distribution differences were most strongly correlated with tumor size for lung-island tumors. For most cases, convolution/superposition and MC algorithms were in good agreement. Mean lung dose (MLD) values computed with the EPL-1D algorithm were highly correlated with that of the other algorithms (correlation coefficient =0.99). The MLD values were found to be ~10% lower for small lung-island tumors with the model-based (conv/superposition and MC) vs. the correction-based (pencil-beam) algorithms with the model-based algorithms predicting greater low dose spread within the lungs. This study suggests that pencil beam algorithms should be avoided for lung SABR planning. For the most challenging cases, small tumors surrounded entirely by lung tissue (lung-island type), a Monte

  10. Early Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postoperative Proton Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuaron, John J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Chon, Brian; Tsai, Henry; Goenka, Anuj; DeBlois, David [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hug, Eugen [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Cahlon, Oren, E-mail: cahlono@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To report dosimetry and early toxicity data in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From March 2013 to April 2014, 30 patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer and no history of prior radiation were treated with proton therapy at a single proton center. Patient characteristics and dosimetry were obtained through chart review. Patients were seen weekly while on treatment, at 1 month after radiation therapy completion, and at 3- to 6-month intervals thereafter. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Frequencies of toxicities were tabulated. Results: Median dose delivered was 50.4 Gy (relative biological equivalent [RBE]) in 5 weeks. Target volumes included the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes including the internal mammary lymph nodes (in 93%). No patients required a treatment break. Among patients with >3 months of follow-up (n=28), grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 20 patients (71.4%), with 8 (28.6%) experiencing moist desquamation. Grade 2 esophagitis occurred in 8 patients (28.6%). Grade 3 reconstructive complications occurred in 1 patient. The median planning target volume V95 was 96.43% (range, 79.39%-99.60%). The median mean heart dose was 0.88 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.01-3.20 Gy (RBE)] for all patients, and 1.00 Gy (RBE) among patients with left-sided tumors. The median V20 of the ipsilateral lung was 16.50% (range, 6.1%-30.3%). The median contralateral lung V5 was 0.34% (range, 0%-5.30%). The median maximal point dose to the esophagus was 45.65 Gy (RBE) [range, 0-65.4 Gy (RBE)]. The median contralateral breast mean dose was 0.29 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.03-3.50 Gy (RBE)]. Conclusions: Postoperative proton therapy is well tolerated, with acceptable rates of skin toxicity. Proton therapy favorably spares normal tissue without compromising target coverage. Further follow-up is necessary to assess for clinical outcomes and cardiopulmonary

  11. Comparative Investigation of Postoperative Complications in Patients With Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer Treated With Preoperative Chemotherapy or Surgery Alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Jensen, L B; Larsson, H;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Gastroesophageal junction cancer is one of the leading causes to cancer-related death and the prognosis is poor. However, progress has been made over the last couple of decades with the introduction of multimodality treatment and optimized surgery. Three-year survival rates have...... complications of patients with cancer at the gastroesophageal junction treated with either neoadjuvant chemotherapy or surgery alone in patients from "The Danish Clinical Registry of Carcinomas of the Esophagus, the Gastro-Esophageal Junction and the Stomach." MATERIALS AND METHODS: A historical follow-up study......, comparing postoperative complications between two cohorts before and after implementation of chemotherapy wascompleted. RESULTS: In all, 180 consecutive patients treated with perioperative chemotherapy and a comparative surgery-only group of patients were identified from The Danish Clinical Registry of...

  12. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  13. A very rare case of HPV-53-related cervical cancer, in a 79-year-old woman with a previous history of negative Pap cytology

    OpenAIRE

    Zappacosta R; Lattanzio G; Viola P; Ianieri MM; Gatta DMP; Rosini S

    2014-01-01

    Roberta Zappacosta,1 Giuseppe Lattanzio,2 Patrizia Viola,2 Manuel Maria Ianieri,3 Daniela Maria Pia Gatta,1 Sandra Rosini11Cytopathology Unit, Experimental and Clinical Sciences Department, Gabriele d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy; 2Surgical Pathology Unit, 3Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit, SS Annunziata Hospital, Chieti, ItalyAbstract: The introduction of organized cervical cancer (CC) screening programs has drastically reduced the prevalence of CC. However the in...

  14. Can GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms predict clinical outcomes of chemotherapy in gastric and colorectal cancers? A result based on the previous reports

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Haixia Liu,1,* Wei Shi,2,* Lianli Zhao,3 Dianlu Dai,4 Jinghua Gao,5 Xiangjun Kong6 1Department of Ultrasound, 2Office of Medical Statistics, 3Human Resource Department, 4Department of Surgical Oncology, 5Department of Medical Oncology, 6Central Laboratory, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Yunhe District, Cangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this study and should be considered cofirst authors Background: Gastric and colorectal cancers remain the maj...

  15. Dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation to the neck has long been associated with an elevated risk of hypothyroidism development. The goal of the present work is to define dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Data for 123 patients, with a median follow up of 4.6 years, were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone levels or with a clinical diagnosis were categorized as hypothyroid. Patient demographic parameters, thyroid volume, mean thyroid dose, the percent of thyroid volume receiving minimum specified dose levels (VxxGy), and the absolute thyroid volume spared from specified dose levels (VSxxGy) were analyzed. Normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) was also calculated using several recently published models. Thyroid volume and many radiation dosimetric parameters were statistically different in the hypothyroid group. For the patients with initial thyroid volumes of 8 cc or greater, several dosimetric parameters were found to define subgroups at statistically significant lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Patients with VS45 Gy of at least 3 cc, VS50 Gy at least 5 cc, VS50 Gy at least 6 cc, V50 Gy below 45%, V50 Gy below 55%, or mean thyroid dose below 49 Gy had a 28-38% estimated risk of hypothyroidism at 3 years compared to a 55% risk for the entire study group. Patients with a NTCP of less than 0.75 or 0.8, calculated using recently published models, were also observed to have a lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Based on long-term follow up data for OPC patients treated with IMRT, we recommend plan optimization objectives to reduce the volume of thyroid receiving over 45 Gy to significantly decrease the risk of developing hypothyroidism. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-014-0269-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  16. Pathological Characteristics of Primary Bladder Carcinoma Treated at a Tertiary Care Hospital and Changing Demographics of Bladder Cancer in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, S; Wijayarathna, K S N; Karunaratne, K A M S; Gobi, U; Pathmeswaran, A; Abeygunasekera, Anuruddha M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to compare demographics and pathological features of bladder carcinoma treated in a urology unit with findings of previous studies done in Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods. Data of newly diagnosed patients with bladder cancer in a tertiary referral centre from 2011 to 2014 were analysed. Data on bladder cancers diagnosed from 1993 to 2014 were obtained from previous publications and Sri Lanka Cancer Registry. Results. There were 148 patients and mean age was 65 years. Male to female ratio was 4.1 : 1. Urothelial carcinoma (UC) was found in 89.2% of patients. Muscle invasion was noted in 35% of patients compared to 48.4% two decades ago. In patients with UC, 16.5% were found to have pT1 high grade tumour. It was 5.3% from 1993 to 2000. Pure squamous cell carcinoma was found in 8.1% of patients while primary or de novo carcinoma in situ (not associated with high grade pT1 tumours) was seen in one patient only. Conclusions. The percentage of squamous carcinoma is higher among Sri Lankan patients while primary carcinoma in situ is a rarity. The percentage of muscle invasive disease has decreased while the percentage of pT1 high grade tumours has increased during the last two decades in Sri Lanka. PMID:26884756

  17. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56–87.5 Gy; 1.5–2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade ≥2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4–37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512–67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm3 of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966–24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267–17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future

  18. Constitutive STAT5 Activation Correlates With Better Survival in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Constitutively activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) factors, in particular STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, have been detected in a wide variety of human primary tumors and have been demonstrated to directly contribute to oncogenesis. However, the expression pattern of these STATs in cervical carcinoma is still unknown, as is whether or not they have prognostic significance. This study investigated the expression patterns of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in cervical cancer and their associations with clinical outcomes in patients treated with radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 165 consecutive patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stages IB to IVA cervical cancer underwent radical radiation therapy, including external beam and/or high-dose-rate brachytherapy between 1989 and 2002. Immunohistochemical studies of their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify and to evaluate the effects of these factors affecting patient survival. Results: Constitutive activations of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 were observed in 11%, 22%, and 61% of the participants, respectively. While STAT5 activation was associated with significantly better metastasis-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p = 0.04), STAT1 and STAT3 activation were not. Multivariate analyses showed that STAT5 activation, bulky tumor (≥4 cm), advanced stage (FIGO Stages III and IV), and brachytherapy (yes vs. no) were independent prognostic factors for cause-specific overall survival. None of the STATs was associated with local relapse. STAT5 activation (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.13–0.63) and advanced stage (odds ratio = 2.54; 95% confidence interval = 1.03–6.26) were independent predictors of distant metastasis. Conclusions: This is the first report to provide the overall expression patterns and prognostic significance

  19. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McBurney, Michelle L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Erasmus, Jeremy [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56-87.5 Gy; 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade {>=}2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512-67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm{sup 3} of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966-24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267-17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective

  20. Constitutive STAT5 Activation Correlates With Better Survival in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Helen H.W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chou, Cheng-Yang [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Wu, Yuan-Hua; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Chiung-Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Guo, How-Ran [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Wen-Ying, E-mail: 7707@so-net.net.tw [Department of Pathology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan (China) and Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Wu-Chou, E-mail: sunnysu@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Constitutively activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) factors, in particular STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, have been detected in a wide variety of human primary tumors and have been demonstrated to directly contribute to oncogenesis. However, the expression pattern of these STATs in cervical carcinoma is still unknown, as is whether or not they have prognostic significance. This study investigated the expression patterns of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in cervical cancer and their associations with clinical outcomes in patients treated with radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 165 consecutive patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stages IB to IVA cervical cancer underwent radical radiation therapy, including external beam and/or high-dose-rate brachytherapy between 1989 and 2002. Immunohistochemical studies of their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify and to evaluate the effects of these factors affecting patient survival. Results: Constitutive activations of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 were observed in 11%, 22%, and 61% of the participants, respectively. While STAT5 activation was associated with significantly better metastasis-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p = 0.04), STAT1 and STAT3 activation were not. Multivariate analyses showed that STAT5 activation, bulky tumor ({>=}4 cm), advanced stage (FIGO Stages III and IV), and brachytherapy (yes vs. no) were independent prognostic factors for cause-specific overall survival. None of the STATs was associated with local relapse. STAT5 activation (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.63) and advanced stage (odds ratio = 2.54; 95% confidence interval = 1.03-6.26) were independent predictors of distant metastasis. Conclusions: This is the first report to provide the overall expression patterns and prognostic significance of

  1. Radiation dose to family members of hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer patients treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) was used for measuring radiation dose to family members of thyrotoxicosis and thyroid cancer patients treated with 131I using CaSO4:Dy discs. There were 45 family members of thyrotoxicosis patients, who were divided into two groups with 22 in the first and 23 in the second group. Radiation safety instructions were the same for both the groups except in the second group where the patients were advised to use a separate bed at home for the first 3 d of dose administration. An activity ranging from 185 to 500 MBq was administered to these patients. The whole-body dose to family members ranged from 0.4 to 2.4 mSv (mean 1.1 mSv) in the first group and 0-1.9 mSv (mean 0.6 mSv) in the second group. A total of 297 family members of thyroid cancer patients were studied for whole-body dose estimation. An activity ranging from 0.925 to 7.4 GBq was administered to the thyroid cancer patients. The family members were divided into three groups depending upon the mode of transport and facilities available at home to avoid close proximity with the patient. Group A with 25 family members received a dose ranging from 0 to 0.9 mSv (mean 0.4 mSv), group B with 96 family members received a dose ranging from 0 to 8.5 mSv (mean 0.8 mSv) and group C with 176 family members received a dose ranging from 0 to 5.0 mSv (mean 0.8 mSv). The thyroid monitoring was also done in 103 family members who attended the patients in isolation wards for >2 d. Thyroid dose in them ranged from 0 to 2.5 mGy (mean 0.1 mGy). (authors)

  2. Early results of quality of life for curatively treated rectal cancers in Chinese patients with EORTC QLQ-CR29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the quality of life in curatively treated patients with rectal cancer in a prospectively collected cohort. Patients with stage I-III rectal cancer who were treated curatively in a single institution were accrued prospectively. Quality of life was assessed by use of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaire module for all cancer patients (QLQ-C30) and for colorectal cancer patients (QLQ-CR29). Quality of life among different treatment modalities and between stoma and nonstoma patients was evaluated in all patients. A total of 154 patients were assessed. The median time of completion for the questionnaires was 10 months after all the treatments. For patients with different treatment modalities, faecal incontinence and diarrhea were significantly higher in radiation group (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively), and no difference in male or female sexual function was found between radiation group and non-radiation group. For stoma and nonstoma patients, the QLQ-CR29 module found the symptoms of Defaecation and Embarrassment with Bowel Movement were more prominent in stoma patients, while no difference was detected in scales QLQ-C30 module. Our study provided additional information in evaluating QoL of Chinese rectal cancer patients with currently widely used QoL questionnaires. As a supplement to the QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-CR29 is a useful questionnaire in evaluating curatively treated patients with rectal cancer. Bowel dysfunction (diarrhea and faecal incontinence) was still the major problem compromising QoL in patients with either pre- or postoperative chemoradiotherapy

