WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer mutation carriers

  1. Cancer risks for MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Dowty, James G.; Win, Aung K.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Clendenning, Mark; Antill, Yoland C.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steve; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A.; Haile, Robert W.; Young, Graeme P.; James, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    We studied 17,576 members of 166 MLH1 and 224 MSH2 mutation-carrying families from the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Average cumulative risks of colorectal cancer (CRC), endometrial cancer (EC) and other cancers for carriers were estimated using modified segregation analysis conditioned on ascertainment criteria. Heterogeneity in risks was investigated using a polygenic risk modifier. Average CRC cumulative risks to age 70 years (95% confidence intervals) for MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers, ...

  2. Reproductive and hormonal factors, and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Rookus, Matti; Andrieu, Nadine

    2009-01-01

    carriers seemed to be greater among more recent users. Tubal ligation was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer for BRCA1 carriers (hazard ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence intervals, 0.22-0.80; P = 0.008). The number of ovarian cancer cases in BRCA2 mutation carriers was too small to draw definitive...

  3. Risk of metachronous colon cancer following surgery for rectal cancer in mismatch repair gene mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Parry, Susan; Parry, Bryan; Kalady, Matthew F; Macrae, Finlay A; Ahnen, Dennis J; Young, Graeme P; Lipton, Lara; Winship, Ingrid; Boussioutas, Alex; Young, Joanne P; Buchanan, Daniel D; Arnold, Julie; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A; Haile, Robert W; Lindor, Noralane M; Gallinger, Steven; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    Despite regular surveillance colonoscopy, the metachronous colorectal cancer risk for mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation carriers after segmental resection for colon cancer is high and total or subtotal colectomy is the preferred option. However, if the index cancer is in the rectum, management decisions are complicated by considerations of impaired bowel function. We aimed to estimate the risk of metachronous colon cancer for MMR gene mutation carriers who underwent a proctectomy for index rectal cancer. This retrospective cohort study comprised 79 carriers of germline mutation in a MMR gene (18 MLH1, 55 MSH2, 4 MSH6, and 2 PMS2) from the Colon Cancer Family Registry who had had a proctectomy for index rectal cancer. Cumulative risks of metachronous colon cancer were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. During median 9 years (range 1-32 years) of observation since the first diagnosis of rectal cancer, 21 carriers (27 %) were diagnosed with metachronous colon cancer (incidence 24.25, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 15.81-37.19 per 1,000 person-years). Cumulative risk of metachronous colon cancer was 19 % (95 % CI 9-31 %) at 10 years, 47 (95 % CI 31-68 %) at 20 years, and 69 % (95 % CI 45-89 %) at 30 years after surgical resection. The frequency of surveillance colonoscopy was 1 colonoscopy per 1.16 years (95 % CI 1.01-1.31 years). The AJCC stages of the metachronous cancers, where available, were 72 % stage I, 22 % stage II, and 6 % stage III. Given the high metachronous colon cancer risk for MMR gene mutation carriers diagnosed with an index rectal cancer, proctocolectomy may need to be considered.

  4. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers : A qualitative exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Annemiek; Vrieling, Alina; Murugesu, Laxsini; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Kampman, Ellen; Hoedjes, Meeke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants of

  5. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers: a qualitative exploration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Vrieling, A.; Murugesu, L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kampman, E.; Hoedjes, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants of

  6. Parity and the risk of breast and ovarian cancer in and mutation carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Milne , Roger L.; Osorio , Ana; Ramón Y Cajal , Teresa; Baiget , Montserrat; Lasa , Adriana; Diaz-Rubio , Eduardo; Hoya , Miguel; Caldés , Trinidad; Teulé , Alex; Lázaro , Conxi; Blanco , Ignacio; Balmaña , Judith; Sánchez-Ollé , Gessamí; Vega , Ana; Blanco , Ana

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Environmental or lifestyle factors are likely to explain part of the heterogeneity in breast and ovarian cancer risk among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We assessed parity as a risk modifier in 515 and 503 Spanish female carriers of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively. Hazard ratios (HR) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using weighted Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusted for year of birth and study centre. The result...

  7. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer : Identification of mutation carriers and assessing pathogenicity of mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, RC; Sijmons, RH; Berends, MJW; Ou, J; Hofstra, RNW; Kleibeuker, JH

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also referred to as Lynch syndrome, is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by susceptibility to colorectal cancer and extracolonic malignancies, in particular endometrial cancer. HNPCC is caused by pathogenic mutations

  8. The association between smoking and cancer incidence in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang-Pil; Kim, Shana J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Lynch, Henry T; Armel, Susan; Park, Sue K; Karlan, Beth; Singer, Christian F; Neuhausen, Susan L; Narod, Steven A; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2018-06-01

    Tobacco smoke is an established carcinogen, but the association between tobacco smoking and cancer risk in BRCA mutation carriers is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively the association between tobacco smoking and cancer incidence in a cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. The study population consisted of unaffected BRCA mutation carriers. Information on lifestyle including smoking histories, reproductive factors, and past medical histories was obtained through questionnaires. Incident cancers were updated biennially via follow-up questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using time-dependent Cox regression models. There were 700 incident cancers diagnosed over 26,711 person-years of follow-up. The most frequent cancers seen in BRCA mutation carriers were breast (n = 428; 61%) and ovarian (n = 109; 15%) cancer. Compared to nonsmokers, (ever) smoking was associated with a modest increased risk of all cancers combined (HR = 1.17; 95%CI 1.01-1.37). Women in the highest group of total pack-years (4.3-9.8) had an increased risk of developing any cancer (HR = 1.27; 95%CI 1.04-1.56), breast cancer (HR = 1.33, 95%CI 1.02-1.75), and ovarian cancer (HR = 1.68; 95%CI 1.06-2.67) compared to never smokers. The associations between tobacco smoking and cancer did not differ by BRCA mutation type or by age at diagnosis. This prospective study suggests that tobacco smoking is associated with a modest increase in the risks of breast and ovarian cancer among women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. © 2018 UICC.

  9. The Effect of Reproductive Factors on Breast Cancer Presentation in Women Who Are BRCA Mutation Carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Yeon; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Kang, Young-Joon; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Woo-Chul; Jung, Yongsik; Moon, Byung-In; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, Sung-Shin; Lee, Min Hyuk; Park, Bo Young; Lee, Jong Won; Noh, Dong-Young

    2017-09-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer increased risks for breast cancers. However, the clinical presentation of breast cancer among women who are carriers of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 ( BRCA1/2 carriers) mutations is heterogenous. We aimed to identify the effects of the reproductive histories of women with the BRCA1/2 mutations on the clinical presentation of breast cancer. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data on women with proven BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations who were recruited to the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer study, from 2007 to 2014. Among the 736 women who were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, a total of 483 women had breast cancers. Breast cancer diagnosis occurred at significantly younger ages in women who experienced menarche at ≤14 years of age, compared to those who experienced menarche at >14 years of age (37.38±7.60 and 43.30±10.11, respectively, p women with the BRCA2 mutation. The prevalence of advanced stages (stage II or III vs. stage I) of disease in parous women was higher than in nulliparous women (68.5% vs. 55.2%, p =0.043). This association was more pronounced in women with the BRCA2 mutation (hazard ratio, 2.67; p =0.014). Our results suggest that reproductive factors, such as the age of onset of menarche and the presence of parity, are associated with the clinical presentation patterns of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  10. Risk of breast cancer after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer in BRCA mutation carriers: Is preventive mastectomy warranted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Jacob; Giannakeas, Vasily; Karlan, Beth; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Rosen, Barry; McLaughlin, John; Risch, Harvey; Sun, Ping; Foulkes, William D; Neuhausen, Susan L; Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Narod, Steven A

    2017-05-01

    Preventive breast surgery and MRI screening are offered to unaffected BRCA mutation carriers. The clinical benefit of these two modalities has not been evaluated among mutation carriers with a history of ovarian cancer. Thus, we sought to determine whether or not BRCA mutation carriers with ovarian cancer would benefit from preventive mastectomy or from MRI screening. First, the annual mortality rate for ovarian cancer patients was estimated for a cohort of 178 BRCA mutation carriers from Ontario, Canada. Next, the actuarial risk of developing breast cancer was estimated using an international registry of 509 BRCA mutation carriers with ovarian cancer. A series of simulations was conducted to evaluate the reduction in the probability of death (from all causes) associated with mastectomy and with MRI-based breast surveillance. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the impacts of mastectomy and MRI screening on breast cancer incidence as well as on all-cause mortality. Twenty (3.9%) of the 509 patients developed breast cancer within ten years following ovarian cancer diagnosis. The actuarial risk of developing breast cancer at ten years post-diagnosis, conditional on survival from ovarian cancer and other causes of mortality was 7.8%. Based on our simulation results, among all BRCA mutation-carrying patients diagnosed with stage III/IV ovarian cancer at age 50, the chance of dying before age 80 was reduced by less than 1% with MRI and by less than 2% with mastectomy. Greater improvements in survival with MRI or mastectomy were observed for women who had already survived 10years after ovarian cancer, and for women with stage I or II ovarian cancer. Among BRCA mutation-carrying ovarian cancer patients without a personal history of breast cancer, neither preventive mastectomy nor MRI screening is warranted, except for those who have survived ovarian cancer without recurrence for ten years and for those with early stage ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017

  11. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients and BRCA1 and 2 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vral, Anne

    2004-01-01

    Enhanced chromosomal radiosensitivity is observed in significant proportions of cancer patients. In breast cancer patients, this elevated sensitivity is confirmed in several independent studies with the G2 assay as well as with the GO micronucleus (MN) assay for peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Enhanced chromosomal radiosensitivity is a common feature of sporadic breast cancer patients as well as breast cancer patients with a family history of the disease. Segregation analysis showed Mendelian heritability of chromosomal radiosensitivity. As mutations in the highly penetrant breast cancer predisposing genes, BRCA1 and 2, are only present in about 3-5 % of familial breast cancer patients, they cannot solely account for the high proportion of radiosensitive cases found among all breast cancer patients. A review on chromosomal radiosensitivity in BRCA1 and 2 mutation carriers shows that breast cancer patients with a BRCAl or 2 mutation are on the average more radiosensitive than healthy individuals, but not different from breast cancer patients without a BRCA mutation. The radiation response of healthy BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, on the contrary, is not significantly different from controls. Most studies performed on wild type and BRCA +/- EBV lymphoblastoid cell lines also could not demonstrate any differences in MN response between both groups. These findings suggest that mutations in BRCA 1 and 2 are not playing a major role in chromosomal radiosensitivity as measured by G2 and MN assay. The enhanced sensitivity observed in a substantial proportion of breast cancer patients, irrespective of a BRCA1/2 mutation or not, suggests that this feature may be related to the presence of other mutations in low penetrance breast cancer predisposing genes, which may be involved in the process of DNA damage. (author)

  12. Survival analysis of cancer risk reduction strategies for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Allison W; Sigal, Bronislava M; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2010-01-10

    Women with BRCA1/2 mutations inherit high risks of breast and ovarian cancer; options to reduce cancer mortality include prophylactic surgery or breast screening, but their efficacy has never been empirically compared. We used decision analysis to simulate risk-reducing strategies in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and to compare resulting survival probability and causes of death. We developed a Monte Carlo model of breast screening with annual mammography plus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from ages 25 to 69 years, prophylactic mastectomy (PM) at various ages, and/or prophylactic oophorectomy (PO) at ages 40 or 50 years in 25-year-old BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. With no intervention, survival probability by age 70 is 53% for BRCA1 and 71% for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The most effective single intervention for BRCA1 mutation carriers is PO at age 40, yielding a 15% absolute survival gain; for BRCA2 mutation carriers, the most effective single intervention is PM, yielding a 7% survival gain if performed at age 40 years. The combination of PM and PO at age 40 improves survival more than any single intervention, yielding 24% survival gain for BRCA1 and 11% for BRCA2 mutation carriers. PM at age 25 instead of age 40 offers minimal incremental benefit (1% to 2%); substituting screening for PM yields a similarly minimal decrement in survival (2% to 3%). Although PM at age 25 plus PO at age 40 years maximizes survival probability, substituting mammography plus MRI screening for PM seems to offer comparable survival. These results may guide women with BRCA1/2 mutations in their choices between prophylactic surgery and breast screening.

  13. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs...... arising in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers display specific pathologic features and whether these features differ from those of BRCA1/2 female BCs (FBCs). METHODS: We characterised the pathologic features of 419 BRCA1/2 MBCs and, using logistic regression analysis, contrasted those with data from 9675 BRCA1...

  14. Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk and Risk Reduction in Jewish BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, Brian S.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Friedman, Sue; Friebel, Tara M.; Dubitsky, Shera; Schonberger, Niecee Singer; Shoretz, Rochelle; Singer, Christian F.; Blum, Joanne L.; Tung, Nadine; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie; Garber, Judy E.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Daly, Mary B.; Isaacs, Claudine; Pichert, Gabrielle; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Couch, Fergus J.; van't Veer, Laura; Eeles, Rosalind; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Evans, D. Gareth; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Narod, Steven A.; Matloff, Ellen; Domchek, Susan; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in BRCA1/2 dramatically increase the risk of both breast and ovarian cancers. Three mutations in these genes (185delAG, 5382insC, and 6174delT) occur at high frequency in Ashkenazi Jews. We evaluated how these common Jewish mutations (CJMs) affect cancer risks and risk reduction. Methods Our cohort comprised 4,649 women with disease-associated BRCA1/2 mutations from 22 centers in the Prevention and Observation of Surgical End Points Consortium. Of these women, 969 were self-identified Jewish women. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate breast and ovarian cancer risks, as well as risk reduction from risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO), by CJM and self-identified Jewish status. Results Ninety-one percent of Jewish BRCA1/2-positive women carried a CJM. Jewish women were significantly more likely to undergo RRSO than non-Jewish women (54% v 41%, respectively; odds ratio, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.44 to 2.42). Relative risks of cancer varied by CJM, with the relative risk of breast cancer being significantly lower in 6174delT mutation carriers than in non-CJM BRCA2 carriers (hazard ratio, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.69). No significant difference was seen in cancer risk reduction after RRSO among subgroups. Conclusion Consistent with previous results, risks for breast and ovarian cancer varied by CJM in BRCA1/2 carriers. In particular, 6174delT carriers had a lower risk of breast cancer. This finding requires additional confirmation in larger prospective and population-based cohort studies before being integrated into clinical care. PMID:22430266

  15. RANK ligand as a potential target for breast cancer prevention in BRCA1-mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Emma; Vaillant, François; Branstetter, Daniel; Pal, Bhupinder; Giner, Göknur; Whitehead, Lachlan; Lok, Sheau W; Mann, Gregory B; Rohrbach, Kathy; Huang, Li-Ya; Soriano, Rosalia; Smyth, Gordon K; Dougall, William C; Visvader, Jane E; Lindeman, Geoffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Individuals who have mutations in the breast-cancer-susceptibility gene BRCA1 (hereafter referred to as BRCA1-mutation carriers) frequently undergo prophylactic mastectomy to minimize their risk of breast cancer. The identification of an effective prevention therapy therefore remains a 'holy grail' for the field. Precancerous BRCA1(mut/+) tissue harbors an aberrant population of luminal progenitor cells, and deregulated progesterone signaling has been implicated in BRCA1-associated oncogenesis. Coupled with the findings that tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 11 (TNFSF11; also known as RANKL) is a key paracrine effector of progesterone signaling and that RANKL and its receptor TNFRSF11A (also known as RANK) contribute to mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated a role for this pathway in the pre-neoplastic phase of BRCA1-mutation carriers. We identified two subsets of luminal progenitors (RANK(+) and RANK(-)) in histologically normal tissue of BRCA1-mutation carriers and showed that RANK(+) cells are highly proliferative, have grossly aberrant DNA repair and bear a molecular signature similar to that of basal-like breast cancer. These data suggest that RANK(+) and not RANK(-) progenitors are a key target population in these women. Inhibition of RANKL signaling by treatment with denosumab in three-dimensional breast organoids derived from pre-neoplastic BRCA1(mut/+) tissue attenuated progesterone-induced proliferation. Notably, proliferation was markedly reduced in breast biopsies from BRCA1-mutation carriers who were treated with denosumab. Furthermore, inhibition of RANKL in a Brca1-deficient mouse model substantially curtailed mammary tumorigenesis. Taken together, these findings identify a targetable pathway in a putative cell-of-origin population in BRCA1-mutation carriers and implicate RANKL blockade as a promising strategy in the prevention of breast cancer.

  16. Urinary Tract Cancer in Lynch Syndrome; Increased Risk in Carriers of MSH2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Therkildsen, Christina; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2015-01-01

    and microsatellite instability in 23% of the tumors. Mutations in MSH2 were overrepresented (73%), and MSH2 mutation carriers were at a significantly increased risk of developing urinary tract cancer compared with individuals with mutations in MLH1 or MSH6. CONCLUSION: Cancers of the upper urinary tract...

  17. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose BRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigated-for the first time to our knowledge-associations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks...

  18. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility....

  19. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-w...

  20. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk inBRCA1andBRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); A. Rudolph (Anja); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); R. Eeles (Rosalind); D.F. Easton (Douglas); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Wilkening (Stefan); B. Chen (Bowang); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); F.H. Van Der Baan (Frederieke H.); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); L.C. Walker (Logan); F. Lose (Felicity); A.-T. Maia (Ana-Teresa); M. Montagna (Marco); L. Matricardi (Laura); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); E.B.G. Garcia; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); S. Orsulic (Sandra); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Y.C. Ding (Yuan Chun); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A.-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); L. Jønson (Lars); A. Osorio (Ana); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); J. Benítez (Javier); E.E. Conway (Edye E.); K.R. Blazer (Kathleen R.); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); M. Barile (Monica); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Papi (Laura); A. Martayan (Aline); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Vratimos (Athanassios); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); T. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); B. Buecher (Bruno); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Piedmonte (Marion); M.L. Friedlander (Michael L.); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L.J. Copeland (Larry J.); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Perez-Segura (Pedro); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); N. Hoogerbrugqe (N.); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); H.C. van Doorn (Helena); J.M. Collée (Margriet); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); L. Feliubadaló (L.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); X. Wang (X.); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Corines (Marina); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M.E. Robson (Mark E.); L. Zhang (Lingling); V. Joseph (Vijai); A. Berger (Andreas); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); Å. Borg (Åke); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul D.P.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); E. Friedman (Eitan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying

  1. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In ...

  2. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Moysich, K.B.; Rudolph, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Simard, J.; Soucy, P.; Eeles, R.A.; Easton, D.F.; Hamann, U.; Wilkening, S.; Chen, B.; Rookus, M.A.; Schmidt, M.K.; Baan, F.H. van der; Spurdle, A.B.; Walker, L.C.; Lose, F.; Maia, A.T.; Montagna, M.; Matricardi, L.; Lubinski, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Garcia, E.B.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Orsulic, S.; Lester, J.; Chung, W.K.; Miron, A.; Southey, M.C.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Ding, Y.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Hansen, T.V.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jonson, L.; Osorio, A.; Martinez-Bouzas, C.; Benitez, J.; Conway, E.E.; Blazer, K.R.; Weitzel, J.N.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Barile, M.; Ficarazzi, F.; Mariette, F.; Fortuzzi, S.; Viel, A.; Giannini, G.; Papi, L.; Martayan, A.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Radice, P.; Vratimos, A.; Fostira, F.; Garber, J.E.; Donaldson, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Brady, A.; Cook, J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.V.; Ellis, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Claes, K.; Maerken, T. Van; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In

  3. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In this study, we

  4. Detection of mismatch repair gene germline mutation carrier among Chinese population with colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hei-Ying; Zhao, Ronghua; Liu, Xiufang; Li, Vicky Ka Ming; Ding, Yijiang; Yang, Bolin; Geng, Jianxiang; Lai, Rensheng; Ding, Shuqing; Ni, Min

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant syndrome. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recommended the Revised Bethesda guidelines for screening HNPCC. There has been a great deal of research on the value of these tests in other countries. However, literature about the Chinese population is scarce. Our objective is to detect and study microsatellite instability (MSI) and mismatch repair (MMR) gene germline mutation carriers among a Chinese population with colorectal cancer. In 146 prospectively recruited consecutive patients with clinically proven colorectal cancer, MSI carriers were identified by analysis of tumor tissue using multiplex fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the NCI recommended panel and classified into microsatellite instability-low (MSI-L), microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) and microsatellite stable (MSS) groups. Immunohistochemical staining for MSH2, MSH6 and MLH1 on tissue microarrays (TMAs) was performed, and methylation of the MLH1 promoter was analyzed by quantitative methylation specific PCR (MSP). Germline mutation analysis of blood samples was performed for MSH2, MSH6 and MLH1 genes. Thirty-four out of the 146 colorectal cancers (CRCs, 23.2%) were MSI, including 19 MSI-H CRCs and 15 MSI-L CRCS. Negative staining for MSH2 was found in 8 CRCs, negative staining for MSH6 was found in 6 CRCs. One MSI-H CRC was negative for both MSH6 and MSH2. Seventeen CRCs stained negatively for MLH1. MLH1 promoter methylation was determined in 34 MSI CRCs. Hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter occurred in 14 (73.7%) out of 19 MSI-H CRCs and 5 (33.3%) out of 15 MSI-L CRCs. Among the 34 MSI carriers and one MSS CRC with MLH1 negative staining, 8 had a MMR gene germline mutation, which accounted for 23.5% of all MSI colorectal cancers and 5.5% of all the colorectal cancers. Five patients harbored MSH2 germline mutations, and three patients harbored MSH6 germline mutations. None of the patients had an MLH

  5. Diagnostic markers for the detection of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Gschwantler-Kaulich

    Full Text Available Screening for ovarian cancer (OC in women at high risk consists of a combination of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125 and transvaginal ultrasound, despite their low sensitivity and specificity. This could be improved by the combination of several biomarkers, which has been shown in average risk patients but has not been investigated until now in female BRCA mutation carriers.Using a multiplex, bead-based, immunoassay system, we analyzed the concentrations of leptin, prolactin, osteopontin, insulin-like growth factor II, macrophage inhibitory factor, CA125 and human epididymis antigen 4 in 26 healthy wild type women, 26 healthy BRCA1 mutation carriers, 28 wildtype OC patients and 26 OC patients with BRCA1 mutation.Using the ROC analysis, we found a high overall sensitivity of 94.3% in differentiating healthy controls from OC patients with comparable results in the wildtype subgroup (sensitivity 92.8%, AUC = 0.988; p = 5.2e-14 as well as in BRCA1 mutation carriers (sensitivity 95.2%, AUC = 0.978; p = 1.7e-15 at an overall specificity of 92.3%. The used algorithm also allowed to identify healthy BRCA1 mutation carriers when compared to healthy wildtype women (sensitivity 88.4%, specificity 80.7%, AUC = 0.895; p = 6e-08, while this was less pronounced in patients with OC (sensitivity 66.7%, specificity 67.8%, AUC = 0.724; p = 0.00065.We have developed an algorithm, which can differentiate between healthy women and OC patients and have for the first time shown, that such an algorithm can also be used in BRCA mutation carriers. To clarify a suggested benefit to the existing early detection program, large prospective trials with mainly early stage OC cases are warranted.

  6. Rare mutations in RINT1 predispose carriers to breast and Lynch Syndrome-spectrum cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daniel J.; Tao, Kayoko; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Nguyen-Dumont, Tu; Robinot, Nivonirina; Hammet, Fleur; Odefrey, Fabrice; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teo, Zhi L.; Thingholm, Louise B.; Young, Erin L.; Voegele, Catherine; Lonie, Andrew; Pope, Bernard J.; Roane, Terrell C.; Bell, Russell; Hu, Hao; Shankaracharya; Huff, Chad D.; Ellis, Jonathan; Li, Jun; Makunin, Igor V.; John, Esther M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Terry, Mary B.; Daly, Mary; Buys, Saundra S.; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Henry T.; Devilee, Peter; Giles, Graham G.; Hopper, John L.; Feng, Bing J.; Lesueur, Fabienne; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of the familial aggregation of breast cancer remains unexplained. A multiple-case breast cancer family exome sequencing study identified three likely pathogenic mutations in RINT1 (NM_021930.4) not present in public sequencing databases: RINT1 c.343C>T (p.Q115X), c.1132_1134del (p.M378del) and c.1207G>T (p.D403Y). Based on this finding, a population-based case-control mutation-screening study was conducted and identified 29 carriers of rare (MAF Lynch syndrome-spectrum cancers (SIR 3.35, 95% CI 1.7-6.0; P=0.005), particularly for relatives diagnosed with cancer under age 60 years (SIR 10.9, 95%CI 4.7-21; P=0.0003). PMID:25050558

  7. Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer for Mismatch Repair Gene Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, S Ghazaleh; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jayasekara, Harindra; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Giles, Graham G; Parry, Susan; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Baron, John A; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko

    2017-03-01

    Background: People with germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes have increased colorectal cancer risk. For these high-risk people, study findings of the relationship between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer risk have been inconclusive. Methods: 1,925 MMR gene mutations carriers recruited into the Colon Cancer Family Registry who had completed a questionnaire on lifestyle factors were included. Weighted Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer. Results: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 769 carriers (40%) at a mean (SD) age of 42.6 (10.3) years. Compared with abstention, ethanol consumption from any alcoholic beverage up to 14 g/day and >28 g/day was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.09-2.07 and 1.69; 95% CI, 1.07-2.65, respectively; P trend = 0.05), and colon cancer risk (HR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.27-2.49 and 1.94; 95% CI, 1.19-3.18, respectively; P trend = 0.02). However, there was no clear evidence for an association with rectal cancer risk. Also, there was no evidence for associations between consumption of individual alcoholic beverage types (beer, wine, spirits) and colorectal, colon, or rectal cancer risk. Conclusions: Our data suggest that alcohol consumption, particularly more than 28 g/day of ethanol (∼2 standard drinks of alcohol in the United States), is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk for MMR gene mutation carriers. Impact: Although these data suggested that alcohol consumption in MMR carriers was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk, there was no evidence of a dose-response, and not all types of alcohol consumption were associated with increased risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 366-75. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. AURKA F31I Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: A CIMBA study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Sinilnikova, Olga; Vierkant, Robert A; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Coupier, Isabelle; Hughes, David; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Baynes, Caroline; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary E.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Schmutzler, Rita; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Sutter, Christian; Horst, Jurgen; Schaefer, Dieter; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ilyushik, Eduard; Glendon, Gordon; Devilee, Peter; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Vasen, Hans F.A.; Borg, Ake; Backenhorn, Katja; Struewing, Jeffery P.; Greene, Mark H.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Nathanson, Katherine; Domchek, Susan; Wagner, Theresa; Garber, Judy E.; Szabo, Csilla; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Olson, Janet E.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lindor, Noralane; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tommiska, Johanna; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Torres, Diana; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine; Guenard, Frederic; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Narod, Steven; Daly, Mary B.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Tomlinson, Gail; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniouon, Antonis C.

