WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer pain management

  1. Pain management in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Not only burdened by the limited overall survival, lung cancer patient also suffer from various symptoms, such as pain, that implicated in the quality of life. Cancer pain is a complicated and transiently dynamic symptom that results from multiple mechanisms. This review will describe the pathophysiology of cancer pain and general approach in managing a patient with lung cancer pain. The use of opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and adjuvant analgesia, as part of the pharmacology therapy along with interventional strategy, will also be discussed.

  2. Pain management in cancer survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Sjøgren, Per

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of patients surviving cancer disease has increased in last decades. Consequently, an emerging population with different needs due to long-term or late effects of cancer disease and/or treatment, e.g. chronic pain, is of major concern. EPIDEMIOLOGY: Chronic pain is one of th...... survivors. Pain management strategies are discussed according to the biopsychosocial model and with the rapidly growing number of cancer survivors the establishment of multidisciplinary clinics as a part of comprehensive cancer centers are proposed.......BACKGROUND: The number of patients surviving cancer disease has increased in last decades. Consequently, an emerging population with different needs due to long-term or late effects of cancer disease and/or treatment, e.g. chronic pain, is of major concern. EPIDEMIOLOGY: Chronic pain is one...... of the main problems in this population and prevalence varies between 16% and 50%. Most information derives from breast cancer patients assessed by surveys from national or local institutional databases. A Danish population-based survey estimated that 41.5% of all cancer survivors reported chronic pain. PAIN...

  3. Pain management in cancer cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palat Gayatri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer of the cervix uteri is a common cause of pain among women. On the physical realm, the cancer may cause somatic [soft tissue and bone], visceral and neuropathic pain [lumbosacral plexopathy]. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy may cause neuropathy too. Psychological, social and cultural factors modify the pain. Evaluation of the individual type of pain and a patient-centred approach are fundamental requirements for rational management. Disease modifying treatment like radiotherapy and chemotherapy must be considered when applicable. Pain control is usually achieved by the use of WHO three-step ladder, remembering that possible association of renal dysfunction would necessitate caution in the use of NSAIDs and opioids. Side effects must be anticipated, prevented when possible, and aggressively treated; nausea and vomiting may already be present, and constipation can worsen pain when there is a pelvic mass. Pain emergencies can be treated by quick titration with intravenous morphine bolus doses. Neuropathic pain may warrant the use of usual adjuvants, with particular reference to cortico-steroids and the NMDA antagonist, ketamine. In intractable pain, many neurolytic procedures are tried, but a solid evidence base to justify their use is lacking. Continuous epidural analgesia with local anaesthetic and opioid may be needed when drug therapy fails, and desperate situations may warrant interventions such as neurolysis. Such physical measures for pain relief must be combined with psychosocial support and adequate explanations to the patient and the family.

  4. Cancer pain management-current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Thapa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer pain is still one of the most feared entities in cancer and about 75% of these patients require treatment with opioids for severe pain. The cancer pain relief is difficult to manage in patients with episodic or incidental pain, neuropathic pain, substance abuse and with impaired cognitive or communication skills. This non-systematic review article aims to discuss reasons for under treatment, tools of pain assessment, cancer pain and anxiety and possibly carve new approaches for cancer pain management in future. The current status of World Health Organization analgesic ladder has also been reviewed. A thorough literature search was carried out from 1998 to 2010 for current status in cancer pain management in MEDLINE, WHO guidelines and published literature and relevant articles have been included.

  5. Cancer pain management: Basic information for the young pain physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SPS Rana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer pain is multifactorial and complex. The impact of cancer pain is devastating, with increased morbidity and poor quality of life, if not treated adequately. Cancer pain management is a challenging task both due to disease process as well as a consequence of treatment-related side-effects. Optimization of analgesia with oral opioids, adjuvant analgesics, and advanced pain management techniques is the key to success for cancer pain. Early access of oral opioid and interventional pain management techniques can overcome the barriers of cancer pain, with improved quality of life. With timely and proper anticancer therapy, opioids, nerve blocks, and other non-invasive techniques like psychosocial care, satisfactory pain relief can be achieved in most of the patients. Although the WHO Analgesic Ladder is effective for more than 80% cancer pain, addition of appropriate adjuvant drugs along with early intervention is needed for improved Quality of Life. Effective cancer pain treatment requires a holistic approach with timely assessment, measurement of pain, pathophysiology involved in causing particular type of pain, and understanding of drugs to relieve pain with timely inclusion of intervention. Careful evaluation of psychosocial and mental components with good communication is necessary. Barriers to cancer pain management should be overcome with an interdisciplinary approach aiming to provide adequate analgesia with minimal side-effects. Management of cancer pain should comprise not only a physical component but also psychosocial and mental components and social need of the patient. With risk-benefit analysis, interventional techniques should be included in an early stage of pain treatment. This article summarizes the need for early and effective pain management strategies, awareness regarding pain control, and barriers of cancer pain.

  6. Interventional Analgesic Management of Lung Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Uri; Elgueta, Maria Francisca; Perez, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the four most prevalent cancers worldwide. Comprehensive patient care includes not only adherence to clinical guidelines to control and when possible cure the disease but also appropriate symptom control. Pain is one of the most prevalent symptoms in patients diagnosed with lung cancer; it can arise from local invasion of chest structures or metastatic disease invading bones, nerves, or other anatomical structures potentially painful. Pain can also be a consequence of therapeutic approaches like surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy. Conventional medical management of cancer pain includes prescription of opioids and coadjuvants at doses sufficient to control the symptoms without causing severe drug effects. When an adequate pharmacological medical management fails to provide satisfactory analgesia or when it causes limiting side effects, interventional cancer pain techniques may be considered. Interventional pain management is devoted to the use of invasive techniques such as joint injections, nerve blocks and/or neurolysis, neuromodulation, and cement augmentation techniques to provide diagnosis and treatment of pain syndromes resistant to conventional medical management. Advantages of interventional approaches include better analgesic outcomes without experiencing drug-related side effects and potential for opioid reduction thus avoiding central side effects. This review will describe various pain syndromes frequently described in lung cancer patients and those interventional techniques potentially indicated for those cases.

  7. A guide to cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Natalie; McGee, Anne; Dunbar, Catherine

    2008-10-01

    Most, if not all, cancer patients require care from community teams at some stage during their disease trajectory. For many of these patients, community nurses and General Practitioners are the main point of contact. Pain is reported by between 55-95% of patients with advanced or terminal disease. Optimal pain control positively impacts on the physical, emotional and functional well-being of the patient. Despite the existence of guidelines (WHO, 1996) (SIGN, 2000) and a wealth of literature on cancer pain management, half of all patients in Western countries still do not receive adequate pain relief. This article looks at the reasons behind this and provides community nurses with an overview of up-to-date information on pain pathophysiology and management, so that the control of cancer pain can be optimized in the community.

  8. Hypnosis: Adjunct Therapy for Cancer Pain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravits, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a symptom associated with prolonged recovery from illness and procedures, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care costs. While there have been advances in the management of cancer pain, there is a need for therapeutic strategies that complement pharmaceutical management without significantly contributing to the side-effect profile of these agents. Hypnosis provides a safe and efficacious supplement to pharmaceutical management of cancer pain. One barrier to the regular use of hypnosis is health-care providers’ lack of current knowledge of the efficacy and safety of hypnosis. Advanced practitioners who are well-informed about hypnosis have an opportunity to increase the treatment options for patients who are suffering with cancer pain by suggesting to the health-care team that hypnosis be incorporated into the plan of care. Integration of hypnosis into the standard of care will benefit patients, caregivers, and survivors by reducing pain and the suffering associated with it. PMID:25031986

  9. Cancer Pain Management in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Shalini; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimated that more than 60% of the 14 million new cancer cases worldwide in 2012 were reported in the developing part of the world, including Asia, Africa, Central and South America. Cancer survival rate is poorer in developing countries due to diagnosis at late stage and limited access to timely treatment. Since the disease per se cannot be treated even with the best available treatment modalities, what remains important is symptom management and providing comfort care to these patients. The incidence of pain in advanced stages of cancer approaches 70-80%. Lack of preventive strategies, poverty, illiteracy, and social stigma are the biggest cause of pain suffering and patient presenting in advance stage of their disease. The need for palliative care is expanding due to aging of world's population and increase in the rate of cancer in developed and developing countries. A huge gap remains between demand and current palliative care services. Overcoming barriers to palliative care is a major global health agenda that need immediate attention. Main causes of inadequate pain relief remain lack of knowledge among physician and patients, lack of adequate supply of opioids and other drugs for pain relief, strong bureaucracy involved in terms of procurement, and dispensing of opioids. Beside this, poverty and illiteracy remain the most important factors of increased suffering.

  10. Cancer Pain Management Education Rectifies Patients' Misconceptions of Cancer Pain, Reduces Pain, and Improves Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Su-Jin; Keam, Bhumsuk; Hyun, Min Kyung; Ju Seo, Jeong; Uk Park, Keon; Oh, Sung Yong; Ahn, Jinseok; Lee, Ja Youn; Kim, JinShil

    2018-03-26

    More than half of the patients have reported improper management of breakthrough cancer pain. Empirical evidence is lacking concerning the effectiveness of cancer pain education on breakthrough pain control. This study aimed to examine the effects of individual pain education on pain control, use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain, quality of life outcomes, and rectification of patients' misconceptions regarding cancer pain. A quasi-experimental design was used. In total, 176 (102 inpatients and 74 outpatients) and 163 (93 inpatients and 70 outpatients) cancer patients completed questionnaires on pain intensity, quality of life, use of short-acting medication for breakthrough pain, and misconceptions about cancer pain and opioid use before and immediately and/or seven days after individual pain education. The mean age of the participants was 60.9 years (±11.2), and 56.3% were male. The most common cancers were lung cancer (17.0%), colon cancer (15.9%), and breast cancer (12.5%). The subjects' reasons for attrition were conditional deterioration, death, or voluntary withdrawal (N = 13, 7.4%). Following the education, there was a significant reduction in overall pain intensity over 24 hours (P < 0.001). The outpatients showed more use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain. Sleep quality change was most significantly associated with intervention; other quality of life aspects (e.g., general feelings and life enjoyment) also improved. Pain education also significantly reduced misconceptions regarding cancer pain management. The present educational intervention was effective in encouraging short-acting analgesic use for breakthrough pain, improving quality of life outcomes, and rectifying patients' misconceptions about analgesic use.

  11. Psychological and behavioral approaches to cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjala, Karen L; Jensen, Mark P; Mendoza, M Elena; Yi, Jean C; Fisher, Hannah M; Keefe, Francis J

    2014-06-01

    This review examines evidence for psychological factors that affect pain across the cancer continuum from diagnosis through treatment and long-term survivorship or end of life. Evidence is convincing that emotional distress, depression, anxiety, uncertainty, and hopelessness interact with pain. Unrelieved pain can increase a desire for hastened death. Patients with cancer use many strategies to manage pain, with catastrophizing associated with increased pain and self-efficacy associated with lower pain reports. A variety of psychological and cognitive behavioral treatments can reduce pain severity and interference with function, as indicated in multiple meta-analyses and high-quality randomized controlled trials. Effective methods include education (with coping skills training), hypnosis, cognitive behavioral approaches, and relaxation with imagery. Exercise has been tested extensively in patients with cancer and long-term survivors, but few exercise studies have evaluated pain outcomes. In survivors post-treatment, yoga and hypnosis as well as exercise show promise for controlling pain. Although some of these treatments effectively reduce pain for patients with advanced disease, few have been tested in patients at the end of life. Given the clear indicators that psychological factors affect cancer pain and that psychological and behavioral treatments are effective in reducing varying types of pain for patients with active disease, these methods need further testing in cancer survivors post-treatment and in patients with end-stage disease. Multidisciplinary teams are essential in oncology settings to integrate analgesic care and expertise in psychological and behavioral interventions in standard care for symptom management, including pain. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Assessment of Adequacy of Pain Management and Analgesic Use in Patients With Advanced Cancer Using the Brief Pain Inventory and Pain Management Index Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harminder Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this cross-sectional, noninterventional, 6-month observational study was to assess the adequacy of pain management in patients with cancer admitted to the Oncology Department of Guru Gobind Singh Medical College in Faridkot, India. Methods and Materials: A total of 348 patients with cancer were recruited for evaluation of the prevalence of inadequate cancer pain management using the Brief Pain Inventory Pain Management Index. Results: The current study included 127 males (36.5% and 221 females (63.5%. The most prevalent cancer type was genitourinary; 268 patients (77% had inadequately managed pain. A significant correlation was observed between poorly managed pain and age groups, analgesic used, and body mass index. Conclusion: Our observation of inadequate pain management among 77% of patients indicates that pain management was insufficient in three quarters of the patients in this study. Accumulating data regarding the inadequacy of cancer pain management is crucial to improve symptom management. Better management of pain not only alleviates pain symptoms but also increases the quality of life for patients with cancer.

  13. A Quebec survey of issues in cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Neil; Ayoub, Joseph; Farley, Justine; Foucault, Claudette; Lesage, Pauline; Mayo, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    We report the results of a cancer pain survey mailed to Quebec hematologist-oncologists and palliative care physicians in 1999. The survey was designed to sample views on the current status of pain management and on obstacles to the provision of adequate pain relief for patients. The survey, formulated by an ethics network centered at the Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, was distributed to all members of the Association of Hematologist-Oncologists of Quebec and to all physician members of the Quebec Palliative Care Association. Responses were obtained from 138 Palliative Care Association members (response rate 61%) and 76 hematologist-oncologists (response rate 45%). Major obstacles reported included inadequate assessment of both contributory psychosocial issues and severity of pain, patient reluctance to take opioids, and inadequate access to non-drug techniques for pain relief. Access to opioids was not regarded as a problem. Both groups felt generally competent in their ability to manage various aspects of cancer pain therapy. They gave little credit to their formal medical school or residency training. Fifty-six percent of the palliative care group and 57% of the hemato-oncologists rated their medical school experience as only "poor" or "fair" on a 4-point scale. Residency ratings were modestly better. We conclude that medical faculties should assign a high priority to teaching health professionals patient assessment techniques. Simple symptom assessment scales should be routinely used in oncology/palliative care practice. Medical school training in pain management is not highly regarded and should be enhanced. We also note that, based on response to the scenario of a patient presenting with severe pain, many physicians, while feeling competent in the use of opioids, may be overly conservative in their initial use.

  14. A selective review of medical cannabis in cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Alexia; Wan, Bo Angela; Malek, Leila; DeAngelis, Carlo; Diaz, Patrick; Lao, Nicholas; Chow, Edward; O'Hearn, Shannon

    2017-12-01

    Insufficient management of cancer-associated chronic and neuropathic pain adversely affects patient quality of life. Patients who do not respond well to opioid analgesics, or have severe side effects from the use of traditional analgesics are in need of alternative therapeutic op-tions. Anecdotal evidence suggests that medical cannabis has potential to effectively manage pain in this patient population. This review presents a selection of representative clinical studies, from small pilot studies conducted in 1975, to double-blind placebo-controlled trials conducted in 2014 that evaluated the efficacy of cannabinoid-based therapies containing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) for reducing cancer-associated pain. A review of literature published on Medline between 1975 and 2017 identified five clinical studies that evaluated the effect of THC or CBD on controlling cancer pain, which have been reviewed and summarised. Five studies that evaluated THC oil capsules, THC:CBD oromucosal spray (nabiximols), or THC oromucosal sprays found some evidence of cancer pain reduction associated with these therapies. A variety of doses ranging from 2.7-43.2 mg/day THC and 0-40 mg/day CBD were administered. Higher doses of THC were correlated with increased pain relief in some studies. One study found that significant pain relief was achieved in doses as low as 2.7-10.8 mg THC in combination with 2.5-10.0 mg CBD, but there was conflicting evidence on whether higher doses provide superior pain relief. Some reported side effects include drowsiness, hypotension, mental clouding, and nausea and vomiting. There is evidence suggesting that medical cannabis reduces chronic or neu-ropathic pain in advanced cancer patients. However, the results of many studies lacked statistical power, in some cases due to limited number of study subjects. Therefore, there is a need for the conduct of further double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials with large sample sizes in order to

  15. Sympathetic blocks for visceral cancer pain management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Klepstad, Pal; Kurita, Geana Paula

    2015-01-01

    was generally poor due to several limitations, including sample size calculation, allocation concealment, no intention to treat analysis. However, at least two CPB studies were of good quality. Data regarding the comparison of techniques or other issues were sparse and of poor quality, and evidence could...... effects in comparison with a conventional analgesic treatment. In one study patients treated with superior hypogastric plexus block (SHPB) had a decrease in pain intensity and a less morphine consumption, while no statistical differences in adverse effects were found. The quality of these studies...

  16. Pain management: a review of organisation models with integrated processes for the management of pain in adult cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink-Huis, Anita; van Achterberg, Theo; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2008-08-01

    This paper reports a review of the literature conducted to identify organisation models in cancer pain management that contain integrated care processes and describe their effectiveness. Pain is experienced by 30-50% of cancer patients receiving treatment and by 70-90% of those with advanced disease. Efforts to improve pain management have been made through the development and dissemination of clinical guidelines. Early improvements in pain management were focussed on just one or two single processes such as pain assessment and patient education. Little is known about organisational models with multiple integrated processes throughout the course of the disease trajectory and concerning all stages of the care process. Systematic review. The review involved a systematic search of the literature, published between 1986-2006. Subject-specific keywords used to describe patients, disease, pain management interventions and integrated care processes, relevant for this review were selected using the thesaurus of the databases. Institutional models, clinical pathways and consultation services are three alternative models for the integration of care processes in cancer pain management. A clinical pathway is a comprehensive institutionalisation model, whereas a pain consultation service is a 'stand-alone' model that can be integrated in a clinical pathway. Positive patient and process outcomes have been described for all three models, although the level of evidence is generally low. Evaluation of the quality of pain management must involve standardised measurements of both patient and process outcomes. We recommend the development of policies for referrals to a pain consultation service. These policies can be integrated within a clinical pathway. To evaluate the effectiveness of pain management models standardised outcome measures are needed.

  17. Pain management in cancer center inpatients: a cluster randomized trial to evaluate a systematic integrated approach—The Edinburgh Pain Assessment and Management Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Fallon, M; Walker, J; Colvin, L; Rodriguez, A; Murray, G; Sharpe, M

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Pain is suboptimally managed in patients with cancer. We aimed to compare the effect of a policy of adding a clinician-delivered bedside pain assessment and management tool (Edinburgh Pain Assessment and management Tool [EPAT]) to usual care (UC) versus UC alone on pain outcomes. Patients and Methods In a two-arm, parallel group, cluster randomized (1:1) trial, we observed pain outcomes in 19 cancer centers in the United Kingdom and then randomly assigned the centers to eithe...

  18. Review of cancer pain management in patients receiving maintenance methadone therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowley, Dominic

    2011-05-01

    Methadone is commonly used in the treatment of heroin addiction. Patients with a history of opioid misuse or on methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) with cancer often have difficult to manage pain. We studied 12 patients referred to the palliative care service with cancer pain who were on MMT. All had difficult to control pain, and a third required 5 or more analgesic agents. Two patients had documented \\'\\'drug-seeking\\'\\' behavior. Methadone was used subcutaneously as an analgesic agent in 1 patient. We explore why patients on MMT have difficult to manage pain, the optimal management of their pain, and the increasing role of methadone as an analgesic agent in cancer pain.

  19. Successful management of a difficult cancer pain patient by appropriate adjuvant and morphine titration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv PS Rana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphine has been used for many years to relieve cancer pain. Oral morphine (in either immediate release or modified release form remains the analgesic of choice for moderate or severe cancer pain. The dose of oral morphine is titrated up to achieve adequate relief from pain with minimal side effects. Antidepressant and anticonvulsant drugs, when used in addition to conventional analgesics, give excellent relief from cancer pain. Most cancer pain responds to pharmacological measures with oral morphine but some pain like neuropathic and bony pain, pain in children and elderly age group, and advanced malignancy pain are very difficult to treat. Here, we report the management of a similar patient of severe cancer pain and the difficulty that we came across during dose titration of oral morphine and adjuvant analgesic.

  20. Cancer pain management in China: current status and practice implications based on the ACHEON survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Z

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Zhongjun Xia Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, ChinaPurpose: Cancer pain can seriously impact the quality of life (QoL of patients, and optimal management practices are therefore of paramount importance. The ACHEON survey queried physicians and patients from 10 Asian countries/regions to assess current clinical practices in cancer pain management in Asia. This study presents the data obtained for cancer pain management in mainland China, with an emphasis on practices related to opioid drugs.Materials and methods: In several tertiary hospitals across China, 250 patients experiencing cancer pain and 100 physicians were surveyed on questions designed to assess current cancer pain management practices and cancer pain impact on QoL.Results: The patient survey showed that 88% of patients reported moderate-to-severe cancer pain, with a median duration of 6 months. The physician survey showed that medical school/residency training with regard to cancer pain management was inadequate in ~80% of physicians. A total of 80% of physicians and 67.2% of patients reported that pain scale was used during pain assessment; 84% of physicians expressed that physician-perceived pain severity was not completely consistent with actual pain the patient experienced. Of the 147 patients who recalled the medication received, 83.7% were administered opioid prescriptions. Of the 240 patients who received treatment, 43.8% perceived the inadequacy of controlling pain. The primary barriers from physicians perceived to optimal pain management included patients’ fear of side effects (58%, patients’ fear of addiction (53%, patients’ reluctance to report pain (43%, physicians’ reluctance to prescribe (29%, physicians’ inadequacy of pain assessment (27% and excessive regulation of opioid analgesics (47%.Conclusion: Knowledge of cancer pain management should be strengthened among physicians. Quantitative pain assessment and principle-based pain

  1. Barriers to cancer pain management in danish and lithuanian patients treated in pain and palliative care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Samsanaviciene, Jurgita; Liubarskiene, Zita

    2014-01-01

    -related barriers to cancer pain management in patient samples from Denmark and Lithuania. Thirty-three Danish and 30 Lithuanian patients responded to, respectively, Danish and Lithuanian versions of the Brief Pain Inventory pain scale, the Barriers Questionnaire II, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale...

  2. The Impact of a National Guideline on the Management of Cancer Pain on the Practice of Pain Assessment and Registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besse, K.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Vissers, K.; Engels, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch clinical practice guideline on the diagnosis and management of pain in patients with cancer was published in 2008 and intensively promoted to healthcare professionals who see patients with cancer. One of the most important recommendations is the systematic registering of the pain and its

  3. Physicians' Practice, Attitudes Toward, and Knowledge of Cancer Pain Management in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiongwen; Yu, Chunhua; Feng, Shijian; Yao, Wenxiu; Shi, Huashan; Zhao, Yuwei; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate physicians' current practice, attitudes toward, and knowledge of cancer pain management in China. We conducted a face-to-face survey of physicians (oncologists, internists, hematologists) who are responsible for the care of cancer patient of 11 general hospitals in Sichuan, China between December 2011 and December 2013. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS (SPSS, Chicago, IL) software. A 23-item questionnaire was designed and distributed to 550 physicians in 11 medical facilities in China. Five hundred (90.90%) physicians responded. About one-third (32.6%) of physicians assessed patients' pain rarely, and 85.5% never or occasionally treated patients' cancer pain together with psychologists. More than half of physicians indicated that opioid dose titration in patients with poor pain control and assessment of the cause and severity of pain were urgently needed knowledge for cancer pain management. Inadequate assessment of pain and pain management (63.0%), patients' reluctance to take opioids (62.2%), and inadequate staff knowledge of pain management (61.4%) were the three most frequently cited barriers to physicians' pain management. Physicians' positive attitudes toward cancer pain management need to be encouraged, and active professional analgesic education programs are needed to improve pain management in China. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cancer pain management and the opioid crisis in America: How to preserve hard-earned gains in improving the quality of cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paice, Judith A

    2018-06-15

    Cancer pain remains a feared consequence of the disease and its treatment. Although prevalent, cancer pain can usually be managed through the skillful application of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. Unfortunately, access to these therapies has been hampered by interventions designed to contain another serious public health problem: the opioid misuse epidemic. This epidemic and the unintended consequences of efforts to control this outbreak are leading to significant barriers to the provision of cancer pain relief. Oncologists and other professionals treating those with cancer pain will require new knowledge and tools to provide safe and effective pain control while preventing additional cases of substance use disorders (SUDs), helping patients in recovery to maintain sobriety, and guiding those not yet in recovery to seek treatment. How do these 2 serious epidemics intersect and affect oncology practice? First, oncology professionals will need to adopt practices to prevent SUDs by assessing risk and providing safe pain care. Second, oncology practices are likely to see an increased number of patients with a current or past SUD, including opioid misuse. Few guidelines exist for the direct management of pain when opioids may be indicated in these individuals. Third, modified prescribing practices along with the education of patients and families are warranted to prevent the exposure of these medications to unintended persons. Finally, advocacy on behalf of those with cancer pain is imperative to avoid losing access to essential therapies, including opioids, for those who might benefit. Cancer 2018;124:2491-7. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  5. Neuropathic pain in people with cancer (part 2): pharmacological and non-pharmacological management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverner, Tarnia

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the management of neuropathic pain associated with cancer and to provide helpful clinical advice for nurses working with patients who may have neuropathic pain. While cancer pain is a mixed-mechanism pain, this article will focus only on neuropathic pain management. The impact of neuropathic pain on patients' quality of life is great and while many patients recover from their cancer, a significant number continue to suffer from a neuropathic pain syndrome. Management of neuropathic pain is significantly different from management of nociceptive pain with respect to pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies. Neuropathic pain is complex, and as such requires complex management using pharmacological as well as non-pharmacological approaches. Specific drugs for neuropathic pain may be effective for some patients, but not all; therefore, ongoing and comprehensive assessment and management are required. Furthermore, these patients may require trials of several drugs before they find one that works for them. It is important for nurses to understand neuropathic pain, its manifestation, impact on quality of life and management when nursing patients with neuropathic pain associated with cancer.

  6. Interview: Cancer pain management: the last decade and looking forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasa, Stein

    2013-11-01

    Stein Kaasa, MD, speaks to Dominic Chamberlain, Assistant Commissioning Editor: Stein Kaasa specializes in oncology and palliative medicine. In 1993 he was appointed as the first professor in palliative medicine in Scandinavia and he was one of the founders of the palliative care unit in Trondheim (Norway). He also was the founder of the European Palliative Care Research Centre. He has been president of the European Association for Palliative Care, coordinator for one EU-funded project and is Work Package Leader of several EU-funded research collaboratives and international partnerships on research and policy development. Kaasa has been an important advocate for evidence-based practice and has worked extensively to get palliative care research on the agenda, both nationally and internationally. Through his role as Cancer Director in Norway he coordinated and led the development of guidelines for different cancer diseases. Important areas of work were the development of regional cancer treatment guidelines and integration of patient disease trajectories into the existing guidelines. Currently he is Vice Managing Director at St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital (Norway), Professor of palliative medicine at the Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology and leads the European Palliative Care Research Centre and chairs the European Association for Palliative Care Research Network. Professor Kaasa has published more than 450 articles and book chapters. He has authored the Nordic Textbook of Palliative Care and is coauthor and editor of the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine. Professor Kaasa advises many international journals - either as an advisory board member or as a reviewer (Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Palliative Medicine, Journal of Palliative Medicine, Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Pain and The Lancet Oncology).

  7. Non-Hispanic Black-White disparities in pain and pain management among newly admitted nursing home residents with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Deborah S; Hunnicutt, Jacob N; Jesdale, Bill M; Lapane, Kate L

    2018-01-01

    Racial disparities in pain management persist across health care settings and likely extend into nursing homes. No recent studies have evaluated racial disparities in pain management among residents with cancer in nursing homes at time of admission. Using a cross-sectional study design, we compared reported pain and pain management between non-Hispanic White and non-Hispanic Black newly admitted nursing home residents with cancer (n=342,920) using the de-identified Minimum Data Set version 3.0. Pain management strategies included the use of scheduled analgesics, pro re nata analgesics, and non-pharmacological methods. Presence of pain was based on self-report when residents were able, and staff report when unable. Robust Poisson models provided estimates of adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) and 95% CIs for reported pain and pain management strategies. Among nursing home residents with cancer, ~60% reported pain with non-Hispanic Blacks less likely to have both self-reported pain (aPR [Black versus White]: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97-0.99) and staff-reported pain (aPR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.86-0.93) documentation compared with Non-Hispanic Whites. While most residents received some pharmacologic pain management, Blacks were less likely to receive any compared with Whites (Blacks: 66.6%, Whites: 71.1%; aPR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97-0.99), consistent with differences in receipt of non-pharmacologic treatments (Blacks: 25.8%, Whites: 34.0%; aPR: 0.98, 95 CI%: 0.96-0.99). Less pain was reported for Black compared with White nursing home residents and White residents subsequently received more frequent pain management at admission. The extent to which unequal reporting and management of pain persists in nursing homes should be further explored.

  8. Cancer pain management by radiotherapists: a survey of radiation therapy oncology group physicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleeland, Charles S.; Janjan, Nora A.; Scott, Charles B.; Seiferheld, Wendy F.; Curran, Walter J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) physicians were surveyed to determine their approach to and attitudes toward cancer pain management. Methods and Materials: Physicians completed a questionnaire assessing their estimates of the magnitude of pain as a specific problem for cancer patients, their perceptions of the adequacy of pain management, and their report of how they manage pain in their own practice setting. Results: Eighty-three percent believed the majority of cancer patients with pain were undermedicated. Forty percent reported that pain relief in their own practice setting was poor or fair. Assessing a case scenario, 23% would wait until the patient's prognosis was 6 months or less before starting maximal analgesia. Adjuvants and prophylactic side effect management were underutilized in the treatment plan. Barriers to pain management included poor pain assessment (77%), patient reluctance to report pain (60%), patient reluctance to take analgesics (72%), and staff reluctance to prescribe opioids (41%). Conclusions: Physicians' perceptions of barriers to cancer pain management remain quite stable over time, and physicians continue to report inadequate pain treatment education. Future educational efforts should target radiation oncologists as an important resource for the treatment of cancer pain

  9. Multi-centre European study of breakthrough cancer pain: pain characteristics and patient perceptions of current and potential management strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Andrew; Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Andersen, Steen

    2011-01-01

    This study involved 320 cancer patients from four Northern European countries. Patients with breakthrough pain were questioned about the characteristics of their pain, the current management of their pain, and the acceptability/utility of alternative routes of administration. The median number...... of episodes was 3/day. Forty-four percent patients reported incident-type pain, 39% spontaneous-type pain, and 17% a combination of these pains. The median duration was 60 min, and the median time to peak intensity was 15 min. Three percent patients reported "mild" pain, 37% "moderate" pain, and 60% "severe......" pain. Ninety percent patients stated that the pain interfered with their daily activities. All patients were using opioids as rescue medication (mainly oral morphine/oxycodone), whilst 28% patients were using non-opioids, and 50% patients were using non-pharmacological interventions. Only 55% patients...

  10. Characteristics and prognostic factors for pain management in 152 patients with lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi L

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Lei Shi,1,* Yumei Liu,2,* Hua He,1 Cong Wang,1 Hongwei Li,1 Nanya Wang1 1Cancer Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 2Department of Hematology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the pain characteristics and factors influencing the outcome of pain control in patients with lung cancer having pain. Methods: Pain characteristics, the effectiveness, and prognostic factors for pain control were analyzed in 152 patients with lung cancer having moderate or severe chronic pain admitted to Cancer Center of The First Hospital of Jilin University, People’s Republic of China, between January 2012 and May 2013. Information about sex, age, pathological type, TNM stage, presence/absence of bone metastases, characteristics of pain, methods, and effectiveness of pain management was recorded. Results: Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and small-cell carcinoma accounted for 132/152 (86.8% and 20/152 (13.2% cases, respectively. Among them, moderate (72.4% or severe pain (27.6% was reported in 73.7% of the cases at stage IV, chest or back pain was reported in 76.3% of the cases, and pain in other locations in the rest of the cases. Bone metastases were apparent in 44.1% of the patients. Neuropathic pain was noted in 46.7% of the patients, and frequent breakthrough pain was noted in 25.7% of the patients. High pain intensity was associated with frequent breakthrough pain. Pain was adequately controlled in 81.6% of the patients prescribed 3 days of analgesics. More patients reported a KPS higher than or equal to 80 after 3 days of analgesic treatment (P<0.001. Severe pain, frequent breakthrough pain, and presence of bone metastases were independent risk factors for poor pain control. Severe pain, frequent breakthrough pain, or neuropathic pain in the patients using opioids required higher

  11. Intermittent subcutaneous methadone administration in the management of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Carlos; Vara, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Methadone is a strong opioid analgesic that has been used successfully in cancer pain management. The oral route of administration is generally preferred for opioid analgesics. However that route sometimes cannot be used. Experience with continuous subcutaneous methadone infusions has produced local intolerance. The aim of this study was to analyze the use of intermittent subcutaneous methadone injections. Ten patients whose pain was well-controlled with oral methadone (average dose 30 mg, range 10 to 120 mg) participated in the study. A subcutaneous small vein needle (butterfly) was used exclusively for administration of methadone. Over a period of seven days the local discomfort of each injection was evaluated by means of a Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and the site of infusion was observed. When any degree of erythema or inflammation was seen, the infusion site was changed. The initial subcutaneous dose was the same as the previously administered oral dose. A daily record was kept of the dose used, level of pain, and toxicity symptoms. This close vigilance was aimed at avoiding dosage errors due to variations among individuals in acceptance to previous oral medication. Changes in dosage were allowed according to standard medical criteria. Two patients were withdrawn from the study due to non-painful irritation at the infusion point. Another eight patients tolerated repeated administration of subcutaneous methadone over seven days. Any local irritation from subcutaneous methadone that occurred was managed satisfactorily by changing the infusion site and limiting doses to 30 mg. In seven of 182 repeat administration, injection site changes were necessitated by local irritation. The NRS for local discomfort was 2/10. The two patients who were intolerant of the subcutaneous injections were receiving injected doses which were significantly higher than the others (42 mg as compared to 25 mg). Dose adjustments needed when changing from the oral to the

  12. Complementary and alternative medicine in cancer pain management: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life (QoL encompasses the physical, psychosocial, social and spiritual dimensions of life lived by a person. Cancer pain is one of the physical component has tremendous impact on the QoL of the patient. Cancer pain is multifaceted and complex to understand and managing cancer pain involves a tool box full of pharmacological and non pharmacological interventions but still there are 50-70% of cancer patients who suffer from uncontrolled pain and they fear pain more than death. Aggressive surgeries, radiotherapy and chemotherapy focus more on prolonging the survival of the patient failing to realize that the QoL lived also matters equally. This paper reviews complementary and alternative therapy approaches for cancer pain and its impact in improving the QoL of cancer patients.

  13. Pain management of opioid-treated cancer patients in hospital settings in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorff, L.; Peuckmann, V.; Sjøgren, Per

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance and quality of cancer pain management in hospital settings. METHODS: Anaesthesiologists specialised in pain and palliative medicine studied pain management in departments of oncology and surgery. Study days were randomly chosen and patients treated with oral opioids......-treated patients in hospital settings: however, focussing on average pain intensity, the outcome seems favourable compared with other countries. Pain mechanisms were seldom examined and adjuvant drugs were not specifically used for neuropathic pain. Opioid dosing intervals and supplemental opioid doses were most...

  14. Psychological and behavioural predictors of pain management outcomes in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the phenomenon of patient-related barriers to cancer pain management and address them more effectively in interventional studies, a theoretical model related to psychological aspects of pain experience and pain-related behaviours was elaborated. The aim of the study was to an......To better understand the phenomenon of patient-related barriers to cancer pain management and address them more effectively in interventional studies, a theoretical model related to psychological aspects of pain experience and pain-related behaviours was elaborated. The aim of the study...... was to analyse the impact of patient-related barriers on cancer pain management outcomes following this model. Thirty-three patients responded to the Brief Pain Inventory Pain scale, the Danish Barriers Questionnaire II (DBQ-II), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), the Danish version of Patient...... was explained by patients' emotional distress (symptoms of anxiety and depression) and that pain relief was explained by cognitive barriers. In conclusion, interventions in emotional distress and patients' concerns may supposedly result in better cancer pain management outcomes....

  15. A Survey of Cancer Pain Management Knowledge and Attitudes of British Columbian Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Gallagher

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There are many potential barriers to adequate cancer pain management, including lack of physician education and prescription monitoring programs. The authors surveyed physicians about their specific knowledge of pain management and the effects of the regulation of opioids on their prescribing practices.

  16. Parents' Voice in Managing the Pain of Children with Cancer during Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariyana, Rina; Allenidekania, Allenidekania; Nurhaeni, Nani

    2018-01-01

    Pain experienced by children can adversely affect their growth and development. Pain is a major health problem for cancer patients and remains an unresolved problem. To know how the experiences of mothers managing their children's pain during palliative care following cancer diagnosis. Pain experienced by children can adversely affect their growth and development. Using qualitative methods within a descriptive phenomenological approach, in-depth interviews were conducted with parents (mostly mothers) of eight children diagnosed with cancer. The data were collected using the snowball sampling method. Participants experienced in managing the pain of children with cancer. Analysis of the results identified 8 themes: the dimensions of pain experienced by children undergoing palliative care; mothers' physical and psychological responses; mothers' emotional responses; barriers encountered by mothers when taking care of their child at home; mothers' interventions to reduce their child's pain; mothers' efforts to distract their child from pain; giving encouragement when the child is in pain; and mothers' efforts and prayers to make their child comfort. It can be concluded that the child's pain is the main cause of mothers' stress and pressure and also affects the daily lives of mothers and children. Along with the most effective intervention, nurses need to provide mothers and children with adequate information about cancer pain.

  17. Parents' voice in managing the pain of children with cancer during palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Mariyana

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pain experienced by children can adversely affect their growth and development. Pain is a major health problem for cancer patients and remains an unresolved problem.Aim: To know how the experiences of mothers managing their children's pain during palliative care following cancer diagnosis.Background: Pain experienced by children can adversely affect their growth and development.Subject and Methods: Using qualitative methods within a descriptive phenomenological approach, in-depth interviews were conducted with parents (mostly mothers of eight children diagnosed with cancer. The data were collected using the snowball sampling method.Results: Participants experienced in managing the pain of children with cancer. Analysis of the results identified 8 themes: the dimensions of pain experienced by children undergoing palliative care; mothers' physical and psychological responses; mothers' emotional responses; barriers encountered by mothers when taking care of their child at home; mothers' interventions to reduce their child's pain; mothers' efforts to distract their child from pain; giving encouragement when the child is in pain; and mothers' efforts and prayers to make their child comfort.Conclusion: It can be concluded that the child's pain is the main cause of mothers' stress and pressure and also affects the daily lives of mothers and children. Along with the most effective intervention, nurses need to provide mothers and children with adequate information about cancer pain.

  18. [Challenges for home care services in the pain management of cancer patients : A qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnass, I; Krutter, S; Nestler, N

    2018-03-21

    People with cancer are increasingly supported by home care services. Pain is a relevant symptom of these diseases and nurses of home care services are involved in the treatment. The German National Expert Standard "Pain management in nursing" includes evidence-based recommendations for the implementation of adequate pain management. Considering the given structural conditions of home care services, nurses describe both barriers and challenges with the implementation. By means of five guideline-based discussion groups, nurses of 14 home care services were questioned about the challenges they had experienced in pain management. The questioning focuses on the level of implementation of the recommendation for each aspect: pain assessment, pharmacological pain therapy, non-pharmacological pain therapy, pain-related side effects, information, training, and counseling in the care of people with cancer. A qualitative content analysis was conducted. On the one hand, the results illustrate a need for further knowledge and possibilities, e.g., for the assessment of pain as a multidimensional phenomenon and, on the other hand, that the conditions for continuous pain monitoring of cancer patients in home care services are limited. The need for short-term reconciliation with the treatment team and the practitioners proved to be more difficult than the cooperation with the palliative care network. Involvement of family members is important to ensure uninterrupted treatment. Beside knowledge and competencies regarding nursing care, structures and processes for interprofessional pain management need further development and research.

  19. Effectiveness of knowledge translation interventions to improve cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Greta G; Olivo, Susan Armijo; Biondo, Patricia D; Stiles, Carla R; Yurtseven, Ozden; Fainsinger, Robin L; Hagen, Neil A

    2011-05-01

    Cancer pain is prevalent, yet patients do not receive best care despite widely available evidence. Although national cancer control policies call for education, effectiveness of such programs is unclear and best practices are not well defined. To examine existing evidence on whether knowledge translation (KT) interventions targeting health care providers, patients, and caregivers improve cancer pain outcomes. A systematic review and meta-analysis were undertaken to evaluate primary studies that examined effects of KT interventions on providers and patients. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. Five studies reported interventions targeting health care providers, four focused on patients or their families, one study examined patients and their significant others, and 16 studies examined patients only. Seven quantitative comparisons measured the statistical effects of interventions. A significant difference favoring the treatment group in least pain intensity (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.44, 1.42) and in usual pain/average pain (95% CI: 0.13, 0.74) was observed. No other statistical differences were observed. However, most studies were assessed as having high risk of bias and failed to report sufficient information about the intervention dose, quality of educational material, fidelity, and other key factors required to evaluate effectiveness of intervention design. Trials that used a higher dose of KT intervention (characterized by extensive follow-up, comprehensive educational program, and higher resource allocation) were significantly more likely to have positive results than trials that did not use this approach. Further attention to methodological issues to improve educational interventions and research to clarify factors that lead to better pain control are urgently needed. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cancer and orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Reyes, M; Salvemini, D

    2016-11-01

    Cancer pain is a devastating condition. Pain in the orofacial region, may be present as the single symptom of cancer or as a symptom of cancer in its later stages. This manuscript revises in a comprehensive manner the content of the conference entitled "Orofacial Pain and Cancer" (Dolor Orofacial y Cancer) given at the VI Simposio International "Advances in Oral Cancer" on the 22 July, 2016 in San Sebastioan-Donostia, Spain. We have reviewed (pubmed-medline) from the most relevant literature including reviews, systematic reviews and clinical cases, the significant and evidence-based mechanisms and mediators of cancer-associated facial pain, the diverse types of cancers that can be present in the craniofacial region locally or from distant sites that can refer to the orofacial region, cancer therapy that may induce pain in the orofacial region as well as discussed some of the new advancements in cancer pain therapy. There is still a lack of understanding of cancer pain pathophysiology since depends of the intrinsic heterogeneity, type and anatomic location that the cancer may present, making more challenging the creation of better therapeutic options. Orofacial pain can arise from regional or distant tumor effects or as a consequence of cancer therapy. The clinician needs to be aware that the pain may present the characteristics of any other orofacial pain disorder so a careful differential diagnosis needs to be given. Cancer pain diagnosis is made by exclusion and only can be reached after a thorough medical history, and all the common etiologies have been carefully investigated and ruled out. The current management tools are not optimal but there is hope for new, safer and effective therapies coming in the next years.

  1. A Survey of Cancer Pain Management Knowledge and Attitudes of British Columbian Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, R; Hawley, P; Yeomans, W

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There are many potential barriers to adequate cancer pain management, including lack of physician education and prescription monitoring programs. The authors surveyed physicians about their specific knowledge of pain management and the effects of the regulation of opioids on their prescribing practices.METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed out to British Columbia physicians who were likely to encounter cancer patients. The survey asked for physicians' opinions about College of Phy...

  2. Kinesiology taping as an adjunct for pain management in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Gourav; Rebanks, Jonathan; Briggs, Michelle; Johnson, Mark I

    2016-07-14

    We present the case of a 46-year-old woman who developed severe pain described as 'tearing' and 'searing' in the left side of the mid-trapezius region near the thoracic 8 vertebra (T8). The patient had undergone surgery for T8 fracture which had resulted from metastasis (secondary breast cancer). A community nurse referred the patient for physiotherapy assessment and treatment for her musculoskeletal pain and related symptoms that had affected her mobility and functional activities. The patient was treated with soft tissue therapy with the addition of kinesiology taping on follow-up visits. Kinesiology tape was applied over her left side trapezius region and left shoulder. The patient reported significant reductions in pain severity and felt greater control and stability over her left shoulder region, which resulted in better function and overall quality of life measures. She did not report any adverse effects. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Predicting, preventing and managing persistent pain after breast cancer surgery:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Kristin L; Kehlet, Henrik; Belfer, Inna

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery (PPBCS) is increasingly recognized as a potential problem facing a sizeable subset of the millions of women who undergo surgery as part of their treatment of breast cancer. Importantly, an increasing number of studies suggest that individual variation...... in psychosocial factors such as catastrophizing, anxiety, depression, somatization and sleep quality play an important role in shaping an individual's risk of developing PPBCS. This review presents evidence for the importance of these factors and puts them within the context of other surgical, medical...

  4. Management of cancer pain: 1. Wider implications of orthodox analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SK

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Susannah K Lee,1 Jill Dawson,2 Jack A Lee,3 Gizem Osman,4 Maria O Levitin,5 Refika Mine Guzel,5 Mustafa BA Djamgoz5,61Pomona College, Claremont, CA, USA; 2Healthcare Communications Consultancy, Danville, CA, USA; 3College of Arts and Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA; 4Department of Chemical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK; 5Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Neuroscience Solutions to Cancer Research Group, South Kensington Campus, Imperial College London, London, UK; 6Cyprus International University, Biotechnology Research Centre, Haspolat, North Cyprus, Mersin, TurkeyAbstract: In this review, the first of two parts, we first provide an overview of the orthodox analgesics used commonly against cancer pain. Then, we examine in more detail the emerging evidence for the potential impact of analgesic use on cancer risk and disease progression. Increasing findings suggest that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, particularly aspirin, may reduce cancer occurrence. However, acetaminophen may raise the risk of some hematological malignancies. Drugs acting upon receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and GABA “mimetics” (eg, gabapentin appear generally safe for cancer patients, but there is some evidence of potential carcinogenicity. Some barbiturates appear to slightly raise cancer risks and can affect cancer cell behavior in vitro. For cannabis, studies suggest an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, larynx, and possibly lung. Morphine may stimulate human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis; it is not clear whether this might cause harm or produce benefit. The opioid, fentanyl, may promote growth in some tumor cell lines. Opium itself is an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma and possibly cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung. It is concluded that analgesics currently prescribed for cancer pain can

  5. The management of breakthrough cancer pain--educational needs a European nursing survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengström, Y; Rundström, C; Geerling, J; Pappa, T; Weisse, I; Williams, S C; Zavratnik, B; Rustøen, T

    2014-01-01

    Poorly managed cancer pain is well known to profoundly impact the patient's daily life and interfere with quality of life. Nurses who cared for patients with cancer from 12 European countries participated in a survey of breakthrough cancer pain practice. The purpose was to investigate how nurses assess breakthrough cancer pain, use of standardised tools, confidence in supporting patients and awareness of medications. Responses from 1241 participants showed country variations. The majority of the sample was female, Germany had the highest proportion of male nurses (21.0%), followed by Greece (15.8%). A significantly larger proportion of nurses with longer experience and more education (78.8%) used a comprehensive definition of breakthrough cancer pain. Significant variations in training were found; 71% of Finnish nurses had received training compared with 6% of Greek nurses. Training and using a standardised assessment tool was associated with a significant increase in the nurses' perceived ability to distinguish between breakthrough and background pain. Nurses in countries with the highest proportion of training were most confident in supporting patients. In conclusion, there still exists problems with effective management of patients' breakthrough cancer pain, continuing inability to define the difference between background and breakthrough cancer pain leads to poor treatment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Health care professionals' familiarity with non-pharmacological strategies for managing cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaza, C; Sellick, S M; Willan, A; Reyno, L; Browman, G P

    1999-01-01

    Many studies have confirmed unnecessary suffering among cancer patients, due to the inadequate use of analgesic medication and other effective interventions. While pharmacological treatments are appropriately the central component of cancer pain management, the under-utilization of effective nonpharmacological strategies (NPS) may contribute to the problem of pain and suffering among cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to determine health care professionals' familiarity with, and perceptions regarding, NPS for managing cancer pain, and to assess their interest in learning more about NPS as adjuncts to pharmacological analgesics. Two-hundred and fourteen health care professionals were surveyed at two cancer treatment centres in Ontario, Canada. The self-report questionnaire included questions regarding 11 psychological strategies (e.g. imagery) and eight other NPS (e.g. acupuncture). The response rate was 67% (141/214). Subjects were found to be the least familiar with autogenic training, operant conditioning, and cognitive therapy. Other than radiation and surgery, subjects most commonly reported recommending support groups (67%), imagery (54%), music or art therapy (49%) and meditation (43%) for managing cancer pain. Participants were most interested in learning more about acupuncture, massage therapy, therapeutic touch, hypnosis, and biofeedback. Participants were somewhat familiar with most of the 19 NPS presented; however, they use or recommend few NPS for managing cancer pain. Health professionals' interest in NPS has important implications for the supportive care of cancer patients.

  7. Health Services for Management of Chronic Non-Cancer Pain in Kuwait: A Case Study Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakha, S Fatima; Pennefather, Peter; Badr, Hanan E; Mailis-Gagnon, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The experience of chronic pain is universal, yet pain management services delivered by health professionals vary substantially, depending on the context and patient. This review is a part of a series that has examined the issue of chronic non-cancer pain services and management in different global cities. The review is structured as a case study of the availability of management services for people living with chronic non-cancer pain within the context of the Kuwaiti health systems, and the cases are built from evidence in the published literature identified through a comprehensive review process. The evolution of the organizational structure of the public and private health systems in Kuwait is described. These are discussed in terms of their impact on the delivery of comprehensive chronic pain management service by health professionals in Kuwait. This review also includes a description of chronic pain patient personas to highlight expected barriers as well as compliance issues with services likely to be encountered in Kuwait. The case study analysis and persona descriptions illustrate a need to move beyond pain symptom management towards considering the entire person and his/her individual experience of pain such that health care success is judged by enhancement of patient well-being rather than access to services. A road map for improving integrative chronic pain management in Kuwait is discussed. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Management of cancer pain--a survey of current practice in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyannwo, A; Amanor-Boadu, S D

    2001-12-01

    A comprehensive management plan for cancer pain is yet to be formulated in the West African sub region despite the priority that the World Health Organisation (WHO) has devoted to the problem over the past decade. As a prerequisite to our cancer pain management curriculum development a structured questionnaire on cancer pain management practice was administered to 80 Fellows attending the Annual Scientific Conference of the West African College of Surgeons in 1996. They were asked how often they treated cancer patients, the causes of cancer pain, their methods of assessment and therapeutic measures and complications of management techniques. Forty-four fellows from Nigeria, Ghana, Liberia and Sierra Leone, all consultants and trainers, responded to the questionnaire. About 80% of them treated cancer patients all the time. Specific anti-cancer therapy such as surgery, chemotherapy and hormone therapy were available in the four countries but radiotherapy was only available in two centers in Nigeria. The respondents estimated that 70-90% of their patients had severe pain at presentation. Pain was thought by 52% of respondents to be due to cancer and its treatment while 47% thought it was due to cancer and the fear of dying. Pain assessment was mostly by the verbal rating scale, only 20% included psychological measurement in their schedules. Oral preparations of strong opioids were not available in most countries andfor severe pain, the parenteral route was employed. Only 18% knew about the 'by the clock' dosing schedule. The study revealed that the standard of practice of the respondents falls below accepted practice. There is thus an urgent need for the formal education of personnel involved in the care of these patients.

  9. Hospice Use and Pain Management in Elderly Nursing Home Residents With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, Jacob N; Tjia, Jennifer; Lapane, Kate L

    2017-03-01

    Pain management is suboptimal in nursing homes. To estimate the extent to which receipt of hospice in nursing homes (NHs) increases the receipt of pain management for residents with cancer at the end of life. Study participants included Medicare beneficiaries with cancer who were NH residents in the last 90 days of life in 2011-2012 (n = 78,160). Residents in pain on hospice were matched to like residents without hospice by facility, type of pain assessment (self-report/staff assessment), and weeks until death (9064 matched strata, 16,968 unique residents). Minimum Data Set 3.0 provided information on residents' pain prevalence and receipt of pain management (scheduled analgesics, as needed [pro re nata {PRN}] medication, nonpharmacologic interventions). We developed conditional logistic models to estimate the association between hospice use and pain management, stratified by self-reported and staff-assessed pain. We found that pain prevalence was higher in residents using hospice versus those without hospice (e.g., residents who self-reported pain: hospice: 59.9%, 95% CIs = 59.3%-60.5%; nonhospice: 50.0%, 95% CI = 49.4%-50.6%). In matched analyses, untreated pain was uncommon (self-reported pain: 2.9% and 5.6% in hospice users and nonusers, respectively). Hospice use was associated with receipt of scheduled analgesics (self-reported: adjusted odds ratio = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.73-1.971) and PRN medication (self-reported: adjusted odds ratio = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.20-1.43). Pain prevalence and the association between hospice and pain management were similar in residents with staff-assessed pain. Untreated pain at the end of life among residents with cancer in NHs is unusual. Hospice is associated with increased pain management among those with documented pain. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Morphine and oxycodone in the management of cancer pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalso, E.; Vainio, A.; Rosenberg, P.H.; Mattila, M.J.; Seppaelae, T.

    1990-01-01

    Morphine and oxycodone were administered to ten patients suffering from severe cancer pain in a double-blind cross-over study. The patients titrated themselves pain-free, first intravenously, using a patient-controlled analgesia device, and then orally. Each titration phase lasted for 48 hours. Blood samples were drawn after 36 hr of each administration phase. The plasma levels of morphine, morphine-6- and morphine-3 glucuronides were determined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), whereas the oxycodone samples were assayed with gas chromatography (GC). Twin samples were analyzed for plasma opioid activity with a radioreceptor assay (RRA) using 3 H-dihydromorphien and 3 H-naloxone as radioligands. Adequate analgesia was achieved with both morphine and oxycodone. About 30% more oxycodone was needed intravenously, whereas 25% less oxycodone than morphine was consumed orally. There was a good linear correlation between the morphine concentrations measured with HPLC and RRA. The mean morphine-6-glucuronide to morphine concentration ratio was 2.3 after intravenous and 4.6 after oral administration. Results from RRA indicate that oxycodone in vivo is a potent μ-agonist and that a least part of its analgesic action is mediated by active metabolites. In vitro morphine glucuronides enhanced morphine in displacing radioligands from the opioid receptors, thus suggesting their complex interactions in vivo. (author)

  11. Methadone for Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric E. Prommer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Pain is one of the most common and incapacitating symptoms experienced by patients with advanced cancer. Methadone is a potent opioid with strong affinity for the µ opioid receptor. In addition to being a potent µ opioid receptor ligand, methadone blocks the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor and modulates neurotransmitters involved in descending pain modulation. These 3 properties enhance analgesic activity. Methadone’s lack of active metabolites makes it an attractive option when opioid responsiveness declines and renal insufficiency complicates opioid therapy. A lipophilic opioid, methadone can be given by multiple routes. Clinical trial data show equivalence with morphine as an analgesic in moderate to severe cancer pain. Further investigations are needed to define the role of methadone in the management of breakthrough pain and neuropathic pain and to determine whether it is truly superior to morphine, the gold standard of cancer analgesia.