  3. Contemporary evidence for robot-assisted radical cystectomy for treating bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satkunasivam, Raj; Wallis, Christopher J D; Nam, Robert K; Desai, Mihir; Gill, Inderbir S

    2016-09-01

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) is an evolving technique for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC); however, its effectiveness compared with open radical cystectomy (ORC) - the established modality - is debated. Six specific areas of evidence are critically important for supporting the continuing use of RARC for MIBC, including technical aspects of surgery, perioperative outcomes, complications, oncological outcomes, functional outcomes, and financial costs. Considerable progress has been made regarding these aspects and data show that RARC replicates the technical benchmarks of ORC in terms of success of cystectomy, lymph node dissection, and urinary diversion, and could offer advantages over the more-established technique. Despite some clear benefits of RARC (such as reduced blood loss) other perioperative outcomes, including duration of inpatient stay and 30-90 day complication rates, seem to be similar to those of ORC. Current data on oncological and functional outcomes are promising, but robust data from prospective studies will help determine the indications for use of RARC for treating MIBC in the future. PMID:27502548

  4. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ippolito, Edy; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Digesu, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco [Radiotherapy Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Radiotherapy Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Pirozzi, Giuseppe Antonio [Endoscopy Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Cilla, Savino [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Cuscuna, Daniele; Di Lallo, Alessandra [Urology Unit, General Hospital A. Cardarelli, Campobasso (Italy); Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Mantini, Giovanna [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Pacelli, Fabio [Surgery Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Ingrosso, Marcello [Endoscopy Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe [Radiotherapy Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura Giovanni Paolo II, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To predict the grade and incidence of late clinical rectal toxicity through short-term (1 year) mucosal alterations. Methods and Materials: Patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with curative or adjuvant radiotherapy underwent proctoscopy a year after the course of radiotherapy. Mucosal changes were classified by the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Late toxicity data were analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison between prognosis groups was performed by log-rank analysis. Results: After a median follow-up time of 45 months (range, 18-99), the 3-year incidence of grade {>=}2 rectal late toxicity according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was 24%, with all patients (24/24; 100%) experiencing rectal bleeding. The occurrence of grade {>=}2 clinical rectal late toxicity was higher in patients with grade {>=}2 (32% vs. 15 %, p = 0.02) or grade {>=}3 VRS telangiectasia (47% vs. 17%, p {<=} 0.01) and an overall VRS score of {>=}2 (31% vs. 16 %, p = 0.04) or {>=}3 (48% vs. 17%, p = 0.01) at the 1-year proctoscopy. Conclusions: Early proctoscopy (1 year) predicts late rectal bleeding and therefore can be used as a surrogate endpoint for late rectal toxicity in studies aimed at reducing this frequent complication.

  5. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To predict the grade and incidence of late clinical rectal toxicity through short-term (1 year) mucosal alterations. Methods and Materials: Patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with curative or adjuvant radiotherapy underwent proctoscopy a year after the course of radiotherapy. Mucosal changes were classified by the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Late toxicity data were analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison between prognosis groups was performed by log-rank analysis. Results: After a median follow-up time of 45 months (range, 18–99), the 3-year incidence of grade ≥2 rectal late toxicity according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was 24%, with all patients (24/24; 100%) experiencing rectal bleeding. The occurrence of grade ≥2 clinical rectal late toxicity was higher in patients with grade ≥2 (32% vs. 15 %, p = 0.02) or grade ≥3 VRS telangiectasia (47% vs. 17%, p ≤ 0.01) and an overall VRS score of ≥2 (31% vs. 16 %, p = 0.04) or ≥3 (48% vs. 17%, p = 0.01) at the 1-year proctoscopy. Conclusions: Early proctoscopy (1 year) predicts late rectal bleeding and therefore can be used as a surrogate endpoint for late rectal toxicity in studies aimed at reducing this frequent complication.

  6. Brain metastasis from differentiated thyroid cancer in patients treated with radioiodine for bone and lung lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) often is detected during treatment of other remote lesions. We examined the prevalence, risk factors and treatment outcome of this disease encountered during nuclear medicine practice. Of the 167 patients with metastasis to lung or bone treated 1-14 times with radioactive iodine (RAI), 9 (5.4%) also had lesions in the brain. Five were males and 4 females, aged 49-84, out of the original population of 49 males and 118 females aged 10-84 (mean 54.7) years. Three of them underwent removal of their brain tumors, 5 received conventional external beam irradiation, and 2 had stereotactic radiosurgery with supervoltage X-ray. None of the brain lesions showed significant uptake of RAI despite demonstrable accumulation in most extracerebral lesions. Seven patients died 4-23 (mean 9.4) months after the discovery of cerebral metastasis, brain damage being the primary or at least a contributing cause. The 8th and 9th patients remained relatively well for more than 42 and 3 months, respectively, without any evidence of intracranial recurrence. Our results confirmed that the brain is a major site of secondary metastasis from DTC. No statistically significant demographic risk factor was detected. Any suspicious neurological symptoms in the course of RAI treatment warrant cerebral computed tomography. As for therapy, from out initial experience, radiosurgery seemed promising as an effective and less invasive alternative to surgical removal. (author)

  7. A Comparative Study on Resilience, Perceived Social Support and Hopelessness Among Cancer Patients Treated with Curative and Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, Ravindran Ottilingam; Devamani, Kiran A

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Psychological distress is common among patients affected by cancer. In this study, we examined the relationship between resilience, social support, and hopelessness among cancer patients treated with curative and palliative care. Patients and Methods: Sixty cancer patients in the age range of 18–65 years were randomly selected and divided into two groups based on their treatment intent namely, curative care (n = 30) and palliative care (n = 30). Both groups were assessed by the following instruments: Bharathiar University Resilience Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and Beck Hopelessness Scale. Results: Resilience was significantly associated with less hopelessness and higher levels of perceived social support. Conclusion: Cancer patients are found to be resilient, and the role of social support and hopelessness on promoting resilience cannot be ignored.

  8. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cencer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-Fluororacil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann;

    2012-01-01

    Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cencer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-Fluororacil......Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cencer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-Fluororacil...

  9. Role of comorbidity on survival after radiotherapy and chemotherapy for nonsurgically treated lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellemgaard, Anders; Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Iachina, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Comorbidity, such as diseases of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and other systems, may influence prognosis in lung cancer and complicate its treatment. The performance status of patients, which is a known prognostic marker, may also be influenced by comorbidity. Due to the close link...... between tobacco smoking and lung cancer, and because lung cancer is often diagnosed in advanced ages (median age at diagnosis in Denmark is 70 years), comorbidity is present in a large proportion of lung cancer patients. METHODS:: Patients with any stage lung cancer who did not have surgical treatment...... were identified in the Danish Lung Cancer Registry. Danish Lung Cancer Registry collects data from clinical departments, the Danish Cancer Registry, Danish National Patient Registry, and the Central Population Register. A total of 20,552 patients diagnosed with lung cancer in 2005 to 2011 were...

  10. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  11. Medically inoperable peripheral lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer-related death in North America. There is wide variation between patients who are medically inoperable and those managed surgically. The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has narrowed the gap in survival rates between operative and non-operative management for those with early stage disease. This retrospective study reports outcomes for the treatment of peripheral non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) with SBRT from a single community practice. Sixty-seven consecutive patients (pts) with inoperable, untreated peripheral lung tumors were treated from 2010 through 2012 and included in this study. Stereotactic targeting was facilitated by either spine or lung-based image guidance, either with or without fiducial marker tracking with a frameless robotic radiosurgery system. Peripheral tumors received a median biological effective dose (BED) of 105.6 Gy10 or in terms of a median physical dose, 48 Gy delivered over 4 daily fractions. Survival was measured using the Kaplan-Meier method to determine rates of local control, progression of disease and overall survival. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to study the effects of tumor size, stage, histology, patient age, tumor location (lobe), tracking method, and BED on the survival distributions. The median follow-up for this cohort was 24.5 months (range: 2.4–50.3) with an overall (OS) 3-year survival of 62.4 % (95 % CI: 74.3-47.3). The median progression-free survival was 28.5 months (95 % CI: 15.8 months to not reached). Local control (LC), defined as a lack of FDG uptake on PET/CT or the absence of tumor growth was achieved in 60 patients (90.9 %) at the time of first follow-up (median 3 months, range: 1–6). Local control at one year for the entire cohort was 81.8 % (95 % CI, 67.3-90.3). The one-year OS probability among those who achieved local control at first follow-up was 86.2 % (95 % CI, 74.3-92.9) but no patients who did not achieve

  12. Effectiveness of bisphosphonate use and risk of contralateral breast cancer and recurrence in women with early-stage breast cancer treated with tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Marilyn L; Shi, Jiaxiao M; Habel, Laurel A; Song, Jun; Chung, Joanie W-L; Avila, Chantal C; Schottinger, Joanne E; Cheetham, T Craig; Fletcher, Suzanne W; Haque, Reina

    2016-04-01

    The effectiveness of bisphosphonates (BP) in reducing risk of second breast cancer and recurrence in observational studies has been minimally studied. We examined the association of oral BP use on risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) and recurrence in 16,781 women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer from 1996 to 2007, treated with tamoxifen, and followed through December 31, 2009 at Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC, n = 8857) and Southern California (KPSC, n = 7924). Sociodemographic, clinical, and pharmacy information were extracted from electronic medical records and cancer registries. CBC was identified from cancer registries, and recurrences from electronic health records and chart reviews. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) treating BP use and hormonal therapy as time-varying variables. After mean 6.4 years of follow-up, 494 (3.0 %) women developed CBC. BP use post-breast cancer diagnosis (>93 % alendronate) ranged from 14.5 to 24.9 % at both study sites. Overall, there was no association of BP use with reduced risk of CBC (ever use, HR = 0.96; 95 % CI 0.67-1.38 and continuous use, HR = 1.03; 95 % CI 0.88, 1.20). Similar null associations were observed for recurrence (ever use, HR = 0.98; 95 % CI 0.82, 1.17 and continuous use, HR = 1.00; 95 % CI 0.92, 1.09). Associations varied somewhat by site yet confidence intervals overlapped. BP use was not associated with reduced risk of recurrence or new primary disease among women diagnosed with early breast cancer and treated with tamoxifen. PMID:27002508

  13. Significance of p16 expression in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and cetuximab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiduschka, Gregor; Thurnher, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Grah, Anja; Kranz, Alexander; Selzer, Edgar [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Oberndorfer, Felicitas; Wrba, Fritz [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Clinical Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Seemann, Rudolf [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Kornek, Gabriela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I - Division of Clinical Oncology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    HPV-infection, p16 positivity, and EGFR expression have been correlated with favorable responses of head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) with or without chemotherapy. However, a possible correlation of HPV/p16 and EGFR status on the effect of RT in combination with cetuximab has not been sufficiently investigated. We analyzed tumor samples for p16 and EGFR expression and correlated these variables with treatment outcome. Cox-proportional-hazard regression models were applied to compare the risk of death among patients stratified according to risk factors. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results were compared with an institutional historical control group treated without cetuximab and with published data. Expression of p16 was predominantly found in oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer patients (OPSCC; 36.6 % positivity; 92 % of all cases), while EGFR was expressed at high levels in all tumor subsites (82 %). p16 expression was associated with improved overall survival in irradiated OPSCC patients (2-year overall survival of 80 % in p16-positive vs. 33 % overall survival in p16-negative patients). In a multivariable analysis covering all tumor sites, nodal stage (> N2a vs. ≤ N2a) and tumor site (OPSSC vs. non-OPSCC) had an impact on overall survival. Our results show that p16 positivity is associated with a favorable outcome in OPSCC patients treated with RT and cetuximab. (orig.) [German] HPV-Infektion, p16-Positivitaet und EGFR-Expression wurden bei Kopf-Hals-Tumorpatienten, die mit einer Strahlentherapie (RT) mit oder ohne Chemotherapie behandelt wurden, mit einem besseren Ergebnis in Verbindung gebracht. Bis jetzt wurde eine solche Korrelation bei Patienten, die mit einer RT in Kombination mit Cetuximab therapiert wurden, nicht untersucht. Es wurden die p16- und die EGFR-Expression in Tumormaterial untersucht und die Daten mit dem Behandlungsergebnissen korreliert. Um die Sterberisiken zu vergleichen, wurden Cox

  14. Cancer incidence and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with human insulin: a cohort study in Shanghai.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjuan Gu

    Full Text Available AIM: The aim was to investigate the association between human insulin and cancer incidence and mortality in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We recruited 8,774 insulin-naïve diabetes patients from the Shanghai Diabetes Registry (SDR. The follow-up rate was 85.4%. All subjects were divided into the insulin use cohort (n = 3,639 and the non-insulin use cohort (n = 5,135. The primary outcome was the first diagnosis of any cancer. The secondary outcome was all-cause mortality. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relative risk (RR of cancer and mortality. RESULTS: We observed 98 cancer events in the insulin use cohort and 170 in the non-insulin use cohort. Cancer incidence rates were 78.6 and 74.3 per 10,000 patients per year in the insulin users and the non-insulin users, respectively. No significant difference in cancer risk was observed between the two cohorts (adjusted RR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.89-1.62, P = 0.228. Regarding site-specific cancers, only the risk of liver cancer was significantly higher in the insulin users compared to that in the non-insulin users (adjusted RR = 2.84, 95% CI 1.12-7.17, P = 0.028. The risks of overall mortality (adjusted RR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.47-2.43, P<0.0001 and death from cancer (adjusted RR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.39-3.35, P = 0.001 were all significantly higher in the insulin users than in the non-insulin users. CONCLUSION: There was no excess risk of overall cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with human insulin. However, a significantly higher risk of liver cancer was found in these patients. Moreover, insulin users showed higher risks of overall and cancer mortality. Considering that individuals treated with insulin were more likely to be advanced diabetic patients, caution should be used in interpreting these results.