    2009-01-01

    The AURKA oncogene is associated with abnormal chromosome segregation and aneuploidy and predisposition to cancer. Amplification of AURKA has been detected at higher frequency in tumors from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers than in sporadic breast tumors, suggesting that overexpression of AURKA and inactivation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 co-operate during tumor development and progression. The F31I polymorphism in AURKA has been associated with breast cancer risk in the homozygous state in prior studies. We evaluated whether the AURKA F31I polymorphism modifies breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). CIMBA was established to provide sufficient statistical power through increased numbers of mutation carriers to identify polymorphisms that act as modifiers of cancer risk and can refine breast cancer risk estimates in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. A total of 4935 BRCA1 and 2241 BRCA2 mutation carriers and 11 individuals carrying both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were genotyped for F31I. Overall, homozygosity for the 31I allele was not significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers combined (HR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.77-1.06). Similarly, no significant association was seen in BRCA1 (HR = 0.90; 95% CI 0.75-1.08) or BRCA2 carriers (HR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.67-1.29) or when assessing the modifying effects of either bilateral prophylactic oophorectomy or menopausal status of BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In summary, the F31I polymorphism in AURKA is not associated with a modified risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. PMID:17627006

  9. A non-synonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Shimon–Paluch; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; García, Encarna B. Gómez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Maria, Muy-Kheng Tea; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Results Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06–1.92; p = 0.019] and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.39–3.52, p=0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class 2 mutations than class 1 (mutations (class 2 HR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.28–2.70; class 1 HR=0.86, 95%CI:0.69–1.09; p-for difference=0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers (HR = 2.42; p = 0.03). Conclusion The IRS1 Gly972Arg SNP, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22729394

  10. Breast cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers after risk reducing salpingo-oophorectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fakkert, I.E.; Jansen, L.; Meijer, K.; Kok, Theo; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Mourits, M.J.E.; de Bock, G.H.

    Breast cancer screening is offered to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from the age of 25 years because of their increased risk of breast cancer. As ovarian cancer screening is not effective, risk-reducing salpingho-oophorectomy (RRSO) is offered after child bearing age. RRSO before menopause

  11. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Soucy, Penny; Leslie, Goska; Rizzolo, Piera; Navazio, Anna Sara; Valentini, Virginia; Zelli, Veronica; Lee, Andrew; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M; Conner, Thomas A; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Steele, Linda; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Osorio, Ana; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Toss, Angela; Medici, Veronica; Cortesi, Laura; Zanna, Ines; Palli, Domenico; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Azzollini, Jacopo; Viel, Alessandra; Cini, Giulia; Damante, Giuseppe; Tommasi, Stefania; Peterlongo, Paolo; Fostira, Florentia; Hamann, Ute; Evans, D Gareth; Henderson, Alex; Brewer, Carole; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Side, Lucy E; Porteous, Mary E; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Frost, Debra; Adlard, Julian; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Dworniczak, Bernd; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Rhiem, Kerstin; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Ditsch, Nina; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wand, Dorothea; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Poppe, Bruce; De Leeneer, Kim; Claes, Kathleen B M; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez Segura, Pedro; Kiiski, Johanna I; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Khan, Sofia; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Asperen, Christi J; Vaszko, Tibor; Kasler, Miklos; Olah, Edith; Balmaña, Judith; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Izquierdo, Angel; Darder, Esther; Brunet, Joan; Del Valle, Jesús; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Lazaro, Conxi; Arason, Adalgeir; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Alducci, Elisa; Tognazzo, Silvia; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pinto, Pedro; Spurdle, Amanda B; Holland, Helene; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jihyoun; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Zisun; Sharma, Priyanka; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Lincoln, Anne; Musinsky, Jacob; Gaddam, Pragna; Tan, Yen Y; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Loud, Jennifer T; Greene, Mark H; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Krogh, Lotte; Kruse, Torben A; Caligo, Maria A; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Teo, Soo-Hwang; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Huo, Dezheng; Nielsen, Sarah M; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Lorenchick, Christa; Jankowitz, Rachel C; Campbell, Ian; James, Paul; Mitchell, Gillian; Orr, Nick; Park, Sue Kyung; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ottini, Laura

    2017-07-10

    Purpose BRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigated-for the first time to our knowledge-associations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/ 2 mutations and implications for cancer risk prediction. Materials and Methods We genotyped 1,802 male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 by using the custom Illumina OncoArray. We investigated the combined effects of established breast and prostate cancer susceptibility variants on cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations by constructing weighted polygenic risk scores (PRSs) using published effect estimates as weights. Results In male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, PRS that was based on 88 female breast cancer susceptibility variants was associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio per standard deviation of PRS, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.56; P = 8.6 × 10 -6 ). Similarly, PRS that was based on 103 prostate cancer susceptibility variants was associated with prostate cancer risk (odds ratio per SD of PRS, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.35 to 1.81; P = 3.2 × 10 -9 ). Large differences in absolute cancer risks were observed at the extremes of the PRS distribution. For example, prostate cancer risk by age 80 years at the 5th and 95th percentiles of the PRS varies from 7% to 26% for carriers of BRCA1 mutations and from 19% to 61% for carriers of BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Conclusion PRSs may provide informative cancer risk stratification for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations that might enable these men and their physicians to make informed decisions on the type and timing of breast and prostate cancer risk management.

  12. The Landscape of Somatic Genetic Alterations in Breast Cancers From ATM Germline Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, Britta; Bi, Rui; Kumar, Rahul; Blecua, Pedro; Mandelker, Diana L; Geyer, Felipe C; Pareja, Fresia; James, Paul A; Couch, Fergus J; Eccles, Diana M; Blows, Fiona; Pharoah, Paul; Li, Anqi; Selenica, Pier; Lim, Raymond S; Jayakumaran, Gowtham; Waddell, Nic; Shen, Ronglai; Norton, Larry; Wen, Hannah Y; Powell, Simon N; Riaz, Nadeem; Robson, Mark E; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2018-02-28

    Pathogenic germline variants in ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a gene that plays a role in DNA damage response and cell cycle checkpoints, confer an increased breast cancer (BC) risk. Here, we investigated the phenotypic characteristics and landscape of somatic genetic alterations in 24 BCs from ATM germline mutation carriers by whole-exome and targeted sequencing. ATM-associated BCs were consistently hormone receptor positive and largely displayed minimal immune infiltrate. Although 79.2% of these tumors exhibited loss of heterozygosity of the ATM wild-type allele, none displayed high activity of mutational signature 3 associated with defective homologous recombination DNA (HRD) repair. No TP53 mutations were found in the ATM-associated BCs. Analysis of an independent data set confirmed that germline ATM variants and TP53 somatic mutations are mutually exclusive. Our findings indicate that ATM-associated BCs often harbor bi-allelic inactivation of ATM, are phenotypically distinct from BRCA1/2-associated BCs, lack HRD-related mutational signatures, and that TP53 and ATM genetic alterations are likely epistatic.

  13. Variation in mutation spectrum partly explains regional differences in the breast cancer risk of female BRCA mutation carriers in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Janet R; Teixeira, Natalia; van der Kolk, Dorina M; Mourits, Marian J E; Rookus, Matti A; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Collée, Margriet; van Asperen, Christi J; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gómez-Garcia, Encarna B; Vasen, Hans F; Brohet, Richard M; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan C; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to quantify previously observed relatively high cancer risks in BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA2 carriers) older than 60 in the Northern Netherlands, and to analyze whether these could be explained by mutation spectrum or population background risk. This consecutive cohort study included all known pathogenic BRCA1/2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands (N = 1,050). Carrier and general reference populations were: BRCA1/2 carriers in the rest of the Netherlands (N = 2,013) and the general population in both regions. Regional differences were assessed with HRs and ORs. HRs were adjusted for birth year and mutation spectrum. All BRCA1 carriers and BRCA2 carriers younger than 60 had a significantly lower breast cancer risk in the Northern Netherlands; HRs were 0.66 and 0.64, respectively. Above age 60, the breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands was higher than in the rest of the Netherlands [HR, 3.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-14.35]. Adjustment for mutational spectrum changed the HRs for BRCA1, BRCA2 <60, and BRCA2 ≥60 years by -3%, +32%, and +11% to 0.75, 0.50, and 2.61, respectively. There was no difference in background breast cancer incidence between the two regions (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.09). Differences in mutation spectrum only partly explain the regional differences in breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers, and for an even smaller part in BRCA1 carriers. The increased risk in BRCA2 carriers older than 60 may warrant extension of intensive breast screening beyond age 60. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. MSH2 mutation carriers are at higher risk of cancer than MLH1 mutation carriers : A study of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Stormorken, A; Menko, FH; Nagengast, FM; Kleibeuker, JH; Griffioen, G; Taal, BG; Moller, P; Wijnen, JT

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the clustering of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and various other cancers. The disease is caused by mutations in DNA-mismatch-repair (MMR) genes, most frequently in MLH1, MSH2, and

  15. MSH2 mutation carriers are at higher risk of cancer than MLH1 mutation carriers: a study of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H.F.; Stormorken, A.; Menko, F.H.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Griffioen, G.; Taal, B.G.; Moller, P.; Wijnen, J.T.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the clustering of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and various other cancers. The disease is caused by mutations in DNA-mismatch-repair (MMR) genes, most frequently in MLH1, MSH2, and

  16. Efficacy of proximal colectomy for surgical management of right-sided first colorectal cancer in Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Molly J; Casey, Murray Joseph; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie L; Stacey, Mark; Walters, Ryan W

    2017-11-08

    This study analyzes the occurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in Lynch syndrome (LS) mutation carriers, interval until diagnosis of metachronous CRC, and survival after proximal colectomy (PC) compared with total (TC) and subtotal colectomy (STC) for right-sided first CRC in LS mutation carriers. Sixty-four LS mutation carriers with right-sided first CRC treated with PC or TC + STC were confirmed by clinical records. Bivariate analyses were examined for significance and life tables were generated for risk of metachronous CRC and survival estimates following surgery. One of 16 (6.3%) mutation carriers treated with TC + STC developed subsequent CRC compared with 13/48 (27%) treated by PC. There was no significant difference in survival estimates between PC compared with TC + STC through 25 years after surgery. Risk of subsequent CRC and survival estimates following PC and TC + STC should be considered in surgical management of right-sided first CRC in LS mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome mutation carriers are still at 27% risk for metachronous colorectal cancer after proximal colectomy for right-sided first colorectal cancers, but this study found no difference in survival through 25 years follow-up compared with those treated with total and subtotal colectomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. RESULTS: We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most...... studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.......1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. METHODS: Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast...

  18. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H; Spurdle, Amanda B; Walker, Logan C; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E; Blazer, Kathleen R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth R; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Doorn, Helena C; Collée, J Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J; Lindor, Noralane M; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Friedman, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In this study, we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n = 3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. The observed P values of association ranged between 0.005 and 1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Cancer spectrum in DNA mismatch repair gene mutation carriers: results from a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Mala; Wei, Chongjuan; Chen, Jinyun; Amos, Christopher I; Lynch, Patrick M; Lu, Karen H; Lucio, Laura A; Boyd-Rogers, Stephanie G; Bannon, Sarah A; Mork, Maureen E; Frazier, Marsha L

    2012-09-01

    The spectrum of cancers seen in a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry of mismatch repair gene mutation carriers was examined to determine the distribution of cancers and examine excess cancer risk. Overall there were 504 cancers recorded in 368 mutation carriers from 176 families. These included 236 (46.8 %) colorectal and 268 (53.2 %) extracolonic cancers. MLH1 mutation carriers had a higher frequency of colorectal cancers whereas MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 mutation carriers had more extracolonic cancers although these differences were not statistically significant. Men had fewer extracolonic cancers than colorectal (45.3 vs. 54.7 %), whereas women had more extracolonic than colorectal cancers (59.0 vs. 41.0 %). The mean age at diagnosis overall for extracolonic cancers was older than for colorectal, 49.1 versus 44.8 years (P ≤ 0.001). As expected, the index cancer was colorectal in 58.1 % of patients and among the extracolonic index cancers, endometrial was the most common (13.8 %). A significant number of non-Lynch syndrome index cancers were recorded including breast (n = 5) prostate (n = 3), thyroid (n = 3), cervix (n = 3), melanoma (n = 3), and 1 case each of thymoma, sinus cavity, and adenocarcinoma of the lung. However, standardized incidence ratios calculated to assess excess cancer risk showed that only those cancers known to be associated with Lynch syndrome were significant in our sample. We found that Lynch syndrome patients can often present with cancers that are not considered part of Lynch syndrome. This has clinical relevance both for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome and surveillance for cancers of different sites during follow-up of these patients.

  20. Age-Dependent Cancer Risk Is not Different in between MSH2 and MLH1 Mutation Carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olschwang, S.; Olschwang, S.; Yu, K.

    2009-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is mostly characterized by early-onset colorectal and endometrial adenocarcinomas. Over 90% of the causal mutations occur in two mismatch repair genes, MSH2 and MLH1. The aim of this study was to evaluate the age-dependent cancer risk in MSH2 or MLH1 mutation carriers from data of DNA diagnostic laboratories. To avoid overestimation, evaluation was based on the age-dependent proportion of mutation carriers in asymptomatic first-degree relatives of identified mutation carriers. Data from 859 such eligible relatives were collected from 8 centers; 387 were found to have inherited the mutation from their relatives. Age-dependent risks were calculated either using a nonparametric approach for four discrete age groups or assuming a modified Weibull distribution for the dependence of risk on age. Cancer risk was estimated starting at 28 (25-32 0.68 confidence interval) and to reach near 0.70 at 70 years. The risks were very similar for MSH2 and MLH1 mutation carriers. Although not statistically significant, the risk in males appeared to precede that for females by ten years. This difference needs to be investigated on a larger dataset. If confirmed, this would indicate that the onset of the colonoscopic surveillance may be different in male and female mutation carriers.

  1. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  2. Cancer risk in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutation carriers; different risk profiles may influence clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsoekh Dewkoemar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lynch syndrome (LS is associated with a high risk for colorectal cancer (CRC and extracolonic malignancies, such as endometrial carcinoma (EC. The risk is dependent of the affected mismatch repair gene. The aim of the present study was to calculate the cumulative risk of LS related cancers in proven MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutation carriers. Methods The studypopulation consisted out of 67 proven LS families. Clinical information including mutation status and tumour diagnosis was collected. Cumulative risks were calculated and compared using Kaplan Meier survival analysis. Results MSH6 mutation carriers, both males and females had the lowest risk for developing CRC at age 70 years, 54% and 30% respectively and the age of onset was delayed by 3-5 years in males. With respect to endometrial carcinoma, female MSH6 mutation carriers had the highest risk at age 70 years (61% compared to MLH1 (25% and MSH2 (49%. Also, the age of EC onset was delayed by 5-10 years in comparison with MLH1 and MSH2. Conclusions Although the cumulative lifetime risk of LS related cancer is similar, MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutations seem to cause distinguishable cancer risk profiles. Female MSH6 mutation carriers have a lower CRC risk and a higher risk for developing endometrial carcinoma. As a consequence, surveillance colonoscopy starting at age 30 years instead of 20-25 years is more suitable. Also, prophylactic hysterectomy may be more indicated in female MSH6 mutation carriers compared to MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers.

  3. Psychological Distress, Anxiety, and Depression of Cancer-Affected BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, Johanna; Wochnowski, Christina; Bosse, Kristin; Giel, Katrin Elisabeth; Schäffeler, Norbert; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the intermediate- and long-term psychological consequences of genetic testing for cancer patients has led to encouraging research, but a clear consensus of the psychosocial impact and clinical routine for cancer-affected BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers is still missing. We performed a systematic review of intermediate- and long-term studies investigating the psychological impact like psychological distress, anxiety, and depression in cancer-affected BRCA mutation carriers compared to unaffected mutation carriers. This review included the screening of 1243 studies. Eight intermediate- and long-term studies focusing on distress, anxiety, and depression symptoms among cancer-affected mutation carriers at least six months after the disclosure of genetic testing results were included. Studies reported a great variety of designs, methods, and patient outcomes. We found evidence indicating that cancer-affected mutation carriers experienced a negative effect in relation to psychological well-being in terms of an increase in symptoms of distress, anxiety, and depression in the first months after test disclosure. In the intermediate- and long-term, no significant clinical relevant symptoms occurred. However, none of the included studies used specific measurements, which can clearly identify psychological burdens of cancer-affected mutation carriers. We concluded that current well-implemented distress screening instruments are not sufficient for precisely identifying the psychological burden of genetic testing. Therefore, future studies should implement coping strategies, specific personality structures, the impact of genetic testing, supportive care needs and disease management behaviour to clearly screen for the possible intermediate- and long-term psychological impact of a positive test disclosure.

  4. Genetic Diagnosis before Surgery has an Impact on Surgical Decision in BRCA Mutation Carriers with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungmin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Ryu, Jai Min; Kim, Issac; Bae, Soo Youn; Lee, Se Kyung; Yu, Jonghan; Kim, Seok Won; Nam, Seok Jin

    2018-05-01

    The first aim of our study was to evaluate surgical decision-making by BRCA mutation carriers with breast cancer based on the timing of knowledge of their BRCA mutation status. The second aim was to evaluate breast cancer outcome following surgical treatment. This was a retrospective study of 164 patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, tested for BRCA mutation, and treated with primary surgery between 2004 and 2015 at Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea. We reviewed types of surgery and timing of the BRCA test result. We compared surgical decision- making of BRCA carriers with breast cancer based on the timing of knowledge of their BRCA mutation status. Only 15 (9.1%) patients knew their BRCA test results before their surgery, and 149 (90.9%) knew the results after surgery. In patients with unilateral cancer, there was a significant difference between groups whose BRCA mutation status known before surgery and groups whose BRCA status unknown before surgery regarding the choice of surgery (p = 0.017). No significant difference was observed across surgery types of risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (p = 0.765) and contralateral breast cancer (p = 0.69). Genetic diagnosis before surgery has an impact on surgical decision choosing unilateral mastectomy or bilateral mastectomy in BRCA mutation carriers with breast cancer. Knowledge about BRCA mutation status after initial surgery led to additional surgeries for patients with BCS. Thus, providing genetic counseling and genetic testing before surgical choice and developing treatment strategies for patients with a high risk of breast cancer are important.

  5. Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Alleles and Risk of Ovarian Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K.E.P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67–0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21–1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10−4, rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10−4, rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81–0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10−4. The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:22253144

  6. Exposure to diagnostic radiation and risk of breast cancer among carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations: retrospective cohort study (GENE-RAD-RISK)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpe, Anouk; Andrieu, Nadine; Easton, Douglas F.; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Cardis, Elisabeth; Noguès, Catherine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Paterson, Joan; Manders, Peggy; van Asperen, Christi J.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Hauptmann, Michael; Goldgar, David; Rookus, Matti A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Fourme, Emmanuelle; Lidereau, Rosette; Stevens, Denise; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chompret, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bonadona, Valérie; Gauducheau, René; de Sienne, Catherine; Lortholary, Alain; Frénay, Marc; Faivre, Laurence; Sobol, Hagay; Huiart, Laetitia; Longy, Michel; Nguyen, Tan Dat; Gladieff, Laurence; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gesta, Paul; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Chevrier, Annie; Rossi, Annick; Perrin, Jean; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Limacher, Jean-Marc; Dugast, Catherine; Courlancy, Polyclinique; Demange, Liliane; Zattara-Cannoni, Hélène; Dreyfus, Hélène; Noruzinia, Mehrdad; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Gregory, Helen; Cole, Trevor; Burgess, Lucy; Rogers, Mark; Hughes, Lisa; Brewer, Carole; Davidson, Rosemarie; Bradshaw, Nicola; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Evans, Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Shenton, Andrew; Side, Lucy; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Castro, Elena; Houlston, Richard; Rahman, Nazneen; Shanley, Susan; Cook, Jackie; Baxter, Lauren; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Eccles, Diana; Verhoef, Senno; Brohet, Richard; Hogervorst, Frans; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; Oosterwijk, Jan; van der Hout, Annemiek; Vasen, Hans; van Leeuwen, Inge

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the risk of breast cancer associated with diagnostic radiation in carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. Retrospective cohort study (GENE-RAD-RISK). Three nationwide studies (GENEPSO, EMBRACE, HEBON) in France, United Kingdom, and the Netherlands, 1993 female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations

  7. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. METHODS: Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast...... and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. RESULTS: We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most...... significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 × 10(-6)). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1...

  8. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vigorito

    Full Text Available Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16. These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6. The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  9. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs650495...

  10. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D. P.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Singer, Christian F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Gregory, Helen; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Taylor, Amy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Bérard, Léon; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, Françoise; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Payrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélèn; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Lynch, Henry T.; Hogervorst, Frans; Vernhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Tollenaar, Rob; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Gille, Hans; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; van Roozendaal, Kees; Blok, Marinus; Oosterwijk, Jan; van der Hout, Annemieke; Mourits, Marian; Vasen, Hans; Szabo, Csilla; Pohlreich, Petr; Kleibl, Zdenek; Machackova, Eva; Lukesova, Miroslava; de Leeneer, Kim; Poppe, Bruce; de Paepe, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs),

  11. Overall survival and clinical characteristics of BRCA mutation carriers with stage I/II pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Talia; Sella, Tal; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Katz, Matthew H G; Epelbaum, Ron; Kelsen, David P; Borgida, Ayelet; Maynard, Hannah; Kindler, Hedy; Friedmen, Eitan; Javle, Milind; Gallinger, Steven

    2017-03-14

    BRCA1/BRCA2 germ line (GL) mutation carriers with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may have distinct outcomes. We recently described an apparent more favourable prognosis of surgically resected BRCA-associated PDAC patients in a single-arm, uncontrolled, retrospective study. However, the prognostic impact of GL BRCA1/2 mutations in surgically resected PDAC has not been compared with a matched control population. A larger multi-centre, case-control retrospective analysis was performed. Cases were patients with surgically resected, BRCA1/2-associated PDAC from 2004 to 2013. Controls included surgically resected PDAC cases treated during the same time period that were either BRCA non-carriers, or had no family history of breast, ovarian or pancreatic cancers. Cases and controls were matched by: age at diagnosis (within ±5-year period) and institution. Demographics, clinical history, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were abstracted from patient records. Statistical comparisons were assessed using χ 2 - and Fisher's exact test, and median DFS/OS using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank testing. Twenty-five patients with BRCA1-(n=4) or BRCA2 (N=21)-associated resectable PDAC were identified. Mean age was 55.7 years (range, 34-78 years), 48% (n=12) were females and 76% (n=19) were Jewish. Cases were compared (1 : 2) with 49 resectable PDAC controls, and were balanced for age, ethnicity and other relevant clinical and pathological features. BRCA-associated PDAC patients received neoadjuvant, or adjuvant platinum-based treatment more frequently than controls (7 out of 8 vs 6 out of 14) and (7 out of 21 vs 3 out of 44), respectively. No significant difference in median OS (37.06 vs 38.77 months, P=0.838) and in DFS (14.3 vs 12.0 months, P=0.303) could be demonstrated between cases and controls. A trend to increased DFS was observed among BRCA-positive cases treated with neoadjuvant/adjuvant platinum-containing regimens (n=10) compared with similarly

  12. Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Osorio, Ana; Hamann, Ute; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Southey, Melissa; Buys, Saundra S.; Singer, Christian F.; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Arason, Adalgeir; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Montagna, Marco; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Sucheston, Lara; Beattie, Mary; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Healey, Sue; Chen, Xiaoqing; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differences in the absolute risk of developing breast cancer for mutation carriers, suggesting that additional modifier loci may further enhance individual risk assessment for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recently, a common variant on 6p22 (rs9393597) was found to be associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [Hazard ratio (HR)=1.55, 95% CI 1.25–1.92, p=6.0×10−5]. This observation was based on data from GWAS studies in which, despite statistical correction for multiple comparisons, the possibility of false discovery remains a concern. Here we report on an analysis of this variant in an additional 6,165 BRCA1 and 3,900 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). In this replication analysis, rs9393597 was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [HR=1.09, 95% CI 0.96–1.24, p=0.18]. No association with ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers was observed. This follow-up study suggests that, contrary to our initial report, this variant is not associated with breast cancer risk among individuals with germline BRCA2 mutations. PMID:23011509

  13. Modifiers of the Efficacy of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kauff, Noah

    2004-01-01

    .... This plan included 1) conduct of a prospective study examining modifiers of the efficacy of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy for the prevention of breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA mutations; and 2...

  14. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Page, Elizabeth C; Castro, Elena

    2014-01-01

    AND PARTICIPANTS: We recruited men aged 40-69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrollment, and those men with PSA >3 ng......BACKGROUND: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening....../ml were offered prostate biopsy. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: We...

  15. Comparison of risk assessment models of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carrier in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybchenko L.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of efficiency of the algorithm BOADICEA using and Manchester scoring system to predict the carrier of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Ukranian patients with breast cancer was performed. Materials for this study were the results of clinical, imunogistological, pathogistological, genealogical, molecular genetic researches of 146 patients with breast cancer. Calculations of mutations risk were performed using BOADICEA algorithm and Manchester scoring system. In the total group of patients the area under the curve while predicting BRCA1 mutations with algorithm BOADICEA was 0.86, with Manchester scoring system - 0.84, and in calculation of the combined risk of BRCA mutations - 0.83 and 0.84, respectively. However, statistical difference between the areas of algorithms has not been established (p> 0.05, it indicates to the same discriminatory power of the test models. Better sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of results of BOADICEA algorithm was reached in 6% of BRCA1 probability and in 8% threshold of BRCA1/2 mutations. The Manchester scoring system has showed the best operating characteristics with 6 and 13-point probability of BRCA1 and BRCA1/2 mutations respectively. Patients with probability of mutations with such thresholds may be offered molecular study of pathogenic alleles.

  16. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs....../2 FBCs and with population-based data from 6351 MBCs in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. RESULTS: Among BRCA2 MBCs, grade significantly decreased with increasing age at diagnosis (P = 0.005). Compared with BRCA2 FBCs, BRCA2 MBCs were of significantly higher stage (P...

  17. Involvement and Influence of Healthcare Providers, Family Members, and Other Mutation Carriers in the Cancer Risk Management Decision-Making Process of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puski, Athena; Hovick, Shelly; Senter, Leigha; Toland, Amanda Ewart

    2018-03-29

    Deciding between increased cancer screening or prophylactic surgery and the timing of such procedures can be a difficult and complex process for women with BRCA mutations. There are gaps in our understanding of involvement of others in the decision-making process for women with BRCA mutations. This study evaluated the management decision-making process of women with BRCA mutations, focusing on the involvement of others. Grounded theory was used to analyze and code risk management decision-making information from interviews with 20 BRCA mutation carriers. Unaffected at-risk participants with a BRCA mutation, those under age 40, and those with no children described having a difficult time making risk management decisions. Physicians were an integral part of the decision-making process by providing decisional support and management recommendations. Family members and other mutation carriers filled similar yet distinct roles by providing experiential information as well as decisional and emotional support for carriers. Participants described genetic counselors as short-term providers of risk information and management recommendations. The study findings suggest that unaffected at-risk women, women under 40, and those who do not have children may benefit from additional support and information during the decision-making process. Genetic counselors are well trained to help women through this process and connect them with resources, and may be under-utilized in long-term follow-up for women with a BRCA mutation.

  18. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2...... mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively...... of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest...