  12. Sociodemographic inequalities in barriers to cancer pain management: a report from the American Cancer Society's Study of Cancer Survivors-II (SCS-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Kevin D; Alcaraz, Kassandra I; Kamson, Chelsey; Fallon, Elizabeth A; Smith, Tenbroeck G

    2016-10-01

    Research has increasingly documented sociodemographic inequalities in the assessment and management of cancer-related pain. Most studies have focused on racial/ethnic disparities, while less is known about the impact of other sociodemographic factors, including age and education. We analyzed data from a large, national, population-based study of cancer survivors to examine the influence of sociodemographic factors, and physical and mental health comorbidities on barriers to cancer pain management. The study included data from 4707 cancer survivors in the American Cancer Society's Study of Cancer Survivors-II, who reported experiencing pain from their cancer. A multilevel, socioecological, conceptual framework was used to generate a list of 15 barriers to pain management, representing patient, provider, and system levels. Separate multivariable logistic regressions for each barrier identified sociodemographic and health-related inequalities in cancer pain management, controlling for years since diagnosis, disease stage, and cancer treatment. Two-thirds of survivors reported at least 1 barrier to pain management. While patient-related barriers were most common, the greatest disparities were noted in provider- and system-level barriers. Specifically, inequalities by race/ethnicity, education, age, and physical and mental health comorbidities were observed. Findings indicate survivors who were nonwhite, less educated, older, and/or burdened by comorbidities were most adversely affected. Future efforts in research, clinical practice, and policy should identify and/or implement new strategies to address sociodemographic inequalities in cancer pain management. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Family caregivers of palliative cancer patients at home: the puzzle of pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anita; Cohen, S Robin; Carnevale, Franco A; Ezer, Hélène; Ducharme, Francine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to understand the processes used by family caregivers to manage the pain of cancer patients at home. A total of 24 family caregivers participated. They were recruited using purposeful then theoretical sampling. The data sources were taped, transcribed (semi-structured) interviews and field notes. Data analysis was based on Strauss and Corbin's (1998) requirements for open, axial, and selective coding. The result was an explanatory model titled "the puzzle of pain management," which includes four main processes: "drawing on past experiences"; "strategizing a game plan"; "striving to respond to pain"; and "gauging the best fit," a decision-making process that joins the puzzle pieces. Understanding how family caregivers assemble their puzzle pieces can help health care professionals make decisions related to the care plans they create for pain control and help them to recognize the importance of providing information as part of resolving the puzzle of pain management.

  14. Systematic Review of the Use of Phytochemicals for Management of Pain in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Harrison

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain in cancer therapy is a common condition and there is a need for new options in therapeutic management. While phytochemicals have been proposed as one pain management solution, knowledge of their utility is limited. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review of the biomedical literature for the use of phytochemicals for management of cancer therapy pain in human subjects. Of an initial database search of 1,603 abstracts, 32 full-text articles were eligible for further assessment. Only 7 of these articles met all inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The average relative risk of phytochemical versus control was 1.03 [95% CI 0.59 to 2.06]. In other words (although not statistically significant, patients treated with phytochemicals were slightly more likely than patients treated with control to obtain successful management of pain in cancer therapy. We identified a lack of quality research literature on this subject and thus were unable to demonstrate a clear therapeutic benefit for either general or specific use of phytochemicals in the management of cancer pain. This lack of data is especially apparent for psychotropic phytochemicals, such as the Cannabis plant (marijuana. Additional implications of our findings are also explored.

  15. Physician-related barriers to cancer pain management with opioid analgesics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Sjøgren, Per; Møldrup, Claus

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of studies on physician-related barriers to cancer pain management with opioid analgesics. METHODS: A literature search was conducted in PUBMED, using a combined text word and MeSH heading search strategy. Those articles whose full...... texts were not available in PUBMED were retrieved from the electronic databases of specific journals. RESULTS: Sixty-five relevant articles, published in the period from 1986 to 2006, were identified. Physicians' barriers to cancer pain management were studied in questionnaire surveys and in the reviews...

  16. How Is Pain Managed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Pain Management Pain is a very common symptom in patients ... of pain. Pain Assessment The first step in pain management is a thorough assessment. Your healthcare provider will ...

  17. Pain in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: Prevalence, Mechanisms, Management and Future Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulouris, Andreas I; Banim, Paul; Hart, Andrew R

    2017-04-01

    Pain affects approximately 80% of patients with pancreatic cancer, with half requiring strong opioid analgesia, namely: morphine-based drugs on step three of the WHO analgesic ladder (as opposed to the weak opioids: codeine and tramadol). The presence of pain is associated with reduced survival. This article reviews the literature regarding pain: prevalence, mechanisms, pharmacological, and endoscopic treatments and identifies areas for research to develop individualized patient pain management pathways. The online literature review was conducted through: PubMed, Clinical Key, Uptodate, and NICE Evidence. There are two principal mechanisms for pain: pancreatic duct obstruction and pancreatic neuropathy which, respectively, activate mechanical and chemical nociceptors. In pancreatic neuropathy, several histological, molecular, and immunological changes occur which correlate with pain including: transient receptor potential cation channel activation and mast cell infiltration. Current pain management is empirical rather etiology-based and is informed by the WHO analgesic ladder for first-line therapies, and then endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) in patients with resistant pain. For EUS-CPN, there is only one clinical trial reporting a benefit, which has limited generalizability. Case series report pancreatic duct stenting gives effective analgesia, but there are no clinical trials. Progress in understanding the mechanisms for pain and when this occurs in the natural history, together with assessing new therapies both pharmacological and endoscopic, will enable individualized care and may improve patients' quality of life and survival.

  18. Application of the BPCQ questionnaire to assess pain management in selected types of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Czerw

    2016-09-01

    With regards to the source of pain management, only the internal control of pain is diversified by the primary site. The external factors were regarded as having the strongest influence by respondents diagnosed with colorectal or breast cancer. The major socio-economic variables differentiating the way in which pain control is perceived are education and net income-per-household-member. The results of analyses of individual groups of patients revealled strong correlations between the beliefs in the doctors' influence, and the beliefs in chance events and socio-economic factors.

  19. Evaluation of hypnotherapy in pain management of cancer patients: A clinical trial from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Kumar Sharma

    2017-01-01

    study indicates that hypnotherapeutic interventions are effective in the management of pain in individuals with cancer.

  20. A smartphone-based pain management app for adolescents with cancer: establishing system requirements and a pain care algorithm based on literature review, interviews, and consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibb, Lindsay A; Stevens, Bonnie J; Nathan, Paul C; Seto, Emily; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Stinson, Jennifer N

    2014-03-19

    Pain that occurs both within and outside of the hospital setting is a common and distressing problem for adolescents with cancer. The use of smartphone technology may facilitate rapid, in-the-moment pain support for this population. To ensure the best possible pain management advice is given, evidence-based and expert-vetted care algorithms and system design features, which are designed using user-centered methods, are required. To develop the decision algorithm and system requirements that will inform the pain management advice provided by a real-time smartphone-based pain management app for adolescents with cancer. A systematic approach to algorithm development and system design was utilized. Initially, a comprehensive literature review was undertaken to understand the current body of knowledge pertaining to pediatric cancer pain management. A user-centered approach to development was used as the results of the review were disseminated to 15 international experts (clinicians, scientists, and a consumer) in pediatric pain, pediatric oncology and mHealth design, who participated in a 2-day consensus conference. This conference used nominal group technique to develop consensus on important pain inputs, pain management advice, and system design requirements. Using data generated at the conference, a prototype algorithm was developed. Iterative qualitative testing was conducted with adolescents with cancer, as well as pediatric oncology and pain health care providers to vet and refine the developed algorithm and system requirements for the real-time smartphone app. The systematic literature review established the current state of research related to nonpharmacological pediatric cancer pain management. The 2-day consensus conference established which clinically important pain inputs by adolescents would require action (pain management advice) from the app, the appropriate advice the app should provide to adolescents in pain, and the functional requirements of the app

  1. An ethnographic study of barriers to cancer pain management and opioid availability in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebaron, Virginia; Beck, Susan L; Maurer, Martha; Black, Fraser; Palat, Gayatri

    2014-05-01

    The world's global cancer burden disproportionally affects lower income countries, where 80% of patients present with late-stage disease and have limited access to palliative care and effective pain-relieving medications, such as morphine. Consequently, millions die each year with unrelieved pain. Objective. The objective of this study was to examine barriers to opioid availability and cancer pain management in India, with an emphasis on the experiences of nurses, who are often the front-line providers of palliative care. Methods. Fifty-nine participants were recruited using a purposive, snowball sampling strategy. Ethnographic data collection included in-depth, semistructured interviews (n = 54), 400+ hours of participant observation, and review of documents over 9 months at a government cancer hospital in South India. Systematic qualitative analysis led to identification of key barriers that are exemplified by representative quotes. Results. Morphine is more available at this study site than in most of India, but access is limited to patients seen by the palliative care service, and significant gaps in supply still occur. Systems to measure and improve pain outcomes are largely absent. Key barriers related to pain management include the role of nursing, opioid misperceptions, bureaucratic hurdles, and sociocultural/infrastructure challenges. Implications. Interventions must streamline process details of morphine procurement, work within the existing sociocultural infrastructure to ensure opioids reach patients most in need, target unexpected audiences for symptom management education, and account for role expectations of health care providers. Conclusion. Macro- and micro-level policy and practice changes are needed to improve opioid availability and cancer pain management in India.

  2. Patient Preferences for Pain Management in Advanced Cancer: Results from a Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meads, David M; O'Dwyer, John L; Hulme, Claire T; Chintakayala, Phani; Vinall-Collier, Karen; Bennett, Michael I

    2017-10-01

    Pain from advanced cancer remains prevalent, severe and often under-treated. The aim of this study was to conduct a discrete choice experiment with patients to understand their preferences for pain management services and inform service development. Focus groups were used to develop the attributes and levels of the discrete choice experiment. The attributes were: waiting time, type of healthcare professional, out-of-pocket costs, side-effect control, quality of communication, quality of information and pain control. Patients completed the discrete choice experiment along with clinical and health-related quality of life questions. Conditional and mixed logit models were used to analyse the data. Patients with cancer pain (n = 221) and within palliative care services completed the survey (45% were female, mean age 64.6 years; age range 21-92 years). The most important aspects of pain management were: good pain control, zero out-of-pocket costs and good side-effect control. Poor or moderate pain control and £30 costs drew the highest negative preferences. Respondents preferred control of side effects and provision of better information and communication, over access to certain healthcare professionals. Those with lower health-related quality of life were less willing to wait for treatment and willing to incur higher costs. The presence of a carer influenced preferences. Outcome attributes were more important than process attributes but the latter were still valued. Thus, supporting self-management, for example by providing better information on pain may be a worthwhile endeavour. However, service provision may need to account for individual characteristics given the heterogeneity in preferences.

  3. Use of multimedia in patient and caregiver education for cancer pain management: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael; Choi, Matthew; Lam, Helen R; Agarwal, Arnav; Chow, Ronald; Chow, Selina; Rowbottom, Leigha; McDonald, Rachel; Lam, Henry; Chan, Stephanie; Chow, Edward; Henry, Blair

    2017-01-01

    Pain is one of the most prominent symptoms faced by cancer patients. It is known that patient and caregiver-targeted educational interventions addressing the proper use of pain management may provide significant clinical value. This review examines the literature surrounding the use of multimedia interventions for patient and caregiver education (PCE) on pain management compared to traditional educational interventions. A literature search was conducted in Ovid MEDLINE (1946-July Week 2, 2016), Ovid Embase (1947-2016 Week 29), and Ovid Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (up to June 2016). Paired reviewers conducted title and abstract screening and full-text screening to identify experimental, quasi-experimental and cohort studies evaluating one or more multimedia-based PCE interventions focused on cancer pain and pain management and targeting patients and/or caregivers. Findings were extracted by paired reviewers and synthesized qualitatively. Of the 68 full-text papers assessed, 7 were deemed relevant, of which 5 were RCTs and 2 were observational studies. We found limited but convincing quantitative data to suggest that the use of multimedia use in pain management education for patients/caregivers has greater value-added benefit compared to standard education. While there is evidence suggesting a positive effect on pain-related outcomes with the use of multimedia-based patient and caregiver-targeted interventions, it is limited to a small number of lower-quality studies. More robust and large-scale studies are needed to supplement existing evidence and provide more insight regarding the usability and user-friendliness of these tools in practice.

  4. Radiofrequency ablation of sphenopalatine ganglion for head and neck cancer pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti R Sanghavi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pain in advanced head and neck cancer is intractable and many a times difficult to manage with pharmacological agents. Sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG block provides excellent pain relief in patients who are suffering from various types of orofacial pain. Role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA of SPG is described for orofacial cancer pain. Aim: The aim of the study was to observe efficacy and duration of pain relief by RFA of SPG in advanced head and neck cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients suffering from advanced head and neck cancer were enrolled in this study between September 2013 and February 2016. All patients underwent RFA of SPG, under fluoroscopy guidance following a successful diagnostic block of SPG with local anesthetic. Pain was assessed before the procedure, immediately after the procedure, and during each follow-up visit. Follow-up visits were weekly for 4 weeks and then monthly till the end of life. Patients were continued on oral morphine, but the dose was reduced to one-third of total dose and was adjusted according to patients' requirement during each follow-up. Duration of analgesia, morphine requirements, and incidence of complications were noted. Results: There were 32 males and one female. Mean age of patients was 43.24 ± 13.52 (mean ± standard deviation [SD], ranging from 19 to 58 years. Three patients did not undergo RFA due to cheek hematoma formation during the procedure. Visual analog score was reduced from 8.43 ± 1.10 (preprocedure to 1.36 ± 1.61 (postprocedure (mean ± SD. Mean duration of analgesia was 17.55 ± 26.12 (mean ± SD weeks. Mean reduction in the dose of morphine was from 124.65 ± 46.78 to 40.00 ± 18.05 mg (mean ± SD immediately after the procedure. One patient was followed up for 30 months. Sixteen patients died within 3 months and had good pain relief. None of the patients had any serious complications. Conclusion: RFA of SPG is a good adjuvant method of pain

  5. Patient-related barriers to cancer pain management: a systematic exploratory review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2009-01-01

    , carried out in Cochrane Library, Medline (through PubMed), Web of Science and EMBASE databases for the period 1994-2005. Thirty-seven studies, dealing with cognitive, sensory and affective patient-related barriers, as well as studies, describing patients' pain communication and their adherence......The aim of this review was to systemically explore the current evidence regarding patient-related barriers to cancer pain management to find new areas that might be important for better understanding of patient barriers' phenomenon. The method used in this study was a computerised literature search...

  6. Cancer Pain Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; Bannister, Kirsty; Dickenson, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of inflammatory and neuropathic pains have been elucidated and translated to patient care by the use of animal models of these pain states. Cancer pain has lagged behind since early animal models of cancer-induced bone pain were based on the systemic injection of carcinoma cells....... This precluded systematic investigation of specific neuronal and pharmacological alterations that occur in cancer-induced bone pain. In 1999, Schwei et al. described a murine model of cancer-induced bone pain that paralleled the clinical condition in terms of pain development and bone destruction, confined...... to the mouse femur. This model prompted related approaches and we can now state that cancer pain may include elements of inflammatory and neuropathic pains but also unique changes in sensory processing. Cancer induced bone pain results in progressive bone destruction, elevated osteoclast activity...

  7. Can patient-reported measurements of pain be used to improve cancer pain management? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rosalind; Burton, Christopher D; Bond, Christine M; de Bruin, Marijn; Murchie, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Cancer pain is a distressing and complex experience. It is feasible that the systematic collection and feedback of patient-reported outcome measurements (PROMs) relating to pain could enhance cancer pain management. We aimed to conduct a systematic review of interventions in which patient-reported pain data were collected and fed back to patients and/or professionals in order to improve cancer pain control. MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases were searched for randomised and non-randomised controlled trials in which patient-reported data were collected and fed back with the intention of improving pain management by adult patients or professionals. We conducted a narrative synthesis. We also conducted a meta-analysis of studies reporting pain intensity. 29 reports from 22 trials of 20 interventions were included. PROM measures were used to alert physicians to poorly controlled pain, to target pain education and to link treatment to management algorithms. Few interventions were underpinned by explicit behavioural theories. Interventions were inconsistently applied or infrequently led to changes in treatment. Narrative synthesis suggested that feedback of PROM data tended to increase discussions between patients and professionals about pain and/or symptoms overall. Meta-analysis of 12 studies showed a reduction in average pain intensity in intervention group participants compared with controls (mean difference=-0.59 (95% CI -0.87 to -0.30)). Interventions that assess and feedback cancer pain data to patients and/or professionals have so far led to modest reductions in cancer pain intensity. Suggestions are given to inform and enhance future PROM feedback interventions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Pain in cancer survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladosievicova, B.

    2017-01-01

    Pain is a common problem among cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain. Overall prevalence of all types pain is about 40% in some cancer survivors with previous specific diagnosis. Until recently, impact of pain in cancer survivors have largely been unexamined. This complication can be predicted by type of malignancy, its therapy, time elapsed from completion of anticancer treatment and effectivity of previous pain interventions. As the purpose of this article is to update readers on more recent data about prevalence of pain in cancer survivors and common treatment-related chronic pain etiologies in patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase, previously known information about acute pain, pain in terminally ill patients. Some new studies in certain subpopulations of cancer survivors will be explored in more detail. (author)

  9. Improving communication in cancer pain management nursing: a randomized controlled study assessing the efficacy of a communication skills training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canivet, Delphine; Delvaux, Nicole; Gibon, Anne-Sophie; Brancart, Cyrielle; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Razavi, Darius

    2014-12-01

    Effective communication is needed for optimal cancer pain management. This study assessed the efficacy of a general communication skills training program for oncology nurses on communication about pain management. A total of 115 nurses were randomly assigned to a training group (TG) or control group (CG). The assessment included the recording of interviews with a simulated cancer patient at baseline for both groups and after training (TG) or 3 months after baseline (CG). Two psychologists rated the content of interview transcripts to assess cancer pain management communication. Group-by-time effects were measured using a generalized estimating equation. Trained nurses asked the simulated patient more questions about emotions associated with pain (relative rate [RR] = 4.28, p = 0.049) and cognitions associated with pain treatment (RR = 3.23, p management (RR = 0.40, p = 0.006) compared with untrained nurses. The general communication skills training program improved only a few of the communication strategies needed for optimal cancer pain management in nursing. General communication skills training programs should be consolidated using specific modules focusing on communication skills related to cancer pain management.

  10. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak I

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Iwona Zaporowska-Stachowiak,1,2 Grzegorz Kowalski,3 Jacek Łuczak,2 Katarzyna Kosicka,4 Aleksandra Kotlinska-Lemieszek,3 Maciej Sopata,3 Franciszek Główka4 1Chair and Department of Pharmacology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Palliative Medicine In-patient Unit, University Hospital of Lord's Transfiguration, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 3Palliative Medicine Chair and Department, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 4Department of Physical Pharmacy and Pharmacokinetics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland Background: Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III "pain ladder" drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient's refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective: Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures, and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal on the bupivacaine plasma concentration.Cases: We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours. The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 m

  11. YouTube as a tool for pain management with informal caregivers of cancer patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Parker Oliver, Debra; Demiris, George; Swarz, Jeff; Rendo, Matthew

    2014-12-01

    Cancer caregivers have information and support needs, especially about cancer pain management. With high Internet use reported among caregivers, YouTube may be an accessible option when looking for information on cancer pain management. The purpose of this study was to explore the availability and characteristics of instructional cancer pain management videos on YouTube and determine to what extent these videos addressed the role of informal caregivers in cancer pain management. A systematic review of videos on YouTube resulting from search terms "pain and cancer," "pain and hospice," and "pain and palliative care" was conducted in May 2013. If the video addressed pain management, was in English, and was instructional, it was coded for the scope and design of instructional content that included caregivers. The search terms yielded 1118 unique videos, and 43 videos met the inclusion criteria. Overall, 63% of videos were viewed 500 times or less, and half of the videos received "like" ratings by viewers. Video instruction was primarily talk without any onscreen action (65%), user-generated amateur video (79%), and had poor quality sources of information. Videos were mainly clinician centered (77%). Although most videos addressed the need for caregiver pain assessment (35%) and caregiver education (23%), few actually addressed specific caregiver pain management barriers. Most videos were primarily directed toward a clinical audience. Future research is necessary to determine if the platform is feasible and beneficial as a support tool for oncology caregivers. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. YouTube as a Tool for Pain Management With Informal Caregivers of Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Swarz, Jeff; Rendo, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Context Cancer caregivers have information and support needs, especially about cancer pain management. With high Internet use reported among caregivers, YouTube may be an accessible option when looking for information on cancer pain management. Objectives The purpose of this study was to explore the availability and characteristics of instructional cancer pain management videos on YouTube and determine to what extent these videos addressed the role of informal caregivers in cancer pain management. Methods A systematic review of videos on YouTube resulting from search terms “pain and cancer,” “pain and hospice,” and “pain and palliative care” was conducted in May 2013. If the video addressed pain management, was in English, and was instructional, it was coded for the scope and design of instructional content that included caregivers. Results The search terms yielded 1118 unique videos and 43 videos met the inclusion criteria. Overall, 63% of videos were viewed 500 times or less and half of the videos received “like” ratings by viewers. Video instruction was primarily talk without any onscreen action (65%), user-generated amateur video (79%), and had poor quality sources of information. Videos were mainly clinician-centered (77%). Although the majority of videos addressed the need for caregiver pain assessment (35%) and caregiver education (23%), few actually addressed specific caregiver pain management barriers. Conclusion The majority of videos were primarily directed toward a clinical audience. Future research is necessary to determine if the platform is feasible and beneficial as a support tool for oncology caregivers. PMID:24793505

  13. Efficacy and safety of fentanyl buccal for cancer pain management by administration through a soluble film: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin Omar Delgado-Guay

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Marvin Omar Delgado-GuayDivision of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, The University of Texas, Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: More than half of patients receiving prescription medicine for cancer pain have been reported to experience inadequate pain relief or breakthrough pain. Buccal administration can deliver lipophilic opioids rapidly to the systemic circulation through the buccal mucosa, limiting gastrointestinal motility and first-pass metabolism. This review updates the safety and efficacy of fentanyl buccal soluble film (FBSF in patients with cancer pain. Literature was identified through searches of Medline (PubMed. Search terms included combinations of the following: cancer pain, fentanyl, fentanyl buccal soluble film, pharmacology, kinetics, safety, efficacy and toxicity. FBSF is an oral transmucosal form of fentanyl citrate developed as a treatment of breakthrough pain in opioid-tolerant patients with cancer. Studies have shown that it is well tolerated in the oral cavity, with adequate bioavailability and safety in cancer patients. Further studies are warranted to evaluate, in comparison with other short-acting opioids, its efficacy in the management of breakthrough cancer pain, its addictive potential and its economic impact in cancer patients.Keywords: fentanyl buccal soluble film, cancer pain

  14. Pain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding Funding Opportunities (NIH Guide) Forms and Deadlines Electronic Research Admin (eRA) Grants Policy OER News About ... remains the most commonly used pain reliever. The French physician, Dr. Albert Schweitzer, proclaimed in 1931 that, “ ...

  15. Connecting the Dots: A Comparative Global Multi-Institutional Study of Prohibitive Factors Affecting Cancer Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoatey Odonkor, Charles; Addison, William; Smith, Sean; Osei-Bonsu, Ernest; Tang, Teresa; Erdek, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study was to elucidate the attitudes, beliefs, and barriers interfering with cancer pain management, the degree of barrier interference with trainees’ care of patients, and the relationships among prohibitive factors to pain management for physicians in a low–middle-income countries (LMICs) vs high-income countries (HICs). A multi-institutional cross-sectional survey of physicians in specialties with a focus in pain management training was performed. All surveys were completed anonymously from July 1, 2015, to November 30, 2015. One hundred and twenty physicians participated in the survey. Surveys were based on prior questionnaires published in the literature. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and chi-square (ℵ2) analysis, Fisher’s exact test, and Spearman rank correlation analyses were performed. Compared with their peers in HICs, physicians in LMICs reported less experience with cancer pain management despite seeing more cancer patients with advanced disease (41% vs 15.2%, p pain (84% vs 76%) and lack of training and expertise (87% vs 78%) were significantly more prohibitive for physicians in LMICs than those in HICs; p pain management among trainee physicians in low- vs high-resource environments. Understanding these differences may spur further collaboration in the design of contextually relevant solutions, which could potentially help improve the adequacy of cancer pain management

  16. Cognitive hypnotherapy for pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Gary; Johnson, Aimee; Fisher, William

    2012-04-01

    Pain is a serious health care problem and there is growing evidence to support the use of hypnosis and cognitive-behavioral interventions for pain management. This article reviews clinical techniques and methods of cognitive hypnotherapy for pain management. Current research with emphasis given to randomized, controlled trials is presented and the efficacy of hypnotherapy for pain management is discussed. Evidence for cognitive hypnotherapy in the treatment in chronic pain, cancer, osteoarthritis, sickle cell disease, temporomandibular disorder, fibromyalgia, non-cardiac chest pain, and disability related chronic pains are identified. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed in light of the accumulating evidence in support of the efficacy and effectiveness of cognitive hypnotherapy for pain management.

  17. Pain management at the end of life: A comparative study of cancer, dementia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romem, Anat; Tom, Sarah E; Beauchene, Michelle; Babington, Lynn; Scharf, Steven M; Romem, Ayal

    2015-05-01

    Limited data exist concerning the unique pain characteristics of patients with non-cancer terminal diseases referred for inpatient hospice care. To define the unique pain characteristics of patients admitted to an acute inpatient hospice setting with end-stage dementia or chronic obstructive lung disease (or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and to compare them to patients with end-stage cancer. Retrospective patient chart review. Demographic, physiological, pain parameters, and medication utilization data were extracted. Associations between pain characteristics, medication utilization, and admission diagnoses were assessed. Analyses included descriptive statistics. In total, 146 patients admitted to an acute inpatient hospice between 1 April 2011 and 31 March 2012 with an underlying primary diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 51), dementia (n = 48), or cancer (n = 47). Pain was highly prevalent in all diagnostic groups, with cancer patients experiencing more severe pain on admission. Cancer patients received a significantly higher cumulative opioid dose compared with dementia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Pain control within 24 h of pain onset was achieved in less than half of all patient groups with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients the least likely to achieve pain control. Despite the fact that pain is the most common complaint at the end of life, pain management may be suboptimal for some primary diagnoses. Admission diagnosis is the strongest predictor of pain control. Patient with cancer achieve the best pain control, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients are the least likely to have their pain adequately treated. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Pharmacologic management of non-cancer pain among nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapane, Kate L; Quilliam, Brian J; Chow, Wing; Kim, Myoung S

    2013-01-01

    Pain is common in nursing home settings. To describe scheduled analgesic use among nursing home (NH) residents experiencing non-cancer pain and evaluate factors associated with scheduled analgesic use. We identified 2508 residents living in one of 185 NHs predominantly from one for-profit chain, with pain recorded on two consecutive Minimum Data Set assessments. Pharmacy transaction files provided detailed medication information. Logistic regression models adjusted for clustering of residents in NHs identified factors related to scheduled prescription analgesics. Twenty-three percent had no scheduled analgesics prescribed. Those with scheduled analgesics were more likely to have excruciating pain (5.5% vs. 1.2%) and moderate pain documented (64.7% vs. 47.5%) than residents without scheduled analgesics. Hydrocodone (41.7%), short-acting oxycodone (16.6%), and long-acting fentanyl (9.4%) were common, and 13.8% reported any nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent use. Factors associated with decreased odds of scheduled analgesics included severe cognitive impairment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.36 to 0.88), age more than 85 years (AOR 0.57; 95% CI 0.41 to 0.80), and Parkinson's disease (AOR 0.55; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.99). Factors associated with increased odds of scheduled analgesic use included history of fracture (AOR 1.79; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.76), diabetes (AOR 1.30; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.66), and higher Minimum Data Set mood scores (AOR 1.11; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.19). Some improvements in pharmacologic management of pain in NHs have been realized. Yet, presence of pain without scheduled analgesics prescribed was still common. Evidence-based procedures to assure adherence to clinical practice guidelines for pain management in this setting are warranted. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient training in cancer pain management using integrated print and video materials: a multisite randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjala, Karen L; Abrams, Janet R; Polissar, Nayak L; Hansberry, Jennifer; Robison, Jeanne; DuPen, Stuart; Stillman, Mark; Fredrickson, Marvin; Rivkin, Saul; Feldman, Eric; Gralow, Julie; Rieke, John W; Raish, Robert J; Lee, Douglas J; Cleeland, Charles S; DuPen, Anna

    2008-03-01

    Standard guidelines for cancer pain treatment routinely recommend training patients to reduce barriers to pain relief, use medications appropriately, and communicate their pain-related needs. Methods are needed to reduce professional time required while achieving sustained intervention effectiveness. In a multisite, randomized controlled trial, this study tested a pain training method versus a nutrition control. At six oncology clinics, physicians (N=22) and nurses (N=23) enrolled patients (N=93) who were over 18 years of age, with cancer diagnoses, pain, and a life expectancy of at least 6 months. Pain training and control interventions were matched for materials and method. Patients watched a video followed by about 20 min of manual-standardized training with an oncology nurse focused on reviewing the printed material and adapted to individual concerns of patients. A follow-up phone call after 72 h addressed individualized treatment content and pain communication. Assessments at baseline, one, three, and 6 months included barriers, the Brief Pain Inventory, opioid use, and physician and nurse ratings of their patients' pain. Trained versus control patients reported reduced barriers to pain relief (P6 on a 0-10 scale) at 1-month outcomes (P=.03). Physician and nurse ratings were closer to patients' ratings of pain for trained versus nutrition groups (P=.04 and print materials, with brief individualized training, effectively improved pain management over time for cancer patients of varying diagnostic and demographic groups.

  20. Pain management in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Bridget; Sean Morrison, R

    2013-11-01

    Chronic pain is prevalent among older adults but is underrecognized and undertreated. The approach to pain assessment and management in older adults requires an understanding of the physiology of aging, validated assessment tools, and common pain presentations among older adults. To identify the overall principles of pain management in older adults with a specific focus on common painful conditions and approaches to pharmacologic treatment. We searched PubMed for common pain presentations in older adults with heart failure, end-stage renal disease, dementia, frailty, and cancer. We also reviewed guidelines for pain management. Our review encompassed 2 guidelines, 10 original studies, and 22 review articles published from 2000 to the present. This review does not discuss nonpharmacologic treatments of pain. Clinical guidelines support the use of opioids in persistent nonmalignant pain. Opioids should be used in patients with moderate or severe pain or pain not otherwise controlled but with careful attention to potential toxic effects and half-life. In addition, clinical practice guidelines recommend use of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with extreme caution and for defined, limited periods. An understanding of the basics of pain pathophysiology, assessment, pharmacologic management, and a familiarity with common pain presentations will allow clinicians to effectively manage pain for older adults. © 2013 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Management of neuropathic pain following treatment for breast cancer in the absence of recurrence: a challenge for the radiation oncologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clubb, B.

    2004-01-01

    This report reviews various management options for treatment-induced neuropathic pain in breast cancer. First-line options include tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsant drugs. Opioids should be prescribed according to published guidelines. Second-line treatments include lignocaine, mexiletine and ketamine. Sympatholytic therapies are available to patients with features of chronic regional pain syndrome. Anti-inflammatory agents are used for neurogenic inflammation. Surgical interventions are considered for refractory neuropathic pain. Interdisciplinary management is appropriate when persisting pain causes physical and psychosocial disabilities. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  2. Can gradual dose titration of ketamine for management of neuropathic pain prevent psychotomimetic effects in patients with advanced cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Tanimukai, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Yoichi; Ohno, Yumiko; Tsugane, Mamiko; Uejima, Etsuko

    2013-08-01

    Ketamine is often used to manage neuropathic pain in patients with cancer. However, it occasionally causes psychotomimetic effects such as vivid dreams, nightmares, illusions, hallucinations, and altered body image. To examine whether gradual dose titration of ketamine for management of neuropathic pain prevents psychotomimetic effects in patients with advanced cancer. This was a retrospective chart review. We administered ketamine when neuropathic pain in patients with advanced cancer became refractory to opioids and oral adjuvant analgesics. The starting dose of ketamine was 10 mg/d by continuous intravenous infusion. The dose was gradually increased by 10 mg/d every 4 to 6 hours to 50 mg/d or until the pain was relieved. It was subsequently increased by 25 mg/d every 12 to 24 hours until the pain was relieved. For this study, we enrolled 46 patients with advanced cancer. The mean age was 52.2 ± 16.9 years. The mean dose at onset of action and maximum dose of ketamine were 56 ± 58 and 272 ± 214 mg/d, respectively. The mean pain intensity (numerical rating scale) decreased significantly from 7.3 ± 2.0 to 3.5 ± 2.2 after the administration of ketamine (P ketamine for management of neuropathic pain can prevent psychotomimetic effects in patients with advanced cancer.

  3. Management of somatic pain induced by treatment of head and neck cancer: Postoperative pain. Guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espitalier, F; Testelin, S; Blanchard, D; Binczak, M; Bollet, M; Calmels, P; Couturaud, C; Dreyer, C; Navez, M; Perrichon, C; Morinière, S; Albert, S

    2014-09-01

    To present the guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL) concerning the management of somatic pain induced by the treatment of head and neck cancer, and in particular the management of early and late post-surgical pain. A multidisciplinary work group conducted a review of the scientific literature on the study topic. An editorial group subsequently read the resulting guidelines before validation. It is recommended to prevent onset of pain caused by malpositioning on the operating table, as well as pain related to postoperative care. During surgery, it is recommended to spare nerve and muscle structures as far as possible to limit painful sequelae. Management of early postoperative pain upon tumor resection and flap harvesting sites requires patient-controlled analgesia by morphine pump. Physical therapy is recommended after flap harvesting to minimize painful sequelae. Preventive and curative measures should be undertaken for appropriate management of post-surgical pain in the treatment of head and neck cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficacy and safety of fentanyl buccal for cancer pain management by administration through a soluble film: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado-Guay, Marvin Omar

    2010-01-01

    More than half of patients receiving prescription medicine for cancer pain have been reported to experience inadequate pain relief or breakthrough pain. Buccal administration can deliver lipophilic opioids rapidly to the systemic circulation through the buccal mucosa, limiting gastrointestinal motility and first-pass metabolism. This review updates the safety and efficacy of fentanyl buccal soluble film (FBSF) in patients with cancer pain. Literature was identified through searches of Medline (PubMed). Search terms included combinations of the following: cancer pain, fentanyl, fentanyl buccal soluble film, pharmacology, kinetics, safety, efficacy and toxicity. FBSF is an oral transmucosal form of fentanyl citrate developed as a treatment of breakthrough pain in opioid-tolerant patients with cancer. Studies have shown that it is well tolerated in the oral cavity, with adequate bioavailability and safety in cancer patients. Further studies are warranted to evaluate, in comparison with other short-acting opioids, its efficacy in the management of breakthrough cancer pain, its addictive potential and its economic impact in cancer patients

  5. Palliative care - managing pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Palliative care is a holistic approach to care that focuses on treating pain ... stressful for you and your family. But with treatment, pain can be managed. How Pain is Measured ...

  6. Evidence-based practice beliefs and behaviors of nurses providing cancer pain management: a mixed-methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Linda H; Meins, Alexa R; Mitchell, Pamela H; Voss, Joachim; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-03-01

    To describe evidence-based practice (EBP) beliefs and behaviors of nurses who provide cancer pain management. Descriptive, cross-sectional with a mixed-methods approach. Two inpatient oncology units in the Pacific Northwest. 40 RNs.
 Data collected by interviews and web-based surveys. EBP beliefs, EBP implementation, evidence-based pain management. Nurses agreed with the positive aspects of EBP and their implementation ability, although implementation level was low. They were satisfied with their pain management practices. Oncology nursing certification was associated with innovativeness, and innovativeness was associated with EBP beliefs. Themes identified were (a) limited definition of EBP, (b) varied evidence-based pain management decision making, (c) limited identification of evidence-based pain management practices, and (d) integration of nonpharmacologic interventions into patient care. Nurses' low level of EBP implementation in the context of pain management was explained by their trust that standards of care and medical orders were evidence-based. Nurses' EBP beliefs and behaviors should be considered when developing strategies for sustaining evidence-based pain management practices. Implementation of the EBP process by nurses may not be realistic in the inpatient setting; therefore, hospital pain management policies need to be evidence-based and reinforced with nurses.

  7. Mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of persons with cancer pain: A prospective case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Mechanism-based classification (MBC was established with current evidence and physical therapy (PT management methods for both cancer and for noncancer pain. Aims: This study aims to describe the efficacy of MBC-based PT in persons with primary complaints of cancer pain. Settings and Design: A prospective case series of patients who attended the physiotherapy department of a multispecialty university-affiliated teaching hospital. Material and Methods: A total of 24 adults (18 female, 6 male aged 47.5 ± 10.6 years, with primary diagnosis of heterogeneous group of cancer, chief complaints of chronic disabling pain were included in the study on their consent for participation The patients were evaluated and classified on the basis of five predominant mechanisms for pain. Physical therapy interventions were recommended based on mechanisms identified and home program was prescribed with a patient log to ensure compliance. Treatments were given in five consecutive weekly sessions for five weeks each of 30 min duration. Statistical Analysis Used: Pre-post comparisons for pain severity (PS and pain interference (PI subscales of Brief pain inventory-Cancer pain (BPI-CP and, European organization for research and treatment in cancer-quality of life questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30 were done using Wilcoxon signed-rank test at 95% confidence interval using SPSS for Windows version 16.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL. Results: There were statistically significant ( P < 0.05 reduction in pain severity, pain interference and total BPI-CP scores, and the EORTC-QLQ-C30. Conclusion: MBC-PT was effective for improving BPI-CP and EORTC-QLQ-C30 scores in people with cancer pain.

  8. Breakthrough cancer pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Andrew; Buchanan, Alison; Zeppetella, Giovambattista

    2013-01-01

    Breakthrough pain is common in patients with cancer and is a significant cause of morbidity in this group of patients.......Breakthrough pain is common in patients with cancer and is a significant cause of morbidity in this group of patients....

  9. Cancer pain and current theory for pain control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Brian

    2014-05-01

    This article discusses current trends in managing cancer pain, with specific regard to opioid transmission, descending pathway inhabitation, and ways to facilitate the endogenous antinociceptive chemicals in the human body. Various techniques for opioid and nonopioid control of potential pain situations of patients with cancer are discussed. The benefits of using pharmacogenetics to assess the appropriate medications are addressed. Finally, specific treatment of abdominal cancer pain using radiofrequency lesioning is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A retrospective study on the influence of nutritional status on pain management in cancer patients using the transdermal fentanyl patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroaki; Chiba, Takeshi; Tairabune, Tomohiko; Kimura, Yusuke; Wakabayashi, Go; Takahashi, Katsuo; Kudo, Kenzo

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown whether nutritional status influences pain intensity in cancer patients receiving a transdermal fentanyl patch (FP). This study aimed to determine whether nutritional status is associated with pain intensity and to evaluate the influence of changes in nutritional status on pain intensity in cancer patients receiving transdermal FP treatment. We included 92 patients receiving transdermal FP treatment for the first time with switching from oxycodone. The patients were classified into low- and normal-nutrition groups based on their nutritional status, which was assessed according to the Nutrition Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) parameters. The pain intensity of each patient was evaluated by a numeric rating scale (11-point scale from 0 to 10). NRS 2002 score and pain intensity were obtained on day 3 after the FP was applied to the skin. Pain intensities were significantly higher among patients in the low-nutrition group than among patients in the normal-nutrition group. NRS 2002 scores showed a significant positive correlation with the pain intensities. In 52 of 92 patients, who were evaluated using the NRS 2002 score and pain intensity on day 30 after FP application, the changes in NRS 2002 scores were significantly related to changes in pain intensities (odds ratio, 30.0; 95% confidence interval, 4.48-200.97; p=0.0005). These results suggest that an increase in the NRS 2002 score is a risk factor for an increase in pain intensity in cancer patients receiving FP treatment. Malnutrition may lead to poor pain management in cancer patients receiving FP treatment.

  11. Ceasing intrathecal therapy in chronic non-cancer pain: an invitation to shift from biomedical focus to active management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Hayes

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report long term experience (1997-2009 of intrathecal (IT therapy for chronic non-cancer pain in the context of our team's increasing emphasis on active management. DESIGN: Descriptive case series. SETTING: Australian tertiary multidisciplinary pain center, Hunter Integrated Pain Service (HIPS. INTERVENTION: This case series reports the changing use of IT implanted drug delivery systems (IDDSs for chronic non-cancer pain over 13 years. Initially IT therapy was used selectively following multidisciplinary assessment and double blind IT trial. Typical therapy combined opioid with clonidine. Multidimensional management was offered. Treatment strategy changed in 2003 due to HIPS experience of limited therapeutic gains and equivocal support for IT therapy in the literature. Subsequently IT therapy was no longer initiated for non-cancer pain and those on established regimes were encouraged to shift to oral/transdermal opioids with greater emphasis on active management. Patient education and consultation were key elements. Where IT cessation was elective gradual dose reduction commenced as an outpatient. In elective and urgent cases ketamine infusion and oral clonidine were used during hospital admissions to cover the switch to oral/transdermal opioids. Over the study period transition occurred to a broader management framework in which IT therapy for chronic non-cancer pain was no longer supported by HIPS. RESULTS: 25 patients were managed using IDDSs; 8 implanted by HIPS and 17 by other teams. Dose escalation and adverse effects were common. 24 of 25 patients ceased IT therapy; 7 (29% with urgent IDDS related complications, 16 (67% electively and 1 due to an unrelated death. The remaining patient returned to her original team to continue IT therapy. One post-explantation patient transferred to another team to recommence IT therapy. The remainder were successfully maintained on oral/transdermal opioids combined with active management.

  12. Multidisciplinary pain management programs.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Ulrike; Arnold, Bernhard; Pfingsten, Michael; Nagel, Bernd; Lutz, Johannes; Sabatowski, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Ulrike Kaiser,1 Bernhard Arnold,2 Michael Pfingsten,3 Bernd Nagel,4 Johannes Lutz,5 Rainer Sabatowski1,61Comprehensive Pain Center, University Hospital “Carl Gustav Carus”, Dresden, 2Department of Pain Management, Klinikum Dachau, Dachau, 3Pain Clinic, University Medicine, University of Göttingen, 4Day Care Unit, DRK Pain Center, Mainz, 5Interdisciplinary Pain Center, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Bad Berka, 6Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University ...

  13. Cancer treatment: dealing with pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000827.htm Cancer treatment - dealing with pain To use the sharing features ... test, can cause pain. Treatment. Many types of cancer treatments can cause pain, including chemotherapy , radiation , and surgery. ...

  14. Improvement of pain-related self-management for cancer patients through a modular transitional nursing intervention: a cluster-randomized multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Patrick; Kuss, Oliver; Schmidt, Heike; Bauer, Alexander; Kitzmantel, Maria; Jordan, Karin; Krasemann, Susann; Landenberger, Margarete

    2014-04-01

    Patients' self-management skills are affected by their knowledge, activities, and attitudes toward pain management. This trial aimed to test the Self Care Improvement through Oncology Nursing (SCION)-PAIN program, a multimodular structured intervention to reduce patients' barriers to self-management of cancer pain. Two hundred sixty-three patients with diagnosed malignancy, pain>3 days, and average pain > or = 3/10 participated in a cluster-randomized trial on 18 wards in 2 German university hospitals. Patients on the intervention wards received, in addition to standard pain treatment, the SCION-PAIN program consisting of 3 modules: pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic pain management, and discharge management. The intervention was conducted by specially trained cancer nurses and included components of patient education, skills training, and counseling. Starting with admission, patients received booster sessions every third day and one follow-up telephone counseling session within 2 to 3 days after discharge. Patients in the control group received standard care. Primary end point was the group difference in patient-related barriers to self-management of cancer pain (Barriers Questionnaire-BQ II) 7 days after discharge. The SCION-PAIN program resulted in a significant reduction of patient-related barriers to pain management 1 week after discharge from the hospital: mean difference on BQ II was -0.49 points (95% confidence interval -0.87 points to -0.12 points; P=0.02). Furthermore, patients showed improved adherence to pain medication; odds ratio 8.58 (95% confidence interval 1.66-44.40; P=0.02). A post hoc analysis indicated reduced average and worst pain intensity as well as improved quality of life. This trial reveals the positive impact of a nursing intervention to improve patients' self-management of cancer pain. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Can a theory-based educational intervention change nurses' knowledge and attitudes concerning cancer pain management? A quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Markus; Borglin, Gunilla

    2013-08-19

    Registered Nurses (RNs) play an important role in caring for patients suffering from cancer pain. A lack of knowledge regarding pain management and the RNs' own perception of cancer pain could act as barriers to effective pain management. Educational interventions that target RNs' knowledge and attitudes have proved promising. However, an intervention consisting of evidence-based practice is a multifaceted process and demands behavioural and cognitive changes to sustain the effects of the intervention. Therefore, our study aimed to investigate if a theory-based educational intervention could change RNs' knowledge and attitudes to cancer pain and pain management, both four and 12 weeks after the start of the intervention. A quasi-experimental design with non-equivalent control groups was used. The primary outcome was measured using a modified version of the instrument Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (NKAS) at baseline, four weeks and 12 weeks after the start of the intervention to evaluate its persistence. The intervention's educational curriculum was based on the principles of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour and consisted of interactive learning activities conducted in workshops founded on evidence-based knowledge. The RN's own experiences from cancer pain management were used in the learning process. The theory-based educational intervention aimed at changing RNs knowledge and attitudes regarding cancer pain management measured by primary outcome NKAS resulted in a statistical significant (presearched and needs to be evaluated further in larger projects. Clinical Trials. Gov: NCT01313234.

  16. Multidisciplinary pain management programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser U

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike Kaiser,1 Bernhard Arnold,2 Michael Pfingsten,3 Bernd Nagel,4 Johannes Lutz,5 Rainer Sabatowski1,61Comprehensive Pain Center, University Hospital “Carl Gustav Carus”, Dresden, 2Department of Pain Management, Klinikum Dachau, Dachau, 3Pain Clinic, University Medicine, University of Göttingen, 4Day Care Unit, DRK Pain Center, Mainz, 5Interdisciplinary Pain Center, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Bad Berka, 6Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital “Carl Gustav Carus”, Dresden, Germany

  17. Pattern of palliative care, pain management and referral trends in patients receiving radiotherapy at a tertiary cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain is a common primary symptom of advanced cancer and metastatic disease, occurring in 50-75% of all patients. Although palliative care and pain management are essential components in oncology practice, studies show that these areas are often inadequately addressed. Materials and Methods: We randomly selected 152 patients receiving palliative radiotherapy (PRT from October 2006 to August 2008, excluding metastatic bone lesions. Patients′ records were studied retrospectively. Results: A median follow-up of 21 weeks was available for 119 males and 33 females with a median age of 55 years. Maximum (60% patients were of head and neck cancers followed by esophagus (14%, lung (10% and others. Dysphagia, growth/ulcer and pain were the chief indications for PRT. Pain was present in 93 (61% cases out of which, 56 (60% were referred to pain clinic. All except one consulted pain clinic with a median pain score of 8 (0-10 point scale. Fifty-three of these 56 patients (96% received opioid-based treatment with adequate pain relief in 33% cases and loss of follow-up in 40% cases. Only five (3% cases were referred to a hospice. Twenty-two (14% cases were considered for radical treatment following excellent response to PRT. Conclusion: In this selective sample, the standard of analgesic treatment was found to be satisfactory. However, there is a lot of scope for improvement regarding referral to pain clinic and later to the hospice. Patients′ follow-up needs to be improved along with future studies evaluating those patients who were considered for further RT till radical dose. Programs to change the patients′ attitude towards palliative care, physicians′ (residents′ training to improve communication skills, and institutional policies may be promising strategies.

  18. Minding the Gaps in Cancer Pain Management Education: A Multicenter Study of Clinical Residents and Fellows in a Low- Versus High-Resource Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odonkor, Charles Amoatey; Osei-Bonsu, Ernest; Tetteh, Oswald; Haig, Andy; Mayer, Robert Samuel; Smith, Thomas J

    2016-12-01

    Inadequate pain management training has been reported as a major cause of undertreatment of cancer pain. Yet, past research has not comprehensively compared the quality of cancer pain management education among physicians in training in high-resource countries (HRCs) with those in low-resource countries (LRCs). The purpose of this study was to examine and compare gaps in cancer pain management education among physician trainees in an HRC (United States) versus an LRC (Ghana). A cross section of physicians at four major academic medical centers completed surveys about the adequacy of cancer pain training. Participation in the study was completely voluntary, and paper or online surveys were completed anonymously. The response rate was 60% (N = 120). Major gaps were identified in cancer pain management education across the spectrum of medical school training. Training was rated as inadequate (by approximately 80% of trainees), although approximately 10% more trainees in HRCs versus LRCs felt this way; 35% said residency training was inadequate in both settings; and 50% in LRCs versus 44% in HRCs said fellowship training was less than good. On the basis of the lowest group means, the three key areas of perceived deficits included interventional pain procedures (2.34 ± 1.12), palliative care interventions (2.39 ± 1.12), and managing procedural and postoperative pain (2.94 ± 0.97), with significant differences in the distribution of deficits in 15 cancer-pain competencies between LRCs and HRCs ( P < .05). This study identifies priority areas that could be targeted synergistically by LRCs and HRCs to advance cancer care globally. The findings underscore differential opportunities to broaden and improve competencies in cancer pain management via exchange training, in which physicians from HRCs spend time in LRCs and vice versa.

  19. A randomized, clinical trial of education or motivational-interviewing-based coaching compared to usual care to improve cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mary Laudon; Elliott, Janette E; Rao, Stephen M; Fahey, Kathleen F; Paul, Steven M; Miaskowski, Christine

    2012-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of two interventions compared to usual care in decreasing attitudinal barriers to cancer pain management, decreasing pain intensity, and improving functional status and quality of life (QOL). Randomized clinical trial. Six outpatient oncology clinics (three Veterans Affairs [VA] facilities, one county hospital, and one community-based practice in California, and one VA clinic in New Jersey)Sample: 318 adults with various types of cancer-related pain. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: control, standardized education, or coaching. Patients in the education and coaching groups viewed a video and received a pamphlet on managing cancer pain. In addition, patients in the coaching group participated in four telephone sessions with an advanced practice nurse interventionist using motivational interviewing techniques to decrease attitudinal barriers to cancer pain management. Questionnaires were completed at baseline and six weeks after the final telephone calls. Analysis of covariance was used to evaluate for differences in study outcomes among the three groups. Pain intensity, pain relief, pain interference, attitudinal barriers, functional status, and QOL. Attitudinal barrier scores did not change over time among groups. Patients randomized to the coaching group reported significant improvement in their ratings of pain-related interference with function, as well as general health, vitality, and mental health. Although additional evaluation is needed, coaching may be a useful strategy to help patients decrease attitudinal barriers toward cancer pain management and to better manage their cancer pain. By using motivational interviewing techniques, advanced practice oncology nurses can help patients develop an appropriate plan of care to decrease pain and other symptoms.

  20. Performance and quality indicators for the management of non-cancer chronic pain: a scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidarov, Diana; Visca, Regina; Gogovor, Amédé; Ahmed, Sara

    2016-02-19

    Chronic pain is a public health problem of epidemic proportion in most countries with important physical, psychological, social and economic consequences. The management of chronic pain is complex and requires an integrated network approach between all levels of the healthcare system and the involvement of several health professionals from different disciplines. Measuring the performance of organisations that provide care to individuals with chronic pain is essential to improve quality of care and requires the use of relevant performance and quality indicators. A scoping review methodology will be used to synthesise the evidence on performance and quality indicators developed for non-cancer chronic pain management across the continuum of care. The following electronic databases will be searched from 2000 onwards: Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Review Group Specialised Register; Cochrane Library; EMBASE; PubMed; CINAHL; PsycINFO; ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. All types of studies will be included if these are concerned with performance or quality indicators in adults with chronic non-cancer pain. In addition, searches will be conducted on provincial, national and international health organisations as well as health professional and scientific associations' websites. A qualitative descriptive approach will be used to describe characteristics of each indicator. All identified indicators will be classified according to dimensions covered by Donabedian and the Triple Aim frameworks. The scoping review findings will inform the development of a performance measurement system comprising a list of performance indicators with their level of evidence which can be used by stakeholders to evaluate the quality of care for individuals with chronic non-cancer pain at the patient, institutional and system level. The results will be disseminated via several knowledge translation strategies, including 2 stakeholder meetings, publication and

  1. Hip fractures and pain following proton therapy for management of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valery, Raul; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Nichols, Romaine C. Jr.; Henderson, Randal; Morris, Christopher G.; Su, Zhong; Li, Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Mendenhall, William M.; Williams, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Proton therapy (PT) for prostate cancer reduces rectal and bladder dose, but increases dose to the femoral necks. We assessed the risk of hip fracture and pain in men treated with PT for prostate cancer. Material and methods: From 2006 to 2008, 382 men were treated for prostate cancer and evaluated at six-month intervals after PT for toxicities at Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Institute (UFPTI). The WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) generated annual hip-fracture risk for the cohort. The WHO FRAX tool was utilized to generate the expected number of patients with hip fractures and the observed-to-expected ratio; confidence intervals and p-value were generated with the mid-P exact test. Univariate analysis of hip pain as a function of several prognostic factors was accomplished with Fisher's exact test. Results. Median follow-up was four years (range, 0.1-5.5 years). Per FRAX, 3.02 patients were expected to develop a hip fracture without PT. Three PT patients actually developed fractures for a rate of 0.21 fractures per 100 person-years of follow-up. There was an observed-expected ratio of 0.99 (p-value not significant). Forty-eight patients (13%) reported new pain in the hip during follow-up; three required prescription analgesics. Conclusion. PT for prostate cancer did not increase hip-fractures in the first four years after PT compared to expected rates in untreated men

  2. Colorectal surgery patients' pain status, activities, satisfaction, and beliefs about pain and pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carolyn; Constance, Kristel; Bédard, Denise; Purden, Margaret

    2013-12-01

    This study describes surgical colorectal cancer patients' pain levels, recovery activities, beliefs and expectations about pain, and satisfaction with pain management. A convenience sample of 50 adult inpatients who underwent colorectal surgery for cancer participated. Patients were administered the modified American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire on postoperative day 2 and asked to report on their status in the preceding 24 hours. Patients reported low current (mean 1.70) and average (mean 2.96) pain scores but had higher scores and greater variation for worst pain (mean 5.48). Worst pain occurred mainly while turning in bed or mobilizing, and 25% of patients experienced their worst pain at rest. Overall, patients expected to have pain after surgery and were very satisfied with pain management. Patients with worst pain scores >7 reported interference with recovery activities, mainly general activity (mean 5.67) and walking ability (mean 5.15). These patients were likely to believe that "people can get addicted to pain medication easily" (mean 3.39 out of 5) and that "pain medication should be saved for cases where pain gets worse" (mean 3.20 out of 5). These beliefs could deter patients from seeking pain relief and may need to be identified and addressed along with expectations about pain in the preoperative nursing assessment. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Feasibility of a mobile and web-based intervention to support self-management in outpatients with cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstenbach, Laura M J; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Courtens, Annemie M; van Kleef, Maarten; de Witte, Luc P

    2016-08-01

    Cancer pain is a prevalent and distressing symptom. To enhance self-management in outpatients, a multi-component intervention was developed, integrating patient self-management and professional care through healthcare technology. This article describes feasibility of the intervention in everyday practice. Patients with moderate to severe cancer pain (n = 11) and registered nurses specialized in pain and palliative care (n = 3) participated in a four-week study. The intervention involved daily monitoring, graphical feedback, education, and advice by means of a mobile application for patients and a web application for nurses. Learnability, usability and desirability were measured in patients with a 20-item questionnaire (1-5 scale), higher scores indicating better feasibility. Patients' adherence was based on completion rates from server logs. Single semi-structured interviews with patients and a focus group interview with nurses provided insight into experiences. Questionnaire findings confirmed learnability (4.8), usability (4.8) and desirability (4.6) of the application for patients. Average completion rates were 76.8% for pain monitoring, 50.4% for medication monitoring and 100% for education sessions. Interviews revealed that patients were pleased with the simplicity of the mobile application and appreciated different components. Nurses agreed upon the added value and were mostly positive about the possibilities of the web application. Patients and nurses provided ideas for improvements relating to the content and technical performance of the intervention. Study results demonstrate feasibility of the intervention in everyday practice. Provided that content-related and technical adjustments are made, the intervention enables patients with cancer pain to practice self-management and nurses to remotely support these patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical management of pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If these therapies fail, and with a thorough multidisciplinary approach involving carefully ... Generally, surgical pain management is divided into neuro- modulative .... 9 suggested. It is important to be sure that the underlying instability or.