  15. Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Treated with Human Insulin: A Cohort Study in Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ying; Hou, Xuhong; Mo, Yifei; Yu, Weihui; Zhang, Lei; Hu, Cheng; Nan, Hairong; Chen, Lei; Li, Jie; Liu, Yuxiang; Huang, Zhezhou; Han, Ming; Bao, Yuqian; Zhong, Weijian; Jia, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim was to investigate the association between human insulin and cancer incidence and mortality in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We recruited 8,774 insulin-naïve diabetes patients from the Shanghai Diabetes Registry (SDR). The follow-up rate was 85.4%. All subjects were divided into the insulin use cohort (n = 3,639) and the non-insulin use cohort (n = 5,135). The primary outcome was the first diagnosis of any cancer. The secondary outcome was all-cause mortality. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of cancer and mortality. Results We observed 98 cancer events in the insulin use cohort and 170 in the non-insulin use cohort. Cancer incidence rates were 78.6 and 74.3 per 10,000 patients per year in the insulin users and the non-insulin users, respectively. No significant difference in cancer risk was observed between the two cohorts (adjusted RR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.89–1.62, P = 0.228). Regarding site-specific cancers, only the risk of liver cancer was significantly higher in the insulin users compared to that in the non-insulin users (adjusted RR = 2.84, 95% CI 1.12–7.17, P = 0.028). The risks of overall mortality (adjusted RR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.47–2.43, P<0.0001) and death from cancer (adjusted RR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.39–3.35, P = 0.001) were all significantly higher in the insulin users than in the non-insulin users. Conclusion There was no excess risk of overall cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with human insulin. However, a significantly higher risk of liver cancer was found in these patients. Moreover, insulin users showed higher risks of overall and cancer mortality. Considering that individuals treated with insulin were more likely to be advanced diabetic patients, caution should be used in interpreting these results. PMID:23308218

  16. Prognostic Cell Biological Markers in Cervical Cancer Patients Primarily Treated With (Chemo)radiation: A Systematic Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the prognostic and predictive significance of cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation. A PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane literature search was performed. Studies describing a relation between a cell biological marker and survival in ≥50 cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation were selected. Study quality was assessed, and studies with a quality score of 4 or lower were excluded. Cell biological markers were clustered on biological function, and the prognostic and predictive significance of these markers was described. In total, 42 studies concerning 82 cell biological markers were included in this systematic review. In addition to cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-ag) levels, markers associated with poor prognosis were involved in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling (EGFR and C-erbB-2) and in angiogenesis and hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase 9 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α). Epidermal growth factor receptor and C-erbB-2 were also associated with poor response to (chemo)radiation. In conclusion, EGFR signaling is associated with poor prognosis and response to therapy in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation, whereas markers involved in angiogenesis and hypoxia, COX-2, and serum SCC-ag levels are associated with a poor prognosis. Therefore, targeting these pathways in combination with chemoradiation may improve survival in advanced-stage cervical cancer patients.

  17. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  18. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  19. Short-term mortality in older patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstock, Aron S; Lei, Xiudong; Tripathy, Debu; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Giordano, Sharon H; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer has lowered cancer recurrence and deaths. However, short-term mortality rates due to cancer or treatment in the general population remain largely unknown. In this study, we evaluate the short-term mortality rate and the determinants of such outcome among a cohort of older breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. This is a population-based study based on the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER)-Medicare and the Texas Cancer Registry (TCR)-Medicare databases. Patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer between 2003 and 2011 who were 66 years or older and were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy within 6 months of diagnosis were included. Short-term mortality was defined as death from any cause within one year of breast cancer diagnosis. Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression modeling were used for the analysis. Of the 21,536 patients included, a total of 625 (2.9 %) died within one year of breast cancer diagnosis. In multivariate analysis, older age (using 66-70 as reference category; 71-75 years OR 1.31, 95 % CI 1.05-1.62; 76-80 years OR 1.73, 95 % CI 1.36-2.19; >80 years OR 3.48, 95 % CI 2.7-4.48) and higher comorbidity index (using Charlson score of 0 as a reference, those with score of 1 or >2 had higher risk OR 1.46, 95 % CI 1.19-1.8 and OR 2.98, 95 % CI 2.42-3.67, respectively) were associated with the increased risk of short-term mortality. Other factors significantly associated with the outcome were higher grade and stage, ER-negative status, poor census tract area, and mastectomy. The findings of this study revealed that, in this large cohort of older breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, 2.9 % of the population died within one year of breast cancer diagnosis. Finally, it was concluded that tumor- and patient-related characteristics were associated with short-term death. Our findings add relevant information that can be

  20. Interstitial brachytherapy for pancreatic cancer: Report of seven cases treated with 125I and a review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1975, seven groups of investigators have reported clinical results of interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) for pancreatic cancer. The reports are comprised of data from 254 patients, 21 of whom died in the postoperative period for an overall operative mortality rate of 8.7%. Operative mortality rate range from 0% to 32% in individual reports. Most patients have been treated with 125I, although 25 patients were treated with 198Au seeds. Most investigators report combining IBT with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) ± adjuvant chemotherapy. In general, IBT has been associated with considerable morbidity. Median patient survival time has not exceeded 15 months. This report describes an additional seven patients with locally unresectable pancreatic cancer, without distant metastases, treated primarily with 60 to 100 Gy matched peripheral dose (MPD) by 125I IBT. One patient died postoperatively of a pulmonary embolus. Four of the remaining six patients were also treated with modest doses (10.5 to 30 Gy) of EBRT late in the course of the disease for local tumor progression. One developed a pancreaticocutaneous fistula, and one developed exacerbation of pre-existing diabetes mellitus. The median patient survival time from the date of IBT was 7 months (range: 0 to 21 months). One patient is alive without clinical evidence of cancer 9 months after IBT. 25 refs

  1. Treating High-grade Lesions to Prevent Anal Cancer in HIV-infected People

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study, called the ANCHOR trial, will investigate whether screening and prevention methods similar to those used to prevent cervical cancer can help prevent anal cancer in HIV-infected men and women.

  2. Cholecalciferol(25-[OH]-Vitamin D) in Treating Patients With Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-16

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer

  3. A New Role for an Old Drug: Metformin Targets MicroRNAs in Treating Diabetes and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Joseph Yi; Xu, Biao; Li, Lixin

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of short, noncoding, 19-23 base pair RNA molecules. Due to their unique role in gene regulation in various tissues, miRNAs play important roles in regulating insulin secretion, metabolic disease, and cancer biology. Emerging evidence demonstrates that miRNAs could also be novel diagnostic markers for a variety of disease states. Additionally, miRNAs have been found to function either as oncogenes, or tumor suppressor genes in cerian cancers. An increasing number of studies have been conducted investigating new drugs targeting miRNAs as a potential anticancer therapy. Metformin is the most widely prescribed medication for treating Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recent clinical data suggests that metformin impacts the miRNA profile in T2D subjects. Most excitingly, studies have found that metformin is protective against cancer. The anticancer activity of metformin is mediated through a direct regulation of miRNAs, which further modulates several downstream genes in metabolic or preoncogenic pathways. These miRNAs are, therefore, prospective therapeutic targets for treating diabetes and cancer which is the topic of this review. Further study on the regulation of miRNAs by metformin could result in novel therapeutic strategies for recurrent or drug-esistant cancer, and as part of combinatorial approaches with conventional anticancer therapies. PMID:26936407

  4. Recent Advances in the Use of Metformin: Can Treating Diabetes Prevent Breast Cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Hatoum, Diana; Eileen M. McGowan

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial epidemiological evidence pointing to an increased incidence of breast cancer and morbidity in obese, prediabetic, and diabetic patients. In vitro studies strongly support metformin, a diabetic medication, in breast cancer therapy. Although metformin has been heralded as an exciting new breast cancer treatment, the principal consideration is whether metformin can be used as a generic treatment for all breast cancer types. Importantly, will metformin be useful as an inexpen...

  5. Diet Modulation is an Effective Complementary Agent in Preventing and Treating Breast Cancer Lung Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xiangmin; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Wang, Dezhi; Siegal, Gene P.; Hardy, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    A significant percentage of breast cancer victims will suffer from metastases indicating that new approaches to preventing breast cancer metastasis are thus needed. Dietary stearate and chemotherapy have been shown to reduce breast cancer metastasis. We tested the complementary use of dietary stearate with a taxol-based chemotherapy which work through separate mechanisms to reduce breast cancer metastasis. We therefore carried out a prevention study in which diets were initiated prior to huma...

  6. Development of a nomogram model predicting current bone scan positivity in patients treated with androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eKattan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop a nomogram predictive of current bone scan positivity in patients receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT for advanced prostate cancer; to augment clinical judgment and highlight patients in need of additional imaging investigations.Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review of bone scan records (conventional 99mTc-scintigraphy of 1,293 patients who received ADT at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 2000 to 2011. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables suitable for inclusion in the nomogram. The probability of current bone scan positivity was determined using these variables and the predictive accuracy of the nomogram was quantified by concordance index.Results: In total, 2,681 bone scan records were analyzed and 636 patients had a positive result. Overall, the median pre-scan prostate-specific antigen (PSA level was 2.4 ng/ml; median PSA doubling time (PSADT was 5.8 months. At the time of a positive scan, median PSA level was 8.2 ng/ml; 53% of patients had PSA <10 ng/ml; median PSADT was 4.0 months. Five variables were included in the nomogram: number of previous negative bone scans after initiating ADT, PSA level, Gleason grade sum, and history of radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy. A concordance index value of 0.721 was calculated for the nomogram. This was a retrospective study based on limited data in patients treated in a large cancer centre who underwent conventional 99mTc bone scans, which themselves have inherent limitations. Conclusions: This is the first nomogram to predict current bone scan positivity in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients, providing high predictive accuracy.

  7. Development of a Nomogram Model Predicting Current Bone Scan Positivity in Patients Treated with Androgen-Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotto, Geoffrey T.; Yu, Changhong; Bernstein, Melanie; Eastham, James A.; Kattan, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a nomogram predictive of current bone scan positivity in patients receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) for advanced prostate cancer; to augment clinical judgment and highlight patients in need of additional imaging investigations. Materials and methods: A retrospective chart review of bone scan records (conventional 99mTc-scintigraphy) of 1,293 patients who received ADT at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 2000 to 2011. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables suitable for inclusion in the nomogram. The probability of current bone scan positivity was determined using these variables and the predictive accuracy of the nomogram was quantified by concordance index. Results: In total, 2,681 bone scan records were analyzed and 636 patients had a positive result. Overall, the median pre-scan prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 2.4 ng/ml; median PSA doubling time (PSADT) was 5.8 months. At the time of a positive scan, median PSA level was 8.2 ng/ml; 53% of patients had PSA <10 ng/ml; median PSADT was 4.0 months. Five variables were included in the nomogram: number of previous negative bone scans after initiating ADT, PSA level, Gleason grade sum, and history of radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy. A concordance index value of 0.721 was calculated for the nomogram. This was a retrospective study based on limited data in patients treated in a large cancer center who underwent conventional 99mTc bone scans, which themselves have inherent limitations. Conclusion: This is the first nomogram to predict current bone scan positivity in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients, providing high predictive accuracy. PMID:25386410

  8. Importance of radiation therapy for breast cancer patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine local-regional failure rates in breast cancer patients treated with surgery and high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant and to relate local-regional failure to the use and timing of radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 165 breast cancer patients treated on institutional protocols with surgery and high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant. All patients had either Stage III disease, 10 or more positive axillary lymph nodes, or 4 or more positive axillary lymph nodes following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Twelve patients had inflammatory breast cancer. Thirteen patients treated with breast preservation and 5 patients who died from toxicity within 30 days of transplant were excluded from the analyses of local-regional recurrences. In the remaining 147 patients, 108 were treated with adjuvant radiation and 39 were not. The disease stage distribution for these two groups was comparable. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 35 months. Results: The 3- and 5-year actuarial disease-free survival (DFS) for the entire group was 60% and 51%, respectively. The 5-year rates of freedom from isolated local-regional recurrence were 95% in the patients treated with adjuvant radiation and 86% in the patients who did not receive radiation (p 0.014, log rank comparison). The 5-year rates of any local-regional recurrence as a first event (isolated recurrences plus those with simultaneous local-regional and distant recurrences) were 92% versus 82%, respectively for patients whose treatment did and did not include radiation (p = 0.038). We could not demonstrate a correlation of the timing of radiation with the risk of local-regional recurrence. Conclusions: These data indicate that high-dose chemotherapy does not negate the importance of radiation in optimizing local-regional control in patients with high-risk breast cancer. Given the results of recent randomized trials studying postmastectomy