  19. Endocrine metabolic disorders in patients with breast cancer, carriers of BRCA1 gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstein, L M; Boyarkina, M P; Vasilyev, D A; Poroshina, T E; Kovalenko, I G; Imyanitov, E N; Semiglazov, V F

    2012-03-01

    Two groups of breast cancer patients (53±2 years) in clinical remission receiving no specific therapy were examined: group 1, with BRCA1 gene mutations (N=11) and group 2, without mutations of this kind (N=11). The two groups did not differ by insulinemia and glycemia, insulin resistance index, blood levels of thyrotropic hormone, sex hormone-binding globulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, triglycerides, or lipoproteins. In group 1, blood estradiol level was higher. Intensive glucose-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in these patients was associated with a decrease of cholesterolemia, of the C-peptide/insulin proportion, and a trend to higher urinary excretion of 4-hydroxyestrone, one of the most genotoxic catecholestrogens. BRCA1 gene mutations in breast cancer patients were associated with signs of estrogenization and a pro-genotoxic shift in the estrogen and glucose system, which could modulate the disease course and requires correction.

  20. Evaluation of Polygenic Risk Scores for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Soucy, Penny; Healey, Sue; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Robson, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Ramus, Susan J.; Mavaddat, Nasim; Terry, Mary Beth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hamann, Ute; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M.; Chung, Wendy K.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Goldgar, David E.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Slager, Susan; Hallberg, Emily; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Cohen, Nancy; Lawler, William; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Barile, Monica; Bonanni, Bernardo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Radice, Paolo; Savarese, Antonella; Papi, Laura; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Adlard, Julian; Brewer, Carole; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Hodgson, Shirley; Izatt, Louise; Lalloo, Fiona; Ong, Kai-ren; Godwin, Andrew K.; Arnold, Norbert; Dworniczak, Bernd; Engel, Christoph; Gehrig, Andrea; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Kast, Karin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Barjhoux, Laure; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Elan, Camille; Golmard, Lisa; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Lesueur, Fabienne; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sokolowska, Joanna; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Poppe, Bruce; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; de Lange, J. L.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Kets, Carolien M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Rookus, Matti A.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Doorn, Helena C.; van Os, Theo A. M.; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Brunet, Joan; Lazaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Lubinski, Jan; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Agata, Simona; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Park, Sue Kyung; Olswold, Curtis; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Gaddam, Pragna; Vijai, Joseph; Pfeiler, Georg; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Hays, John L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Martyn, Julie; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Kruse, Torben A.; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria A.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Berger, Raanan; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Arver, Brita; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rantala, Johanna; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Bradbury, Angela R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the high-risk BC and OC genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. The combined effects of these variants on BC or OC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have not yet been assessed while their clinical management could benefit from improved personalized risk estimates. Methods: We constructed polygenic risk scores (PRS) using BC and OC susceptibility SNPs identified through population-based GWAS: for BC (overall, estrogen receptor [ER]–positive, and ER-negative) and for OC. Using data from 15 252 female BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 carriers, the association of each PRS with BC or OC risk was evaluated using a weighted cohort approach, with time to diagnosis as the outcome and estimation of the hazard ratios (HRs) per standard deviation increase in the PRS. Results: The PRS for ER-negative BC displayed the strongest association with BC risk in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.31, P = 8.2×10−53). In BRCA2 carriers, the strongest association with BC risk was seen for the overall BC PRS (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.28, P = 7.2×10−20). The OC PRS was strongly associated with OC risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. These translate to differences in absolute risks (more than 10% in each case) between the top and bottom deciles of the PRS distribution; for example, the OC risk was 6% by age 80 years for BRCA2 carriers at the 10th percentile of the OC PRS compared with 19% risk for those at the 90th percentile of PRS. Conclusions: BC and OC PRS are predictive of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management. PMID

  1. The effect of genotypes and parent of origin on cancer risk and age of cancer development in PMS2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suerink, Manon; van der Klift, Heleen M; Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Dekkers, Olaf M; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G W; Menko, Fred H; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J W; Olderode-Berends, M J W; Olderode, Maran; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Vos, Yvonne J; Wagner, Anja; Morreau, Hans; Hes, Frederik J; Vasen, Hans F A; Tops, Carli M; Wijnen, Juul T; Nielsen, Maartje

    2016-04-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), a heritable disorder with an increased risk of primarily colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC), can be caused by mutations in the PMS2 gene. We wished to establish whether genotype and/or parent-of-origin effects (POE) explain (part of) the reported variability in severity of the phenotype. European PMS2 mutation carriers (n = 381) were grouped and compared based on RNA expression and whether the mutation was inherited paternally or maternally. Mutation carriers with loss of RNA expression (group 1) had a significantly lower age at CRC diagnosis (51.1 years vs. 60.0 years, P = 0.035) and a lower age at EC diagnosis (55.8 years vs. 61.0 years, P = 0.2, nonsignificant) compared with group 2 (retention of RNA expression). Furthermore, group 1 showed slightly higher, but nonsignificant, hazard ratios (HRs) for both CRC (HR: 1.31, P = 0.38) and EC (HR: 1.22, P = 0.72). No evidence for a significant parent-of-origin effect was found for either CRC or EC. PMS2 mutation carriers with retention of RNA expression developed CRC 9 years later than those with loss of RNA expression. If confirmed, this finding would justify a delay in surveillance for these cases. Cancer risk was not influenced by a parent-of-origin effect.Genet Med 18 4, 405-409.

  2. Smoking and physical inactivity increase cancer prevalence in BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 mutation carriers: results from a retrospective observational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Sabine; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Dukatz, Ricarda; Lammert, Jacqueline; Ullrich, Mirjam; Engel, Christoph; Pfeifer, Katharina; Basrai, Maryam; Siniatchkin, Michael; Schmidt, Thorsten; Weisser, Burkhard; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Schmutzler, Rita; Bischoff, Stephan C; Halle, Martin; Kiechle, Marion

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this analysis in a pilot study population was to investigate whether we can verify seemingly harmful lifestyle factors such as nicotine and alcohol indulgence, obesity, and physical inactivity, as well as a low socioeconomic status for increased cancer prevalence in a cohort of BRCA 1 and 2 mutation carriers. The analysis data are derived from 68 participants of the lifestyle intervention study LIBRE-1, a randomized, prospective trial that aimed to test the feasibility of a lifestyle modification in BRCA 1 and 2 mutation carriers. At study entry, factors such as medical history, lifestyle behavior, and socioeconomic status were retrospectively documented by interview and the current BMI was determined by clinical examination. The baseline measurements were compared within the cohort, and presented alongside reference values for the German population. Study participants indicating a higher physical activity during their adolescence showed a significantly lower cancer prevalence (p = 0.019). A significant difference in cancer occurrence was observed in those who smoked prior to the disease, and those who did not smoke (p physical activity level than diseased mutation carriers (p = 0.046). The present data in this small cohort of 68 mutation carriers suggest that smoking and low physical activity during adolescence are risk factors for developing breast cancer in women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Further data of the ongoing LIBRE 2 study are necessary to confirm these findings in a larger cohort of 600 mutation carriers.

  3. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: updated clinical guidelines with an emphasis on germline CDH1 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima; Guilford, Parry; Huntsman, David; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Caldas, Carlos; Schreiber, Karen E Chelcun; Hardwick, Richard H; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Bardram, Linda; Benusiglio, Patrick R; Bisseling, Tanya M; Blair, Vanessa; Bleiker, Eveline; Boussioutas, Alex; Cats, Annemieke; Coit, Daniel; DeGregorio, Lynn; Figueiredo, Joana; Ford, James M; Heijkoop, Esther; Hermens, Rosella; Humar, Bostjan; Kaurah, Pardeep; Keller, Gisella; Lai, Jennifer; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; O'Donovan, Maria; Oliveira, Carla; Ragunath, Krish; Rasenberg, Esther; Richardson, Susan; Roviello, Franco; Schackert, Hans; Seruca, Raquel; Taylor, Amy; ter Huurne, Anouk; Tischkowitz, Marc; Joe, Sheena Tjon A; van Dijck, Benjamin; van Grieken, Nicole C T; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Sandick, Johanna W; Vehof, Rianne; van Krieken, J Han; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects, including diet post gastrectomy. The updated guidelines include revised CDH1 testing criteria (taking into account first-degree and second-degree relatives): (1) families with two or more patients with gastric cancer at any age, one confirmed DGC; (2) individuals with DGC before the age of 40 and (3) families with diagnoses of both DGC and LBC (one diagnosis before the age of 50). Additionally, CDH1 testing could be considered in patients with bilateral or familial LBC before the age of 50, patients with DGC and cleft lip/palate, and those with precursor lesions for signet ring cell carcinoma. Given the high mortality associated with invasive disease, prophylactic total gastrectomy at a centre of expertise is advised for individuals with pathogenic CDH1 mutations. Breast cancer surveillance with annual breast MRI starting at age 30 for women with a CDH1 mutation is recommended. Standardised endoscopic surveillance in experienced centres is recommended for those opting not to have gastrectomy at the current time, those with CDH1 variants of uncertain significance and those that fulfil hereditary DGC criteria without germline CDH1 mutations. Expert histopathological confirmation of (early) signet ring cell carcinoma is recommended. The impact of gastrectomy and mastectomy should not be underestimated; these can have severe consequences on a psychological, physiological and metabolic level. Nutritional problems should be carefully monitored. PMID:25979631

  4. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigorito, E.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Beesley, J.; Adlard, J.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Andrulis, I.L.; Arun, B.K.; Barjhoux, L.; Belotti, M.; Benitez, J.; Berger, A.; Bojesen, A.; Bonanni, B.; Brewer, C.; Caldes, T.; Caligo, M.A.; Campbell, I.; Chan, S.B.; Claes, K.B.; Cohn, D.E.; Cook, J.; Daly, M.B.; Damiola, F.; Davidson, R.; Pauw, A. de; Delnatte, C.; Diez, O.; Domchek, S.M.; Dumont, M.; Durda, K.; Dworniczak, B.; Easton, D.F.; Eccles, D.; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, C.; Eeles, R.; Ejlertsen, B.; Ellis, S.; Evans, D.G.; Feliubadalo, L.; Fostira, F.; Foulkes, W.D.; Friedman, E.; Frost, D.; Gaddam, P.; Ganz, P.A.; Garber, J.; Garcia-Barberan, V.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Gehrig, A.; Gerdes, A.M.; Giraud, S.; Godwin, A.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Hake, C.R.; Hansen, T.V.; Healey, S.; Hodgson, S.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Houdayer, C.; Hulick, P.J.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Isaacs, C.; Izatt, L.; Izquierdo, A.; Jacobs, L; Jakubowska, A.; Janavicius, R.; Jaworska-Bieniek, K.; Jensen, U.B.; John, E.M.; Vijai, J.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kast, K.; Khan, S.; Kwong, A.; Laitman, Y.; Lester, J.; Lesueur, F.; Liljegren, A.; Lubinski, J.; Mai, P.L.; Manoukian, S.; Mazoyer, S.; Meindl, A.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Montagna, M.; Nathanson, K.L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Nevanlinna, H.; Niederacher, D.; Olah, E.; Olopade, O.I.; Ong, K.R.; Osorio, A.; Park, S.K.; Paulsson-Karlsson, Y.; Pedersen, I.S.; Peissel, B.; Peterlongo, P.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  5. Association of PHB 1630 C>T and MTHFR 677 C>T polymorphisms with breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakubowska, A; Rozkrut, D; Antoniou, A

    2012-01-01

    The variable penetrance of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers suggests that other genetic or environmental factors modify breast cancer risk. Two genes of special interest are prohibitin (PHB) and methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), both of which are important either directly or...

  6. Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Kristen N; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differe...

  7. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 ...

  8. Assessing associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Blanco

    Full Text Available While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers and subsequently analyzed using a retrospective likelihood approach. The association of HMMR rs299290 with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers was confirmed: per-allele hazard ratio (HR = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.04-1.15, p = 1.9 x 10(-4 (false discovery rate (FDR-adjusted p = 0.043. Variation in CSTF1, located next to AURKA, was also found to be associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs2426618 per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.16, p = 0.005 (FDR-adjusted p = 0.045. Assessment of pairwise interactions provided suggestions (FDR-adjusted pinteraction values > 0.05 for deviations from the multiplicative model for rs299290 and CSTF1 rs6064391, and rs299290 and TUBG1 rs11649877 in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following these suggestions, the expression of HMMR and AURKA or TUBG1 in sporadic breast tumors was found to potentially interact, influencing patients' survival. Together, the results of this study support the hypothesis of a causative link between altered function of AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 and breast carcinogenesis in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  9. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers ...

  10. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Issacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Iganacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Izatt, Louise; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrede, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Urhammer, Nancy; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révilliion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Megalie; Coron, Fanny; Prieur, Fabienne; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Gill, Mona; Collins, Lucine; Gokgoz, Nalan; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Karlsson, Per; Nordlilng, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of

  11. Excess of extracolonic non-endometrial multiple primary cancers in MSH2 germline mutation carriers over MLH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin-Hurtubise, Kevin M; Yheulon, Christopher G; Gagliano, Ronald A; Lynch, Henry T

    2013-12-01

    The lynch syndrome (LS) tumor spectrum involves colorectal cancer (CRC), endometrial cancer (EC), and less frequently various extracolonic non-endometrial cancers (non-EC). The organ-specific survival rates of these patients are well defined, however, the collective survival of all-cancers combined (CRC + EC + non-EC) are unclear. Fifty-two MSH2 patients and 68 MLH1 patients were followed for a median of 6.3 years after diagnosis of first cancer, regardless of type. The proportions of CRC only, EC, non-EC, and multiple primary cancers were compared between the two genotypes. Kaplan-Meier curves were developed for survival comparisons. MSH2 patients present less frequently with only CRC (37% MSH2, 62% MLH1, P = 0.0096), manifest more multiple primary cancers (38% MSH2, 18% MLH1, P = 0.013), develop more extracolonic cancers (62% MSH2, 38% MLH1, P = 0.003), non-EC only cancers (46% MSH2, 24% MLH1, P = 0.028) and carry a greater risk for urinary tract cancer (UTC) (13.4% MSH2, 1.5% MLH1, P = 0.024). There was no difference in 10-year survival between the two groups (P = 0.4). The additional propensity for UTC in MSH2 carriers argues in favor of UTC screening in MSH2 individuals. Other types of cancer screening should be tailored to the expression history of the specific LS mutation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Andrulis, IL; Mulligan, AM; Schmutzler, RK; Barrowdale, D; McGuffog, L; Robson, M; Schmidt, MK; Spurdle, AB; Neuhausen, SL; Kuchenbaecker, KB

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and the general population for several loci, no study has comprehensively evaluated the associations of all known BC susceptibility alleles with risk of BC subtypes in BRCA1 and BRC...

  13. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with Malays, 3 BRCA1 and 2 BRCA2 mutations in Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  14. Common breast cancer-predisposition alleles are associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Spurdle, Amanda B; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast cancer. However, evidence suggests that these risks are modified by other genetic or environmental factors that cluster in families. A recent genome-wide association study has shown that common alleles at single nucleotide polymorp...

  15. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Osorio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase, and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2 gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03-1.16, p = 2.7 × 10(-3 for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, p = 4.8 × 10(-3. DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied.

  16. Assessing Associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 Functional Module and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanco, Ignacio; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Cuadras, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM) may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between ...

  17. Assessing Associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 Functional Module and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco, Ignacio; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Cuadras, Daniel; Wang, Xianshu; Barrowdale, Daniel; Ruiz de Garibay, Gorka; Librado, Pablo; Sanchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio; Bonifaci, Nuria; McGuffog, Lesley; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Islam, Abul; Mateo, Francesca; Berenguer, Antoni; Petit, Anna; Catala, Isabel; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Tornero, Eva; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramon Y.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Arun, Banu K.; Toland, Amanda E.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Diez, Orland; Hansen, Thomas V.; Jonson, Lars; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Dunning, Alison M.; Oliver, Clare; Fineberg, Elena; Cook, Margaret; Peock, Susan; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Jacobs, Chris; Pichert, Gabriella; Lalloo, Fiona; Chu, Carol; Dorkins, Huw; Paterson, Joan; Ong, Kai-Ren; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teixeira, M.R.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Devilee, Peter; Wijnen, Juul T.; Rookus, Matti A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Blok, Marinus J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne A.; Piedmonte, Marion; Nerenstone, Stacy R.; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; O'Malley, David M.; Ratner, Elena S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg J.; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Foretova, Lenka; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Peissel, Bernard; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo; Ottini, Laura; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Maugard, Christine; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alex; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Daly, Mary B.; Goldgar, David E.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elisabeth J.; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Olah, Edith; Narod, Steven A.; Rennert, Gad; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Friedman, Eitan; Liljegren, Annelie; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Hamann, Ute; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Healey, Sue; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Herzog, Josef; Margileth, David; Gorrini, Chiara; Esteller, Manel; Gomez, Antonio; Sayols, Sergi; Vidal, Enrique; Heyn, Holger; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Leone, Melanie; Barjhoux, Laure; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; de Pauw, Antoine; Lasset, Christine; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Castera, Laurent; Berthet, Pascaline; Cornelis, Francois; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Damiola, Francesca; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Maxwell, Christopher A.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Corines, Marina J.; Villano, Danylko; Cunningham, Julie; Lee, Adam; Lindor, Noralane; Lazaro, Conxi; Easton, Douglas F.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Angel Pujana, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM) may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between the

  18. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of th...

  19. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Osorio (Ana); R.L. Milne (Roger); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); T. Vaclová (Tereza); G. Pita (Guillermo); R. Alonso (Rosario); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); M. Durán (Mercedes); O. Díez (Orland); T. Ramon Y Cajal; I. Konstantopoulou (I.); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); R. Andrés Conejero (Raquel); P. Soucy (Penny); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); J. Rantala (Johanna); N. Loman (Niklas); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); E.M. John (Esther); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); J. Infante (Jon); B. Herráez (Belén); L.T. Moreno (Leticia Thais); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Herzog (Josef); K. Weeman (Kisa); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); F. Mariette (F.); S. Volorio (Sara); A. Viel (Alessandra); L. Varesco (Liliana); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); J. Garber; S.D. Ellis (Steve); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); T.J. Cole (Trevor); D. Eccles (Diana); J. Cook (Jackie); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); C. Brewer (Carole); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); F. Douglas (Fiona); M.E. Porteous (Mary); L. Side (Lucy); L.J. Walker (Lisa); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); A. Donaldson (Alan); J. Kennedy (John); C. Foo (Claire); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Steinemann (Doris); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); F. Damiola (Francesca); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Claes (Kathleen); M. Piedmonte (Marion); K. Tucker (Kathryn); F.J. Backes (Floor); P.M. Rodríguez; W. Brewster (Wendy); K. Wakeley (Katie); T. Rutherford (Thomas); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); M.A. Rookus (Matti); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); L. van der Kolk (Lizet); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); J.M. Collée (Margriet); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); P. Devilee (Peter); E. Olah (Edith); C. Lazaro (Conxi); A. Teulé (A.); M. Menéndez (Mireia); A. Jakubowska (Anna); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); C. Maugard; M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); P.J. Teixeira; S. Healey (Sue); C. Olswold (Curtis); L. Guidugli (Lucia); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Slager (Susan); C. Szabo (Csilla); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); N. Kauff (Noah); L. Zhang (Lingling); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Geschwantler Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; A. Berger (Annemarie); C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); L. Sunde (Lone); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); S.P. Shimon (Shani Paluch); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); K. Offit (Kenneth); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); J. Benítez (Javier)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractSingle Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between

  20. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Kuchenbaecker, K.; Vaclova, T.; Pita, G.; Alonso, R.; Peterlongo, P.; Blanco, I.; Hoya, M. de la; Duran, M.; Diez, O.; Ramon, Y.C.T.; Konstantopoulou, I.; Martinez-Bouzas, C.; Conejero, R. Andres; Soucy, P.; McGuffog, L.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, A.; Swe, B.; Arver, B.; Rantala, J.; Loman, N.; Ehrencrona, H.; Olopade, O.I.; Beattie, M.S.; Domchek, S.M.; Nathanson, K.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Walsh, C.; Lester, J.; John, E.M.; Whittemore, A.S.; Daly, M.B.; Southey, M.; Hopper, J.; Terry, M.B.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Steele, L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Hansen, T.V.; Jonson, L.; Ejlertsen, B.; Gerdes, A.M.; Infante, M.; Herraez, B.; Moreno, L.T.; Weitzel, J.N.; Herzog, J.; Weeman, K.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Bonanni, B.; Mariette, F.; Volorio, S.; Viel, A.; Varesco, L.; Papi, L.; Ottini, L.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Radice, P.; Yannoukakos, D.; Garber, J.; Ellis, S.; Frost, D.; Platte, R.; Fineberg, E.; Evans, G.; Lalloo, F.; Izatt, L.; Eeles, R.; Adlard, J.; Davidson, R.; Cole, T.; Eccles, D.; Cook, J; Hodgson, S.; Brewer, C.; Tischkowitz, M.; Douglas, F.; Porteous, M.; Side, L.; Walker, L.; Morrison, P.; Donaldson, A.; Kennedy, J.; Foo, C.; Godwin, A.K.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Rhiem, K.; Engel, C.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the

  1. Common variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 loci are associated with ER subtypes of breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); S.J. Ramus (Susan); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); X. Wang (Xing); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); T.A. Kruse (Torben); M.A. Caligo (Maria); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); G. Barbany-Bustinza (Gisela); N. Loman (Niklas); M. Soller (Maria); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); P. Karlsson (Per); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); S.M. Domchek (Susan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); E. Zołwocka (Elzbieta); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); C. Cybulski (Cezary); B. Górski (Bohdan); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Durán (Mercedes); M.I. Tejada; J. Benítez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); F.E. van Leeuwen (Flora); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M.J. Blok (Marinus); C.M. Kets; M.J. Hooning (Maartje); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); S.D. Ellis (Steve); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); C. Jacobs (Chris); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T.J. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); J. Paterson (Joan); C. Brewer (Carole); F. Douglas (Fiona); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L.J. Walker (Lisa); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); L. Side (Lucy); B. Bove (B.); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); M. Fassy-Colcombet (Marion); L. Castera (Laurent); F. Cornelis (Franco̧is); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Léone (Mélanie); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); L. Akloul (Linda); H. Lynch (Henry); C.L. Snyder (Carrie); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); M.-K. Tea; A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Vijai (Joseph); S. Shah (Sonia); K. Sarrel (Kara); M. Robson (Mark); M. Piedmonte (Marion); K. Phillips (Kelly); J. Basil (Jack); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); J.F. Boggess (John); K. Wakeley (Katie); A. Ewart-Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); L. Feliubadaló (L.); J. Brunet (Joan); S.A. Gayther (Simon); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Odunsi (Kunle); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); E. Olah; S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); M.S. Beattie (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); C.M. Dorfling (Cecelia); O. Diez (Orland); A. Kwong (Ava); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); S. Heidemann (Simone); D. Niederacher (Dieter); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); H. Deissler (Helmut); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); K. Kast (Karin); B. Fiebig (Britta); W. Heinritz (Wolfram); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T.A. Muranen (Taru); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); M. Barile (Monica); L. Bernard (Loris); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Varesco (Liliana); P. Radice (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Simard (Jacques)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for

  2. Common Variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 Loci Are Associated with ER Subtypes of Breast Cancer and Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ramus, Susan J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xianshu; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A.; Caligo, Maria A.; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Zlowocka, Elzbieta; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Górski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, María Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; van Os, Theo A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Blok, Marinus J.; Kets, Marleen; Hooning, Maartje J.; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana M.; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Side, Lucy E.; Bove, Betsy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Castera, Laurent; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Delnatte, Capucine; Akloul, Linda; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Marybeth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Goldgar, David E.; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Arason, Aðalgeir; Vijai, Joseph; Shah, Sohela; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark E.; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly; Basil, Jack; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Boggess, John; Wakeley, Katie; Ewart-Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Brunet, Joan; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul P. D.; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; teo, Soo Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tischkowitz, Marc D.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Lindor, Noralane M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Bernard, Loris; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Simard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for these

  3. Common variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 loci are associated with ER subtypes of breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Gaudet, Mia M; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for these variants in mut...

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A. Lee (Andrew); C. Olswold (Curtis); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Dennis (Joe); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); E. Dicks (Ed); M. Kosel (Matthew); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); F. Bacot (Francois); D. Vincent (Daniel); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Peock (Susan); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); A. Jakubowska (Anna); P. Radice (Paolo); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S.M. Domchek (Susan); M. Piedmonte (Marion); C.F. Singer (Christian); E. Friedman (Eitan); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); C. Szabo (Csilla); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M.H. Greene (Mark); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Garber; C. Phelan (Catherine); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Montagna (Marco); E. Olah; I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); D. Goldgar (David); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); A. Osorio (Ana); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); M.B. Daly (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); U. Hamann (Ute); S.J. Ramus (Susan); A. Ewart-Toland (Amanda); M.A. Caligo (Maria); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); N. Tung (Nadine); K. Claes (Kathleen); M.S. Beattie (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); E.M. John (Esther); A. Kwong (Ava); O. Diez (Orland); J. Balmana (Judith); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Rennert (Gad); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); I. Campbell (Ian); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.J. Gille (Johan); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); M.J. Blok (Marinus); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); M.A. Rookus (Matti); P. Devilee (Peter); S. Verhoef; T.A.M. van Os (Theo); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); D. Frost (Debra); S. Ellis (Steve); E. Fineberg (Elena); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); D. Eccles (Diana); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (C.); F. Douglas (Fiona); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L. Side (Lucy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Houghton (Catherine); M.T. Rogers (Mark); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Eason (Jacqueline); H. Gregory (Helen); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); A. Calender (Alain); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Nogues (Catherine); C. Lasset (Christine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Sobol (Hagay); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Castera (Laurent); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); M. Léone (Mélanie); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); E. Złowocka-Perłowska (Elzbieta); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Peissel (Bernard); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); G. Melloni (Giulia); L. Ottini (Laura); L. Papi (Laura); L. Varesco (Liliana); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); N. Arnold (Norbert); C. Engel (Christoph); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); D. Niederacher (Dieter); N. Ditsch (Nina); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); S. Engert (Stefanie); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); D.E. Cohn (David); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L. Small (Laurie); M. Friedlander (Michael); V.L. Bae-Jump (Victoria L.); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; N.M. Lindor (Noralane); B. Kaufman (Bella); S. Shimon Paluch (Shani); Y. Laitman (Yael); A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); S.T. Moeller (Sanne Traasdahl); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; J. Vijai (Joseph); K. Sarrel (Kara); M. Robson (Mark); N. Kauff (Noah); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); L. Jønson (Lars); M.K. Andersen (Mette); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); L. Steele (Linda); L. Foretova (Lenka); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); M.A. Pujana (Miguel); P.L. Mai (Phuong); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); S. Narod (Steven); J. Herzog (Josef); S.R. Sand (Sharon); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); S. Agata (Simona); T. Vaszko (Tibor); J. Weaver (JoEllen); A. Stavropoulou (Alexandra); S.S. 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Hoffman (Jonathan); M. James (Margaret); J. Paterson (Joan); A. Taylor (Amy); A. Murray (Anna); M.J. Kennedy (John); D.E. Barton (David); M.E. Porteous (Mary); S. Drummond (Sarah); C. Brewer (Carole); E. Kivuva (Emma); A. Searle (Anne); S. Goodman (Selina); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); V. Murday (Victoria); N. Bradshaw (Nicola); L. Snadden (Lesley); M. Longmuir (Mark); C. Watt (Catherine); S. Gibson (Sarah); E. Haque (Eshika); E. Tobias (Ed); A. Duncan (Alexis); L. Izatt (Louise); C. Jacobs (Chris); C. Langman (Caroline); A.F. Brady (Angela); S.A. Melville (Scott); K. Randhawa (Kashmir); J. Barwell (Julian); G. Serra-Feliu (Gemma); I.O. Ellis (Ian); F. Lalloo (Fiona); J. Taylor (James); A. Male (Alison); C. Berlin (Cheryl); R. Collier (Rebecca); F. Douglas (Fiona); O. Claber (Oonagh); I. Jobson (Irene); L.J. Walker (Lisa); D. McLeod (Diane); D. Halliday (Dorothy); S. Durell (Sarah); B. Stayner (Barbara); S. Shanley (Susan); N. Rahman (Nazneen); R. Houlston (Richard); A. Stormorken (Astrid); E.K. Bancroft (Elizabeth); E. Page (Elizabeth); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); K. Kohut (Kelly); J. Wiggins (Jennifer); E. Castro (Elena); S.R. Killick; S. Martin (Sue); D. Rea (Dan); A. Kulkarni (Anjana); O. Quarrell (Oliver); C. Bardsley (Cathryn); S. Goff (Sheila); G. Brice (Glen); L. Winchester (Lizzie); C. Eddy (Charlotte); V. Tripathi (Vishakha); V. Attard (Virginia); A. Lehmann (Anna); A. Lucassen (Anneke); G. Crawford (Gabe); D. McBride (Donna); S. Smalley (Sarah); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); C. Verny-Pierre (Carole); S. Giraud (Sophie); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); B. Buecher (Bruno); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Belotti (Muriel); C. Tirapo (Carole); A. de Pauw (Antoine); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); O. Caron (Olivier); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); S. Handallou (Sandrine); A. hardouin (Agnès); H. Sobol (Hagay); V. Bourdon (Violaine); T. Noguchi (Tetsuro); A. Remenieras (Audrey); F. Eisinger (François); J.-P. Peyrat; J. Fournier (Joëlle); F. Révillion (Françoise); P. Vennin (Philippe); C. Adenis (Claude); R. Lidereau (Rosette); L. Demange (Liliane); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); E. Barouk-Simonet (Emmanuelle); F. Bonnet (Françoise); V. Bubien (Virginie); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); M. Longy (Michel); C. Toulas (Christine); R. Guimbaud (Rosine); L. Gladieff (Laurence); V. Feillel (Viviane); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); C. Rebischung (Christine); M. Peysselon (Magalie); F. Coron (Fanny); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); S.F. Ferrer; M. Frenay (Marc); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); F. Coulet (Florence); C. Colas (Chrystelle); F. Soubrier; J. Sokolowska (Johanna); M. Bronner (Myriam); H. Lynch (Henry); C.L. Snyder (Carrie); M. Angelakos (Maggie); J. Maskiell (Judi); G.S. Dite (Gillian)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer),

  5. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a

  6. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a fur...