  5. Neonatal pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Bhalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The past 2-3 decades have seen dramatic changes in the approach to pain management in the neonate. These practices started with refuting previously held misconceptions regarding nociception in preterm infants. Although neonates were initially thought to have limited response to painful stimuli, it was demonstrated that the developmental immaturity of the central nervous system makes the neonate more likely to feel pain. It was further demonstrated that untreated pain can have long-lasting physiologic and neurodevelopmental consequences. These concerns have resulted in a significant emphasis on improving and optimizing the techniques of analgesia for neonates and infants. The following article will review techniques for pain assessment, prevention, and treatment in this population with a specific focus on acute pain related to medical and surgical conditions.

  6. Pain assessement and management in surgical cancer patients: pilot and evaluation of a continuing education program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Huijer-Abu Saad, H.; Grypdonck, M.

    1995-01-01

    In a pilot study, a continuing education program on pain assessment and management was implemented and evaluated. Questionnaires were completed by the nurse participants at the beginning, the end, and 2 months after the end of the pilot program. After the pilot program, participants reported having

  7. Pain management: a fundamental human right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Frank; Carr, Daniel B; Cousins, Michael

    2007-07-01

    This article surveys worldwide medical, ethical, and legal trends and initiatives related to the concept of pain management as a human right. This concept recently gained momentum with the 2004 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Chapters-, International Association for the Study of Pain- and World Health Organization-sponsored "Global Day Against Pain," where it was adopted as a central theme. We survey the scope of the problem of unrelieved pain in three areas, acute pain, chronic noncancer pain, and cancer pain, and outline the adverse physical and psychological effects and social and economic costs of untreated pain. Reasons for deficiencies in pain management include cultural, societal, religious, and political attitudes, including acceptance of torture. The biomedical model of disease, focused on pathophysiology rather than quality of life, reinforces entrenched attitudes that marginalize pain management as a priority. Strategies currently applied for improvement include framing pain management as an ethical issue; promoting pain management as a legal right, providing constitutional guarantees and statutory regulations that span negligence law, criminal law, and elder abuse; defining pain management as a fundamental human right, categorizing failure to provide pain management as professional misconduct, and issuing guidelines and standards of practice by professional bodies. The role of the World Health Organization is discussed, particularly with respect to opioid availability for pain management. We conclude that, because pain management is the subject of many initiatives within the disciplines of medicine, ethics and law, we are at an "inflection point" in which unreasonable failure to treat pain is viewed worldwide as poor medicine, unethical practice, and an abrogation of a fundamental human right.

  8. Comparison of pregabalin versus ketamine in postoperative pain management in breast cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Mahran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast surgery compromises one of the most common cancer surgeries in females and commonly followed by acute postoperative pain. Pregabalin and ketamine have been used in many previous studies and was found to have a good analgesic profile. We assumed that pregabalin and ketamine can be used in control of postoperative pain in female patients undergoing breast cancer surgery. Material and Methods: Ninety female patients scheduled for cancer breast surgery were allocated in three groups (30 patients each, control group (group c received preoperative placebo, pregabalin group (group p received oral 150 mg pregabalin 1 h before surgery, ketamine group (group k received intravenous (IV 0.5 mg/kg ketamine with induction of anesthesia followed by 0.25 mg/kg/h IV throughout the surgery. All patients received general anesthesia and after recovery, the three groups were assessed in the first postoperative 24 h for postoperative visual analog scale (VAS , total 24 h morphine consumption, incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV, sedation score >2 and any complications from the drugs used in the study. Results: The use of pregabalin or ketamine was found to reduce total postoperative morphine consumption with P 2. Conclusion: The use of preoperative oral 150 mg pregabalin 1 h before surgery or IV 0.5 mg ketamine with induction of anesthesia can reduce postoperative opioid consumption in breast cancer surgery without change in sedation or PONV and with a good safety profile.

  9. Pressure pain sensitivity as a marker for stress and pressure pain sensitivity-guided stress management in women with primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Christen K; Ballegaard, Søren; Karpatschof, Benny

    2014-01-01

    employees was divided in a High Stress Group (HSG, n = 37) and a Low Stress Group (LSG, n = 128) to evaluate the association between PPS, questionnaire-related Quality of Life (QOL) and self-evaluated stress. (2) A PPS-guided stress management program (n = 40) was compared to a Psychosocial Group......OBJECTIVES: To validate (1) Pressure Pain Sensitivity (PPS) as a marker for stress and (2) a PPS-guided intervention in women with primary Breast Cancer (BC). METHODS: (1) A total of 58 women with BC were examined before and after 6 months of intervention. A control group of 165 women office...... scores: (all p stress scores (all p

  10. Randomized controlled trial of the Valencia model of waking hypnosis plus CBT for pain, fatigue, and sleep management in patients with cancer and cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, M E; Capafons, A; Gralow, J R; Syrjala, K L; Suárez-Rodríguez, J M; Fann, J R; Jensen, M P

    2017-11-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of an intervention combining the Valencia model of waking hypnosis with cognitive-behavioral therapy (VMWH-CBT) in managing cancer-related pain, fatigue, and sleep problems in individuals with active cancer or who were post-treatment survivors. We hypothesized that four sessions of VMWH-CBT would result in greater improvement in participants' symptoms than four sessions of an education control intervention. Additionally, we examined the effects on several secondary outcome domains that are associated with increases in these symptoms (depression, pain interference, pain catastrophizing, and cancer treatment distress). The study design was a randomized controlled crossover clinical trial comparing the VMWH-CBT intervention with education control. Participants (N = 44) received four sessions of both treatments, in a counterbalanced order (n = 22 per order condition). Participants were 89% female (N = 39) with mean age of 61 years (SD = 12.2). They reported significantly greater improvement after receiving the active treatment relative to the control condition in all the outcome measures. Treatment gains were maintained at 3-month follow-up. This study supports the beneficial effects of the VMWH-CBT intervention relative to a control condition and that treatment gains remain stable. VMWH-CBT-trained clinicians should be accessible for managing symptoms both during and after cancer treatment, though the findings need to be replicated in larger samples of cancer survivors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Pain management after lung surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Frödin; Margareta Warrén Stomberg

    2014-01-01

    Pain management is an integral challenge in nursing and includes the responsibility of managing patients’ pain, evaluating pain therapy and ensuring the quality of care. The aims of this study were to explore patients’ experiences of pain after lung surgery and evaluate their satisfaction with the postoperative pain management. A descriptive design was used which studied 51 participants undergoing lung surgery. The incidence of moderate postoperative pain varied from 36- 58% among the partici...

  12. Piroxicam and Doxepin—An Alternative to Narcotic Analgesics in Managing Advanced Cancer Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, L.; Machado, Antonio F.; Bier, Robert; Cohn, Marthe

    1988-01-01

    To provide an effective continuum of the relief of severe carcinomatous pain with minimal side reactions, we initiated treatment with piroxicam (60 to 120 mg per day) and doxepin hydrochloride (25 to 225 mg per day). Of 30 patients presenting with severe pain of cancer of various origins, 7 continued to death with piroxicam and doxepin therapy. An additional 17 were successfully treated for 6 to 66 weeks with therapy reported here but, as disease progressed, required supplemental narcotics. The remaining six abandoned the use of piroxicam due to complications of therapy, which ranged from diarrhea to gastric perforation; serious complications were associated with patients' failure to adhere to a prescribed regimen of sucralfate. Therapy with piroxicam and doxepin proved to be safe and efficacious. PMID:3363962

  13. Ethical Tensions in the Pain Management of an End-Stage Cancer Patient with Evidence of Opioid Medication Diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Arvind; Kim, David

    2016-06-01

    At the end of life, pain management is commonly a fundamental part of the treatment plan for patients where curative measures are no longer possible. However, the increased recognition of opioid diversion for secondary gain coupled with efforts to treat patients in the home environment towards the end of life creates the potential for ethical dilemmas in the palliative care management of terminal patients in need of continuous pain management. We present the case of an end-stage patient with rectal cancer who required a continuous residential narcotic infusion of fentanyl for pain control due to metastatic disease. His functional status was such that he had poor oral intake and ability to perform other activities of daily living, but was able to live at home with health agency nursing care. The patient presented to this institution with a highly suspect history of having lost his fentanyl infusion in a residential accident and asking for a refill to continue home therapy. The treating physicians had concerns of diversion of the infusion medication by caregivers and were reluctant to continue the therapeutic relationship with the patient. This case exemplifies the tension that can exist between wanting to continue with palliative care management of an end-stage patient and the fear of providers when confronted by evidence of potential diversion of opioid analgesic medications. We elucidate how an ethical framework based on a combination of virtue and narrative/relationship theories with reference to proportionality can guide physicians to a pragmatic resolution of these difficult situations.

  14. Pressure pain sensitivity as a marker for stress and pressure pain sensitivity-guided stress management in women with primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Christen K; Ballegaard, Søren; Karpatschof, Benny; Schousen, Peer

    2014-08-01

    To validate (1) Pressure Pain Sensitivity (PPS) as a marker for stress and (2) a PPS-guided intervention in women with primary Breast Cancer (BC). (1) A total of 58 women with BC were examined before and after 6 months of intervention. A control group of 165 women office employees was divided in a High Stress Group (HSG, n = 37) and a Low Stress Group (LSG, n = 128) to evaluate the association between PPS, questionnaire-related Quality of Life (QOL) and self-evaluated stress. (2) A PPS-guided stress management program (n = 40) was compared to a Psychosocial Group Intervention (PGI, n = 91) and no treatment (n = 86) with respect to a European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) questionnaire measured QOL. (1) Resting PPS and changes in PPS during the intervention period correlated significantly to EORTC and Short Form 36 (SF 36) main scores: (all p stress scores (all p stress. (2) The PPS-guided intervention group improved EORTC main score, pain and nausea, when compared to the control groups (all p stress. PPS-guided intervention improved QOL in women with breast cancer.

  15. AAPT Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic Cancer Pain Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Paice, Judith A.; Mulvey, Matt; Bennett, Michael; Dougherty, Patrick M.; Farrar, John T.; Mantyh, Patrick W.; Miaskowski, Christine; Schmidt, Brian; Smith, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cancer pain is a serious complication of malignancy or its treatment. Currently, no comprehensive, universally accepted cancer pain classification system exists. Clarity in classification of common cancer pain syndromes would improve clinical assessment and management. Moreover, an evidence-based taxonomy would enhance cancer pain research efforts by providing consistent diagnostic criteria, ensuring comparability across clinical trials. As part of a collaborative effort between the A...

  16. Principles of Burn Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Dominika Lipowska; Jowza, Maryam

    2017-10-01

    This article describes pathophysiology of burn injury-related pain and the basic principles of burn pain management. The focus is on concepts of perioperative and periprocedural pain management with extensive discussion of opioid-based analgesia, including patient-controlled analgesia, challenges of effective opioid therapy in opioid-tolerant patients, and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. The principles of multimodal pain management are discussed, including the importance of psychological counseling, perioperative interventional pain procedures, and alternative pain management options. A brief synopsis of the principles of outpatient pain management is provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Vitamin D in Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helde-Frankling, Maria; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda

    2017-10-18

    Vitamin D is a hormone synthesized in the skin in the presence of sunlight. Like other hormones, vitamin D plays a role in a wide range of processes in the body. Here we review the possible role of vitamin D in nociceptive and inflammatory pain. In observational studies, low vitamin D levels have been associated with increased pain and higher opioid doses. Recent interventional studies have shown promising effects of vitamin D supplementation on cancer pain and muscular pain-but only in patients with insufficient levels of vitamin D when starting intervention. Possible mechanisms for vitamin D in pain management are the anti-inflammatory effects mediated by reduced cytokine and prostaglandin release and effects on T-cell responses. The recent finding of vitamin D-mediated inhibition of Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is especially interesting and exhibits a credible mechanistic explanation. Having reviewed current literature, we suggest that patients with deficient levels defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) levels 50 nmol/L probably have little benefit from supplementation. Our conclusion is that vitamin D may constitute a safe, simple and potentially beneficial way to reduce pain among patients with vitamin D deficiency, but that more randomized and placebo-controlled studies are needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.

  18. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of multimodal and multi-agent approach to acute pain management for better patient care. Data Source:The material ..... in the management of pain and stiffness arising ..... include immediate, direct psychologic feedback to the motivated ...

  19. A primary care, multi-disciplinary disease management program for opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain and a high burden of psychiatric comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malone Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic non-cancer pain is a common problem that is often accompanied by psychiatric comorbidity and disability. The effectiveness of a multi-disciplinary pain management program was tested in a 3 month before and after trial. Methods Providers in an academic general medicine clinic referred patients with chronic non-cancer pain for participation in a program that combined the skills of internists, clinical pharmacists, and a psychiatrist. Patients were either receiving opioids or being considered for opioid therapy. The intervention consisted of structured clinical assessments, monthly follow-up, pain contracts, medication titration, and psychiatric consultation. Pain, mood, and function were assessed at baseline and 3 months using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale scale (CESD and the Pain Disability Index (PDI. Patients were monitored for substance misuse. Results Eighty-five patients were enrolled. Mean age was 51 years, 60% were male, 78% were Caucasian, and 93% were receiving opioids. Baseline average pain was 6.5 on an 11 point scale. The average CESD score was 24.0, and the mean PDI score was 47.0. Sixty-three patients (73% completed 3 month follow-up. Fifteen withdrew from the program after identification of substance misuse. Among those completing 3 month follow-up, the average pain score improved to 5.5 (p = 0.003. The mean PDI score improved to 39.3 (p Conclusions A primary care disease management program improved pain, depression, and disability scores over three months in a cohort of opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Substance misuse and depression were common, and many patients who had substance misuse identified left the program when they were no longer prescribed opioids. Effective care of patients with chronic pain should include rigorous assessment and treatment of these comorbid disorders and intensive efforts to insure follow up.

  20. Development and pilot test of a new set of good practice indicators for chronic cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, P J; Martinez-Nicolas, I; Robles-Garcia, I S; López-Soriano, F; Angel-García, D

    2015-01-01

    Pain is among the most important symptoms in terms of prevalence and cause of distress for cancer patients and their families. However, there is a lack of clearly defined measures of quality pain management to identify problems and monitor changes in improvement initiatives. We built a comprehensive set of evidence-based indicators following a four-step model: (1) review and systematization of existing guidelines to list evidence-based recommendations; (2) review and systematization of existing indicators matching the recommendations; (3) development of new indicators to complete a set of measures for the identified recommendations; and (4) pilot test (in hospital and primary care settings) for feasibility, reliability (kappa), and usefulness for the identification of quality problems using the lot quality acceptance sampling (LQAS) method and estimates of compliance. Twenty-two indicators were eventually pilot tested. Seventeen were feasible in hospitals and 12 in all settings. Feasibility barriers included difficulties in identifying target patients, deficient clinical records and low prevalence of cases for some indicators. Reliability was mostly very good or excellent (k > 0.8). Four indicators, all of them related to medication and prevention of side effects, had acceptable compliance at 75%/40% LQAS level. Other important medication-related indicators (i.e., adjustment to pain intensity, prescription for breakthrough pain) and indicators concerning patient-centred care (i.e., attention to psychological distress and educational needs) had very low compliance, highlighting specific quality gaps. A set of good practice indicators has been built and pilot tested as a feasible, reliable and useful quality monitoring tool, and underscoring particular and important areas for improvement. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  1. AAPT Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic Cancer Pain Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paice, Judith A; Mulvey, Matt; Bennett, Michael; Dougherty, Patrick M; Farrar, John T; Mantyh, Patrick W; Miaskowski, Christine; Schmidt, Brian; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-03-01

    Chronic cancer pain is a serious complication of malignancy or its treatment. Currently, no comprehensive, universally accepted cancer pain classification system exists. Clarity in classification of common cancer pain syndromes would improve clinical assessment and management. Moreover, an evidence-based taxonomy would enhance cancer pain research efforts by providing consistent diagnostic criteria, ensuring comparability across clinical trials. As part of a collaborative effort between the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTTION) and the American Pain Society (APS), the ACTTION-APS Pain Taxonomy initiative worked to develop the characteristics of an optimal diagnostic system. After the establishment of these characteristics, a working group consisting of clinicians and clinical and basic scientists with expertise in cancer and cancer-related pain was convened to generate core diagnostic criteria for an illustrative sample of 3 chronic pain syndromes associated with cancer (ie, bone pain and pancreatic cancer pain as models of pain related to a tumor) or its treatment (ie, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy). A systematic review and synthesis was conducted to provide evidence for the dimensions that comprise this cancer pain taxonomy. Future efforts will subject these diagnostic categories and criteria to systematic empirical evaluation of their feasibility, reliability, and validity and extension to other cancer-related pain syndromes. The ACTTION-APS chronic cancer pain taxonomy provides an evidence-based classification for 3 prevalent syndromes, namely malignant bone pain, pancreatic cancer pain, and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. This taxonomy provides consistent diagnostic criteria, common features, comorbidities, consequences, and putative mechanisms for these potentially serious cancer pain conditions that can be extended and applied with other cancer

  2. Co-creative development of an eHealth nursing intervention: Self-management support for outpatients with cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstenbach, Laura M J; Courtens, Annemie M; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Vermeulen, Joan; van Kleef, Maarten; de Witte, Luc P

    2017-08-01

    Co-creative methods, having an iterative character and including different perspectives, allow for the development of complex nursing interventions. Information about the development process is essential in providing justification for the ultimate intervention and crucial in interpreting the outcomes of subsequent evaluations. This paper describes a co-creative method directed towards the development of an eHealth intervention delivered by registered nurses to support self-management in outpatients with cancer pain. Intervention development was divided into three consecutive phases (exploration of context, specification of content, organisation of care). In each phase, researchers and technicians addressed five iterative steps: research, ideas, prototyping, evaluation, and documentation. Health professionals and patients were consulted during research and evaluation steps. Collaboration of researchers, health professionals, patients and technicians was positive and valuable in optimising outcomes. The intervention includes a mobile application for patients and a web application for nurses. Patients are requested to monitor pain, adverse effects and medication intake, while being provided with graphical feedback, education and contact possibilities. Nurses monitor data, advise patients, and collaborate with the treating physician. Integration of patient self-management and professional care by means of eHealth key into well-known barriers and seem promising in improving cancer pain follow-up. Nurses are able to make substantial contributions because of their expertise, focus on daily living, and their bridging function between patients and health professionals in different care settings. Insights from the intervention development as well as the intervention content give thought for applications in different patients and care settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ethnic Differences in Cancer Pain Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-ok

    2008-01-01

    Background Inconsistent findings on ethnic differences in cancer pain experience suggest the need for further studies on this topic for adequate cancer pain management. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine ethnic differences in cancer pain experience of 4 ethnic groups in the U.S. Methods A feminist perspective provided the theoretical basis. This was a survey of a multiethnic sample of 480 cancer patients asking questions on sociodemographic characteristics and health/illness status, 3 unidimensional cancer pain scales, 2 multidimensional cancer pain scales, the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Scale. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics including ANOVA and hierarchical multiple regression analyses. Results The results indicated certain ethnic differences in types of pain and symptoms that patients experienced. Also, the results demonstrated significant ethnic differences in cancer pain and functional status. The VDS, VAS, FS, MPQ, and BPI scores of Non-Hispanic (N-H) Asian participants were significantly lower than those of Hispanic and N-H White participants (p<.01). The VAS and MPQ scores of N-H African American participants were significantly lower than those of Hispanic and N-H White participants (p<.01). The FACT-G scores of N-H Asian participants were significantly lower than Hispanic participants (p<.01). The findings also indicated that being N-H Asian or not was a significant predictor of the VDS, FS, and BPI scores. Discussion The findings suggest further in-depth qualitative exploration on cultural values and beliefs related to cancer pain in each ethnic group and national-scope studies with a larger number of ethnic minorities on this topic. PMID:17846550

  4. Implementing practice change in chronic cancer pain management: clinician response to a phase III study of ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, J R; Spruyt, O; Quinn, S J; Devilee, L R; Currow, D C

    2014-06-01

    An adequately powered, double-blind, multisite, randomised controlled trial has shown no net clinical benefit for subcutaneous ketamine over placebo in the management of cancer pain refractory to combination opioid and co-analgesic therapy. The results of the trial were disseminated widely both nationally and internationally. To determine whether the trial had impacted on clinical practice in Australasia. Members of the Australia and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine were sent an online ketamine utilisation survey. A total of 123/392 clinicians responded (31% response rate). The majority of respondents had practised for more than 10 years in a metropolitan hospital setting. Ketamine had been prescribed by 91% of respondents, and 92% were aware of the trial. As a result, 65% of respondents had changed practice (17% no longer prescribed ketamine, 46% used less and 2% more). Thirty-five per cent had not changed practice. Reasons for change included belief in the results of the study, concerns over the toxicity reported or because there were alternatives for pain control. Of those who prescribed less, over 80% were more selective and would now only use the drug in certain clinical situations or pain types, or when all other medications had failed. Although two-thirds of respondents reported practice change as a result of the randomised controlled trial, a minority remained convinced of the benefit of the drug from their own observations and would require additional evidence. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. Toward freedom from cancer pain in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kuniko; Yasuhara, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    Life expectancy in Japan is highest in the world. Cancer is the leading cause of mortality in Japan, accounting for about 30 percent of all deaths. Many Japanese cancer patients experience severe pain although they and their families hope to be pain free at the end of their lives. Toward that end, the consumption of morphine in Japan has increased markedly since 1989. The amount of morphine hydrochloride and morphine sulfate consumed in 2001 was 6.1 times that used in Japan in 1989. However, the amount of morphine consumed in Japan is still less than in other developed nations, and was only one-sixth of the amount used in Australia in 2001. As a result, many Japanese cancer patients experience potentially manageable cancer pain, largely because the amount of the drug used by doctors is insufficient for pain control. An increasing number of Japanese doctors now understand that their patients' quality of life is most important in end-of-life care and how to use the three step analgesic ladder of the World Health Organization (WHO). However, other doctors do not understand these issues sufficiently causing some patients to die without good pain control. Both the general population and some medical professionals misunderstand and have prejudice against the use of morphine. Patients often do not participate in decision making about medical treatment because of remaining paternalism in the relationship between Japanese doctors and patients. Thus, cancer pain management in Japan is not as effective as it can be and not all Japanese cancer patients receive appropriate management for their cancer pain. To improve outcomes for Japanese patients, it is necessary for health professional and social work students and practicing professionals to receive contemporary education including an introduction to palliative care and ethics.

  6. A theory-based educational intervention targeting nurses' attitudes and knowledge concerning cancer-related pain management: A study protocol of a quasi-experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafsson Markus

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is one of the most frequent problems among patients diagnosed with cancer. Despite the availability of effective pharmacological treatments, this group of patients often receives less than optimal treatment. Research into nurses' pain management highlights certain factors, such as lack of knowledge and attitudes and inadequate procedures for systematic pain assessment, as common barriers to effective pain management. However, educational interventions targeting nurses' pain management have shown promise. As cancer-related pain is also known to have a negative effect on vital aspects of the patient's life, as well as being commonly associated with problems such as sleep, fatigue, depression and anxiety, further development of knowledge within this area is warranted. Methods/design A quasi-experimental study design will be used to investigate whether the implementation of guidelines for systematic daily pain assessments following a theory-based educational intervention will result in an improvement in knowledge and attitude among nurses. A further aim is to investigate whether the intervention that targets nurses' behaviour will improve hospital patients' perception of pain. Data regarding nurses' knowledge and attitudes to pain (primary outcome, patient perception regarding pain (secondary outcome, together with socio-demographic variables, will be collected at baseline and at four weeks and 12 weeks following the intervention. Discussion Nursing care is nowadays acknowledged as an increasingly complicated activity and "nursing complexity is such that it can be seen as the quintessential complex intervention." To be able to change and improve clinical practice thus requires multiple points of attack appropriate to meet complex challenges. Consequently, we expect the theory-based intervention used in our quasi-experimental study to improve care as well as quality of life for this group of patients and we also envisage that

  7. A theory-based educational intervention targeting nurses' attitudes and knowledge concerning cancer-related pain management: a study protocol of a quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borglin, Gunilla; Gustafsson, Markus; Krona, Hans

    2011-09-23

    Pain is one of the most frequent problems among patients diagnosed with cancer. Despite the availability of effective pharmacological treatments, this group of patients often receives less than optimal treatment. Research into nurses' pain management highlights certain factors, such as lack of knowledge and attitudes and inadequate procedures for systematic pain assessment, as common barriers to effective pain management. However, educational interventions targeting nurses' pain management have shown promise. As cancer-related pain is also known to have a negative effect on vital aspects of the patient's life, as well as being commonly associated with problems such as sleep, fatigue, depression and anxiety, further development of knowledge within this area is warranted. A quasi-experimental study design will be used to investigate whether the implementation of guidelines for systematic daily pain assessments following a theory-based educational intervention will result in an improvement in knowledge and attitude among nurses. A further aim is to investigate whether the intervention that targets nurses' behaviour will improve hospital patients' perception of pain. Data regarding nurses' knowledge and attitudes to pain (primary outcome), patient perception regarding pain (secondary outcome), together with socio-demographic variables, will be collected at baseline and at four weeks and 12 weeks following the intervention. Nursing care is nowadays acknowledged as an increasingly complicated activity and "nursing complexity is such that it can be seen as the quintessential complex intervention." To be able to change and improve clinical practice thus requires multiple points of attack appropriate to meet complex challenges. Consequently, we expect the theory-based intervention used in our quasi-experimental study to improve care as well as quality of life for this group of patients and we also envisage that evidence-based guidelines targeting this patient group's pain

  8. Managing cancer pain and symptoms of outpatients by rotation to sustained-release hydromorphone: a prospective clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirz, Stefan; Wartenberg, Hans Christian; Elsen, Christian; Wittmann, Maria; Diederichs, Marta; Nadstawek, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: In this prospective clinical trial we examined the technique of opioid rotation to oral sustained-release hydromorphone for controlling pain and symptoms in outpatients with cancer pain. METHODS: Before and after rotation, 50 patients were assessed by Numerical Analog Scales [Numerical

  9. Intranasal ketamine for the management of incidental pain during wound dressing in cancer patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Page

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cancer wounds need regular dressing; else they develop infection, foul odor, and in extreme cases, maggots. Patients resist dressing due to the severe incidental pain during dressing. Intranasal ketamine was tried as an analgesic to reduce this incidental pain. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients with wounds requiring regular dressing were selected; these patients had a basal pain score of 4/10 and incidental pain score of 7/10 during four consecutive dressings. Ketamine 0.5 mg/kg was administered transmucosally 10 min before dressing, and pain scores, hemodynamic parameters, and sedation were recorded for up to 2 h in six consecutive dressings. Results: Ketamine produced a significant reduction in incidental pain without any hemodynamic changes or sedation. Conclusion: Ketamine appears to be a safe and effective analgesic when used intranasally for incidental pain.

  10. Striving to be prepared for the painful: Management strategies following a family member's diagnosis of advanced cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedberg Berith

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer has consequences not only for the sick person but also for those who have a close relationship with that person. Greater knowledge about how family members manage the situation in the period immediately following the diagnosis means greater opportunity to provide the best possible support for the family. The purpose of this study was to explore management strategies that family members use when the patient is in the early stage of treatment for advanced cancer. Methods Twenty family members of cancer patients were included in the study shortly after the diagnosis. The patients had been diagnosed 8-14 weeks earlier with advanced lung cancer or gastrointestinal cancer. The data were collected in interviews with family members and subjected to qualitative latent content analysis. Through the identification of similarities and dissimilarities in the units of meaning, abstraction into codes and sub-themes became possible. The sub-themes were then brought together in one overarching theme. Results The overall function of management strategies is expressed in the theme Striving to be prepared for the painful. The family members prepare themselves mentally for the anticipated tragedy. Family relationships become increasingly important, and family members want to spend all their time together. They try to banish thoughts of the impending death and want to live as normal a life as possible. It becomes important to family members to live in the present and save their energy for the time when they will need it the most. How participants handle their worries, anxiety and sadness can be categorized into seven sub-themes or management strategies: Making things easier in everyday life, Banishing thoughts about the approaching loss, Living in the present, Adjusting to the sick person's situation, Distracting oneself by being with others, Shielding the family from grief, and Attempting to maintain hope. Conclusions The findings revealed

  11. Paediatric pain management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients is musculoskeletal pain, headache or abdominal pain.2. The pain ... Children older than four years of age can usually talk about their pain; at the age of six to eight years they can use the ... Pain presentation in children normally falls into one of the ... expression, body posture and movement.10 This scale is often.

  12. Managing painful chronic wounds: the Wound Pain Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Patricia; Fogh, Karsten; Glynn, Chris

    2007-01-01

    of the pain experience: location, duration, intensity, quality, onset and impact on activities of daily living. Holistic management must be based on a safe and effective mix of psychosocial approaches together with local and systemic pain management. It is no longer acceptable to ignore or inadequately...... to the wound should be handled as one of the main priorities in chronic wound management together with addressing the cause. Management of pain in chronic wounds depends on proper assessment, reporting and documenting patient experiences of pain. Assessment should be based on six critical dimensions...... document persistent wound pain and not to develop a treatment and monitoring strategy to improve the lives of persons with chronic wounds. Unless wound pain is optimally managed, patient suffering and costs to health care systems will increase. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Apr...

  13. Psychological and behavioural predictors of pain management outcomes in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2010-01-01

    Perceived Involvement in Care Scale measuring the quality of patient-physician pain communication, and the Danish version of Medication Adherence Report Scale (DMARS-4). Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 16.00. The results of the multivariable linear regression analyses showed that pain intensity...

  14. Advanced dementia pain management protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoro-Lorite, Mercedes; Canalias-Reverter, Montserrat

    Pain management in advanced dementia is complex because of neurological deficits present in these patients, and nurses are directly responsible for providing interventions for the evaluation, management and relief of pain for people suffering from this health problem. In order to facilitate and help decision-makers, pain experts recommend the use of standardized protocols to guide pain management, but in Spain, comprehensive pain management protocols have not yet been developed for advanced dementia. This article reflects the need for an integrated management of pain in advanced dementia. From the review and analysis of the most current and relevant studies in the literature, we performed an approximation of the scales for the determination of pain in these patients, with the observational scale PAINAD being the most recommended for the hospital setting. In addition, we provide an overview for comprehensive management of pain in advanced dementia through the conceptual framework «a hierarchy of pain assessment techniques by McCaffery and Pasero» for the development and implementation of standardized protocols, including a four-phase cyclical process (evaluation, planning/performance, revaluation and recording), which can facilitate the correct management of pain in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Paediatric pain management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    REVIEW. Introduction. Pain is defined by the International Association for the Study of. Pain (IASP) as ... lasts for a short time, whilst chronic pain normally persists for a much longer ..... on a regular time schedule, i.e. 'by the clock', whereby the medicine is .... combination with a non-opioid (from the first step) for severe pain.

  16. Nabilone for the Management of Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Corey C; Giudice, Mirella G

    2016-03-01

    Nabilone, a synthetic cannabinoid, is approved in many countries including, but not limited to, Canada, the United States, Mexico, and the United Kingdom for the treatment of severe nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy. Clinical evidence is emerging for its use in managing pain conditions with different etiologies. We review the efficacy and safety of nabilone for various types of pain as well as its abuse potential, precautions and contraindications, and drug interactions; summarize pertinent clinical practice guidelines; and provide recommendations for dosing, monitoring, and patient education. Citations involving nabilone were identified through systematic reviews evaluating cannabinoids for pain. A systematic search (updated July 23, 2015) of the Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and Cochrane Library databases was performed. Eight randomized controlled trials, two prospective cohort trials, and one retrospective chart review were retrieved. Cancer pain, chronic noncancer pain, neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia, and pain associated with spasticity were the pain conditions evaluated. Nabilone was most commonly used as adjunctive therapy and led to small but significant reductions in pain. The most common adverse drug reactions included euphoria, drowsiness, and dizziness. Nabilone was rarely associated with severe adverse drug reactions requiring drug discontinuation, and the likelihood of abuse was thought to be low. Although the optimal role of nabilone in the management of pain is yet to be determined, certain clinical practice guidelines consider nabilone as a third-line agent. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  17. Neuropathological findings after continuous intrathecal administration of S(+)-ketamine for the management of neuropathic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Troost, D.; Wegener, J. T.; Kruis, M. R.; van der Vegt, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    Questions have been raised about the potential neurotoxicity of the neuraxial use of ketamine although ketamine and its active enantiomer S(+)-ketamine have been used intrathecally and epidurally (caudally) for the management of perioperative pain and in a variety of chronic pain syndromes. Clinical

  18. Under-treatment of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Alysa

    2010-03-01

    Cancer pain remains inadequately treated, despite internationally accepted management guidelines and a myriad of treatment options. Risk factors for undertreatment are reviewed, along with possible explanations. Recent studies documenting the scope of the problem as well as investigating solutions are discussed with clinical-practice recommendations outlined. Women over 65 years of age representative of a cultural minority, with earlier stage disease, cared for at home, and with high-school education or less are at highest risk of having uncontrolled cancer pain. Optimal treatment is impeded by patients' maladaptive beliefs, nonadherence, underreporting or miscommunication with caregivers; from a healthcare provider perspective, it may be due to inadequate assessment, documentation, knowledge, and communication. Emerging data support the vital influence of lay caregivers on appropriate pain management. Although home-education programs may decrease pain and improve quality of life, there are also less intensive approaches deliverable by individuals to holistically address pain. Prospective study of barriers to both delivery and receipt of adequate pain management is needed, as the majority of published literature is based on survey studies. Treatment must be individualized based on clinical circumstances and patient wishes, with the goal of maximizing function and quality of life.

  19. Clinical hypnosis versus cognitive behavioral training for pain management with pediatric cancer patients undergoing bone marrow aspirations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liossi, C; Hatira, P

    1999-04-01

    A randomized controlled trial was conducted to compare the efficacy of clinical hypnosis versus cognitive behavioral (CB) coping skills training in alleviating the pain and distress of 30 pediatric cancer patients (age 5 to 15 years) undergoing bone marrow aspirations. Patients were randomized to one of three groups: hypnosis, a package of CB coping skills, and no intervention. Patients who received either hypnosis or CB reported less pain and pain-related anxiety than did control patients and less pain and anxiety than at their own baseline. Hypnosis and CB were similarly effective in the relief of pain. Results also indicated that children reported more anxiety and exhibited more behavioral distress in the CB group than in the hypnosis group. It is concluded that hypnosis and CB coping skills are effective in preparing pediatric oncology patients for bone marrow aspiration.

  20. National Institutes of Health State-of-the-Science Conference Statement: Symptom management in cancer: pain, depression, and fatigue, July 15-17, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Daniel L; Ferketich, Sandra L; Frame, Paul S; Harris, Jesse J; Hendricks, Carolyn B; Levin, Bernard; Link, Michael P; Lustig, Craig; McLaughlin, Joseph; Reid, L Douglas; Turrisi, Andrew T; Unützer, Jürgen; Vernon, Sally W

    2004-01-01

    Despite advances in early detection and effective treatment, cancer remains one of the most feared diseases. Among the most common side effects of cancer and treatments for cancer are pain, depression, and fatigue. Although research is producing increasingly hopeful insights into the causes and cures for cancer, efforts to manage the side effects of the disease and its treatments have not kept pace. The challenge that faces us is how to increase awareness of the importance of recognizing and actively addressing cancer-related distress. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a State-of-the-Science Conference on Symptom Management in Cancer: Pain, Depression, and Fatigue to examine the current state of knowledge regarding the management of pain, depression, and fatigue in individuals with cancer and to identify directions for future research. Specifically, the conference examined how to identify individuals who are at risk for cancer-related pain, depression, and/or fatigue; what treatments work best to address these symptoms when they occur; and what is the best way to deliver interventions across the continuum of care. STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE PROCESS: A non-advocate, non-Federal, 14-member panel of experts representing the fields of oncology, radiology, psychology, nursing, public health, social work, and epidemiology prepared the statement. In addition, 24 experts in medical oncology, geriatrics, pharmacology, psychology, and neurology presented data to the panel and to the conference audience during the first 1.5 days of the conference. The panel then prepared its statement, addressing the five predetermined questions and drawing on submitted literature, the speakers' presentations, and discussions held at the conference. The statement was presented to the conference audience, followed by a press conference to allow the panel to respond to questions from the media. After its release at the conference, the draft statement was made available on the Internet

  1. Bone pain induced by metastatic cancer: pathophysiology and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas-Herrera, Isaias; Huertas-Gabert, Luis Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Cancer patients who develop bone metastases are an estimated 60 to 84% . Of these 79% experienced pain syndromes are difficult to manage, of which 50% die without adequate pain relief and with a poor quality of life. Therefore, it is necessary to have accessible and effective medications for the management of this condition. The pathophysiology of pain in bone is reviewed and the drugs used most frequently in the management of this type of cancer pain are described. Furthermore an algorithm of 6 steps is presented and can guide the physician when making a therapeutic decision. (author) [es

  2. Continuous brachial plexus block at the cervical level using a posterior approach in the management of neuropathic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; van der Vegt, M. H.; Zuurmond, W. W.; Pijl, A. J.; Dzoljic, M.

    2001-01-01

    Neuropathic cancer pain due to tumor growth near the brachial plexus is often treated with a combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and oral or transdermal opioids. We propose placement of a catheter along the brachial plexus using a

  3. Genital pain: algorithm for management

    OpenAIRE

    Calixte, Nahomy; Brahmbhatt, Jamin; Parekattil, Sijo

    2017-01-01

    Chronic testicular pain although becoming very common in our patient population poses a challenge to the physician, the patient and his family. The pathogenesis of chronic orchialgia (CO) is not well understood. The objective of this paper is to review the current literature on chronic testicular pain and its management and to propose an algorithm for its treatment. Abstracts, original papers and review articles were reviewed during a literature search using words such as testicular pain, CO,...

  4. Using Qualitative Research to Overcome the Shortcomings of Systematic Reviews When Designing of a Self-Management Intervention for Advanced Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Flemming

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the key components for a self-management intervention for advanced cancer pain using evidence drawn from systematic reviews of complex interventions and syntheses of qualitative research. Methods: Evidence from up-to-date systematic reviews was prioritized. Searches were initially undertaken to identify the systematic reviews of effectiveness in Cinahl, Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane Database of systematic reviews from 2009 to June 2014, using validated search terms. Subsequent searches to identify the qualitative systematic reviews were undertaken in Cinahl, Medline, Embase, and PsycInfo from 2009 to January 2015. The results of the two sets of reviews were integrated using methods based on constant comparative techniques. Results: Four systematic reviews examining interventions for the self-management of advanced cancer pain were identified. Although each review recommended some attributes of a pain management intervention, it was not possible to determine the essential key components. Subsequent searches for qualitative evidence syntheses identified three reviews. These were integrated with the effectiveness reviews. The integration identified key components for a self-management intervention including individualized approaches to care, the importance of addressing patients’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes toward pain management, and the significance of team approaches and inter-disciplinary working in the management of pain. Conclusion: Implementing the findings from systematic reviews of complex interventions is often hindered by a lack of understanding of important contextual components of care, often provided by qualitative research. Using both types of data to provide answers for practice demonstrates the benefits of incorporating qualitative research in reviews of complex interventions by ensuring the strengths of qualitative and quantitative research are combined and that their respective

  5. Pain management : Internationally a nursing responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Petrini, Marcia, A

    1999-01-01

    Pain management by nurses internationally has increased with the awareness of the importance of relief from pain in the healing process. Studies of the physiological mechanisms of pain and the impact on healing havepromoted the recognition for pain relief

  6. Evaluation of surgical resident staff knowledge of cancer pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Inadequate knowledge and expertise are major contributing factors to poor pain management in the cancer patient. This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of formal teaching on pain management on the current practice of the resident surgeons at the University College Hospital (UCH). Ibadan. Method: ...

  7. Pain experiences of patients with advanced cancer: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Ozgul; Unsar, Serap; Yacan, Lale; Pelin, Meryem; Kurt, Seda; Erdogan, Bülent

    2018-04-01

    Uncontrolled pain, especially in patients with advanced cancer, affects quality of life negatively and causes negative physical and psychological conditions. The aim of this study was to explore the pain experiences of patients with advanced cancer and how they manage with pain, and to present a view of pain management approaches of nurses from the perspectives of the patients. This was a qualitative descriptive study of sixteen hospitalized patients with advanced cancer. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with patients. Data were analysed by Colaizzi's phenomenological method. This study found that patients with advanced cancer who had pain experienced anxiety, helplessness, hopelessness and many restrictions in daily life as well as inability to manage with pain. Most of the patients with advanced cancer were not satisfied with their nursing care with regard to pain management. The themes that emerged were pain perception and experiences, effects of pain on daily life, pain management and management strategies and the patients' perspectives about nursing approaches to pain. This study demonstrated the difficulties of patients with advanced cancer who experienced pain in their daily lives, yet lack pain management strategies. Furthermore, nurses' caring approaches to patients with advanced cancer who experienced pain was found inadequate. Oncology nurses should provide educational interventions in order to enhance knowledge and skills about pain assessment and non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies used in pain management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Identifying MRI markers to evaluate early treatment-related changes post-laser ablation for cancer pain management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pallavi; Danish, Shabbar; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) has recently emerged as a new treatment modality for cancer pain management that targets the cingulum (pain center in the brain), and has shown promise over radio-frequency (RF) based ablation which is reported to provide temporary relief. One of the major advantages enjoyed by LITT is its compatibility with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), allowing for high resolution in vivo imaging to be used in LITT procedures. Since laser ablation for pain management is currently exploratory and is only performed at a few centers worldwide, its short-, and long-term effects on the cingulum are currently unknown. Traditionally treatment effects are evaluated by monitoring changes in volume of the ablation zone post-treatment. However, this is sub-optimal since it involves evaluating a single global parameter (volume) to detect changes pre-, and post-MRI. Additionally, the qualitative observations of LITT-related changes on multi-parametric MRI (MPMRI) do not specifically address differentiation between the appearance of treatment related changes (edema, necrosis) from recurrence of the disease (pain recurrence). In this work, we explore the utility of computer extracted texture descriptors on MP-MRI to capture early treatment related changes on a per-voxel basis by extracting quantitative relationships that may allow for an in-depth understanding of tissue response to LITT on MRI, subtle changes that may not be appreciable on original MR intensities. The second objective of this work is to investigate the efficacy of different MRI protocols in accurately capturing treatment related changes within and outside the ablation zone post-LITT. A retrospective cohort of studies comprising pre- and 24-hour post-LITT 3 Tesla T1-weighted (T1w), T2w, T2-GRE, and T2-FLAIR acquisitions was considered. Our scheme involved (1) inter-protocol as well as inter-acquisition affine registration of pre- and post-LITT MRI, (2) quantitation of MRI parameters

  9. Optimising pain management- An update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    or managing the side-effects of pain medication. This will only be possible .... structure of tapentadol is unlike other opioids such as morphine, but resembles .... together with psychological and rehabilitative modalities.36 This multidimensional ...

  10. Exposure to Fentanyl After Transdermal Patch Administration for Cancer Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Sudeep R; Haywood, Alison; Hardy, Janet; Norris, Ross; Hennig, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to describe exposure after fentanyl transdermal patch administration in patients with advanced cancer to quantify variability around the exposure. Patients (n  =  56) with advanced cancer who received transdermal fentanyl (Durogesic®; median dose, 50 μg/h; range, 12-200 μg/h) provided venous blood samples (n  =  163) at various times (0.5-72 hours) during several patch application intervals. Plasma fentanyl concentration was determined (median, 0.9 μg/L; range, 0.04-9.7 μg/L) by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling with NONMEM. A 1-compartment distribution model with first-order absorption and elimination described fentanyl exposure after transdermal patch administration. Fentanyl apparent clearance (between-subject variability [BSV], %) was estimated at 122 L/h/70 kg and 38.5%, respectively. The absorption rate constant was 0.013 h(-1) . Between-occasion variability on apparent clearance was 22.0%, which was lower than BSV, suggesting predictable exposure within the same patient and justifying therapeutic drug monitoring. Except for weight-based dosing, no other patient characteristic could be identified to guide initial fentanyl dose selection in patients with advanced cancer. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  11. Optimal management of orthodontic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolski, Francielle; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria; Schimim, Sasha Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician's range of options in the search for better patient care.

  12. Treatment of the pain caused by cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masao

    1979-01-01

    Relief of pain caused by cancerous invasion is one of the most important role of radiotherapy. Telecobalt has improved the palliative effects for cancer pain, because of its sufficient depth dose. Supervoltage x-ray generated from Linac has expanded indications of treatment for cancer pain by the shortening of treatment time due to high dose rate. Intraoperative electron beam therapy is useful in the case of carcinoma of the pancreas suffering severe pain. Fast neutron therapy is clearly more effective than supervoltage x-ray for pain caused by the invasion of radioresistant cancer. Pelvic angiography is useful for diagnosis of pain focus caused by illiac lymph node metastasis. (author)

  13. Hepatitis C: Managing Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pain: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For Veterans and the Public Veterans and the Public Home Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatitis C Home Getting ...

  14. Managing your chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health. It is not always easy to reduce stress, but it's easier if you are able to ask your friends ... worse. Then try to make changes in your home and work to decrease the causes of your pain. For ...

  15. Orofacial pain management: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Reyes M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marcela Romero-Reyes, James M Uyanik Orofacial and Head Pain Service, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Radiology and Medicine, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Some of the most prevalent and debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures. Orofacial pain (OFP can arise from different regions and etiologies. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD are the most prevalent orofacial pain conditions for which patients seek treatment. Temporomandibular disorders include a number of clinical problems that involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ or both. Trigeminal neuropathic pain conditions can arise from injury secondary to dental procedures, infection, neoplasias, or disease or dysfunction of the peripheral and/or central nervous system. Neurovascular disorders, such as primary headaches, can present as chronic orofacial pain, such as in the case of facial migraine, where the pain is localized in the second and third division of the trigeminal nerve. Together, these disorders of the trigeminal system impact the quality of life of the sufferer dramatically. A multidisciplinary pain management approach should be considered for the optimal treatment of orofacial pain disorders including both non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities. Keywords: pain, orofacial, neuropathic, TMD, trigeminal, headache

  16. Neuropathic pain management in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hyde, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    There are difficulties in assessing, managing, and evaluating neuropathic pain in dying children, particularly those with neurological impairment. Neuropathic pain in children often presents differently to how it presents in the adult population. Comprehensive assessment as well as pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions are crucial to its successful management and frequently require input from an interdisciplinary team. Notwithstanding the need for further research, this paper brings together research papers, reviews, and clinical guidelines to present an exploration of existing evidence regarding care for children with neuropathic pain and their families.

  17. Evaluation of Evidence-based Nursing Pain Management Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-08-01

    It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. The aim of this study was to modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via the electronic medical system. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score ranging from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Management of chronic visceral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne E; Farmer, Adam D; Olesen, Søren S

    2016-01-01

    Despite marked differences in underlying pathophysiology, the current management of visceral pain largely follows the guidelines derived from the somatic pain literature. The effective management of patients with chronic visceral pain should be multifaceted, including both pharmacological...... and psychological interventions, thereby providing a mechanism-orientated approach to treatment. Patients can frequently become disenfranchised, and subsequently disengaged, with healthcare providers leading to repeated consultations. Thus, a key aspect of management is to break this cycle by validating patients......' symptoms, adopting an empathic approach and taking time to educate patients. To optimize treatment and outcomes in chronic visceral pain we need to move away from approaches exclusively based on dealing with peripheral nociceptive input toward more holistic strategies, taking into account alterations...

  19. Pain management in ER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Burattin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available For over 30 years, the International Association for the Study of Pain has defined pain as «an unpleasant sensorial and emotional experience associated to real or potential tissue damage». Today, evident shortcomings still exist in the use of adequate analgesia, especially in the emergency medicine context: pain is the most common symptom amongst the Emergency Department patients (reaching a prevalence of over 60%, however, statistics reported in literature show that only 45% of patients receive analgesic prescriptions on discharge. In recent years, the influence of changes connected to accreditation standards has generated new expectations of healthcare professionals; although this aspect connected to the evolution of public health provides a stimulus to the evolution of the practical aspect of everyday clinical work, we must not forget that doctors take the Hippocratic oath, the ethical obligation to treat suffering and pain, which is especially pertinent to doctors working in Emergency conditions. The quality of the service provided with regard to pain-relief in ED cannot exclude an analysis of the local situation, the definition of roles, the extrinsication of potential with the ultimate aim of providing a service as close as possible to user hopes. Organisational efforts must be directed at reaching excellent quality levels, in which the monitoring of the activities performed takes place through the registration and periodic re-evaluation of the deriving data. Through this observational, prospective study, we intend to evaluate the effective prevalence of the pain symptom in the Emergency Department and the impact of the use of different classes of analgesia, also estimating the latency between the onset of the symptom and triage in order to quantify the efficacy of the analgesia practiced.

  20. Acidosis and Formaldehyde Secretion as a Possible Pathway of Cancer Pain and Options for Improved Cancer Pain Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Ba X; Shaw, D Graeme; Han, Bo; Fang, Josephine Y; Nimni, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of cancer pain in patients with cancer is high. The majority of efforts are spent on research in cancer treatment, but only a small fraction focuses on cancer pain. Pain in cancer patients, viewed predominantly as a secondary issue, is considered to be due to the destruction of tissues, compression of the nerves, inflammation, and secretion of biological mediators from the necrotic tumor mass. As a result, opioid drugs have remained as the primary pharmacological therapy for cancer pain for the past hundred years. This report reviews evidence that cancer pain may be produced by the metabolic effects of two byproducts of cancer-high acidity in the cancer microenvironment and the secretion of formaldehyde and its metabolites. We propose the research and development of therapeutic approaches for preemptive, short- and long-term management of cancer pain using available drugs or nutraceutical agents that can suppress or neutralize lactic acid production in combination with formaldehyde scavengers. We believe this approach may not only improve cancer pain control but may also enhance the quality of life for patients.

  1. Pain management discussion forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Harald

    2013-08-01

    A 23-year-old hemophilia patient with severe pain from bleeding into his joints who developed problematic opioid use is described. The potential value of methadone in such a patient is described, as are the risks of drug interactions leading to toxicity and cardiac arrhythmias.

  2. Optimal management of orthodontic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topolski F

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Francielle Topolski,1 Alexandre Moro,1,2 Gisele Maria Correr,3 Sasha Cristina Schimim1 1Department of Orthodontics, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 2Department of Orthodontics, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 3Department of Restorative Dentistry, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil Abstract: Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician’s range of options in the search for better patient care. Keywords: tooth movement, pain control, drug therapy, laser therapy

  3. Management of cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis pain and xerostomia with extra- and intra oral laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libik, T. V.; Gileva, O. S.; Danilov, K. V.; Grigorev, S. S.; Pozdnyakova, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of combined (intra- and extraoral) low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and conventional pharmacological modalities in prevention and treatment of oral mucositis (OM) and associated pain and xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). A prospective comparative randomized study was conducted with 21 patients with head and neck cancer subjected to CRT. Eleven patients received extra- and intraoral LLLT daily from the 1st day until the end of CRT-course before each session during 5 consecutive days, and the other 10 patients received conventional preventive and treatment procedures based on the use of benzidamine 0.15% solution also throughout the duration of CRT, including weekends. OM was measured using an oral toxicity scale (OTS), oral pain was measured using the color-numeric visual analogue scale (VAS), unstimulated salivary flow rate measured by the spitting technique (ml/min), dry mouth symptoms were self-estimated by patients using The Xerostomia Inventory (XI). The LLLT group showed lower mean OTS and VAS scores, lower level of reduction of salivary flow rate during the course of CRT. In both groups, no interruption of CRT was needed. The prophylactic use of both treatments proposed in this study seems to reduce the incidence of severe OM lesions. However, the LLLT was more effective in delaying the appearance of severe OM, oral pain and xerostomia.

  4. Orofacial pain management: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Uyanik, James M

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most prevalent and debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures). Orofacial pain (OFP) can arise from different regions and etiologies. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most prevalent orofacial pain conditions for which patients seek treatment. Temporomandibular disorders include a number of clinical problems that involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or both. Trigeminal neuropathic pain conditions can arise from injury secondary to dental procedures, infection, neoplasias, or disease or dysfunction of the peripheral and/or central nervous system. Neurovascular disorders, such as primary headaches, can present as chronic orofacial pain, such as in the case of facial migraine, where the pain is localized in the second and third division of the trigeminal nerve. Together, these disorders of the trigeminal system impact the quality of life of the sufferer dramatically. A multidisciplinary pain management approach should be considered for the optimal treatment of orofacial pain disorders including both non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities.

  5. Interventional Management for Pelvic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Ameet S; Moody, Erika L

    2017-08-01

    Interventional procedures can be applied for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of the patient with pelvic pain, often once more conservative measures have failed to provide relief. This article reviews interventional management strategies for pelvic pain. We review superior and inferior hypogastric plexus blocks, ganglion impar blocks, transversus abdominis plane blocks, ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric and genitofemoral blocks, pudendal nerve blocks, and selective nerve root blocks. Additionally, we discuss trigger point injections, sacroiliac joint injections, and neuromodulation approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pain and the ethics of pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R B

    1984-01-01

    In this article I clarify the concepts of 'pain', 'suffering', 'pains of body', 'pains of soul'. I explore the relevance of an ethic to the clinical setting which gives patients a strong prima facie right to freedom from unnecessary and unwanted pain and which places upon medical professionals two concomitant moral obligations to patients. First, there is the duty not to inflict pain and suffering beyond what is necessary for effective diagnosis, treatment and research. Next, there is the duty to do all that can be done to relieve all the pain and suffering which can be alleviated. I develop in some detail that individuality of pain sensitivity must be taken into account in fulfilling these obligations. I explore the issue of the relevance of informed consent and the right to refuse treatment to the matter of pain relief. And I raise the question of what conditions, if any, should override the right to refuse treatment where pain relief is of paramount concern.