  9. Pan FGFR Kinase Inhibitor BGJ398 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  10. Implementation of Man-made Tongue Immobilization Devices in Treating Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong Geal; Kim, Joo Ho; Lee, Sang Kyu; Lee, Won Joo; Yoon, Jong Won; Cho, Jeong Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yensei Cancer Center, Yensei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    For head and neck cancer patients treated with radiation therapy, proper immobilization of intra-oral structures is crucial in reproducing treatment positions and optimizing dose distribution. We produced a man-made tongue immobilization device for each patient subjected to this study. Reproducibility of treatment positions and dose distributions at air-and-tissue interface were compared using man-made tongue immobilization devices and conventional tongue-bites. Dental alginate and putty were used in producing man-made tongue immobilization devices. In order to evaluate reproducibility of treatment positions, all patients were CT-simulated, and linac-gram was repeated 5 times with each patient in the treatment position. An acrylic phantom was devised in order to evaluate safety of man-made tongue immobilization devices. Air, water, alginate and putty were placed in the phantom and dose distributions at air-and-tissue interface were calculated using Pinnacle (version 7.6c, Phillips, USA) and measured with EBT film. Two different field sizes (33 cm and 55 cm) were used for comparison. Evaluation of linac grams showed reproducibility of a treatment position was 4 times more accurate with man-made tongue immobilization devices compared with conventional tongue bites. Patients felt more comfortable using customized tongue immobilization devices during radiation treatment. Air-and-tissue interface dose distributions calculated using Pinnacle were 7.78% and 0.56% for 33 cm field and 55 cm field respectively. Dose distributions measured with EBT (international specialty products, USA) film were 36.5% and 11.8% for 33 cm field and 55 cm field respectively. Values from EBT film were higher. Using man-made tongue immobilization devices made of dental alginate and putty in treatment of head and neck cancer patients showed higher reproducibility of treatment position compared with using conventional mouth pieces. Man-made immobilization devices can help optimizing air

  11. ATM sequence variants are predictive of adverse radiotherapy response among patients treated for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine whether the presence of sequence variants in the ATM (mutated in ataxia-telangiectasia) gene is predictive for the development of radiation-induced adverse responses resulting from 125I prostate brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty-seven patients with a minimum of 1-year follow-up who underwent 125I prostate brachytherapy of early-stage prostate cancer were screened for DNA sequence variations in all 62 coding exons of the ATM gene using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. The clinical course and postimplant dosimetry for each genetically characterized patient were obtained from a database of 2,020 patients implanted at Mount Sinai Hospital after 1990. Results: Twenty-one ATM sequence alterations located within exons, or in short intronic regions flanking each exon, were found in 16 of the 37 patients screened. For this group, 10 of 16 (63%) exhibited at least one form of adverse response. In contrast, of the 21 patients who did not harbor an ATM sequence variation, only 3 of 21 (14%) manifested radiation-induced adverse responses (p = 0.005). Nine of the patients with sequence alterations specifically possessed missense mutations, which encode for amino acid substitutions and are therefore more likely to possess functional importance. For this group, 7 of 9 (78%) exhibited at least one form of adverse response. In contrast, of the 28 patients who did not have a missense alteration, only 6 of 28 (21%) manifested any form of adverse response to the radiotherapy (p = 0.004). Of the patients with missense variants, 5 of 9 (56%) exhibited late rectal bleeding vs. 1 of 28 (4%) without such alterations (p = 0.002). Of those patients who were at risk for developing erectile dysfunction, 5 of 8 (63%) patients with missense mutations developed prospectively evaluated erectile dysfunction as opposed to 2 of 20 (10%) without these sequence alterations (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Possession of sequence

  12. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Head and Neck Cancer or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus

  13. Frequency of cancer in children residing in Mexico City and treated in the hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (1996–2001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this article is to present the frequency of cancer in Mexican children who were treated in the hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Mexico City (IMSS-MC) in the period 1996–2001. The Registry of Cancer in Children, started in 1996 in the IMSS-MC, is an on-going, prospective register. The data from 1996 through 2001 were analyzed and the different types of cancer were grouped according to the International Classification for Cancer in Children (ICCC). From this analysis, the general and specific frequencies by age and by sex were obtained for the different groups of neoplasms. Also, the frequency of the stage of the disease that had been diagnosed in cases of children with solid tumors was obtained. A total of 1,702 new cases of children with cancer were registered, with the male/female ratio at 1.1/1. Leukemias had the highest frequency with 784 cases (46.1%) and, of these, acute lymphoblastic leukemias were the most prevalent with 614 cases (78.3%). Thereafter, in descending order of frequency, were tumors of the central nervous system (CNST) with 197 cases (11.6%), lymphomas with 194 cases (11.4%), germinal cell tumors with 110 cases (6.5%), and bone tumors with 97 cases (5.7%). The highest frequency of cancer was found in the group of one to four year-olds that had 627 cases (36.8%). In all the age groups, leukemias were the most frequent. In the present work, the frequency of Hodgkin's disease (~4%) was found to be lower than that (~10%) in previous studies and the frequency of tumors of the sympathetic nervous system was low (2.3%). Of those cases of solid tumors for which the stage of the disease had been determined, 66.9% were diagnosed as being Stage III or IV. The principal cancers in the children treated in the IMSS-MC were leukemias, CNST, and lymphomas, consistent with those reported by developed countries. A 2.5-fold reduction in the frequency of Hodgkin's disease was found. Of the children, the stage of

  14. A comparative dosimetric study of left sided breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery treated with VMAT and IMRT

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hongfu; He, Mingyuan; Cheng, Guanghui; Han, Dongmei; Wu, Ning; Shi, Dan; Zhao, Zhipeng; Jin, Jianxue

    2015-01-01

    Background and purposes This study compared VMAT and IMRT plans for intact breast radiotherapy for left sided breast cancer and evaluated the irradiated dose of planning target volume and OARs, especially focusing on heart and coronary artery. Materials and methods Eleven patients with left sided breast cancer whose breast was relatively smaller (the mean volumes is 296 cc) treated with breast-conserving surgery were prescribed radiotherapy of 50 Gy in 25 fractions using two or four-field ste...

  15. 10-year epidemiological profile changes for cervical and endometrial cancer patients treated by radiotherapy in the Pernambuco state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is a worldwide public health problem, its prevention and control are included within 16 strategic objectives of the Brazilian Ministry of Health for the period 2011-2015. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common tumor in the female population, being new 15,590 cases estimated for 2014 according to the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA). Pernambuco is the fifth state with the highest number of cases of cervical cancer and the seventh in cases of endometrial ones, both estimative for 2014. The understanding of the epidemiological profile of these pathologies corroborates strategies for prevention, control and treatment. As Pernambuco has implemented the radiotherapy for cancer treatment since 1998-1999, this work encompassed the comparison of the 1998-1999 epidemiological profile of patients treated by radiotherapy for cervical and endometrial cancer in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, with 2008-2009 profile - ten years after. Medical record of 490 patients treated at the Center of Radiotherapy of Pernambuco (CERAPE) were compiled according to the patient origin, the affected uterus region, the staging of disease, the type and cell differentiation of the tumor, the age group, and, finally, the realization of hysterectomy as part of the treatment. More than 90% of the patients were affected by cervical cancer in the two investigated periods. For the interval of 1998-1999 the proportion of patients submitted to hysterectomy was quite higher compared to those after ten years. The results also showed a change in the origin of the patients, in which, in 1999, most of the patients were from the capital and the metropolitan area, while, after ten years, patients were mostly from the interior of the State. There was a predominance of squamous cell type tumors in both periods evaluated. For the 1998-1999 interval, tumors were stage 2, moderately differentiated type. Differently, the tumors were mostly stage 3, not differentiated type, for the 2008-2009 period

  16. 10-year epidemiological profile changes for cervical and endometrial cancer patients treated by radiotherapy in the Pernambuco state, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Franca, Elvis J., E-mail: ejfranca@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com, E-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Pessoa, Juanna G.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Amancio, Francisco F., E-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, E-mail: amanciobike@gmail.com, E-mail: juannapessoa@gmail.com, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Radiobiologia; Oliveira Neto, Aristides M.; Melo, Jonathan A., E-mail: aristidesoliveira466@hotmail.com, E-mail: jonathan@truenet.com.br [Centro de Radioterapia de Pernambuco (CERAPE), Santo Amaro, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Cancer is a worldwide public health problem, its prevention and control are included within 16 strategic objectives of the Brazilian Ministry of Health for the period 2011-2015. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common tumor in the female population, being new 15,590 cases estimated for 2014 according to the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA). Pernambuco is the fifth state with the highest number of cases of cervical cancer and the seventh in cases of endometrial ones, both estimative for 2014. The understanding of the epidemiological profile of these pathologies corroborates strategies for prevention, control and treatment. As Pernambuco has implemented the radiotherapy for cancer treatment since 1998-1999, this work encompassed the comparison of the 1998-1999 epidemiological profile of patients treated by radiotherapy for cervical and endometrial cancer in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, with 2008-2009 profile - ten years after. Medical record of 490 patients treated at the Center of Radiotherapy of Pernambuco (CERAPE) were compiled according to the patient origin, the affected uterus region, the staging of disease, the type and cell differentiation of the tumor, the age group, and, finally, the realization of hysterectomy as part of the treatment. More than 90% of the patients were affected by cervical cancer in the two investigated periods. For the interval of 1998-1999 the proportion of patients submitted to hysterectomy was quite higher compared to those after ten years. The results also showed a change in the origin of the patients, in which, in 1999, most of the patients were from the capital and the metropolitan area, while, after ten years, patients were mostly from the interior of the State. There was a predominance of squamous cell type tumors in both periods evaluated. For the 1998-1999 interval, tumors were stage 2, moderately differentiated type. Differently, the tumors were mostly stage 3, not differentiated type, for the 2008-2009 period

  17. Urinary incontinence in prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To describe the incidence of urinary incontinence among prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT) and to investigate associated risk factors. Patients and methods: One thousand and hundred ninety-two patients with ≥24 months follow-up were the subjects of this series. All patients received between 50 and 72 Gy in 20-37 fractions (median 66 Gy/33). Post-RT urinary incontinence was scored by direct patient interviewing according to the modified RTOG/SOMA scale: Grade 1-occasional use of incontinence pads, Grade 2-intermittent use of incontinence pads, Grade 3-persistent use of incontinence pads, and Grade 4-permanent catheter. Risk-factors investigated were: age, diabetes, TURP prior to RT, elapsed time from TURP to RT, clinical stage, RT dose and presence of Grade ≥2 acute GU and GI toxicity. Non-parametric, actuarial univariate (Kaplan-Meier) and multivariate tests (MVA, Cox regression) were performed. Results: Median follow-up for the group is 52 months (24-109). Thirty-four patients (2.9%) had incontinence prior to RT, which was more common in TURP patients (7.8% vs 1.6% P<0.001). These are excluded from further analysis. Fifty-seven patients (4.9%) developed Grade 1 incontinence, 7 (0.6%) Grade 2, and 7 (0.6%) Grade 3. There was no Grade 4 incontinence. Actuarial rates for Grade ≥1 and ≥2 incontinence at 5 years are 7 and 1.7%, respectively. Risk factors on MVA associated with the development of Grade 1 or worse incontinence are pre-RT TURP (5-year rates 10% vs 6%, P=0.026), presence of Grade ≥2 acute GU toxicity (5-year rates 11% vs 5%, P=0.002). Age, diabetes, clinical stage, elapsed time from TURP to RT, RT dose or fraction size, acute GI toxicity were not significant. Patients who underwent post-RT TURP or dilatation for obstructive symptoms (4.3%), were more likely to develop Grade 2-3 incontinence (5-year rate 8 vs 1.5%, P=0.0015). Conclusions: Grade 2 or greater urinary incontinence is rare

  18. Prognostic impact of clinicopathologic parameters in stage II/III breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant docetaxel and doxorubicin chemotherapy: paradoxical features of the triple negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dong-Wan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognostic factors in locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy differ from those of early breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical significance of potential predictive and prognostic factors in breast cancer patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods A total of 145 stage II and III breast cancer patients received neoadjuvant docetaxel/doxorubicin chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. We examined the clinical and biological factors (ER, PR, p53, c-erbB2, bcl-2, and Ki-67 by immunohistochemistry. We analyzed clinical outcome and their correlation with clinicopathologic parameters. Results Among the clinicopathologic parameters investigated, none of the marker was correlated with response rate (RR except triple negative phenotype. Patients with triple negative phenotype showed higher RR (83.0% in triple negative vs. 62.2% in non-triple negative, p = 0.012 and pathologic complete RR (17.0% in triple negative vs. 3.1% in non-triple negative, p = 0.005. However, relapse free survival (RFS and overall survival (OS were significantly shorter in triple negative breast cancer patients (p p = 0.021, respectively. Low histologic grade, positive hormone receptors, positive bcl-2 and low level of Ki-67 were associated with prolonged RFS. In addition, positive ER and positive bcl-2 were associated with prolonged OS. In our homogeneous patient population, initial clinical stage reflects RFS and OS more precisely than pathologic stage. In multivariate analysis, initial clinical stage was the only significant independent prognostic factor to impact on OS (hazard ratio 3.597, p = 0.044. Conclusion Several molecular markers provided useful predictive and prognostic information in stage II and III breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant docetaxel/doxorubicin chemotherapy. Triple negative phenotype was associated with shorter survival, even though it was associated