  7. Knowledge about hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer; mutation carriers and physicians at equal levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Carlsson, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    questions about cancer risks and surveillance strategies. RESULTS: Both groups answered questions on colorectal cancer risk, surveillance and genetic testing well, whereas answers about inheritance and risks for HNPCC associated cancer were less accurate. Only half of the family members and one third......BACKGROUND: Identification and adequate management of individuals at risk for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is crucial since surveillance programmes reduce morbidity and mortality. We investigated knowledge about key features of HNPCC in at risk individuals and physicians...

  8. Breast Cancer Risk-reducing Strategies in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.M. Heemskerk-Gerritsen (Bernadette)

    2014-01-01

    textabstract__Abstract__ Breast cancer (BC) is the most common type of cancer in women in developed countries. Currently, approximately 14,000 women are diagnosed with BC every year in the Netherlands. One out of eight Dutch women (12%-13%) will develop BC during their life, and 3% to 4% of

  9. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergus J Couch

    Full Text Available BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer, with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20. In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4 × 10(-8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38 and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38. The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10(-4. These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Investigators, kConFab; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7×10−8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09–1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4×10−8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4×10−8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10−4). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%–50% compared to 81%–100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers. PMID:23544013

  11. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30% rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001, attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  12. Evaluation of Polygenic Risk Scores for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic ...... risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management....

  13. PMS2 monoallelic mutation carriers: the known unknown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenberger, McKinsey L; Thomas, Brittany C; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas; Boland, C Richard; Plon, Sharon E; Clendenning, Mark; Win, Aung Ko; Senter, Leigha; Lipkin, Steven M; Stadler, Zsofia K; Macrae, Finlay A; Lynch, Henry T; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; de la Chapelle, Albert; Syngal, Sapna; Lynch, Patrick; Parry, Susan; Jenkins, Mark A; Gallinger, Steven; Holter, Spring; Aronson, Melyssa; Newcomb, Polly A; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Pichurin, Pavel; Hampel, Heather; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Lu, Karen H; Thibodeau, Stephen; Lindor, Noralane M

    2016-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 have been shown to cause Lynch syndrome. The penetrance of the cancer and tumor spectrum has been repeatedly studied, and multiple professional societies have proposed clinical management guidelines for affected individuals. Several studies have demonstrated a reduced penetrance for monoallelic carriers of PMS2 mutations compared with the other mismatch repair (MMR) genes, but clinical management guidelines have largely proposed the same screening recommendations for all MMR gene carriers. The authors considered whether enough evidence existed to propose new screening guidelines specific to PMS2 mutation carriers with regard to age at onset and frequency of colonic screening. Published reports of PMS2 germ-line mutations were combined with unpublished cases from the authors' research registries and clinical practices, and a discussion of potential modification of cancer screening guidelines was pursued. A total of 234 monoallelic PMS2 mutation carriers from 170 families were included. Approximately 8% of those with colorectal cancer (CRC) were diagnosed before age 30, and each of these tumors presented on the left side of the colon. As it is currently unknown what causes the early onset of CRC in some families with monoallelic PMS2 germline mutations, the authors recommend against reducing cancer surveillance guidelines in families found having monoallelic PMS2 mutations in spite of the reduced penetrance.Genet Med 18 1, 13-19.

  14. Pathology of breast and ovarian cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Engel, Christoph; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; O’Malley, Frances; John, Esther M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Hansen, Thomas v O; Nielsen, Finn C.; Osorio, Ana; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Benítez, Javier; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Volorio, Sara; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Putignano, Anna Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Brewer, Carole; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Houghton, Catherine; Weaver, JoEllen; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Doroteha; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Barjhoux, Laure; Isaacs, Claudine; Peshkin, Beth N.; Caldes, Trinidad; de al Hoya, Miguel; Cañadas, Carmen; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; D’Andrea, Emma; Yan, Max; Fox, Stephen; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Rubinstein, Wendy; Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia M.; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Rappaport, Christine; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Sokolenko, Anna; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Sweet, Kevin; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben; Caligo, Maria; Aretini, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeld, Anna; Henriksson, Karin; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nussbaum, Bob; Beattie, Mary; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara; Gayther, Simon A; Nathanson, Kate; Gross, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous small studies found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization. Methods We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze the pathology of invasive breast, ovarian and contralateral breast cancers. Results There was strong evidence that the proportion of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors decreased with age at diagnosis among BRCA1 (p-trend=1.2×10−5) but increased with age at diagnosis among BRCA2 carriers (p-trend=6.8×10−6). The proportion of triple negative tumors decreased with age at diagnosis in BRCA1 carriers but increased with age at diagnosis of BRCA2 carriers. In both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, ER-negative tumors were of higher histological grade than ER-positive tumors (Grade 3 vs. Grade 1, p=1.2×10−13 for BRCA1 and p=0.001 for BRCA2). ER and progesterone receptor (PR) expression were independently associated with mutation carrier status (ER-positive odds ratio (OR) for BRCA2=9.4, 95%CI:7.0-12.6 and PR-positive OR=1.7, 95%CI:1.3-2.3, under joint analysis). Lobular tumors were more likely to be BRCA2-related (OR for BRCA2=3.3, 95%CI:2.4-4.4, p=4.4×10−14), and medullary tumors BRCA1-related (OR for BRCA2=0.25, 95%CI:0.18-0.35, p=2.3×10−15). ER-status of the first breast cancer was predictive of ER-status of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (p=0.0004 for BRCA1; p=0.002 for BRCA2). There were no significant differences in ovarian cancer morphology between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers (serous:67%; mucinous:1%; endometriod:12%; clear-cell:2%). Conclusions/Impact Pathology characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumors may be useful for improving risk prediction algorithms and informing clinical strategies for screening and prophylaxis. PMID:22144499

  15. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas Vo; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Conejero, Raquel Andrés; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cédrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Hélène; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Sornin, Valérie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Kets, Carolien M; Aalfs, Cora M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne Ej; Oosterwijk, Jan C; van Roozendaal, Kees Ep; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesús; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Spurdle, Amanda B; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Szabo, Csilla I; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Ramus, Susan J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Cox, David G

    2015-04-25

    Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria. Mitochondrial genome variations affect electron transport chain efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Individuals with different mitochondrial haplogroups differ in their metabolism and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Variability in mitochondrial genetic background can alter reactive oxygen species production, leading to cancer risk. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial haplogroups modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We genotyped 22,214 (11,421 affected, 10,793 unaffected) mutation carriers belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for 129 mitochondrial polymorphisms using the iCOGS array. Haplogroup inference and association detection were performed using a phylogenetic approach. ALTree was applied to explore the reference mitochondrial evolutionary tree and detect subclades enriched in affected or unaffected individuals. We discovered that subclade T1a1 was depleted in affected BRCA2 mutation carriers compared with the rest of clade T (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.88; P = 0.01). Compared with the most frequent haplogroup in the general population (that is, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. This study illustrates how original approaches such as the phylogeny-based method we used can empower classical molecular epidemiological studies aimed at identifying association or risk modification effects.

  16. Colorectal cancer risk variants at 8q23.3 and 11q23.1 are associated with disease phenotype in APC mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanoghli, Z; Nieuwenhuis, M H; Houwing-Duistermaat, J J; Jagmohan-Changur, S; Hes, F J; Tops, C M; Wagner, A; Aalfs, C M; Verhoef, S; Gómez García, E B; Sijmons, R H; Menko, F H; Letteboer, T G; Hoogerbrugge, N; van Wezel, T; Vasen, H F A; Wijnen, J T

    2016-10-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a dominantly inherited syndrome caused by germline mutations in the APC gene and characterized by the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and a high risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). The severity of polyposis is correlated with the site of the APC mutation. However, there is also phenotypic variability within families with the same underlying APC mutation, suggesting that additional factors influence the severity of polyposis. Genome-wide association studies identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with CRC. We assessed whether these SNPs are associated with polyp multiplicity in proven APC mutation carriers. Sixteen CRC-associated SNPs were analysed in a cohort of 419 APC germline mutation carriers from 182 families. Clinical data were retrieved from the Dutch Polyposis Registry. Allele frequencies of the SNPs were compared for patients with APC genotype as a covariate. We found a trend of association of two of the tested SNPs with the ≥100 adenoma phenotype: the C alleles of rs16892766 at 8q23.3 (OR 1.71, 95 % CI 1.05-2.76, p = 0.03, dominant model) and rs3802842 at 11q23.1 (OR 1.51, 95 % CI 1.03-2.22, p = 0.04, dominant model). We identified two risk variants that are associated with a more severe phenotype in APC mutation carriers. These risk variants may partly explain the phenotypic variability in families with the same APC gene defect. Further studies with a larger sample size are recommended to evaluate and confirm the phenotypic effect of these SNPs in FAP.

  17. Preferences for breast cancer risk reduction among BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers: a discrete-choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liede, Alexander; Mansfield, Carol A; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Price, Melanie A; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Henry T; Friedman, Sue; Amelio, Justyna; Posner, Joshua; Narod, Steven A; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Evans, D Gareth

    2017-09-01

    Unaffected women who carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations face difficult choices about reducing their breast cancer risk. Understanding their treatment preferences could help us improve patient counseling and inform drug trials. The objective was to explore preferences for various risk-reducing options among women with germline BRCA1/2 mutations using a discrete-choice experiment survey and to compare expressed preferences with actual behaviors. A discrete-choice experiment survey was designed wherein women choose between hypothetical treatments to reduce breast cancer risk. The hypothetical treatments were characterized by the extent of breast cancer risk reduction, treatment duration, impact on fertility, hormone levels, risk of uterine cancer, and ease and mode of administration. Data were analyzed using a random-parameters logit model. Women were also asked to express their preference between surgical and chemoprevention options and to report on their actual risk-reduction actions. Women aged 25-55 years with germline BRCA1/2 mutations who were unaffected with breast or ovarian cancer were recruited through research registries at five clinics and a patient advocacy group. Between January 2015 and March 2016, 622 women completed the survey. Breast cancer risk reduction was the most important consideration expressed, followed by maintaining fertility. Among the subset of women who wished to have children in future, the ability to maintain fertility was the most important factor, followed by the extent of risk reduction. Many more women said they would take a chemoprevention drug than had actually taken chemoprevention. Women with BRCA1/2 mutations indicated strong preferences for breast cancer risk reduction and maintaining fertility. The expressed desire to have a safe chemoprevention drug available to them was not met by current chemoprevention options.

  18. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Lee, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Hansen, Thomas vO; Nielsen, Finn C.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Osorio, Ana; Muñoz-Repeto, Iván; Durán, Mercedes; Godino, Javier; Pertesi, Maroulio; Benítez, Javier; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pasini, Barbara; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Savarese, Antonella; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Verheus, Martijn; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Nelen, Marcel R.; Kets, C. Marleen; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo; Rookus, Matti; Frost, Debra; Jones, J. Louise; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cook, Jackie; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Gregory, Helen; Eason, Jacqueline; Houghton, Catherine; Barwell, Julian; Side, Lucy E.; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Kast, Karin; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schäfer, Dieter; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Soucy, Penny; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; D'Andrea, Emma; Fox, Stephen; Yan, Max; Rebbeck, Tim; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia; Bhatia, Jasmine; Kauff, Noah; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Imyanitov, Evgeny; O'Malley, Frances P.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gordon; Toland, Amanda E.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Soller, Maria; Henriksson, Karin; Wachenfeldt, von Anna; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Karlsson, Per; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Beattie, Mary; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; Miron, Alexander F.; Goldgar, David; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Rogers, T.; Kennedy, John M.; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Taylor, Jane; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Roussy, Gustave; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bérard, Léon; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Baclesse, François; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Lacassagne, Antoine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; Aalfs, C. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  19. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); F.J. Couch (Fergus); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S.M. Domchek (Susan); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); S.J. Ramus (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); M.E. Sherman (Mark); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Lee (Andrew); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A. Osorio (Ana); I. Muñoz-Repeto (Iván); M. Durán (Mercedes); J. Godino (Javier); M. Pertesi (Maroulio); J. Benítez (Javier); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); E. Cattaneo (Elisa); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Pasini (Barbara); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); A. Savarese (Antonella); L. Bernard (Loris); P. Radice (Paolo); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Verheus (Martijn); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); M.R. Nelen (Marcel); C.M. Kets; C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); T.V. Os (Theo); M.A. Rookus (Matti); D. Frost (Debra); J.L. Jones (J Louise); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); J. Cook (Jackie); A. Donaldson (Alan); H. Dorkins (Huw); H. Gregory (Helen); J. Eason (Jacqueline); C. Houghton (Catherine); J. Barwell (Julian); L. Side (Lucy); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); S. Peock (Susan); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); K. Kast (Karin); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); I. Schoenbuchner (Ines); B. Fiebig (Britta); W. Heinritz (Wolfram); D. Schäfer (Dieter); H. Gevensleben (Heidrun); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Fassy-Colcombet (Marion); F. Cornelis (Franco̧is); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Léone (Mélanie); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Heikinen (Tuomas); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Soucy (Penny); M. Dumont (Martine); J. Simard (Jacques); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); E. D'Andrea (Emma); S.B. Fox (Stephen); M. Yan (Max); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); H. Lynch (Henry); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); G. Tomlinson (Gail); X. Wang (Xing); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); R. Sakr (Rita); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash); N. Kauff (Noah); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); F.P. O'Malley (Frances); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); M.A. Caligo (Maria); M. Soller (Maria); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); P. Karlsson (Per); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M.S. Beattie (Mary); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); E.M. John (Esther); M.B. Daly (Mary); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes

  20. Bias Correction Methods Explain Much of the Variation Seen in Breast Cancer Risks of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Janet R; Hsu, Li; Brohet, Richard M; Mourits, Marian J E; de Vries, Jakob; Malone, Kathleen E; Oosterwijk, Jan C; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2015-08-10

    Recommendations for treating patients who carry a BRCA1/2 gene are mainly based on cumulative lifetime risks (CLTRs) of breast cancer determined from retrospective cohorts. These risks vary widely (27% to 88%), and it is important to understand why. We analyzed the effects of methods of risk estimation and bias correction and of population factors on CLTRs in this retrospective clinical cohort of BRCA1/2 carriers. The following methods to estimate the breast cancer risk of BRCA1/2 carriers were identified from the literature: Kaplan-Meier, frailty, and modified segregation analyses with bias correction consisting of including or excluding index patients combined with including or excluding first-degree relatives (FDRs) or different conditional likelihoods. These were applied to clinical data of BRCA1/2 families derived from our family cancer clinic for whom a simulation was also performed to evaluate the methods. CLTRs and 95% CIs were estimated and compared with the reference CLTRs. CLTRs ranged from 35% to 83% for BRCA1 and 41% to 86% for BRCA2 carriers at age 70 years width of 95% CIs: 10% to 35% and 13% to 46%, respectively). Relative bias varied from -38% to +16%. Bias correction with inclusion of index patients and untested FDRs gave the smallest bias: +2% (SD, 2%) in BRCA1 and +0.9% (SD, 3.6%) in BRCA2. Much of the variation in breast cancer CLTRs in retrospective clinical BRCA1/2 cohorts is due to the bias-correction method, whereas a smaller part is due to population differences. Kaplan-Meier analyses with bias correction that includes index patients and a proportion of untested FDRs provide suitable CLTRs for carriers counseled in the clinic. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Pathology of Breast and Ovarian Cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previously, small studies have found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization.METHODS: We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze the patho...

  2. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A; Milne, R L; Pita, G

    2009-01-01

    Background:In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.Methods:We have geno...

  3. Association of PHB 1630 C > T and MTHFR 677 C > T polymorphisms with breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers: results from a multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakubowska, A.; Rozkrut, D.; Antoniou, A.; Hamann, U.; Scott, R. J.; McGuffog, L.; Healy, S.; Sinilnikova, O. M.; Rennert, G.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Flugelman, A.; Andrulis, I. L.; Glendon, G.; Ozcelik, H.; Thomassen, M.; Paligo, M.; Aretini, P.; Kantala, J.; Aroer, B.; Von Wachenfeldt, A.; Liljegren, A.; Loman, N.; Herbst, K.; Kristoffersson, U.; Rosenquist, R.; Karlsson, P.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Melin, B.; Nathanson, K. L.; Domchek, S. M.; Byrski, T.; Huzarski, T.; Gronwald, J.; Menkiszak, J.; Cybulski, C.; Serrano, P.; Osorio, A.; Cajal, T. R.; Tsitlaidou, M.; Benítez, J.; Gilbert, M.; Rookus, M.; Aalfs, C. M.; Kluijt, I.; Boessenkool-Pape, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, H. E. J.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Blok, M. J.; Nelen, M. R.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Seynaeve, C.; van der Luijt, R. B.; Devilee, P.; Easton, D. F.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Platte, R.; Ellis, S. D.; Fineberg, E.; Evans, D. G.; Lalloo, F.; Eeles, R.; Jacobs, C.; Adlard, J.; Davidson, R.; Eccles, D.; Cole, T.; Cook, J.; Godwin, A.; Bove, B.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Caux-Moncoutier, V.; Belotti, M.; Tirapo, C.; Mazoyer, S.; Barjhoux, L.; Boutry-Kryza, N.; Pujol, P.; Coupier, I.; Peyrat, J.-P.; Vennin, P.; Muller, D.; Fricker, J.-P.; Venat-Bouvet, L.; Johannsson, O. Th; Isaacs, C.; Schmutzler, R.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Meindl, A.; Arnold, N.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Niederacher, D.; Sutter, C.; Deissler, H.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Simard, J.; Soucy, P.; Durocher, F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Beesley, J.; Chen, X.; Rebbeck, T.; Couch, F.; Wang, X.; Lindor, N.; Fredericksen, Z.; Pankratz, V. S.; Peterlongo, P.; Bonanni, B.; Fortuzzi, S.; Peissel, B.; Szabo, C.; Mai, P. L.; Loud, J. T.; Lubinski, J.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Ellis, Steve D.; Fineberg, Elena; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, M. John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Izatt, Louise; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Adlard, Julian; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Sinilnikova, Olga; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Remenieras, Audrey; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Rookus, M. A.; Collée, M.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Szabo, C. I.; Zikan, Michal; Pohlreich, Petr; Kleibl, Zdenek; Foretova, Lenka; Eva, Machackova; Miroslava, Lukesova; Claes, Kathleen; de Leeneer, Kim; Poppe, Bruce; de Paepe, Anne; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Soller, Maria; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The variable penetrance of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers suggests that other genetic or environmental factors modify breast cancer risk. Two genes of special interest are prohibitin (PHB) and methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), both of which are important either

  4. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R. L.; Pita, G.; Peterlongo, P.; Heikkinen, T.; Simard, J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Spurdle, A. B.; Beesley, J.; Chen, X.; Healey, S.; Neuhausen, S. L.; Ding, Y. C.; Couch, F. J.; Wang, X.; Lindor, N.; Manoukian, S.; Barile, M.; Viel, A.; Tizzoni, L.; Szabo, C. I.; Foretova, L.; Zikan, M.; Claes, K.; Greene, M. H.; Mai, P.; Rennert, G.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Barnett-Griness, O.; Andrulis, I. L.; Ozcelik, H.; Weerasooriya, N.; Gerdes, A.-M.; Thomassen, M.; Cruger, D. G.; Caligo, M. A.; Friedman, E.; Kaufman, B.; Laitman, Y.; Cohen, S.; Kontorovich, T.; Gershoni-Baruch, R.; Dagan, E.; Jernström, H.; Askmalm, M. S.; Arver, B.; Malmer, B.; Domchek, S. M.; Nathanson, K. L.; Brunet, J.; Ramón Y Cajal, T.; Yannoukakos, D.; Hamann, U.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Gómez García, E. B.; Wijnen, J. T.; van den Ouweland, A.; Easton, D. F.; Peock, S.; Cook, M.; Oliver, C. T.; Frost, D.; Luccarini, C.; Evans, D. G.; Lalloo, F.; Eeles, R.; Pichert, G.; Cook, J.; Hodgson, S.; Morrison, P. J.; Douglas, F.; Godwin, A. K.; Sinilnikova, O. M.; Barjhoux, L.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Moncoutier, V.; Giraud, S.; Cassini, C.; Olivier-Faivre, L.; Révillion, F.; Peyrat, J.-P.; Muller, D.; Fricker, J.-P.; Lynch, H. T.; John, E. M.; Buys, S.; Daly, M.; Hopper, J. L.; Terry, M. B.; Miron, A.; Yassin, Y.; Goldgar, D.; Singer, C. F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Pfeiler, G.; Spiess, A.-C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Johannsson, O. T.; Kirchhoff, T.; Offit, K.; Kosarin, K.; Piedmonte, M.; Rodriguez, G. C.; Wakeley, K.; Boggess, J. F.; Basil, J.; Schwartz, P. E.; Blank, S. V.; Toland, A. E.; Montagna, M.; Casella, C.; Imyanitov, E. N.; Allavena, A.; Schmutzler, R. K.; Versmold, B.; Engel, C.; Meindl, A.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Deissler, H.; Fiebig, B.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Schaefer, D.; Froster, U. G.; Caldes, T.; de la Hoya, M.; McGuffog, L.; Antoniou, A. C.; Nevanlinna, H.; Radice, P.; Benítez, J.; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine; Laframboise, Rachel; Plante, Marie; Bridge, Peter; Parboosingh, Jilian; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Lesperance, Bernard; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernstrom, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Malmer, Beatrice; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Hogervorst, Frans; Verhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Devilee, Peter; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Taylor, Amy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Murday; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; Durell, Sarah; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancrof, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Lynch, Henry T.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We have genotyped rs744154 in

  5. Ambiguity in a masculine world: Being a BRCA1/2 mutation carrier and a man with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, C; Bancroft, E K; Mitra, A; Ardern-Jones, A; Castro, E; Page, E C; Eeles, R A

    2017-11-01

    Increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa) is observed in men with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. Sex and gender are key determinants of health and disease although unequal care exists between the sexes. Stereotypical male attitudes are shown to lead to poor health outcomes. Men with BRCA1/2 mutations and diagnosed with PCa were identified and invited to participate in a qualitative interview study. Data were analysed using a framework approach. "Masculinity theory" was used to report the impact of having both a BRCA1/2 mutation and PCa. Eleven of 15 eligible men were interviewed. The umbrella concept of "Ambiguity in a Masculine World" was evident. Men's responses often matched those of women in a genetic context. Men's BRCA experience was described, as "on the back burner" but "a bonus" enabling familial detection and early diagnosis of PCa. Embodiment of PCa took precedence as men revealed stereotypical "ideal" masculine responses such as stoicism and control while creating new "masculinities" when faced with the vicissitudes of having 2 gendered conditions. Health workers are urged to take a reflexive approach, void of masculine ideals, a belief in which obfuscates men's experience. Research is required regarding men's support needs in the name of equality of care. © 2017 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Common variants at 12p11, 12q24, 9p21, 9q31.2 and in ZNF365 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Several common alleles have been shown to be associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recent genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified eight additional breast cancer susceptibility loci: rs1011970 (9p21, CDKN2A/B), rs10995190 (ZNF365), rs704010 (ZMIZ1), rs2380205 (10p15), rs614367 (11q13), rs1292011 (12q24), rs10771399 (12p11 near PTHLH) and rs865686 (9q31.2). Methods To evaluate whether these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 mutation carriers and analysed the associations with breast cancer risk within a retrospective likelihood framework. Results Only SNP rs10771399 near PTHLH was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.81 to 0.94, P-trend = 3 × 10-4). The association was restricted to mutations proven or predicted to lead to absence of protein expression (HR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 3.1 × 10-5, P-difference = 0.03). Four SNPs were associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs10995190, P-trend = 0.015; rs1011970, P-trend = 0.048; rs865686, 2df-P = 0.007; rs1292011 2df-P = 0.03. rs10771399 (PTHLH) was predominantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 4 × 10-5) and there was marginal evidence of association with ER-negative breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.62 to 1.00, P-trend = 0.049). Conclusions The present findings, in combination with previously identified modifiers of risk, will ultimately lead to more accurate risk prediction and an improved understanding of the disease etiology in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22348646

  7. The effect of genotypes and parent of origin on cancer risk and age of cancer development in PMS2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suerink, Manon; van der Klift, Heleen M.; ten Broeke, Sanne W.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; Bernstein, Inge; Capella Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Menko, Fred H.; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A.; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J. W.; Olderode, Maran; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Vos, Yvonne J.; Wagner, Anja; Morreau, Hans; Hes, Frederik J.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Tops, Carli M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Nielsen, Maartje

    Purpose: Lynch syndrome (LS), a heritable disorder with an increased risk of primarily colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC), can be caused by mutations in the PMS2 gene. We wished to establish whether genotype and/or parent-of-origin effects (POE) explain (part of) the reported

  8. The effect of genotypes and parent of origin on cancer risk and age of cancer development in PMS2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suerink, Manon; van der Klift, Heleen M; Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Dekkers, Olaf M; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G W; Menko, Fred H; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J W; Olderode, Maran; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Vos, Yvonne J; Wagner, Anja; Morreau, Hans; Hes, Frederik J; Vasen, Hans F A; Tops, Carli M; Wijnen, Juul T; Nielsen, Maartje

    PURPOSE: Lynch syndrome (LS), a heritable disorder with an increased risk of primarily colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC), can be caused by mutations in the PMS2 gene. We wished to establish whether genotype and/or parent-of-origin effects (POE) explain (part of) the reported

  9. The effect of genotypes and parent of origin on cancer risk and age of cancer development in PMS2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suerink, Manon; van der Klift, Heleen M.; ten Broeke, Sanne W.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Menko, Fred H.; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A.; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J. W.; Olderode-Berends, M. J. W.; Olderode, Maran; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Vos, Yvonne J.; Wagner, Anja; Morreau, Hans; Hes, Frederik J.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Tops, Carli M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Nielsen, Maartje

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), a heritable disorder with an increased risk of primarily colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC), can be caused by mutations in the PMS2 gene. We wished to establish whether genotype and/or parent-of-origin effects (POE) explain (part of) the reported variability in

  10. The effect of genotypes and parent of origin on cancer risk and age of cancer development in PMS2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suerink, M.; Klift, H.M. van der; Broeke, S.W. ten; Dekkers, O.M.; Bernstein, I.; Capella Munar, G.; Garcia, E.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Letteboer, T.G.; Menko, F.H.; Lindblom, A.; Mensenkamp, A.; Moller, P.; Os, T.A. van; Rahner, N.; Redeker, B.J.; Olderode-Berends, M.J.; Spruijt, L.; Vos, Y.J.; Wagner, A.; Morreau, H.; Hes, F.J.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Tops, C.M.; Wijnen, J.T.; Nielsen, M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Lynch syndrome (LS), a heritable disorder with an increased risk of primarily colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC), can be caused by mutations in the PMS2 gene. We wished to establish whether genotype and/or parent-of-origin effects (POE) explain (part of) the reported

  11. A nonsynonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yuan C; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated wit...