  7. Radiotherapy for pain management of bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende Junior, Ismar de; Mattos, Marcos Duarte de; Nakamura, Ricardo; Lemes Junior, Joaquim; Vanzelli, Talita Lozano, E-mail: rezende.med@terra.com.br [Radioterapia do Hospital de Cancer de Barretos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: This is the first Brazilian study intended to evaluate the response of pain relief with radiotherapy in three different fractionation and the clinical differences in managing pain in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods: Prospective study of patients with painful bone metastases referred to the Radiotherapy Sector of the Hospital de Cancer de Barretos for pain-relieving radiotherapy between March and December 2010. It is known that radiotherapy seems to alter the activation of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, relieving pain in cases of painful bone metastases. Patients were assessed in relation to the status of pain intensity before and after the initiation of radiotherapy. Either a single fraction of 8Gy, five fractions of 4Gy or ten fractions of 3Gy were given. A visual analog scale (VAS) was applied by doctors, nurses and nursing technicians to assess pain intensity at each session of radiotherapy, and follow-up at 8, 30 and 90 days from the end of treatment. Results: We evaluated 92 consecutive patients, 48 male and 44 female, with a median age of 58 years. We found that 14% of patients referred from the Palliative Care or Clinical Oncology sectors need better pharmacological analgesia due to severe pain, compared with 40.5% of patients from the other sectors (p = 0.004). We also found that the onset of pain relief to patients receiving 10 fractions of 300cGy analgesia without changing the pre-radiotherapy analgesia occurred with significance after the fifth fraction. Improvement in pain experienced within 90 days of follow-up was found in eighty percent of patients, independent of fractionated radiotherapy, site of metastases and the clinical condition of the patient. Discussion/Conclusion: The Palliative Care and Clinical Oncology sectors expressed greater concern in regards to analgesia for the patient with painful bone metastases. Radiotherapy is an effective pain-relieving treatment in different fractionation studied, even though the

  8. Radiotherapy for pain management of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende Junior, Ismar de; Mattos, Marcos Duarte de; Nakamura, Ricardo; Lemes Junior, Joaquim; Vanzelli, Talita Lozano

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This is the first Brazilian study intended to evaluate the response of pain relief with radiotherapy in three different fractionation and the clinical differences in managing pain in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods: Prospective study of patients with painful bone metastases referred to the Radiotherapy Sector of the Hospital de Cancer de Barretos for pain-relieving radiotherapy between March and December 2010. It is known that radiotherapy seems to alter the activation of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, relieving pain in cases of painful bone metastases. Patients were assessed in relation to the status of pain intensity before and after the initiation of radiotherapy. Either a single fraction of 8Gy, five fractions of 4Gy or ten fractions of 3Gy were given. A visual analog scale (VAS) was applied by doctors, nurses and nursing technicians to assess pain intensity at each session of radiotherapy, and follow-up at 8, 30 and 90 days from the end of treatment. Results: We evaluated 92 consecutive patients, 48 male and 44 female, with a median age of 58 years. We found that 14% of patients referred from the Palliative Care or Clinical Oncology sectors need better pharmacological analgesia due to severe pain, compared with 40.5% of patients from the other sectors (p = 0.004). We also found that the onset of pain relief to patients receiving 10 fractions of 300cGy analgesia without changing the pre-radiotherapy analgesia occurred with significance after the fifth fraction. Improvement in pain experienced within 90 days of follow-up was found in eighty percent of patients, independent of fractionated radiotherapy, site of metastases and the clinical condition of the patient. Discussion/Conclusion: The Palliative Care and Clinical Oncology sectors expressed greater concern in regards to analgesia for the patient with painful bone metastases. Radiotherapy is an effective pain-relieving treatment in different fractionation studied, even though the

  9. [Management of neuropathic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, P; Kubis, N

    2015-07-01

    Neuropathic pain is often underestimated and not adequately treated. The DN4 scale is very useful for its identification since it will benefit from pharmacological and non-pharmacological specific alternative care. The pathophysiological mechanisms involve the hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways or decreased inhibitory descending controls that will be the target of pharmacological treatments. Frontline molecules are antidepressants (tricyclics and mixed serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors) and antiepileptics (α2δ calcium channel inhibitors). However, these drugs will only have a partial efficacy on pain. The therapeutic strategy is based on reasonable goals, starting with a monotherapy adapted to the patient's symptoms and comorbidities and increased step by step. Patient compliance to contract is essential and requires clear and complete information. The impact on profession, social and family integration should rapidly be taken into account. In case of inefficiency, a change of the first-line treatment or an association could be considered. Some indications justify a specific therapy. Patients with resistant chronic pain should be sent to a specialized centre. New drugs are being studied and non-pharmacological support must be evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Parental Perceptions about Pain and Pain Management Practices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pain management in neonates remains sub-optimal in sub-Saharan countries like Kenya due to lack of resources to procure pharmacological analgesics. There, however, exist low-cost, mother-driven pain management strategies such as breastfeeding and kangaroo care that can be used for pain relief in ...

  11. Cognitive Impairment and Pain Among Nursing Home Residents With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Catherine E; Mack, Deborah S; Hunnicutt, Jacob N; Lapane, Kate L

    2018-06-01

    The prevalence of pain and its management has been shown to be inversely associated with greater levels of cognitive impairment. To evaluate whether the documentation and management of pain varies by level of cognitive impairment among nursing home residents with cancer. Using a cross-sectional study, we identified all newly admitted U.S. nursing home residents with a cancer diagnosis in 2011-2012 (n = 367,462). Minimum Data Set 3.0 admission assessment was used to evaluate pain/pain management in the past five days and cognitive impairment (assessed via the Brief Interview for Mental Status or the Cognitive Performance Scale for 91.6% and 8.4%, respectively). Adjusted prevalence ratios with 95% CI were estimated from robust Poisson regression models. For those with staff-assessed pain, pain prevalence was 55.5% with no/mild cognitive impairment and 50.5% in those severely impaired. Pain was common in those able to self-report (67.9% no/mild, 55.9% moderate, and 41.8% severe cognitive impairment). Greater cognitive impairment was associated with reduced prevalence of any pain (adjusted prevalence ratio severe vs. no/mild cognitive impairment; self-assessed pain 0.77; 95% CI 0.76-0.78; staff-assessed pain 0.96; 95% CI 0.93-0.99). Pharmacologic pain management was less prevalent in those with severe cognitive impairment (59.4% vs. 74.9% in those with no/mild cognitive impairment). In nursing home residents with cancer, pain was less frequently documented in those with severe cognitive impairment, which may lead to less frequent use of treatments for pain. Techniques to improve documentation and treatment of pain in nursing home residents with cognitive impairment are needed. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Improvement of burn pain management through routine pain monitoring and pain management protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyeong Tae; Hur, Giyeun; Kwak, In-Suk; Yim, Haejun; Cho, Yong Suk; Kim, Dohern; Hur, Jun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Lee, Boung Chul; Seo, Cheong Hoon; Chun, Wook

    2013-06-01

    Pain management is an important aspect of burn management. We developed a routine pain monitoring system and pain management protocol for burn patients. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of our new pain management system. From May 2011 to November 2011, the prospective study was performed with 107 burn patients. We performed control group (n=58) data analysis and then developed the pain management protocol and monitoring system. Next, we applied our protocol to patients and performed protocol group (n=49) data analysis, and compared this to control group data. Data analysis was performed using the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) of background pain and procedural pain, Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Scale (STAIS), and Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale (HRSS). The NRS of background pain for the protocol group was significantly decreased compared to the control group (2.8±2.0 versus 3.9±1.9), and the NRS of procedural pain of the protocol group was significantly decreased compared to the control group (4.8±2.8 versus 3.7±2.5). CAPS and HDRS were decreased in the protocol group, but did not have statistical significance. STAIS and HRSS were decreased in the protocol group, but only the STAIS had statistical significance. Our new pain management system was effective in burn pain management. However, adequate pain management can only be accomplished by a continuous and thorough effort. Therefore, pain control protocol and pain monitoring systems need to be under constant revision and improvement using creative ideas and approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. Pain management in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Linda G; Ramadurai, Murali

    2009-06-01

    This article is about pain management and some of the best practices to address the problem of pain in nursing home patients who have a serious illness and multiple comorbid conditions. Management of the emotional distress that accompanies chronic or acute pain is of foremost concern. In this article, the topics discussed include general pain management in a nursing home for a long-term care resident who has chronic pain, the relief of symptoms and suffering in a patient who is on palliative care and hospice, and the pain management of a postoperative patient with acute pain for a short transitional period (post-acute illness or surgery).

  14. Smartphone applications for pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Benjamin A; Eccleston, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Smartphone applications (or apps) are becoming increasingly popular. The lack of regulation or guidance for health-related apps means that the validity and reliability of their content is unknown. We have conducted a review of available apps relating to the generic condition of pain. The official application stores for five major smartphone platforms were searched: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia/Symbian and Windows Mobile. Apps were included if they reported a focus on pain education, management or relief, and were not solely aimed at health-care professionals (HCPs). A total of 111 apps met the inclusion criteria. The majority of apps reviewed claimed some information provision or electronic manual component. Diary tracking of pain variables was also a common feature. There was a low level of stated HCP involvement in app development and content. Despite an increasing number of apps being released, the frequency of HCP involvement is not increasing. Pain apps appear to be able to promise pain relief without any concern for the effectiveness of the product, or for possible adverse effects of product use. In a population often desperate for a solution to distressing and debilitating pain conditions, there is considerable risk of individuals being misled.

  15. Rehabilitation Medicine Approaches to Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheville, Andrea L; Smith, Sean R; Basford, Jeffrey R

    2018-06-01

    Rehabilitation medicine offers strategies that reduce musculoskeletal pain, targeted approaches to alleviate movement-related pain, and interventions to optimize patients' function despite the persistence of pain. These approaches fall into four categories: modulating nociception, stabilizing and unloading painful structures, influencing pain perception, and alleviating soft tissue musculotendinous pain. Incorporating these interventions into individualized, comprehensive pain management programs offers the potential to empower patients and limit pain associated with mobility and required daily activities. Rehabilitative approach may be particularly helpful for patients with refractory movement-associated pain and functional vulnerability, and for those who do not wish for, or cannot, tolerate pharmacoanalgesia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Best Practices in Management of Postpartum Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Jenifer O

    Pain has been documented as a major concern for women in the postpartum period. Management of postpartum pain, however, is a relatively neglected area of clinical research. As a result, evidence to support interventions to alleviate the discomforts associated with childbirth is sparse. This paucity of research on postpartum pain management is particularly surprising given that in the United States alone nearly 4 million women give birth each year. Inadequate pain relief in the hours to months following childbirth can interfere with maternal-newborn bonding and feeding and, by impeding mobility, can increase the risk of postpartum complications. In addition, pain that is not adequately managed may increase the risk of chronic pain that lasts beyond the postpartum period. In this article, the more common causes of pain following childbirth are reviewed and recommendations for pain management based on available evidence are outlined. Considerations for pain management in lactating women and for hospital discharge are discussed.

  17. A review of the use of ketamine in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfic, Qutaiba A

    2013-01-01

    Ketamine is a noncompetitive antagonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. It has been widely used in anesthesia and pain management. Ketamine has been administered via the intravenous, intramuscular, subcutaneous, oral, rectal, topical, intranasal, sublingual, epidural, and caudal routes. Ketamine improves postoperative and posttrauma pain scores and reduces opioid consumption. It has special indication for patients with opioid tolerance, acute hyperalgesia, and neuropathic pain. It also has a role in the management of chronic pain including both cancer and noncancer pain. Recreational use of ketamine is increasing as well through different routes of administration like inhalation, smoking, or intravenous injection. Long-time exposure to ketamine, especially in the abusers, may lead to serious side effects. This review is trying to define the role of ketamine in pain management.

  18. Management of somatic pain induced by head-and-neck cancer treatment: definition and assessment. Guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology- Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binczak, M; Navez, M; Perrichon, C; Blanchard, D; Bollet, M; Calmels, P; Couturaud, C; Dreyer, C; Espitalier, F; Testelin, S; Albert, S; Morinière, S

    2014-09-01

    The authors present the guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology- Head and Neck Surgery Society (Société Française d'Oto-rhino-Laryngologie et de Chirurgie de la Face et du Cou [SFORL]) for the management of somatic pain induced by head-and-neck cancer treatment, and in particular the instruments needed for the definition and initial assessment of the various types of pain. A multidisciplinary work group was entrusted with a review of the scientific literature on the above topic. Guidelines were drawn up, based on the articles retrieved and the group members' individual experience. They were then read over by an editorial group independent of the work group. The final version was established in a coordination meeting. The guidelines were graded as A, B, C or expert opinion, by decreasing level of evidence. The priority is to eliminate tumoral recurrence when pain reappears or changes following head-and-neck cancer treatment. Neuropathic pain screening instruments and pain assessment scales should be used to assess pain intensity and treatment efficacy. Functional rehabilitation sessions should be prescribed to reduce musculoskeletal pain and prevent ankylosis and postural disorder. Psychotherapy and mind-body therapy, when available, should be provided in case of chronic pain. In case of recalcitrant complex pain, referral should be made to a multidisciplinary pain structure. The management of somatic pain induced by head-and-neck cancer treatment above all requires identifying and assessing the intensity of the various types of pain involved, their functional impact and their emotional component. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Fundamentals of pain management in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulling, Sarah

    Under-treated pain can result in a number of potentially serious sequelae (Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, 2006), including delayed mobilization and recovery, cardiac complications, thromboses, pulmonary complications, delayed healing, psychosocial problems and chronic pain syndromes. This article considers pain management in the context of painful wounds. An international comparative survey on wound pain (European Wound Management Association, 2002) found that practitioners in the wound care community tend to focus on healing processes rather than the patient's total pain experience involving an accurate pain assessment and selection of an appropriate pain management strategy. Procedural pain with dressing removal and cleansing caused the greatest concerns. An overview of simple, evidence-based drug and non-drug techniques is offered as potential strategies to help minimize the experience of pain.

  20. Opioid-prescribing practices in chronic cancer pain in a tertiary care pain clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu S Thota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Under treatment of pain is a recognized global issue. Opioid analgesic medication is the mainstay of treatment in cancer patients as per the World Health Organization (WHO pain relief ladder, yet 50% of cancer patients worldwide do not receive adequate pain relief or are undertreated. Aim: The aim of this study was to audit the ongoing opioid-prescribing practices in our tertiary cancer pain clinic during January-June 2010. Materials& Methods: The prescribed type of opioid, dose, dosing interval, and laxatives details were analyzed. Results: Five hundred pain files were reviewed and 435 were found complete for audit. Three hundred forty-eight (80% patients were prescribed opioids. Two hundred fifty-nine (74.4% received weak opioids while 118 (33.9% received strong opioids. A total of 195 (45% patients had moderate and 184 (42% had severe pain. Ninety-three (26.7% patients received morphine; however, only 31.5% (58 of 184 in severe pain received morphine as per the WHO pain ladder. Only 73 of 93 (78.4% patients received an adequate dose of morphine with an adequate dosing interval and only 27 (29% were prescribed laxatives with morphine. Conclusion: This study shows that the under treatment of pain and under dosing of opioids coupled with improper side effect management are major issues.

  1. A Small Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Comparing Mobile and Traditional Pain Coping Skills Training Protocols for Cancer Patients with Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara J. Somers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial pain management interventions are efficacious for cancer pain but are underutilized. Recent advances in mobile health (mHealth technologies provide new opportunities to decrease barriers to access psychosocial pain management interventions. The objective of this study was to gain information about the accessibility and efficacy of mobile pain coping skills training (mPCST intervention delivered to cancer patients with pain compared to traditional in-person pain coping skills training intervention. This study randomly assigned participants (N=30 to receive either mobile health pain coping skills training intervention delivered via Skype or traditional pain coping skills training delivered face-to-face (PCST-trad. This pilot trial suggests that mPCST is feasible, presents low burden to patients, may lead to high patient engagement, and appears to be acceptable to patients. Cancer patients with pain in the mPCST group reported decreases in pain severity and physical symptoms as well as increases in self-efficacy for pain management that were comparable to changes in the PCST-trad group (p’s < 0.05. These findings suggest that mPCST, which is a highly accessible intervention, may provide benefits similar to an in-person intervention and shows promise for being feasible, acceptable, and engaging to cancer patients with pain.

  2. Availability and utilization of opioids for pain management: global issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjiani, Deepak; Paul, D Baby; Kunnumpurath, Sreekumar; Kaye, Alan David; Vadivelu, Nalini

    2014-01-01

    Pain can significantly influence an individual's health status and can have serious negative consequences: poor nutrition, decreased appetite, abnormal sleep patterns, fatigue, and impairment of daily living activities. Pain can cause psychological impairment and decrease healing and recovery from injuries and illness. A hallmark of many chronic conditions, pain affects more patients' lives than diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and cancer combined. However, many chronic sufferers do not have access to effective pain management for a variety of reasons, including limited access, restrictions, and personal and cultural biases. This review summarizes issues of access, distribution, and cultural bias with regard to opioid agents and seeks to clarify the challenges related to opioid delivery. The considerable negative physical and mental consequences of chronic pain are discussed for the general and palliative care population. Opioids are an effective treatment for various intractable painful conditions, but problems in global opioid access for safe and rational use in pain management contribute to unnecessary suffering. These problems persist despite increased understanding in recent years of the pathophysiology of pain. Comprehensive guidelines for goal-directed and patient-friendly chronic opiate therapy will potentially enhance the outlook for future chronic pain management. The improvement of pain education in undergraduate and postgraduate training will benefit patients and clinicians. The promise of new medications, along with the utilization of multimodal approaches, has the potential to provide effective pain relief to future generations of sufferers.

  3. Assessment and management of adult cancer pain: a systematic review and synthesis of recent qualitative studies aimed at developing insights for managing barriers and optimizing facilitators within a comprehensive framework of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckett, Tim; Davidson, Patricia M; Green, Anna; Boyle, Frances; Stubbs, John; Lovell, Melanie

    2013-08-01

    Cancer pain is a common, burdensome problem, which is not well managed despite evidence-based guidelines. To develop insights for managing barriers and optimizing facilitators to adult cancer pain assessment and management within a comprehensive framework of patient care. We undertook a systematic review and synthesis of qualitative studies. Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, AMED, CINAHL, and Sociological Abstracts were searched from May 20 to 26, 2011. To be included, the articles had to be published in a peer-reviewed journal since 2000; written in English; and report original qualitative studies on the perspectives of patients, their significant others, or health care providers. Article quality was rated using the checklist of Kitto et al. Thematic synthesis followed a three-stage approach using Evidence for Policy and Practice Information and Co-ordinating Centre-Reviewer 4 software: 1) free line-by-line coding of "Results," 2) organization into "descriptive" themes, and 3) development of "analytical" themes informative to our objective. At Stage 3, a conceptual framework was selected from the peer-reviewed literature according to prima facie "fit" for descriptive themes. Of 659 articles screened, 70 met the criteria, reporting 65 studies with 48 patient, 19 caregiver, and 21 health care provider samples. Authors rarely reported reflexivity or negative cases. Mead and Bower's model of patient-centered care accommodated 85% of the descriptive themes; 12% more related to the caregiver and service/system factors. Three themes could not be accommodated. Findings highlight the need to integrate patient/family education within improved communication, individualize care, use more nonpharmacological strategies, empower patients/families to self-manage pain, and reorganize multidisciplinary roles around patient-centered care and outcomes. These conclusions require validation via consensus and intervention trials. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published

  4. Clinical management of chronic TMD pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D B

    1998-01-01

    Chronic Pain extracts a "penalty" on society now estimated to be well in excess of $100 million per year. The "penalty" that Chronic Pain extracts from its victims is incalculable. Chronic Pain is a major component of Temporomandibular Disorders. The current neurological theory of the mechanism of chronic TMD pain is explored along with the current modes of treatment. Pharmacological management of Chronic Pain in a clinical setting is outlined. Dentists are involved in pain management on a daily basis. Dentists treat pain both prophylacticly and in response to specific patient symptoms. Most dental treatment involves some type of pain management. We, dentists, have become very adept at managing acute pain. We have much greater difficulty managing chronic pain. The word "pain" derives from the Greek word for penalty, and appeared to them to be a "penalty" inflicted by the gods. In 1984, Bonica estimated that one-third of all Americans suffered from some kind of chronic pain at a "penalty" to society of $65 Billion annually in medical expenses and lost wages and productivity. This figure is certainly much greater now. Chronic pain can be a very complex problem that can require a multidisciplinary approach to treatment. Chronic pain in the dental setting is most frequetly caused by prolonged Temporomandibular Disorders.

  5. Pain Control In Cancer Patients By Opiate Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohagheghi M A

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are increasingly being recognized as the primary treatment for cancer pain management. Optimal treatment of cancer pain involves assessing its characteristics, considering different management strategies, evaluating side effects and adverse drug reactions and establishing the most appropriate therapeutic regimen. This study was designed to review the current status of pain management for advanced cancer cases using opioid analgesics."nMaterials and Methods: A questionnaire was used to collect data on demographics, disease characteristics, and opioids use indicators in 700 cases of advanced cancer patients."nResults: A total of 700 cancer cases, 42 percent females and 58 percent males, between 17-80 years age range (Mean age of 57.25 were studied retrospectively. Cancers of breast (21 percent, colorectal (12 percent, lung (7 percent, stomach (7 percent and bone either primary or metastatic (6 percent in women and stomach (17 percent, lung (12 percent, colorectal (11 percent, prostate (9 percent , and bone (8 percent in men were the most common causes of opioids prescription in study group respectively. Advanced primary cancer (in 52 percent, bone metastasis (in 32 percent, and treatment complications (in 7 percent were considered as physical basis for pain in patients. Morphine (by injection, Opium (by oral intake and methadone (injection and/or oral were the most common opioids prescribed. Using equianalgesic conversion chart, the daily dosages and therapeutics schedules of morphine administration were as follows:"n43 percent received 21-30 mg. in 2-4 divided doses"n27 percent received >30 mg. in 3-5 divided doses"n21 percent received 11-20 mg. in 2-3 divided doses"n9 percent received 5-10 mg. in 1-2 divided doses"nConclusion: Pain management of cancer patients is not adequate and opioid use is not rational. New educational and managerial strategies are needed to optimize cancer pain treatment in routine medical practice. To overcome

  6. Evidence of peripheral nerve blocks for cancer-related pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klepstad, P; Kurita, G P; Mercadante, S

    2015-01-01

    The European Association for Palliative Care has initiated a comprehensive program to achieve an over-all review of the evidence of multiple cancer pain management strategies in order to extend the current guideline for treatment of cancer pain. The present systematic review analyzed the existing...... evidence of analgesic efficacy for peripheral nerve blocks in adult patients with cancer. A search strategy was elaborated with words related to cancer, pain, peripheral nerve and block. The search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane for the period until February 2014. The number of abstracts...... retrieved was 155. No controlled studies were identified. Sixteen papers presented a total of 79 cases. The blocks applied were paravertebral blocks (10 cases), blocks in the head region (2 cases), plexus blocks (13 cases), intercostal blocks (43 cases) and others (11 cases). In general, most cases reported...

  7. Opioids in Cancer Pain: Right or Privilege?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Leanne K; Imam, Syed N; Braun, Ursula K

    2017-09-01

    Opioid analgesia is a mainstay of the treatment of cancer pain. Treatment of pain in patients with cancer with an ongoing substance abuse disorder can be difficult. We report the ethical challenges of treating a patient with cancer with a concomitant substance abuse disorder in an outpatient palliative care setting. We present an analysis of ethical considerations for the palliative care physician and strategies to aid in the successful treatment of such patients. We argue that there are select patients with cancer for whom exclusion from treatment with opioid therapy is warranted if their health is endangered by prescription of these medications.

  8. Predictors of Pain among Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Andrew G.; Terrell, Jeffrey E.; Light, Emily; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; Chepeha, Douglas; Jiang, Yunyun; McLean, Scott; Ghanem, Tamer A.; Duffy, Sonia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pain is a strong contributor to cancer patients’ quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine predictors of pain 1 year after the diagnosis of head and neck cancer. Design Prospective, multi-site cohort study. Setting Three academically-affiliated medical centers. Patients Previously untreated patients with carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract (n=374). Main Outcome Measures Participants were surveyed pre-treatment and 1 year thereafter. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine predictors of the SF-36 bodily pain score 1 year after diagnosis. Results The mean SF-36 bodily pain score at 1 year was 65, compared to 61 at diagnosis (p=.004), compared to 75 among population norms (lower scores indicate worse pain). Variables independently associated with pain included pre-treatment pain score (p<0.001), less education (p=0.02), neck dissection (p=0.001), feeding tube (p=0.05), xerostomia (p<0.001), depressive symptoms (p<0.001), taking more pain medication (p<0.001), less physical activity (p=.02), and poor sleep quality (p=0.006). Current smoking and problem drinking were marginally significant (p=0.07 and 0.08, respectively). Conclusions Aggressive pain management may be indicated for head and neck cancer patients who undergo neck dissections, complain of xerostomia, require feeding tubes, and have medical comorbidities. Treatment of modifiable risk factors such as depression, poor sleep quality, tobacco and alcohol abuse may also reduce pain and improve quality of life among head and neck cancer patients. PMID:23165353

  9. Pain and pharmacologic pain management in long-stay nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, Jacob N; Ulbricht, Christine M; Tjia, Jennifer; Lapane, Kate L

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies estimate that >40% of long-stay nursing home (NH) residents experience persistent pain, with 20% of residents in pain receiving no analgesics. Strengthened NH surveyor guidance and improved pain measures on the Minimum Data Set 3.0 were introduced in March 2009 and October 2010, respectively. This study aimed to provide estimates after the important initiatives of (1) prevalence and correlates of persistent pain; and (2) prevalence and correlates of untreated or undertreated persistent pain. We identified 1,387,405 long-stay residents in U.S. NHs between 2011 and 2012 with 2 Minimum Data Set assessments 90 days apart. Pain was categorized as persistent (pain on both assessments), intermittent (pain on either assessment), or none. Pharmacologic pain management was classified as untreated pain (no scheduled or as needed medications received) or potentially undertreated (no scheduled received). Modified Poisson models adjusting for resident clustering within NHs provided adjusted prevalence ratios (APRs) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The prevalence of persistent and intermittent pain was 19.5% and 19.2%, respectively, but varied substantially by age, sex, race and ethnicity, cognitive impairment, and cancer. Of residents in persistent pain, 6.4% and 32.0% were untreated and undertreated, respectively. Racial and ethnic minorities (non-Hispanic blacks vs whites, APR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.13-1.25) and severely cognitively impaired residents (severe vs no/mild APR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.44-1.57) had an increased prevalence of untreated and undertreated pain. One in 5 NH residents has persistent pain. Although this estimate is greatly improved, many residents may be undertreated. The disturbing disparities in untreated and undertreated pain need to be addressed.

  10. Nursing approaches in the postoperative pain management

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilay Yüceer

    2011-01-01

    Patients frequently experience moderate to severe pain inthe postoperative period. Although the pain managementis an integral and important part of the nursing care, studiessuggest that, nursing management of postoperativepain remains inadequate.Postoperative care nurses are responsible to assess thepatient’s pain, teach the patient strategies to deal with thepain, apply the analgesic treatment plan, monitor the resultsof treatment, educate the patient and the family onpain management and doc...

  11. Pain management in pediatric age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Namrata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of pain in palliative care of children is somewhat different from that in adults.The use of opioids in pediatric palliative care presents some unique challenges. Confident and rational use of opioids, illustrated by WHO Guidelines is essential for adequate management of pain in children with life limiting conditions.

  12. Neonatal nurses' perceptions of pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collados-Gómez, L; Camacho-Vicente, V; González-Villalba, M; Sanz-Prades, G; Bellón-Vaquerizo, B

    To describe the perceptions of nurses in neonatal units on pain management, meet the educational profile and describe the use of pain assessment tools and non-pharmacological management for treatment. Cross-sectional descriptive multicentre study, developed during the months of February to September 2015, in the neonatology services of three hospitals at the Community of Madrid, Spain. Data collection was performed through an ad hoc questionnaire on paper or electronically using Survey Monkey platform. The sample consisted of 142 professionals, with a response rate of 55%: 47.9% (68) confirmed they had received specific training in pain management; 39.5% (56) stated that pain is regularly assessed in the unit; only 43.6% reported using validated scales, the most used being the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP). As for the non-pharmacological management, swaddling and non-nutritive sucking it is the most used, followed by sucrose. Intravenous cannulation was identified as the most painful procedure. Pain management is in the process of improvement, because of training and because there is little pain assessment using validated scales. The improvement in the use of non-pharmacological management for the relief of pain in minor procedures is noteworthy. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Nursing approaches in the postoperative pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay Yüceer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients frequently experience moderate to severe pain inthe postoperative period. Although the pain managementis an integral and important part of the nursing care, studiessuggest that, nursing management of postoperativepain remains inadequate.Postoperative care nurses are responsible to assess thepatient’s pain, teach the patient strategies to deal with thepain, apply the analgesic treatment plan, monitor the resultsof treatment, educate the patient and the family onpain management and document the pain managementoutcomes. The nurses’ holistic approach to pain managementminimizes the patients’ discomfort caused by pain inthe postoperative period after the surgery. In this article,nurses’ approaches to postoperative pain managementare discussed. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (4: 474-478

  14. Buprenorphine-naloxone therapy in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-05-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone; Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggest that bup/nal may provide pain relief in patients with chronic pain with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent patients with chronic pain may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management.

  15. Pain Management in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Vigano

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a common feature in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID. An abnormally low visceral sensory threshold, as well as a number of central, spinal and peripheral pain-modulating abnormalities, have been proposed for this syndrome. Clinical aspects of pain associated with irritable esophagus, functional dyspepsia, biliary dysmotility, inflammatory bowel syndrome and proctalgia fugax are reviewed. Because of its unclear pathophysiology, pain expression is the main target for the successful assessment and management of symptomatic FGID. The sensory, cognitive and affective components of pain intensity expression need to be addressed in the context of a good physician-patient rapport. A multidisciplinary team approach is ideal for the smaller subset of patients with severe and disabling symptoms. Although pharmacotherapy may target specific functional disorders, the role of behavioural techniques and psychotherapy appears much more important for pain management in FGID. Functional performance and quality of life improvement, rather than pain intensity, are the main therapeutic goals in these patients.

  16. Insufficient pain management after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A prospective observational quality assurance study was performed at Glostrup Hospital, Denmark, to describe patients undergoing spine surgery with regard to perioperative analgesic management, post-operative pain, opioid consumption and side effects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients...... experienced acceptable pain levels, but instrumented lumbar fusion leads to moderate to severe pain levels and a relatively high opioid consumption. The scheduled standard pain management protocols were sparsely followed. Challenges exist in post-operative pain management as observed in previous surveys...... eligible for the study were identified consecutively from the operation chart. The following data were registered: post-operative visual analogue (VAS) pain score at rest and during mobilisation, opioid consumption for the first 24 h, other analgesics administered and side effects. RESULTS: A total of 87...

  17. Management of pain through autogenic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, N

    2000-08-01

    Physical and emotional pain are an inevitable part of human existence and are without natural antidotes. In view of this, and in the light of increasing professional reluctance to depend on analgesics, this paper proposes the widespread application of autogenic training, a relaxation technique which has been seen to confront pain very effectively, and also to reduce substantially drugs dependency. It analyses autogenic training in respect of some of the more common pain-allied disorders such as childbirth, headaches and migraines, back pain, cancer and palliative care, and cardiology.

  18. Priority interventions to improve the management of chronic non-cancer pain in primary care: a participatory research of the ACCORD program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalonde L

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lyne Lalonde,1–4 Manon Choinière,3,5 Elisabeth Martin,3 Lise Lévesque,3 Éveline Hudon,2,3,6 Danielle Bélanger,2 Sylvie Perreault,1,7 Anaïs Lacasse,8 Marie-Claude Laliberté1,9 1Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Équipe de recherche en soins de première ligne, Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Laval, Laval, QC, Canada; 3Centre de recherche, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CRCHUM, Montreal, QC, Canada; 4Sanofi Aventis Endowment Chair in Ambulatory Pharmaceutical Care, Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal and Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Laval, QC, Canada; 5Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 6Department of Family Medicine and Emergency, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 7Sanofi Aventis Endowment Chair in Drug Utilization, Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 8Département des sciences de la santé, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Rouyn-Noranda, QC, Canada; 9AbbVie Corporation, St-Laurent, QC, Canada Purpose: There is evidence that the management of chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP in primary care is far from being optimal. A 1-day workshop was held to explore the perceptions of key actors regarding the challenges and priority interventions to improve CNCP management in primary care. Methods: Using the Chronic Care Model as a conceptual framework, physicians (n=6, pharmacists (n=6, nurses (n=6, physiotherapists (n=6, psychologists (n=6, pain specialists (n=6, patients (n=3, family members (n=3, decision makers and managers (n=4, and pain researchers (n=7 took part in seven focus groups and five nominal groups. Results: Challenges identified in focus group discussions were related to five dimensions: knowledge gap, “work in silos”, lack of awareness that CNCP represents an important clinical problem

  19. Unilateral facial pain and lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakespeare, T.P.; Stevens, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Facial pain in lung cancer patients may be secondary to metastatic disease to the brain or skull base. Since 1983 there have been 19 published reports of hemi-facial pain as a non-metastatic complication of lung carcinoma. This report describes an additional case in whom unilateral face pain preceded the diagnosis of lung cancer by 9 months. A clinical diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia was made after a normal brain CT scan. Later on the patient complained of global lethargy, weight loss and haemoptysis. A chest X-ray disclosed a 6 cm right hilar mass that was further defined with a whole body CT scan. The neural mechanism of the unilateral facial pain is discussed and the literature reviewed. 14 refs., 1 tab

  20. Unilateral facial pain and lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakespeare, T.P.; Stevens, M.J. [Royal North Shore Hospital, Crows Nest, NSW (Australia)

    1996-02-01

    Facial pain in lung cancer patients may be secondary to metastatic disease to the brain or skull base. Since 1983 there have been 19 published reports of hemi-facial pain as a non-metastatic complication of lung carcinoma. This report describes an additional case in whom unilateral face pain preceded the diagnosis of lung cancer by 9 months. A clinical diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia was made after a normal brain CT scan. Later on the patient complained of global lethargy, weight loss and haemoptysis. A chest X-ray disclosed a 6 cm right hilar mass that was further defined with a whole body CT scan. The neural mechanism of the unilateral facial pain is discussed and the literature reviewed. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Pain Management in the Emergency Chain: The Use and Effectiveness of Pain Management in Patients With Acute Musculoskeletal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, Jorien; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Gaakeer, Menno I.; Berben, Sivera A.; Eenennaam, Fred L.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint in emergency care, its management is often neglected, placing patients at risk for insufficient pain relief. Our aim is to investigate how often pain management is provided in the prehospital phase and emergency department (ED) and

  2. Acupuncture Reduces Breast Cancer Joint Pain | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the largest, most rigorous study of its kind, acupuncture was found to significantly reduce the debilitating joint pain experienced by tens of thousands of women each year while being treated for early stage breast cancer with aromatase inhibitors (AIs). |

  3. American Society for Pain Management Nursing position statement: pain management at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Janice; Drew, Debra; Dunwoody, Colleen

    2013-09-01

    Pain at the end of life continues to be of great concern as it may be unrecognized or untreated. While nurses have an ethical obligation to reduce suffering at the end of life, barriers remain regarding appropriate and adequate pain management at the end of life. This position statement from the American Society for Pain Management Nursing contains recommendations for nurses, prescribers, and institutions that would improve pain management for this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhancing knowledge and attitudes in pain management: a pain management education program for nursing home staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Ho, Suki S K

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of a pain management program (PMP) in enhancing the knowledge and attitudes of health care workers in pain management. Many nursing home residents suffer from pain, and treatment of pain is often inadequate. Failure of health care workers to assess pain and their insufficient knowledge of pain management are barriers to adequate treatment. It was a quasiexperimental pretest and posttest study. Four nursing homes were approached, and 88 staff joined the 8-week PMP. Demographics and the knowledge and attitudes regarding pain were collected with the use of the Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain-Chinese version (NKASRP-C) before and after the PMP. A deficit in knowledge and attitudes related to pain management was prominent before the PMP, and there was a significant increase in pain knowledge and attitudes from 7.9 ± SD 3.52 to 19.2 ± SD4.4 (p nursing staff and enable them to provide adequate and appropriate care to older persons in pain. PMPs for nurses and all health care professionals are important in enhancing care for older adults and to inform policy on the provision of pain management. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exercise despite pain – breast cancer patient experiences of muscle and joint pain during adjuvant chemotherapy and concurrent participation in an exercise intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christina; Rørth, M; Ejlertsen, B

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-related pain is a well-known side effect in cancer patient receiving chemotherapy. However, limited knowledge exists describing whether exercise exacerbates existing pain. Aim of the research was to explore muscle and joint pain experienced by women with breast cancer receiving...... intervention comprised supervised training: high-intensity cardiovascular, heavy resistance and relaxation, massage and body-awareness (9 h weekly, 6 weeks). The analysis revealed five categories: Abrupt pain - a predominant side effect, cogitated pain management, the adapted training, non......-immediate exacerbation of pain and summarised into the essence of chemotherapy related muscle and joint pain in exercise breast cancer patients; exercise despite pain. Findings indicate that the patients' perception of sudden onset of chemotherapy-related muscle and joint pain was not aggravated by training. Pain...

  6. Orofacial pain management: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Uyanik, James M

    2014-01-01

    Marcela Romero-Reyes, James M Uyanik Orofacial and Head Pain Service, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Radiology and Medicine, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Some of the most prevalent and debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures). Orofacial pain (OFP) can arise from different regions and etiologies. Tem...

  7. Fifteen minute consultation: Practical pain management in paediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Emily Jane; Brombley, Karen; Boyce, Katherine

    2017-10-01

    Pain and distress in the paediatric palliative care population can be very difficult to manage. Clinical scenarios range from the acute management of cancer-related pain at the end of life to the ongoing long-term support of children with complex multimodal pain related to progressive neurological conditions. Understanding the child's underlying condition, possible causes of pain and their preferred mode of communication are important to the delivery of holistic care. Modification of environmental factors, basic care consideration and non-pharmacological measures have a large role to play, alongside conventional analgesics. Medication may also need to be delivered by novel routes such as transdermal patches, continuous subcutaneous infusion of multiple drugs or transmucosal breakthrough analgesic doses. Two cases are used to illustrate approaches to these clinical problems. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. A systematic review of the effectiveness of patient-based educational interventions to improve cancer-related pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerling, Jenske I; Mostovaya, Irina; Vissers, Kris C P; de Graeff, Alexander; Reyners, Anna K.L.; Van Der Linden, Yvette M.

    BACKGROUND: Despite existing guidelines to assess and manage pain, the management of cancer-related pain is often suboptimal with patients often being undertreated. Inadequate pain management may be due to patient-related barriers. Educating patients may decrease these barriers. However, the effect

  9. Managing neuropathic pain in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Moore

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the somatosensory system such as neuropathic pain are common in people with chronic neurologic and musculoskeletal diseases, yet these conditions remain an underappreciated morbidity in our veterinary patients. This is likely because assessment of neuropathic pain in people relies heavily on self-reporting, something our veterinary patients are not able to do. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex phenomenon, and concepts related to it are frequently not addressed in the standard veterinary medical curriculum such that veterinarians may not recognize this as a potential problem in patients. The goals of this review are to discuss basic concepts in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, provide definitions for common clinical terms used in association with the condition, and discuss available medical treatment options for dogs with neuropathic pain. The development of neuropathic pain involves key mechanisms such as ectopic afferent nerve activity, peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, impaired inhibitory modulation, and activation of microglia. Treatments aimed at reducing neuropathic pain are targeted at one or more of these mechanisms. Several drugs are commonly used in the veterinary clinical setting to treat neuropathic pain. These include gabapentin, pregabalin, amantadine, and amitriptyline. Proposed mechanisms of action for each drug, and known pharmacokinetic profiles in dogs are discussed. Strong evidence exists in the human literature for the utility of most of these treatments, but clinical veterinary-specific literature is currently limited. Future studies should focus on objective methods to document neuropathic pain and monitor response to therapy in our veterinary patients.

  10. Comparative legal aspects of pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansweevelt, T

    2008-12-01

    Administering pain medication to terminal patients can cause legal problems when it has a life-shortening effect, because according to some authors it equates with manslaughter. The legal basis of the acceptance of pain alleviation with life-shortening effect can be found on the grounds of necessity. In different countries physicians have been prosecuted because of their pain management, which to the public prosecutor was in fact a sort of euthanasia. On the other hand, it is not unknown that physicians administer opioids to mask euthanasia. Pain management needs some rules, which can reassure the physician who alleviates pain. The physician who alleviates pain with life-shortening effect will have to act with due care to avoid a liability risk. This implies at least an informed consent, to observe the proportionality rule, and to keep a medical record.

  11. Pharmacologic management of chronic neuropathic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Alex; Weinberg, Erica; Moulin, Dwight E.; Clarke, Hance

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide family physicians with a practical clinical summary of the Canadian Pain Society (CPS) revised consensus statement on the pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain. Quality of evidence A multidisciplinary interest group within the CPS conducted a systematic review of the literature on the current treatments of neuropathic pain in drafting the revised consensus statement. Main message Gabapentinoids, tricyclic antidepressants, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are the first-line agents for treating neuropathic pain. Tramadol and other opioids are recommended as second-line agents, while cannabinoids are newly recommended as third-line agents. Other anticonvulsants, methadone, tapentadol, topical lidocaine, and botulinum toxin are recommended as fourth-line agents. Conclusion Many pharmacologic analgesics exist for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Through evidence-based recommendations, the CPS revised consensus statement helps guide family physicians in the management of patients with neuropathic pain. PMID:29138154

  12. A Call for Saving Interdisciplinary Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiulu; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pain is pervasive and costly. In 2011, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released a landmark report on chronic pain, which estimated that more than 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, making pain a major and significant public health problem. The benefits of interdisciplinary pain management programs are undeniable and have been demonstrated for over a half century. Until health care leaders and other stakeholders such as insurers work together to ensure best practices in pain management, we will certainly end up in a lose-lose situation for both the health care teams and patients. In order to impact health care policy more effectively, we need to better understand the politics of health policy decision making. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(12):1021-1023. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0611.

  13. Persistent pain and sensory disturbances after treatment for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, Mathias Kvist; Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Gärtner, Rune

    2013-01-01

    To examine the development of persistent pain after treatment for breast cancer and to examine risk factors associated with continuing pain.......To examine the development of persistent pain after treatment for breast cancer and to examine risk factors associated with continuing pain....

  14. Multimodal pain management after arthroscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sten

    Multimodal Pain Management after Arthroscopic Surgery By Sten Rasmussen, M.D. The thesis is based on four randomized controlled trials. The main hypothesis was that multimodal pain treatment provides faster recovery after arthroscopic surgery. NSAID was tested against placebo after knee arthroscopy...

  15. Pain management in patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Wilco P; Pieper, Marjoleine J C; van Dalen-Kok, Annelore H; de Waal, Margot W M; Husebo, Bettina S; Lautenbacher, Stefan; Kunz, Miriam; Scherder, Erik J A; Corbett, Anne

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 35 million people with dementia across the world, of whom 50% experience regular pain. Despite this, current assessment and treatment of pain in this patient group are inadequate. In addition to the discomfort and distress caused by pain, it is frequently the underlying cause of behavioral symptoms, which can lead to inappropriate treatment with antipsychotic medications. Pain also contributes to further complications in treatment and care. This review explores four key perspectives of pain management in dementia and makes recommendations for practice and research. The first perspective discussed is the considerable uncertainty within the literature on the impact of dementia neuropathology on pain perception and processing in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, where white matter lesions and brain atrophy appear to influence the neurobiology of pain. The second perspective considers the assessment of pain in dementia. This is challenging, particularly because of the limited capacity of self-report by these individuals, which means that assessment relies in large part on observational methods. A number of tools are available but the psychometric quality and clinical utility of these are uncertain. The evidence for efficient treatment (the third perspective) with analgesics is also limited, with few statistically well-powered trials. The most promising evidence supports the use of stepped treatment approaches, and indicates the benefit of pain and behavioral interventions on both these important symptoms. The fourth perspective debates further difficulties in pain management due to the lack of sufficient training and education for health care professionals at all levels, where evidence-based guidance is urgently needed. To address the current inadequate management of pain in dementia, a comprehensive approach is needed. This would include an accurate, validated assessment tool that is sensitive to different types of pain and therapeutic

  16. Effects of a pain program on nurses' pharmacological pain management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, AL; Dingemans, WA; Borg, PAJ; Luiken, JB; Grypdonck, M; Abu-Saad, HH

    1999-01-01

    Surgical nurses from five Dutch general hospitals participated in a continuing education program on pain assessment and management. Effects of the program were measured in a pretest-post-test control group design, in which nursing wards were randomly allocated to the experimental condition (program)

  17. Acute pain management in burn patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst-Jensen, Hejdi; Vedel, Pernille Nygaard; Lindberg-Larsen, Viktoria Oline

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Burn patients suffer excruciating pain due to their injuries and procedures related to surgery, wound care, and mobilization. Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, chronic pain and depression are highly prevalent among survivors of severe burns. Evidence-based pain...... patients. The most highly recommended guidelines provided clear and accurate recommendations for the nursing and medical staff on pain management in burn patients. We recommend the use of a validated appraisal tool such as the AGREE instrument to provide more consistent and evidence-based care to burn...

  18. Emergency nurses' knowledge of pain management principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, P; Buschmann, M

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine areas of emergency nurses' knowledge deficit regarding pain management, and to identify barriers to pain management as perceived by emergency nurses. Data were collected anonymously in a mail survey using a 52-item knowledge questionnaire addressing pain management principles and asking emergency nurses (Illinois Emergency Nurses Association members) to rate various barriers as to how often they affect their practice. Questionnaires were mailed to all Illinois ENA members (n = 1000). Three hundred five emergency nurses' questionnaires were returned. A significant deficit existed on 2 domains of knowledge: understanding of the terms "addiction," "tolerance," and "dependence"; and knowledge of various pharmacologic analgesic principles. Nurses with a master's degree or higher, or those who attended a 1-day seminar on pain management, achieved statistically significantly higher scores. The 2 barriers identified by emergency nurses as the most common were the inability to administer medication until a diagnosis is made (53%), and inadequate assessment of pain and pain relief (48%) (the percentage indicates how often the emergency nurses believed the barrier was present in their practice). The data indicate that emergency nurses may not have a good understanding of the management of pain with drugs, or of such issues as risk of addiction.

  19. Contextualized pain management in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Valerio Bellieni

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal pain treatment requires personalization, and pain assessment should be contextualized to be effective. Here we summarize the available tools in neonatal analgesia, paying a special attention to highlight the personalization of antalgic behavior, both in assessment and in treatment of neonatal pain. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  20. From "breakthrough" to "episodic" Cancer Pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhre, Erik Torbjørn; Klepstad, Pål; Bennett, Michael I

    2016-01-01

    consensus on definitions, terminology, and subclassification of transient cancer pain exacerbations. Methods The most frequent authors on BTCP literature were identified using the same search strategy as in a systematic review and invited to participate in a two-round Delphi survey. Topics with a low degree...

  1. PROMs for pain in adult cancer patients: a systematic review of measurement properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abahussin, Asma A; West, Robert M; Wong, David C; Ziegler, Lucy E

    2018-05-17

    Pain is one of the most devastating symptoms for cancer patients. One-third of patients who experience pain do not receive effective treatment. A key barrier to effective pain management is lack of routine measurement and monitoring of pain. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) are recommended for measuring cancer pain. However, evidence to guide the selection of the most appropriate measure to identify and monitor cancer pain is limited. A systematic review of measurement properties of PROMs for pain in cancer patients is needed to identify the best validated measure for adoption to an electronic platform. Systematically review measurement properties of PROMs used for adult cancer patients to measure pain and, as a secondary goal, investigate the evidence of validated mobile health (mHealth) applications used to measure pain (registration number: CRD42017065575). Medline, EMBASE and CINAHL were systematically searched in March 2018 for studies examining measurement properties for PROMs for pain in adult cancer patients. Both of the methodological quality of the studies and their results were appraised using the COSMIN checklist and specific measurement properties criteria respectively. Sixteen studies evaluating eight instruments were included. No studies using a PROM in a mHealth application were identified. The methodological quality of the measurement properties ranged between poor and fair. No instrument showed strong positive evidence for all the evaluated measurement properties. Based on the available evidence, the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) had the strongest evidence to support its selection for the measurement of cancer pain. The BPI-SF was the best performing measure across all proprieties evaluated through COSMIN. Better quality validation studies of PROMs for cancer pain are needed to explore the full range of measurement properties. Utilising mHealth applications for measuring pain for cancer patients is an innovative approach worth

  2. Chronic pain management in pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, F; Valensise, H; Sacco, M; Allegri, M

    2014-02-01

    During pregnancy most of women will experience some kind of pain, either as a result of a pre-existing condition (low back pain, headache, fibromyalgia, and rheumatoid arthritis) or as a direct consequence of pregnancy (weight gain, postural changes, pelvic floor dysfunction, hormonal factors). However, chronic pain management during pregnancy and lactation remains a challenge for clinicians and pregnant women are at risk of undertreatment for painful conditions, because of fear about use of drugs during pregnancy. Few analgesic drugs have been demonstrated to be absolutely contraindicated during pregnancy and breastfeeding, but studies in pregnant women are not available for most of pain medications. The aim of this paper is to review the safety profile in pregnancy or lactation of the commonly prescribed pain medications and non-pharmacological treatments. In addition to the conventional classifications from the Food and Drug Administration and the American Academy of Paediatrics, authors analyzed the currently available clinical data from literature.

  3. European pain management discussion forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Harald

    2012-12-01

    Queries from European physicians about analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from the author are presented. Topics addressed in this issue pertain to epidural injection for painful central lumbar stenosis and epicondolysis.

  4. Management pain and anxiety in endodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Sumidarti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental pain is a common symptom that most often causes patient to seek dentist. A survey conducted by the American Association of Endodontics revealed that more than half patients who come to dentist have experienced pain, which originate from the teeth or of the surrounding tissue, can causes difficulties in handling, also the anxiety of the patient. Understanding the pain experienced by patient will help dentist to determine when to make an action. Most patient being fear with pain, so they delay to getting treatment from dentist, and led to the development of further infection and inflammation. Aim of this paper is to improve the understanding of pharmacology and procedures for pain and anxiety management in endodontic treatment. So, it was importance of determining accurate diagnosis, management and drug administration.

  5. Pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Debra B; Love, Georgette

    2004-12-01

    The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain are complex but are gradually coming to light. Agents that have been found effective in a variety of neuropathic pain conditions include drugs that act to modulate (a) sodium or calcium channels, (b) N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, (c) norepinephrine or serotonin reuptake, (d) opioid receptors, and (e) other cellular processes. Clinical trials have primarily evaluated these treatments for postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy, the two most common types of neuropathic pain. Nonetheless, the identification of effective treatment regimens remains challenging, often because multiple mechanisms may be operating in a given patient giving rise to the same symptom. Alternatively, a single mechanism may be responsible for multiple symptoms. Currently available diagnostic tools are inadequate to determine the best treatment using a mechanism-based model. Clinically, drug treatment of neuropathic pain is often a matter of treatment trials. This article presents a summary of available clinical information on first-line and lesser-known treatments for neuropathic pain.

  6. Oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) for cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McNicol, Ewan D; Bell, Rae F; Carr, Daniel B; McIntyre, Mairead; Wee, Bee

    2017-07-12

    Pain is a common symptom with cancer, and 30% to 50% of all people with cancer will experience moderate to severe pain that can have a major negative impact on their quality of life. Non-opioid drugs are commonly used to treat mild to moderate cancer pain, and are recommended for this purpose in the WHO cancer pain treatment ladder, either alone or in combination with opioids.A previous Cochrane review that examined the evidence for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or paracetamol, alone or combined with opioids, for cancer pain was withdrawn in 2015 because it was out of date; the date of the last search was 2005. This review, and another on NSAIDs, updates the evidence. To assess the efficacy of oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) for cancer pain in adults and children, and the adverse events reported during its use in clinical trials. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and Embase from inception to March 2017, together with reference lists of retrieved papers and reviews, and two online study registries. We included randomised, double-blind, studies of five days' duration or longer, comparing paracetamol alone with placebo, or paracetamol in combination with an opioid compared with the same dose of the opioid alone, for cancer pain of any intensity. Single-blind and open studies were also eligible for inclusion. The minimum study size was 25 participants per treatment arm at the initial randomisation. Two review authors independently searched for studies, extracted efficacy and adverse event data, and examined issues of study quality and potential bias. We did not carry out any pooled analyses. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE and created a 'Summary of findings' table. Three studies in adults satisfied the inclusion criteria, lasting up to one week; 122 participants were randomised initially, and 95 completed treatment. We found no studies in children. One study was parallel-group, and

  7. Review of extended-release formulations of Tramadol for the management of chronic non-cancer pain: focus on marketed formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilbash, Arshi; Ngô-Minh, Cường

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic non-malignant pain report impairments of physical, social, and psychological well-being. The goal of pain management should include reducing pain and improving quality of life. Patients with chronic pain require medications that are able to provide adequate pain relief, have minimum dosing intervals to maintain efficacy, and avoid breakthrough pain. Tramadol has proven efficacy and a favourable safety profile. The positive efficacy and safety profile has been demonstrated historically in numerous published clinical studies as well as from post-marketing experience. It is a World Health Organization “Step 2” opioid analgesic that has been shown to be effective, well-tolerated, and valuable, where treatment with strong opioids is not required. A number of extended release formulations of Tramadol are available in Canada and the United States. An optimal extended release Tramadol formulation would be expected to provide consistent pain control with once daily dosing, few sleep interruptions, flexible dosing schedules, and no limitation on taking with meals. Appropriate treatment options should be based on the above proposed attributes. A comparative review of available extended release Tramadol formulations shows that these medications are not equivalent in their pharmacokinetic profile and this may have implications for selecting the optimal therapy for patients with pain syndromes where Tramadol is an appropriate analgesic agent. Differences in pharmacokinetics amongst the formulations may also translate into varied clinical responses in patients. Selection of the appropriate formulation by the health care provider should therefore be based on the patient’s chronic pain condition, needs, and lifestyle. PMID:24711710

  8. Adherence of pain assessment to the German national standard for pain management in 12 nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Osterbrink, Jürgen; Bauer, Zsuzsa; Mitterlehner, Barbara; Gnass, Irmela; Kutschar, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain is very common among nursing home residents. The assessment of pain is a prerequisite for effective multiprofessional pain management. Within the framework of the German health services research project, ‘Action Alliance Pain-Free City Muenster’, the authors investigated pain assessment adherence according to the German national Expert Standard for Pain Management in Nursing, which is a general standard applicable to all chronic/acute pain-affected persons and highly recommen...

  9. Adherence of Pain Assessment to the German National Standard for Pain Management in 12 Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Osterbrink

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain is very common among nursing home residents. The assessment of pain is a prerequisite for effective multiprofessional pain management. Within the framework of the German health services research project, ‘Action Alliance Pain-Free City Muenster’, the authors investigated pain assessment adherence according to the German national Expert Standard for Pain Management in Nursing, which is a general standard applicable to all chronic/acute pain-affected persons and highly recommended for practice.

  10. Supporting Self-management of Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-04

    Chronic Pain Syndrome; Chronic Pain; Chronic Pain Due to Injury; Chronic Pain Due to Trauma; Chronic Pain Due to Malignancy (Finding); Chronic Pain Post-Procedural; Chronic Pain Hip; Chronic Pain, Widespread

  11. Pain management discussion forum: prevention of chronic postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Harald

    2014-09-01

    ABSTRACT A case of a 35-year-old woman scheduled for removal of a painful breast tumor is discussed. Ways to reduce risk of chronic pain developing postoperatively are described. Preoperative medications, nerve blocks, local anesthetics, and postoperative epidural pharmacotherapy are described. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 1, Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd., and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, Ltd., and is distributed free of charge to health care professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the Web site: http://www.paineurope.com, at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication.

  12. Interest of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex in the management of refractory cancer pain in palliative care: Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizard, Julien; Levesque, Amélie; Denis, Nathalie; de Chauvigny, Edwige; Lepeintre, Aurélie; Raoul, Sylvie; Labat, Jean-Jacques; Bulteau, Samuel; Maillard, Benoît; Buffenoir, Kevin; Potel, Gilles; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Nguyen, Jean Paul

    2015-06-01

    Non-drug treatments should be systematically associated to the medical analgesic treatment during the terminal phase of cancer. Patient 1, a 23-year-old woman, presented an adenocarcinoma of the rectum, with liver and lung metastases. Pain was initially treated by oral morphine and a combination of pregabalin and amitriptyline. Ketamine and intrathecal administration of morphine were both ineffective. Patient 2, a 69-year-old woman, presented a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. She was admitted to the palliative care unit with mixed pain related to cutaneous lymphomatous infiltration. World Health Organization (WHO) step 3 analgesics had not been tolerated. Both patients received five consecutive 20-min sessions of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to the right motor cortex. Patient 1 experienced a marked improvement of her pain over the days following the first repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation session. Medical treatment was able to be rapidly decreased by about 50%, which restored an almost normal level of consciousness and lucidity. Patient 2's pain was also markedly decreased over the days following these five consecutive sessions, and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation also appeared to have had a beneficial effect on the patient's anxiety and mood. In the context of palliative care of cancer patients experiencing refractory pain that is difficult to control by the usual treatments, motor cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, due to its noninvasive nature, can be used as an adjuvant therapy to improve various components of pain, including the emotional components. By reducing the doses of analgesics, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation decreases the severity of their adverse effects and improves the patient's quality of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. The situation-specific theory of pain experience for Asian American cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok

    2008-01-01

    Studies have indicated the need for theories that explain and target ethnic-specific cancer pain experiences, including those of Asian Americans. In this article, I present a situation-specific theory that explains the unique cancer pain experience of Asian Americans. Unlike other existing theories, this situation-specific theory was developed on the basis of evidence, including a systematic literature review and research findings, making it comprehensive and highly applicable to research and practice with Asian American patients with cancer. Thus, this theory would strengthen the interconnections among theory, evidence, and practice in pain management for Asian American cancer patients.