  19. Is Androgen Deprivation Therapy Necessary in All Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated in the Dose Escalation Era?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castle, Katherine O., E-mail: kocastle@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, Karen E.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adding androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer is unclear; therefore, we assessed the impact of adding ADT to dose-escalated RT on freedom from failure (FFF). Methods: Three groups of men treated with intensity modulated RT or 3-dimensional conformal RT (75.6-78 Gy) from 1993-2008 for prostate cancer were categorized as (1) 326 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone, (2) 218 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ≤6 months of ADT, and (3) 274 low-risk patients treated with definitive RT. Median follow-up was 58 months. Recursive partitioning analysis based on FFF using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment PSA concentration was applied to the intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 5-year FFF. Results: Based on recursive partitioning analysis, intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were divided into 3 prognostic groups: (1) 188 favorable patients: GS 6, ≤T2b or GS 3+4, ≤T1c; (2) 71 marginal patients: GS 3+4, T2a-b; and (3) 68 unfavorable patients: GS 4+3 or T2c disease. Hazard ratios (HR) for recurrence in each group were 1.0, 2.1, and 4.6, respectively. When intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were compared to intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ADT, the greatest benefit from ADT was seen for the unfavorable intermediate-risk patients (FFF, 74% vs 94%, respectively; P=.005). Favorable intermediate-risk patients had no significant benefit from the addition of ADT to RT (FFF, 94% vs 95%, respectively; P=.85), and FFF for favorable intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone approached that of low-risk patients treated with RT alone (98%). Conclusions: Patients with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer did not benefit from the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT, and their FFF was nearly as good as patients with low-risk disease

  20. The impact of abdominal compression on outcome in patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal compression (AC) on outcome in patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed data for 47 patients with histologically proven non-small cell lung cancer and lung tumour motion ≥8 mm treated with SBRT. Setup error was corrected based on bony structure. The differences in overall survival (OS), local control (LC) and disease-free survival (DFS) were evaluated to compare patients treated with AC (n = 22) and without AC (n = 25). The median follow-up was 42.6 months (range, 1.4–94.6 months). The differences in the 3-year OS, LC and DFS rate between the two groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.909, 0.209 and 0.639, respectively). However, the largest difference was observed in the LC rate, which was 82.5% (95% CI, 54.9–94.0%) for patients treated without AC and 65.4% (95% CI, 40.2–82.0%) for those treated with AC. After stratifying the patients into prognostic groups based on sex and T-stage, the LC difference increased in the group with an unfavourable prognosis. The present study suggests that AC might be associated with a worse LC rate after SBRT using a bony-structure-based set-up

  1. Radiation Therapy Risk Factors for Development of Lymphedema in Patients Treated With Regional Lymph Node Irradiation for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Ravi A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Miller, Cynthia L. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Skolny, Melissa N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Warren, Laura E.G. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Horick, Nora [Department of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jammallo, Lauren S.; Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); O' Toole, Jean [Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle C. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: We previously evaluated the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE) with the addition of regional lymph node irradiation (RLNR) and found an increased risk when RLNR is used. Here we analyze the association of technical radiation therapy (RT) factors in RLNR patients with the risk of LE development. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively screened 1476 women for LE who underwent surgery for breast cancer. Among 1507 breasts treated, 172 received RLNR and had complete technical data for analysis. RLNR was delivered as supraclavicular (SC) irradiation (69% [118 of 172 patients]) or SC plus posterior axillary boost (PAB) (31% [54 of 172]). Bilateral arm volume measurements were performed pre- and postoperatively. Patients' RT plans were analyzed for SC field lateral border (relative to the humeral head), total dose to SC, RT fraction size, beam energy, and type of tangent (normal vs wide). Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze associated risk factors for LE. Results: Median postoperative follow-up was 29.3 months (range: 4.9-74.1 months). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LE was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15%-32%) for SC and 20% (95% CI: 11%-37%) for SC plus PAB (SC+PAB). None of the analyzed variables was significantly associated with LE risk (extent of humeral head: P=.74 for <1/3 vs >2/3, P=.41 for 1/3 to 2/3 vs >2/3; P=.40 for fraction size of 1.8 Gy vs 2.0 Gy; P=.57 for beam energy 6 MV vs 10 MV; P=.74 for tangent type wide vs regular; P=.66 for SC vs SC+PAB). Only pretreatment body mass index (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, P=.0007) and the use of axillary lymph node dissection (HR: 7.08, 95% CI: 0.98-51.40, P=.05) were associated with risk of subsequent LE development. Conclusions: Of the RT parameters tested, none was associated with an increased risk of LE development. This study underscores the need for future work investigating alternative RLNR risk factors for LE.

  2. Radiation Therapy Risk Factors for Development of Lymphedema in Patients Treated With Regional Lymph Node Irradiation for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We previously evaluated the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE) with the addition of regional lymph node irradiation (RLNR) and found an increased risk when RLNR is used. Here we analyze the association of technical radiation therapy (RT) factors in RLNR patients with the risk of LE development. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively screened 1476 women for LE who underwent surgery for breast cancer. Among 1507 breasts treated, 172 received RLNR and had complete technical data for analysis. RLNR was delivered as supraclavicular (SC) irradiation (69% [118 of 172 patients]) or SC plus posterior axillary boost (PAB) (31% [54 of 172]). Bilateral arm volume measurements were performed pre- and postoperatively. Patients' RT plans were analyzed for SC field lateral border (relative to the humeral head), total dose to SC, RT fraction size, beam energy, and type of tangent (normal vs wide). Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze associated risk factors for LE. Results: Median postoperative follow-up was 29.3 months (range: 4.9-74.1 months). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LE was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15%-32%) for SC and 20% (95% CI: 11%-37%) for SC plus PAB (SC+PAB). None of the analyzed variables was significantly associated with LE risk (extent of humeral head: P=.74 for <1/3 vs >2/3, P=.41 for 1/3 to 2/3 vs >2/3; P=.40 for fraction size of 1.8 Gy vs 2.0 Gy; P=.57 for beam energy 6 MV vs 10 MV; P=.74 for tangent type wide vs regular; P=.66 for SC vs SC+PAB). Only pretreatment body mass index (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, P=.0007) and the use of axillary lymph node dissection (HR: 7.08, 95% CI: 0.98-51.40, P=.05) were associated with risk of subsequent LE development. Conclusions: Of the RT parameters tested, none was associated with an increased risk of LE development. This study underscores the need for future work investigating alternative RLNR risk factors for LE

  3. A case report of breast cancer successfully treated with radium needles and their estimated radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nearly 80 years that radium has been used for the treatment of malignancy, the method of dose control have progressed toward a more detailed description of the radiation distribution as permitted by the knowledge and technology of the time. Although the early unit of milligram-hour reveals nothing of the dose distribution, it is still used for some advantages such as a rough indicator of patient tolerance to radiation. We carried out this study on the comparison between two tumor dosages calculated from the TLD system and the Paterson-Parker system in a case of breast cancer successfully treated by us with radium needles several years ago. Case; M.T. a female aged 76 years, was seen on March 30, 1973 for an extensive carcinoma of the left breast. On June 12, 1973 radium needles were put on a tumor dose of 5,550 miligram-hour for twenty-five days. Four months later, the tumor disappeared and has not recured to date. Dose values calculated from the chips of MSO-S type (TLD system) at a distance of 10 mm from radium needles were in the range of 27.24 - 50.06 R, averaged 39.34 R per hour. Therefore, the total radiation dose values were approximately 10,000 R (9,800 rads). Dose values calculated from Paterson-Parker system in this case were 9,700 rads, therefore, these values are approximately equivalent to the values from TLD system. We pointed out that the dose values in this case are more than those reported by many investigators probably due to greater tumor than usual. (author)

  4. Hyperbaric oxygen - an effective tool to treat radiation morbidity in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We report the results of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) used in the treatment of radiation cystitis and proctitis following irradiation of prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Between June 1995 and March 2000, 18 men (median age 71 years) with radiation proctitis (n=7), cystitis (n=8), and combined proctitis/cystitis (n=3) underwent HBO therapy in a multiplace chamber for a median of 26 sessions (range 2-60). The treatment schedule (2.2-2.4 atmospheres absolute, 60 min bottom time, once-a-day, 7 days a week) was set at a lower limit of 20 sessions; the upper limit was left open to symptom-related adjustment. Prior to HBO treatment, RTOG/EORTC late genitourinal (GU) morbidity was Grade 2 (n=3), Grade 3 (n=6) or Grade 4 (n=2); modified RTOG/EORTC late gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity was either Grade 2 (n=4) or Grade 3 (n=6). Results: Sixteen patients underwent an adequate number of sessions. RTOG/EORTC late GU as well as modified GI morbidity scores showed a significant improvement after HBO (GI, P=0.004; GU, P=0.004; exact Wilcoxon signed rank test); bleeding ceased in five out of five patients with proctitis and in six out of eight patients with cystitis; one of those two patients, in whom an ineffective treatment outcome was obtained, went on to have a cystectomy. Conclusions: HBO treatment seems to be an effective tool to treat those patients with late GI and GU morbidity when conventional treatment has led to unsatisfactory results. Particularly in patients with radiation cystitis, HBO should not be delayed too long, as in the case of extensive bladder shrinkage improvement is hard to achieve

  5. Pelvic insufficiency fractures in postmenopausal woman with advanced cervical cancer treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the predisposing factors and clinical characteristics of pelvic insufficiency fractures (PIF) in postmenopausal women with pelvic irradiation. Material and methods: A total 335 postmenopausal patients with cervical cancer of the intact uterus treated with radiation therapy between 1983 and 1998 were reviewed. Total external dose was delivered between 45 and 50.4 Gy with parallel opposed anteroposterior portals. Total brachytherapy dose at point A was delivered between 10 and 36 Gy. PIF were diagnosed by bone scintigraphy and confirmed by computed tomography. The cumulative incidence of symptomatic PIF was estimated by actuarial methods. Potential risk factors (age, weight, type II diabetes, delivery, menopause, total external dose, total brachytherapy dose) were assessed. Results: Fifty-seven (17.0%) of 335 patients were diagnosed as having PIF. Forty-seven patients were symptomatic and ten were asymptomatic. Parameters carrying a significant association with PIF were body weight 49 kg or below (P=0.044) in stepwise logistic regression analysis. The cumulative incidence of symptomatic PIF at 5 years was 17.9% calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. A body weight of 49 kg or below and more than three deliveries were identified as having a significant effect on symptomatic PIF in univariate analysis (P=0.021, P=0.003, log-rank test) and Cox life table regression analysis (P=0.038, P=0.013). Five patients required narcotic agents and eight patients required hospital admission. Conclusions: We should consider reducing the dose contribution to the sacrum and sacroilac joints, without underdosing the tumor, especially in postmenopausal women with many deliveries or low body weight

  6. Treating patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer: latest evidence and management strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Bin-Chi; Lin, Chia-Chi; Shih, Jin-Yuan; Yang, James Chih-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Rearrangements in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) gene were first described in a small portion of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2007. Fluorescence in situ hybridization is used as the diagnostic test for detecting an EML4–ALK rearrangement. Crizotinib, an ALK inhibitor, is effective in treating advanced ALK-positive NSCLC, and the US Food and Drug Administration approved it for treating ALK-positive NSCLC ...

  7. Acute esophagitis for patients with local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Yi; Brink, Carsten; Knap, Marianne;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Esophagitis is common in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy for local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose-effect relationship using clinical and dosimetric parameters in patients receiving intensity modulated...... radiotherapy (IMRT) and concomitant chemotherapy (CCT). METHODS: Between 2009 and 2013, 117 patients with stages IIB-IIIB NSCLC were treated in a multicenter randomized phase II trial with 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by IMRT and CCT. The esophagitis was prospectively scored using the Common...

  8. Gastric cancer patients treated by a general or gastric cancer surgical team: a comparative study Estudo comparativo entre cirurgia geral e cirurgia especializada no tratamento de pacientes com câncer gástrico

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando O. Souza; Dalnei V. Pereira; Luís H. Santos; Luis Antunes; Juarez Chiesa

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although gastric cancer has been decreasing in incidence in many countries, it is still the second most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Its prognosis is poor and depends, among other factors, on early diagnosis as well as on surgeon expertise. AIM: To compare the outcomes of gastric cancer patients treated at a university hospital by a general surgical team and later on by a gastric cancer surgical team. METHODS: Gastric cancer patients were separated into two groups acco...