  12. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Paluch-Shimon, Shani-; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M.; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng Maria; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R.; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were

  13. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Y.C.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Friedman, E.; Laitman, Y.; Paluch-Shimon, S.; Kaufman, B.; Liljegren, A.; Lindblom, A.; Olsson, H.; Kristoffersson, U.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Melin, B.; Domchek, S.M.; Nathanson, K.L.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Jakubowska, A.; Lubinski, J.; Jaworska, K.; Durda, K.; Gronwald, J.; Huzarski, T.; Cybulski, C.; Byrski, T.; Osorio, A.; Cajal, T.R.; Stavropoulou, A.V.; Benitez, J.; Hamann, U.; Rookus, M.; Aalfs, C.M.; Lange, J.L. de; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Asperen, C.J. van; Gomez Garcia, E.B.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Jager, A.; Luijt, R.B. van der; Easton, D.F.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Ellis, S.D.; Platte, R.; Fineberg, E.; Evans, D.G.; Lalloo, F.; Izatt, L.; Eeles, R.; Adlard, J.; Davidson, R.; Eccles, D.; Cole, T.; Cook, J.; Brewer, C.; Tischkowitz, M.; Godwin, A.K.; Pathak, H.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Mazoyer, S.; Barjhoux, L.; Leone, M.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Caux-Moncoutier, V.; Pauw, A. de; Hardouin, A.; Berthet, P.; Dreyfus, H.; Ferrer, S.F.; Collonge-Rame, M.A.; Sokolowska, J.; Buys, S.; Daly, M.; Miron, A.; Terry, M.B.; Chung, W.; John, E.M.; Southey, M.; Goldgar, D.; Singer, C.F.; Tea, M.K.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Fink-Retter, A.; Hansen, T.V.; Ejlertsen, B.; Johannsson, O.T.; Offit, K.; Sarrel, K.; Gaudet, M.M.; Vijai, J.; Robson, M.; Piedmonte, M.R.; Andrews, L.; Cohn, D.; Demars, L.R.; Disilvestro, P.; Rodriguez, G.; Toland, A.E.; Montagna, M.; Agata, S.; Imyanitov, E.; Isaacs, C.; Janavicius, R.; Lazaro, C.; Blanco, I.; Ramus, S.J.; Sucheston, L.; Karlan, B.Y.; Gross, J.; Ganz, P.A.; Beattie, M.S.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Meindl, A.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Gadzicki, D.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Deissler, H.; Gehrig, A.; Sutter, C.; Kast, K.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Simard, J.; Spurdle, A.B.; Beesley, J.; Chen, X.; Tomlinson, G.E.; Weitzel, J.; Garber, J.E.; Olopade, O.I.; Rubinstein, W.S.; Tung, N.; Blum, J.L.; Narod, S.A.; Brummel, S.; Gillen, D.L.; Lindor, N.; Fredericksen, Z.; Pankratz, V.S.; Couch, F.J.; Radice, P.; Peterlongo, P.; Greene, M.H.; Loud, J.T.; Mai, P.L.; Andrulis, I.L.; Glendon, G.; Ozcelik, H.; Gerdes, A.M.; Thomassen, M.; Jensen, U.B.; Skytte, A.B.; Caligo, M.A.; Lee, A.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were

  14. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Paluch-Shimon, [No Value; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Ramony Cajal, Teresa; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian

    Background: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were

  15. A nonsynonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.C. Ding (Yuan); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); S.-P. Shimon (Shani-Paluch); B. Kaufman (Bella); A. Liljegren (Annelie); A. Lindblom (Annika); H. Olsson; U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); B. Melin (Beatrice); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); T. Byrski (Tomasz); A. Osorio (Ana); T.R. Cajal; A. Stavropoulou (Alexandra); J. Benítez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); M.A. Rookus (Matti); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); A. Jager (Agnes); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); S.D. Ellis (Steve); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T.J. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (Carole); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); S.S. Pathak; D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); M. Léone (Mélanie); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); A. de Pauw (Antoine); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); S.F. Ferrer; M.-A. Collonge-Rame; J. Sokolowska (Johanna); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); A. Miron (Alexander); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); E.M. John (Esther); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); K. Offit (Kenneth); K. Sarrel (Kara); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); M. Piedmonte (Marion); L. Andrews (Lesley); D.E. Cohn (David); L.R. DeMars (Leslie); P. DiSilvestro (Paul); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); S.J. Ramus (Susan); L. Sucheston (Lara); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); M.S. Beattie (Mary); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); H. Deissler (Helmut); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); K. Kast (Karin); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); J. Simard (Jacques); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); G. Tomlinson (Gail); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Garber; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); N. Tung (Nadine); J.L. Blum (Joanne); S. Narod (Steven); S. Brummel (Sean); D.L. Gillen (Daniel); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); F.J. Couch (Fergus); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); P.L. Mai (Phuong); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); M.A. Caligo (Maria); A. Lee (Andrew); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk inwomen carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and

  16. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Pita, G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. METHODS: We have...... genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. RESULTS: We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk...... for BRCA1 (per-allele HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.04, P = 0.5) or BRCA2 (per-allele HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06, P = 0.5) mutation carriers. CONCLUSION: This SNP is not a significant modifier of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers, though weak associations cannot be ruled out Udgivelsesdato: 2009/12/15...

  17. Aromatase expression is increased in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chand, Ashwini L; KConFab; Simpson, Evan R; Clyne, Colin D

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, the molecular mechanisms explaining increased incidence of ovarian and breast cancers in carriers of BRCA1 gene mutations had not been clearly understood. Of significance is the finding that BRCA1 negatively regulates aromatase expression in vitro. Our objective was to characterise aromatase gene (CYP19A1) and its promoter expression in breast adipose and ovarian tissue in BRCA1 mutation carriers and unaffected controls. We measured aromatase transcripts, total and promoter-specific (PII, PI.3, PI.4) in prophylactic oophorectomy or mastectomy, therapeutic mastectomy, ovarian and breast tissue from unaffected women. We demonstrate that the lack of functional BRCA1 protein correlates to higher aromatase levels in 85% of BRCA1 mutation carriers. This increase is mediated by aberrant transcriptional regulation of aromatase; in breast adipose by increases in promoter II/I.3 and I.4-specific transcripts; and in the ovary with elevation in promoter I.3 and II-specific transcripts. Understanding the link between BRCA1 and aromatase is significant in terms of understanding why carcinogenesis is restricted to estrogen-producing tissues in BRCA1 mutation carriers

  18. A locus on 19p13 modifies risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is associated with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S

    2010-01-01

    diagnosis over age 35. We took forward 96 SNPs for replication in another 5,986 BRCA1 carriers (2,974 individuals with breast cancer and 3,012 unaffected individuals). Five SNPs on 19p13 were associated with breast cancer risk (P(trend) = 2.3 × 10¿¿ to P(trend) = 3.9 × 10¿7), two of which showed independent......Germline BRCA1 mutations predispose to breast cancer. To identify genetic modifiers of this risk, we performed a genome-wide association study in 1,193 individuals with BRCA1 mutations who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer under age 40 and 1,190 BRCA1 carriers without breast cancer...... associations (rs8170, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.26, 95% CI 1.17-1.35; rs2363956 HR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.80-0.89). Genotyping these SNPs in 6,800 population-based breast cancer cases and 6,613 controls identified a similar association with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (rs2363956 per-allele odds ratio (OR...

  19. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C.; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Wijnen, Juul T.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Perkins, Jo; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Weaver, Joellen; Bove, Betsy; Sinilnikova, Olga; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Calender, Alain; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Handallo, Sandrine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Remenieras, Audrey; Eisinger, François; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Sokolowska, Johanna; Bronner, Myriam; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Damette, Alexandre; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Coene, Ilse; Crombez, Brecht; Segura, Pedro Perez; Romero, Atocha; Diaque, Paula; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Muranen, Taru A.; Erkkilä, Irja; Palola, Virpi; Rookus, M. A.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Verhoef, S.; Schmidt, M. K.; Wijnands, R.; Collée, J. M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Hooning, M. J.; Seynaeve, C.; van Deurzen, C. H. M.; Obdeijn, I. M.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Devilee, P.; van Cronenburg, T. C. T. E. F.; Kets, C. M.; Mensenkamp, A. R.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gómez-Garcia, E. B.; Blok, M. J.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.; Vasen, H. F.; Siesling, S.; Overbeek, L. I. H.; Papp, Janos; Vaszko, Tibor; Bozsik, Aniko; Pocza, Timea; Franko, Judit; Balogh, Maria; Domokos, Gabriella; Ferenczi, Judit; Balmaña, J.; Capella, Gabriel; Dumont, Martine; Tranchant, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation

  20. Genetic Mutations in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many different types of genetic mutations are found in cancer cells. This infographic outlines certain types of alterations that are present in cancer, such as missense, nonsense, frameshift, and chromosome rearrangements.

  1. Variation in breast cancer risk associated with factors related to pregnancies according to truncating mutation location, in the French National BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carrier cohort (GENEPSO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Noguès, Catherine; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Caron, Olivier; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Bonadona, Valérie; Buecher, Bruno; Coupier, Isabelle; Gladieff, Laurence; Gesta, Paul; Eisinger, François; Frénay, Marc; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Lortholary, Alain; Colas, Chrystelle; Dugast, Catherine; Longy, Michel; Pujol, Pascal; Tinat, Julie; Lidereau, Rosette; Andrieu, Nadine

    2012-07-03

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer a high risk of breast cancer (BC), but the magnitude of this risk seems to vary according to the study and various factors. Although controversial, there are data to support the hypothesis of allelic risk heterogeneity. We assessed variation in BC risk according to factors related to pregnancies by location of mutation in the homogeneous risk region of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 990 women in the French study GENEPSO by using a weighted Cox regression model. Our results confirm the existence of the protective effect of an increasing number of full-term pregnancies (FTPs) toward BC among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (≥3 versus 0 FTPs: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.33 to 0.81). Additionally, the HR shows an association between incomplete pregnancies and a higher BC risk, which reached 2.39 (95% CI = 1.28 to 4.45) among women who had at least three incomplete pregnancies when compared with women with zero incomplete pregnancies. This increased risk appeared to be restricted to incomplete pregnancies occurring before the first FTP (HR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.63). We defined the TMAP score (defined as the Time of Breast Mitotic Activity during Pregnancies) to take into account simultaneously the opposite effect of full-term and interrupted pregnancies. Compared with women with a TMAP score of less than 0.35, an increasing TMAP score was associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of BC (P trend = 0.02) which reached 1.97 (95% CI = 1.19 to 3.29) for a TMAP score >0.5 (versus TMAP ≤0.35). All these results appeared to be similar in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Nevertheless, our results suggest a variation in BC risk associated with parity according to the location of the mutation in BRCA1. Indeed, parity seems to be associated with a significantly decreased risk of BC only among women with a mutation in the central region of BRCA1 (low-risk region) (≥1 versus 0 FTP: HR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.13 to

  2. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Mæhle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; van Os, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in

  3. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers : Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Maehle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T.

    Background: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in

  4. Renal cancer and pneumothorax risk in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome; an analysis of 115 FLCN mutation carriers from 35 BHD families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, A. C.; Gijezen, L. M.; Jonker, M. A.; van Doorn, M. B. A.; Oldenburg, R. A.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; Leter, E. M.; van Os, T. A.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; Jaspars, E. H.; de Jong, M. M.; Bongers, E. M. H. F.; Johannesma, P. C.; Postmus, P. E.; van Moorselaar, R. J. A.; van Waesberghe, J-H T. M.; Starink, T. M.; van Steensel, M. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Menko, F. H.

    2011-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by germline FLCN mutations, and characterised by fibrofolliculomas, pneumothorax and renal cancer. The renal cancer risk, cancer phenotype and pneumothorax risk of BHD have not yet been fully clarified. The main focus of this

  5. Renal cancer and pneumothorax risk in Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome; an analysis of 115 FLCN mutation carriers from 35 BHD families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, A. C.; Gijezen, L. M.; Jonker, M. A.; van Doorn, M. B. A.; Oldenburg, R. A.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; Leter, E. M.; van Os, T. A.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; Jaspars, E. H.; de Jong, M. M.; Johannesma, P. C.; Postmus, P. E.; van Moorselaar, R. J. A.; van Waesberghe, J-H T. M.; Starink, T. M.; van Steensel, M. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Menko, F. H.; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by germline FLCN mutations, and characterised by fibrofolliculomas, pneumothorax and renal cancer. The renal cancer risk, cancer phenotype and pneumothorax risk of BHD have not yet been fully clarified. The main

  6. BRCA mutation carrier detection. A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis comparing the traditional family history approach and the testing of all patients with breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Grindedal, Eli Marie; Heramb, Cecilie; Karsrud, Inga; Ariansen, Sarah Louise; Undlien, Dag Erik; Schlichting, Ellen; Mæhle, Lovise

    2018-01-01

    Background Identification of BRCA mutation carriers among patients with breast cancer (BC) involves costs and gains. Testing has been performed according to international guidelines, focusing on family history (FH) of breast and/or ovarian cancer. An alternative is testing all patients with BC employing sequencing of the BRCA genes and Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification (MLPA). Patients and methods A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis, employing data from Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål (OUH-U) and a decision tree, was done. The societal and the healthcare perspectives were focused and a lifetime perspective employed. The comparators were the traditional FH approach used as standard of care at OUH-U in 2013 and the intervention (testing all patients with BC) performed in 2014 and 2015 at the same hospital. During the latter period, 535 patients with BC were offered BRCA testing with sequencing and MLPA. National 2014 data on mortality rates and costs were implemented, a 3% discount rate used and the costing year was 2015. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated in euros (€) per life-year gained (LYG). Results The net healthcare cost (healthcare perspective) was €40 503/LYG. Including all resource use (societal perspective), the cost was €5669/LYG. The univariate sensitivity analysis documented the unit cost of the BRCA test and the number of LYGs the prominent parameters affecting the result. Diagnostic BRCA testing of all patients with BC was superior to the FH approach and cost-effective within the frequently used thresholds (healthcare perspective) in Norway (€60 000–€80 000/LYG). PMID:29682331

  7. BRCA mutation carrier detection. A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis comparing the traditional family history approach and the testing of all patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Grindedal, Eli Marie; Heramb, Cecilie; Karsrud, Inga; Ariansen, Sarah Louise; Undlien, Dag Erik; Schlichting, Ellen; Mæhle, Lovise

    2018-01-01

    Identification of BRCA mutation carriers among patients with breast cancer (BC) involves costs and gains. Testing has been performed according to international guidelines, focusing on family history (FH) of breast and/or ovarian cancer. An alternative is testing all patients with BC employing sequencing of the BRCA genes and Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification (MLPA). A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis, employing data from Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål (OUH-U) and a decision tree, was done. The societal and the healthcare perspectives were focused and a lifetime perspective employed. The comparators were the traditional FH approach used as standard of care at OUH-U in 2013 and the intervention (testing all patients with BC) performed in 2014 and 2015 at the same hospital. During the latter period, 535 patients with BC were offered BRCA testing with sequencing and MLPA. National 2014 data on mortality rates and costs were implemented, a 3% discount rate used and the costing year was 2015. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated in euros (€) per life-year gained (LYG). The net healthcare cost (healthcare perspective) was €40 503/LYG. Including all resource use (societal perspective), the cost was €5669/LYG. The univariate sensitivity analysis documented the unit cost of the BRCA test and the number of LYGs the prominent parameters affecting the result.Diagnostic BRCA testing of all patients with BC was superior to the FH approach and cost-effective within the frequently used thresholds (healthcare perspective) in Norway (€60 000-€80 000/LYG).

  8. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 carriers, SNP rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele HR for ER-positive=1.35, 95%CI:1.17-1.56 vs HR=0.91, 95%CI:0.85-0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity=6.5e-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER...... subtypes. As more risk modifying variants are identified, incorporating these associations into breast cancer subtype-specific risk models may improve clinical management for mutation carriers....

  9. Bias Correction Methods Explain Much of the Variation Seen in Breast Cancer Risks of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Janet R.; Hsu, Li; Brohet, Richard M.; Mourits, Marian J. E.; de Vries, Jakob; Malone, Kathleen E.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; de Bock, Geertruida H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recommendations for treating patients who carry a BRCA1/2 gene are mainly based on cumulative lifetime risks (CLTRs) of breast cancer determined from retrospective cohorts. These risks vary widely (27% to 88%), and it is important to understand why. We analyzed the effects of methods of risk

  10. Cancer risk in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutation carriers; different risk profiles may influence clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Ramsoekh (Dewkoemar); A. Wagner (Anja); M.E. van Leerdam (Monique); D. Dooijes (Dennis); C.M.J. Tops (Carli); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Lynch syndrome (LS) is associated with a high risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) and extracolonic malignancies, such as endometrial carcinoma (EC). The risk is dependent of the affected mismatch repair gene. The aim of the present study was to calculate the cumulative risk of

  11. Increasing awareness and knowledge of lifestyle recommendations for cancer prevention in Lynch syndrome carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Visser, A.; Hoedjes, Meeke; Hurks, H.M.H.; Gómez García, E.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kampman, E.

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) mutation carriers may reduce their cancer risk by adhering to lifestyle recommendations for cancer prevention. This study tested the effect of providing LS mutation carriers with World Cancer Research Fund-the Netherlands (WCRF-NL) health promotion materials on awareness and

  12. No efficacy of annual gynaecological screening in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers; an observational follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, B. B. J.; Olivier, R. I.; Verheijen, R. H. M.; van Beurden, M.; de Hullu, J. A.; Massuger, L. F.; Burger, C. W.; Brekelmans, C. T.; Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.; Gaarenstroom, K. N.; van Boven, H. H.; Mooij, T. M.; Rookus, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    BRCA1/ 2 mutation carriers are offered gynaecological screening with the intention to reduce mortality by detecting ovarian cancer at an early stage. We examined compliance and efficacy of gynaecological screening in BRCA1/ 2 mutation carriers. In this multicentre, observational, follow-up study we

  13. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Hansen, Thomas vO; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Conejero, Raquel Andrés; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L.; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; de Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cédrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Hélène; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Sornin, Valérie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne Ej; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Roozendaal, Kees Ep; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; del Valle, Jesús; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Ramus, Susan J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Cox, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria.

  14. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Andres Conejero, Raquel; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L.; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cedrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Helene; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valerie; Sornin, Valerie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teule, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesus; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Ramus, Susan J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Cox, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are

  15. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Blein (Sophie); C. Bardel (Claire); V. Danjean (Vincent); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); J. Dennis (Joe); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F. Nielsen (Finn); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); R.A. Conejero (Raquel Andrés); E. Segota (Ena); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Thelander (Margo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); P. Radice (Paolo); V. Pensotti (Valeria); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); L. Varesco (Liliana); G.L. Capone (Gabriele L.); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); A. Brady (A.); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Cook (Jackie); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); T.J. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); C. Isaacs (Claudine); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); K. De Leeneer (Kim); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); N.B. Markov (Nadja Bogdanova); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); A. de Pauw (Antoine); C. Lefol (Cédrick); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Sornin (Valérie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); J. Carter (Jonathan); L. van Le (Linda); M. Piedmonte (Marion); P. DiSilvestro (Paul); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A. Jager (Agnes); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.M. Kets; C.M. Aalfs (Cora); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M.A. Rookus (M.); P. Devilee (Peter); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); J. Del Valle (Jesús); A. Jakubowska (Anna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); C. Maugard; A. Amadori (Alberto); M. Montagna (Marco); P.J. Teixeira; A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); W.D. Foulkes (William); C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); C. Szabo (Csilla); A. Lincoln (Anne); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); M. Robson (Mark); J. Vijai (Joseph); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); A.E. Toland (Amanda); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); J. Zidan (Jamal); Y. Laitman (Yael); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R. Nussbaum (Robert); S.J. Ramus (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Thomas (Gilles); J. Simard (Jacques); F.J. Couch (Fergus); K. Offit (Kenneth); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); C. Phelan (Catherine); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D.G. Cox (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of

  16. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, David G.; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel; Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Ouimet, Manon; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Szabo, Csilla; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani S.; Borg, Åke; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Bustinza, Gisela Barbany; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Gille, Hans J. J. P.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Paterson, Joan; Eason, Jacqueline; Godwin, Andrew K.; Remon, Marie-Alice; Moncoutier, Virginie; van Os, T. A.; Meijers-Heijboer, H. E. J.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly

  17. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, David G; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly...

  18. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, D.G.; Simard, J.; Sinnett, D.; Hamdi, Y.; Soucy, P.; Ouimet, M.; Barjhoux, L.; Verny-Pierre, C.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Szabo, C.; Greene, M.H.; Mai, P.L.; Andrulis, I.L.; Thomassen, M.; Gerdes, A.M.; Caligo, M.A.; Friedman, E.; Laitman, Y.; Kaufman, B.; Paluch, S.S.; Borg, A.; Karlsson, P.; Askmalm, M.S.; Bustinza, G.B.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Benitez, J.; Hamann, U.; Rookus, M.A.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Ausems, M.G.; Aalfs, C.M.; Asperen, C.J. van; Devilee, P.; Gille, H.J.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Evans, D.G.; Eeles, R.; Izatt, L.; Adlard, J.; Paterson, J.; Eason, J.; Godwin, A.K.; Remon, M.A.; Moncoutier, V.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Lasset, C.; Giraud, S.; Hardouin, A.; Berthet, P.; Sobol, H.; Eisinger, F.; Bressac de Paillerets, B.; Caron, O.; Delnatte, C.; Goldgar, D.; Miron, A.; Ozcelik, H.; Buys, S.; Southey, M.C.; Terry, M.B.; Singer, C.F.; Dressler, A.C.; Tea, M.K.; Hansen, T.V.; Johannsson, O.; Piedmonte, M.; Rodriguez, G.C.; Basil, J.B.; Blank, S.; Toland, A.E.; Montagna, M.; Isaacs, C.; Blanco, I.; Gayther, S.A.; Moysich, K.B.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Engel, C.; Meindl, A.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Sutter, C.; Gadzicki, D.; Fiebig, B.; Caldes, T.; Laframboise, R.; Nevanlinna, H.; Chen, X.; Beesley, J.; Spurdle, A.B.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Couch, F.J.; Wang, X.; Peterlongo, P.; Manoukian, S.; Bernard, L.; Radice, P.; Easton, D.F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Mazoyer, S.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; et al.,

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly

  19. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, S.; Bardel, C.; Danjean, V.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, A.; Dennis, J.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Soucy, P.; Terry, M.B.; Chung, W.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Tihomirova, L.; Tung, N.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Nielsen, F.C.; Hansen, T.V.; Osorio, A.; Benitez, J.; Conejero, R.A.; Segota, E.; Weitzel, J.N.; Thelander, M.; Peterlongo, P.; Radice, P.; Pensotti, V.; Dolcetti, R.; Bonanni, B.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Manoukian, S.; Varesco, L.; Capone, G.L.; Papi, L.; Ottini, L.; Yannoukakos, D.; Konstantopoulou, I.; Garber, J.; Hamann, U.; Donaldson, A.; Brady, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Douglas, F.; Cook, J.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Walker, L.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Eeles, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Isaacs, C.; Claes, K.; Leeneer, K. De; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Niederacher, D.; Steinemann, D.; Plendl, H.; Kast, K.; Rhiem, K.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Markov, N.B.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Pauw, A. de; Lefol, C.; Lasset, C.; Leroux, D.; Rouleau, E.; Damiola, F.; Dreyfus, H.; Barjhoux, L.; Golmard, L.; Uhrhammer, N.; Bonadona, V.; Sornin, V.; Bignon, Y.J.; Carter, J.; Le, L; Piedmonte, M.; DiSilvestro, P.A.; Hoya, M. de la; Caldes, T.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Jager, A.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Kets, C.M.; Aalfs, C.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Hogervorst, F.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Roozendaal, K.E. van; Rookus, M.A.; Devilee, P.; Luijt, R.B. van der; Olah, E.; Diez, O.; Teule, A.; Lazaro, C.; Blanco, I.; Valle, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Sukiennicki, G.; Gronwald, J.; Lubinski, J.; Durda, K.; Jaworska-Bieniek, K.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Maugard, C.; Amadori, A.; Montagna, M.; Teixeira, M.R.; Spurdle, A.B.; Foulkes, W.; Olswold, C.; Lindor, N.M.; Pankratz, V.S.; Szabo, C.I.; Lincoln, A.; Jacobs, L.; Corines, M.; Robson, M.; Vijai, J.; Berger, A.; Fink-Retter, A.; Singer, C.F.; Rappaport, C.; Kaulich, D.G.; Pfeiler, G.; Tea, M.K.; Greene, M.H.; Mai, P.L.; Rennert, G.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Mulligan, A.M.; Glendon, G.; Andrulis, I.L.; Tchatchou, S.; Toland, A.E.; Pedersen, I.S.; Thomassen, M.; Kruse, T.A.; Jensen, U.B.; Caligo, M.A.; Friedman, E.; Zidan, J.; Laitman, Y.; Lindblom, A.; Melin, B.; Arver, B.; Loman, N.; Rosenquist, R.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Ramus, S.J.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Mitchell, G.; Karlan, B.Y.; Lester, J.; Orsulic, S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Thomas, G; Simard, J.; Couch, F.J.; Offit, K.; Easton, D.F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Mazoyer, S.; Phelan, C.M.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Cox, D.G.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are

  20. Risks of Breast, Ovarian, and Contralateral Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Hopper, John L; Barnes, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    for trend). Breast cancer risk was higher if mutations were located outside vs within the regions bounded by positions c.2282-c.4071 in BRCA1 (HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.11-1.93; P=.007) and c.2831-c.6401 in BRCA2 (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.36-2.74; P

  1. Evaluation of current prediction models for Lynch syndrome: updating the PREMM5 model to identify PMS2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverde, A; Spaander, M C W; Nieboer, D; van den Ouweland, A M W; Dinjens, W N M; Dubbink, H J; Tops, C J; Ten Broeke, S W; Bruno, M J; Hofstra, R M W; Steyerberg, E W; Wagner, A

    2018-07-01

    Until recently, no prediction models for Lynch syndrome (LS) had been validated for PMS2 mutation carriers. We aimed to evaluate MMRpredict and PREMM5 in a clinical cohort and for PMS2 mutation carriers specifically. In a retrospective, clinic-based cohort we calculated predictions for LS according to MMRpredict and PREMM5. The area under the operator receiving characteristic curve (AUC) was compared between MMRpredict and PREMM5 for LS patients in general and for different LS genes specifically. Of 734 index patients, 83 (11%) were diagnosed with LS; 23 MLH1, 17 MSH2, 31 MSH6 and 12 PMS2 mutation carriers. Both prediction models performed well for MLH1 and MSH2 (AUC 0.80 and 0.83 for PREMM5 and 0.79 for MMRpredict) and fair for MSH6 mutation carriers (0.69 for PREMM5 and 0.66 for MMRpredict). MMRpredict performed fair for PMS2 mutation carriers (AUC 0.72), while PREMM5 failed to discriminate PMS2 mutation carriers from non-mutation carriers (AUC 0.51). The only statistically significant difference between PMS2 mutation carriers and non-mutation carriers was proximal location of colorectal cancer (77 vs. 28%, p PMS2 mutation carriers (AUC 0.77) and overall (AUC 0.81 vs. 0.72). We validated these results in an external cohort of 376 colorectal cancer patients, including 158 LS patients. MMRpredict and PREMM5 cannot adequately identify PMS2 mutation carriers. Adding location of colorectal cancer to PREMM5 may improve the performance of this model, which should be validated in larger cohorts.