  14. Fentanyl Formulations in the Management of Pain: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Stephan A; Ting, Sonya

    2017-05-01

    Fentanyl is a synthetic, highly selective opioid with many desirable physicochemical properties, including a high lipophilicity and predictable pharmacokinetics. These properties have an established record in the management of pain in a variety of settings, particularly acute pain and breakthrough cancer pain. Fentanyl was initially developed for parenteral use; however, this is invasive and impractical in the outpatient setting. Unfortunately, the high first-pass metabolism of fentanyl makes oral formulations unfeasible. However, its high lipophilicity allows fentanyl to be absorbed via a number of other routes. Thus new formulations were designed to allow non-invasive methods of administration. Transmucosal and transdermal fentanyl formulations are well established, and have proven useful in the settings of breakthrough cancer pain, emergencies and in the paediatric population. The iontophoretic transdermal system was developed to provide a needle-free system of delivering bolus doses of fentanyl on demand, a novel way of delivering patient-controlled opioid analgesia. Transpulmonary administration of fentanyl remains experimental. The aim of this review is to provide an update on current non-parenteral fentanyl formulations, with attention to their particular pharmacokinetics and features relevant to clinical use in pain management.

  15. GP pain management: what are the 'Ps' and 'As' of pain management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Aston

    2014-08-01

    Pain is one common reason for clinical encounters in primary care. The complex nature of chronic pain syndromes can make assessment and management daunting at times. This article presents an easy scheme to help general practitioners efficiently assess, manage and review/follow up patients with chronic pain. The mnemonic presented for assessment is the '4Ps' (pain, other pathology/past medical history, performance/function and psychological/psychiatric status). For management, we can also use '4Ps' (physical, psychological, pharmacological and procedural) and for review there are the '6As' (activities, analgesia, adverse effects, aberrance behaviours, affects and adequate documentation).

  16. American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) position statement: male infant circumcision pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Conner-Von, Susan; Turner, Helen N

    2013-12-01

    The ASPMN strongly recommends that infants who are being circumcised must receive optimal pain management. ‘‘If a decision for circumcision is made, procedural analgesia should be provided’’ (AAP, 1999, p. 691). Therefore, it is the position of the ASPMN that optimal pain management must be provided throughout the circumcision process. Furthermore, parents must be prepared for the procedure and educated about infant pain assessment. They must also be informed of pharmacologic and integrative pain management therapies that are appropriate before, during, and after the procedure.

  17. Effectiveness of fentanyl transdermal patch (fentanyl-TTS, durogegic) for radiotherapy induced pain and cancer pain: multi-center trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Huh, Seung Jae

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of fentanyl-TTS in the management of radiotherapy induced acute pain and cancer pain treated with radiotherapy. Our study was open labelled prospective phase IV multi-center study, the study population included patients with more 4 numeric rating scale (NRS) score pain although managed with other analgesics or more than 6 NRS score pain without analgesics. Patients divided into two groups: patients with radiotherapy induced pain (Group A) and patients with cancer pain treated with radiotherapy (Group B). All patients received 25 ug/hr of fentanyl transdermal patch. Primary end point was pain relief: second end points were change in patient quality of life, a degree of satisfaction for patients and clinician, side effects. Between March 2005 and June 2005, 312 patients from 26 participating institutes were registered, but 249 patients completed this study. Total number of patients in each group was 185 in Group A, 64 in Group B. Mean age was 60 years and male to female ratio was 76:24. Severe pain NRS score at 2 weeks after the application of fentanyl was decreased from 7.03 to 4.01, ρ = 0.003. There was a significant improvement in insomnia, social functioning, and quality of life. A degree of satisfaction for patients and clinician was very high. The most common reasons of patients' satisfactions was good pain control. Ninety six patients reported side effect. Nausea was the most common side effect. There was no serious side effect. Fentanyl-TTS was effective in both relieving pain with good tolerability and improving the quality of life for patients with radiotherapy induced acute pain and cancer pain treated with radiotherapy. The satisfaction of the patients and doctors was good. There wa no major side effect

  18. Effectiveness of fentanyl transdermal patch (fentanyl-TTS, durogegic) for radiotherapy induced pain and cancer pain: multi-center trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae [Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-12-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of fentanyl-TTS in the management of radiotherapy induced acute pain and cancer pain treated with radiotherapy. Our study was open labelled prospective phase IV multi-center study, the study population included patients with more 4 numeric rating scale (NRS) score pain although managed with other analgesics or more than 6 NRS score pain without analgesics. Patients divided into two groups: patients with radiotherapy induced pain (Group A) and patients with cancer pain treated with radiotherapy (Group B). All patients received 25 ug/hr of fentanyl transdermal patch. Primary end point was pain relief: second end points were change in patient quality of life, a degree of satisfaction for patients and clinician, side effects. Between March 2005 and June 2005, 312 patients from 26 participating institutes were registered, but 249 patients completed this study. Total number of patients in each group was 185 in Group A, 64 in Group B. Mean age was 60 years and male to female ratio was 76:24. Severe pain NRS score at 2 weeks after the application of fentanyl was decreased from 7.03 to 4.01, {rho} = 0.003. There was a significant improvement in insomnia, social functioning, and quality of life. A degree of satisfaction for patients and clinician was very high. The most common reasons of patients' satisfactions was good pain control. Ninety six patients reported side effect. Nausea was the most common side effect. There was no serious side effect. Fentanyl-TTS was effective in both relieving pain with good tolerability and improving the quality of life for patients with radiotherapy induced acute pain and cancer pain treated with radiotherapy. The satisfaction of the patients and doctors was good. There wa no major side effect.

  19. Medical hypnotherapy for pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón, Yvette; Avnet, Mark S

    2014-06-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. Hypnotherapy, its uses and process, and certification and training of hypnotherapy professionals are addressed.

  20. Biofeedback for pain management in traumatised refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Julia; Karl, Anke; Denke, Claudia; Mathier, Fabienne; Dittmann, Jennifer; Rohleder, Nicolas; Knaevelsrud, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pain (CP) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are both frequent and often comorbid in refugees. To date, few controlled trials have studied the efficacy of treatments targeting this comorbidity; no treatment guidelines yet exist. The authors examined the feasibility and efficacy of short-term cognitive behavioural biofeedback (BF) addressing CP in traumatised refugees. The sample comprised 11 severely traumatised refugees with CP and PTSD (mean age = 36 years, SD = 6), who underwent assessment with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale, Pain Disability Index, and Visual Rating Scale. Additionally, coping with pain and psychotherapy tolerance were assessed. Acceptance of BF was high. Pre-post effects were small to medium for increased pain management and associated heart rate reactivity but large for coping with pain. The results encourage further research to confirm whether BF is indicated as a treatment component, but not a stand-alone treatment, for traumatised refugees with comorbid CP and PTSD.

  1. American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Pain Management in Patients with Substance Use Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St. Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen; Turner, Helen N.

    2012-01-01

    The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high qu...

  2. Optimal pain management for radical prostatectomy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Grish P; Jaschinski, Thomas; Bonnet, Francis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increase in the diagnosis of prostate cancer has increased the incidence of radical prostatectomy. However, the literature assessing pain therapy for this procedure has not been systematically evaluated. Thus, optimal pain therapy for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy remains...... controversial. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for studies assessing the effects of analgesic and anesthetic interventions on pain after radical prostatectomy. All searches were conducted in October 2012 and updated in June 2015. RESULTS: Most...... treatments studied improved pain relief and/or reduced opioid requirements. However, there were significant differences in the study designs and the variables evaluated, precluding quantitative analysis and consensus recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review reveals that there is a lack...

  3. Management of patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debarle, Michel; Aigron, Rémi; Depernet, Laure

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the level of consensus within the French chiropractic profession regarding management of clinical issues. A previous Swedish study showed that chiropractors agreed relatively well on the management strategy for nine low back pain scenarios. We wished to investiga...

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Two Methadone Titration Methods for the Treatment of Cancer-Related Pain: The EQUIMETH2 Trial (Methadone for Cancer-Related Pain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Philippe; Berleur, Marie-Pierre; Lefki, Shimsi; Lefebvre, Danièle; Chvetzoff, Gisèle; Serra, Eric; Tremellat, Fibra; Derniaux, Alain; Filbet, Marilène

    2016-11-01

    In the European Association for Palliative Care recommendations for cancer pain management, there was no consensus regarding the indications, titration, or monitoring of methadone. This national, randomized, multicenter trial aimed to compare two methadone titration methods (stop-and-go vs. progressive) in patients with cancer-related pain who were inadequately relieved by or intolerant to Level 3 opioids. The primary end point was the rate of success/failure at Day 4, defined as pain relief (reduction of at least two points on the visual scale and a pain score methods were considered equally easy to perform by nearly 60% of the clinicians. Methadone is an effective and sustainable second-line alternative opioid for the treatment of cancer-related pain. The methods of titration are comparable in terms of efficacy, safety, and ease of use. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pain management in patients with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achterberg WP

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Wilco P Achterberg,1 Marjoleine JC Pieper,2 Annelore H van Dalen-Kok,1 Margot WM de Waal,1 Bettina S Husebo,3 Stefan Lautenbacher,4 Miriam Kunz,4 Erik JA Scherder,5 Anne Corbett6 1Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, 2Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 3Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 4Physiological Psychology, Otto Friedrich University Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany; 5Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 6Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, King's College London, London, UK Abstract: There are an estimated 35 million people with dementia across the world, of whom 50% experience regular pain. Despite this, current assessment and treatment of pain in this patient group are inadequate. In addition to the discomfort and distress caused by pain, it is frequently the underlying cause of behavioral symptoms, which can lead to inappropriate treatment with antipsychotic medications. Pain also contributes to further complications in treatment and care. This review explores four key perspectives of pain management in dementia and makes recommendations for practice and research. The first perspective discussed is the considerable uncertainty within the literature on the impact of dementia neuropathology on pain perception and processing in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, where white matter lesions and brain atrophy appear to influence the neurobiology of pain. The second perspective considers the assessment of pain in dementia. This is challenging, particularly because of the limited capacity of self-report by these individuals, which means that assessment relies in large part on observational methods. A number of tools are available but the psychometric quality and clinical utility of these are

  6. Contemporary pain management in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanasuk, Yutthana; Ngarmukos, Srihatach

    2012-10-01

    Pain management has become a very important part of postoperative care for total knee arthroplasty patients. Contemporary pain control has evolved from high-dose opioid in the past to state-of-the-art multimodal regimens. These include multiple non-opioid medication such as NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, and gabapentinoid, and novel anesthetic techniques such as preemptive analgesia and ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks. Another method which is gaining popularity is intraarticular injection of anesthetic cocktail during surgery. Pre-op education can also help patients cope with their pain better.

  7. [QUIPS: quality improvement in postoperative pain management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    Despite the availability of high-quality guidelines and advanced pain management techniques acute postoperative pain management is still far from being satisfactory. The QUIPS (Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management) project aims to improve treatment quality by means of standardised data acquisition, analysis of quality and process indicators, and feedback and benchmarking. During a pilot phase funded by the German Ministry of Health (BMG), a total of 12,389 data sets were collected from six participating hospitals. Outcome improved in four of the six hospitals. Process indicators, such as routine pain documentation, were only poorly correlated with outcomes. To date, more than 130 German hospitals use QUIPS as a routine quality management tool. An EC-funded parallel project disseminates the concept internationally. QUIPS demonstrates that patient-reported outcomes in postoperative pain management can be benchmarked in routine clinical practice. Quality improvement initiatives should use outcome instead of structural and process parameters. The concept is transferable to other fields of medicine. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Preoperative distress predicts persistent pain after breast cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, Mathias Kvist; Mertz, Birgitte Goldschmidt; Bidstrup, Pernille Envold Hansen

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Persistent pain after breast cancer treatment (PPBCT) affects 25% to 60% of breast cancer survivors and is recognized as a clinical problem, with 10% to 15% reporting moderate to severe pain several years after treatment. Psychological comorbidity is known to influence pain perception...

  9. Pain management in the pediatric oncological patient and factors influencing its perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego Muñoz, Cristóbal; Martínez Bautista, María José; Romero Hernández, Irene; García Martín, Fátima; Manzano Martín, María Victoria; Guerrero Navarro, Nieves

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a subjective characteristic found in many patients during their hospital stay. Pediatric population presents physiological and psychological characteristics different from those of the adults. Added to this, if a cancer process is present, for which they are subjected to numerous painful experiences during their diagnosis and treatment, adequate pain management is vital. The objective of this paper was to review the main factors that influence the perception of cancer pain in the pediatric patient and both non-pharmacological and pharmacological measures that are necessary to take into account for proper pain management. To this end, a literature review was made in MEDLINE database, which covered the scientific publications of the last 25 years. It can be concluded that oncological pain perception has a multifactoral component. Furthermore, in addition to appropriate use of pharmacologic measures, non-pharmacological actions are very important for a comprehensive approach to pain. (author)

  10. A survey of Canadian cancer patients' perspectives on the characteristics and treatment of breakthrough pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Gillian; Hawley, Philippa; Zhang, Liying; Slaven, Marissa; Gagnon, Pierre; Bisland, Stuart; Bennett, Margaret; Tardif, Francois; Chow, Edward

    2013-09-01

    Breakthrough pain is defined as a transient exacerbation of pain that occurs spontaneously or in response to a trigger despite stable and controlled background pain. The purpose of this study was to explore Canadian patients' awareness of and experience with breakthrough pain in cancer (BTPc). Four Canadian cancer centers participated in a non-interventional survey recruiting cancer patients who experienced breakthrough pain. These patients were asked about their pain, its impact on functioning, current management and interest in new treatments of BTPc. Ninety-four Canadian cancer patients participated in this study, with 96% stating that cancer pain impacted their daily living with over half unable to go to work or shopping. Fifty percent of patients said that an episode of BTPc lasted greater than 60 minutes, with the pain score being on average 7.8/10, impacting normal work (7.2/10) and general activity (7.1/10). Only 35% of patients were very satisfied with the speed of relief of their medications. Those who did not take their breakthrough pain medication for every episode stated that was because the pain was not always severe (37%), or they were afraid of becoming tolerant (23%) or addicted (12%). Patients stated that the most important features of a new treatment for BTPc were the ability to relieve pain completely (47%), and quickly (43%). Patients expressed willingness to try transmucosal products (80%) or nasal products (59%). Breakthrough cancer pain in Canadian cancer patients greatly impacts their daily lives. There is room for improvement in the management of BTPc, and the majority of patients would be willing to try new treatments.

  11. Design and rational for the precision medicine guided treatment for cancer pain pragmatic clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Scott A; Hicks, J Kevin; Portman, Diane G; Donovan, Kristine A; Gopalan, Priya; Schmit, Jessica; Starr, Jason; Silver, Natalie; Gong, Yan; Langaee, Taimour; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Starostik, Petr; Chang, Young D; Rajasekhara, Sahana; Smith, Joshua E; Soares, Heloisa P; George, Thomas J; McLeod, Howard L; Cavallari, Larisa H

    2018-05-01

    Pain is one of the most burdensome symptoms associated with cancer and its treatment, and opioids are the cornerstone of pain management. Opioid therapy is empirically selected, and patients often require adjustments in therapy to effectively alleviate pain or ameliorate adverse drug effects that interfere with quality of life. There are data suggesting CYP2D6 genotype may contribute to inter-patient variability in response to opioids through its effects on opioid metabolism. Therefore, we aim to determine if CYP2D6 genotype-guided opioid prescribing results in greater reductions in pain and symptom severity and interference with daily living compared to a conventional prescribing approach in patients with cancer. Patients with solid tumors with metastasis and a self-reported pain score ≥ 4/10 are eligible for enrollment and randomized to a genotype-guided or conventional pain management strategy. For patients in the genotype-guided arm, CYP2D6 genotype information is integrated into opioid prescribing decisions. Patients are asked to complete questionnaires regarding their pain, symptoms, and quality of life at baseline and 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after enrollment. The primary endpoint is differential change in pain severity by treatment strategy (genotype-guided versus conventional pain management). Secondary endpoints include change in pain and symptom interference with daily living. Pharmacogenetic-guided opioid selection for cancer pain management has potential clinical utility, but current evidence is limited to retrospective and observational studies. Precision Medicine Guided Treatment for Cancer Pain is a pragmatic clinical trial that seeks to determine the utility of CYP2D6 genotype-guided opioid prescribing in patients with cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Pain and Fatigue of Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghabati, Nahid; Pour Esmaiel, Zahra

    2010-01-01

    Despite major advances in pain management, cancer pain is managed poorly in 80% of the patients with cancer. Due to deleterious side effects of pharmacology therapy in these people, there is an urgent need for clinical trials of non-pharmacological interventions. To examine the effect of therapeutic touch (TT) on the pain and fatigue of the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, a randomized and three-groups experimental study—experimental (TT), placebo (placebo TT), and control (usual care)—was carried out. Ninety patients undergoing chemotherapy, exhibiting pain and fatigue of cancer, were randomized into one of the three groups in the Cancer Center of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran. Pain and fatigue were measured and recorded by participants before and after the intervention for 5 days (once a day). The intervention consisted of 30 min TT given once a day for 5 days between 10:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of pain and the Rhoten Fatigue Scale (RFS) were completed for 5 days before and after the intervention by the subjects. The TT (significant) was more effective in decreasing pain and fatigue of the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy than the usual care group, while the placebo group indicated a decreasing trend in pain and fatigue scores compared with the usual care group. PMID:18955319

  13. Pain Management: Road Map to Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Steven Z

    2017-02-01

    Lindblom Young Investigator Award for Clinical Sciences from the International Association for the Study of Pain, the Florida Physical Therapy Association's Award for Scholarly Impact on Practice, and APTA's Jules M. Rothstein Golden Pen Award and Eugene Michels New Investigator Award. In 2014, George's innovative knowledge contributed to being identified by Expertscape as the 10th-ranked world expert for scholarly contributions to the understanding and treatment of back pain. Expertscape's ranking, based on the quantity and quality of peer-reviewed clinical research publications in the National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE database, highlights George's status as a visionary in the profession. For his advocacy toward conducting meaningful research, expertise on pain management, and profound impact beyond published works, APTA is pleased to honor Steven Z. George as the 2016 John H.P. Maley Lecturer. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association

  14. [Physiotherapy and physical therapy in pain management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, M; Seeger, D; Schöps, P

    2015-10-01

    Patients attend physiotherapy and physical therapy (PT) due to pain problems and/or functional impairments. Although the main focus for therapists has traditionally been physical examination and treatment of tissue structures and biomechanics, over the last few decades a growing body of research has highlighted the importance of central nervous system processing and psychosocial contributors to pain perception. Treatment with PT aims to reduce disability and suffering by reducing pain and increasing tolerance to movement. In Germany, pain management conducted by physiotherapists is currently undergoing major changes. Firstly, PT education is transitioning from a vocational to a degree level and additionally new concepts for improved multidisciplinary treatment approaches are being developed. However, there still remain substantial differences between therapists working in multidisciplinary pain clinics and those following medical referral in private practices. This article provides information on how national and international impulses have contributed to the development of different concepts of passive therapies and active/functional pain rehabilitation in Germany. In the future PT will need to provide more evidence about efficiency and modes of actions for different treatment options to selectively reason the application to patients with acute, subacute and chronic pain.

  15. Mechanisms and management of functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Aziz, Qasim

    2014-09-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome is characterised by frequent or continuous abdominal pain associated with a degree of loss of daily activity. It has a reported population prevalence of between 0.5% and 1.7%, with a female preponderance. The pathophysiology of functional abdominal pain is incompletely understood although it has been postulated that peripheral sensitisation of visceral afferents, central sensitisation of the spinal dorsal horn and aberrancies within descending modulatory systems may have an important role. The management of patients with functional abdominal pain requires a tailored multidisciplinary approach in a supportive and empathetic environment in order to develop an effective therapeutic relationship. Patient education directed towards an explanation of the pathophysiology of functional abdominal pain is in our opinion a prerequisite step and provides the rationale for the introduction of interventions. Interventions can usefully be categorised into general measures, pharmacotherapy, psychological interventions and 'step-up' treatments. Pharmacotherapeutic/step-up options include tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors and the gabapentinoids. Psychological treatments include cognitive behavioural therapy and hypnotherapy. However, the objective evidence base for these interventions is largely derived from other chronic pain syndrome, and further research is warranted in adult patients with functional abdominal pain. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  16. Management of chronic pain after hernia repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andresen K

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Kristoffer Andresen, Jacob Rosenberg Department of Surgery, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: Chronic pain following inguinal hernia repair is a common problem and feared complication. Up to 16% of people experience chronic pain following the repair of a groin hernia. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of treatment strategies for patients with chronic pain following inguinal hernia repair based on best practice guidelines and current clinical routines. The optimal management of chronic pain following inguinal hernia surgery should begin with a thorough clinical examination to rule out other causes of chronic pain and to rule out a recurrence. A scaled approach to treatment is recommended. Initially, watchful waiting can be tried if it can be tolerated by the patient and then systemic painkillers, escalating to blocks, and surgery as the final option. Surgery should include mesh removal and triple neurectomy following anterior approaches or mesh and tack removal following a posterior approach. The diagnosis and treatment strategies should be performed by or discussed with experts in the field. Keywords: inguinal hernia, chronic pain, management, surgery, pharmacology, radio frequency

  17. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) for cancer pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlow, Adam; Bennett, Michael I; Robb, Karen A; Johnson, Mark I; Simpson, Karen H; Oxberry, Stephen G

    2012-03-14

    Cancer-related pain is complex and multi-dimensional but the mainstay of cancer pain management has predominantly used a biomedical approach. There is a need for non-pharmacological and innovative approaches. Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation (TENS) may have a role in pain management but the effectiveness of TENS is currently unknown. This is an update of the original review published in Issue 3, 2008. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of TENS for cancer-related pain in adults. The initial review searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED and PEDRO databases in April 2008. We performed an updated search of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PEDRO databases in November 2011. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTS) investigating the use of TENS for the management of cancer-related pain in adults. The search strategy identified a further two studies for possible inclusion. One of the review authors screened each abstract using a study eligibility tool. Where eligibility could not be determined, a second author assessed the full paper. One author used a standardised data extraction sheet to collect information on the studies and independently assess the quality of the studies using the validated five-point Oxford Quality Scale. The small sample sizes and differences in patient study populations of the three included studies (two from the original review and a third included in this update) prevented meta-analysis. For the original review the search strategy identified 37 possible published studies; we divided these between two pairs of review authors who decided on study selection; all four review authors discussed and agreed final scores. Only one additional RCT met the eligibility criteria (24 participants) for this updated review. Although this was a feasibility study, not designed to investigate intervention effect, it suggested that TENS may improve bone pain on movement in a

  18. The Danish Barriers Questionnaire-II: preliminary validation in cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Danish version of the Barriers Questionnaire-II (DBQ-II). METHODS: The validated Norwegian version of the DBQ-II was translated into Danish. Cancer patients for the study were recruited from specialized pain...... cancer pain management. Scale two, Immune System, consisted of three items addressing the belief that pain medications harm the immune system. Scale three, Monitor, consisted of three items addressing the fear that pain medicine masks changes in one's body. Scale four, Communication, consisted of five......: The DBQ-II seems to be a reliable and valid measure of the barriers to pain management among Danish cancer patients....

  19. Management of female sexual pain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Stéphanie C; Goldfinger, Corrie; Thibault-Gagnon, Stéphanie; Pukall, Caroline F

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the sexual pain disorders vaginismus and dyspareunia has been fundamentally altered over the past two decades due to increased attention and empirically sound research in this domain. This increased knowledge base has included a shift from a dualistic view of the etiology of painful and/or difficult vaginal penetration being due to either psychological or physiological causes, to a multifactorial perspective. The present chapter reviews current classification and prevalence rates, including ongoing definitional debates. Research regarding the etiology, assessment and management of sexual pain disorders is discussed from a biopsychosocial perspective. Cyclical theories of the development and maintenance of sexual pain disorders, which highlight the complex interplay among physiological, psychological and social factors, are described. Medical/surgical treatment options, pelvic floor rehabilitation and psychological approaches are reviewed, as well as future directions in treatment research. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Accountable disease management of spine pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J

    2011-09-01

    The health care landscape has changed with new legislation addressing the unsustainable rise in costs in the US system. Low-value service lines caring for expensive chronic conditions have been targeted for reform; for better or worse, the treatment of spine pain has been recognized as a representative example. Examining the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and existing pilot studies can offer a preview of how chronic care of spine pain will be sustained. Accountable care in an organization capable of collecting, analyzing, and reporting clinical data and operational compliance is forthcoming. Interdisciplinary spine pain centers integrating surgical and medical management, behavioral medicine, physical reconditioning, and societal reintegration represent the model of high-value care for patients with chronic spine pain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Physical modalities in chronic pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakel, Barbara; Barr, John O

    2003-09-01

    The following conclusions can be made based on review of the evidence: There is limited but positive evidence that select physical modalities are effective in managing chronic pain associated with specific conditions experienced by adults and older individuals. Overall, studies have provided the most support for the modality of therapeutic exercise. Different physical modalities have similar magnitudes of effects on chronic pain. Therefore, selection of the most appropriate physical modality may depend on the desired functional outcome for the patient, the underlying impairment, and the patient's preference or prior experience with the modality. Certain patient characteristics may decrease the effectiveness of physical modalities, as has been seen with TENS. These characteristics include depression, high trait anxiety, a powerful others locus of control, obesity, narcotic use, and neuroticism. The effect on pain by various modalities is generally strongest in the short-term period immediately after the intervention series, but effects can last as long as 1 year after treatment (e.g., with massage). Most research has tested the effect of physical modalities on chronic low back pain and knee OA. The effectiveness of physical modalities for other chronic pain conditions needs to be evaluated more completely. Older and younger adults often experience similar effects on their perception of pain from treatment with physical modalities. Therefore, use of these modalities for chronic pain in older adults is appropriate, but special precautions need to be taken. Practitioners applying physical modalities need formal training that includes the risks and precautions for these modalities. If practitioners lack formal training in the use of physical modalities, or if modality use is not within their scope of practice, it is important to consult with and refer patients to members of the team who have this specialized training. Use of a multidisciplinary approach to chronic pain

  2. Concepts within the Chinese culture that influence the cancer pain experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lih-Mih; Miaskowski, Christine; Dodd, Marylin; Pantilat, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe some of the concepts within the Chinese culture that influence the sociocultural dimension of the cancer pain experience. The major concepts that influence Chinese patients' perspectives on cancer pain and its management include Taoism/energy, Buddhism, and Confucianism. Within the beliefs of Taoism/energy, pain occurs if Qi, or blood circulation, is blocked. To relieve pain, the blockage of Qi/blood must be removed and the person needs to maintain harmony with the universe. Within the beliefs of Buddhism, pain/suffering is a power, unwanted but existent, that comes from a barrier in the last life; from the objective world; from a person's own sensation; or from other people, animals, and materials. Only by following the 8 right ways (ie, right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration) can an individual end the path of pain/suffering. A Confucian believes that pain is an essential element of life, a "trial" or a "sacrifice." Therefore, when a person suffers with pain, he or she would rather endure the pain and not report it to a clinician until the pain becomes unbearable. Oncology nurses who care for Chinese patients need to understand the fundamental beliefs that influence the sociocultural dimension of the pain experience for these patients. This information will assist the oncology nurse in developing a more effective pain management plan.

  3. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C.I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2008-01-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain.Altho...

  4. Documentation of pain care processes does not accurately reflect pain management delivered in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Erin E; Bair, Matthew J; Carey, Timothy S; Weinberger, Morris

    2010-03-01

    Researchers and quality improvement advocates sometimes use review of chart-documented pain care processes to assess the quality of pain management. Studies have found that primary care providers frequently fail to document pain assessment and management. To assess documentation of pain care processes in an academic primary care clinic and evaluate the validity of this documentation as a measure of pain care delivered. Prospective observational study. 237 adult patients at a university-affiliated internal medicine clinic who reported any pain in the last week. Immediately after a visit, we asked patients to report the pain treatment they received. Patients completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) to assess pain severity at baseline and 1 month later. We extracted documentation of pain care processes from the medical record and used kappa statistics to assess agreement between documentation and patient report of pain treatment. Using multivariable linear regression, we modeled whether documented or patient-reported pain care predicted change in pain at 1 month. Participants' mean age was 53.7 years, 66% were female, and 74% had chronic pain. Physicians documented pain assessment for 83% of visits. Patients reported receiving pain treatment more often (67%) than was documented by physicians (54%). Agreement between documentation and patient report was moderate for receiving a new pain medication (k = 0.50) and slight for receiving pain management advice (k = 0.13). In multivariable models, documentation of new pain treatment was not associated with change in pain (p = 0.134). In contrast, patient-reported receipt of new pain treatment predicted pain improvement (p = 0.005). Chart documentation underestimated pain care delivered, compared with patient report. Documented pain care processes had no relationship with pain outcomes at 1 month, but patient report of receiving care predicted clinically significant improvement. Chart review measures may not accurately

  5. Microsurgical spinothalamic chordotomy in the treatment of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavik, E; Ivanović, S; Grujisić, D; Djurović, B; Nikolić, I

    2005-01-01

    Advances in cancer treatment continue to lengthen survival among cancer patients. As patients live longer, the need for effective pain control has gained increased importance for improving quality of life. In patients who do not respond to all available conservative methods of therapy for cancer pain, surgical methods have been applied; one of them is the open high thoracic spinothalamic chordotomy. We present a group of 86 patients suffering from nociceptive cancer pain, caused by compression of lumbosacral plexus. All patients were treated by microsurgical open high thoracic spinothalamic chordotomy. These patients did not respond to any available conservative treatment. Immediately after surgery 68 (79%) patients had total pain relief. Of the remaining 18 (21%) patients, significant pain relief was achieved in 9 (10%), while in the remaining 9 patients this procedure had no effect. After a 6-month follow-up, total pain relief remained in 62 (72%) and significant pain relief in 10 (17%) of the patients. From 62 of patients with well-defined unilateral pain treated by "moderately deep" chordotomy, total pain relief was achieved in 53 (85%), lasting for 6 months in 49 (79%) of them. These results show that microsurgical chordotomy can achieve total control of intractable cancer pain in the majority (79%) of patients, especially in those with well-defined unilateral pain (85%), indicating the usefullness of this surgical approach in the treatment of nociceptive cancer pain.

  6. Coping with cancer -- managing fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How severe your fatigue is depends on the type of cancer you have, the stage of cancer, and ... distressed. These emotions can drain your energy and motivation. Medicines. Many of the medicines for treating pain, depression, insomnia, and ...

  7. American Society for Pain Management nursing position statement: pain management in patients with substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen; Turner, Helen N

    2012-10-01

    The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high-quality pain assessment and management. Failure to identify and treat the concurrent conditions of pain and substance use disorders will compromise the ability to treat either condition effectively. Barriers to caring for these patients include stigmatization, misconceptions, and limited access to providers skilled in these two categories of disorders. Topics addressed in this position statement include the scope of substance use and related disorders, conceptual models of addiction, ethical considerations, addiction risk stratification, and clinical recommendations.

  8. [Prevalence and aetiopathogenesis of neuropathic pain in elderly cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezón-Gutiérrez, Luis; Custodio-Cabello, Sara; Khosravi-Shahi, Parham

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of neuropathic pain is difficult to estimate as most studies evaluating chronic pain do not differentiate neuropathic from nociceptive pain. There are only a few studies of neuropathic pain in the elderly, specifically in the oncology population. This article is a non-systematic review of the relevant evidence on the prevalence and aetiopathogenesis of neuropathic cancer pain in the elderly. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Postoperative Pain Management: Clinicians' Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative Pain Management: Clinicians' Knowledge and Practices on Assessment and Measurement at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. ... A standardized questionnaire was administered to 236 hospital – based clinicians including medical doctors, nurses and clinical officers. The questionnaire consisted of ...

  10. Pain management in the outpatient surgical setting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-14

    May 14, 2003 ... Pain management in the outpatient surgical setting. Robert S. Wolf MD. American Sports Medicine Institute. Birmingham, AL USA emptive and post-operative setting. These medications inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, promote analgesia, and consequently decrease the post-operative demand for opioids.

  11. Oxycodone for cancer-related pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hansen, Mia; Bennett, Michael I; Arnold, Stephanie; Bromham, Nathan; Hilgart, Jennifer S

    2015-02-27

    Many patients with cancer experience moderate to severe pain that requires treatment with strong opioids, of which oxycodone and morphine are examples. Strong opioids are, however, not effective for pain in all patients, nor are they well-tolerated by all patients. The aim of this review was to assess whether oxycodone is associated with better pain relief and tolerability than other analgesic options for patients with cancer pain. To assess the effectiveness and tolerability of oxycodone for pain in adults with cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and MEDLINE In-Process (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), Science Citation Index, Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (ISI Web of Science), BIOSIS (ISI), PsycINFO (Ovid) and PubMed to March 2014. We also searched Clinicaltrials.gov, metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), EU Clinical Trials Register and World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). We checked the bibliographic references of relevant identified studies and contacted the authors of the included studies to find additional trials not identified by the electronic searches. No language, date or publication status restrictions were applied to the search. We included randomised controlled trials (parallel-group or cross-over) comparing oxycodone (any formulation or route of administration) with placebo or an active drug (including oxycodone) for cancer background pain in adults. Two authors independently extracted study data (study design, participant details, interventions and outcomes) and independently assessed the quality of the included studies according to standard Cochrane methodology. Where possible, we meta-analysed the pain intensity data using the generic inverse variance method, otherwise these data were summarised narratively along with the adverse event and patient preference data. The overall quality of the evidence for each outcome

  12. Treatment for Chronic Pain in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-25

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Pain; Precancerous/Nonmalignant Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. The effect of foot reflexology on pain in patients with metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Nancy; Dalton, Jo Ann; Carlson, John

    2003-11-01

    Thirty-six oncology inpatients participated in this third pilot study investigating the effects of foot reflexology in which equianalgesic dosing was calculated. Foot reflexology was found to have a positive immediate effect for patients with metastatic cancer who report pain, although there was no statistically significant effect at 3 hours after intervention or at 24 hours after intervention. Further study is suggested for foot reflexology delivered by family in the homes for management of cancer pain.

  14. Menstrual pain and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babic, Ana; Harris, Holly R; Vitonis, Allison F

    2018-01-01

    to lack of power. We assessed menstrual pain using either direct questions about having experienced menstrual pain, or indirect questions about menstrual pain as indication for use of hormones or medications. We used multivariate logistic regression to calculate the odds ratio (OR) for the association......Menstrual pain, a common gynecological condition, has been associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer in some, but not all studies. Furthermore, potential variations in the association between menstrual pain and ovarian cancer by histologic subtype have not been adequately evaluated due...... between severe menstrual pain and ovarian cancer, adjusting for potential confounders and multinomial logistic regression to calculate ORs for specific histologic subtypes. We observed no association between ovarian cancer and menstrual pain assessed by indirect questions. Among studies using direct...

  15. The relationship between ethnicity and the pain experience of cancer patients: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wingfai Kwok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer pain is a complex multidimensional construct. Physicians use a patient-centered approach for its effective management, placing a great emphasis on patient self-reported ratings of pain. In the literature, studies have shown that a patient′s ethnicity may influence the experience of pain as there are variations in pain outcomes among different ethnic groups. At present, little is known regarding the effect of ethnicity on the pain experience of cancer patients; currently, there are no systematic reviews examining this relationship. Materials and Methods: A systematic search of the literature in October 2013 using the keywords in Group 1 together with Group 2 and Group 3 was conducted in five online databases (1 Medline (1946-2013, (2 Embase (1980-2012, (3 The Cochrane Library, (4 Pubmed, and (5 Psycinfo (1806-2013. The search returned 684 studies. Following screening by inclusion and exclusion criteria, the full text was retrieved for quality assessment. In total, 11 studies were identified for this review. The keywords used for the search were as follows: Group 1-Cancer; Group 2- Pain, Pain measurement, Analgesic, Analgesia; Group 3- Ethnicity, Ethnic Groups, Minority Groups, Migrant, Culture, Cultural background, Ethnic Background. Results: Two main themes were identified from the included quantitative and qualitative studies, and ethnic differences were found in: (1 The management of cancer pain and (2 The pain experience. Six studies showed that ethnic groups face barriers to pain treatment and one study did not. Three studies showed ethnic differences in symptom severity and one study showed no difference. Interestingly, two qualitative studies highlighted cultural differences in the perception of cancer pain as Asian patients tended to normalize pain compared to Western patients who engage in active health-seeking behavior. Conclusion: There is an evidence to suggest that the cancer pain experience is different between

  16. Pain, movement, and mind: does physical activity mediate the relationship between pain and mental health among survivors of breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiston, Catherine M; Brunet, Jennifer; Burke, Shaunna

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the relationship between pain and mental health outcomes of depression and affect among survivors of breast cancer. The mediating role of physical activity was also tested. Survivors of breast cancer (N=145) completed self-report measures of pain symptoms at baseline, wore an accelerometer for 7 days, and reported levels of depression symptoms and negative and positive affect 3 months later. Hierarchical linear regression analyses, controlling for personal and cancer-related demographics, were used to test the association between pain symptoms and each mental health outcome, as well as the mediation effect of physical activity. Pain positively predicted depression symptoms [F(6,139)=4.31, Paffect [F(5,140)=4.17, Ppositive affect [F(6,139)=2.12, P=0.03, R=0.08]. Physical activity was a significant (Ppositive affect. Participation in physical activity is one pathway through which pain influences mental health. Efforts are needed to help survivors of breast cancer manage pain symptoms and increase their level of physical activity to help improve mental health.

  17. Nurses' strategies for managing pain in the postoperative setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Botti, Mari

    2005-03-01

    Acute pain is a significant problem in the postoperative setting. Patients report a lack of information about pain-control measures and ineffective pain control. Nurses continue to rely on pharmacologic measures and tend to under-administer analgesics. The purpose of this study was to determine the strategies nurses used to manage patients' pain in the postoperative setting. It also sought to examine the effect of context, including organization of care, nurses' prioritization of work activities, and pressures during a working shift, on their pain-management strategies. An observational design was used in two surgical units of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Six fixed observation times were identified as key periods for pain activities, each comprising a 2-hour duration. An observation period was examined at least 12 times, resulting in the completion of 74 observations and the identification of 316 pain cases. Fifty-two nurses were observed during their normal day's work with postoperative patients. Six themes were identified: managing pain effectively; prioritizing pain experiences for pain management; missing pain cues for pain management; regulators and enforcers of pain management; preventing pain; and reactive management of pain. The findings highlighted the critical nature of communication between clinicians and patients and among clinicians. It also demonstrated the influence of time on management strategies and the relative importance that nurses place on nonpharmacologic measures in actual practice. This research, which portrays what happens in actual clinical practice, has facilitated the identification of new data that were not evident from other research studies.

  18. Drug Reduces Cancer Treatment-Related Joint Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Cancer Currents blog post about a clinical trial demonstrating that duloxetine (Cymbalta®) may reduce joint pain caused by aromatase inhibitors in women being treated for early-stage breast cancer.

  19. Evaluation of pain incidence and pain management in a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design. A prospective observational study, using the Numerical Rating Scale for pain (NRS pain), Numerical Rating Scale for anxiety (NRS anxiety), the Alder Hey Triage Pain Score (AHTPS), the COMFORT behaviour scale and the Touch Visual Pain Scale (TVPS). All patients were assessed at admission; those who were ...

  20. Assessment of patient satisfaction with pain management in small community inpatient and outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corizzo, C C; Baker, M C; Henkelmann, G C

    2000-09-01

    To describe patient outcomes (e.g., pain intensity and relief, satisfaction, expectations) and analgesic practices of healthcare providers for inpatients and outpatients in community hospital settings. Descriptive, correlational, and random sampling. Three community-based institutions in southeast Louisiana. 114 inpatients and outpatients with cancer-related or acute postoperative pain. Inpatients (n = 68) mostly were women and younger than 60 years of age. Outpatients (n = 46) mostly were men and older than 60 years of age. Both groups were predominantly well-educated and Caucasian. Subjects completed a modified version of the American Pain Society's Patient Satisfaction Survey. Researchers completed a chart audit tool reviewing analgesic prescriptive and administrative practices. Weak to moderately strong correlations existed for the relationships between the satisfaction variables and the pain intensity, pain relief, and expectation variables for all subjects. Satisfaction with current pain intensity was correlated most strongly with pain intensity and relief scores. Higher pain intensity and relief were related to lower satisfaction with current pain intensity. Regardless of setting or pain type, subjects experienced significant amounts of pain during a 24-hour period. Patient expectations for experiencing high levels of pain were realized, but expectations for significant pain relief were not. Institutional pain management programs that approach pain from a multidimensional perspective need to be developed. Continued education for healthcare professionals and patients is a vital part of this process.

  1. [AIDS and pain management-a survey of German AIDS and pain management units.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, D; Radbruch, L; Grond, S; Heise, W

    1994-06-01

    The number of AIDS patients is steadily increasing. According to the literature these patients are often in severe pain. We evaluated pain diagnoses and treatments with two almost identical questionnaires for AIDS treatment units (ATU) and pain management units (PMU). Questions dealt with unit type and size, number of patients treated per year and the proportion of intravenous drug users. The units were also asked to give an estimate of pain aetiologies, pain types and localizations and treatment modalities offered. Completed questionnaires were returned by 38 of 235 ATU and 85 of 127 PMU. In the ATU, 16% of the patients (estimated at 580 patients per year) had pain requiring treatment. In 26 of the PMU approximately 120 AIDS patients per year were treated, while 59 PMU had not yet seen any AIDS patients. Pain was caused mainly by opportunistic infections and by neurological syndromes connected with AIDS. Pain aetiologies could not be differentiated in the ATU in 22% of patients (PMU 9%), and pain types in 33% (PMU 9%). Neuropathic pain (ATU 38%, PMU 89%) was more frequent than nociceptive pain (ATU 29%, PMU 36%). The treatment modalities were systemic pharmacotherapy in 76% of ATU and 73% of PMU and nerve blocks in 37% of ATU and 42% of PMU. In 82% of ATU the staff thought their analgesic therapy was adequate, and in 92% staff were interested in closer cooperation with PMU such as was currently practised in only 6 of the 38 units (16%) that responded. The high incidence of complicated neuropathic pain syndromes in AIDS patients requires a sophisticated therapeutic approach. Closer cooperation between AIDS specialists and pain specialists, comparable to that already existing for other patient groups, is therefore desirable.

  2. Spinal cord stimulation for cancer-related pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lihua; Min, Su; Zejun, Zhou; Wei, Ke; Bennett, Michael I

    2015-06-29

    This is an update of a review first published in The Cochrane Library in Issue 3, 2013. Cancer-related pain places a heavy burden on public health with related high expenditure. Severe pain is associated with a decreased quality of life in patients with cancer. A significant proportion of patients with cancer-related pain are under-treated. There is a need for more effective control of cancer-related pain. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may have a role in pain management. The effectiveness and safety of SCS for patients with cancer-related pain is currently unknown. This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of SCS for cancer-related pain compared with standard care using conventional analgesic medication. We also appraised risk and potential adverse events associated with the use of SCS. This is an update of a review first published in The Cochrane Library in Issue 3, 2013. The search strategy for the update was the same as in the original review. We searched the following bibliographic databases in order to identify relevant studies: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; and CBM (Chinese Biomedical Database) in October 2014. We also handsearched relevant journals. There were no language restrictions. We planned to include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that directly compared SCS with other interventions with regards to the effectiveness of pain management. We also planned to include cross-over trials that compared SCS with another treatment. We planned to identify non-randomised controlled trials but these would only be included if no RCTs could be found. The literature search for the update of this review found 121 potentially eligible articles. The initial search strategy yielded 430 articles. By scrutinising titles and abstracts, we found 412 articles irrelevant to the analytical purpose of this systematic review due to different scopes of diseases or different methods of intervention

  3. Neonatal pain management: Still in search of the Holy Grail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Allegaert (Karel); J.N. van den Anker (John)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractInadequate pain management but also inappropriate use of analgesics in early infancy has negative effects on neuro-developmental outcome. As a consequence, neonatal pain management is still in search for the Holy Grail. At best, effective pain management is based on prevention,

  4. Optimising pain management- An update | Schellack | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The key to optimal pain management is the ability to effectively monitor the patient to ensure pain relief, whilst minimising or managing the side-effects of pain medication. This will only be possible though the collaborative work of all healthcare professionals managing the patient. This article provides an overview of the ...

  5. Spiritual pain among patients with advanced cancer in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mako, Caterina; Galek, Kathleen; Poppito, Shannon R

    2006-10-01

    The large body of empirical research suggesting that patients' spiritual and existential experiences influence the disease process has raised the need for health care professionals to understand the complexity of patients' spiritual pain and distress. The current study explores the multidimensional nature of spiritual pain, in patients with end-stage cancer, in relation to physical pain, symptom severity, and emotional distress. The study combines a quantitative evaluation of participants' intensity of spiritual pain, physical pain, depression, and intensity of illness, with a qualitative focus on the nature of patients' spiritual pain and the kinds of interventions patients believed would ameliorate their spiritual pain. Fifty-seven patients with advanced stage cancer in a palliative care hospital were interviewed by chaplains. Overall, 96% of the patients reported experiencing spiritual pain, but they expressed it in different ways: (1) as an intrapsychic conflict, (2) as interpersonal loss or conflict, or (3) in relation to the divine. Intensity of spiritual pain was correlated with depression (r = 0.43, p spiritual pain did not vary by age, gender, disease course or religious affiliation. Given both the universality of spiritual pain and the multifaceted nature of pain, we propose that when patients report the experience of pain, more consideration be given to the complexity of the phenomena and that spiritual pain be considered a contributing factor. The authors maintain that spiritual pain left unaddressed both impedes recovery and contributes to the overall suffering of the patient.

  6. A European survey of oncology nurse breakthrough cancer pain practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rustoen, Tone; Geerling, Jenske I.; Pappa, Theodora; Rundstrom, Carina; Weisse, Isolde; Williams, Sian C.; Zavratnik, Bostjan; Kongsgaard, Ulf E.; Wengstrom, Yvonne

    Purpose of the research: Breakthrough cancer pain (BTCP) is a prevalent type of pain in which the nurse can play an important role in improving patients' pain symptoms and overall well-being. Nurses' experience with BTCP (number of patients, and estimates of severity and frequency), the treatment of

  7. Effects of Herbal Acupuncture(Soyeum on Cancer Patients Accompanied by Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa-Seung Yoo

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study was designed to evaluate effects of "Soyeum" on cancer patients accompanied by pain. Materials and Methods : We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 9 patients accompanied by pain who had been injected with "Soyeum" for over 14 days continuously in East-West Cancer Center of Oriental Hospital of Daejeon University from June 2002 through August 2002. Results : The statistical significance between the pre-treatment and post-treatment results (Changes of Cytokine Level, QOL, BPQ and Pain relief after pain management were analyzed. Analysis of cytokines (IL-12, IFN-γ level showed that the percentage of increase of IL-12 is 60.0%, IFN-γ is 60.0%. Analysis of QOL showed that the percentage of maintenance and improvement is 77.8%. 55.5% of the patients reported a "worst pain" intensity score of 3 or greater, 44.5% reported a "least pain" intensity score of 2 or greater, and 66.7% reported "average pain" intensity score of 2 or greater. 33.3% of the patients were in pain at the time of interview and 22.2% had a current intensity score of 2 or greater. Analysis of pain relief after pain management showed that the percentage of pain relief score of 2 and 3 is 55.6%. The data was expressed as Mean±SE by using descriptive statistics. Statistical significance examined by using paired t-test. Conclusions : It is suggested that "Soyeum" has effects on pain of cancer patients, also expected that "Soyeum" is useful to improve immunoactivity and for cancer patients.

  8. Patient-related barriers to pain management: the Barriers Questionnaire II (BQ-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Sigridur; Donovan, Heidi S; Serlin, Ronald C; Voge, Catherine; Ward, Sandra

    2002-10-01

    Patients' beliefs can act as barriers to optimal management of cancer pain. The Barriers Questionnaire (BQ) is a tool used to evaluate such barriers. Here, the BQ has been revised to reflect changes in pain management practices, resulting in the Barriers Questionnaire-II (BQ-II), a 27-item, self report instrument. This paper presents the results from two studies where the psychometric properties of the BQ-II were evaluated. In the first study, the responses of 27 nurses trained in pain management were compared to responses of a convenience sample of 12 patients with cancer. The results indicated that patients with cancer had higher mean scores on the BQ-II than did nurses trained in pain management. In the second study, a convenience sample of 172 patients with cancer responded to the BQ-II and a set of pain and quality of life (QOL) measures. A factor analysis supported four factors. Factor one, physiological effects, consists of 12 items addressing the beliefs that side effects of analgesics are inevitable and unmanageable, concerns about tolerance, and concerns about not being able to monitor changes in one's body when taking strong pain medications. Factor two, Fatalism, consists of three items addressing fatalistic beliefs about cancer pain and its management. Factor three, Communication, consists of six items addressing the concern that reports of pain distract the physician from treating the underlying disease, and the belief that 'good' patients do not complain of pain. The fourth and final factor, harmful effects, consists of six items addressing fear of becoming addicted to pain medication and the belief that pain medications harm the immune system. The BQ-II total had an internal consistency of 0.89, and alpha for the subscales ranged from 0.75 to 0.85. Mean (SD) scores on the total scale was 1.52 (0.73). BQ-II scores were related to measures of pain intensity and duration, mood, and QOL. Patients who used adequate analgesics for their levels of pain had

  9. Dimethyl sulfoxide and sodium bicarbonate in the treatment of refractory cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Ba X; Tran, Dao M; Tran, Hung Q; Nguyen, Phuong T M; Pham, Tuan D; Dang, Hong V T; Ha, Trung V; Tran, Hau D; Hoang, Cuong; Luong, Khue N; Shaw, D Graeme

    2011-01-01

    Pain is a major concern of cancer patients and a significant problem for therapy. Pain can become a predominant symptom in advanced cancers. In this open-label clinical study, the authors have treated 26 cancer patients who have been declared as terminal without the option of conventional treatment. These patients suffered from high levels of pain that was poorly managed by all available interventional approaches recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) guideline. The results indicate that intravenous infusion of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and sodium bicarbonate (SB) solution can be a viable, effective, and safe treatment for refractory pain in cancer patients. These patients had pain due to the disease progression and complication of chemotherapy and radiation. Moreover, the preliminary clinical outcome of 96-day follow-up suggests that the application of DMSO and SB solution intravenously could lead to better quality of life for patients with nontreatable terminal cancers. The data of this clinical observation indicates that further research and application of the DMSO and SB combination may help the development of an effective, safe, and inexpensive therapy to manage cancer pain.

  10. Barriers in the management of cancer-related pain and strategies to overcome them: findings of a qualitative research involving physicians and nurses in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesarina Prandi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and aims. There are many barriers and obstacles that even today lead to an inadequate treatment of cancer-related pain. The aim is to describe the experiences of a group of Italian physicians and nurses as far as the nature of these barriers is concerned and the possible tools to be used to overcome them. Material and method. We run 5 focus groups with 42 healthcare professionals (11 physicians, 31 nurses working in 5 hospitals in Italy. The findings of the focus groups were analysed according to the “Content Analysis” method. Results. Five main items emerged: the importance of communication, the need for education regarding pain therapy, the ethnic/cultural/religious differences, the mutual trust and support within the working group, the daily challenges. Conclusion. In harmony with the most recent literature, physicians and nurses voice above all their need for an education more directly aimed at overcoming the prevailing barriers rooted in ignorance, prejudice and fears.

  11. Knowledge and attitudes of pain management among nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voshall, Barbara; Dunn, Karen S; Shelestak, Debra

    2013-12-01

    A descriptive correlational design was used in this study to examine nursing faculty knowledge and attitudes in pain management. Relationships between age, education level, pain management preparation, length of time practicing as a nurse, length of time teaching nursing, time teaching pain management in the classroom, taught pain guidelines in the classroom, and additional continuing education about pain management were explored. Ninety-six nursing faculty participated from 16 schools of nursing in one Midwestern U.S. region. Findings identified that most of the nursing faculty recalled being taught about pain management in their basic education, but less than one-half felt adequately prepared. Most respondents said that they taught pain management, yet fewer than one-half identified that they used specific pain management guidelines. Faculty demonstrated adequate knowledge of pain assessment, spiritual/cultural issues, and pathophysiology. Areas of weakness were found in medications, interventions, and addiction. Faculty that reported teaching pain management in the classroom and reported more continuing education missed fewer items. Older nursing faculty reported more years of practice, more years of teaching, and more continuing education in pain management than younger faculty. Younger nursing faculty remembered being taught pain management in nursing school and felt more adequately prepared than older nursing faculty. Faculty that reported practicing for longer periods of time felt less prepared in pain management than faculty who practiced for shorter periods of time. More continuing education in pain management may be needed for older nurses to meet the recommendations of the Institute of Medicines' report on relieving pain in the U.S. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychometric Evaluation of the Pain Attitudes Questionnaire-Revised for People With Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Kenneth; Tran, Kim T; Gauthier, Lynn R; Rodin, Gary; Zimmermann, Camilla; Warr, David; Librach, S Lawrence; Moore, Malcolm; Shepherd, Frances A; Gagliese, Lucia

    2017-07-01

    Pain-related stoicism and cautiousness are theorized to be more prevalent in older than younger patients and to lead to greater pain under-reporting and consequently inadequate pain management in older patients. The Pain Attitudes Questionnaire-Revised (PAQ-R), which measures 5 pain-related stoicism (fortitude, concealment, superiority) and cautiousness (self-doubt, reluctance) factors in chronic pain, can help test this hypothesis in advanced cancer but requires validation. We conducted a psychometric evaluation of the PAQ-R in 155 younger (younger than 60 years) and 114 older (aged 60 years and older) patients with advanced cancer. Participants showed disagreement with self-doubt items and floor effects with the subscale. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed good fit of the PAQ-R's 5 factors to younger and older groups' data but collinearity between fortitude and concealment. Multisample confirmatory factor analyses supported partial scalar invariance between age groups. Few hypothesized age-related differences were observed. Younger patients reported higher superiority scores than older patients. Whereas older patients showed greater fortitude and superiority with lower average pain intensity, younger patients showed greater concealment or fortitude with greater worst and average pain intensity. Furthermore, whereas older patients displayed greater superiority with lower interference in relations with others, younger patients displayed greater concealment and superiority with greater interference in walking ability and greater concealment and self-doubt with more interference in relations with others. Cross-validation of the PAQ-R's factor structure and identification of pathways to the factors and effect on pain-related outcomes using multivariate approaches are warranted. This article presents the psychometric properties of a measure of 2 particular pain-related attitudes. The measure can help clarify whether these attitudes adversely influence pain

  13. Post-operative pain prevalence, predictors, management practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MWASHAMBWA

    developing countries however, the prevalence of post-operative pain is relatively very high and pain control strategies ... Keywords: post-operative pain, prevalence, predictors, pain management, satisfaction, Tanzania. Introduction ..... perception and patterns of cerebral activation during noxious heat stimulation in humans.

  14. Ketamine for cancer pain: what is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkman, Kelly; van de Donk, Tine; Dahan, Albert

    2017-06-01

    In this review, we assess the benefit of ketamine in the treatment of terminal cancer pain that is refractory to opioid treatment and/or complicated by neuropathy. While randomized controlled trials consistently show lack of clinical efficacy of ketamine in treating cancer pain, a large number of open-label studies and case series show benefit. Ketamine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist that at low-dose has effective analgesic properties. In cancer pain, ketamine is usually prescribed as adjuvant to opioid therapy when pain becomes opioid resistant or when neuropathic pain symptoms dominate the clinical picture. A literature search revealed four randomized controlled trials that examined the benefit of oral, subcutaneous or intravenous ketamine in opioid refractory cancer pain. None showed clinically relevant benefit in relieving pain or reducing opioid consumption. This suggests absence of evidence of benefit for ketamine as adjuvant analgesic in cancer pain. These findings contrast the benefit from ketamine observed in a large number of open-label studies and (retrospective) case series. We relate the opposite outcomes to methodological issues. The complete picture is such that there is still insufficient evidence to state with certainty that ketamine is not effective in cancer pain.