  9. Two kinds of biological dosimeters applied to 131I-treated thyroid cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated 10 thyroid cancer patients after 131I oral medication at the range of (3.7-27.5 GBq) total activity with dicentric chromosome aberration analysis and the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) mutation assay. We compared and evaluated both methods on their accuracy and applicability. The 10 thyroid cancer patients are at 30-50 years old, and we got 5 ml peripheral blood individually for the investigations. We worked the dicentric aberration analysis with the conventional giemsa method. The first division cells were observed, and 100 or 200 metaphase cells of each patient were investigated. The background level of dicentric analysis is 1 in 500 metaphase cells. For the TCR mutation assay, we applied the FACS caliber flow cytometer manufactured by Becton Dickinson Co. to measure the CD3-CD4+ mutant frequency. Only 0.1 ml blood were needed and stained with fluorescein-labeled anti-leu3a(CD4) and phycoerythrin-labeled anti-leu4(CD3) antibodies as specified by the supplier (BD Co.). The Mf values were calculated as the number of CD3-CD4+ in the mutant cell windows divided by the total number of CD3-CD4+ T cells in the flow distribution. The average coefficient of variation(CV) on the mutant CD3-CD4+ T cell frequency (x10-4) in 10 normal donors aged 27-50 is 34%. The background rate of CD3-CD4+ mutant cells is 1.16x10-4 on 13 healthy unexposed persons. In general, the results or dicentric analysis and TCR mutation assay with total activity 3.7-27.5 GBq or 131I oral administration on 10 thyroid cancer patients are in coincidence, but the 131I treated the affects the results. The earlier 131I exposure (around 6 years), No. 6, 7, 9 patients showed obviously a decrease in data of TCR mutant. No.7, 8, 9, 10 patients also showed a decrease in TCR rate and no. of dicentric per cell because of the early and long period (on more than 5 years) 131I treatment. But nevertheless the No.10 patient was taken 131I 27.5 GBq total activity still has the highest TCR rates and

  10. Two kinds of biological dosimeters applied to {sup 131}I-treated thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ming-Shia; Chen, Li-Hsiang [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China)

    2000-05-01

    We investigated 10 thyroid cancer patients after {sup 131}I oral medication at the range of (3.7-27.5 GBq) total activity with dicentric chromosome aberration analysis and the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) mutation assay. We compared and evaluated both methods on their accuracy and applicability. The 10 thyroid cancer patients are at 30-50 years old, and we got 5 ml peripheral blood individually for the investigations. We worked the dicentric aberration analysis with the conventional giemsa method. The first division cells were observed, and 100 or 200 metaphase cells of each patient were investigated. The background level of dicentric analysis is 1 in 500 metaphase cells. For the TCR mutation assay, we applied the FACS caliber flow cytometer manufactured by Becton Dickinson Co. to measure the CD{sub 3}{sup -}CD{sub 4}{sup +} mutant frequency. Only 0.1 ml blood were needed and stained with fluorescein-labeled anti-leu3a(CD{sub 4}) and phycoerythrin-labeled anti-leu4(CD{sub 3}) antibodies as specified by the supplier (BD Co.). The Mf values were calculated as the number of CD{sub 3}{sup -}CD{sub 4}{sup +} in the mutant cell windows divided by the total number of CD{sub 3}{sup -}CD{sub 4}{sup +} T cells in the flow distribution. The average coefficient of variation(CV) on the mutant CD{sub 3}{sup -}CD{sub 4}{sup +} T cell frequency (x10{sup -4}) in 10 normal donors aged 27-50 is 34%. The background rate of CD{sub 3}{sup -}CD{sub 4}{sup +} mutant cells is 1.16x10{sup -4} on 13 healthy unexposed persons. In general, the results or dicentric analysis and TCR mutation assay with total activity 3.7-27.5 GBq or {sup 131}I oral administration on 10 thyroid cancer patients are in coincidence, but the {sup 131}I treated the affects the results. The earlier {sup 131}I exposure (around 6 years), No. 6, 7, 9 patients showed obviously a decrease in data of TCR mutant. No.7, 8, 9, 10 patients also showed a decrease in TCR rate and no. of dicentric per cell because of the early and

  11. Persistence of unstable and stable chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Radiation-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes has equal probability of producing both stable or unstable chromosome aberrations (C.A.). Reports of its in vivo persistence show considerable variations. The quantification of unstable C.A. (dicentrics) in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P.B.L.) is the most reliable biological method for estimating whole-body doses of recent overexposures to ionizing radiation. Given that during the division of T cell precursors, proliferative death of cells containing dicentrics reduces the number of such lymphocytes in peripheral blood, dicentric methodology should be modified to account for past exposures. Micronuclei (M.N.) in cytokinesis-blocked human P.B.L. are well established bio markers for assessing radiation damage in vivo. However, persistence of radiation induced M.N. is limited. Unlike dicentrics and M.N., stable C.A. (translocations) identified at present by the FISH technique, seem to be an adequate indicator for the dosimetric evaluation of past exposures, since translocations are not selected against during mitotic division in the haematopoietic stem cells compartment. Nevertheless, for partial -body exposures with high dose there is some evidence that the decline with time of dicentrics causes some reduction in the yield of translocations. Purpose: To assess the persistence along time of dicentrics, M.N. and translocations in lymphocytes of cancer patients after radiotherapy in order to model changes in C.A. frequencies with partial-body exposures. Materials and methods: 22 cancer patients with different tumor sites, treated with radiotherapy, were evaluated through dicentric chromosome, M.N. and FISH techniques with a follow-up time of up to 90 months after the end of radiotherapy. Regression analysis were performed: 1) for dicentric and for M.N. frequencies in relation to time after the end of radiotherapy and total tumor dose; 2) for the percentage of uns table cells in relation to time after the end

  12. Docetaxel plus cisplatin is effective for patients with metastatic breast cancer resistant to previous anthracycline treatment: a phase II clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) are frequently exposed to high cumulative doses of anthracyclines and are at risk of resistance and cardiotoxicity. This phase II trial evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel plus cisplatin, as salvage chemotherapy in patients with MBC resistant to prior anthracyclines. Patients with MBC that had progressed after at least one prior chemotherapy regimen containing anthracyclines received docetaxel 75 mg/m2 followed by cisplatin 60 mg/m2 every 3 weeks for a maximum of 6 cycles or until disease progression. Between Jan 2000 and May 2002, 24 patients with tumors primary resistant and 15 with secondary resistant disease were accrued. All 39 patients were evaluable for safety and 36 for efficacy. The objective response rate was 31% (95% CI, 16–45%) with 3 complete responses. The median time to disease progression was 7 months, and the median overall survival was 23 months (median follow-up of 41 months). Neutropenia was the most frequently observed severe hematologic toxicity (39% of patients), whereas asthenia and nausea were the most common non-hematologic toxicities. No treatment-related death was observed. In conclusion, we found docetaxel plus cisplatin to be an active and safe chemotherapy regimen for patients with MBC resistant to anthracyclines

  13. Skin cancer in patients with psoriasis treated with coal tar. A 25-year follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, crude coal tar has been used for the treatment of psoriasis. The possible carcinogenic effect of crude coal tar and ultraviolet (UV) radiation (Goeckerman regimen), considered individually or in combination, has been of some concern to physicians. A 25-year follow-up study was completed on 280 patients with psoriasis who were hospitalized and treated with crude coal tar and UV radiation at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn, during the years 1950 through 1954. The results of this study suggest that the incidence of skin cancer is not appreciably increased above the expected incidence for the general population when patients are treated with coal tar ointments. It seems that the Goeckerman regimen (topical crude coal tar combined with UV radiation) can be used with minimal risk for skin cancer in the treatment of psoriasis

  14. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Fulvestrant and Palbociclib in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-29

    Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    OpenAIRE

    Leppert, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Wojciech Leppert,1 Mikolaj Majkowicz,2 Maria Forycka,1 Eleonora Mess,3 Agata Zdun-Ryzewska2 1Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Quality of Life Research, Gdansk Medical University, Gdansk, Poland; 3Palliative Care Nursing Department, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Aim of the study: To assess quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU), and at a day care...

  17. Comparison of PET metabolic indices for the early assessment of tumour response in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated by polychemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Maisonobe, Jacques-Antoine; Garcia, Camilo A.; Necib, Hatem; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Hendlisz, Alain; Flamen, Patrick; Buvat, Irène

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the performance of eight metabolic indices for the early assessment of tumour response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with chemotherapy. Methods Forty patients with advanced mCRC underwent two FDG PET/CT scans, at baseline and on day 14 after chemotherapy initiation. For each lesion, eight metabolic indices were calculated: four standardized uptake values (SUV) without correction for the partial volume effect (PVE), two SUV with correction for ...

  18. A modified radiofrequency ablation approach for treating distant lymph node metastasis in two patients with late-stage cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yun-Fei Yuan; Ya-Di Liao; Ji-Liang Qiu; Qi-Jiong Li; Ru-Hai Zou; An-Hua Li

    2013-01-01

    Patients with late-stage cancer commonly have distant lymph node metastasis; however, poor health often contraindicates surgical treatment. Although the quality of life and overall survival for these patients are low, there is neither a consensus nor a guide for treatment. Ablation technique and surrounding tissue damage are two possible reasons for limited study of radiofrequency ablation in patients with superficial distant lymph node metastasis. Here, we report two patients treated success...

  19. A Case of Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Seong, Shin; Kim, Sung-Su; Han, Jae-Bok

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a case that shows a significant anticancer effect of Korean medicine therapy (KMT). A 79-year-old man, who was diagnosed as stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in December 2012, was treated with KMT including intravenous pharmacopunctures and oral herbal medicine from February 22, 2013, until September 2013 without any surgical intervention, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The intravenous pharmacopunctures were the wild ginseng pharmacopuncture, Cordyceps sinensis p...

  20. Multi-transcript profiling in archival diagnostic prostate cancer needle biopsies to evaluate biomarkers in non-surgically treated men

    OpenAIRE

    Kachroo, Naveen; Warren, Anne Y; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Most biomarkers in prostate cancer have only been evaluated in surgical cohorts. The value of these biomarkers in a different therapy context remains unclear. Our objective was to test a panel of surgical biomarkers for prognostic value in men treated by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT). Methods The Fluidigm® PCR array was used for multi-transcript profiling of laser microdissected tumours from archival formalin-fixed diagnostic biop...

  1. Cadmium modifies the cell cycle and apoptotic profiles of human breast cancer cells treated with 5-fluorouracil

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Madeddu; Cristiano Farace; Andrea Montella; Pasquale Bandiera; Garcia, Maria A.; Houria Boulaiz; Giuliana Solinas; Yolande Asara; Juan A. Marchal; Esther Carrasco

    2013-01-01

    Industrialisation, the proximity of factories to cities, and human work activities have led to a disproportionate use of substances containing heavy metals, such as cadmium (Cd), which may have deleterious effects on human health. Carcinogenic effects of Cd and its relationship with breast cancer, among other tumours, have been reported. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a fluoropyrimidine anticancer drug used to treat solid tumours of the colon, breast, stomach, liver, and pancreas. The purpose of th...

  2. Clinical study of 312 cases with matastatic differentiated thyroid cancer treated with large doses of 131 I

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Rui-sen; YU Yong-li; LU Han-kui; LUO Quan-yong; CHEN Li-bo

    2005-01-01

    @@ Patients with metastatic thyroid cancer (MTC) was routinely treated with a small dose of 131I before 1989. After that we have been switched to multiple courses of large dose 131I therapy. In this paper, the therapeutic result and its effect, in particular on bone marrow depression, pulmonary, parathyroid and salivary gland function as well as chromosome aberration1-3 were observed and reported.

  3. Endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Thine; Winding, Kamilla; Rinnov, Anders; Dejgaard, Thomas Engel; Thomsen, Carsten; Iversen, Peter; Brasso, Klaus; Mikines, Kari J; van Hall, Gerrit; Lindegaard, Birgitte; Solomon, Thomas; Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance and changes in body composition are side effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) given to prostate cancer patients. The present study investigated whether endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients. Nine men...... undergoing ADT for prostate cancer and ten healthy men with normal testosterone levels underwent 12 weeks of endurance training. Primary endpoints were insulin sensitivity (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps with concomitant glucose-tracer infusion) and body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and...... magnetic resonance imaging). The secondary endpoint was systemic inflammation. Statistical analysis was carried out using two-way ANOVA. Endurance training increased VO2max (ml(O2)/min per kg) by 11 and 13% in the patients and controls respectively (P...

  4. A case of esophageal cancer with septic disseminated intravascular coagulation treated with recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin during chemoradiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 70-year-old woman was diagnosed with synchronous advanced esophageal cancer and early renal cancer. During chemo-radiation therapy for the esophageal cancer, she suffered from septic shock due to pneumonia. She got worse despite the administration of antibiotics and γglobulin. On the following day, she was diagnosed with septic disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) on the basis of the diagnostic criterion for acute DIC. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rTM) was administered to treat the DIC. The patient responded promptly to rTM treatment and recovered from the DIC in just 1 day. rTM is thought to be an effective drug for sepsis-induced DIC during chemoradiation therapy. (author)

  5. Clinical application of radiofrequency ablation combined with bronchial artery infusion of docetaxel in treating non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the clinical application of radiofrequency ablation combined with bronchial artery infusion of docetaxel in treating non-small cell lung cancer and to summarize the experience of using this therapy in clinical practice. Methods: Radiofrequency ablation was performed in twenty-one patients with lung cancer. The diagnosis was confirmed by CT-guided percutaneous needle biopsy or bronchoscopic biopsy in all patients. One week after radiofrequency ablation treatment, bronchial artery infusion of docetaxel was conducted. The therapeutic results were observed and evaluated. Results: After the treatment, the lesion's size was markedly reduced and the clinical symptoms were dramatically improved in all patients. Conclusion: Radiofrequency ablation combined with bronchial artery infusion of docetaxel is a safe, effective and simple technique with excellent therapeutic results for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. It is really worth popularizing this technique in clinical practice. (authors)

  6. GPER1-mediated IGFBP-1 induction modulates IGF-1-dependent signaling in tamoxifen-treated breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri-Gohar, Ali; Houston, Kevin D

    2016-02-15

    Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is a commonly prescribed adjuvant therapy for estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast cancer patients. To determine if extracellular factors contribute to the modulation of IGF-1 signaling after tamoxifen treatment, MCF-7 cells were treated with IGF-1 in conditioned medium (CM) obtained from 4-OHT-treated MCF-7 cells and the accumulation of phospho-Akt (S473) was measured. CM inhibited IGF-1-dependent cell signaling and suggesting the involvement of extracellular factors (ie. IGFBPs). A significant increase in IGFBP-1 mRNA and extracellular IGFBP-1 protein was observed in 4-OHT-treated MCF-7 cells. Knockdown experiments demonstrated that both GPER1 and CREB mediate IGFBP-1 induction. Furthermore, experiments showed that 4-OHT-dependent IGFBP-1 transcription is downstream of GPER1-activation in breast cancer cells. Additionally, neutralization and knockdown experiments demonstrated a role for IGFBP-1 in the observed inhibition of IGF-1 signaling. These results suggested that 4-OHT inhibits IGF-1 signaling via GPER1 and CREB mediated extracellular IGFBP-1 accumulation in breast cancer cells. PMID:26690777

  7. Reconstruction in previously irradiated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhari Charudatta

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy, which forms the mainstay of the treatment in many head and neck cancers, is viewed by many surgeons with skepticism. But many are not fully conversant with radiobiology and the effect of the radiation in tissues. This article aims at bringing the reader acquainted with the beneficial and harmful effects of radiation on the tissues. The alterations in tissue healing with radiation and the problems associated with surgery in a previously irradiated patient is discussed din detail. The role of free tissue transfer, in this setting is also dealt with.