  2. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 carriers, SNP rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele HR for ER-positive=1.35, 95%CI:1.17-1.56 vs HR=0.91, 95%CI:0.85-0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity=6.5e-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER...... in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers defined by estrogen (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumor. METHODS: We used genotype data on up to 11,421 BRCA1 and 7,080 BRCA2 carriers, of whom 4,310 had been affected with breast cancer and had information on either ER or PR status of the tumor......, to assess the associations of twelve loci with breast cancer tumor characteristics. Associations were evaluated using a retrospective cohort approach. RESULTS: The results suggested stronger associations with ER-positive breast cancer than ER-negative for eleven loci in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Among...

  3. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, D. G.; Simard, J.; Sinnett, D.; Hamdi, Y.; Soucy, P.; Ouimet, M.; Barjhoux, L.; Verny-Pierre, C.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Szabo, C.; Greene, M. H.; Mai, P. L.; Andrulis, I. L.; Thomassen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly instrumental in safeguarding cells against tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms that alter the expression and/or function of BRCA1 carried on the wild-type (non-mutated) copy of the BRCA...

  4. An international survey of surveillance schemes for unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madorsky-Feldman, Dana; Sklair-Levy, Miri; Perri, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Female BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and/or ovarian cancer, and are offered enhanced surveillance including screening from a young age and risk-reducing surgery (RRS)-mastectomy (RRM) and/or salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). While there are es...

  5. Genaesthics : Breast Surgery in BRCA1/2 Gene Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.M.T. van Verschuer (Victorien)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThe present thesis focuses on breast surgery in BRCA1/2 gene mutation carriers. The topics that are studied vary broadly, representing the multiple disciplines that are involved in the diagnostic work-up and treatment of BRCA1/2-associated breast cancer. The first part contains

  6. Motor pathway excitability in ATP13A2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zittel, S; Kroeger, J; van der Vegt, J P M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe excitability of motor pathways in Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (PARK9), an autosomal recessive nigro-striatal-pallidal-pyramidal neurodegeneration caused by a mutation in the ATP13A2 gene, using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). METHODS: Five members of a Chilean family...... with an ATP13A2 mutation (one affected mutation carrier (MC) with a compound heterozygous mutation, 4 asymptomatic MC with a single heterozygous mutation) and 11 healthy subjects without mutations were studied. We measured motor evoked potentials (MEP), the contralateral silent period (cSP), short interval....... RESULTS: CSP duration was increased in the symptomatic ATP13A2 MC. The iSP measurements revealed increased interhemispheric inhibition in both the compound heterozygous and the heterozygous MC. CONCLUSION: A compound heterozygous mutation in the ATP13A2 gene is associated with increased intracortical...

  7. Risk-reducing mastectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy in unaffected BRCA mutation carriers: uptake and timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, A-B; Gerdes, Anne-Marie Axø; Andersen, M K

    2010-01-01

    from 306 healthy BRCA carriers with no personal history of ovarian or breast cancer. We found a 10-year uptake of 75% for risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy and 50% for risk-reducing mastectomy by time to event analysis. Age and childbirth influenced this decision. The uptake rate has not changed......Once female carriers of a BRCA mutation are identified they have to make decisions on risk management. The aim of this study is to outline the uptake of risk-reducing surgery in the Danish population of BRCA mutation positive women and to search for factors affecting this decision. We analysed data...

  8. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer risk in the international BRCA1/2 carrier cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohet, Richard M; Goldgar, David E; Easton, Douglas F

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE Earlier studies have shown that endogenous gonadal hormones play an important role in the etiology of breast cancer among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. So far, little is known about the safety of exogenous hormonal use in mutation carriers. In this study, we examined the association between ...

  9. Genaesthics : Breast Surgery in BRCA1/2 Gene Mutation Carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Verschuer, Victorien

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThe present thesis focuses on breast surgery in BRCA1/2 gene mutation carriers. The topics that are studied vary broadly, representing the multiple disciplines that are involved in the diagnostic work-up and treatment of BRCA1/2-associated breast cancer. The first part contains studies on molecular and prognostic tumor characteristics in breast cancer. The thesis continues with an anatomical study on safety of prophylactic mastectomy, and finishes with studies on aesthetics an...

  10. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Engel (Christoph); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Thomassen (Mads); M.C. Southey (Melissa); P. Radice (Paolo); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); A. Lee (Andrew); S. Healey (Sue); R. Nussbaum (Robert); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); M. James (Margaret); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); I. Cass (Ilana); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M.J. Daly (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); T. v O Hansen (Thomas); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); F. Nielsen (Finn); J. Dennis (Joe); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); S. Hart (Stewart); S. Slager (Susan); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); M. Duran (Mercedes); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); I. Tafur (Isaac); M. Hander (Mary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); G. Roversi (Gaia); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); L. Varesco (Liliana); L. Papi (Laura); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); F. Fostira (Florentia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); K. Ong; L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); D. Steinemann (Doris); N. Bogdanova-Markov (Nadja); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Markiefka (Birgid); B. Buecher (Bruno); C. Lefol (Cédrick); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Van Maerken (Tom); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); M. Piedmonte (Marion); L. Andrews (Lesley); J. Hays (John); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); S. Khan (Sofia); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Teulé (A.); M. Menéndez (Mireia); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); A. Arason (Adalgeir); C. Maugard; P. Soucy (Penny); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); B. Hallberg (Boubou); X. Wang (Xianshu); C. Szabo (Csilla); J. Vijai (Joseph); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); A. Lincoln (Anne); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); R. Berger (Raanan); Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); CIMBA; EMBRACE Study; Breast Cancer Family; GEMO Study Collaborators; HEBON; KConFab Investigators

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2

  11. Common filaggrin gene mutations and risk of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Sørensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As carriers of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations may have a compromised cervical mucosal barrier against human papillomavirus infection, our primary objective was to study their risk of cervical cancer. METHODS: We genotyped 586 cervical cancer patients for the two most common FLG...... mutations, R501X and 2282del4, using blood from the Copenhagen Hospital Biobank, Denmark. Controls (n = 8050) were genotyped in previous population-based studies. Information on cervical cancer, mortality and emigration were obtained from national registers. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated by logistic...... and stratification by cancer stage. RESULTS: The primary results showed that FLG mutations were not associated with the risk of cervical cancer (6.3% of cases and 7.7% of controls were carriers; OR adjusted 0.81, 95% CI 0.57-1.14; OR adjusted+ weighted 0.96, 95% CI 0.58-1.57). Among cases, FLG mutations increased...

  12. Evaluating the performance of the breast cancer genetic risk models BOADICEA, IBIS, BRCAPRO and Claus for predicting BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probabilities: a study based on 7352 families from the German Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Christine; Kuchenbäcker, Karoline; Engel, Christoph; Zachariae, Silke; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Rahner, Nils; Dikow, Nicola; Plendl, Hansjörg; Debatin, Irmgard; Grimm, Tiemo; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Horvath, Judit; Schröck, Evelin; Stock, Friedrich; Schäfer, Dieter; Schwaab, Ira; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Mavaddat, Nasim; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Antoniou, Antonis C; Schmutzler, Rita

    2013-06-01

    Risk prediction models are widely used in clinical genetic counselling. Despite their frequent use, the genetic risk models BOADICEA, BRCAPRO, IBIS and extended Claus model (eCLAUS), used to estimate BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probabilities, have never been comparatively evaluated in a large sample from central Europe. Additionally, a novel version of BOADICEA that incorporates tumour pathology information has not yet been validated. Using data from 7352 German families we estimated BRCA1/2 carrier probabilities under each model and compared their discrimination and calibration. The incremental value of using pathology information in BOADICEA was assessed in a subsample of 4928 pedigrees with available data on breast tumour molecular markers oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor 2. BRCAPRO (area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC)=0.80 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.81)) and BOADICEA (AUC=0.79 (0.78-0.80)), had significantly higher diagnostic accuracy than IBIS and eCLAUS (p<0.001). The AUC increased when pathology information was used in BOADICEA: AUC=0.81 (95% CI 0.80 to 0.83, p<0.001). At carrier thresholds of 10% and 15%, the net reclassification index was +3.9% and +5.4%, respectively, when pathology was included in the model. Overall, calibration was best for BOADICEA and worst for eCLAUS. With eCLAUS, twice as many mutation carriers were predicted than observed. Our results support the use of BRCAPRO and BOADICEA for decision making regarding genetic testing for BRCA1/2 mutations. However, model calibration has to be improved for this population. eCLAUS should not be used for estimating mutation carrier probabilities in clinical settings. Whenever possible, breast tumour molecular marker information should be taken into account.

  13. Reliability of self-reported diagnostic radiation history in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijpe, Anouk; Manders, Peggy; Mulder, Renee L.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Rookus, Matti A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed reliability of self-reported diagnostic radiation history in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with and without breast cancer. Within the frame-work of the HEBON study, 401 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers completed a baseline (1999-2004) and a follow-up questionnaire (2006-2007). Test-retest reliability of self-reported exposure to chest X-rays, fluoroscopies and mammograms was assessed for the entire study population and by case status. Overall proportion agreement on reporting ever/never exposure was good (> 75%), while the corresponding kappa coefficients were between 0.40 and 0.75, indicating at least moderate reliability beyond chance. Reliability of number of exposures was also good (> 75%). Proportion agreement on reporting age at first mammogram was low (40%) for exact consistency and moderate (60%) for consistency ± 1 year. Reliability of age at first mammogram was higher for cases than for unaffected carriers (P < 0.001) but this difference disappeared when excluding diagnostic mammograms (P = 0.60). In unaffected carriers proportion agreement on age at last mammogram was 50%. In general, the direction of disagreement on all items was equally distributed. More consistent reporting was mainly determined by a younger age at questionnaire completion. In conclusion, inconsistent self-report of diagnostic radiation by BRCA1/2 mutation carriers was mainly non-differential by disease status.

  14. Haplotype analysis of TP53 polymorphisms, Arg72Pro and Ins16, in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers of French Canadian descent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallone, Luca; Arcand, Suzanna L; Maugard, Christine; Ghadirian, Parviz; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane; Tonin, Patricia N

    2008-01-01

    The TP53 polymorphisms Arg72Pro (Ex4+199 G>C) and Ins16 (IVS3+24 ins16) have been proposed to modify risk of breast cancer associated with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Allele frequencies of these polymorphisms were investigated to determine if they modify risk in BRCA mutation carriers in breast cancer cases drawn from French Canadian cancer families, a population shown to exhibit strong founder effects. The frequencies of the TP53 alleles, genotypes and haplotypes of 157 index breast cancer cases comprised of 42 BRCA1 mutation carriers, 57 BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 58 BRCA mutation-negative cases, where each case was drawn from independently ascertained families were compared. The effect of TP53 variants on the age of diagnosis was also investigated for these groups. The TP53 polymorphisms were also investigated in 112 women of French Canadian descent with no personal history of cancer. The BRCA mutation-positive groups had the highest frequency of homozygous carriers of the 72Pro allele compared with mutation-negative group. The TP53 polymorphisms exhibited linkage disequilibrium (p < 0.001), where the 72Arg and Ins16minus alleles occurred in strong disequilibrium. The highest frequency of carriers of Ins16minus-72Arg haplotype occurred in the BRCA mutation-negative groups. The BRCA1 mutation carriers homozygous for the 72Pro allele had the youngest ages of diagnosis of breast cancer. However none of these observations were statistically significant. In contrast, the BRCA2 mutation carriers homozygous for the 72Pro allele had a significantly older age of diagnosis of breast cancer (p = 0.018). Moreover, in this group, the mean age of diagnosis of breast cancer in carriers of the Ins16minus-72Arg haplotype was significantly younger than that of the individuals who did not this carry this haplotype (p = 0.009). We observed no significant association of breast cancer risk with TP53 genetic variants based on BRCA1/2 mutation carrier status. Although the

  15. Expression of estrogen receptor beta in the breast carcinoma of BRCA1 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litwiniuk, Maria M; Rożnowski, Krzysztof; Filas, Violetta; Godlewski, Dariusz D; Stawicka, Małgorzata; Kaleta, Remigiusz; Bręborowicz, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancers (BC) in women carrying mutations in BRCA1 gene are more frequently estrogen receptor negative than the nonhereditary BC. Nevertheless, tamoxifen has been found to have a protective effect in preventing contralateral tumors in BRCA1 mutation carriers. The identification of the second human estrogen receptor, ERβ, raised a question of its role in hereditary breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of ERα, ERβ, PgR (progesterone receptor) and HER-2 expression in breast cancer patients with mutated BRCA1 gene and in the control group. The study group consisted of 48 women with BRCA1 gene mutations confirmed by multiplex PCR assay. The patients were tested for three most common mutations of BRCA1 affecting the Polish population (5382insC, C61G, 4153delA). Immunostaining for ERα, ERβ and PgR (progesterone receptor) was performed using monoclonal antibodies against ERα, PgR (DakoCytomation), and polyclonal antibody against ERβ (Chemicon). The EnVision detection system was applied. The study population comprised a control group of 120 BC operated successively during the years 1998–99. The results of our investigation showed that BRCA1 mutation carriers were more likely to have ERα-negative breast cancer than those in the control group. Only 14.5% of BRCA1-related cancers were ERα-positive compared with 57.5% in the control group (P < 0.0001). On the contrary, the expression of ERβ protein was observed in 42% of BRCA1-related tumors and in 55% of the control group. An interesting finding was that most hereditary cancers (75% of the whole group) were triple-negative: ERα(-)/PgR(-)/HER-2(-) but almost half of this group (44.4%) showed the expression of ERβ. In the case of BRCA1-associated tumors the expression of ERβ was significantly higher than the expression of ERα. This may explain the effectiveness of tamoxifen in preventing contralateral breast cancer development in BRCA1 mutation carriers

  16. Leucocytes Mutation load Declines with Age in Carriers of the m.3243A>G Mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langdahl, Jakob Høgild; Larsen, Martin; Frost, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Carriers of the mitochondrial mutation m.3243A>G presents highly variable phenotypes including mitochondrial encephalomyopaty, lactoacidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). We conducted a follow-up study to evaluate changes in leucocyte heteroplasmy and the clinical phenotypes in m.3243A...

  17. Effect of BRCA germline mutations on breast cancer prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretta, Zora; Mocellin, Simone; Goldin, Elena; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Huo, Dezheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The contribution of BRCA germline mutational status to breast cancer patients’ prognosis is unclear. We aimed to systematically review and perform meta-analysis of the available evidence of effects of BRCA germline mutations on multiple survival outcomes of breast cancer patients as a whole and in specific subgroups of interest, including those with triple negative breast cancer, those with Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, and patients with stage I–III disease. Methods: Sixty studies met all inclusion criteria and were considered for this meta-analysis. These studies involved 105,220 breast cancer patients, whose 3588 (3.4%) were BRCA mutations carriers. The associations between BRCA genes mutational status and overall survival (OS), breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were evaluated using random-effect models. Results: BRCA1 mutation carriers have worse OS than BRCA-negative/sporadic cases (hazard ratio, HR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.11–1.52) and worse BCSS than sporadic/BRCA-negative cases among patients with stage I–III breast cancer (HR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.01–2.07). BRCA2 mutation carriers have worse BCSS than sporadic/BRCA-negative cases (HR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.03–1.62), although they have similar OS. Among triple negative breast cancer, BRCA1/2 mutations carriers had better OS than BRCA-negative counterpart (HR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.26–0.92). Among Ashkenazi Jewish women, BRCA1/2 mutations carriers presented higher risk of death from breast cancer (HR 1.44, 95% CI: 1.05–1.97) and of distant metastases (HR 1.82, 95% CI: 1.05–3.16) than sporadic/BRCA-negative patients. Conclusion: Our results support the evaluation of BRCA mutational status in patients with high risk of harboring BRCA germline mutations to better define the prognosis of breast cancer in these patients. PMID:27749552

  18. Mutation Clusters from Cancer Exome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2017-08-15

    We apply our statistically deterministic machine learning/clustering algorithm *K-means (recently developed in https://ssrn.com/abstract=2908286) to 10,656 published exome samples for 32 cancer types. A majority of cancer types exhibit a mutation clustering structure. Our results are in-sample stable. They are also out-of-sample stable when applied to 1389 published genome samples across 14 cancer types. In contrast, we find in- and out-of-sample instabilities in cancer signatures extracted from exome samples via nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), a computationally-costly and non-deterministic method. Extracting stable mutation structures from exome data could have important implications for speed and cost, which are critical for early-stage cancer diagnostics, such as novel blood-test methods currently in development.

  19. The significance of circumscribed malignant mammographic masses in the surveillance of BRCA 1/2 gene mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaas, R.; Kroger, R.; Besnard, A.P.E.; Koops, W.; Pameijer, F.A.; Prevoo, W.; Loo, C.E.; Muller, S.H.; Hendriks, J.H.C.L.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancers in gene mutation carriers may escape mammographic detection because of rapid growth and tumor expansion. Therefore, they may mimic benign lesions on the mammogram. Twenty-nine BRCA 1/2 mutation carriers under surveillance developed 31 breast cancers between 1994 and 2001 at a mean age of 44.2 years. Controls were 63 women with 67 breast cancers in the same period at a mean age of 53.8 years, also under surveillance because of a life time risk of at least 15%. In 26% of the carriers vs. 48% of the controls, mammography was the method that first suspected a malignancy. Seven radiologists performed a retrospective review of the original mammograms to establish technical assessment, with special attention for circumscribed lesions and estimated probability of malignancy. In the mutation carriers seven (23%) circumscribed non-calcified mammographic masses were found and three in the controls (4.5%) P=0.01. These masses were proven to be malignant. In both groups around 70% of these fast-growing circumscribed lesions were detected by the patients. The masses were situated in breasts with a good interpretable breast pattern. BRCA 1/2 mutation carriers had a significantly higher percentage of circumscribed non-calcified mammographic masses that proved to be malignant. These mammographic lesions in women at high risk should be described as at least Birads 0 and worked-up with ultrasound and needle biopsy. (orig.)

  20. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Sinilnikova, Olga M; McGuffog, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 an...

  1. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs...

  2. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs...... to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women....

  3. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); P. Soucy (Penny); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); E. Cattaneo (Elisa); M. Barile (Monica); V. Pensotti (Valeria); B. Pasini (Barbara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); A.L. Putignano; L. Varesco (Liliana); P. Radice (Paolo); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; D. Cruger (Dorthe); M.A. Caligo (Maria); Y. Laitman (Yael); R. Milgrom (Roni); B. Kaufman (Bella); S. Paluch-Shimon (Shani); E. Friedman (Eitan); N. Loman (Niklas); K. Harbst (Katja); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); B. Górski (Bohdan); A. Osorio (Ana); T.R. Cajal; F. Fostira (Florentia); R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); M.R. Nelen (Marcel); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); P. Devilee (Peter); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); E.B.G. Garcia; S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); D. Frost; R. Platte (Radka); J. Leyland (Jean); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); K.-R. Ong; F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Paterson (Joan); M.J. Kennedy (John); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); B. Buecher (Bruno); M. Belotti (Muriel); C. Tirapo (Carole); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Bronner (Myriam); F. Prieur (Fabienne); C. Nogues (Catherine); E. Rouleau (Etienne); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); M. Frenay (Marc); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); E.M. John (Esther); S.S. Buys (Saundra); Y. Yassin (Yosuf); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; G. Pfeiler (Georg); C. Dressler (Catherina); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L. Small (Laurie); J.F. Boggess (John); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); J. Basil (Jack); M. Azodi (Masoud); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); L. Sucheston (Lara); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); E. Olah (Edith); A. Bozsik (Aniko); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); J.L. Seldon (Joyce); M.S. Beattie (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); M.D. Sluiter (Michelle); O. Diez (Orland); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); K. Kast (Karin); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Niederacher (Dieter); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); I. Schönbuchner (Ines); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); M. Dumont (Martine); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); X. Wang (Xing); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P. Karlsson (Per); M. Nordling (Margareta); A. Bergman (Annika); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); S. Liedgren (Sigrun); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Olsson (Hans); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); H. Jernström (H.); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); A. Liljegren (Annelie); G. Barbany-Bustinza (Gisela); J. Rantala (Johanna); H. Grönberg (Henrik); E.-L. Stattin; M. Emanuelsson (Monica); R.R. Brandell; N. Dahl (Niklas); S. Verhoef; M. Verheus (Martijn); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); F.E. van Leeuwen; J.M. Collée (Margriet); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); A. Jager (Agnes); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.J.P. Gille (Jan); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); C.E. van Roozendaal (Cees); M.J. Blok (Marinus); B. Caanen; J.C. Oosterwijk; A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.J. Mourits; H.F. Vasen (Hans); H. Gregory (Helen); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L. Jeffers (Lisa); T.J. Cole (Trevor); C. McKeown (Carole); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); A. Donaldson (Alan); S. Downing (Sarah); A. Taylor (Amy); A. Murray (Alexandra); M.T. Rogers (Mark); E. McCann (Emma); M.E. Porteous (Mary); S. Drummond (Sarah); C. Brewer (Carole); E. Kivuva (Emma); A. Searle (Anne); S. Goodman (Selina); K. Hill (Kathryn); V. Murday (Victoria); N. Bradshaw (Nicola); L. Snadden (Lesley); M. Longmuir (Mark); C. Watt (Catherine); S. Gibson (Sarah); E. Haque (Eshika); E. Tobias (Ed); A. Duncan (Alexis); C. Jacobs (Chris); C. Langman (Caroline); A. Whaite (Anna); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Barwell (Julian); C. Chu (Chengbin); J. Miller (Julie); I.O. Ellis (Ian); C. Houghton (Catherine); L. Side (Lucy); A. Male (Alison); C. Berlin (Cheryl); J. Eason (Jacqueline); R. Collier (Rebecca); O. Claber (Oonagh); I. Jobson (Irene); L.J. Walker (Lisa); D. McLeod (Diane); D. Halliday (Dorothy); S. Durell (Sarah); B. Stayner (Barbara); S. Shanley (Susan); N. Rahman (Nazneen); R. Houlston (Richard); E.K. Bancroft (Elizabeth); L. D'Mello (Lucia); E. Page (Elizabeth); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); K. Kohut (Kelly); J. Wiggins (Jennifer); E. Castro (Elena); A. Mitra (Anita); L. Robertson (Lisa); O. Quarrell (Oliver); C. Bardsley (Cathryn); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); D.E. Barton (David); S. Goff (Sheila); G. Brice (Glen); L. Winchester (Lizzie); C. Eddy (Charlotte); V. Tripathi (Vishakha); V. Attard (Virginia); A. Lucassen (Anneke); G. Crawford (Gillian); D. McBride (Donna); S. Smalley (Sarah); J.W. Adlard (Julian); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTwo single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility

  4. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Putignano, Anna Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; van Os, Theo A. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Aalfs, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants:

  5. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Foretova, Lenka; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gord; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Sunde, Lone; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Kontorovich, Tair; Cohen, Shimrit; Kaufman, Bella; Dagan, Efrat; Baruch, Ruth Gershoni; Friedman, Eitan; Harbst, Katja; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Osorio, Ana; Blanco, Ignacio; Lasa, Adriana; Beniez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collee, J. Margriet; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wijnen, Juul; van Roozendaal, Cornelis E. P.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Oliver, Clare; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Rosalind; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Leone, Melanie; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert M.; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Prieur, Fabienne; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Yassin, Yosuf; Singer, Christian; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Staudigl, Christine; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Pal, Prodipto; Kosarin, Kristi; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F.; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Allavena, Anna; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Deissler, Helmut; Fiebig, Britta; Suttner, Christian; Schoenuchner, Ines; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Pooley, Karen A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gill, Mona; Collins, Lucine; Gokgoz, Nalan; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; H, F. B. L.; Verhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; R, M. A.; C, J. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; W, J.; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; L, M. J.; Ausems, Margreet; v d L, R.; A, C. M.; van Os, Theo; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; P, S.; C, M.; O, C.; F, D.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; C, T.; McKeown, Carole; Burgess, Lucy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; D, R.; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; I, L.; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; C, C.; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; E, D. G.; L, F.; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Walker, Lisa; Durell, Sarah; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; H, S.; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Lucassen, Anneke; S, O. M.; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; S-L, D.; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; B-d-P, B.; R, A.; Byrde, Veronque; Capoulade, Corinne; L, G. M.; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valeri; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, Francos; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joelle; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Daniel; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; L, M.; S, N.; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Helene; Rebischung, Christine; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; P, F.; Frena, Marc; Lynch, Henry T.; G, A. K.; S, R. K.; S, J.; Durocher, Francine; Laframboise, Rachel; Plante, Marie; Bridge, Peter; Parboosingh, Jilian; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Lesperance, Bernard; S, C. I.; F, L.; Eva, Machakova; Miroslava, Lukesova; de Paepe, Anne; Poppe, Bruce; K, P.; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernstrom, Helena; H, K.; Henrisson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; B-B, G.; R, J.; A, A.