  15. Pain management strategies for neuropathic pain in Fabry disease--a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuller, Y.; Linthorst, G. E.; Hollak, C. E. M.; van Schaik, I. N.; Biegstraaten, M.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the key features of (classical) Fabry disease (FD). No randomized clinical trials comparing effectiveness of different pain management strategies have been performed. This review aims to give an overview of existing pain management strategies. PubMed and Embase were

  16. Analgesic Prescription Patterns and Pain Outcomes in Southeast Asia: Findings From the Analgesic Treatment of Cancer Pain in Southeast Asia Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Huy Quoc Thinh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify patterns of analgesic prescription and to explore patient-reported pain intensity, sleep disturbance, and quality of life among cancer patients with pain in Southeast Asia (SEA. Methods: This cross-sectional observational study included 465 adult outpatients prescribed analgesics for cancer pain for 1 month or longer at 22 sites in Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Data on analgesic prescription and cancer characteristics were extracted from medical records. Pain intensity, sleep disturbance, and quality of life measures were recorded via questionnaires. Results: Most patients (84.4% had stage III or IV cancer. A total of 419 patients (90.7% were prescribed opioids; of these, 42.2% received only weak opioids, whereas 57.8% received at least one strong opioid. The mean worst pain intensity during the past 24 hours was 4.76 (standard deviation [SD], 2.47 on a scale of 0 (no pain to 10 (worst possible pain; the mean current pain intensity was 4.10 (SD, 2.61. More than half of patients (54.8% reported sleep disturbance caused by pain in the past 7 days. The majority of patients reported problems with pain/discomfort (82.3%, usual activities (65.8%, mobility (58.2%, and anxiety/depression (56.3%. The median daily dose prescribed in oral morphine equivalents was 30 mg for both morphine and tramadol. Conclusion: Despite unrelieved pain, sleep disturbance, and issues with quality of life, a notable proportion of patients were prescribed only weak opioids, and opioid doses prescribed were generally low. Efforts focused on encouragement of prescriptions with analgesic strength and/or doses proportional to the pain management needs of patients are vital to improve the status of cancer pain management in the region.

  17. Aromatherapy for pain management in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline A; Collins, Carmel T; Crowther, Caroline A

    2011-07-06

    Many women would like to avoid pharmacological or invasive methods of pain management in labour and this may contribute towards the popularity of complementary methods of pain management. This review examined currently available evidence supporting the use of aromatherapy for pain management in labour. To examine the effects of aromatherapy for pain management in labour on maternal and perinatal morbidity. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 October 2010), The Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field's Trials Register (October 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to 31 October 2010), CINAHL (1980 to 31 October 2010), the Australian and New Zealand Trials Registry (31 October 2010), Chinese Clinical Trial Register (31 October 2010), Current Controlled Trials (31 October 2010), ClinicalTrials.gov (31 October 2010), ISRCTN Register (31 October 2010), National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) (31 October 2010) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (31 October 2010). Randomised controlled trials comparing aromatherapy with placebo, no treatment or other non-pharmacological forms of pain management in labour. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We included two trials (535 women) in the review. The trials found no difference between groups for the primary outcomes of pain intensity, assisted vaginal birth (risk ratio (RR) 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48 to 2.28, one trial, 513 women; RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.06 to 11.70, one trial, 22 women), and caesarean section (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.94, one trial, 513 women; RR 2.54, 95% CI 0.11 to 56.25, one trial, 22 women); there were more babies admitted to neonatal intensive care in the control group of one trial (RR 0.08, 95% CI 0.00 to 1.42, one trial, 513 women) but this

  18. Relaxation techniques for pain management in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline A; Levett, Kate M; Collins, Carmel T; Armour, Mike; Dahlen, Hannah G; Suganuma, Machiko

    2018-03-28

    Many women would like to avoid pharmacological or invasive methods of pain management in labour and this may contribute to the popularity of complementary methods of pain management. This review examined currently available evidence on the use of relaxation therapies for pain management in labour. This is an update of a review first published in 2011. To examine the effects of mind-body relaxation techniques for pain management in labour on maternal and neonatal well-being during and after labour. We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (9 May 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 5 2017), MEDLINE (1966 to 24 May 2017), CINAHL (1980 to 24 May 2017), the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (18 May 2017), ClinicalTrials.gov (18 May 2017), the ISRCTN Register (18 May 2017), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (18 May 2017), and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised controlled trials (including quasi randomised and cluster trials) comparing relaxation methods with standard care, no treatment, other non-pharmacological forms of pain management in labour or placebo. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. We attempted to contact study authors for additional information. We assessed evidence quality with GRADE methodology. This review update includes 19 studies (2519 women), 15 of which (1731 women) contribute data. Interventions examined included relaxation, yoga, music and mindfulness. Approximately half of the studies had a low risk of bias for random sequence generation and attrition bias. The majority of studies had a high risk of bias for performance and detection bias, and unclear risk of bias for, allocation concealment, reporting bias and other bias. We assessed the evidence from these studies as ranging from low to very low quality, and

  19. Effectiveness of the World Health Organization cancer pain relief guidelines: an integrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Cathy L

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate cancer pain relief has been documented extensively across historical records. In response, in 1986, the World Health Organization (WHO) developed guidelines for cancer pain treatment. The purpose of this paper is to disseminate the results of a comprehensive, integrative review of studies that evaluate the effectiveness of the WHO guidelines. Studies were included if they: 1) identified patients treated with the guidelines, 2) evaluated self-reported pain, 3) identified instruments used, 4) provided data documenting pain relief, and 5) were written in English. Studies were coded for duration of treatment, definition of pain relief, instruments used, findings related to pain intensity or relief, and whether measures were used other than the WHO analgesic ladder. Twenty-five studies published since 1987 met the inclusion criteria. Evidence indicates 20%–100% of patients with cancer pain can be provided pain relief with the use of the WHO guidelines – while considering their status of treatment or end-of-life care. Due to multiple limitations in included studies, analysis was limited to descriptions. Future research to examine the effectiveness of the WHO guidelines needs to consider recommendations to facilitate study comparisons by standardizing outcome measures. Recent studies have reported that patients with cancer experience pain at moderate or greater levels. The WHO guidelines reflect the knowledge and effectual methods to relieve most cancer pain, but the guidelines are not being adequately employed. Part of the explanation for the lack of adoption of the WHO guidelines is that they may be considered outdated by many because they are not specific to the pharmacological and interventional options used in contemporary pain management practices. The conundrum of updating the WHO guidelines is to encompass the latest pharmacological and interventional innovations while maintaining its original simplicity. PMID:27524918

  20. Spirituality and Quality of Life in Black Patients with Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jinbing; Brubaker, Andrea; Meghani, Salimah H; Bruner, Deborah W; Yeager, Katherine A

    2018-05-29

    The objective of this study was to examine the associations between spirituality and overall quality of life (QOL) and individual QOL domains in Black patients with cancer pain. A secondary data analysis of a parent study exploring pain medication adherence in Black patients receiving around-the-clock opioids with cancer pain was performed. All the participating patients completed Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being Scale (spirituality), Brief Pain Inventory (pain severity and interference), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (symptoms), and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (QOL). Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between spirituality and overall QOL and QOL domains and to identify the predictors of overall QOL and QOL domains. Black patients treated for cancer pain (n = 102) completed the study. Pearson correlation showed significant positive associations between spirituality and overall QOL (p < 0.001) and individual QOL domains (physical, social, emotional, functional). Higher spirituality was associated with lower pain severity (p = 0.01), pain interference (p = 0.001) and total symptoms score (p < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, the best model for the overall QOL explained 67% of the variance (p < 0.001) and included total symptoms score, pain interference, spirituality and age. Spirituality significantly predicted QOL domains of social (p < 0.0001), emotional (p = 0.002) and functional well-being (p = 0.001) rather than physical well-being. Spirituality is associated with decreased pain and lower symptom burden and may serve as a protective factor against diminished overall QOL, specifically social, emotional and functional domains in back patients with cancer pain. There is a need to develop spirituality-based interventions along with symptom management interventions to improve QOL for this population. Copyright © 2018. Published by

  1. Cancer pain in the opioid-addicted patient: can we treat it right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto-Lowe, Vania; Girard, Lisa; Chaplin, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Although cancer elicits an array of physical and emotional symptoms, pain is often identified as the most distressing. Cancer pain may result from the primary tumor, metastasis, surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or medical comorbidities. Although treatment with opioid analgesics is accepted as appropriate therapy for cancer-related pain, under treatment may persist among certain patients. Opioid-addicted individuals represent a challenging and heterogeneous population to treat. Addiction is linked to psychopathology and antisocial behaviors (eg, lying) which often complicate evaluation. Chronic exposure to opioids may lead to physiologic dependence and its correlates, tolerance and hyperalgesia. Given the variability and subjectivity of the cancer pain experience, there are no objective measures which capture the adequacy of pain control. Thus, when faced with complaints of uncontrolled pain, clinicians must consider a differential diagnosis of tolerance, disease progression, addiction, pseudoaddiction, chemical coping, or even criminal behavior. This article explores the cognitive, behavioral, and physiological correlates of opioid addiction that may impact cancer pain management. It also discusses risk reduction strategies for opioid misuse and research directions that may lead to improved clinical outcomes in these patients.

  2. [Management of postoperative pain in surgical units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbos, A

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve the management of postoperative pain many publications insist on progressive changes in care organization. The following list outlines steps to be taken for implementation of these changes: 1) an initial analysis of management of post-operative pain allows awareness of reforms to be proposed; 2) participation of health teams in special training in order to use evaluation tools and collect data (use of analgesics, adverse effects); 3) establishing policies and procedures: recovery room, guidelines for analgesic use and adverse effects; 4) notifying patient about the various procedures to be used in postoperative period--discussion with the patient during the preoperative interview; 5) current use of standard patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and locoregional analgesia; 6) use of combined techniques in order to achieve a balanced analgesia; 7) implementing a quality assurance programme which should include analgesic effectiveness, patient satisfaction and prevention of complications; and 8) planning of an Acute Pain Service based on a clinical nurse co-ordinator which offers highly effective forms of postsurgical analgesia.

  3. Teaching Pain Management to Student Nurses: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekatrina Wijayanti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To provide nursing students knowledge of pain prior, during, and post- surgery, recovery and rehabilitation. Methods: Review articles published during 2005 until 2012 that focused on pain assessment and pain management. The databases used in this study were Medline and CINAHL.Results: Postoperative pains need special approach and care. It needs teach patient how to adapt pain, control pain, monitor result of treatment. Conclusion: Nursing students need to learn how to assess pain using appropriate tools for each age level and in patients with special needs. The students also need to learn about pain management including pharmacology and non-pharmacology means and consider pain as the fifth vital sign. As student nurses learn pain assessment, they should be considerate about culture, and different languages that might happen during practical rotations.

  4. Pain Management in Children with Collaborative Parents and Healthcare Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Vakili

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Most children in hospital have pain. Seeing your child in pain or discomfort is incredibly difficult. Pain in children is a public health concern of major significance in most parts of the world. We have learned that unrelieved pain causes the body to release certain chemicals that may actually delay healing, so it's important to work with child's nurses and doctors to help children for control the pain. On the other side, medication is not the only way to relieve pain. Pain in children should always be managed and pain expression is dependent on the child’s age, cognitive development, and socio cultural context and it is important to pay particular attention to developmental variations in any behavioural manifestations of pain. In this study to explain some ways for parents and healthcare team to manage pain in children.

  5. Implementing a pain management nursing protocol for orthopaedic surgical patients: Results from a PAIN OUT project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Cui; Wang, Ling-Xiao; Li, Qi; Zaslansky, Ruth; Li, Li

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the effect of introducing a standardised pain management nursing protocol in orthopaedic patients undergoing surgery. Postoperative pain is a common phenomenon but is still undertreated in hospitalised patients. Nurses' lack of sufficient knowledge and skills about pain management may be a contributing factor to poor outcomes. An interventional, separate sample pre- and post-test. A pain management nursing protocol was introduced and a handbook and training sessions regarding management of postsurgical pain were provided to the nurses on a Joint Orthopaedic ward at a university-affiliated general hospital in Guangzhou, China. Before and after the intervention, nurses' knowledge about pain management and attitudes were assessed, and perioperative management practices and pain-related patient-reported outcomes were evaluated. Sixteen and 15 registered nurses, and 77 and 71 patients participated in the study before and after the intervention, respectively. Nurses' scores related to knowledge and skills increased significantly after the protocol was introduced but were still insufficient with regard to pharmacological-related items. The proportion of patients receiving a combined opioid and nonopioid increased after the intervention. Clinically significant changes were observed in some patient-reported outcomes, such as worst pain since surgery, percentage of time experiencing severe pain, and pain interference with activities out of bed. There were significant changes in nonpharmacological methods administered by nurses to patients or used by patients to relieve pain. Implementation of a pain management nursing protocol combined with education in one surgical ward was associated with nurses' increased knowledge and attitudes regarding pain, a change in some management practices, and improvement in a number of pain-related patient-reported outcomes. It was feasible to develop and implement a standardised pain management nursing protocol and use it in the

  6. The cost of survival: an exploration of colorectal cancer survivors' experiences of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Amanda; Payne, Sheila; Brady, Anne-Marie

    2017-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine report 'From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor' has drawn widespread attention to the experiences of cancer survivors. Research examining the symptom experiences of survivors are proliferative within the literature but limited by samples which include multiple tumor groups and varying inclusion criteria. This cross-sectional quantitative study seeks to examine pain and quality of life (QoL) in the context of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivorship, as defined by the Institute of Medicine. A purposive sample of CRC survivors (n = 252) attending hospitals and cancer support centers in the Republic of Ireland were recruited between September 2014 and January 2016. Self-rated health (SRH), QoL and pain were assessed in the sample using the EuroQOL questionnaire, the Functional Assessment of Therapy-Colorectal (FACT-C) questionnaire, and symptom experience items. One hundred participants (40%) indicated they had pain on the day of the survey or in the past week. Of those with pain, many also experienced a lack of energy (95%), bowel dysfunction (74%), sleep disturbance (76%) or interference with their ability to enjoy life (75%). Pain was associated with younger age, female gender, current chemotherapy treatment, and previous radiotherapy treatment. Although participants reported positive QoL scores, statistical analysis revealed pain was linked to significantly poorer SRH and overall QoL, and poorer physical, emotional, functional, social/family and CRC-specific wellbeing, compared to those who did not indicate pain. Pain was experienced by almost two fifths of CRC survivors up to five years after treatment and was associated with poorer SRH and QoL. In light of these findings, healthcare professionals must endeavor to manage cancer survivors' needs in a manner which is cognizant of the burden of pain and in the context of other symptoms and morbidities experienced by long-term cancer survivors.

  7. The role of tramadol in pain management in Latin America: a report by the Change Pain Latin America Advisory Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Garcia, Joäo Batista; Lech, Osvandré; Campos Kraychete, Durval; Rico, María Antonieta; Hernández-Castro, John Jairo; Colimon, Frantz; Guerrero, Carlos; Sempértegui Gallegos, Manuel; Lara-Solares, Argelia; Flores Cantisani, José Alberto; Amescua-Garcia, César; Guillén Núñez, María Del Rocío; Berenguel Cook, María Del Rosario; Jreige Iskandar, Aziza; Bonilla Sierra, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    Change Pain Latin America (CPLA) was created to enhance chronic pain understanding and develop pain management improving strategies in this region. During its seventh meeting (August 2016), the main objective was to discuss tramadol's role in treating pain in Latin America. Furthermore, potential pain management consequences were considered, if tramadol was to become more stringently controlled. Key topics discussed were: main indications for prescribing tramadol, its pharmacological characteristics, safety and tolerability, effects of restrictions on its availability and use, and consequent impact on pain care quality. The experts agreed that tramadol is used to treat a wide spectrum of non-oncological pain conditions (e.g. post-surgical, musculoskeletal, post-traumatic, neuropathic, fibromyalgia), as well as cancer pain. Its relevance when treating special patient groups (e.g. the elderly) is recognized. The main reasons for tramadol's high significance as a treatment option are: its broad efficacy, an inconspicuous safety profile and its availability, considering that access to strong analgesics - mainly controlled drugs (classical opioids) - is highly restricted in some countries. The CPLA also agreed that tramadol is well tolerated, without the safety issues associated with long-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use, with fewer opioid-like side effects than classical opioids and lower abuse risk. In Latin America, tramadol is a valuable and frequently used medication for treating moderate to severe pain. More stringent regulations would have significant impact on its availability, especially for outpatients. This could cause regression to older and frequently inadequate pain management methods, resulting in unnecessary suffering for many Latin American patients.

  8. Neural Blockade for Persistent Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijayasinghe, Nelun; Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Kehlet, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    involved in neuropathic pain syndromes or to be used as a treatment in its own right. The purpose of this review was to examine the evidence for neural blockade as a potential diagnostic tool or treatment for persistent pain after breast cancer surgery. In this systematic review, we found only 7 studies (n......Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery is predominantly a neuropathic pain syndrome affecting 25% to 60% of patients and related to injury of the intercostobrachial nerve, intercostal nerves, and other nerves in the region. Neural blockade can be useful for the identification of nerves...

  9. Pain management in primary care – current perspectives | Meyer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to a 1998 World Health Organization Survey of 26 000 primary care ... in pain medicine and continue to follow the biomedical approach, which ... The modern paradigm of pain management has moved from this biomedical to the ...

  10. Acute pain management in children with sickle cell anaemia during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    inpatient system for debilitating events such as crises or acute pain. ... and pharmacological treatments documented in the patients' case files. ... this study. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate acute pain management in SCA children on ...

  11. Pain management in Jordan: nursing students' knowledge and attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khalaileh, Murad; Al Qadire, Mohammad

    Pain management requires knowledgeable and trained nurses. Because nursing students are the nurses of the future, it is important to ensure that students receive adequate education about pain management in nursing schools. The purpose of this study is to evaluate nursing students' knowledge and attitudes regarding pain management. A cross-sectional survey was used. The sample comprised 144 students from three nursing colleges in Jordan. Sixty-one percent were female and the average age was 21.6 years (SD 1.7). The students' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain was used. The rate of correct answers ranged from 11.1% to 64%. Students showed a low level of knowledge regarding pain management-the average score was just 16 (SD 5.11) out of 40. Students were weak in their knowledge of pain medications pharmacology (actions and side effects). Less than half of students (47.9%) recognised that pain may be present, even when vital signs are normal and facial expressions relaxed. Finally, students showed negative attitudes towards pain management, believing that patients should tolerate pain as much as they can before receiving opioids; almost half (48%) of students agreed that patients' pain could be managed with placebo rather than medication. In conclusion, Jordanian nursing students showed lower levels of pain knowledge compared with other nursing students around the world. This study underlines the need to include pain-management courses throughout undergraduate nursing curricula in Jordan.

  12. Sickle cell disease pain management in adolescents: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bridget H; Nelson, Jessica

    2015-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) pain continues to emerge in adolescents. More than 98,000 individuals are believed to have SCD in the United States. In fact, 1 in 500 Black infants will be affected by SCD. Identifying standards of care for this unique population can improve pain management and treatment. A significant effect of vaso-occlusive crisis is a decrease in the quality of life in children. Therefore, pain management is multidimensional and includes pharmacologic, physical, and psychological strategies. A review of the literature was conducted to identify best practices regarding pain management in adolescents with sickle cell anemia. Key words such as pain, pain management, adolescent sickle cell anemia, and acute sickle cell pain were entered into databases to reveal qualitative and quantitative studies from 2009 to the present. Many of the research articles identified poor SCD pain management. Studies showed that acute SCD pain management is essential and should be evaluated and robustly managed to achieve optimum pain relief for patients. Acute SCD pain usually occurs as a result of vaso-occlusive crisis. Untreated acute SCD pain can result in morbidity and mortality in adolescents. Nursing knowledge is critical to reducing the stigma and improving management of SCD pain. Nurses play a vital role in the introduction of evidence-based practice within the clinical setting. In an effort to educate nurses and other health care professionals about SCD, this article is a literature review of studies concerning SCD and pain management in emergency rooms. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in a major cancer center for the treatment of severe cancer-related pain and associated disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Jeffrey; Gulati, Amitabh

    2015-06-01

    Cancer pain is difficult to treat, often requiring a multimodal approach. While medication management remains the mainstay for the treatment of cancer pain, medications are often associated with undesired side effects. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) provides a potential adjunctive method for treating cancer pain with minimal side effects. Few studies have been performed evaluating the efficacy of TENS on cancer pain. We sought to examine the usefulness of TENS on all cancer patients and to specifically look at the use of TENS as a goal-directed therapy to improve functionality. Retrospective cohort study. Since 2008, patients with chronic cancer pain and on multimodal pain regimens were trialed with TENS. Those patients who showed an improvement in pain symptoms or severity were educated about and provided with a TENS unit for use at home. Pain symptoms and scores were monitored with the visual analog scale (VAS), the numerical rating pain (NRP) scale, and Short-Form McGill Questionnaire at the start of TENS treatment and at 2 months follow-up. TENS proved beneficial in 69.7% of patients over the course of 2 months. In TENS responsive patients, VAS scores decreased by 9.8 on a 0-100 mm scale (P TENS provides a beneficial adjunct for the treatment of cancer pain, especially when utilized as a goal-directed therapy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. TelePain: Primary care chronic pain management through weekly didactic and case‐based telementoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Flynn

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a significant problem among military personnel and a priority of the military health system. The U.S. Army Surgeon General's Pain Management Task Force recommends using telehealth capabilities to enhance pain management. This article describes the development and evaluation of a telehealth intervention (TelePain designed to improve access to pain specialist consultation in the military health system. The study uses a wait-list cluster controlled clinical trial to test: 1 effectiveness of the intervention, and 2 interviews to assess barriers and facilitators of the intervention implementation. The intervention involves a didactic presentation based on the Joint Pain Education Curriculum followed by patient case presentations and multi-disciplinary discussion via videoconference by clinicians working in the military health system. A panel of pain specialists representing pain medicine, internal medicine, anesthesiology, rehabilitation medicine, psychiatry, addiction medicine, health psychology, pharmacology, nursing, and complementary and integrative pain management provide pain management recommendations for each patient case. We use the Pain Assessment Screening Tool and Outcomes Registry (PASTOR to measure patient outcomes, including pain, sleep, fatigue, anxiety, and depression. This article reports some of the challenges and lessons learned during early implementation of the TelePain intervention. Weekly telephone meetings among the multisite research team were instrumental in problem solving, identifying problem areas, and developing solutions. Solutions for recruitment challenges included additional outreach and networking to military health providers, both building on existing relationships and new relationships.

  15. TelePain: Primary Care Chronic Pain Management through Weekly Didactic and Case-based Telementoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Diane M; Eaton, Linda H; McQuinn, Honor; Alden, Ashley; Meins, Alexa R; Rue, Tessa; Tauben, David J; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2017-12-01

    Chronic pain is a significant problem among military personnel and a priority of the military health system. The U.S. Army Surgeon General's Pain Management Task Force recommends using telehealth capabilities to enhance pain management. This article describes the development and evaluation of a telehealth intervention (TelePain) designed to improve access to pain specialist consultation in the military health system. The study uses a wait-list controlled clinical trial to test: 1) effectiveness of the intervention, and 2) interviews to assess barriers and facilitators of the intervention implementation. The intervention involves a didactic presentation based on the Joint Pain Education Curriculum followed by patient case presentations and multi-disciplinary discussion via videoconference by clinicians working in the military health system. A panel of pain specialists representing pain medicine, internal medicine, anesthesiology, rehabilitation medicine, psychiatry, addiction medicine, health psychology, pharmacology, nursing, and complementary and integrative pain management provide pain management recommendations for each patient case. We use the Pain Assessment Screening Tool and Outcomes Registry (PASTOR) to measure patient outcomes, including pain, sleep, fatigue, anxiety, and depression. This article reports some of the challenges and lessons learned during early implementation of the TelePain intervention. Weekly telephone meetings among the multisite research team were instrumental in problem solving, identifying problem areas, and developing solutions. Solutions for recruitment challenges included additional outreach and networking to military health providers, both building on.

  16. Pain related to cancer treatments and diagnostic procedures: a no man's land?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, C I; Bossi, P; Santini, D; Fallon, M

    2014-06-01

    While guidelines are available for the management of cancer-related pain, little attention is given to the assessment and treatment of pain caused by treatments and diagnostic procedures in cancer patients. We evaluated the literature on pain related to cancer treatment and diagnostic procedures within a critical analysis. The data available are sparse, suggesting that little attention has been directed at this important aspect of oncology. This points to potentially suboptimal patient management. Appropriate studies are necessary in order to understand the incidence and appropriate management of pain, both during and/or after oncological treatments and diagnostic procedures. At the same time, Health Care Professionals should have heightened awareness of the causes and treatment of pain with the aim of anticipating and managing pain most appropriately for each individual patient. This is clearly an important component of holistic patient care before, during, and after oncological treatment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Management of lumbar zygapophysial (facet) joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Falco, Frank JE; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic validity and therapeutic value of lumbar facet joint interventions in managing chronic low back pain. METHODS: The review process applied systematic evidence-based assessment methodology of controlled trials of diagnostic validity and randomized controlled trials of therapeutic efficacy. Inclusion criteria encompassed all facet joint interventions performed in a controlled fashion. The pain relief of greater than 50% was the outcome measure for diagnostic accuracy assessment of the controlled studies with ability to perform previously painful movements, whereas, for randomized controlled therapeutic efficacy studies, the primary outcome was significant pain relief and the secondary outcome was a positive change in functional status. For the inclusion of the diagnostic controlled studies, all studies must have utilized either placebo controlled facet joint blocks or comparative local anesthetic blocks. In assessing therapeutic interventions, short-term and long-term reliefs were defined as either up to 6 mo or greater than 6 mo of relief. The literature search was extensive utilizing various types of electronic search media including PubMed from 1966 onwards, Cochrane library, National Guideline Clearinghouse, clinicaltrials.gov, along with other sources including previous systematic reviews, non-indexed journals, and abstracts until March 2015. Each manuscript included in the assessment was assessed for methodologic quality or risk of bias assessment utilizing the Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies checklist for diagnostic interventions, and Cochrane review criteria and the Interventional Pain Management Techniques - Quality Appraisal of Reliability and Risk of Bias Assessment tool for therapeutic interventions. Evidence based on the review of the systematic assessment of controlled studies was graded utilizing a modified schema of qualitative evidence with best evidence synthesis, variable from level I to level V

  18. Pediatric Nurses’ Beliefs and Pain Management Practices: An Intervention Pilot

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Catherine Van Hulle; Wilkie, Diana J.; Wang, Edward

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated feasibility of the Internet-based Relieve Children's Pain (RCP) protocol to improve nurses’ management of children's pain. RCP is an interactive, content-focused, and Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory-based intervention. Using a one-group, pre/posttest design, we evaluated feasibility of RCP and pre/post difference in scores for nurses’ beliefs, and simulated and actual pain management practices. Twenty-four RNs completed an Internet-based Pain Beliefs and Practices Questionnai...

  19. Meta-Analysis of Massage Therapy on Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Yeop; Yeo, Sujung; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lim, Sabina

    2015-07-01

    Cancer pain is the most common complaint among patients with cancer. Conventional treatment does not always relieve cancer pain satisfactorily. Therefore, many patients with cancer have turned to complementary therapies to help them with their physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Massage therapy is increasingly used for symptom relief in patients with cancer. The current study aimed to investigate by meta-analysis the effects of massage therapy for cancer patients experiencing pain. Nine electronic databases were systematically searched for studies published through August 2013 in English, Chinese, and Korean. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and Cochrane risk-of-bias scales. Twelve studies, including 559 participants, were used in the meta-analysis. In 9 high-quality studies based on the PEDro scale (standardized mean difference, -1.24; 95% confidence interval, -1.72 to -0.75), we observed reduction in cancer pain after massage. Massage therapy significantly reduced cancer pain compared with no massage treatment or conventional care (standardized mean difference, -1.25; 95% confidence interval, -1.63 to -0.87). Our results indicate that massage is effective for the relief of cancer pain, especially for surgery-related pain. Among the various types of massage, foot reflexology appeared to be more effective than body or aroma massage. Our meta-analysis indicated a beneficial effect of massage for relief of cancer pain. Further well-designed, large studies with longer follow-up periods are needed to be able to draw firmer conclusions regarding the effectiveness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. The management of chronic pain in Switzerland: a comparative survey of Swiss medical specialists treating chronic pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Mohrle, J.J.; Dolin, P.J.; Martin, N.C.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic pain management by Swiss specialist physicians with the primary hypothesis that pain clinic practitioners conform better to good practice (interdisciplinarity, diagnostic/therapeutic routines, quality control, education) than other specialists treating chronic pain was surveyed. Management

  1. Parent Attitudes Toward Pain Management for Childhood Immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Mark; Wallace, Dustin P; Williams, Kristi; Parker, JoLynn; Schurman, Jennifer V

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based pain-limiting strategies for pediatric immunizations remain underutilized, with barriers identified to date mostly pertaining to health care providers and systems of care. The present study sought to quantify and investigate parent attitudes toward pain management as another potential barrier to the routine use of pain-mitigating strategies during immunizations. Questionnaires measuring parent attitudes, willingness to pay, and perceived barriers for using pain management for immunizations were completed by 259 parent/guardians of children ages 0 to 5 years attending appointments at an urban primary care clinic in the Midwestern United States. Parent attitudes toward pain management for immunization were relatively normally distributed and varied from strongly positive to negative, with 33% of parents disagreeing that they were concerned about the pain their child may experience and 50% agreeing that there are no lasting negative effects from immunization pain. Negative parent attitudes were associated with willingness to spend less in money or time for pain management and with greater perceived significance of cost, time, and other barriers for using pain-mitigating strategies. Some parents perceive limited value in trying to reduce pain during immunizations such that they may be hesitant to invest much time or effort in interventions. Greater success of translating evidence-based pain management into practice therefore may require accounting for differences in parent attitudes by tailoring educational efforts and pain management options accordingly.

  2. Management of pain in advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Dylan G

    2014-06-01

    Pain is common in advanced malignancy but also prevalent in other non-malignant life-limiting diseases such as advanced heart disease; end stage renal failure and multiple sclerosis. Patients with renal or liver impairment need specific consideration, as most analgesics rely on either or both for their metabolism and excretion. Recent evidence-based guidelines and the systematic reviews that have informed their recommendations. The principles of the WHO (World Health Organisation) analgesic ladder are commonly endorsed as a structured approach to the management of pain. For neuropathic pain, the efficacy of different agents is similar and choice of drug more guided by side effects, drug interactions and cost. Evidence supporting the WHO analgesic ladder is disputed and alternatives suggested, but no overwhelming evidence for an alternative approach exists to date. Alternative approaches to the WHO analgesic ladder, new analgesic agents, e.g. rapid onset oral/intranasal fentanyl. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Evaluation of pain management interventions for neonatal circumcision pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, B A; Keck, J F; Gerkensmeyer, J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of music and eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) on pain responses of neonates undergoing circumcision. A randomized, double-blind experimental design was used with 23 neonates. Pain response was measured using an observational pain intensity rating scale and the physiologic parameters of heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation levels, salivary cortisol levels, and length of cry. Each infant's state was examined for a potential contribution to the pain response. Infant state, salivary cortisol levels, and respiratory rates were not significant. Pain ratings had considerable variability for all treatment conditions, but both single treatment groups had less pain by the end of the procedure. The heart rate was significantly lower for the EMLA group and remained stable for the music group. Oxygen saturation differences were statistically significant for the music group (P =.02) and approached significance for the EMLA group. Preliminary support was provided for the efficacy of EMLA and music to contribute to the pain relief of neonates undergoing circumcision. Further study is warranted. Neonates deserve interventions that will provide them with a less painful start in life.

  4. Pain in castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gater Adam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone metastases are a common painful and debilitating consequence of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CPRC. Bone pain may predict patients' prognosis and there is a need to further explore CRPC patients' experiences of bone pain in the overall context of disease pathology. Due to the subjective nature of pain, assessments of pain severity, onset and progression are reliant on patient assessment. Patient reported outcome (PRO measures, therefore, are commonly used as key endpoints for evaluating the efficacy of CRPC treatments. Evidence of the content validity of leading PRO measures of pain severity used in CRPC clinical trials is, however, limited. Methods To document patients' experience of CRPC symptoms including pain, and their impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL, semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 patients with CRPC and bone metastases. The content validity of the Present Pain Intensity (PPI scale from the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ, and the 'Average Pain' and 'Worst Pain' items of the Brief Pain Inventory Short-Form (BPI-SF was also assessed. Results Patients with CRPC and bone metastases present with a constellation of symptoms that can have a profound effect on HRQL. For patients in this study, bone pain was the most prominent and debilitating symptom associated with their condition. Bone pain was chronic and, despite being generally well-managed by analgesic medication, instances of breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP were common. Cognitive debriefing of the selected PRO measures of pain severity highlighted difficulties among patients in understanding the verbal response scale (VRS of the MPQ PPI scale. There were also some inconsistencies in the way in which the BPI-SF 'Average Pain' item was interpreted by patients. In contrast, the BPI-SF 'Worst Pain' item was well understood and interpreted consistently among patients. Conclusions Study findings support the

  5. African Americans' Perceptions of Pain and Pain Management: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Staja Q

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to explore the perceptions of acute, persistent, and disease-specific pain and treatment options held by adult African Americans. Underassessment and undermanagement of pain in African Americans has been well documented; however, the cultural continuum of pain perceptions and their influence on pain assessment and management has not been synthesized. Electronic database searches of the Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PubMed, Web-based searches of the pain-specific journals plus a manual search of reference lists identified 41 relevant articles addressing perceptions of pain and/or pain management. Analysis of the literature revealed six themes: (a) meaning of pain, (b) description of pain, (c) coping with pain, (d) impact of pain, (e) patient-provider relationship, and (f) treatment approaches. These findings warrant further research and indicate the need for more precise evaluation of pain in African Americans, highlighting an imperative to incorporate cultural patterns into pain management practice and education. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. The Management of Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    pain syndrome (MFPS) was attributed to an inflammation of fibrous tissue ... Afferent nerve fibres to muscle are classified as groups I, II,. III and IV. .... tion of pain. There is evidence that pain caused by peripheral .... C. Occupational therapy.

  7. Codeine, alone and with paracetamol (acetaminophen), for cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Carmen; Derry, Sheena; Jackson, Kenneth C; Wiffen, Philip J; Bell, Rae F; Strassels, Scott; Straube, Sebastian

    2014-09-19

    Pain is very common in patients with cancer. Opioid analgesics, including codeine, play a significant role in major guidelines on the management of cancer pain, particularly for mild to moderate pain. Codeine is widely available and inexpensive, which may make it a good choice, especially in low-resource settings. Its use is controversial, in part because codeine is not effective in a minority of patients who cannot convert it to its active metabolite (morphine), and also because of concerns about potential abuse, and safety in children. To determine the efficacy and safety of codeine used alone or in combination with paracetamol for relieving cancer pain. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 2), MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception to 5 March 2014, supplemented by searches of clinical trial registries and screening of the reference lists of the identified studies and reviews in the field. We sought randomised, double-blind, controlled trials using single or multiple doses of codeine, with or without paracetamol, for the treatment of cancer pain. Trials could have either parallel or cross-over design, with at least 10 participants per treatment group. Studies in children or adults reporting on any type, grade, and stage of cancer were eligible. We accepted any formulation, dosage regimen, and route of administration of codeine, and both placebo and active controls. Two review authors independently read the titles and abstracts of all studies identified by the searches and excluded those that clearly did not meet the inclusion criteria. For the remaining studies, two authors read the full manuscripts and assessed them for inclusion. We resolved discrepancies between review authors by discussion. Included studies were described qualitatively, since no meta-analysis was possible because of the small amount of data identified, and clinical and methodological between-study heterogeneity. We included 15

  8. Improving physician-patient communication about cancer pain with a tailored education-coaching intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Richard L; Slee, Christina; Kalauokalani, Donna K; Dean, Dionne Evans; Tancredi, Daniel J; Kravitz, Richard L

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the effect of a theoretically grounded, tailored education-coaching intervention to help patients more effectively discuss their pain-related questions, concerns, and preferences with physicians. Grounded in social-cognitive and communication theory, a tailored education-coaching (TEC) intervention was developed to help patients learn pain management and communication skills. In a RCT, 148 cancer patients agreed to have their consultations audio-recorded and were assigned to the intervention or a control group. The recordings were used to code for patients' questions, acts of assertiveness, and expressed concerns and to rate the quality of physicians' communication. Patients in the TEC group discussed their pain concerns more than did patients in the control group. More active patients also had more baseline pain and interacted with physicians using participatory decision-making. Ratings of physicians' information about pain were higher when patients talked more about their pain concerns. The study demonstrates the efficacy of a theoretically grounded, coaching intervention to help cancer patients talk about pain control. Coaching interventions can be effective resources for helping cancer patients communicate about their pain concerns if they are theoretically grounded, can be integrated within clinical routines, and lead to improve health outcomes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Could kinesiology taping help mitigate pain, breathlessness and abdominal-related symptoms in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Gourav; Rose, Alison; Briggs, Michelle; Johnson, Mark I

    2017-02-24

    We present the case of a woman who was an amateur athlete diagnosed with primary breast cancer, and 10 years later with terminal metastatic cancer. This case report was prepared posthumously in co-operation with her next of kin (husband). The patient first presented to a sports physiotherapist (AR) for her pain-management and to help maintain physical fitness so that she could continue with sports and an active lifestyle. The patient continued with physiotherapy for several months to enable her to be active. However, when her health deteriorated significantly due to advancing cancer, the treatment was modified and aimed at improving the patient's general well-being. The physiotherapist applied kinesiology tape over the patient's lower rib cage, diaphragm and abdomen in an attempt to manage pain, breathlessness and abdominal bloating. The patient reported alleviation of pain, breathlessness, abdominal discomfort and nausea, accompanied by improvements in eating, drinking, energy levels and physical function. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Tramadol with or without paracetamol (acetaminophen) for cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2017-05-16

    Tramadol is an opioid analgesic licensed for use in moderate to severe pain. It is considered as a low risk for abuse, so control regulations are not as stringent as for 'strong' opioids such as morphine. It has a potential role as a step 2 option of the World Health Organization (WHO) analgesic ladder. To assess the benefits and adverse effects of tramadol with or without paracetamol (acetaminophen) for cancer-related pain. We searched the following databases using a wide range of search terms: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS. We also searched three clinical trials registry databases. The date of the last search was 2 November 2016. We selected studies that were randomised, with placebo or active controls, or both, and included a minimum of 10 participants per treatment arm. We were interested particularly in blinded studies, but also included open studies.We excluded non-randomised studies, studies of experimental pain, case reports, and clinical observations. Two review authors independently extracted data using a standard form and checked for agreement before entry into Review Manager 5. We included information about the number of participants treated and demographic details, type of cancer, drug and dosing regimen, study design (placebo or active control) and methods, study duration and follow-up, analgesic outcome measures and results, withdrawals, and adverse events. We collated multiple reports of the same study, so that each study, rather than each report, was the unit of interest in the review. We assessed the evidence using GRADE and created a 'Summary of findings' table.The main outcomes of interest for benefit were pain reduction of 30% or greater and 50% or greater from baseline, participants with pain no worse than mild, and participants feeling much improved or very much improved. We included 10 studies (12 reports) with 958 adult participants. All the studies enrolled participants with

  11. Many Patients with Cancer Need Better Treatments for Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inadequate pain treatment in patients with cancer remains a significant problem and appears to be more frequent among minorities, according to a new study published online April 16, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Therapeutic management of locally unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard-Bohas, C.; Saurin, J.C.; Mornex, F.

    1997-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer still have bad prognosis. At the time of diagnosis, less than 10 % of patients can undergo surgery with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 2 %. For patients with localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma, the combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy has been shown to control symptoms and to enhance patient survival. This treatment should be proposed to all the patients with good performance status and without icterus. Pain management should be optimized and often need morphinic and co-antalgic (anticonvulsants, steroids) consumption. The celiac plexus block with alcohol gives an excellent pain relief and should be more frequently used. (author)

  13. Quality pain management outcomes: the power of place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, L R; Mitchell, P H

    2000-01-01

    This study explores how an organization, as the context of care, influences nursing practice and a nursing-sensitive, quality health outcome-pain management. The results provide important insights into organizational patterns associated with favorable pain management-related outcomes as well as the congruence between and among subunits within the organization. Outcomes were most favorable on units where nurses had attitudes supportive of aggressive pain management and higher levels of coordination and discretion.

  14. [Breakthrough cancer pain in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezón-Gutiérrez, Luis; Viloria-Jiménez, María Aurora; Pérez-Cajaraville, Juan; Álamo-González, Cecilio; López-Trigo, José Antonio; Gil-Gregorio, Pedro

    Breakthrough pain is defined as an acute exacerbation of pain with rapid onset, short duration and moderate or high intensity, which occurs spontaneously or in connection with a predictable or unpredictable event despite there being stabilised and controlled baseline pain. However, there are doubts about the definition, terminology, epidemiology, and assessment of breakthrough pain, with no clear answers or consensus, especially in the elderly population. This non-systematic review summarises the most important aspects of breakthrough pain in the elderly, based on the limited publications there are in that population group. Copyright © 2016 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. An Algorithm for Neuropathic Pain Management in Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Pickering, Gis?le; Marcoux, Margaux; Chapiro, Sylvie; David, Laurence; Rat, Patrice; Michel, Micheline; Bertrand, Isabelle; Voute, Marion; Wary, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain frequently affects older people, who generally also have several comorbidities. Elderly patients are often poly-medicated, which increases the risk of drug?drug interactions. These patients, especially those with cognitive problems, may also have restricted communication skills, making pain evaluation difficult and pain treatment challenging. Clinicians and other healthcare providers need a decisional algorithm to optimize the recognition and management of neuropathic pain. W...

  16. Ongoing strategies and updates on pain management in gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Kari E; Reynolds, R Kevin; Uppal, Shitanshu

    2018-05-01

    The opioid crisis in the United States has been declared a public health emergency. Various governmental agencies, cancer care organizations and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued guidelines in hopes of managing this crisis. Curbing over-prescription of opioids by medical professionals has been a central theme in many of these guidelines. Gynecologic oncologists encounter patients with a variety of pain sources, including acute pain secondary to the underlying malignancy or surgical procedures as well as chronic pain related to the malignancy and the sequelae of treatments rendered. In this review, we discuss the various etiologies of pain experienced by gynecologic oncology patients and discuss modalities frequently used to treat this pain. We highlight strategies to reduce the number of opioids prescribed and focus on incorporating non-opioid pain relief management principles in this review. We also discuss the mechanisms and etiology of various types of pain, with a focus on multimodal treatment strategies including preoperative counseling, strategies to identify individuals at risk of developing opioid dependence, and the role of symptom management and palliative care teams. Finally, we provide a blueprint for gynecologic oncology practices to develop their practice-specific pain management contracts to engage patients in a meaningful conversation around the addictive potential of opioids. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pain medicine versus pain management: ethical dilemmas created by contemporary medicine and business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeser, John D; Cahana, Alex

    2013-04-01

    The world of health care and the world of business have fundamentally different ethical standards. In the past decades, business principles have progressively invaded medical territories, leading to often unanticipated consequences for both patients and providers. Multidisciplinary pain management has been shown to be more effective than all other forms of health care for chronic pain patients; yet, fewer and fewer multidisciplinary pain management facilities are available in the United States. The amazing increase in interventional procedures and opioid prescriptions has not led to a lessening of the burden of chronic pain patients. Ethical dilemmas abound in the treatment of chronic pain patients: many are not even thought about by providers, administrators, insurance companies, or patients. We call for increased pain educational experiences for all types of health care providers and the separation of business concepts from pain-related health care.

  19. Pain management in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Jennifer; Naser, Basem

    2003-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common inherited diseases worldwide. The disease is characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, as well as acute and chronic complications. One of the most intractable problems encountered by children with SCD is the painful episode that results from tissue ischemia due to vaso-occlusion. Pain related to SCD is unique among pain syndromes due to the unpredictable, recurrent, and often persistent nature of the disease, as well as the recurring and essential need for the use of opioids. Painful vaso-occlusive episodes (VOE) are a principal cause of morbidity and account for a significant number of emergency department and hospital admissions. When untreated or inadequately managed, the pain of VOE may cause both short- and long-term consequences. Despite the fact that pain is an almost universal feature of the disease, children with SCD may form one of the most undertreated and understudied populations. One of the factors contributing to poor pain management is conflicting perceptions between patients, their families, and healthcare professionals about pain that is reported and analgesia that is required. Pain management guidelines have recently been published in an effort to overcome barriers in the assessment and management of pain related to SCD. Although there is considerable variability in the way SCD pain is managed, the standard treatment protocol for painful episodes has been rest, rehydration, and analgesia. However, pain control for children with SCD is often a difficult and complex process, and one that requires frequent systematic pain assessments and continuous adjustment of comfort measures, especially analgesics. There are a variety of analgesic agents to choose from, such as acetaminophen (paracetamol), oral or parenteral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and oral or parenteral opioids. Each of these options has advantages and disadvantages to their use. Continuous infusions of analgesics and patient

  20. Management of chronic pain in osteoporosis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolucci T

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Teresa Paolucci,* Vincenzo Maria Saraceni, Giulia Piccinini* Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Unit, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Osteoporosis (OP is a pathological condition that manifests clinically as pain, fractures, and physical disability, resulting in the loss of independence and the need for long-term care. Chronic pain is a multidimensional experience with sensory, affective, and cognitive aspects. Age can affect each of these dimensions and the pain that is experienced. In OP, chronic pain appears to have sensory characteristics and properties of nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Its evaluation and treatment thus require a holistic approach that focuses on the specific characteristics of this population. Pain management must therefore include pharmacological approaches, physiotherapy interventions, educational measures, and, in rare cases, surgical treatment. Most rehabilitative treatments in the management of patients with OP do not evaluate pain or physical function, and there is no consensus on the effects of rehabilitation therapy on back pain or quality of life in women with OP. Pharmacological treatment of pain in patients with OP is usually insufficient. The management of chronic pain in patients with OP is complicated with regard to its diagnosis, the search for reversible secondary causes, the efficacy and duration of oral bisphosphonates, and the function of calcium and vitamin D. The aim of this review is to discuss the most appropriate solutions in the management of chronic pain in OP. Keywords: physical therapy, exercise, pharmacological treatment, posture and balance

  1. Symptoms and side effects in chronic non-cancer pain: patient report vs. systematic assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Torsten; Christrup, Lona Louring; Højsted, J

    2011-01-01

    relieving distressing symptoms and managing the side effects of analgesics are essential in order to improve quality of life and functional capacity in chronic non-cancer pain patients. A quick, reliable and valid tool for assessing symptoms and side effects is needed in order to optimize treatment....... We aimed to investigate the symptoms reported by chronic non-cancer pain patients after open-ended questioning vs. a systematic assessment using a list of symptoms, and to assess whether the patients could distinguish between the symptoms and the side effects induced by analgesics....

  2. Symptoms and side effects in chronic non-cancer pain:patient report vs. systematic assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Torsten; Christrup, Lona Louring; Højsted, Jette

    2011-01-01

    relieving distressing symptoms and managing the side effects of analgesics are essential in order to improve quality of life and functional capacity in chronic non-cancer pain patients. A quick, reliable and valid tool for assessing symptoms and side effects is needed in order to optimize treatment....... We aimed to investigate the symptoms reported by chronic non-cancer pain patients after open-ended questioning vs. a systematic assessment using a list of symptoms, and to assess whether the patients could distinguish between the symptoms and the side effects induced by analgesics....

  3. The Social Organization of Nurses' Pain Management Work in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Khadra; Rankin, Janet; Al-Tawafsheh, Atef

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the social organization of nurses' pain management work in Qatar. The research data drew our attention to unacceptable delays in intervening with patients in pain. We describe and analyze delays in opioid administration. Institutional ethnography was the method of inquiry used to guide the study. The main findings of the study reveal that there is a socially organized system of delays built into nurses' work to manage pain. Nurses are subject to time-consuming processes of securing, handling, and administering opioids. This study's innovative approach introduces a promising "alternate" analysis to prior work investigating hospital nurses' pain management practices. Both the method of inquiry and the findings have international relevance for researchers interested in undertreated pain. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Improvement of pain related self management for oncologic patients through a trans institutional modular nursing intervention: protocol of a cluster randomized multicenter trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoke-Colberg Anette

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is one of the most frequent and distressing symptoms in cancer patients. For the majority of the patients, sufficient pain relief can be obtained if adequate treatment is provided. However, pain remains often undertreated due to institutional, health care professional and patient related barriers. Patients self management skills are affected by the patients' knowledge, activities and attitude to pain management. This trial protocol is aimed to test the SCION-PAIN program, a multi modular structured intervention to improve self management in cancer patients with pain. Methods 240 patients with diagnosed malignancy and pain > 3 days and average pain ≥ 3/10 will participate in a cluster randomized trial on 18 wards in 2 German university hospitals. Patients from the intervention wards will receive, additionally to standard pain treatment, the SCION-PAIN program consisting of 3 modules: pharmacologic pain management, nonpharmacologic pain management and discharge management. The intervention will be conducted by specially trained oncology nurses and includes components of patient education, skills training and counseling to improve self care regarding pain management beginning with admission followed by booster session every 3rd day and one follow up telephone counseling within 2 to 3 days after discharge. Patients in the control group will receive standard care. Primary endpoint is the group difference in patient related barriers to management of cancer pain (BQII, 7 days after discharge. Secondary endpoints are: pain intensity & interference, adherence, coping and HRQoL. Discussion The study will determine if the acquired self management skills of the patients continue to be used after discharge from hospital. It is hypothesized that patients who receive the multi modular structured intervention will have less patient related barriers and a better self management of cancer pain. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials NCT

  5. Could kinesiology taping help mitigate pain, breathlessness and abdominal-related symptoms in cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, G; Rose, A; Briggs, M; Johnson, MI

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a woman who was an amateur athlete diagnosed with primary breast cancer, and 10 years later with terminal metastatic cancer. This case report was prepared posthumously in co-operation with her next of kin (husband). The patient first presented to a sports physiotherapist (AR) for her pain-management and to help maintain physical fitness so that she could continue with sports and an active lifestyle. The patient continued with physiotherapy for several months to enable h...

  6. An Algorithm for Neuropathic Pain Management in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Gisèle; Marcoux, Margaux; Chapiro, Sylvie; David, Laurence; Rat, Patrice; Michel, Micheline; Bertrand, Isabelle; Voute, Marion; Wary, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain frequently affects older people, who generally also have several comorbidities. Elderly patients are often poly-medicated, which increases the risk of drug-drug interactions. These patients, especially those with cognitive problems, may also have restricted communication skills, making pain evaluation difficult and pain treatment challenging. Clinicians and other healthcare providers need a decisional algorithm to optimize the recognition and management of neuropathic pain. We present a decisional algorithm developed by a multidisciplinary group of experts, which focuses on pain assessment and therapeutic options for the management of neuropathic pain, particularly in the elderly. The algorithm involves four main steps: (1) detection, (2) evaluation, (3) treatment, and (4) re-evaluation. The detection of neuropathic pain is an essential step in ensuring successful management. The extent of the impact of the neuropathic pain is then assessed, generally with self-report scales, except in patients with communication difficulties who can be assessed using behavioral scales. The management of neuropathic pain frequently requires combination treatments, and recommended treatments should be prescribed with caution in these elderly patients, taking into consideration their comorbidities and potential drug-drug interactions and adverse events. This algorithm can be used in the management of neuropathic pain in the elderly to ensure timely and adequate treatment by a multidisciplinary team.

  7. Quality of Postoperative Pain Management After Maxillofacial Fracture Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisker, Andre; Meissner, Winfried; Raschke, Gregor F; Fahmy, Mina D; Guentsch, Arndt; Schiller, Juliane; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Effective pain management is an essential component in the perioperative care of surgical patients. However, postoperative pain after maxillofacial fracture repair and its optimal therapy has not been described in detail. In a prospective cohort study, 95 adults rated their pain on the first postoperative day after maxillofacial fracture repair using the questionnaire of the Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management (QUIPS) project. Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management allowed for a standardized assessment of patients' characteristics and pain-related parameters. Overall, the mean maximal pain and pain on activity (numeric rating scales) were significantly higher in patients with mandibular fractures than in patients with midface fractures (P = 0.002 and P = 0.045, respectively). In patients with mandibular fractures, a longer duration of surgery was significantly associated with higher satisfaction with pain intensity (P = 0.015), but was more frequently associated with postoperative vomiting (P = 0.023). A shorter duration of surgery and an absence of preoperative pain counseling in these patients were significantly correlated to desire for more pain medication (P = 0.049 and P = 0.004, respectively). Patients with mandibular fractures that received opioids in the recovery room had significantly higher strain-related pain (P = 0.017). In patients with midface fractures, a longer duration of surgery showed significantly higher levels of decreased mobility (P = 0.003). Patients receiving midazolam for premedication had significantly less minimal pain (P = 0.021). Patients with mandibular fractures seem to have more postoperative pain than patients with midface fractures. Monitoring of postsurgical pain and a procedure-specific pain-treatment protocol should be performed in clinical routine.

  8. Bilateral CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy for cancer pain relief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yegul, I.; Erhan, E.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy is a useful procedure for treating unilateral cancer pain, however, bilateral cordotomy can be required on some occasions. We evaluated the effectiveness and complications of bilateral cordotomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and thirty-four patients who suffered from unilateral cancer pain underwent CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy. The procedure was repeated in 22 patients, and nine patients had bilateral cordotomy. Effectiveness and complications were recorded after each procedure. RESULTS: Of nine patents (three women and six men) having bilateral percutaneous cordotomy in our study, four patients had mirror pain after the first procedure. In the remaining five patients the contralateral pain was due to new pain sites. The pain scores before and after the first procedure were 9.3 (range 7-10) and 1.2 (range 0-3), respectively. After the first procedure complete or satisfactory pain relief was achieved in all patients. The duration between the two procedures ranged from 7-243 days (mean 59.8 days). The pain scores before and after the second procedure were 8.4 (range 5-10) and 1.6 (range 0-4), respectively. After the second procedure complete or satisfactory pain relief was reported in all patients. There were no complications in four patients. One patient developed transient motor deficit after the first procedure. Other complications (nausea/vomiting, headache, ipsilateral neck pain, postcordotomy dysesthesia) were mild and transient. CONCLUSION: CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy is a useful procedure for the treatment of severe unilateral cancer pain syndromes. The procedure can be repeated on the other side at least 1 week later. These results show that the success on the second side appears to be similar to the first side with low complication rate for both procedures

  9. Bilateral CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy for cancer pain relief

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yegul, I. E-mail: iyegul@med.ege.edu.tr; Erhan, E. E-mail: elvanerhan@yahoo.com

    2003-11-01

    AIM: CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy is a useful procedure for treating unilateral cancer pain, however, bilateral cordotomy can be required on some occasions. We evaluated the effectiveness and complications of bilateral cordotomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and thirty-four patients who suffered from unilateral cancer pain underwent CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy. The procedure was repeated in 22 patients, and nine patients had bilateral cordotomy. Effectiveness and complications were recorded after each procedure. RESULTS: Of nine patents (three women and six men) having bilateral percutaneous cordotomy in our study, four patients had mirror pain after the first procedure. In the remaining five patients the contralateral pain was due to new pain sites. The pain scores before and after the first procedure were 9.3 (range 7-10) and 1.2 (range 0-3), respectively. After the first procedure complete or satisfactory pain relief was achieved in all patients. The duration between the two procedures ranged from 7-243 days (mean 59.8 days). The pain scores before and after the second procedure were 8.4 (range 5-10) and 1.6 (range 0-4), respectively. After the second procedure complete or satisfactory pain relief was reported in all patients. There were no complications in four patients. One patient developed transient motor deficit after the first procedure. Other complications (nausea/vomiting, headache, ipsilateral neck pain, postcordotomy dysesthesia) were mild and transient. CONCLUSION: CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy is a useful procedure for the treatment of severe unilateral cancer pain syndromes. The procedure can be repeated on the other side at least 1 week later. These results show that the success on the second side appears to be similar to the first side with low complication rate for both procedures.