  8. Comparison of mastectomy with tamoxifen for treating elderly patients with operable breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, J. F.; Todd, J. H.; Ellis, I O; Elston, C. W.; Blamey, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--Comparison of tamoxifen and mastectomy in treatment of breast cancer in elderly patients. DESIGN--Randomised trial of treatment of operable breast cancer by wedge mastectomy or tamoxifen, with median follow up 24 and 25 months respectively (range 1-63). SETTING--University hospital; most patients from primary catchment area. PATIENTS--135 consecutive patients with breast cancer aged over 70 with operable tumours (less than 5 cm maximum diameter); 68 were allocated to tamoxife...

  9. Targeting Alternative Sites on the Androgen Receptor to Treat Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rennie, Paul S.; Artem Cherkasov; Nada Lallous; Kush Dalal

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-death in men. The androgen receptor (AR) is a modular, ligand-inducible transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes that can drive the progression of this disease, and as a consequence, this receptor is a key therapeutic target for controlling prostate cancer. The current drugs designed to directly inhibit the AR are called anti-androgens, and all act by competing with androgens for binding to the ...

  10. Recent Advances in the Use of Metformin: Can Treating Diabetes Prevent Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Hatoum

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial epidemiological evidence pointing to an increased incidence of breast cancer and morbidity in obese, prediabetic, and diabetic patients. In vitro studies strongly support metformin, a diabetic medication, in breast cancer therapy. Although metformin has been heralded as an exciting new breast cancer treatment, the principal consideration is whether metformin can be used as a generic treatment for all breast cancer types. Importantly, will metformin be useful as an inexpensive therapy for patients with comorbidity of diabetes and breast cancer? In general, meta-analyses of clinical trial data from retrospective studies in which metformin treatment has been used for patients with diabetes and breast cancer have a positive trend; nevertheless, the supporting clinical data outcomes remain inconclusive. The heterogeneity of breast cancer, confounded by comorbidity of disease in the elderly population, makes it difficult to determine the actual benefits of metformin therapy. Despite the questionable evidence available from observational clinical studies and meta-analyses, randomized phases I–III clinical trials are ongoing to test the efficacy of metformin for breast cancer. This special issue review will focus on recent research, highlighting in vitro research and retrospective observational clinical studies and current clinical trials on metformin action in breast cancer.

  11. Recent advances in the use of metformin: can treating diabetes prevent breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatoum, Diana; McGowan, Eileen M

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial epidemiological evidence pointing to an increased incidence of breast cancer and morbidity in obese, prediabetic, and diabetic patients. In vitro studies strongly support metformin, a diabetic medication, in breast cancer therapy. Although metformin has been heralded as an exciting new breast cancer treatment, the principal consideration is whether metformin can be used as a generic treatment for all breast cancer types. Importantly, will metformin be useful as an inexpensive therapy for patients with comorbidity of diabetes and breast cancer? In general, meta-analyses of clinical trial data from retrospective studies in which metformin treatment has been used for patients with diabetes and breast cancer have a positive trend; nevertheless, the supporting clinical data outcomes remain inconclusive. The heterogeneity of breast cancer, confounded by comorbidity of disease in the elderly population, makes it difficult to determine the actual benefits of metformin therapy. Despite the questionable evidence available from observational clinical studies and meta-analyses, randomized phases I-III clinical trials are ongoing to test the efficacy of metformin for breast cancer. This special issue review will focus on recent research, highlighting in vitro research and retrospective observational clinical studies and current clinical trials on metformin action in breast cancer. PMID:25866793

  12. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage III Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  13. Donor Stem Cell Transplant or Donor White Blood Cell Infusions in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Unusual Cancers of Childhood

  14. Recent Advances in the Use of Metformin: Can Treating Diabetes Prevent Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial epidemiological evidence pointing to an increased incidence of breast cancer and morbidity in obese, prediabetic, and diabetic patients. In vitro studies strongly support metformin, a diabetic medication, in breast cancer therapy. Although metformin has been heralded as an exciting new breast cancer treatment, the principal consideration is whether metformin can be used as a generic treatment for all breast cancer types. Importantly, will metformin be useful as an inexpensive therapy for patients with comorbidity of diabetes and breast cancer? In general, meta-analyses of clinical trial data from retrospective studies in which metformin treatment has been used for patients with diabetes and breast cancer have a positive trend; nevertheless, the supporting clinical data outcomes remain inconclusive. The heterogeneity of breast cancer, confounded by comorbidity of disease in the elderly population, makes it difficult to determine the actual benefits of metformin therapy. Despite the questionable evidence available from observational clinical studies and meta-analyses, randomized phases I–III clinical trials are ongoing to test the efficacy of metformin for breast cancer. This special issue review will focus on recent research, highlighting in vitro research and retrospective observational clinical studies and current clinical trials on metformin action in breast cancer. PMID:25866793

  15. Developments in treating metastatic colorectal cancer: Recent international reports from ASCO 2007 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Ducreux

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Michel DucreuxGastro-Intestinal Unit, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif Cedex, France; Department of Oncology, Paul Brousse University Hospital, Villejuif, France; Paris-Sud XI University, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, FranceIntroduction: Treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, employing various schedules, combinations, and regimens utilizing 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, capecitabine, bevacizumab, and cetuximab, currently achieves an overall survival that extends to approximately two years. Major questions regarding optimal management of mCRC await resolution.Methods: A thorough review was conducted of all mCRC abstracts, posters, and other presentations at the 2007 meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO. Information was analyzed in relationship to previously published research to determine the potential impact of new data on current and future mCRC management strategies and patient outcomes. Updated data presented at ASCO 2008 relevant to these findings was also analyzed.Discussion: Ongoing challenges in mCRC treatment include defining the optimal role of targeted agents such as cetuximab and bevacizumab, elaborating the mechanisms underlying their toxicities, resolving the benefits of adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients who are candidates for surgical resection, establishing whether there are substantive differences between sequential and combination chemotherapy regimens, and determining the safety and tolerability of chemotherapy in elderly subjects.Conclusion: Recent reports presented at ASCO 2007 and 2008 indicate incremental improvements in care of patients with mCRC. Nevertheless, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, 5-FU, and to an increasing extent the targeted biologic agents bevacizumab and cetuximab continue unchallenged as first-line and later selections.Keywords: chemotherapy, combination chemotherapy, irinotecan, bevacizumab, cetuximab

  16. Percentage of Cancer Volume in Biopsy Cores Is Prognostic for Prostate Cancer Death and Overall Survival in Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic utility of the percentage of cancer volume (PCV) in needle biopsy specimens for prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The outcomes were analyzed for 599 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external beam radiotherapy to a minimal planning target volume dose of 75 Gy (range, 75–79.2). We assessed the effect of PCV and the pretreatment and treatment-related factors on the freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival. Results: The median number of biopsy cores was 7 (interquartile range, 6–12), median PCV was 10% (interquartile range, 2.5–25%), and median follow-up was 62 months. The PCV correlated with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group and individual risk features, including T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, and percentage of positive biopsy cores. On log–rank analysis, the PCV stratified by quartile was prognostic for all endpoints, including overall survival. In addition, the PCV was a stronger prognostic factor than the percentage of positive biopsy cores when the two metrics were analyzed together. On multivariate analysis, the PCV predicted a worse outcome for all endpoints, including freedom from biochemical failure, (hazard ratio, 1.9; p = .0035), freedom from metastasis (hazard ratio, 1.7, p = .09), cause-specific survival (hazard ratio, 3.9, p = .014), and overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.8, p = .02). Conclusions: For patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy, the volume of cancer in the biopsy specimen adds prognostic value for clinically relevant endpoints, particularly in intermediate- and high-risk patients. Although the PCV determination is more arduous than the percentage of positive biopsy cores, it provides superior risk stratification.

  17. Continuous controversy about radiation oncologists’ choice of treatment regimens for bone metastases: should we blame doctors, cancer-related features, or design of previous clinical studies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies from Italy, Japan and Norway have confirmed previous reports, which found that a large variety of palliative radiotherapy regimens are used for painful bone metastases. Routine use of single fraction treatment might or might not be the preferred institutional approach. It is not entirely clear why inter-physician and inter-institution differences continue to persist despite numerous randomized trials, meta-analyses and guidelines, which recommend against more costly and inconvenient multi-fraction regimens delivering total doses of 30 Gy or more in a large number of clinical scenarios. In the present mini-review we discuss the questions of whether doctors are ignoring evidence-based medicine or whether we need additional studies targeting specifically those patient populations where recent surveys identified inconsistent treatment recommendations, e.g. because of challenging disease extent. We identify open questions and provide research suggestions, which might contribute to making radiation oncology practitioners more confident in selecting the right treatment for the right patient

  18. Donor Bone Marrow Transplant With or Without G-CSF in Treating Young Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Other Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  19. Ondansetron in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer and Chronic Nausea and Vomiting Not Caused by Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Nausea and Vomiting; Precancerous Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Sphincter preservation in patients with low rectal cancer treated with radiation therapy with or without local excision or fulguration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-six patients with small cancers limited to the lower two-thirds of the rectum were treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy (XRT). In patients treated with local excision or fulguration followed by XRT, there was a 6% local failure rate (one in 17); in 16 of 17 patients receiving radiation doses above 4500 cGy, the local control was complete for follow-up periods of 6 months to 7 years. In nine patients treated with XRT for residual tumor, local failure occurred in five (56%). Serious late complications occurred only if total doses were greater than 6300 cGy. Local excision combined with XRT proved to be a safe alternative to radical surgery in selected patients and resulted in excellent local control while allowing preservation of anal sphincter function

  1. Response to eribulin in a difficult-to-treat, heavily pretreated breast cancer patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Luigi; Caputo, Francesca; Sarno, Antonella Di; Garofano, Tiziana; Andreozzi, Francesca; Massaro, Maria Grazia; Montesarchio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In this short paper, we report our experience with eribulin mesylate in a heavily pretreated breast cancer patient with multiple bone metastases. The patient had been treated with doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, fluorouracil, tamoxifen, letrozole, LH-RH analogs, fulvestrant, bevacizumab and paclitaxel and liposomal doxorubicin. In November 2013 treatment with eribulin ready to use solution (1.23 mg/m(2) days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle) was started and administered for a total of 14 courses. After six cycles of eribulin, evaluation with MRI showed a marked decrease in neoplastic involvement and replacement of osteolytic lesions with osteoblastic ones. No unexpected acute toxicity was observed. Although with all the limitations of any anecdotal report, our experience documents the efficacy and safety of eribulin in this difficult-to-treat patient who had been treated with multiple lines of chemotherapy. PMID:26235262

  2. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin or High-Dose Methotrexate, Vinblastine, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Urothelial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-27

    Anterior Urethral Cancer; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Posterior Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  3. Acute mucosal reactions in patients with advanced head and neck cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conducted a clinical study to analyze the acute reactions in the oral cavity and the oropharyngeal (OCOPH) mucosa in patients with advanced head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing a definitive treatment consisted of 3-D conformal radiotherapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy. Twenty nine patients with HNC who were treated between February 2008 and October 2009 were included in the study. The median age was 55 years (range 29-70). The site distribution was as follows: oropharynx, 20.7%; hypopharynx, 41.4%; larynx, 37.9%. The radiation technique used for 3-D conformal radiotherapy was named 'oblique photon fields' technique. The OCOPH mucosa as a critical normal tissue was delineated in every patient. Extraction of planning target volume (PTV50) from the volume of OCOPH mucosa led to formation of an OCOPH mucosa with extracted PTV50 (OCOPHEx mucosa). Acute mucosal reactions were recorded using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading system. The duration of a maximum grade of reaction was also recorded. A time intensity parameter, so-called Severity-Time Units (STU), quantifying the area under the acute reaction curve, was used to express the intensity of mucositis over time in every patient. Grade 3 acute mucosal reaction was manifested in 19 patients (65.5%). The median duration of confluent mucositis was 21 days (range 14-35). The STU less than 1000 mm2 and the STU more than 1500 mm2 was calculated in equal number of patients (9 patients, or 31.0%). Statistically significant difference in the distribution of the grade 3 reaction was found among patients with different site of the primary tumor (p = 0.003). Statistically significant difference was found between the grade of the acute mucositis and the volume of OCOPHEx mucosa, the dose in 50% of the volume of OCOPHEx (D50%, OCOPHEx) mucosa, and the mean dose to OCOPHEx mucosa (p = 0.02, p = 0.0002, p = 0.00001, respectively). The tested relation between STU and delineated volumes (PTV50 and OCOPHEx

  4. MALNUTRITION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS TREATED FOR ORAL OR OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; van Oort, Rob P.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Background. This study assessed whether malnourished patients score lower on quality of life after treatment for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Methods. Malnutrition (weight loss >= 10% in 6 months/>= 5% in 1 month) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality

  5. Grappling with the androgen receptor—a new approach for treating advanced prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Andersen et al report on a small molecule that interacts with and blocks transactivation of the androgen receptor amino-terminal domain. This agent can overcome the shortcomings of clinically used antiandrogens, an important advance in the development of effective therapy for advanced prostate cancer.