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and

  6. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexandrov, L.B.; Nik-Zainal, S.; Wedge, D.C.; Aparicio, S.A.; Behjati, S.; Biankin, A.V.; Bignell, G.R.; Bolli, N.; Borg, A.; Borresen-Dale, A.L.; Boyault, S.; Burkhardt, B.; Butler, A.P.; Caldas, C.; Davies, H.R.; Desmedt, C.; Eils, R.; Eyfjord, J.E.; Foekens, J.A.; Greaves, M.; Hosoda, F.; Hutter, B.; Ilicic, T.; Imbeaud, S.; Imielinsk, M.; Jager, N.; Jones, D.T.; Knappskog, S.; Kool, M.; Lakhani, S.R.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Martin, S.; Munshi, N.C.; Nakamura, H.; Northcott, P.A.; Pajic, M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Paradiso, A.; Pearson, J.V.; Puente, X.S.; Raine, K.; Ramakrishna, M.; Richardson, A.L.; Richter, J.; Rosenstiel, P.; Schlesner, M.; Schumacher, T.N.; Span, P.N.; Teague, J.W.; Totoki, Y.; Tutt, A.N.; Valdes-Mas, R.; Buuren, M.M. van; Veer, L. van 't; Vincent-Salomon, A.; Waddell, N.; Yates, L.R.; Zucman-Rossi, J.; Futreal, P.A.; McDermott, U.; Lichter, P.; Meyerson, M.; Grimmond, S.M.; Siebert, R.; Campo, E.; Shibata, T.; Pfister, S.M.; Campbell, P.J.; Stratton, M.R.; Schlooz-Vries, M.S.; Tol, J.J. van; Laarhoven, H.W. van; Sweep, F.C.; Bult, P.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations; however, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we analysed 4,938,362

  7. Mitochondrial mutations drive prostate cancer aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y.; Weischenfeldt, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear mutations are well known to drive tumor incidence, aggression and response to therapy. By contrast, the frequency and roles of mutations in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome are poorly understood. Here we sequence the mitochondrial genomes of 384 localized prostate cancer...... in prostate cancer, and suggest interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial mutational profiles in prostate cancer....

  8. BRCA2 Mutations in 154 Finnish Male Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Syrjäkoski

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology and pathogenesis of male breast cancer (MBC are poorly known. This is due to the fact that the disease is rare, and large-scale genetic epidemiologic studies have been difficult to carry out. Here, we studied the frequency of eight recurrent Finnish BRCA2 founder mutations in a large cohort of 154 MBC patients (65% diagnosed in Finland from 1967 to 1996. Founder mutations were detected in 10 patients (6.5%, eight of whom carried the 9346(-2 A>G mutation. Two novel mutations (4075 delGT and 5808 del5 were discovered in a screening of the entire BRCA2 coding region in 34 samples. However, these mutations were not found in the rest of the 120 patients studied. Patients with positive family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were often BRCA2 mutation carriers (44%, whereas those with no family history showed a low frequency of involvement (3.6%; P < .0001. Finally, we found only one Finnish MBC patient with 999 dell, the most common founder mutation in Finnish female breast cancer (FBC patients, and one that explains most of the hereditary FBC and MBC cases in Iceland. The variation in BRCA2 mutation spectrum between Finnish MBC patients and FBC patients in Finland and breast cancer patients in Iceland suggests that modifying genetic and environmental factors may significantly influence the penetrance of MBC and FBC in individuals carrying germline BRCA2 mutations in some populations.

  9. Weight History, Smoking, Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Risk among French-Canadian Women Non-Carriers of More Frequent BRCA1/2 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnee Bissonauth

    2009-01-01

    Comparing cases to controls, breast cancer risk was higher among subjects who reached their maximum body mass index (BMI at an older age (>50 years (OR=2.83; 95% CI: 2.34–2.91. A positive association was noted between breast cancer risk and weight gain of >34 lbs compared to weight gain of ≤15 lbs, since the age of 20 (OR=1.68; 95% CI: 1.10–2.58. Weight gain of >24 lbs compared to weight gain of ≤9 lbs, since the age of 30 also resulted in the same relationship (OR=1.96; 95% CI: 1.46–3.06. Similarly, since the age of 40, weight gain of >12 lbs compared to weight gain of ≤1 lb was associated with increased breast cancer risk (OR=1.91; 95% CI: 1.53–2.66. Women who smoked >9 pack-years of cigarettes had a 59% higher breast cancer risk (P=.05. Subjects who engaged in >24.8 metabolic-equivalent- (MET- hours per week compared to ≤10.7 MET-hours per week of moderate physical activity had a 52% (P=.01 decreased risk and total physical activity between 16.2 and 33.2 MET-hours per week compared to ≤16.2 MET-hours per week, resulted in a 43% (P=.05 lower risk of breast cancer. In conclusion, weight history did affect breast cancer risk. Moreover, smoking appeared to raise the risk, whereas moderate physical activity had a protective effect.

  10. Cancer risk in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer due to MSH6 mutations: impact on counseling and surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Yvonne M. C.; Wagner, Anja; Morreau, Hans; Menko, Fred; Stormorken, Astrid; Quehenberger, Franz; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk; Møller, Pal; Genuardi, Maurizio; van Houwelingen, Hans; Tops, Carli; van Puijenbroek, Marjo; Verkuijlen, Paul; Kenter, Gemma; van Mil, Anneke; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Tan, Gita B.; Breuning, Martijn H.; Fodde, Riccardo; Wijnen, Juul Th; Bröcker-Vriends, Annette H. J. T.; Vasen, Hans

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) is caused by a mutated mismatch repair (MMR) gene. The aim of our study was to determine the cumulative risk of developing cancer in a large series of MSH6 mutation carriers. METHODS: Mutation analysis was performed in 20

  11. Lynch syndrome caused by germline PMS2 mutations: delineating the cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, S.W. ten; Brohet, R.M.; Tops, C.M.; Klift, H.M. van der; Velthuizen, M.E.; Bernstein, I.; Capella Munar, G.; Garcia, E.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Letteboer, T.G.; Menko, F.H.; Lindblom, A.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Moller, P.; Os, T.A. van; Rahner, N.; Redeker, B.J.; Sijmons, R.H.; Spruijt, L.; Suerink, M.; Vos, Y.J.; Wagner, A.; Hes, F.J.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Nielsen, M.; Wijnen, J.T.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. METHODS: Data were collected from 98

  12. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations: Delineating the Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Broeke, Sanne W.; Brohet, Richard M.; Tops, Carli M.; van der Klift, Heleen M.; Velthuizen, Mary E.; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Menko, Fred H.; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A.; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J. W.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Suerink, Manon; Vos, Yvonne J.; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J.; Vasen, Hans F.; Nielsen, Maartje; Wijnen, Juul T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. Methods Data were collected from 98 PMS2

  13. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations : Delineating the Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Broeke, Sanne W.; Brohet, Richard M.; Tops, Carli M.; van der Klift, Heleen M.; Velthuizen, Mary E.; Bernstein, Inge; Capella Munar, Gabriel; Garcia, Encarna Gomez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Menko, Fred H.; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Moller, Pal; Van Os, Theo A.; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J. W.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Suerink, Manon; Vos, Yvonne J.; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J.; Vasen, Hans F.; Nielsen, Maartje; Wijnen, Juul T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. Methods Data were collected from 98 PMS2

  14. Baseline results from the UK SIGNIFY study: a whole-body MRI screening study in TP53 mutation carriers and matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saya, Sibel; Killick, Emma; Thomas, Sarah; Taylor, Natalie; Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Rothwell, Jeanette; Benafif, Sarah; Dias, Alexander; Mikropoulos, Christos; Pope, Jenny; Chamberlain, Anthony; Gunapala, Ranga; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy; Walker, Lisa; Tomkins, Susan; Cook, Jackie; Barwell, Julian; Wiles, Vicki; Limb, Lauren; Eccles, Diana; Leach, Martin O; Shanley, Susan; Gilbert, Fiona J; Hanson, Helen; Gallagher, David; Rajashanker, Bala; Whitehouse, Richard W; Koh, Dow-Mu; Sohaib, S Aslam; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2017-07-01

    In the United Kingdom, current screening guidelines for TP53 germline mutation carriers solely recommends annual breast MRI, despite the wide spectrum of malignancies typically seen in this group. This study sought to investigate the role of one-off non-contrast whole-body MRI (WB MRI) in the screening of asymptomatic TP53 mutation carriers. 44 TP53 mutation carriers and 44 population controls were recruited. Scans were read by radiologists blinded to participant carrier status. The incidence of malignancies diagnosed in TP53 mutation carriers against general population controls was calculated. The incidences of non-malignant relevant disease and irrelevant disease were measured, as well as the number of investigations required to determine relevance of findings. In TP53 mutation carriers, 6 of 44 (13.6, 95% CI 5.2-27.4%) participants were diagnosed with cancer during the study, all of which would be considered life threatening if untreated. Two were found to have two primary cancers. Two participants with cancer had abnormalities on the MRI which were initially thought to be benign (a pericardial cyst and a uterine fibroid) but transpired to be sarcomas. No controls were diagnosed with cancer. Fifteen carriers (34.1, 95% CI 20.5-49.9%) and seven controls (15.9, 95% CI 6.7-30.1%) underwent further investigations following the WB MRI for abnormalities that transpired to be benign (p = 0.049). The cancer detection rate in this group justifies a minimum baseline non-contrast WB MRI in germline TP53 mutation carriers. This should be adopted into national guidelines for management of adult TP53 mutation carriers in addition to the current practice of contrast enhanced breast MRI imaging.

  15. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Tucker, Katherine M.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understanding the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 9.19–50.1; p colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative. PMID:26202870

  16. Association of Mismatch Repair Mutation With Age at Cancer Onset in Lynch Syndrome: Implications for Stratified Surveillance Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Neil A J; Morris, Julie; Green, Kate; Lalloo, Fiona; Woodward, Emma R; Hill, James; Crosbie, Emma J; Evans, D Gareth

    2017-12-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by dominantly inherited germline mutations that predispose individuals to colorectal, endometrial, ovarian, and other cancers through inactivation of the cellular mismatch repair system. Lynch syndrome–associated cancers are amenable to surveillance strategies that may improve survival. The age at which surveillance should start is disputed. To determine whether mutated gene and type of mutation influence age at onset of Lynch syndrome–associated cancers. A retrospective cohort study of individuals with Lynch syndrome–associated colorectal, endometrial, and/or ovarian cancers whose medical records were included in the clinical database of a large quaternary referral center for genomic medicine in the Northwest of England. Mutated gene (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and/or PMS2) and type of mutation (truncating, splicing, or large rearrangement). Age at cancer diagnosis. A total of 1063 individuals with proven Lynch syndrome were included, 495 male and 568 female (mean age 52 years; age range, 10-93 years [children were included in the database, but no children developed cancer]). There were 546 men and women with colorectal cancer, 162 women with endometrial cancer, and 49 women with ovarian cancer; mean follow-up was 68.2 months. Among MLH1 mutation carriers, mutations in MLH1 were associated with colorectal cancer in 249 (61%) of 409 men and women; endometrial cancer in 53 of 196 (27%) women; and ovarian cancer in 15 (8%) of 196 women. Among MSH2 mutation carriers, mutations in MSH2 (the most prevalent mutations overall) were most commonly associated with female-specific cancers: endometrial cancer in 83 (30%) of 279 women; ovarian cancer in 28 (10%) of 279 women; and colorectal cancer in 239 (50%) 479 men and women. Mutations in MSH6 were less prevalent, and MSH6 mutation carriers presented with colorectal and endometrial cancer at later ages than carriers of mutations in MSH2 or MLH1. When stratified by mutation type, women with truncating

  17. Population genetic testing for cancer susceptibility: founder mutations to genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, William D; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Turnbull, Clare

    2016-01-01

    The current standard model for identifying carriers of high-risk mutations in cancer-susceptibility genes (CSGs) generally involves a process that is not amenable to population-based testing: access to genetic tests is typically regulated by health-care providers on the basis of a labour-intensive assessment of an individual's personal and family history of cancer, with face-to-face genetic counselling performed before mutation testing. Several studies have shown that application of these selection criteria results in a substantial proportion of mutation carriers being missed. Population-based genetic testing has been proposed as an alternative approach to determining cancer susceptibility, and aims for a more-comprehensive detection of mutation carriers. Herein, we review the existing data on population-based genetic testing, and consider some of the barriers, pitfalls, and challenges related to the possible expansion of this approach. We consider mechanisms by which population-based genetic testing for cancer susceptibility could be delivered, and suggest how such genetic testing might be integrated into existing and emerging health-care structures. The existing models of genetic testing (including issues relating to informed consent) will very likely require considerable alteration if the potential benefits of population-based genetic testing are to be fully realized.

  18. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for 129 mitochondrial polymorphisms using the iCOGS array. Haplogroup inference and association detection were performed using a phylogenetic approach. ALTree was applied to explore the reference mitochondrial evolutionary tree and detect subclades enriched in affected......, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: This study illustrates how...... original approaches such as the phylogeny-based method we used can empower classical molecular epidemiological studies aimed at identifying association or risk modification effects....

  19. Cortical volumes and atrophy rates in FTD-3 CHMP2B mutation carriers and related non-carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon F; Østergaard, Lasse R; Rodell, Anders B

    2008-01-01

    with a mean interval of 16 months and surface based cortical segmentation we measured cortical thickness and volume, and quantified atrophy rates. Cortical thickness and atrophy rates were averaged within major lobes and focal effects were determined by parametric statistical maps. The volumetric atrophy...... in the frontal and occipital lobes, and in the left temporal lobe. Results indicated that cortical thickness has a higher sensitivity for detecting small changes than whole-brain volumetric measures. Comparing mutation carriers with non-carriers revealed increased atrophy rates in mutation carriers bilaterally...

  20. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Im, Kate M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu

    2011-01-01

    Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele...... the tools of statistical genomics to examine the likelihood of long-range LD at a deleterious locus in a population that faced a genetic bottleneck. We studied the genotypes of hundreds of women from a large international consortium of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and found that AJ women exhibited long......-range haplotypes compared to CNJ women. More than 50% of the AJ chromosomes with the BRCA1 185delAG mutation share an identical 2.1 Mb haplotype and nearly 16% of AJ chromosomes carrying the BRCA2 6174delT mutation share a 1.4 Mb haplotype. Simulations based on the best inference of Ashkenazi population demography...

  1. Electrocardiographic features of sarcomere mutation carriers with and without clinically overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens Jakob; Maron, Barry J

    2011-01-01

    In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), electrocardiographic (ECG) changes have been postulated to be an early marker of disease, detectable in sarcomere mutation carriers when left ventricular (LV) wall thickness is still normal. However, the ECG features of mutation carriers have not been fully...

  2. TP53 mutations in ovarian carcinomas from sporadic cases and carriers of two distinct BRCA1 founder mutations; relation to age at diagnosis and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kringen, Pedro; Wang, Yun; Dumeaux, Vanessa; Kristensen, Gunnar; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Dorum, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Ovarian carcinomas from 30 BRCA1 germ-line carriers of two distinct high penetrant founder mutations, 20 carrying the 1675delA and 10 the 1135insA, and 100 sporadic cases were characterized for somatic mutations in the TP53 gene. We analyzed differences in relation to BRCA1 germline status, TP53 status, survival and age at diagnosis, as previous studies have not been conclusive. DNA was extracted from paraffin embedded formalin fixed tissues for the familial cases, and from fresh frozen specimen from the sporadic cases. All cases were treated at our hospital according to protocol. Mutation analyses of exon 2 – 11 were performed using TTGE, followed by sequencing. Survival rates for BRCA1-familial cases with TP53 mutations were not significantly lower than for familial cases without TP53 mutations (p = 0.25, RR = 1.64, 95% CI [0.71–3.78]). Median age at diagnosis for sporadic (59 years) and familial (49 years) cases differed significantly (p < 0.001) with or without TP53 mutations. Age at diagnosis between the two types of familial carriers were not significantly different, with median age of 47 for 1675delA and 52.5 for 1135insA carriers (p = 0.245). For cases ≥50 years at diagnosis, a trend toward longer survival for sporadic over familial cases was observed (p = 0.08). The opposite trend was observed for cases <50 years at diagnosis. There do not seem to be a protective advantage for familial BRCA1 carriers without TP53 mutations over familial cases with TP53 mutations. However, there seem to be a trend towards initial advantage in survival for familial cases compared to sporadic cases diagnosed before the age of 50 both with and without TP53 mutations. However, this trend diminishes over time and for cases diagnosed ≥50 years the sporadic cases show a trend towards an advantage in survival over familial cases. Although this data set is small, if confirmed, this may be a link in the evidence that the differences in ovarian cancer survival reported, are

  3. Lynch syndrome caused by germline PMS2 mutations: delineating the cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Broeke, Sanne W; Brohet, Richard M; Tops, Carli M; van der Klift, Heleen M; Velthuizen, Mary E; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G W; Menko, Fred H; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J W; Sijmons, Rolf H; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Suerink, Manon; Vos, Yvonne J; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J; Vasen, Hans F; Nielsen, Maartje; Wijnen, Juul T

    2015-02-01

    The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. Data were collected from 98 PMS2 families ascertained from family cancer clinics that included a total of 2,548 family members and 377 proven mutation carriers. To adjust for potential ascertainment bias, a modified segregation analysis model was used to calculate colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC) risks. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52 years, and there was a significant difference in mean age of CRC between the probands (mean, 47 years; range, 26 to 68 years) and other family members with a PMS2 mutation (mean, 58 years; range, 31 to 86 years; P PMS2 mutation, and it should be noted that we observed a substantial variation in cancer phenotype within and between families, suggesting the influence of genetic modifiers and lifestyle factors on cancer risks. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. The Potential Contribution of BRCA Mutations to Early Onset and Familial Breast Cancer in Uzbekistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Abdikhakimov

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: This preliminary evidence suggests a potential contribution of BRCA1 5382insC mutation to breast cancer development in Uzbek population. Taking into account a high disease penetrance in carriers of BRCA1 mutation, it seems reasonable to recommend inclusion of the 5382insC mutation test in future research on the development of screening programs for breast cancer prevention in Uzbekistan.

  5. Risk of malignant paraganglioma in SDHB-mutation and SDHD-mutation carriers: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulsteijn, L.T.; Dekkers, O.M.; Hes, F.J.; Smit, J.W.A.; Corssmit, E.P.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the risk of developing malignant paraganglioma (PGL) in SDHB-mutation and SDHD-mutation carriers. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, COCHRANE and Academic Search Premier (2000-August 2011) and references of key

  6. Pathology of ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakhani, Sunil R.; Manek, Sanjiv; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Flanagan, Adrienne; Arnout, Laurent; Merrett, Samantha; McGuffog, Lesley; Steele, Dawn; Devilee, Peter; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Radice, Paolo; Pilotti, Silvana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Butzow, Ralf; Sobol, Hagay; Jacquemier, Jocylyne; Lyonet, Dominique Stoppa; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Weber, Barbara; Wagner, Teresa; Winqvist, Robert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Monti, Franco; Schmitt, Fernando; Lenoir, Gilbert; Seitz, Susanne; Hamman, Ute; Pharoah, Paul; Lane, Geoff; Ponder, Bruce; Bishop, D. Timothy; Easton, Douglas F.

    2004-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer increased susceptibility to ovarian cancer. There is evidence that tumors in carriers may exhibit a distinct distribution of pathological features, but previous studies on the pathology of such tumors have been small. Our aim was to evaluate the

  7. Identification of Germline Genetic Mutations in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E.; O’Reilly, Eileen; Kelsen, David; Ashraf, Asad M.; Lowery, Maeve; Yu, Kenneth; Reidy, Diane; Epstein, Andrew S.; Lincoln, Anne; Saldia, Amethyst; Jacobs, Lauren M.; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Zhang, Liying; Kurtz, Robert; Saltz, Leonard; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Stadler, Zsofia K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is part of several cancer predisposition syndromes; however, indications for genetic counseling/testing are not well-defined. We sought to determine mutation prevalence and characteristics that predict for inherited predisposition to PAC. Methods We identified 175 consecutive PAC patients who underwent clinical genetics assessment at Memorial Sloan Kettering between 2011–2014. Clinical data, family history, and germline results were evaluated. Results Among 159 PAC patients who pursued genetic testing, 24 pathogenic mutations were identified (15.1%; 95%CI, 9.5%–20.7%), including BRCA2(n=13), BRCA1(n=4), p16(n=2), PALB2(n=1), and Lynch syndrome(n=4). BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence was 13.7% in Ashkenazi Jewish(AJ) (n=95) and 7.1% in non-AJ(n=56) patients. In AJ patients with strong, weak, or absent family history of BRCA-associated cancers, mutation prevalence was 16.7%, 15.8%, and 7.4%, respectively. Mean age at diagnosis in all mutation carriers was 58.5y(range 45–75y) compared to 64y(range 27–87y) in non-mutation carriers(P=0.02). Although BRCA2 was the most common mutation identified, no patients with early-onset PAC(≤50y) harbored a BRCA2 mutation and the mean age at diagnosis in BRCA2 carriers was equivalent to non-mutation carriers(P=0.34). Mutation prevalence in early-onset patients(n=21) was 28.6%, including BRCA1(n=2), p16(n=2), MSH2(n=1) and MLH1(n=1). Conclusion Mutations in BRCA2 account for over 50% of PAC patients with an identified susceptibility syndrome. AJ patients had high BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence regardless of personal/family history, suggesting that ancestry alone indicates a need for genetic evaluation. With the exception of BRCA2-associated PAC, inherited predisposition to PAC is associated with earlier age at PAC diagnosis suggesting that this subset of patients may also represent a population warranting further evaluation. PMID:26440929

  8. Classifications within molecular subtypes enables identification of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers by RNA tumor profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Kruse, Torben A; Tan, Qihua

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are detected in less than one third of families with a strong history of breast cancer. It is therefore expected that mutations still remain undetected by currently used screening methods. In addition, a growing number of BRCA1/2 sequence variants...... of unclear pathogen significance are found in the families, constituting an increasing clinical challenge. New methods are therefore needed to improve the detection rate and aid the interpretation of the clinically uncertain variants. In this study we analyzed a series of 33 BRCA1, 22 BRCA2, and 128 sporadic...... tumors by RNA profiling to investigate the classification potential of RNA profiles to predict BRCA1/2 mutation status. We found that breast tumors from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers display characteristic RNA expression patterns, allowing them to be distinguished from sporadic tumors. The majority...

  9. Influence of the MDM2 single nucleotide polymorphism SNP309 on tumour development in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Peter W

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MDM2 gene encodes a negative regulator of the p53 tumour suppressor protein. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the MDM2 promoter (a T to G exchange at nucleotide 309 has been reported to produce accelerated tumour formation in individuals with inherited p53 mutations. We have investigated the effect of the MDM2 SNP309 on clinical outcome in a cohort of patients with germline mutations of BRCA1. Methods Genomic DNA was obtained for 102 healthy controls and 116 patients with established pathogenic mutations of BRCA1 and Pyrosequencing technology™ was used to determine the genotype at the MDM2 SNP309 locus. Results The polymorphism was present in 52.9% of the controls (G/T in 37.3% and G/G in 15.6% and 58.6% of the BRCA1 mutation carriers (47.4% G/T and 11.2% G/G. Incidence of malignancy in female BRCA1 carriers was not significantly higher in SNP309 carriers than in wildtype (T/T individuals (72.7% vs. 75.6%, p = 1.00. Mean age of diagnosis of first breast cancer was 41.2 years in the SNP309 G/G genotype carriers, 38.6 years in those with the SNP309 G/T genotype and 39.0 years in wildtype subjects (p = 0.80. Conclusion We found no evidence that the MDM2 SNP309 accelerates tumour development in carriers of known pathogenic germline mutations of BRCA1.

  10. Tubal epithelial lesions in salpingo-oophorectomy specimens of BRCA-mutation carriers and controls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mingels, M.J.J.M.; Roelofsen, T.; Laak, J.A.W.M. van der; Hullu, J.A. de; Ham, M.A.P.C. van; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Bulten, J.; Bol, M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A precursor lesion for ovarian carcinoma, tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (TIC), has been identified in BRCA-mutation carriers undergoing prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (pBSO). Other lesions were also identified in fallopian tubes, but different terminology, interpretation,

  11. MSH6 and PMS2 mutation positive Australian Lynch syndrome families: novel mutations, cancer risk and age of diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talseth-Palmer, Bente A; McPhillips, Mary; Groombridge, Claire; Spigelman, Allan; Scott, Rodney J

    2010-05-21

    Approximately 10% of Lynch syndrome families have a mutation in MSH6 and fewer families have a mutation in PMS2. It is assumed that the cancer incidence is the same in families with mutations in MSH6 as in families with mutations in MLH1/MSH2 but that the disease tends to occur later in life, little is known about families with PMS2 mutations. This study reports on our findings on mutation type, cancer risk and age of diagnosis in MSH6 and PMS2 families. A total of 78 participants (from 29 families) with a mutation in MSH6 and 7 participants (from 6 families) with a mutation in PMS2 were included in the current study. A database of de-identified patient information was analysed to extract all relevant information such as mutation type, cancer incidence, age of diagnosis and cancer type in this Lynch syndrome cohort. Cumulative lifetime risk was calculated utilising Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. MSH6 and PMS2 mutations represent 10.3% and 1.9%, respectively, of the pathogenic mutations in our Australian Lynch syndrome families. We identified 26 different MSH6 and 4 different PMS2 mutations in the 35 families studied. We report 15 novel MSH6 and 1 novel PMS2 mutations. The estimated cumulative risk of CRC at age 70 years was 61% (similar in males and females) and 65% for endometrial cancer in MSH6 mutation carriers. The risk of developing CRC is different between males and females at age 50 years, which is 34% for males and 21% for females. Novel MSH6 and PMS2 mutations are being reported and submitted to the current databases for identified Lynch syndrome mutations. Our data provides additional information to add to the genotype-phenotype spectrum for both MSH6 and PMS2 mutations.

  12. MSH6 and PMS2 mutation positive Australian Lynch syndrome families: novel mutations, cancer risk and age of diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talseth-Palmer Bente A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 10% of Lynch syndrome families have a mutation in MSH6 and fewer families have a mutation in PMS2. It is assumed that the cancer incidence is the same in families with mutations in MSH6 as in families with mutations in MLH1/MSH2 but that the disease tends to occur later in life, little is known about families with PMS2 mutations. This study reports on our findings on mutation type, cancer risk and age of diagnosis in MSH6 and PMS2 families. Methods A total of 78 participants (from 29 families with a mutation in MSH6 and 7 participants (from 6 families with a mutation in PMS2 were included in the current study. A database of de-identified patient information was analysed to extract all relevant information such as mutation type, cancer incidence, age of diagnosis and cancer type in this Lynch syndrome cohort. Cumulative lifetime risk was calculated utilising Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results MSH6 and PMS2 mutations represent 10.3% and 1.9%, respectively, of the pathogenic mutations in our Australian Lynch syndrome families. We identified 26 different MSH6 and 4 different PMS2 mutations in the 35 families studied. We report 15 novel MSH6 and 1 novel PMS2 mutations. The estimated cumulative risk of CRC at age 70 years was 61% (similar in males and females and 65% for endometrial cancer in MSH6 mutation carriers. The risk of developing CRC is different between males and females at age 50 years, which is 34% for males and 21% for females. Conclusion Novel MSH6 and PMS2 mutations are being reported and submitted to the current databases for identified Lynch syndrome mutations. Our data provides additional information to add to the genotype-phenotype spectrum for both MSH6 and PMS2 mutations.