  10. Effect of music therapy on pain and anxiety levels of cancer patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadharshini Krishnaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pain associated with cancer is highly detrimental to the quality of life of the affected individuals. It also contributes to the anxiety of the patient. There is a need for a nonpharmacological approach in addition to the pharmacological therapy for the management of the pain for a more holistic improvement in the individual. With this study, we wish to achieve this through music. Objective: To assess the effect of music therapy on pain scores and anxiety levels of cancer patients with pain. Study Design: In this quantitative study, a comparative study was done on fourteen cancer patients admitted for pain relief under the Department of Pain and Palliative Medicine, of a tertiary care hospital, having moderate to severe pain (numerical pain rating scale [NRS] - of 4 to 10. Subjects and Methods: Convenience sampling was used. Patients were allocated to test group or control group nonrandomly. The test group patients were subjected to music therapy for 20 min while the control group patients were kept occupied by talking to them for 20 min. The NRS scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional pain scores and the Hamilton anxiety rating scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional anxiety scores in the two groups. Statistics: Student′s t-test was used for comparing the pre- and post-interventional data. Two sample t-test was used to compare the data obtained from the control and study groups. Results: Statistically significant reduction seen in the pain scores in the test group after music therapy (P = 0.003. No statistically significant reduction seen in the pain score in the control group (P = 0.356. There was a statistically significant reduction in the postintervention pain scores in the test group compared to the control group (P = 0.034. The reduction in anxiety levels in both groups after intervention was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Music therapy was found to lower the pain score of

  11. The role of managers in addressing employees with musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Konring; Falkenstrøm, Signe; Jørgensen, Marie Birk

    2018-01-01

    Purpose This study investigates management awareness of employee musculoskeletal pain and conditions that shape managers’ handling of employees with pain. Methods We used a mixed methods design including data from a questionnaire survey and focus group sessions. All employees and managers from...

  12. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2008-09-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain.Although research is limited for paediatric pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies.

  13. Adherence of pain assessment to the German national standard for pain management in 12 nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterbrink, Jürgen; Bauer, Zsuzsa; Mitterlehner, Barbara; Gnass, Irmela; Kutschar, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Pain is very common among nursing home residents. The assessment of pain is a prerequisite for effective multiprofessional pain management. Within the framework of the German health services research project, 'Action Alliance Pain-Free City Muenster', the authors investigated pain assessment adherence according to the German national Expert Standard for Pain Management in Nursing, which is a general standard applicable to all chronic⁄acute pain-affected persons and highly recommended for practice. To evaluate the state of pain assessment and to identify need for improvement in 12 nursing homes in a German city. In the present study, the authors used an ex-post-facto design (survey methodology). Available written policies for routine pain assessment in residents ≥65 years of age were reviewed and a standardized online survey completed by 151 of 349 nurses in 12 nursing home facilities was conducted between September 2010 and April 2011. Most of the included nursing homes provided written policies for pain assessment, and the majority of nurses reported that they assess and regularly reassess pain. However, observational tools for residents with severe cognitive impairment and written reassessment schedules were lacking in many facilities or were inconsistent. Essentially, pain assessment appeared to be feasible in the majority of the German nursing homes studied. However, the absence or inconsistency of reassessment schedules indicate that pain management guidelines should include a detailed and explicit reassessment schedule for the heterogenic needs of nursing home residents. For residents with severe cognitive impairment, assessment tools are needed that are simple to use and clearly indicate the presence or absence of pain.

  14. Pain management in patients with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.P.; Pieper, M.J.C.; van Dalen-Kok, A.H.; de Waal, M.W.M.; Husebo, B.S.; Lautenbacher, S.; Kunz, M.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Corbett, A.

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 35 million people with dementia across the world, of whom 50% experience regular pain. Despite this, current assessment and treatment of pain in this patient group are inadequate. In addition to the discomfort and distress caused by pain, it is frequently the underlying cause

  15. Pain management in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvath, Barbara; Janse, Ineke C.; Sibbald, Gary R.

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, relapsing, and painful inflammatory disease. HS patients' quality of life is severely impaired, and this impairment correlates strongly with their pain. Pain in HS can be acute or chronic and has both inflammatory and noninflammatory origins. The purpose

  16. Pain and Pain Management Among University Students: Online Survey and Web-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Tang, Angel; Budnick, Andrea; Ng, Shamay Sheung Mei; Yeung, Suey Shuk Yu

    2017-05-01

    Pain is common among university students. Unrelieved pain has adverse impacts on their quality of life. In this study, a pain management Web site was developed to distribute an online survey and provide Web-based pain education to university students. Participants were recruited from eight universities in Hong Kong using snowball sampling. The online survey included 37 items examining pain situations, pain management strategies, knowledge about self-medication, and demographic data of the participants. A total of 387 students participated and over 90 percent of them reported pain in the past 6 months. Around one-third of participants did not take any action to manage their pain. Pharmacological method was the most common strategy for students to relieve pain (37.2 percent). The use of over-the-counter (OTC) drug for pain relief was high (n = 214). However, OTC drug knowledge score was significantly higher among health-related group than nonhealth-related group (p education and completed the evaluation on its usefulness. Nonhealth-related students reported significantly higher scores of self-perceived usefulness for the online education than the health-related students (p online education program in the future.

  17. Reporting characteristics of cancer pain: A systematic review and quantitative analysis of research publications in palliative care journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A common disorder requiring symptom palliation in palliative and end-of-life care is cancer. Cancer pain is recognized as a global health burden. This paper sought to systematically examine the extent to which there is an adequate scientific research base on cancer pain and its reporting characteristics in the palliative care journal literature. Materials and Methods: Search conducted in MEDLINE and CINAHL sought to locate all studies published in 19 palliative/ hospice/ supportive/ end-of-life care journals from 2009 to 2010. The journals included were: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care, BMC Palliative Care, Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care, End of Life Care Journal, European Journal of Palliative Care, Hospice Management Advisor, Indian Journal of Palliative Care, International Journal of Palliative Nursing, Internet Journal of Pain Symptom Control and Palliative Care, Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy, Journal of Palliative Care, Journal of Palliative Medicine, Journal of Social Work in End-of-life and Palliative Care, Journal of Supportive Oncology, Palliative Medicine, Palliative and Supportive Care, and Supportive Care in Cancer. Journal contents were searched to identify studies that included cancer pain in abstract. Results: During the years 2009 and 2010, of the selected 1,569 articles published in the journals reviewed, only 5.86% (92 articles were on cancer pain. Conclusion: While researchers in the field of palliative care have studied cancer pain, the total percentage for studies is still a low 5.86%. To move the field of palliative care forward so that appropriate guidelines for cancer pain management can be developed, it is critical that more research be reported upon which to base cancer pain therapy in an evidence-based palliative care model.

  18. Pain Management in the Opioid-Dependent Pregnant Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safley, Rebecca R; Swietlikowski, Jamie

    Opioid dependence is an epidemic in the United States, and the percentage of pregnant women who are opioid dependent has increased dramatically in the last decade. Pain management, already a concern for intrapartum and postpartum care, is complicated in the context of opioid dependence. This clinical review surveys the literature on pain management in opioid-dependent pregnant women to summarize current consensus and evidence to guide clinical practice. Points of consensus for pain management in opioid-dependent pregnant women include continual opioid maintenance therapy throughout the pregnancy and the postpartum period; adequate management of acute pain; the contraindication of opioid agonist-antagonists for pain management; and the need for interdisciplinary teams using a multimodal approach to provide optimal care to opioid-dependent pregnant women.

  19. Pain management: association with patient satisfaction among emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Hemangini C; Marco, Catherine A

    2014-04-01

    Patient satisfaction with emergency care is associated with timeliness of care, empathy, technical competence, and information delivery. Previous studies have demonstrated inconsistent findings regarding the association between pain management and patient satisfaction. This study was undertaken to determine the association between pain management and patient satisfaction among Emergency Department (ED) patients presenting with acute painful conditions. In this survey study, a standardized interview was conducted at the Emergency Department at the University of Toledo Medical Center in May-July 2011. Participants were asked to answer 18 questions pertaining to patient satisfaction. Additional data collected included demographic information, pain scores, and clinical management. Among 328 eligible participants, 289 (88%) participated. The mean triage pain score on the verbal numeric rating scale was 8.2 and the mean discharge score was 6.0. The majority of patients (52%) experienced a reduction in pain of 2 or more points. Participants received one pain medication dose (44%), two medication doses (14%), three medication doses (5%), or four medication doses (2%). Reduction in pain scores of 2 or more points was associated with a higher number of medications administered. Reduction in pain scores was associated with higher satisfaction as scored on questions of patient perceptions of adequate assessment and response to pain, and treatment of pain. There was a significant association between patient satisfaction and a reduction in pain of 2 or more points and number of medications administered. Effective pain management is associated with improved patient satisfaction among ED patients with painful conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pediatric pain: prevalence, assessment, and management in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B.M. Linhares

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to examine the prevalence, assessment and management of pediatric pain in a public teaching hospital. The study sample consisted of 121 inpatients (70 infants, 36 children, and 15 adolescents, their families, 40 physicians, and 43 nurses. All participants were interviewed except infants and children who could not communicate due to their clinical status. The interview included open-ended questions concerning the inpatients’ pain symptoms during the 24 h preceding data collection, as well as pain assessment and pharmacological/non-pharmacological management of pain. The data were obtained from 100% of the eligible inpatients. Thirty-four children/adolescents (28% answered the questionnaire and for the other 72% (unable to communicate, the family/health professional caregivers reported pain. Among these 34 persons, 20 children/adolescents reported pain, 68% of whom reported that they received pharmacological intervention for pain relief. Eighty-two family caregivers were available on the day of data collection. Of these, 40 family caregivers (49% had observed their child’s pain response. In addition, 74% reported that the inpatients received pharmacological management. Physicians reported that only 38% of the inpatients exhibited pain signs, which were predominantly acute pain detected during clinical procedures. They reported that 66% of patients received pharmacological intervention. The nurses reported pain signs in 50% of the inpatients, which were detected during clinical procedures. The nurses reported that pain was managed in 78% of inpatients by using pharmacological and/or non-pharmacological interventions. The findings provide evidence of the high prevalence of pain in pediatric inpatients and the under-recognition of pain by health professionals.

  1. The Danish version of the questionnaire on pain communication: preliminary validation in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2009-01-01

    of the shortened Danish version of the M-PICS (SDM-PICS). METHODS: The validated English version of the M-PICS was translated into Danish following the repeated back-translation procedure. Cancer patients were recruited for the study from specialized pain management facilities. RESULTS: Thirty-three patients...... shared information with his/her health care provider, and Factor two, health care provider information, consisted of four items measuring the degree to which a health care provider was perceived as the one who shares information. Two separate items addressed the perceived level of information exchange...... between the patient and the health care provider. The SDM-PICS total had an internal consistency of 0.88. The SDM-PICS scores were positively related to pain relief and inversely related to the measures of cognitive pain management barriers, anxiety, and reported pain levels. CONCLUSION: The SDM...

  2. Successful treatment of mixed (mainly cancer) pain by tramadol preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Shinji; Soga, Tomohiro; Mita, Naoji; Satomi, Shiho; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Arase, Tomoko; Kondo, Akira; Miki, Hitoshi; Takaishi, Kazumi; Kitahata, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The patient, a 70-year-old Japanese woman diagnosed with parotid gland cancer, underwent wide excision and reconstruction (facial nerve ablation, nerve transposition). At 1 month after the surgery, she was brought to our hospital's pain medicine department because her postoperative pain and cancer-related pain were poorly controlled. She had already been prescribed a tramadol (37.5 mg)/acetaminophen (325 mg) combination tablet (5 tablets/day). However, in addition to the continuous pain in her face and lower limbs, she was troubled by a trigeminal neuralgia-like prominence ache. Because this pain could not be controlled by an increase to eight combination tablets per day, we switched her medication to a tramadol capsule. At 11 months post-surgery, we then switched her medication to an orally disintegrating tramadol tablet to improve medication adherence of the drug. From 14 months post-surgery, the patient also used a sustained-release tramadol preparation, and she was then able to sleep well. Her current regimen is an orally disintegrating sustained-release tablet combination (total 300 mg tramadol) per day, and she achieved sufficient pain relief. Because tramadol is not classified as a medical narcotic drug, it widely available and was shown here to be extremely useful for the treatment of our patient's mixed (mainly cancer) pain. J. Med. Invest. 64: 311-312, August, 2017.

  3. Subanesthetic ketamine for pain management in hospitalized children, adolescents, and young adults: a single-center cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheehy KA

    2017-04-01

    .004. Interestingly, greater reductions in pain scores were observed in patients with cancer pain and patients with pain associated with pancreatitis and Crohn’s disease. There were no records of psychotomimetic side effects requiring therapy. Conclusion: These data suggest that administration of subanesthetic ketamine for pain management is feasible and safe in regular inpatient care units and may benefit children, adolescents, and young adults with acute and chronic pain. This study is informative and can be helpful in determining sample and effect sizes when planning clinical trials to determine the role of subanesthetic ketamine infusions for pain management in pediatric patients. Keywords: cancer pain, sickle cell disease, CRPS, postoperative pain, chronic pain, acute pain

  4. Thoracoscopic Splanchnicectomy for Pain Control in Irresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Tavassoli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Severepain is a major problem in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of Thoracoscopic Splanchnicectomy (TS on pain control in these patients suffering from unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods:Between years 2000 to 2011, 20 patients suffering from unresectable pancreatic cancer underwent TS due to severe pain. They were studied in terms of age, sex, location of pancreas tumor, history of previous surgery, response to treatments for pain control (assessed with VAS scoring system and complications of surgery. Results:M/F = 14/6 with a mean age of 63 years. The most common tumour site was at the pancreas head (in 8 patients. The most cause of unresectability was local expansion to critical adjacent elements (in 10 patients. Surgery was performed successfully in all patients. Post-operative complication included only pleural effusion on the left side which was cured by proper treatment. There were no post-op mortalities.  15 patients had acceptable levels of pain at the end of a six month follow-up period. ConclusionTS provides good pain control, little side effects and minimal invasiveness, the technique is recommended for pain control in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

  5. Electroacupuncture treatment for pancreatic cancer pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Liu, Tang-Yi; Kuai, Le; Zhu, Ji; Wu, Cai-Jun; Liu, Lu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is often accompanied by severe abdominal or back pain. It's the first study to evaluate the analgesic effect of electroacupuncture on pancreatic cancer pain. A randomized controlled trial compared electroacupuncture with control acupuncture using the placebo needle. Sixty patients with pancreatic cancer pain were randomly assigned to the electroacupuncture group (n = 30) and the placebo control group (n = 30). Patients were treated on Jiaji (Ex-B2) points T8-T12 bilaterally for 30 min once a day for 3 days. Pain intensity was assessed with numerical rated scales (NRS) before the treatment (Baseline), after 3 treatments, and 2 days follow-up. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After 3 treatment, pain intensity on NRS decreased compared with Baseline (-1.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.46 to -1.87) in the electroacupuncture group; there was little change (-0.13, 95% CI 0.08 to -0.35) in control group; the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P electroacupuncture group compared with the control group (P Electroacupuncture was an effective treatment for relieving pancreatic cancer pain. Copyright © 2013 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Arthroscopic management of painful first metatarsophalangeal joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debnath U

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthroscopy of the great toe MTP joint has been practiced with favourable outcomes. A range of indications have been described ranging from synovitis to osteochondral defects. The purpose of the present study was to describe our technique and to assess the functional outcome following arthroscopic management of Hallux MTP disorders using AOFAS scoring system. Methods: We describe the technique of Hallux MTP joint arthroscopy in twenty patients. Indications included hallux rigidus with osteophytes, chondromalacia, OCDs, loose bodies, arthrofibrosis, synovitis, tophaceous gout arthritis and intra-articular fractures of MTP joint. All patients had been evaluated clinically and radiologically with record of their AOFAS scores pre-operatively. At a minimum follow-up of two years the clinical assessment was carried out with AOFAS scores. Results: The mean pre-operative and post-operative AOFAS score were 47 (range 10-78 and 97 (87 -100 respectively. The patient with intra-articular fracture had an excellent outcome following arthroscopic reduction of the fracture. Conclusion: Arthroscopic management of painful hallucial MTP joint is a specialized technique, which if performed for the right indications, gives a favourable outcome with minimal complications.

  7. [Use of methadone in the elderly with cancer pain: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taberna, Miren; Villavicencio-Chávez, Christian; González-Barboteo, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    To identify the clinical use of methadone as an analgesic in the management of cancer pain in elderly patients. We performed a systemic review of the literature on the specific use of methadone in elderly with cancer pain in MEDLINE, COCHRANE DATABASE and SCOPUS. A second search was conducted in MEDLINE to look for clinical trials and systematic review of the use of methadone in cancer pain, selecting only those in which the mean age of patients was ≥ 65 years old. Four articles were obtained in the first search, and from the second 7 clinical trials, none of them specific to methadone use in elderly patients with cancer. There are insufficient data on the use of methadone as an analgesic in the elderly with cancer. Given its pharmacological characteristics it must be used by trained personnel. Several recommendations are proposed for its use as an analgesic in the treatment of cancer pain in the elderly. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Pain in Breast Cancer Treatment: Aggravating Factors and Coping Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fatima Guerreiro Godoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate pain in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema and the characteristics of aggravating factors and coping mechanisms. The study was conducted in the Clinica Godoy, São Jose do Rio Preto, with a group of 46 women who had undergone surgery for the treatment of breast cancer. The following variables were evaluated: type and length of surgery; number of radiotherapy and chemotherapy sessions; continued feeling of the removed breast (phantom limb, infection, intensity of pain, and factors that improve and worsen the pain. The percentage of events was used for statistical analysis. About half the participants (52.1% performed modified radical surgery, with 91.3% removing only one breast; 82.6% of the participants did not perform breast reconstruction surgery. Insignificant pain was reported by 32.60% of the women and 67.3% said they suffered pain; it was mild in 28.8% of the cases (scale 1–5, moderate in 34.8% (scale 6–9, and severe in 4.3%. The main mechanisms used to cope with pain were painkillers in 41.30% of participants, rest in 21.73%, religious ceremonies in 17.39%, and chatting with friends in 8.69%. In conclusion, many mastectomized patients with lymphedema complain of pain, but pain is often underrecognized and undertreated.

  9. Development and testing of a multidimensional iPhone pain assessment application for adolescents with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Jennifer N; Jibb, Lindsay A; Nguyen, Cynthia; Nathan, Paul C; Maloney, Anne Marie; Dupuis, L Lee; Gerstle, J Ted; Alman, Benjamin; Hopyan, Sevan; Strahlendorf, Caron; Portwine, Carol; Johnston, Donna L; Orr, Mike

    2013-03-08

    Pain is one of the most common and distressing symptoms reported by adolescents with cancer. Despite advancements in pain assessment and management research, pain due to cancer and/or its treatments continues to be poorly managed. Our research group has developed a native iPhone application (app) called Pain Squad to tackle the problem of poorly managed pain in the adolescent with cancer group. The app functions as an electronic pain diary and is unique in its ability to collect data on pain intensity, duration, location, and the impact pain has on an adolescent's life (ie, relationships, school work, sleep, mood). It also evaluates medications and other physical and psychological pain management strategies used. Users are prompted twice daily at configurable times to complete 20 questions characterizing their pain and the app transmits results to a database for aggregate reporting through a Web interface. Each diary entry represents a pain case filed by an adolescent with cancer and a reward system (ie, moving up through law-enforcement team ranks, built-in videotaped acknowledgements from fictitious officers) encourages consistent use of the diary. Our objective was to design, develop, and test the usability, feasibility, compliance, and satisfaction of a game-based smartphone pain assessment tool for adolescents with cancer. We used both low- and high-fidelity qualitative usability testing with qualitative semi-structured, audio-taped interviews and iterative cycles to design and refine the iPhone based Pain Squad app. Qualitative thematic analysis of interviews using constant comparative methodology captured emergent themes related to app usability. Content validity was assessed using question importance-rating surveys completed by participants. Compliance and satisfaction data were collected following a 2-week feasibility trial where users were alarmed to record their pain twice daily on the app. Thematic analysis of usability interviews showed the app to be

  10. Case report: efficacy and tolerability of ketamine in opioid-refractory cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Priya; Roeland, Eric; Atayee, Rabia

    2014-09-01

    A 36-year-old female with metastatic breast cancer involving bones, liver, lung, and pleura/chest wall with worsening back pain received weight-based intravenous (IV) ketamine and was transitioned to oral ketamine for cancer-related neuropathic pain. She had responded poorly to outpatient pain regimen of oxycodone sustained and immediate release, hydromorphone, gabapentin, and duloxetine (approximate 480 mg total oral morphine equivalents [OME]), reporting an initial pain score of 10/10. She was started on hydromorphone parenteral patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) bolus dose in addition to her outpatient regimen. Despite escalating doses of opioids and the addition of a lidocaine 5% patch, the patient's pain remained uncontrolled 6 days after admission. On hospital day 7, utilizing a hospital weight-based ketamine protocol, the patient was started on subanesthetic doses of ketamine at 0.2 mg/kg/h (288 mg/24 h) and titrated over 2 days to 0.4 mg/kg/h (576 mg/24 h). Then, a 3-day rotation from intravenous to oral ketamine was initiated, and the patient was discharged on ketamine oral solution, 75 mg every 8 hours. When the patient's dose was increased to 0.4 mg/kg/h, adequate pain relief was charted by the nurse within 120 minutes, "patient pain free and resting comfortably." Her pain continued to be well managed, with an average pain score of 5/10 with the ketamine continuous infusion and sustained with conversion to oral ketamine without any report of side effects. This was a 37% reduction in pain scores. With the patient's stabilized dose of ketamine, opioid requirements decreased by 61.4% (1017.5 mg reduction in total OME). The use of weight-based dosing of IV continuous infusion and transition to oral ketamine was effective and tolerable in the management of opioid-refractory, neuropathic cancer pain. It is hoped that this case report promotes a discussion regarding ketamine dosing in refractory neuropathic cancer pain.

  11. Barriers to pediatric pain management: a nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Michelle L; Simon, Katherine; Thompson, Jamie J; Armus, Cheryl L; Hanson, Tom C; Berg, Kristin A; Petrie, Jodie L; Xiang, Qun; Malin, Shelly

    2011-09-01

    This study describes strategies used by the Joint Clinical Practice Council of Children's Hospital of Wisconsin to identify barriers perceived as interfering with nurses' (RNs) ability to provide optimal pain management. A survey was used to ascertain how nurses described optimal pain management and how much nurses perceived potential barriers as interfering with their ability to provide that level of care. The survey, "Barriers to Optimal Pain management" (adapted from Van Hulle Vincent & Denyes, 2004), was distributed to all RNs working in all patient care settings. Two hundred seventy-two surveys were returned. The five most significant barriers identified were insufficient physician (MD) orders, insufficient MD orders before procedures, insufficient time to premedicate patients before procedures, the perception of a low priority given to pain management by medical staff, and parents' reluctance to have patients receive pain medication. Additional barriers were identified through narrative comments. Information regarding the impact of the Acute Pain Service on patient care, RNs' ability to overcome barriers, and RNs' perception of current pain management practices is included, as are several specific interventions aimed at improving or ultimately eliminating identified barriers. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pain management in Guillain-Barre syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, L; Moreno, C B; Gutierrez-Alvarez, A M

    2015-09-01

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome. Intensity is moderate to severe in most cases and pain may persist after resolution of the disease. Identify the most appropriate analgesic therapy for pain management in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome. Systematic review and selection of scientific articles on treatment of pain in Guillain-Barre syndrome patients, published between January 1985 and December 2012. We included only randomised, double-blind, controlled trials assessing the effectiveness of drugs for pain management in these patients. Four articles met the inclusion criteria. One evaluated the use of gabapentin, another evaluated carbamazepine, a third compared gabapentin to carbamazepine, and the last evaluated use of methylprednisolone. Both carbamazepine and gabapentin were useful for pain management. Patients experienced lower-intensity pain with gabapentin treatment in the study comparing that drug to carbamazepine. Methylprednisolone was not shown to be effective for reducing pain. The published data did not permit completion of a meta-analysis. There is no robust evidence at present that would point to a single treatment option for this disorder. Further clinical studies of larger patient samples and with a longer duration are needed to characterise types of pain for each patient and measure pain intensity in an objective way. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Groin Pain in Athletes: A Review of Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Matthew; Aherne, Emily; O'Reilly, Michael; Sugrue, Gavin; Cashman, James; Kavanagh, Eoin

    2015-05-01

    Groin pain is a common symptom in athletes, particularly in sports requiring sudden changes in speed and direction and those involving kicking. Despite a high prevalence of groin pain in this patient cohort, the diagnosis and management of the underlying pathological processes remains a challenge for surgeons and radiologists alike. The aim of this paper is to review the imaging findings and management of the common pathological processes which produce groin pain in athletes. The anatomy of the groin region will be defined as a basis for further discussion. The common pathological processes underlying groin pain such as adductor dysfunction, rectus abdominus injury, osteitis pubis, and femuro-acetabular impingement will then be reviewed and correlating radiological imaging findings presented. Current management options will also be considered. This paper will aid surgeons and radiologists in navigating the challenging diagnostic and management dilemma of groin pain in athletes.

  14. Cancer Pain Control for Advanced Cancer Patients by Using Autonomic Nerve Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwi-joong Kang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to report a case series of advanced cancer patients whose cancer pain was relieved by using autonomic nerve pharmacopuncture (ANP treatment. ANP is a subcutaneous injection therapy of mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP along the acupoints on the spine (Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue; 0.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous processes of vertebrae to enhance the immune system and to balance autonomic nerve function. Methods: Patients with three different types of cancer (gastric cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer with distant metastases with cancer pain were treated with ANP. 1 mL of MGP was injected into the bilateral Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue on the T1-L5 sites (total 12 ─ 20 mL injection of each patient’s dorsum by using the principle of symptom differentiation. During ANP treatment, the visual analogue scale (VAS for pain was used to assess their levels of cancer pain; also, the dosage and the frequency of analgesic use were measured. Results: The cancer pain levels of all three patients improved with treatment using ANP. The VAS scores of the three patients decreased as the treatment progressed. The dosage and the frequency of analgesics also gradually decreased during the treatment period. Significantly, no related adverse events were found. Conclusion: ANP has shown benefit in controlling cancer pain for the three different types of cancer investigated in this study and in reducing the dosage and the frequency of analgesics. ANP is expected to be beneficial for reducing cancer pain and, thus, to be a promising new treatment for cancer pain.

  15. The Danish version of the questionnaire on pain communication: preliminary validation in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, R; Møldrup, C; Christrup, L; Sjøgren, P; Hansen, O B

    2009-07-01

    The modified version of the patients' Perceived Involvement in Care Scale (M-PICS) is a tool designed to assess cancer patients' perceptions of patient-health care provider pain communication process. The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the shortened Danish version of the M-PICS (SDM-PICS). The validated English version of the M-PICS was translated into Danish following the repeated back-translation procedure. Cancer patients were recruited for the study from specialized pain management facilities. Thirty-three patients responded to the SDM-PICS, Danish Barriers Questionnaire II, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Brief Pain Inventory Pain Severity Scale. A factor analysis of the SDM-PICS resulted in two factors: Factor one, patient information, consisted of four items assessing the extent to which the patient shared information with his/her health care provider, and Factor two, health care provider information, consisted of four items measuring the degree to which a health care provider was perceived as the one who shares information. Two separate items addressed the perceived level of information exchange between the patient and the health care provider. The SDM-PICS total had an internal consistency of 0.88. The SDM-PICS scores were positively related to pain relief and inversely related to the measures of cognitive pain management barriers, anxiety, and reported pain levels. The SDM-PICS seems to be a reliable and valid measure of perceived patient-health care provider communication in the context of cancer pain.

  16. Effect of music therapy on pain behaviors in rats with bone cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ji; Chen, Shaoqin; Lin, Suyong; Han, Hongjing

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of music therapy on the pain behaviors and survival of rats with bone cancer pain and analyze the mediating mechanism of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathway. Male Wistar rats aged 5-8 weeks and weighing 160-200 g were collected. The rat models of colorectal cancer bone cancer pain was successfully established. Animals were divided into experimental and control group, each with 10 rats. The animals in the observation group were given Mozart K448 sonata, sound intensity of 60 db, played the sonata once every 1 hr in the daytime, stopped playing during the night, and this cycle was kept for 2 weeks. On the other hand, rats in the control group were kept under the same environment without music. Animals in the experimental group consumed more feed and gained significant weight in comparison to the control group. The tumor volume of the experimental group was significantly smaller than that of the control group (pMusic therapy may improve the pain behaviors in rats with bone cancer pain, which might be related with low expression of p38á and p38β in the MAPK signal transduction pathway.

  17. Person-centred pain management for the patient with acute abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avallin, Therese; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa; Sorensen, Erik Elgaard

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To explore and describe the impact of the organizational culture on and the patient-practitioner patterns of actions that contribute to or detract from successful pain management for the patient with acute abdominal pain across the acute care pathway. BACKGROUND: Although pain management...... is a recognised human right, unmanaged pain continues to cause suffering and prolong hospital care. Unanswered questions about how to successfully manage pain relate to both organizational culture and individual practitioners' performance. DESIGN: Focused ethnography, applying the Developmental Research Sequence...... and the Fundamentals of Care framework. METHODS: Participant observation and informal interviews (92 hours) were performed at one emergency department and two surgical wards at a University Hospital during April - November 2015. Data includes 261 interactions between patients, aged ≥18 years seeking care for acute...

  18. European Pain Federation position paper on appropriate opioid use in chronic pain management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Brien, T; Christrup, L L; Drewes, A M

    2017-01-01

    burdened by an unacceptable level of adverse effects, the overall management strategy must be reviewed and revised. No responsible clinician will wish to pursue a failed treatment strategy or persist with an ineffective and burdensome treatment. In a considered attempt to empower and inform non......Poorly controlled pain is a global public health issue. The personal, familial and societal costs are immeasurable. Only a minority of European patients have access to a comprehensive specialist pain clinic. More commonly the responsibility for chronic pain management and initiating opioid therapy...... years of clinical practice to produce these series of recommendations. Its success will be judged on the extent to which it contributes to an improved pain management experience for chronic pain patients across Europe. SIGNIFICANCE: This position paper provides expert recommendations for primary care...

  19. Evaluation of a Pain Management Education Program and Operational Guideline on Nursing Practice, Attitudes, and Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonkowski, Sara L; De Gagne, Jennie C; Cade, Makia B; Bulla, Sally A

    2018-04-01

    Nurses lack adequate pain management knowledge, which can result in poorly managed postsurgical pain. This study aimed to develop, implement, and evaluate pain management education and operational guidelines to improve nursing knowledge and pain management. This quality improvement project employed convenience samples of surgical oncology nurses and postoperative patients. The intervention involved an online module, live education, and operational guideline for pain management. Nurses completed pre- and postintervention practice and attitudes surveys. Random chart reviews of intravenous narcotic administrations the day before discharge were completed to evaluate whether narcotic administration changed after intervention. Readmissions and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems data were collected to determine whether the intervention influenced patient satisfaction. A statistically significant improvement in nursing practice and intravenous narcotic administrations demonstrated changes to pain management practices employed by the nursing staff. Although not statistically significant, fewer pain-related readmissions occurred postintervention. Findings demonstrate that targeted pain management continuing education, paired with operational guidelines, improves nursing practice and decreases intravenous narcotic administrations prior to discharge. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(4):178-185. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Leveraging Interactive Patient Care Technology to Improve Pain Management Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao-Gupta, Suma; Kruger, David; Leak, Lonna D; Tieman, Lisa A; Manworren, Renee C B

    2017-12-15

    Most children experience pain in hospitals; and their parents report dissatisfaction with how well pain was managed. Engaging patients and families in the development and evaluation of pain treatment plans may improve perceptions of pain management and hospital experiences. The aim of this performance improvement project was to engage patients and families to address hospitalized pediatric patients' pain using interactive patient care technology. The goal was to stimulate conversations about pain management expectations and perceptions of treatment plan effectiveness among patients, parents, and health care teams. Plan-Do-Study-Act was used to design, develop, test, and pilot new workflows to integrate the interactive patient care technology system with the automated medication dispensing system and document actions from both systems into the electronic health record. The pediatric surgical unit and hematology/oncology unit of a free-standing, university-affiliated, urban children's hospital were selected to pilot this performance improvement project because of the high prevalence of pain from surgeries and hematologic and oncologic diseases, treatments, and invasive procedures. Documentation of pain assessments, nonpharmacologic interventions, and evaluation of treatment effectiveness increased. The proportion of positive family satisfaction responses for pain management significantly increased from fiscal year 2014 to fiscal year 2016 (p = .006). By leveraging interactive patient care technologies, patients and families were engaged to take an active role in pain treatment plans and evaluation of treatment outcomes. Improved active communication and partnership with patients and families can effectively change organizational culture to be more sensitive to patients' pain and patients' and families' hospital experiences. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms and management of functional abdominal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer, Adam D; Aziz, Qasim

    2014-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome is characterised by frequent or continuous abdominal pain associated with a degree of loss of daily activity. It has a reported population prevalence of between 0.5% and 1.7%, with a female preponderance. The pathophysiology of functional abdominal pain is incompletely understood although it has been postulated that peripheral sensitisation of visceral afferents, central sensitisation of the spinal dorsal horn and aberrancies within descending modulatory sys...

  2. Procedural Pain Management for Children Receiving Physiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    von Baeyer, Carl L.; Tupper, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides an overview of literature relevant to the prevention and relief of pain and distress during physiotherapy procedures, with guidance for physiotherapists treating children.

  3. Epigenomics in cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Fabricio F

    2010-01-01

    The identification of all epigenetic modifications implicated in gene expression is the next step for a better understanding of human biology in both normal and pathological states. This field is referred to as epigenomics, and it is defined as epigenetic changes (ie, DNA methylation, histone modifications and regulation by noncoding RNAs such as microRNAs) on a genomic scale rather than a single gene. Epigenetics modulate the structure of the chromatin, thereby affecting the transcription of genes in the genome. Different studies have already identified changes in epigenetic modifications in a few genes in specific pathways in cancers. Based on these epigenetic changes, drugs against different types of tumors were developed, which mainly target epimutations in the genome. Examples include DNA methylation inhibitors, histone modification inhibitors, and small molecules that target chromatin-remodeling proteins. However, these drugs are not specific, and side effects are a major problem; therefore, new DNA sequencing technologies combined with epigenomic tools have the potential to identify novel biomarkers and better molecular targets to treat cancers. The purpose of this review is to discuss current and emerging epigenomic tools and to address how these new technologies may impact the future of cancer management

  4. Radiation-induced mucositis pain in laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Atsuhito; Shoji, Kazuhiko; Iki, Takehiro; Mizuta, Masanobu; Matsubara, Mami

    2009-01-01

    Radiation therapy in those with head and neck malignancies often triggers painful mucositis poorly controlled by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). To better understand how radiation-induced pain develops over time, we studied the numerical rating scale (NRS 0-5) pain scores from 32 persons undergoing radiation therapy of 60-72 Gy for newly diagnosed laryngeal cancer. The degree of mucositis was evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version3.0 (CTCAE v3.0). We divided the 32 into a conventional fractionation (CF) group of 14 and a hyperfractionation (HF) group of 18, and further divided laryngeal cancer into a small-field group of 23 and a large-field group of 9. The mucositis pain course was similar in CF and HF, but mucositis pain was severer in the HF group, which also required more NSAIDs. Those in the large-field group had severer pain and mucositis and required more NSAIDs than those in the small-field group. We therefore concluded that small/large-field radiation therapy, rather fractionation type, was related to the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis pain. (author)

  5. Impact of a brief intervention on patient communication and barriers to pain management: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Meredith Y; DuHamel, Katherine N; Egert, Jennifer; Winkel, Gary

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the impact of a brief pain communication/education intervention on patient outcomes in breast cancer. We hypothesized that our intervention would improve patient communication and reduce misconceptions ("Barriers") concerning pain management, and that patients with lower Barriers, or who perceived their physician as being more facilitative and receptive, would report better outcomes. Female breast cancer patients with persistent pain (n=89) were randomly assigned to either a 30-min in-person pain education/communication intervention or control condition and followed for 12 weeks. Intervention group patients reported a significant decrease in pain Barriers but not in other outcomes. Overall, patients with lower barrier scores reported less distress and better emotional well-being. Patients who scored higher in active communication (e.g., asking questions, giving information) reported fewer Barriers and better pain relief. Individuals who perceived their physicians as being more receptive reported better pain management while those who perceived their physicians as being both more receptive and facilitative were more satisfied with their health care. A brief education/communication intervention reduced patients' Barriers to pain management but did not impact other patient outcomes. Pain outcomes may be improved by addressing patients' pain misconceptions and emphasizing a receptive and responsive communication style. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. PCA and Postoperative Pain Management After Orthopedic Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Hashemi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients often suffer from inadequate treatment of postoperative pain. The aim of this study was to investigate effect of PCA on postoperative pain management and patients’ satisfaction from use of PCA. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, between 2010 to 2011, patients presented by orthopedic specialists to acute and chronic pain service of Akhtar Hospital. A satisfaction questionnaire was given on discharge to this patients, were asked to fill out it . Then collected by ward nurse. Results: patients’ satisfaction from pain relief with use of PCA was high ( 94.9% . In this patient pain relief at third day after surgery and require analgesic was low, significantly (p=0.0001. Significant patients’ satisfaction from effect of PCA in pain control and products support was high (p=0.0001.     Conclusion: Patient controlled analgesia is a safe, effective and noninvasive method for post operative pain management and in this study patients’ satisfaction for pain management was high for use of PCA and pain service. 

  7. Managing low back pain second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkaldy-Willis, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 26 chapters. Some of the titles are: Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine; Diagnostic techniques; The site and nature of the lesion; The anatomy of the lumbosacral spine; The perception of pain; Differential diagnosis of low back pain; and A comprehensive outline of treatment

  8. Paediatric pain management | Schellack | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pain is defined by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) as an “unpleasant sensory and emotional experience, associated with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage”. It can be steady, throbbing, stabbing, aching, pinching or described in many other ways as being either ...

  9. Pain management in patients with Parkinson's disease: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skogar O

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Orjan Skogar,1,2 Johan Lokk2 1Academy for Health and Care (FUTURUM, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, 2Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden Abstract: This review focuses on the diagnosis and management of Parkinson-related pain which is one of the more frequently reported nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD, which is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s disease. Pain is ranked high by patients as a troublesome symptom in all stages of the disease. In early-stage PD, pain is rated as the most bothersome symptom. Knowledge of the correct diagnosis of pain origin and possible methods of treatments for pain relief in PD is of great importance. The symptoms have a great negative impact on health-related quality of life. Separating PD-related pain from pain of other origins is an important challenge and can be characterized as “many syndromes under the same umbrella”. Among the different forms of PD-related pain, musculoskeletal pain is the most common form, accounting for 40%–90% of reported pain in PD patients. Augmentation by pathophysiological pathways other than those secondary to rigidity, tremor, or any of the other motor manifestations of the disease seems most probable. In PD, the basal ganglia process somatosensory information differently, and increased subjective pain sensitivity with lower electrical and heat-pain thresholds has been reported in PD patients. The mechanism is assumed to be diminished activity of the descending inhibitory control system of the basal ganglia. PD pain, like many of the nonmotor symptoms, remains underdiagnosed and, thus, poorly managed. A systematic collection of patient descriptions of type, quality, and duration of pain is, therefore, of utmost importance. Recent studies have validated new and more specific and dedicated pain scales for PD-related symptoms. Symptomatic treatments based

  10. Hypnotherapy for the Management of Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Gary; Jensen, Mark P.; Patterson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews controlled prospective trials of hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain. Thirteen studies, excluding studies of headaches, were identified that compared outcomes from hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain to either baseline data or a control condition. The findings indicate that hypnosis interventions consistently produce significant decreases in pain associated with a variety of chronic-pain problems. Also, hypnosis was generally found to be more effective than nonhypnotic interventions such as attention, physical therapy, and education. Most of the hypnosis interventions for chronic pain include instructions in self-hypnosis. However, there is a lack of standardization of the hypnotic interventions examined in clinical trials, and the number of patients enrolled in the studies has tended to be low and lacking long-term follow-up. Implications of the findings for future clinical research and applications are discussed. PMID:17558718

  11. A prospective analysis of pain experience, beliefs and attitudes, and pain management of a cohort of Danish surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Vibeke; Hermansen, I.L.; Botti, M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: ABSTRACT Background: Adequacy of pain management is a process indicator of health care quality with consequences for patient outcomes and satisfaction. The reported incidence of moderate to severe postoperative pain worldwide is between 20 to 80%. Objectives: The purpose was to assess...... the quality of pain management in a cohort of Danish postoperative patients by examining their pain experience, beliefs about pain and pain treatment, and relationships between pain intensity, its effect on function, and pharmacological pain management. Methods: The American Pain Society's Patient Outcome...... Questionnaire was used in a consecutive cohort of Danish patients who had undergone gastrointestinal, gynaecological, orthopaedic or urological surgery in the previous 48 hours. Results: Findings indicated uncontrolled pain in 45.5% of patients, who experienced moderate to severe intensity average pain...

  12. Bertolotti syndrome: a diagnostic and management dilemma for pain physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anuj; Agarwal, Anil; Jain, Suruchi; Shamshery, Chetna

    2013-10-01

    Bertolotti's syndrome (BS), a form of lumbago in lumbosacral transitional vertebrae, is an important cause of low back pain in young patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the etiology of low back pain and the efficacy of treatment offered to patients with BS. All patients of BS Castellvi type1a during a period of 6 months were enrolled in the study. The patients underwent interventional pain procedures for diagnosis and pain relief. Response to the therapy was assessed based on VAS and ODI scores. A 50% decrease in VAS score or a VAS score less than 3 would be considered adequate pain relief. All 20 patients diagnosed with BS during the 6-month observation period had scoliosis. Common causes of back pain were the ipsilateral L5-S1 facet joint, neoarticulation, the SI joint, and disc degeneration. Responses to various interventions for pain relief were different and inconsistent from patient to patient. In particular, responses to interventions for neoarticular pain were generally poor. Pain in patients with BS does not usually respond to interventional pain treatment. A very dynamic treatment approach must be pursued while managing BS patients, and the treatment plan must be individualized at various stages in order to obtain satisfactory pain relief.

  13. Knowledge Toward Cancer Pain and the Use of Opioid Analgesics Among Medical Students in their Integrated Clinical Clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fidelis C. Manalo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among the focal issues of barriers to pain management include the physicians’ lack of knowledge about cancer pain and negative attitudes towards opioids. Many physicians and educators attribute this, at least in part, to limited exposure to pain and palliative care education during medical school.Aim: The researcher investigated the medical students’ knowledge about cancer pain and the use of opioid analgesics.Methods: The subjects were a sample of 50 students of the University of the Philippines College of Medicine in their integrated clinical clerkship year. Descriptive statistics (frequencies, means, standard deviation, rating scales were used to determine mean knowledge score and level of confidence with opioid use. The study also identified specific areas where students exhibited good or poor knowledge of opioids.Results: Approximately sixty-nine (69% of the study respondents mentioned that pain management was given to them during their Anesthesiology lectures while a few recalled that they had these lectures during their Family Medicine rotation in Supportive, Palliative and Hospice Care. More than a third (35% of the respondents admitted to not being confident with morphine use at present. The top three reasons cited as limitations in choice of opioids for cancer pain include fear of addiction, lack of adequate knowledge and experience and fear of side effects and complications. Out of a maximum of 13 correct answers, the mean knowledge score of the medical students was 6.6 ± 2.9. Less than 16% of the respondents had adequate knowledge on cancer pain and opioid use.Conclusions: The results show that basic knowledge of the role of opioids in cancer pain management among medical students in their integrated clinical clerkship year at the University of the Philippines is poor. The findings imply a need to look into making revisions in the medical curriculum to include a training program that will enable all students to

  14. Cancer and its management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tobias, Jeffrey S; Hochhauser, Daniel; Souhami, Robert L

    2010-01-01

    ... cancer, 328 19 Testicular cancer, 357 20 Thyroid and adrenal cancer, 374 v9781405170154_1_pre.qxd 28/10/09 16:01 Page vi vi Contents 21 Cancer from an unknown primary site, 388 22 Skin cancer, 393 23...

  15. Acute abdominal pain : considerations on diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorenvliet, Boudewijn Ronald

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis several aspects on the diagnosing and management of patients with acute abdominal pain are investigated. 1; The efficacy and safety of standard outpatient re-evaluation for patients not admitted to the hospital after emergency department evaluation for acute abdominal pain. 2; The use

  16. The Experience of Intense Pain: Nursing Management and Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser-Larson, Norma

    Personal stories of illness give depth to otherwise clinical descriptions of diagnoses. This article offers an autobiographical narrative of complications after total knee replacement surgery. Diagnosis and nursing management of acute compartment syndrome, nociceptive and neuropathic origins of pain, pharmacologic and nursing interventions for pain, the use of prayer in illness, and compassionate caring from a Christian perspective are discussed.

  17. Antidepressants for chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Tess E; Heathcote, Lauren C; Clinch, Jacqui; Gold, Jeffrey I; Howard, Richard; Lord, Susan M; Schechter, Neil; Wood, Chantal; Wiffen, Philip J

    2017-08-05

    Pain is a common feature of childhood and adolescence around the world, and for many young people, that pain is chronic. The World Health Organization guidelines for pharmacological treatments for children's persisting pain acknowledge that pain in children is a major public health concern of high significance in most parts of the world. While in the past pain was largely dismissed and was frequently left untreated, views on children's pain have changed over time and relief of pain is now seen as important.We designed a suite of seven reviews on chronic non-cancer pain and cancer pain (looking at antidepressants, antiepileptic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, and paracetamol) in order to review the evidence for children's pain utilising pharmacological interventions.As the leading cause of morbidity in the world today, chronic disease (and its associated pain) is a major health concern. Chronic pain (that is pain lasting three months or longer) can arise in the paediatric population in a variety of pathophysiological classifications (nociceptive, neuropathic, or idiopathic) from genetic conditions, nerve damage pain, chronic musculoskeletal pain, and chronic abdominal pain, as well as for other unknown reasons.Antidepressants have been used in adults for pain relief and pain management since the 1970s. The clinical impression from extended use over many years is that antidepressants are useful for some neuropathic pain symptoms, and that effects on pain relief are divorced and different from effects on depression; for example, the effects of tricyclic antidepressants on pain may occur at different, and often lower, doses than those on depression. Amitriptyline is one of the most commonly used drugs for treating neuropathic pain in the UK. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of antidepressants used to treat chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents aged between birth and 17 years, in any setting. We searched the

  18. Practical considerations and patient selection for intrathecal drug delivery in the management of chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulino M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael Saulino,1,2 Philip S Kim,3,4 Erik Shaw5 1MossRehab, Elkins Park, PA, USA; 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Helen F Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE, USA; 4Center for Interventional Pain Spine, LLC., Bryn Mawr, PA, USA; 5Shepherd Pain Institute, Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Chronic pain continues to pose substantial and growing challenges for patients, caregivers, health care professionals, and health care systems. By the time a patient with severe refractory pain sees a pain specialist for evaluation and management, that patient has likely tried and failed several nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches to pain treatment. Although relegated to one of the interventions of “last resort”, intrathecal drug delivery can be useful for improving pain control, optimizing patient functionality, and minimizing the use of systemic pain medications in appropriately selected patients. Due to its clinical and logistical requirements, however, intrathecal drug delivery may fit poorly into the classic pain clinic/interventional model and may be perceived as a "critical mass" intervention that is feasible only for large practices that have specialized staff and appropriate office resources. Potentially, intrathecal drug delivery may be more readily adopted into larger practices that can commit the necessary staff and resources to support patients' needs through the trialing, initiation, monitoring, maintenance, and troubleshooting phases of this therapy. Currently, two agents – morphine and ziconotide – are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for long-term intrathecal delivery. The efficacy and safety profiles of morphine have been assessed in long-term, open-label, and retrospective studies of >400 patients with chronic cancer and noncancer pain types. The efficacy and safety profiles of ziconotide have been

  19. Randomized trial of opioids versus tricyclic antidepressants for radiation-induced mucositis pain in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrnrooth, E.; Grau, C.; Zachariae, R.; Andersen, Joern

    2001-01-01

    Patients who receive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are likely to develop painful mucositis. The pain is characterized by a burning or stinging sensation similar to neuropathic pain sensations. The purpose of the present study was to compare the analgesic effect of a tricyclic antidepressant (TC), commonly used in the treatment of neuropathic pain, with the effect of opioids on radiation-induced mucositis pain. Forty-three patients receiving 66-68 Gy external radiation according to the DAHANCA guidelines (the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Study Group) were randomized to either morphine or TC when mucositis pain was insufficiently managed with weak analgesics. Patients with insufficient pain control in either treatment arm received supplementary medication from the opposite treatment arm. Pain was evaluated weekly using a VAS scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The degree of mucositis and the degree of depression were measured at the same time intervals. Twenty-two patients entered the opioid arm and 21 the TC arm. Two patients in each arm were non-evaluable. VAS pain scores were significantly reduced in the opioid treatment arm one week after randomization (p=0.01). Eight patients in the TC arm were managed with TC alone, but for 11 patients it was necessary to add morphine. The 20 evaluable patients in the morphine arm required no additional treatment. There were no significant differences in side effects between the two groups. Higher pain scores in the TC arm, but not in the opioid arm, were significantly correlated with higher BDI scores. Some head and neck cancer patients with radiation-induced nucositis pain may have sufficient pain control on TC alone. This might be useful in patients with relative counter-indications to opioid treatment

  20. Randomized trial of opioids versus tricyclic antidepressants for radiation-induced mucositis pain in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrnrooth, E.; Grau, C.; Zachariae, R.; Andersen, Joern [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    2001-11-01

    Patients who receive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are likely to develop painful mucositis. The pain is characterized by a burning or stinging sensation similar to neuropathic pain sensations. The purpose of the present study was to compare the analgesic effect of a tricyclic antidepressant (TC), commonly used in the treatment of neuropathic pain, with the effect of opioids on radiation-induced mucositis pain. Forty-three patients receiving 66-68 Gy external radiation according to the DAHANCA guidelines (the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Study Group) were randomized to either morphine or TC when mucositis pain was insufficiently managed with weak analgesics. Patients with insufficient pain control in either treatment arm received supplementary medication from the opposite treatment arm. Pain was evaluated weekly using a VAS scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The degree of mucositis and the degree of depression were measured at the same time intervals. Twenty-two patients entered the opioid arm and 21 the TC arm. Two patients in each arm were non-evaluable. VAS pain scores were significantly reduced in the opioid treatment arm one week after randomization (p=0.01). Eight patients in the TC arm were managed with TC alone, but for 11 patients it was necessary to add morphine. The 20 evaluable patients in the morphine arm required no additional treatment. There were no significant differences in side effects between the two groups. Higher pain scores in the TC arm, but not in the opioid arm, were significantly correlated with higher BDI scores. Some head and neck cancer patients with radiation-induced nucositis pain may have sufficient pain control on TC alone. This might be useful in patients with relative counter-indications to opioid treatment.

  1. A holistic approach to chronic pain management that involves all stakeholders: change is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Hans-Georg; Aldington, Dominic; Alon, Eli; Coaccioli, Stefano; Collett, Beverly; Coluzzi, Flaminia; Huygen, Frank; Jaksch, Wolfgang; Kalso, Eija; Kocot-Kępska, Magdalena; Mangas, Ana Cristina; Ferri, Cesar Margarit; Mavrocordatos, Philippe; Morlion, Bart; Müller-Schwefe, Gerhard; Nicolaou, Andrew; Hernández, Concepción Pérez; Sichère, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain affects a large proportion of the population, imposing significant individual distress and a considerable burden on society, yet treatment is not always instituted and/or adequate. Comprehensive multidisciplinary management based on the biopsychosocial model of pain has been shown to be clinically effective and cost-efficient, but is not widely available. A literature review of stakeholder groups revealed many reasons for this, including: i) many patients believe healthcare professionals lack relevant knowledge, and consultations are rushed, ii) general practitioners consider that pain management has a low priority and is under-resourced, iii) pain specialists cite non-adherence to evidence-based treatment, sub-optimal prescribing, and chronic pain not being regarded as a disease in its own right, iv) nurses', pharmacists' and physiotherapists' skills are not fully utilized, and v) psychological therapy is employed infrequently and often too late. Many of the issues relating to physicians could be addressed by improving medical training, both at undergraduate and postgraduate levels - for example, by making pain medicine a compulsory core subject of the undergraduate medical curriculum. This would improve physician/patient communication, increase the use of standardized pain assessment tools, and allow more patients to participate in treatment decisions. Patient care would also benefit from improved training for other multidisciplinary team members; for example, nurses could provide counseling and follow-up support, psychologists offer coping skills training, and physiotherapists have a greater role in rehabilitation. Equally important measures include the widespread adoption of a patient-centered approach, chronic pain being recognized as a disease in its own right, and the development of universal guidelines for managing chronic non-cancer pain. Perhaps the greatest barrier to improvement is lack of political will at both national and international

  2. Factors of accepting pain management decision support systems by nurse anesthetists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain management is a critical but complex issue for the relief of acute pain, particularly for postoperative pain and severe pain in cancer patients. It also plays important roles in promoting quality of care. The introduction of pain management decision support systems (PM-DSS) is considered a potential solution for addressing the complex problems encountered in pain management. This study aims to investigate factors affecting acceptance of PM-DSS from a nurse anesthetist perspective. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data from nurse anesthetists in a case hospital. A total of 113 questionnaires were distributed, and 101 complete copies were returned, indicating a valid response rate of 89.3%. Collected data were analyzed by structure equation modeling using the partial least square tool. Results The results show that perceived information quality (γ=.451, pDSS. Information quality (γ=.267, pDSS ease of use. Furthermore, both perceived ease of use (β=.436, pDSS acceptance (R2=.640). Thus, the critical role of information quality in the development of clinical decision support system is demonstrated. Conclusions The findings of this study enable hospital managers to understand the important considerations for nurse anesthetists in accepting PM-DSS, particularly for the issues related to the improvement of information quality, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of the system. In addition, the results also provide useful suggestions for designers and implementers of PM-DSS in improving system development. PMID:23360305

  3. [Transfer managment of postoperative acute pain therapy to outpatient aftercare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, C; Lefering, R; Althaus, A; Simanski, C; Neugebauer, E

    2014-10-01

    The significance of postoperative pain management for patients in the hospital is well known and has been a focus of research for several years. The ambulatory care after hospital discharge, however, is not well investigated. A prospective observational study was therefore conducted to study the transfer management from in-hospital patients to ambulatory care. A patient questionnaire was developed and patients were asked to fill it out at different time points after the operation: during the time in the hospital, then at 2 weeks and 6 months after hospital discharge. In addition, the responsible family doctor was approached and interviewed. The main focus of the questionnaire was the measurement of post-surgical pain (numeric rating scale NRS), patient satisfaction (Cologne patient questionnaire), and quality of life (SF 12). Of a total of 128 patients 72.9% described moderate to severe pain after the orthopaedic operations in the hospital. 90.8% of the patients had pain directly after discharge from the hospital; in 67.4% of the cases pain was ≥3 and in 23.4% of the cases pain was ≥6. Six months after discharge pain was significant in 29.4% of the patients, 60.8% of the patients were satisfied with the transfer to the home setting. 16% were not satisfied at all and 23.2% were neutral. Important factors for dissatisfaction with the transfer management were, according to stepwise logistic regeression analysis, sex (female patients), young age, a poor bodily constitution at the hospital and thereafter, and the pain management in the hospital and after discharge. The study shows the significance of the acute pain therapy not only during the hospital stay but also after discharge. There are very few data on pain therapy after discharge from the hospital. Based on the significance of the chronification of acute pain it is of the utmost importance to close this gap. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Noncardiac chest pain: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Takahisa; Fass, Ronnie

    2017-07-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) has been defined as recurrent chest pain that is indistinguishable from ischemic heart pain after excluding a cardiac cause. NCCP is a common and highly challenging clinical problem in Gastrointestinal practice that requires targeted diagnostic assessment to identify the underlying cause of the symptoms. Treatment is tailored according to the cause of NCCP: gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal dysmotility or functional chest pain. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current diagnosis and treatment of NCCP. Utilization of new diagnostic techniques such as pH-impedance and high-resolution esophageal manometry, and the introduction of a new definition for functional chest pain have helped to better diagnose the underlying mechanisms of NCCP. A better therapeutic approach toward GERD-related NCCP, the introduction of new interventions for symptoms due to esophageal spastic motor disorders and the expansion of the neuromodulator armamentarium for functional chest pain have changed the treatment landscape of NCCP. GERD is the most common esophageal cause of NCCP, followed by functional chest pain and esophageal dysmotility. The proton pump inhibitor test, upper endoscopy, wireless pH capsule and pH-impedance are used to identify GERD-induced NCCP. High-resolution esophageal manometry is the main tool to identify esophageal motor disorder in non-GERD-related NCCP. Negative diagnostic assessment suggests functional chest pain. Potent antireflux treatment is offered to patients with GERD-related NCCP; medical, endoscopic or surgical interventions are considered in esophageal dysmotility; and neuromodulators are prescribed for functional chest pain. Assessment and treatment of psychological comorbidity should be considered in all NCCP patients.