  6. Sensory function and pain in a population of patients treated for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilholm, O J; Cold, S; Rasmussen, Lars;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is often reported after surgery for breast cancer. This study examined pain and sensory abnormalities in women following breast cancer surgery. METHODS: Sensory tests were carried out on the operated and contra-lateral side in 55 women with chronic pain after breast cance...

  7. Tyrosinernia type I treated by NTBC: How does AFP predict liver cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.L. Koelink; P. van Hasselt; A. van der Ploeg; M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink; F.A. Wijburg; C.M.A. Bijleveld; F.J. van Spronsen

    2006-01-01

    Background: Tyrosinemia type I is associated with an increased risk of liver cancer development. The formation of the pathogenic fumarylacetoacetate is prevented by 2-(2-nitro-4-3 trifluoro-methylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC). Still, some patients with NTBC treatment develop liver cancer. A r

  8. Tyrosinernia type I treated by NTBC : How does AFP predict liver cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelink, C. J. L.; van Hasselt, P.; van der Ploeg, A.; van den Heuvel-Elbrink, M. M.; Wijburg, F. A.; Bijleveld, C. M. A.; van Spronsen, F. J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Tyrosinemia type I is associated with an increased risk of liver cancer development. The formation of the pathogenic fumarylacetoacetate is prevented by 2-(2-nitro-4-3 trifluoro-methylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC). Still, some patients with NTBC treatment develop liver cancer. A r

  9. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  10. Total-Body Irradiation and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Renal Medullary Carcinoma; Type 1 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Type 2 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppert W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wojciech Leppert,1 Mikolaj Majkowicz,2 Maria Forycka,1 Eleonora Mess,3 Agata Zdun-Ryzewska2 1Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Quality of Life Research, Gdansk Medical University, Gdansk, Poland; 3Palliative Care Nursing Department, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Aim of the study: To assess quality of life (QoL in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU, and at a day care center (DCC. Patients and methods: QoL was assessed in advanced cancer patients at baseline and after 7 days of symptomatic treatment using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative Care (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS, and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS scale. Results: A total of 129 patients completed the study, with 51 patients treated at home, 51 patients treated at the PCU, and 27 patients at DCC. In the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, improvement in functional and symptom scales was observed except in physical functioning and fatigue levels; patients at DCC had a better physical functioning, global QoL, appetite, and fatigue levels. In the ESAS, improvement in all items was found except for drowsiness levels, which was stable in patients treated at DCC and deteriorated in home and PCU patients. Higher activity, better appetite and well-being, and less drowsiness were observed in patients treated at DCC. KPS was better in DCC patients compared to those treated at home and at the PCU; the latter group deteriorated. Conclusions: QoL improved in all patient groups, with better results in DCC patients and similar scores in those staying at home and at the PCU. Along with clinical assessment, baseline age, KPS, physical and emotional functioning may be considered when assigning patients to care at a DCC, PCU, or at home. Keywords: oncology, patient care

  12. Outcome of 289 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy alone and radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the outcome of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Methods: 289 patients who were treated either by radiotherapy alone (168 patients) or radiotherapy plus chemotherapy (121 patients) from Dec. 1999 to Dec. 2002 were entered into the database for analysis. Pathological types: squamous cancer (152), adenocarcinoma(74), squamoadenocarcinoma(2) and other types (2). 24 showed cancer unclassificable and 35 were diagnosed without pathological proof. Stages: 74 had III A and 215 III B stage disease. Among the 121 patients treated with combined modality, 24 were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, 78 radiotherapy after chemotherapy(C + R), and 19 radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy(R + C). In patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy or C + R, 38 received consolidation chemotherapy after induction treatment. Results: The 1-, 3-, 5-year overall survival, and the median survival were: 45% , 16% , 8%, and 16.2 months for all patients; 57%, 27%, 11%, and 21.7 months for stage IIIA; 41%, 12%, 7%, and 15.3 months for IIIB. By logrank test, clinical stage, KPS performance, tumor volume, hemoglobin level before treatment, consolidation chemotherapy, radiation dose, and response to treatment showed statistically dramatic impact on overall survival. The overall survival rate and median survival time were slightly higher in the combined group than in the radiotherapy alone group, but the difference is statistically insignificant. In Cox multivariable regression, stage and consolidation chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors; KPS performance, radiation dose, and response to treatment were at the margin of statistical significance. Esophagitis and pneumonitis of Grade II or higher were 24% and 8%, respectively. Failure sites included in the thorax(41%), outside of thorax(48%), and both in and outside the thorax(11%). There was no difference between the

  13. Capecitabine and Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Head and Neck Cancer; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  14. Intravenous ascorbic acid to prevent and treat cancer-associated sepsis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogin Vladimir

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The history of ascorbic acid (AA and cancer has been marked with controversy. Clinical studies evaluating AA in cancer outcome continue to the present day. However, the wealth of data suggesting that AA may be highly beneficial in addressing cancer-associated inflammation, particularly progression to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS and multi organ failure (MOF, has been largely overlooked. Patients with advanced cancer are generally deficient in AA. Once these patients develop septic symptoms, a further decrease in ascorbic acid levels occurs. Given the known role of ascorbate in: a maintaining endothelial and suppression of inflammatory markers; b protection from sepsis in animal models; and c direct antineoplastic effects, we propose the use of ascorbate as an adjuvant to existing modalities in the treatment and prevention of cancer-associated sepsis.

  15. Treating colon cancer with a suicide gene delivered by self-assembled cationic MPEG-PCL micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xingmei; Wang, Pan; Men, Ke; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Meijuan; Gou, Maling; Chen, Lijuan; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-03-01

    Biodegradable cationic micelles show promise for applications in gene delivery. In this article, we used DOTAP to modify monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (MPEG-PCL, MP) micelles in one step, creating novel cationic self-assembled DOTAP and MPEG-PCL hybrid micelles (DMP). These micelles had a mean particle size of 46 +/- 5.6 nm and a zeta potential of 41.8 +/- 0.5 mV, and had the capacity to bind DNA. Compared with PEI25K (the gold standard), DMP micelles had higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity. Moreover, we used DMP to deliver the Survivin-T34A gene (S-T34A, a suicide gene) to treat colon cancer. DMP delivered the Survivin-T34A gene (DMP/S-T34A) and could induce apoptosis in cancer cells, resulting in inhibition of the growth of C-26 colon cancer cells in vitro. An in vivo study indicated that intraperitoneal administration of DMP micelles delivered the Survivin-T34A gene and efficiently inhibited the growth of abdominal metastatic C-26 colon cancer and the malignant ascites. These data suggest that DMP may be a novel gene carrier, and its delivery of the S-T34A gene may have promising applications in the treatment of colon cancer.

  16. Therapeutic Evaluation on Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated by Integrative Chinese and Western Medicine—Clinical Analysis of 56 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIULu-ming; WULiang-cun; 等

    2003-01-01

    Objective:In comparison with chemotherapy,to evaluate therapeutic effects on advanced pancreatic cancer treated by integrative Chinese and western medicine(ICWM) therapies.Methods:Based on the retrospective study of 56 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer,life table was applied to the anal-ysis of patients' survival rate and X2 test to the comparison of therapeutic response between ICWM and chemotherapy groups.Results:The results showed that 1-year survival rate 25.96%±24.64%; 5-year 37%±3.24%;2-year survival rate 34.61%±16.31%;3-year survival rate 25.96%±24.64%;5-year survival rate 25.96%±24.64%; and median survival period 16.3 months.However 1-year survival rate in the chemotherapy group was 21.95%±27.54%;2-year survival rate 7.31%±27.54%;3-year survival rate 0%; and median survival period 7.5months.The therapeutic effects between two groups were signifi-cantly different(P=0.004).Further analysis suggested that the reduction of cancer mass in the ICWM group was more than that in chemotherapy group(P=0.049) and the improvement of advanced pancreatic cancer related-symptoms better than that of chemotherapy group(P=0.002).Conclusion:The ICWM comprehensive therapy is of important value in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer.

  17. Therapeutic Evaluation on Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated by Integrative Chinese and Western Medicine Clinical Analysis of 56 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鲁明; 吴良村; 林胜友; 杨维鸿; 郭勇; 徐颖扉; 舒琦瑾

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In comparison with chemotherapy, to evaluate therapeutic effcts on advanced pancreatic cancer treated by integrative Chinese and western medicine (ICWM) therapies. Methods: Based on the retrospective study of 56 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer,life table was applied to the analysis of patients' survival rate and χ2 test to the comparison of therapeutic response between ICWM and chemotherapy groups. Results: The results showed that 1-year survival rate in the ICWM group was 55.37%±3.24%; 2-year survival rate 34.61%±16.31%; 3-year survival rate 25.96%±24.64%; 5-year survival rate 25.96%±24.64%; and median survival period 16.3 months. However 1-year survival rate in the chemotherapy group was 21.95%±27.54%; 2-year survival rate 7.31%±27.54%; 3-year survival rate 0%; and median survival period 7.5 months. The therapeutic effects between two groups were significantly different (P=0.004). Further analysis suggested that the reduction of cancer mass in the ICWM group was more than that in chemotherapy group (P=0.049) and the improvement of advanced pancreatic cancer related-symptoms better than that of chemotherapy group (P=0.002). Conclusion: The ICWM comprehensive therapy is of important value in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer.

  18. Assessment of Ovarian Cancer Tumors Treated with Intraperitoneal Cisplatin Therapy by Nanoscopic X-ray Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforce, Brecht; Carlier, Charlotte; Vekemans, Bart; Villanova, Julie; Tucoulou, Rémi; Ceelen, Wim; Vincze, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is amongst the most common types of cancer in women, with a relatively low overall cure rate of approximately 30%. This is therefore an important incentive to urge for further research in order to maximize the chances of survival for these patients. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy with Cisplatin is an effective treatement for ovarian cancer; however, many questions still remain concerning the ideal treatment protocol and tumor resistance towards the drug, which should be resolved for optimal application of this therapy. For the first time in-vivo grown tumors treated with both hyper- and normothermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy have been studied using nano-XRF spectroscopy to examine the platinum (Pt) distribution within the analyzed tissues. These measurements prove Pt resides predominantly outsides the cancer cells in the stroma of the tissue. These findings indicate the resistance mechanism of the cancer cells prevents Cisplatin from diffusing through their cell membranes. This is an important addition to the existing knowledge on the resistance mechanism providing insights which might help to overcome this effect. In our aim to find the optimal treatment protocol, no significant differences were found between the two examined procedures. A more extensive data set will be needed to draw definite conclusions. PMID:27444797

  19. Relative Importance of Hip and Sacral Pain Among Long-Term Gynecological Cancer Survivors Treated With Pelvic Radiotherapy and Their Relationships to Mean Absorbed Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the relative importance of patient-reported hip and sacral pain after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for gynecological cancer and its relationship to the absorbed doses in these organs. Methods and Materials: We used data from a population-based study that included 650 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic RT in the Gothenburg and Stockholm areas in Sweden with a median follow-up of 6 years (range, 2–15) and 344 population controls. Symptoms were assessed through a study-specific postal questionnaire. We also analyzed the hip and sacral dose-volume histogram data for 358 of the survivors. Results: Of the survivors, one in three reported having or having had hip pain after completing RT. Daily pain when walking was four times as common among the survivors compared to controls. Symptoms increased in frequency with a mean absorbed dose >37.5 Gy. Also, two in five survivors reported pain in the sacrum. Sacral pain also affected their walking ability and tended to increase with a mean absorbed dose >42.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survivors of gynecological cancer treated with pelvic RT experience hip and sacral pain when walking. The mean absorbed dose was significantly related to hip pain and was borderline significantly related to sacral pain. Keeping the total mean absorbed hip dose below 37.5 Gy during treatment might lower the occurrence of long-lasting pain. In relation to the controls, the survivors had a lower occurrence of pain and pain-related symptoms from the hips and sacrum compared with what has previously been reported for the pubic bone.

  20. TGFB1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Are Associated With Adverse Quality of Life in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate whether the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within TGFB1 might be predictive for the development of adverse quality-of-life outcomes in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 141 prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy were screened for SNPs in TGFB1 using DNA sequencing. Three quality-of-life outcomes were investigated: (1) prospective decline in erectile function, (2) urinary quality of life, and (3) rectal bleeding. Median follow-up was 51.3 months (range, 12-138 months; SD, 24.4 months). Results: Those patients who possessed either the T/T genotype at position -509, the C/C genotype at position 869 (pro/pro, codon 10) or the G/C genotype at position 915 (arg/pro, codon 25) were significantly associated with the development of a decline in erectile function compared with those who did not have these genotypes: 56% (9 of 16) vs. 24% (11 of 45) (p = 0.02). In addition, patients with the -509 T/T genotype had a significantly increased risk of developing late rectal bleeding compared with those who had either the C/T or C/C genotype at this position: 55% (6 of 11) vs. 26% (34 of 130) (p = 0.05). Conclusions: Possession of certain TGFB1 genotypes is associated with the development of both erectile dysfunction and late rectal bleeding in patients treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Therefore, identification of patients harboring these genotypes may represent a means to predict which men are most likely to suffer from poor quality-of-life outcomes after radiotherapy for prostate cancer