  5. Pain management in patients with Parkinson's disease: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogar, Orjan; Lokk, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the diagnosis and management of Parkinson-related pain which is one of the more frequently reported nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), which is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease. Pain is ranked high by patients as a troublesome symptom in all stages of the disease. In early-stage PD, pain is rated as the most bothersome symptom. Knowledge of the correct diagnosis of pain origin and possible methods of treatments for pain relief in PD is of great importance. The symptoms have a great negative impact on health-related quality of life. Separating PD-related pain from pain of other origins is an important challenge and can be characterized as "many syndromes under the same umbrella". Among the different forms of PD-related pain, musculoskeletal pain is the most common form, accounting for 40%-90% of reported pain in PD patients. Augmentation by pathophysiological pathways other than those secondary to rigidity, tremor, or any of the other motor manifestations of the disease seems most probable. In PD, the basal ganglia process somatosensory information differently, and increased subjective pain sensitivity with lower electrical and heat-pain thresholds has been reported in PD patients. The mechanism is assumed to be diminished activity of the descending inhibitory control system of the basal ganglia. PD pain, like many of the nonmotor symptoms, remains underdiagnosed and, thus, poorly managed. A systematic collection of patient descriptions of type, quality, and duration of pain is, therefore, of utmost importance. Recent studies have validated new and more specific and dedicated pain scales for PD-related symptoms. Symptomatic treatments based on clinical pain classification include not only pharmacological but also nonpharmacological methods and, to some degree, invasive approaches. In the clinic, pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions can be effective to varying degrees - as

  6. Assessment and management of pain in pediatric otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Maria Claudia; Villamor, Perla; Castillo, Tatiana

    2016-11-01

    Pain is a disease by itself and it's a public health concern of major implication in children, not just because of the emotional component of the child and his family, but also due to the potential morbidity and mortality involving it. A proper assessment of pain it's a challenge in the pediatric population, due to their lack of understanding and verbalization of hurt. Additionally, a satisfactory treatment of pediatric pain can be arduous due to a lack of clinical knowledge, insufficient pediatric research, and the fear to opioid side effects and addiction. The aim of this review is to address the current definitions of pain, its physiological mechanisms and the consequences of its inadequate management, as well as, to guide the clinicians in the assessment and management of pain in the pediatric population at otolaryngology services. Narrative review by selective MeSH search terms: Children, Pediatrics, Otolaryngology, Pain measurement, Pain Management, Analgesics and Analgesia, from databases: MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane, ISI, Current Contents, Scielo and LILACS, between January 2000 and May 2016. 129 articles were reviewed according to the requirements of the objectives. Pain measurement is a challenge in children as there are no physical signs that constitute an absolute or specific indicator of pain, and its diagnosis must rely on physiological, behavioral and self-report methods. Regarding treatment, a suitable alternative are the non-pharmacological cognitive/behavioral therapies helped by pharmacological therapies tailored to the severity of pain and the child's age. We provide evidence-based recommendations on pain treatment, including non-opioid analgesics, opioid analgesics and adjuvant medicines to improve the management of pain in children in otolaryngology services. We present a global review about assessment and management of pain in pediatric otolaryngology, which leads to future specific reviews on each topic. Research gaps on pain assessment and

  7. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW ON EFFICACY OF KINESIOTAPING IN PAIN MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most common complaint of an individual is pain, which can be with or without injury. It is the key that enables human being to figure out disease ordisorders that is interfering normal life. Pain can be because of numerous reasons but known pathways for pain can be physiological, nociceptive, neuropathic or mixed, which may be experienced as aching pain, burning pain, stabbing pain, etc. Although there are various clinical methods to reduce pain but the main objective of present study was to find if taping can reduce pain be it musculoskeletal or neurological pain. Also to summarise all evaluated work done in various studies. Methods: various studies have been taken from pub med, Google scholar that includes relief of pain with application of taping irrespective to technique used. Study selection, data extraction, and assessment of methodological quality and clinical relevance were performed independently by two reviewers. All the data extracted from randomised controlled trials included in the review has been used to synthesise the results. Therefore the results are based on facts laid down by the articles included. Results: Pedro scoring has been used to asses various studies which show the use of taping for relief of pain on various musculoskeletal disorders and neurological disorders. Conclusions: Although there are various modalities which can help in reducing pain but present review shows that taping can be used as very useful tool for reducing pain. Further it is cheap, less time consuming and easy to manage with excellent results. taping can be used as an adjunct to modalities present to reduce pain.

  8. Persistent Postmastectomy Pain in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belfer, Inna; Schreiber, Kristin L; Shaffer, John R

    2013-01-01

    , medical, and treatment information was abstracted from patients' medical records. One third (32.5%) of patients reported PPMP, defined as ≥3/10 pain severity in the breast, axilla, side, or arm, which did not vary according to time since surgery. Multiple regression analysis revealed significant...

  9. Pain Management (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Arthritis is one of the most common chronic conditions in the United States. Unfortunately, as the population ages, it's only expected to increase. In this podcast, Dr. Jennifer Hootman discusses ways to manage the pain of arthritis.

  10. Stage-dependent analgesia of electro-acupuncture in a mouse model of cutaneous cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao-Ying, Qi-Liang; Cui, Ke-Mi; Liu, Qiong; Dong, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jun; Sha, Hong; Wu, Gen-Cheng; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2006-11-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most effective alternative medical treatments in pain management with the advantages of simple application, low cost and minimal side effects. However its scientific evidence and laws of action are not very clear in cancer pain relieving. The aim of this study was to examine the immediate and therapeutic anti-hyperalgesic effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) on a mouse model of cutaneous cancer pain. B16-BL6 melanoma cells were inoculated into the plantar region of unilateral hind paw and the thermal hyperalgesia was measured by using radiant heat test and hot plate test. C57BL/6 mice showed moderate and marked hyperalgesia during days 8-12 and from day 14 after the orthotopic inoculation of B16-BL6 melanoma cells into the hind paw. Single EA on day 8 after inoculation showed significant analgesic effect immediately after the treatment, the analgesic effect reached its maximum within 15-30min and declined to its minimum at 50min after EA treatment. Single EA treatment on day 20 showed no significant analgesic effect; Repeated EA treatments (started from day 8, once every other day) showed therapeutic analgesic effect, while it showed no therapeutic effect when started from day 16, a relatively late stage of this cancer pain model. The results demonstrated that EA had anti-hyperalgesic effect on early stage of cutaneous cancer pain but not on late stage. These results indicated a tight correlation of EA anti-hyperalgesic effects with the time window of cancer pain.

  11. Pharmacological Treatment of Pain in Cancer Patients : The Role of Adjuvant Analgesics, a Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Beuken-van Everdingen, Marieke H J; de Graeff, Alexander; Jongen, Joost L M; Dijkstra, Denise; Mostovaya, Irina; Vissers, Kris C P

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: In patients with cancer, pain is one of the most feared and burdensome symptoms. Adjuvant analgesics are an important cornerstone on which treatment of pain in patients with cancer is based. OBJECTIVES: To update our guidelines for the treatment of pain in patients with cancer, we performed

  12. Integrated Approach for Pain Management in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geroin, Christian; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Bruno, Veronica; Smania, Nicola; Tinazzi, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Pain, one of the most frequent nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD), is recognized as an important component of the illness that adversely affects patient quality of life. The aims of this review are to summarize the current knowledge on the clinical assessment and to provide a detailed overview of the evidence-based pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches to treating pain. Results of a literature search include studies investigating pain/sensory abnormalities in PD. The effects of levodopa administration, deep brain stimulation (DBS), pallidotomy, spinal cord stimulation, rehabilitation, and complementary/alternative medicine are reviewed critically. PD patients have altered pain and sensory thresholds; levodopa and DBS improve pain and change sensory abnormalities toward normal levels through antinociceptive and/or modulatory effects that remain unknown. A wide range of nonpharmacologic approaches require further investigation. A multidisciplinary approach is fundamental in managing pain syndromes in PD.

  13. Multidimensional Patient Impression of Change Following Interdisciplinary Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Christine M; Scholten, Paul; Atchison, James

    2018-04-20

    To assess patient impression of change following interdisciplinary pain management utilizing a newly developed Multidimensional Patient Impression of Change (MPIC) questionnaire. A heterogeneous group of chronic pain patients (N = 601) participated in an interdisciplinary treatment program. Programs included individual and group therapies (pain psychology, physical therapy, occupational therapy, relaxation training/biofeedback, aerobic conditioning, patient education and medical management). Patients completed measures of pain, mood, coping, physical functioning and pain acceptance both prior to and at completion of their treatment programs. The newly developed MPIC is an expansion to the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) including seven additional domains (Pain, Mood, Sleep, Physical Functioning, Cope with Pain, Manage Pain Flare-ups, and Medication Effectiveness). The MPIC was administered to the patients post-treatment. There were statistically significant pre- to post-treatment improvements found on all outcome measures. The majority of these improvements were significantly correlated with all domains of the MPIC. The original PGIC item was significantly associated with all of the new MPIC domains and the domains were significantly associated with each other; but there were variations in the distribution of responses highlighting variation of perceived improvements among the domains. Our results support the use of the MPIC as a quick and easy post-treatment assessment screening tool. Future research is needed to examine relevant correlates to Medication Effectiveness. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychological and physical effects of pain on cancer patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychological and physical effects of pain on cancer patients in Ibadan, Nigeria. FT Nuhu, OA Odejide, KO Adebayo, AJ Yusuf. Abstract. No Abstract. African Journal of Psychiatry Vol. 12 (1) 2009: pp. 64-70. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  15. Quality of life considerations and pain management in hidradenitis suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jemec, Gregor Be

    2017-01-01

    perceived as unclean and stigmatizing by the patients, but also cause pain and scarring making this inflammatory skin disorder unique. It is obvious that the disease has a significant negative impact on the patients' quality of life (QOL). The impact is influenced not only by the pain which is a significant...... independent contributor to the patients' life quality, but by the clinically significant comorbidity associated with HS. In particular, the psychological comorbidities of depression and anxiety both further compound QOL impairment and pain. It is strongly recommended that these factors be taken into account...... when planning a treatment strategy for patients with HS, and that specific steps are taken to manage pain and comorbidities associated with the reduced QOL generally experienced by this group of patients. Basic pain management includes anti-inflammatory treatments as well as local- and central...

  16. Determinants of nurses' knowledge gap on pain management in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziato, Lydia; Adejumo, Oluyinka

    2014-03-01

    There are concerns about adequacy of nurses' knowledge and skill in effective pain management since effective pain management promotes early recovery after surgery. This study explores factors that accounted for Ghanaian nurses' inadequate knowledge of postoperative pain management using a focused ethnographic design for data collection at a tertiary teaching hospital in Ghana. Fourteen nurses designated as key informants with different backgrounds as nurse educators and leaders were purposively sampled to participate. Data were collected through in-depth individual interviews; all interviews were conducted in English, audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The study revealed that nurses' inadequate pain management knowledge might have resulted from curriculum gaps during training; inadequate clinical supervision, study days, and workshops for practising nurses; lack of funding for organising regular workshops; and, negative attitudes of nurses whereby new information learned at workshops was not readily applied in clinical practice. It was concluded that nursing curricula at all levels of training in Ghana should incorporate credit-bearing courses on pain management, and appropriate pain management education programmes should be instituted for practising nurses. Regular monitoring and evaluation of the impact of such education programs is required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cognitive Dissonance and Pediatric Procedural Pain Management: A Concept Clarification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bice, April A

    2018-06-01

    Pediatric nurses have often reported that pain management is a vital part of patient care. Evidence, however, suggests pediatric procedural pain treatments are often underused. Cognitive dissonance, the mental conflict leading to unpleasant thoughts and or feelings, may be related to this evidence-based gap found between what pediatric nurses claim about procedural pain management (that it is important) and what they actually do (underutilize pain treatments). The purpose of this manuscript is to clarify and further develop the concept of cognitive dissonance in terms of its relationship to nurses' mental struggles with underutilization of pediatric procedural pain treatments. A more relevant and extended definition of cognitive dissonance is presented. The concept of cognitive dissonance was examined using Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis approach/framework. Analysis Methods: Through a six-step process of concept identification, setting and sample identification, data collection, data analysis, and future implication discussion, a more accurate and representative definition of cognitive dissonance is described. Databases used included CINAHL, Google Scholar, PsycINFO, ERIC, and PubMed. Seminal, recent, and relevant works were included in the review to adequately develop and clarify the concept. Procedural pain management breech among pediatric nurses is proposed to occur before the mental conflict produced. The unpleasant mental conflict created after the breech is followed by the nurse's determination to reduce mental conflict through attitude change followed by cognition change, which more closely reflects his or her behavior. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation and analysis of oncologists' knowledge of morphine usage in cancer pain treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu W

    2014-05-01

    also identified major impediment factors on clinical use of morphine.Results: Among the 127 respondents, morphine controlled-release tablets were the most popular drug chosen to treat severe cancer pain (76 respondents, 35.8%. Participants who reported having received training in cancer pain management and drug use demonstrated a significantly higher mean score of basic knowledge compared with their untrained peers (11.51±2.60 versus 9.28±3.68, t=2.48, P=0.022. The top four barriers to widespread clinical use of morphine for cancer pain were 1 insufficient analgesia administration training for medical personnel, 2 poor patient compliance, 3 drug side effects, and 4 concerns surrounding drug addiction.Conclusion: The oncologists in the People's Republic of China simultaneously lack comprehensive knowledge and harbor misconceptions with regard to cancer pain treatment and morphine's clinical application. Creating professional training initiatives for oncologists is necessary to enhance their awareness and expertise in morphine use for cancer pain treatment.Keywords: pain management, training, clinical application

  19. Comparison of efficacy of meperidine and fentanyl in terms of pain management and quality of life in patients with cervical cancer receiving intracavitary brachytherapy: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanthong, Saengrawee; Rojthamarat, Sirikorn; Worasawate, Wipra; Vichitvejpaisal, Phongthara; Nantajit, Danupon; Ieumwananontachai, Nantakarn

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two sedative regimens, a benzodiazepine with either meperidine or fentanyl, in relieving pain in patients with cervical cancer undergoing intracavitary brachytherapy in terms of pain score and quality of life. Forty unselected outpatients undergoing brachytherapy (160 fractions) were enrolled with informed consent and randomized to receive a benzodiazepine with either meperidine or fentanyl. The perceived pain score according to a standard 10-item numeric rating scale was collected every 15 min during the procedure, and the perceived quality of life was determined at the end of each procedure using the EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire. The patients and medical staff members directly involved with the procedure were blinded to the medication used. The patients' pain levels were mild in both analgesic groups. Meperidine appeared to be slightly more effective than fentanyl, although the differences in the average pain score and quality of life were not statistically significant. Both meperidine and fentanyl in combination with benzodiazepine were effective in relieving pain and discomfort in patients undergoing brachytherapy. NCT02684942, ClinicalTrials.gov.

  20. An exploration into the level and characteristics of pain experienced by South African women treated for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilipo Kaila

    Full Text Available Despite the high incidence of cervical cancer in Africa, little is known about pain management in women treated for this disease as best practices primarily focus on the prevention of cervical cancer. The study aimed at describing pain in women diagnosed with cervical cancer who received radiotherapy with/without concurrent chemotherapy, before treatment and at six and 12 months after the completion of the treatment. A cross sectional design and calculated sample size were used to recruit 168 women (n = 168, 58 (n = 56 in each treatment group. Structured interviews were used to collect the data and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI served as the data collecting instrument. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data and the Kruskal-Wallis H Test determined statistical significant differences between the groups (p = 0.05. The majority of the respondents (78.0% n = 131 experienced disease related pain and most (73.9%; n = 85 experienced pain at the time of data collection. However, pain, on average, decreased after treatment and was at its lowest level six months after treatment but increased during the following six months. Pain influenced all the domains of function before treatment but improved after six months. There was a misfit between the level of pain and the type of analgesia used. In addition, most participants (58.3%; n = 67 took their pain medication only when needed. Our study highlighted the complexity of pain control, suggesting failure of both the healthcare professionals and the patients in achieving the ultimate goal of being pain free. Keywords: Cervical cancer, Pain, Radiotherapy

  1. Partner-delivered reflexology: effects on cancer pain and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Nancy L N; Swanson, Melvin; Dalton, Joann; Keefe, Frances J; Engelke, Martha

    2007-01-01

    To compare the effects of partner-delivered foot reflexology and usual care plus attention on patients' perceived pain and anxiety. The experimental pretest/post-test design included patient-partner dyads randomly assigned to an experimental or control group. Four hospitals in the southeastern United States. 42 experimental and 44 control subjects comprised 86 dyads of patients with metastatic cancer and their partners, representing 16 different types of cancer; 23% of patients had lung cancer, followed by breast, colorectal, and head and neck cancer and lymphoma. The subjects had a mean age of 58.3 years, 51% were female, 66% had a high school education or less, and 58% were Caucasian, 40% were African American, and 1% were Filipino. The intervention included a 15- to 30-minute teaching session on foot reflexology to the partner by a certified reflexologist, an optional 15- to 30-minute foot reflexology session for the partner, and a 30-minute, partner-delivered foot reflexology intervention for the patient. The control group received a 30-minute reading session from their partners. Pain and anxiety. Following the initial partner-delivered foot reflexology, patients experienced a significant decrease in pain intensity and anxiety. A nurse reflexologist taught partners how to perform reflexology on patients with metastatic cancer pain in the hospital, resulting in an immediate decrease in pain intensity and anxiety; minimal changes were seen in the control group, who received usual care plus attention. Hospitals could have qualified professionals offer reflexology as a complementary therapy and teach interested partners the modality.

  2. Opioid therapy in non-cancer chronic pain patients: Trends and efficacy in different types of pain, patients age and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasin S AlMakadma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In both developing and developed countries, chronic pain remains a real issue and a true disease that affects up to 42% of the population in some areas. Opioids are widely used for the management of chronic pain with variations in prescribing practices, indications and observed efficacy. Aim: to analyze trends in opioids prescribing and patient response in chronic non-cancer pain conditions. Methods: Retrospective study of 1500 casenotes of patients suffering variable non-cancer chronic pain conditions. Detailed review of those cases who were managed using opioids. Statistical analysis using "SOFA" software set. Results: The prevalence of opioids prescribing in patients suffering this condition was thus around 35% (n=526. Women older than 50 years were more likely than men to have a chronic pain condition and to be given opioid therapy for 1 year or more. Opioid efficacy on neuropathic and mixed types of pain was found to be significant with relatively low rate of drop-out and limited side-effects that are not life threatening. Overall, patients stopped or changed their opioid medication due to inefficacy in only 12.7% of cases. Conclusions: The simple fact of having pain is itself a source of self-reported disability regardless of the actual physiological or pathological mechanism. Policy makers should be aware of the huge impact of chronic pain disease and of its serious effects on social and economical well-being. In developing countries, chronic pain could represent a real challenge for all parties. Multimodal management, including opioids, appears crucial for the approach of this disease.

  3. Effectiveness of Splanchnic Nerve Neurolysis for Targeting Location of Cancer Pain: Using the Pain Drawing as an Outcome Variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novy, Diane M; Engle, Mitchell P; Lai, Emily A; Cook, Christina; Martin, Emily C; Trahan, Lisa; Yu, Jun; Koyyalagunta, Dhanalakshmi

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of splanchnic nerve neurolysis (SNN) for cancer-related abdominal pain has been investigated using numeric pain intensity rating as an outcome variable. The outcome variable in this study used the grid method for obtaining a targeted pain drawing score on 60 patients with pain from pancreatic or gastro-intestinal primary cancers or metastatic disease to the abdominal region. Results demonstrate excellent inter-rater agreement (intra-class correlation [ICC] coefficient at pre-SNN = 0.97 and ICC at within one month post-SNN = 0.98) for the grid method of scoring the pain drawing and demonstrate psychometric generalizability among patients with cancer-related pain. Using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and associated effect sizes, results show significant improvement in dispersion of pain following SNN. Effect sizes for the difference in pre-SNN to 2 post-SNN time points were higher for the pain drawing than for pain intensity rating. Specifically, the effect size difference from pre- to within one month post-SNN was r = 0.42 for pain drawing versus r = 0.23 for pain intensity rating. Based on a smaller subset of patients who were seen within 1 - 6 months following SNN, the effect size difference from pre-SNN was r = 0.46 for pain drawing versus r = 0.00 for pain intensity rating. Collectively, these data support the use of the pain drawing as a reliable outcome measure among patients with cancer pain for procedures such as SNN that target specific location and dispersion of pain.

  4. Managing cancer pain at the end of life with multiple strong opioids: a population-based retrospective cohort study in primary care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    Full Text Available End-of-life cancer patients commonly receive more than one type of strong opioid. The three-step analgesic ladder framework of the World Health Organisation (WHO provides no guidance on multiple opioid prescribing and there is little epidemiological data available to inform practice. This study aims to investigate the time trend of such cases and the associated factors.Strong opioid prescribing in the last three months of life of cancer patients were extracted from the General Practice Research Database (GPRD. The outcome variable was the number of different types of prescribed non-rescue doses of opioids (1 vs 2-4, referred to as a complex case. Associated factors were evaluated using prevalence ratios (PR derived from multivariate log-binomial model, adjusting for clustering effects and potential confounding variables.Overall, 26.4% (95% CI: 25.6-27.1% of 13,427 cancer patients (lung 41.7%, colorectal 19.1%, breast 18.6%, prostate 15.5%, head and neck 5.0% were complex cases. Complex cases increased steadily over the study period (1.02% annually, 95%CI: 0.42-1.61%, p = 0.048 but with a small dip (7.5% reduction, 95%CI: -0.03 to 17.8% around the period of the Shipman case, a British primary care doctor who murdered his patients with opioids. The dip significantly affected the correlation of the complex cases with persistent increasing background opioid prescribing (weighted correlation coefficients pre-, post-Shipman periods: 0.98(95%CI: 0.67-1.00, p = 0.011; 0.14 (95%CI: -0.85 to 0.91, p = 0.85. Multivariate adjusted analysis showed that the complex cases were predominantly associated with year of death (PRs vs 2000: 1.05-1.65, not other demographic and clinical factors except colorectal cancer (PR vs lung cancer: 1.24, 95%CI: 1.12-1.37.These findings suggest that prescribing behaviour, rather than patient factors, plays an important role in multiple opioid prescribing at the end of life; highlighting the need for training and

  5. The clinical psychologist and the management of inpatient pain: a small case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Childs SR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Susan R Childs,1,* Emma M Casely,2,* Bianca M Kuehler,1 Stephen Ward,1 Charlotte L Halmshaw,1 Sarah E Thomas,1 Ian D Goodall,1 Carsten Bantel1,3 1Pain Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, 2Anaesthetic Department, Hillingdon Hospital, Uxbridge, 3Section of Anaesthetics, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, London, UK *These authors contributed equally to this manuscript Abstract: Recent research has confirmed that between 25% and 33% of all hospitalized patients experience unacceptable levels of pain. Studies further indicate that this reduces patient satisfaction levels, lengthens hospital stays, and increases cost. Hospitals are aiming to discharge patients earlier, and this can interfere with adequate pain management. Therefore, the pain service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has adapted to this changing model of care. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that psychological factors are key components of patients’ pain experiences in both acute and chronic pain. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest a clinical psychologist should be involved in inpatient pain management. This small study discusses three cases that highlight how patient care could be improved by including a clinical psychologist as part of the inpatient pain team. Two cases particularly highlight the active role of the psychologist in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as fear and anxiety, along with other psychiatric comorbidities. The management therefore employed an eclectic approach adapted from chronic pain and comprising of behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavioral therapeutic techniques blended with brief counseling. The third case exemplifies the importance of nurse-patient interactions and the quality of nurse-patient relationships on patient outcomes. Here, the psychologist helped to optimize

  6. Effects of a cognitive-behavioral pain-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, C; Dahl, J; Jannert, M; Melin, L; Andersson, G

    1998-10-01

    A cognitive behavioral multidisciplinary pain management program was evaluated in two separate outcome studies; one controlled study (study I) and one study conducted on a consecutive sample with a long-term follow-up (study II). The 4-week inpatient treatment program included education sessions, goal setting, graded activity training, pacing, applied relaxation, cognitive techniques, social skills training, drug reduction methods, contingency management of pain behaviors, and planning of work return. The outcome of study I showed significant between-group differences in favor of the treatment group on measures of occupational training at 1-month follow-up, activity level in the sparetime at post-treatment and at follow-up, and decreased catastrophizing and pain behaviors at post-treatment. In study II significant improvements over time were found on measures of sick leave, pain intensity, pain interference, life control, affective distress, activity level in the sparetime, physical fitness and use of analgetics at 2-month follow-up and at 1-year follow-up. The results of the two outcome studies reported show that cognitive behavioral multidisciplinary pain management programs can successfully be applied to Swedish musculoskeletal pain patients.

  7. The management of painful crisis in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Josh; Ahmedzai, Sam H

    2010-06-01

    Until recently management of sickle pain was the province of haematologists. However, a recent National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death report highlighted problems with the management of pain and opioid analgesia in this group and suggested a multiagency approach similar to that used in palliative care. Pain is the most frequent complication of this haemoglobin disorder. Sickle cell disease is very variable with many patients leading full lives with long periods with little or no pain. At the other end of the spectrum there are those who exist in a sea of pain. The mechanisms of sickle pain are poorly understood and evidence for the best treatment modalities sparse. Historically there has been a dearth of clinical trials in sickle cell; however, this is starting to be addressed. In this review we will give a brief overview of the disease and its pathogenesis before examining the epidemiology, management of pain in sickle cell disease. We will also review recent evidence regarding quality of life and discuss the role of opioid hyperalgesia in sickle cell disease.

  8. Opioids Switching with Transdermal Systems in Chronic Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbarisi M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to tolerance development and adverse side effects, chronic pain patients frequently need to be switched to alternative opioid therapy Objective To assess the efficacy and tolerability of an alternative transdermally applied (TDS opioid in patients with chronic cancer pain receiving insufficient analgesia using their present treatment. Methods A total of 32 patients received alternative opioid therapy, 16 were switched from buprenorphine to fentanyl and 16 were switched from fentanyl to buprenorphine. The dosage used was 50% of that indicated in equipotency conversion tables. Pain relief was assessed at weekly intervals for the next 3 weeks Results Pain relief as assessed by VAS, PPI, and PRI significantly improved (p Conclusion Opioid switching at 50% of the calculated equianalgesic dose produced a significant reduction in pain levels and rescue medication. The incidence of side effects decreased and no new side effects were noted. Further studies are required to provide individualized treatment for patients according to their different types of cancer.

  9. The cost of chronic pain: an analysis of a regional pain management service in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Brenda; Finn, David P; O'Gorman, David; Ruane, Nancy; McGuire, Brian E

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the study was to collect data on the direct and indirect economic cost of chronic pain among patients attending a pain management clinic in Ireland. A tertiary pain management clinic serving a mixed urban and rural area in the West of Ireland. Data were collected from 100 patients using the Client Services Receipt Inventory and focused on direct and indirect costs of chronic pain. Patients were questioned about health service utilization, payment methods, and relevant sociodemographics. Unit costs were multiplied by resource use data to obtain full costs. Cost drivers were then estimated. Our study showed a cost per patient of US$24,043 over a 12-month period. Over half of this was attributable to wage replacement costs and lost productivity in those unable to work because of pain. Hospital stays and outpatient hospital services were the main drivers for health care utilization costs, together accounting for 63% of the direct medical costs per study participant attending the pain clinic. The cost of chronic pain among intensive service users is significant, and when extrapolated to a population level, these costs represent a very substantial economic burden. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Military Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and Psychiatric Comorbidity: Is Better Pain Management the Answer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy A. McGeary

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic musculoskeletal pain, such as low back pain, often appears in the presence of psychiatric comorbidities (e.g., depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, especially among U.S. military service members serving in the post-9/11 combat era. Although there has been much speculation about how to best address pain/trauma psychiatric symptom comorbidities, there are little available data to guide practice. The present study sought to examine how pre-treatment depression and PTSD influence outcomes in a functional restoration pain management program using secondary analysis of data from the Department of Defense-funded Functional and Orthopedic Rehabilitation Treatment (FORT trial. Twenty-eight FORT completers were analyzed using a general linear model exploring how well depression and PTSD symptoms predict post-treatment pain (Visual Analog Scale (VAS pain rating, disability (Oswestry Disability Index; Million Visual Analog Scale, and functional capacity (Floor-to-Waist and Waist-to-Eye Level progressive isoinertial lifting evaluation scores in a sample of active duty military members with chronic musculoskeletal pain and comorbid depression or PTSD symptoms. Analysis revealed that pre-treatment depression and PTSD symptoms did not significantly predict rehabilitation outcomes from program completers. Implications of these findings for future research on trauma-related pain comorbidities are discussed.

  11. Studying protocol-based pain management in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkamahadevi Patil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Majority of the patients presenting to emergency department (ED have pain. ED oligoanalgesia remains a challenge. Aims: This study aims to study the effect of implementing a protocol-based pain management in the ED on (1 time to analgesia and (2 adequacy of analgesia obtained. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional study in the ED. Methods: Patients aged 18–65 years of age with pain of numeric rating scale (NRS ≥4 were included. A series of 100 patients presenting before introduction of the protocol-based pain management were grouped “pre-protocol,” and managed as per existing practice. Following this, a protocol for management of all patients presenting to ED with pain was implemented. Another series of 100 were grouped as “post-protocol” and managed as per the new pain management protocol. The data of patients from both the groups were collected and analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistical tests such as percentage, mean and standard deviation and inferential statistical tests such as Pearson coefficient, Student's t-test were applied. Differences were interpreted as significant when P < 0.05. Results: Mean time to administer analgesic was significantly lesser in the postprotocol group (preprotocol 20.30 min vs. postprotocol 13.05 min; P < 0.001. There was significant difference in the pain relief achieved (change in NRS between the two groups, with greater pain relief achieved in the postprotocol group (preprotocol group 4.6800 vs. postprotocol group 5.3600; P < 0.001. Patients' rating of pain relief (assessed on E5 scale was significantly higher in the postprotocol group (preprotocol 3.91 vs. postprotocol 4.27; P = 0.001. Patients' satisfaction (North American Spine Society scale with the overall treatment was also compared and found to be significantly higher in postprotocol group (mean: preprotocol 1.59 vs. postprotocol 1.39; P = 0.008. Conclusion: Protocol-based pain management provided timely and

  12. Prevention of addiction in pain management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2005-09-06

    The present invention provides a composition for treating pain. The composition includes a pharmaceutically acceptable analgesic and a GABAergic agent, such as gamma vinyl GABA, effective in reducing or eliminating the addictive liability of the analgesic. The invention also includes a method for reducing or eliminating the addictive

  13. Pain Management in CKD: A Guide for Nephrology Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koncicki, Holly M; Unruh, Mark; Schell, Jane O

    2017-03-01

    Although pain is one of the most commonly experienced symptoms by patients with chronic kidney disease, it is under-recognized, the severity is underestimated, and the treatment is inadequate. Pain management is one of the general primary palliative care competencies for medical providers. This review provides nephrology providers with basic skills for pain management. These skills include recognition of types of pain (nociceptive and neuropathic) syndromes and appropriate history-taking skills. Through this history, providers can identify clinical circumstances in which specialist referral is beneficial, including those who are at high risk for addiction, at risk for adverse effects to medications, and those with complicated care needs such as patients with a limited prognosis. Management of pain begins with the development of a shared treatment plan, identification of appropriate medications, and continual follow-up and assessment of efficacy and adverse effects. Through adequate pain management, providers can positively affect the health of individual patients and the performance of health care systems. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multidisciplinary chronic pain management in a rural Canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Robert; Day, Jeremiah; Dudley, Wallace

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pain is prevalent, complex and most effectively treated by a multidisciplinary team, particularly if psychosocial issues are dominant. The limited access to and high costs of such services are often prohibitive for the rural patient. We describe the development and 18-month outcomes of a small multidisciplinary chronic pain management program run out of a physician's office in rural Alberta. The multidisciplinary team consisted of a family physician, physiatrist, psychologist, physical therapist, kinesiologist, nurse and dietician. The allied health professionals were involved on a part-time basis. The team triaged referral information and patients underwent either a spine or medical care assessment. Based on the findings of the assessment, the team managed the care of patients using 1 of 4 methods: consultation only, interventional spine care, supervised medication management or full multidisciplinary management. We prospectively and serially recorded self-reported measures of pain and disability for the supervised medication management and full multidisciplinary components of the program. Patients achieved clinically and statistically significant improvements in pain and disability. Successful multidisciplinary chronic pain management services can be provided in a rural setting.

  15. Review of Opioid Pharmacogenetics and Considerations for Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu Obeng, Aniwaa; Hamadeh, Issam; Smith, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Opioid analgesics are the standards of care for the treatment of moderate to severe nociceptive pain, particularly in the setting of cancer and surgery. Their analgesic properties mainly emanate from stimulation of the μ receptors, which are encoded by the OPRM1 gene. Hepatic metabolism represents the major route of elimination, which, for some opioids, namely codeine and tramadol, is necessary for their bioactivation into more potent analgesics. The highly polymorphic nature of the genes coding for phase I and phase II enzymes (pharmacokinetics genes) that are involved in the metabolism and bioactivation of opioids suggests a potential interindividual variation in their disposition and, most likely, response. In fact, such an association has been substantiated in several pharmacokinetic studies described in this review, in which drug exposure and/or metabolism differed significantly based on the presence of polymorphisms in these pharmacokinetics genes. Furthermore, in some studies, the observed variability in drug exposure translated into differences in the incidence of opioid-related adverse effects, particularly nausea, vomiting, constipation, and respiratory depression. Although the influence of polymorphisms in pharmacokinetics genes, as well as pharmacodynamics genes (OPRM1 and COMT) on response to opioids has been a subject of intense research, the results have been somehow conflicting, with some evidence insinuating for a potential role for OPRM1. The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines provide CYP2D6-guided therapeutic recommendations to individualize treatment with tramadol and codeine. However, implementation guidelines for other opioids, which are more commonly used in real-world settings for pain management, are currently lacking. Hence, further studies are warranted to bridge this gap in our knowledge base and ultimately ascertain the role of pharmacogenetic markers as predictors of response to opioid analgesics. © 2017

  16. Patients' perception of postoperative pain management: validation of the International Pain Outcomes (IPO) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothaug, Judith; Zaslansky, Ruth; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Komann, Marcus; Allvin, Renée; Backström, Ragnar; Brill, Silviu; Buchholz, Ingo; Engel, Christoph; Fletcher, Dominique; Fodor, Lucian; Funk, Peter; Gerbershagen, Hans J; Gordon, Debra B; Konrad, Christoph; Kopf, Andreas; Leykin, Yigal; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Puig, Margarita; Rawal, Narinder; Taylor, Rod S; Ullrich, Kristin; Volk, Thomas; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Meissner, Winfried

    2013-11-01

    PAIN OUT is a European Commission-funded project aiming at improving postoperative pain management. It combines a registry that can be useful for quality improvement and research using treatment and patient-reported outcome measures. The core of the project is a patient questionnaire-the International Pain Outcomes questionnaire-that comprises key patient-level outcomes of postoperative pain management, including pain intensity, physical and emotional functional interference, side effects, and perceptions of care. Its psychometric quality after translation and adaptation to European patients is the subject of this validation study. The questionnaire was administered to 9,727 patients in 10 languages in 8 European countries and Israel. Construct validity was assessed using factor analysis. Discriminant validity assessment used Mann-Whitney U tests to detect mean group differences between 2 surgical disciplines. Internal consistency reliability was calculated as Cronbach's alpha. Factor analysis resulted in a 3-factor structure explaining 53.6% of variance. Cronbach's alpha at overall scale level was high (.86), and for the 3 subscales was low, moderate, or high (range, .53-.89). Significant mean group differences between general and orthopedic surgery patients confirmed discriminant validity. The psychometric quality of the International Pain Outcomes questionnaire can be regarded as satisfactory. The International Pain Outcomes questionnaire provides an instrument for postoperative pain assessment and improvement of quality of care, which demonstrated good psychometric quality when translated into a variety of languages in a large European and Israeli patient population. This measure provides the basis for the first comprehensive postoperative pain registry in Europe and other countries. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis: Aetiology, evaluation and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Rourke

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis or bladder pain syndrome (BPS is often a chronic debilitating condition characterised by predominantly storage symptoms and associated frequently with pelvic pain that varies with bladder filling. The aetiology is uncertain as the condition occurs in the absence of a urinary tract infection or other obvious pathology. Resulting discomfort may vary and ranges from abdominal tenderness to intense bladder spasms. Diagnosis and management of this syndrome may be difficult and is often made by its typical cystoscopic features. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of interstitial cystitis according to the current available best evidence and advises a multimodal approach in its management.

  18. The Danish version of the Medication Adherence Report Scale: preliminary validation in cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2009-01-01

    into Danish following the repeated back-translation procedure. Cancer patients for the study were recruited from specialized pain management facilities. Thirty-three patients responded to the DMARS-4, the Danish Barriers Questionnaire II, The Danish version of Patient Perceived Involvement in Care Scale......OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychometric properties of the Danish version of the Medication Adherence Report Scale (DMARS-4) adapted to measure adherence to analgesic regimen among cancer patients. METHODS: The validated English version of the Medication Adherence Report Scale was translated...

  19. Complementary therapies for symptom management in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aanchal Satija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients are often poly-symptomatic which distressingly affects their quality of lives (QOLs. Alhough, conventional management provides adequate symptom control, yet is coupled with some limitations. Complementary therapies (CTs have shown beneficial effects in cancer patients for symptomatic relief. The aim of this article is to provide evidence-based review of commonly used CTs for symptom management in cancer care. Hypnosis has promising evidence to be used for managing symptoms such as pain, chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, distress, fatigue, and hot flashes. Guided imagery increases comfort and can be used as a psycho-supportive therapy. Meditation substantially improves psychological function, mental health, and QOL. Cognitive behavioral therapies effectively reduce pain, distress, fatigue, anxiety, and depression; and improve subjective sleep outcomes along with mood and QOL. Yoga has short term beneficial effects for anxiety, depression, fatigue, perceived stress, QOL, and well-being. T'ai Chi and qigong are beneficial adjunctive therapies for supportive cancer care, but their role in reducing cancer pain is not well proven. Acupuncture is effective for reducing treatment related side-effects, pain and fatigue. Other therapies such as massage techniques, energy therapies, and spiritual interventions have also demonstrated positive role in managing cancer-related symptoms and improve overall well-being. However, the clinical effectiveness of these therapies for symptom management in cancer patients cannot be concluded due to poor strength of evidence. Nonetheless, these are relatively free from risks and hence can be given along with conventional treatments. Only by tailoring these therapies as per patient's beliefs and preferences, optimal patient-centered holistic care can be provided.

  20. Quality Pain Management in Adult Hospitalized Patients: A Concept Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoëga, Sigridur; Gunnarsdottir, Sigridur; Wilson, Margaret E; Gordon, Debra B

    2016-01-01

    To explore the concept of quality pain management (QPM) in adult hospitalized patients. Pain is common in hospitalized patients, and pain management remains suboptimal in some settings. A concept evaluation based on Morse et al.'s method. Of more than 5,000 articles found, data were restricted to 37 selected key articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Data were extracted from the selected articles and then synthesized according to the following: definition, characteristics, boundaries, preconditions, and outcomes. QPM relates to the Structure: organizationally supported evidence-based policies, competent staff, interprofessional and specialized care, and staff accountability; screening, assessment/reassessment and communication of pain and its treatment, patient/family education, individualized evidence-based treatment, embedded in safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable services; and reduced pain severity and functional interference, decreased prevalence/severity of adverse consequences from pain or pain treatment, and increase in patient satisfaction. QPM is a multifaceted concept that remains poorly defined in the literature. Studies should aim to develop valid, reliable, and operational measures of the pillars of QPM and to look at the relationship among these factors. Authors need to state how they define and what aspects of QPM they are measuring. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Clinical management of pain and fatigue in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sorbo, Francesca; Albanese, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Pain and fatigue are part of the phenomenological spectrum of Parkinson's disease (PD). These non-motor symptoms can be as troublesome as motor symptoms, impact activities of daily living, and are often underdiagnosed. The recognition of pain and fatigue requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and is facilitated by the use of specific questionnaires and ancillary tests. This workup is highly valuable particularly considering that pain and fatigue in PD may be treatable. We review here the clinical manifestations and management of these non-motor symptoms. Their resolution can be challenging, as there is insufficient evidence concerning effective treatment options. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of the radiologist in the management of pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, S.F.; Murtagh, F.R.; Chatfield, R.; Kori, S.; Kavanagh, J.; Clark, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Radiologists are taking an expanding role in the management of pain. The procedures most commonly used at our institution are facet blocks, peripheral nerve blocks, peripheral nerve ablations, ganglion ablations, chemoinfusions, chemoembolizations, and embolizations alone. CT is used for the facet, ganglion, and peripheral nerve procedures. The techniques for these procedures will be stressed, as meticulous technique is imperative. The radiologist must work closely with the attending clinician to determine both the neurologic level and to monitor therapy. The University of South Florida pain team flow sheet and pain evaluation method is presented

  3. Mirror therapy: A potential intervention for pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla G. Wittkopf

    Full Text Available Summary The consequences of chronic pain and associated disabilities to the patient and to the health care system are well known. Medication is often the first treatment of choice for chronic pain, although side effects and high costs restrict long-term use. Inexpensive, safe and easy to self-administer non-pharmacological therapies, such as mirror therapy, are recommended as adjuncts to pain treatment. The purpose of this review is to describe the principles of use of mirror therapy so it can be incorporated into a health care delivery. The physiological rationale of mirror therapy for the management of pain and the evidence of clinical efficacy based on recent systematic reviews are also discussed. Mirror therapy, whereby a mirror is placed in a position so that the patient can view a reflection of a body part, has been used to treat phantom limb pain, complex regional pain syndrome, neuropathy and low back pain. Research evidence suggests that a course of treatment (four weeks of mirror therapy may reduce chronic pain. Contraindications and side effects are few. The mechanism of action of mirror therapy remains uncertain, with reintegration of motor and sensory systems, restored body image and control over fear-avoidance likely to influence outcome. The evidence for clinical efficacy of mirror therapy is encouraging, but not yet definitive. Nevertheless, mirror therapy is inexpensive, safe and easy for the patient to self-administer.

  4. The challenge of perioperative pain management in opioid-tolerant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coluzzi F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Flaminia Coluzzi,1 Francesca Bifulco,2 Arturo Cuomo,2 Mario Dauri,3 Claudio Leonardi,4 Rita Maria Melotti,5 Silvia Natoli,3 Patrizia Romualdi,6 Gennaro Savoia,7 Antonio Corcione8 1Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Unit of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Polo Pontino, Latina, 2National Cancer Institute “G Pascale” Foundation, Unit of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Naples, 3Department of Clinical Science and Translational Medicine, Tor Vergata University of Rome, 4Addiction Disease Department, Local Health Unit (ASL Rome 2, Rome, 5Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, 6Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Bologna, 7Department Anesthesia, Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Naples, 8Unit of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Dei Colli Hospital, V. Monaldi, Naples, Italy Abstract: The increasing number of opioid users among chronic pain patients, and opioid abusers among the general population, makes perioperative pain management challenging for health care professionals. Anesthesiologists, surgeons, and nurses should be familiar with some pharmacological phenomena which are typical of opioid users and abusers, such as tolerance, physical dependence, hyperalgesia, and addiction. Inadequate pain management is very common in these patients, due to common prejudices and fears. The target of preoperative evaluation is to identify comorbidities and risk factors and recognize signs and symptoms of opioid abuse and opioid withdrawal. Clinicians are encouraged to plan perioperative pain medications and to refer these patients to psychiatrists and addiction specialists for their evaluation. The aim of this review was to give practical suggestions for perioperative management of surgical opioid-tolerant patients, together with schemes of opioid conversion for chronic pain patients assuming oral or transdermal opioids, and

  5. Classification of neuropathic pain in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunelli, Cinzia; Bennett, Michael I; Kaasa, Stein

    2014-01-01

    and on the relevance of patient-reported outcome (PRO) descriptors for the screening of NP in this population. An international group of 42 experts was invited to participate in a consensus process through a modified 2-round Internet-based Delphi survey. Relevant topics investigated were: peculiarities of NP...... in patients with cancer, IASP NeuPSIG diagnostic criteria adaptation and assessment, and standardized PRO assessment for NP screening. Median consensus scores (MED) and interquartile ranges (IQR) were calculated to measure expert consensus after both rounds. Twenty-nine experts answered, and good agreement...... was proposed. Clinical research on PRO in the screening phase and on the application of the algorithm will be needed to examine their effectiveness in classifying NP in cancer patients....

  6. Pediatric nurses' beliefs and pain management practices: an intervention pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Wilkie, Diana J; Wang, Edward

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated feasibility of the Internet-based Relieve Children's Pain (RCP) protocol to improve nurses' management of children's pain. RCP is an interactive, content-focused, and Kolb's experiential learning theory-based intervention. Using a one-group, pretest-posttest design, we evaluated feasibility of RCP and pretest-posttest difference in scores for nurses' beliefs, and simulated and actual pain management practices. Twenty-four RNs completed an Internet-based Pain Beliefs and Practices Questionnaire (PBPQ, alpha=.83) before and after they completed the RCP and an Acceptability Scale afterward. Mean total PBPQ scores significantly improved from pretest to posttest as did simulated practice scores. After RCP in actual hospital practice, nurses administered significantly more ibuprofen and ketorolac and children's pain intensity significantly decreased. Findings showed strong evidence for the feasibility of RCP and study procedures and significant improvement in nurses' beliefs and pain management practices. The 2-hr RCP program is promising and warrants replication with an attention control group and a larger sample.

  7. Implementation of a Hydrotherapy Protocol to Improve Postpartum Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, Meghann; Stevenson, Eleanor; Zimmermann, Deb; Isaacs, Christine

    2017-03-01

    A growing number of women are seeking alternatives to traditional pharmacologic pain management during birth. While there has been an extensive array of nonpharmacologic options developed for labor, there are limited offerings in the postpartum period. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to implement a hydrotherapy protocol in the early postpartum period to improve pain management for women choosing a nonmedicated birth. The postpartum hydrotherapy protocol was initiated in a certified nurse-midwife (CNM) practice in an urban academic medical center. All women who met criteria were offered a 30-minute warm water immersion bath at one hour postpartum. Pain scores were assessed prior to the bath, at 15 minutes after onset, and again at the conclusion (30 minutes). Women who completed the bath were also asked to complete a brief survey on their experience with postpartum hydrotherapy. In women who used the bath (N = 45), there was a significant reduction in pain scores (P hydrotherapy protocol as an alternative or adjunct to medication for early postpartum pain management that significantly reduced pain and improved the birth experience for those who used it. It offers a nonpharmacologic alternative where there have traditionally been limited options. © 2017 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  8. Developments in managing severe chronic pain: role of oxycodone–naloxone extended release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanelli G

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Guido Fanelli,1 Andrea Fanelli2 1Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, University of Parma, Parma, 2Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Policlinico S Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Chronic pain is a highly disabling condition, which can significantly reduce patients’ quality of life. Prevalence of moderate and severe chronic pain is high in the general population, and it increases significantly in patients with advanced cancer and older than 65 years. Guidelines for the management of chronic pain recommend opioids for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain in patients whose pain is not responsive to initial therapies with paracetamol and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Despite their analgesic efficacy being well recognized, adverse events can affect daily functioning and patient quality of life. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC occurs in 40% of opioid-treated patients. Laxatives are the most common drugs used to prevent and treat OIC. Laxatives do not address the underlying mechanisms of OIC; for this reason, they are not really effective in OIC treatment. Naloxone is an opioid receptor antagonist with low systemic bioavailability. When administered orally, naloxone antagonizes the opioid receptors in the gut wall, while its extensive first-pass hepatic metabolism ensures the lack of antagonist influence on the central-mediated analgesic effect of the opioids. A prolonged-release formulation consisting of oxycodone and naloxone in a 2:1 ratio was developed trying to reduce the incidence of OIC maintaining the analgesic effect compared with use of the sole oxycodone. This review includes evidence related to use of oxycodone and naloxone in the long-term management of chronic non-cancer pain and OIC. Keywords: chronic pain, opioid-induced constipation, opioids, oxycodone–naloxone

  9. An improved behavioural assay demonstrates that ultrasound vocalizations constitute a reliable indicator of chronic cancer pain and neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Deepitha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On-going pain is one of the most debilitating symptoms associated with a variety of chronic pain disorders. An understanding of mechanisms underlying on-going pain, i.e. stimulus-independent pain has been hampered so far by a lack of behavioural parameters which enable studying it in experimental animals. Ultrasound vocalizations (USVs have been proposed to correlate with pain evoked by an acute activation of nociceptors. However, literature on the utility of USVs as an indicator of chronic pain is very controversial. A majority of these inconsistencies arise from parameters confounding behavioural experiments, which include novelty, fear and stress due to restrain, amongst others. Results We have developed an improved assay which overcomes these confounding factors and enables studying USVs in freely moving mice repetitively over several weeks. Using this improved assay, we report here that USVs increase significantly in mice with bone metastases-induced cancer pain or neuropathic pain for several weeks, in comparison to sham-treated mice. Importantly, analgesic drugs which are known to alleviate tumour pain or neuropathic pain in human patients significantly reduce USVs as well as mechanical allodynia in corresponding mouse models. Conclusions We show that studying USVs and mechanical allodynia in the same cohort of mice enables comparing the temporal progression of on-going pain (i.e. stimulus-independent pain and stimulus-evoked pain in these clinically highly-relevant forms of chronic pain.

  10. Pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of pain in most common locations in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, W; Zajaczkowska, R; Wordliczek, J; Dobrogowski, J; Woron, J; Krzakowski, M

    2016-12-01

    Pain is one of the most common symptoms in cancer patients, especially in advanced disease. However, pain also accompanies a significant percentage of patients during diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In some patients pain may be the first symptom of the disease. The causes of pain in cancer patients are often multifactorial including direct and indirect cancer effects, anticancer therapy and co-morbidities. Moreover, pain in cancer patients often has mixed pathophysiology including both nociceptive and neuropathic components, especially in patients with bone metastases. In this article, basic knowledge regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of pain in cancer patients with a primary tumour localised in lung, gastrointestinal tract (stomach, colon and pancreas), breast in women and prostate in men are presented. Pain is a common symptom in cancer patients and its appropriate assessment and treatment may significantly improve in patients' and families' quality of life.

  11. P2X7 receptor-mediated analgesia in cancer-induced bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; D. Schwab, Samantha; Frøsig-Jørgensen, Majbrit

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a common and debilitating complication for cancer patients significantly compromising their quality of life. Cancer-induced bone pain involves a complex interplay of molecular events, including mechanisms observed in inflammatory and neuropathic pain states, but also changes unique for ca...

  12. Management of vulvar cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hullu, J. A.; van der Avoort, I. A. M.; Oonk, M. H. M.; van der Zee, A. G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim The radical surgical approach in the treatment of vulvar cancer patients has led to a favorable prognosis for the majority of the patients with early stage squamous cell cancer. However, the morbidity is impressive, leading to more individualized treatment. The aim of this review is to give an

  13. Management of vulvar cancers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hullu, J.A. de; Avoort, I.A.M. van der; Oonk, M.H.; Zee, A.G. van der

    2006-01-01

    AIM: The radical surgical approach in the treatment of vulvar cancer patients has led to a favorable prognosis for the majority of the patients with early stage squamous cell cancer. However, the morbidity is impressive, leading to more individualized treatment. The aim of this review is to give an

  14. Management of male breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay V. Dimitro v

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The management of male breast cancer is still under discussion due to lack of information from prospective, randomized clinical trials and low incidence of this disease. Current management is based largely on extrapolation from data related to treatment of female breast cancer. Over the last two decades, several review articles have discussed mainly retrospective and anecdotal data related to hormonal and chemotherapy treatment modalities. In this review, we present the most recent information and future considerations related to the management of male breast cancer. In addition to the conventional treatment options we will discuss the possible role of targeted therapy. Establishing a national or global registry for male breast cancer will provide more precise information about the natural history of the disease and will facilitate the design and execution of prospective, randomized multicenter clinical trials.

  15. Retrospective analysis of self-reporting pain scores and pain management during head and neck IMRT radiotherapy: A single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, P.; Bisson, J.; Asplin, P.; Gahir, D.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Head and neck carcinomas are relatively rare in the United Kingdom with an estimated 9000 cases diagnosed annually. However, pain associated with disease and treatment side effects such as oral mucositis present a major issue for therapy radiographers in providing effective care and maintaining radiotherapy treatment compliance, all factors that can compromise patient outcome if not managed appropriately. Method: This retrospective analysis of self-reporting pain scores collected during a course of radiotherapy aims to assess the perceived pain intensity scores in 30 patients. Data was collected during radiographer review sessions held weekly to determine if any variables to perceived pain scores occurred during a course of radiotherapy. Results: As treatment progressed, the self-reporting pain scores within the cohort increased, in week one the total cohort pain score was 35, this increased to 114 in week 3 and in the final week had totalled 151. An escalation in pain was observed in week 3 of treatment possibly as a result of radiation induced inflammation alongside cytotoxic chemotherapy. Conclusions: The findings of this study provide further evidence to an individualised approach to patient pain relief and providing regular on treatment reviews, thus maintaining patient comfort and ensuring continued treatment compliance. - Highlights: • Pain is an important but too infrequently analysed symptom in head and neck cancer. • As treatment progressed, the self-reporting pain scores within the cohort increased. • These findings provide the rationale for an individualised approach to pain relief. • Ensuring adequate pain control can positively influence continued treatment compliance.

  16. Pain experiences and non-pharmacological strategies for pain management after tonsillectomy: a qualitative interview study of children and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idvall, Ewa; Holm, Charlotta; Runeson, Ingrid

    2005-09-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most common paediatric surgical procedures. This study aimed to investigate children's experience of pain and the nonpharmacological strategies that they used to manage pain after tonsillectomy. A further aim was to investigate parental views on these same phenomena. Six children (aged seven to 18 years) and their parents (four mothers and two fathers) were interviewed separately on the day after tonsillectomy. The data were analysed using a qualitative approach. Pain experiences were divided into the categories of physiological pain and psychological pain. Children rated their 'worst pain' during the past 24 hours between 6 and 10 (visual analogue scale, 0-10). The non-pharmacological strategies used most frequently to manage pain were thermal regulation (physical method) and distraction (cognitive-behavioural method) according to the framework used. Specific non-pharmacological strategies for pain management relative to different surgical procedures need to be considered.

  17. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: diagnosis and management.