  13. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, nois...... patterns of mutual exclusivity. These techniques, coupled with advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing, are enabling precision medicine approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer....

  14. Do BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have an earlier onset of natural menopause?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tilborg, Theodora C.; Broekmans, Frank J.; Pijpe, Anouk; Schrijver, Lieske H.; Mooij, Thea M.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Verhoef, Senno; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Adank, Muriel A.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Doorn, Helena C.; van Os, Theo A.; Bos, Anna M.; Rookus, Matti A.; Ausems, Margreet G.

    Objective: It has been hypothesized that BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have an earlier age at natural menopause (ANM), although to date findings are inconclusive. This study assessed the influence of BRCA mutation status on ANM, and aimed to explore the reasons of inconsistency in the literature.

  15. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: Application to point mutation and carrier detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, T.W.; Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.; Sedra, M.S.; Western, L.M.; Bartolo, C.; Mendell, J.R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Moxley, R.T. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, the authors identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. The authors conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Brain white matter 1 H MRS in Leber optic neuropathy mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostojic, Jelena; Jancic, Jasna; Kozic, Dusko

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted in order to test the hypothesis that proton MR spectroscopic (1H MRS) profile of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutation carriers group (including both symptomatic and asymptomatic) differs from group of healthy individuals and to determine metabolite...... or ratio that contributes most to differentiation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed single voxel 1H MRS in normal appearing white matter of eighteen LHON mtDNA mutation carriers bearing one of three LHON mtDNA point mutations and in fifty control subjects. RESULTS: ANOVA showed significant difference...

  17. Association of Type and Location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations With Risk of Breast and Ovarian Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; McGuffog, Lesley; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Laitman, Yael; Kushnir, Anya; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Berger, Raanan; Zidan, Jamal; Friedman, Eitan; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Huo, Dezheng; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Seldon, Joyce; Ganz, Patricia A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Chan, Salina B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Gayther, Simon A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Arun, Banu K.; Lu, Karen H.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Daly, Mary B.; Whittemore, Alice S.; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Godino, Javier; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Bobolis, Kristie A.; Sand, Sharon R.; Fontaine, Annette; Savarese, Antonella; Pasini, Barbara; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Vignolo-Lutati, Francesca; Scuvera, Giulietta; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Genuardi, Maurizio; Radice, Paolo; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Gismondi, Viviana; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy; Torres, Diana; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Donaldson, Alan; Ellis, Steve; Sharma, Priyanka; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Becker, Alexandra; Rhiem, Kerstin; Hahnen, Eric; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Engert, Stefanie; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Mundhenke, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Fleisch, Markus; Sutter, Christian; Bartram, C. R.; Dikow, Nicola; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Steinemann, Doris; Kast, Karin; Beer, Marit; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Weber, Bernhard H.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Damiola, Francesca; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Lasset, Christine; Sobol, Hagay; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Isaacs, Claudine; de Paepe, Anne; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; de Leeneer, Kim; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Wakely, Katie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie V.; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Romero, Atocha; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verhoef, Senno; Collée, J. Margriet; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Kets, Carolien M.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Devilee, Peter; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Papp, Janos; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Darder, Esther; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Mónica; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Menkiszak, Janusz; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Simard, Jacques; Laframboise, Rachel; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Alducci, Elisa; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Lee, Min Hyuk; Park, Sue K.; Kim, Sung-Won; Friebel, Tara M.; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Guidugli, Lucia; Wang, Xianshu; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Kauff, Noah; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Aretini, Paolo; teo, Soo-Hwang; Selkirk, Christina G.; Hulick, Peter J.; Andrulis, Irene

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational study of women who were ascertained

  18. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Rebbeck (Timothy); N. Mitra (Nandita); F. Wan (Fei); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Healey (Sue); L. McGuffog (Lesley); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); Y. Laitman (Yael); A. Kushnir (Anya); S. Paluch-Shimon (Shani); R. Berger (Raanan); J. Zidan (Jamal); E. Friedman (Eitan); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (Marie); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); N. Loman (Niklas); K. Harbst (Katja); J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Melin (Beatrice); D. Huo (Dezheng); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J.L. Seldon (Joyce); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); S. Chan (Salina); K. Odunsi (Kunle); S.A. Gayther (Simon); S.M. Domchek (Susan); B.K. Arun (Banu); K.H. Lu (Karen); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); S.S. Pathak; E.B. Ross (Eric); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); T. Ramon Y Cajal; A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); J. Godino (Javier); M.I. Tejada; M. Duran (Mercedes); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); K.A. Bobolis (Kristie A.); S.R. Sand (Sharon); A. Fontaine (Annette); A. Savarese (Antonella); B. Pasini (Barbara); B. Peissel (Bernard); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); F. Vignolo-Lutati (Francesca); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Bernard (Loris); M. Genuardi (Maurizio); P. Radice (Paolo); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); V. Gismondi (Viviana); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); D. Torres (Diana); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); R. Eeles (Rosalind); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (Carole); S. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L.J. Walker (Lisa); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Adlard; A. Donaldson (Alan); S.D. Ellis (Steve); P. Sharma (Priyanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Becker (Alexandra); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); E. Hahnen (Eric); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); C. Mundhenke (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); M.C. Fleisch (Markus); C. Sutter (Christian); C.R. Bartram (Claus); N. Dikow (Nicola); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); D. Steinemann (Doris); K. Kast (Karin); M. Beer (Marit); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); F. Damiola (Francesca); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); C. Lasset (Christine); H. Sobol (Hagay); J.-P. Peyrat; D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); M.-A. Collonge-Rame; I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); C. Nogues (Catherine); E. Rouleau (Etienne); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. de Paepe (Anne); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Claes (Kathleen); K. De Leeneer (Kim); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); K. Wakely (Katie); J.F. Boggess (John); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); J. Basil (Jack); M. Azodi (Masoud); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); A. Romero (Atocha); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Verhoef; J.M. Collée (Margriet); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); J.J. Gille (Johan); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); C.M. Kets; M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); P. Devilee (Peter); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A. Kwong (Ava); E. Olah; J. Papp (Janos); O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); E. Darder (Esther); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M. Salinas; A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); A. Toloczko-Grabarek (Aleksandra); E. Złowocka-Perłowska (Elzbieta); J. Menkiszak (Janusz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); J. Simard (Jacques); R. Laframboise (Rachel); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); E. Alducci (Elisa); A. Peixoto (Ana); P.J. Teixeira; A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); M.H. Lee (Min Hyuk); S.K. Park (Sue); S.-W. Kim (Sung-Won); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); L. Guidugli (Lucia); X. Wang (Xianshu); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Foretova (Lenka); J. Vijai (Joseph); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); N. Kauff (Noah); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; A. Berger (Andreas); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A.E. Toland (Amanda); L. Senter (Leigha); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); L. Sunde (Lone); M. Thomassen (Mads); S.T. Moeller (Sanne Traasdahl); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); P. Aretini (Paolo); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); C.G. Selkirk (Christina); P.J. Hulick (Peter); I.L. Andrulis (Irene)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractImportance: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. Objective: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. Design, Setting, and Participants: Observational study ofwomen whowere

  19. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebbeck, T.R.; Mitra, N.; Wan, F.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Healey, S.; McGuffog, L.; Mazoyer, S.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Easton, D.F.; Antoniou, A.C.; Nathanson, K.L.; Laitman, Y.; Kushnir, A.; Paluch-Shimon, S.; Berger, R.; Zidan, J.; Friedman, E.; Ehrencrona, H.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Einbeigi, Z.; Loman, N.; Harbst, K.; Rantala, J.; Melin, B.; Huo, D.; Olopade, O.I.; Seldon, J.; Ganz, P.A.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Chan, S.B.; Odunsi, K.; Gayther, S.A.; Domchek, S.M.; Arun, B.K.; Lu, K.H.; Mitchell, G.; Karlan, B.Y.; Walsh, C.; Lester, J.; Godwin, A.K.; Pathak, H.; Ross, E.; Daly, M.B.; Whittemore, A.S.; John, E.M.; Miron, A.; Terry, M.B.; Chung, W.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Tihomirova, L.; Tung, N.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Steele, L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Ejlertsen, B.; Gerdes, A.M.; Hansen, T.; Ramon Y Cajal, T.; Osorio, A.; Benitez, J.; Godino, J.; Tejada, M.I.; Duran, M.; Weitzel, J.N.; Bobolis, K.A.; Sand, S.R.; Fontaine, A.; Savarese, A.; Pasini, B.; Peissel, B.; Bonanni, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Vignolo-Lutati, F.; Scuvera, G.; Giannini, G.; Bernard, L.; Genuardi, M.; Radice, P.; Dolcetti, R.; Manoukian, S.; Pensotti, V.; Gismondi, V.; Yannoukakos, D.; Fostira, F.; Garber, J.; Torres, D.; Rashid, M.U.; Hamann, U.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Platte, R.; Evans, D.G.; Eeles, R.; Davidson, R.; Eccles, D.; Cole, T.; Kets, M.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Observational study of women who were ascertained

  20. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Observational study of women who were ascertained...

  1. Role of BRCA2 mutation status on overall survival among breast cancer patients from Sardinia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budroni, Mario; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Cesaraccio, Rosaria; Coviello, Vincenzo; Sechi, Ornelia; Pirino, Daniela; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Pisano, Marina; Palomba, Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Conversely, the impact of BRCA mutations on prognosis and survival of breast cancer patients is still debated. In this study, we investigated the role of such mutations on breast cancer-specific survival among patients from North Sardinia. Among incident cases during the period 1997–2002, a total of 512 breast cancer patients gave their consent to undergo BRCA mutation screening by DHPLC analysis and automated DNA sequencing. The Hakulinen, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox regression methods were used for both relative survival assessment and statistical analysis. In our series, patients carrying a germline mutation in coding regions and splice boundaries of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were 48/512 (9%). Effect on overall survival was evaluated taking into consideration BRCA2 carriers, who represented the vast majority (44/48; 92%) of mutation-positive patients. A lower breast cancer-specific overall survival rate was observed in BRCA2 mutation carriers after the first two years from diagnosis. However, survival rates were similar in both groups after five years from diagnosis. No significant difference was found for age of onset, disease stage, and primary tumour histopathology between the two subsets. In Sardinian breast cancer population, BRCA2 was the most affected gene and the effects of BRCA2 germline mutations on patients' survival were demonstrated to vary within the first two years from diagnosis. After a longer follow-up observation, breast cancer-specific rates of death were instead similar for BRCA2 mutation carriers and non-carriers

  2. Heterozygous carriers of a Parkin or PINK1 mutation share a common functional endophenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Nuenen, BF; Siebner, Hartwig; Weiss, MM

    2008-01-01

    inherited Parkinson disease alters the cortical control of sequential finger movements. METHODS: Nonmanifesting individuals carrying a single heterozygous Parkin (n = 13) or PINK1 (n = 9) mutation and 23 healthy controls without these mutations were studied with functional MRI (fMRI). During f...... rostral dorsal premotor cortex in mutation carriers but not in controls. Task-related activation of these premotor areas was similar in carriers of a Parkin or PINK1 mutation. CONCLUSION: Mutations in different genes linked to recessively inherited Parkinson disease are associated with an additional...... recruitment of rostral supplementary motor area and rostral dorsal premotor cortex during a simple motor sequence task. These premotor areas were recruited independently of the underlying genotype. The observed activation most likely reflects a "generic" compensatory mechanism to maintain motor function...

  3. TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Owain Jones

    Full Text Available TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA. Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology.

  4. Drug Carrier for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Ayane Debele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a non-invasive combinatorial therapeutic modality using light, photosensitizer (PS, and oxygen used for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. When PSs in cells are exposed to specific wavelengths of light, they are transformed from the singlet ground state (S0 to an excited singlet state (S1–Sn, followed by intersystem crossing to an excited triplet state (T1. The energy transferred from T1 to biological substrates and molecular oxygen, via type I and II reactions, generates reactive oxygen species, (1O2, H2O2, O2*, HO*, which causes cellular damage that leads to tumor cell death through necrosis or apoptosis. The solubility, selectivity, and targeting of photosensitizers are important factors that must be considered in PDT. Nano-formulating PSs with organic and inorganic nanoparticles poses as potential strategy to satisfy the requirements of an ideal PDT system. In this review, we summarize several organic and inorganic PS carriers that have been studied to enhance the efficacy of photodynamic therapy against cancer.

  5. Modifiers of the Efficacy of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kauff, Noah D

    2006-01-01

    .... This plan included 1) conduct of a prospective study examining modifiers of the efficacy of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy for the prevention of breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA mutations; and 2...

  6. Molecular aspects of HNPCC and identification of mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, Renée Cecil

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) - also referred to as Lynch syndrome - is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of cancer susceptibility with high penetrance (80-85%). It is one of the most common inherited cancer syndromes identified in humans so far. In typical HNPCC

  7. Lipid Oxidation in Carriers of Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase Gene Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holleboom, Adriaan G.; Daniil, Georgios; Fu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Renliang; Hovingh, G. Kees; Schimmel, Alinda W.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Hazen, Stanley L.; Chroni, Angeliki; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2012-01-01

    Objective-Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) has been shown to play a role in the depletion of lipid oxidation products, but this has so far not been studied in humans. In this study, we investigated processes and parameters relevant to lipid oxidation in carriers of functional LCAT

  8. Lipid Oxidation in Carriers of Lecithin : Cholesterol Acyltransferase Gene Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holleboom, Adriaan G.; Daniil, Georgios; Fu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Renliang; Hovingh, G. Kees; Schimmel, Alinda W.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Hazen, Stanley L.; Chroni, Angeliki; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) has been shown to play a role in the depletion of lipid oxidation products, but this has so far not been studied in humans. In this study, we investigated processes and parameters relevant to lipid oxidation in carriers of functional LCAT

  9. Anatomical patterns of dermatitis in adult filaggrin mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heede, Nina G; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Thuesen, Betina H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common filaggrin (FLG) null mutations are associated with severe and early onset of atopic dermatitis (AD). To date, few studies have investigated anatomical patterns of dermatitis and none has been conducted in the general population. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated patterns of dermatitis...... by use of questionnaires. Participants were genotyped for common FLG mutations. A history of AD was defined by the United Kingdom Working Party's diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: The frequency of foot dermatitis in the general population was associated with FLG genotype (P = .014). However, when...... stratification of FLG genotype and AD was performed, we found that FLG mutations increased the prevalence (odds ratios) of foot dermatitis (odds ratio 10.41; 95% confidence interval 5.27-20.60) and persistent hand dermatitis (odds ratio 17.57; 95% confidence interval 8.60-35.89) only in participants with AD...

  10. Prevalence of BRCA1 mutations in familial and sporadic greek ovarian cancer cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra V Stavropoulou

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes contribute to approximately 18% of hereditary ovarian cancers conferring an estimated lifetime risk from 15% to 50%. A variable incidence of mutations has been reported for these genes in ovarian cancer cases from different populations. In Greece, six mutations in BRCA1 account for 63% of all mutations detected in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of BRCA1 mutations in a Greek cohort of 106 familial ovarian cancer patients that had strong family history or metachronous breast cancer and 592 sporadic ovarian cancer cases. All 698 patients were screened for the six recurrent Greek mutations (including founder mutations c.5266dupC, p.G1738R and the three large deletions of exon 20, exons 23-24 and exon 24. In familial cases, the BRCA1 gene was consequently screened for exons 5, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24. A deleterious BRCA1 mutation was found in 43/106 (40.6% of familial cancer cases and in 27/592 (4.6% of sporadic cases. The variant of unknown clinical significance p.V1833M was identified in 9/698 patients (1.3%. The majority of BRCA1 carriers (71.2% presented a high-grade serous phenotype. Identifying a mutation in the BRCA1 gene among breast and/or ovarian cancer families is important, as it enables carriers to take preventive measures. All ovarian cancer patients with a serous phenotype should be considered for genetic testing. Further studies are warranted to determine the prevalence of mutations in the rest of the BRCA1 gene, in the BRCA2 gene, and other novel predisposing genes for breast and ovarian cancer.

  11. Breast tumor characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltman, J.; Mann, R.; Blickman, J.G.; Boetes, C.; Kok, T.; Obdeijn, I.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2008-01-01

    The appearance of malignant lesions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA-MCs) on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Thus, 29 BRCA-MCs with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated and the results compared with an age, tumor size and tumor type matched control group of 29 sporadic breast cancer cases. Detection rates on both modalities were evaluated. Tumors were analyzed on morphology, density (mammography), enhancement pattern and kinetics (MRI). Overall detection was significantly better with MRI than with mammography (55/58 vs 44/57, P = 0.021). On mammography, lesions in the BRCA-MC group were significantly more described as rounded (12//19 vs 3/13, P = 0.036) and with sharp margins (9/19 vs 1/13, P 0.024). On MRI lesions in the BRCA-MC group were significantly more described as rounded (16/27 vs 7/28, P = 0.010), with sharp margins (20/27 vs 7/28, P < 0.001) and with rim enhancement (7/27 vs 1/28, P = 0.025). No significant difference was found for enhancement kinetics (P = 0.667). Malignant lesions in BRCA-MC frequently have morphological characteristics commonly seen in benign lesions, like a rounded shape or sharp margins. This applies for both mammography and MRI. However the possibility of MRI to evaluate the enhancement pattern and kinetics enables the detection of characteristics suggestive for a malignancy. (orig.)

  12. Identifying pathways affected by cancer mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iengar, Prathima

    2017-12-16

    Mutations in 15 cancers, sourced from the COSMIC Whole Genomes database, and 297 human pathways, arranged into pathway groups based on the processes they orchestrate, and sourced from the KEGG pathway database, have together been used to identify pathways affected by cancer mutations. Genes studied in ≥15, and mutated in ≥10 samples of a cancer have been considered recurrently mutated, and pathways with recurrently mutated genes have been considered affected in the cancer. Novel doughnut plots have been presented which enable visualization of the extent to which pathways and genes, in each pathway group, are targeted, in each cancer. The 'organismal systems' pathway group (including organism-level pathways; e.g., nervous system) is the most targeted, more than even the well-recognized signal transduction, cell-cycle and apoptosis, and DNA repair pathway groups. The important, yet poorly-recognized, role played by the group merits attention. Pathways affected in ≥7 cancers yielded insights into processes affected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of common MEFV mutations and carrier frequencies in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Christian Oberkanins, oberkanins@viennalab.com. 1967; Pras et al. ... affected populations with spreading very diverse mutational patterns, especially ..... Arabs, mainly living in Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan and Iraq, and North .... Mediterranean fever suspected patients and gender correlation: a retrospective study.

  14. Appreciating the broad clinical features of SMAD4 mutation carriers: a multi-center chart review

    OpenAIRE

    Wain, K.E.; Ellingson, M.S.; McDonald, J.; Gammon, A.; Roberts, M.; Pichurin, P.; Winship, I.; Riegert-Johnson, D.; Weitzel, J. N.; Lindor, N.M.

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function (LOF) SMAD4 mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JP) and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Some carriers exhibit symptoms of both conditions, leading to the name JP-HHT syndrome. Three families have been reported with connective tissue abnormalities. In order to better understand the spectrum and extent of clinical findings in SMAD4 carriers, medical records of 34 patients (20 families) from five clinical practices were reviewed. ...

  15. Do BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have an earlier onset of natural menopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilborg, Theodora C; Broekmans, Frank J; Pijpe, Anouk; Schrijver, Lieske H; Mooij, Thea M; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Verhoef, Senno; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A; Adank, Muriel A; van Asperen, Christi J; van Doorn, Helena C; van Os, Theo A; Bos, Anna M; Rookus, Matti A; Ausems, Margreet G

    2016-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have an earlier age at natural menopause (ANM), although to date findings are inconclusive. This study assessed the influence of BRCA mutation status on ANM, and aimed to explore the reasons of inconsistency in the literature. Cross-sectional assessment from an ongoing nationwide cohort study among members of BRCA1/2 mutated families. Information was obtained by a standardized questionnaire. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed, and Cox regression was used to assess the association between BRCA1/2 mutation status and ANM. Adjustments were made for birth cohort, family, smoking, use of hormonal contraceptives, and parity. A total of 1,208 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and 2,211 proven noncarriers were included. Overall, no association was found between BRCA1/2 mutation status and ANM (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.06 [95% CI, 0.87-1.30]). We examined if the null finding was due to informative censoring by uptake of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy. Indeed, within the oldest birth cohort, in which the percentage of surgical menopause events was lowest and comparable between carriers and noncarriers, the HR for earlier natural menopause in carriers was 1.45 (95% CI, 1.09-1.94). The second oldest birth cohort, however, demonstrated a decreased HR (0.67 [95% CI, 0.46-0.98]), and thus no trend over birth cohorts was found. Various types of selection bias hamper the comparison of ANM between BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and noncarriers, genetically tested in the clinic.

  16. Cognitive impairment in the preclinical stage of dementia in FTD-3 CHMP2B mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Jette; Teasdale, Thomas W; Johannsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    -3). Subjects were assessed with neuropsychological tests in 2002, 2005 and 2010. RESULTS: Cross-sectional analyses showed that the mutation carriers scored lower on tests of psychomotor speed, working memory, executive functions and verbal memory than a control group consisting of not-at-risk family...... members and spouses. Longitudinal analyses showed a gradual decline in psychomotor speed, working memory capacity and global executive measures in the group of non-demented mutation carriers that was not found in the control group. In contrast, there were no significant group differences in domain scores...

  17. Primary fibroblasts from CSP? mutation carriers recapitulate hallmarks of the adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Benitez, Bruno A.; Sands, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the co- chaperone protein, CSP?, cause an autosomal dominant, adult-neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (AD-ANCL). The current understanding of CSP? function exclusively at the synapse fails to explain the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) dysfunction in cells from AD-ANCL patients. Here, we demonstrate unexpectedly that primary dermal fibroblasts from pre-symptomatic mutation carriers recapitulate in vitro features found in the brains of AD-ANCL patients including auto-fluorescent sto...

  18. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression : identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemaçon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caligo, Maria A; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Gareth Evans, D; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fountzilas, George; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganschow, Pamela; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Hays, John L; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Joseph, Vijai; Just, Walter; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kets, Carolien M; Kirk, Judy; Kriege, Mieke; Laitman, Yael; Laurent, Maïté; Lazaro, Conxi; Leslie, Goska; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Loman, Niklas; Loud, Jennifer T; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mariani, Milena; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park, Sue Kyung; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Segura, Pedro Perez; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Sevenet, Nicolas; Shah, Payal D; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sokolowska, Johanna; Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda B; Stadler, Zsofia; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Tan, Yen; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teulé, Alex; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tung, Nadine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wijnen, Juul T; Rebbeck, Timothy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Nord, Silje; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Simard, Jacques

    PURPOSE: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1

  19. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Hamdi (Yosr); Soucy, P. (Penny); Kuchenbaeker, K.B. (Karoline B.); Pastinen, T. (Tomi); A. Droit (Arnaud); Lemaçon, A. (Audrey); J.W. Adlard (Julian); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A. Arason (Adalgeir); N. Arnold (Norbert); B.K. Arun (Banu); J. Azzollini; A.L. Bane (Anita L.); Barjhoux, L. (Laure); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Benítez (Javier); P. Berthet (Pascaline); M.J. Blok (Marinus); K.A. Bobolis (Kristie A.); V. Bonadona (Valérie); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); Bradbury, A.R. (Angela R.); C. Brewer (Carole); B. Buecher (Bruno); Buys, S.S. (Saundra S.); M.A. Caligo (Maria); Chiquette, J. (Jocelyne); W. Chung (Wendy); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); Daly, M.B. (Mary B.); F. Damiola (Francesca); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. De Leeneer (Kim); O. Díez (Orland); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S.M. Domchek (Susan); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); D. Eccles (Diana); R. Eeles (Ros); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); EMBRACE; C. Engel (Christoph); Gareth Evans, D.; L. Feliubadaló (L.); L. Foretova (Lenka); F. Fostira (Florentia); Foulkes, W.D. (William D.); G. Fountzilas (George); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); P. Ganschow (Pamela); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); J. Garber (Judy); S.A. Gayther (Simon); GEMO Study Collaborators; A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); D. Goldgar (David); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); J. Gronwald (Jacek); E. Hahnen (Eric); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S. Hart (Stewart); J. Hays (John); HEBON; F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); P.J. Hulick (Peter); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); L. Izatt (Louise); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. James (Margaret); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); U.B. Jensen; E.M. John (Esther); V. Joseph (Vijai); Just, W. (Walter); Kaczmarek, K. (Katarzyna); Karlan, B.Y. (Beth Y.); KConFab Investigators; C.M. Kets; J. Kirk (Judy); Kriege, M. (Mieke); Y. Laitman (Yael); Laurent, M. (Maïté); C. Lazaro (Conxi); Leslie, G. (Goska); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); F. Lesueur (Fabienne); A. Liljegren (Annelie); N. Loman (Niklas); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); Mariani, M. (Milena); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. McGuffog (Lesley); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A. Meindl (Alfons); A. Miller (Austin); M. Montagna (Marco); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); Olah, E. (Edith); O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); A. Osorio (Ana); L. Papi (Laura); S.K. Park (Sue K.); Pedersen, I.S. (Inge Sokilde); B. Peissel (Bernard); P.P. Segura (Pedro Perez); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); P. Radice (Paolo); J. Rantala (Johanna); Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C. (Christine); G. Rennert (Gad); A.L. Richardson (Andrea); M. Robson (Mark); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); M.A. Rookus (Matti); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); Shah, P.D. (Payal D.); C.F. Singer (Christian); Slavin, T.P. (Thomas P.); Snape, K. (Katie); J. Sokolowska (Johanna); Sønderstrup, I.M.H. (Ida Marie Heeholm); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); Stadler, Z. (Zsofia); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); C. Sutter (Christian); Tan, Y. (Yen); M.-K. Tea; P.J. Teixeira; A. Teulé (A.); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); A.E. Toland (Amanda); N. Tung (Nadine); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); K. van Engelen (Klaartje); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); Couch, F.J. (Fergus J.); S. Nord (Silje); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); Simard, J. (Jacques)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility

  20. POLE somatic mutations in advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Joana; Pinto, Carla; Pinto, Diana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Silva, Romina; Peixoto, Ana; Rocha, Patrícia; Veiga, Isabel; Santos, Catarina; Santos, Rui; Cabreira, Verónica; Lopes, Paula; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2017-12-01

    Despite all the knowledge already gathered, the picture of somatic genetic changes in colorectal tumorigenesis is far from complete. Recently, germline and somatic mutations in the exonuclease domain of polymerase epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) gene have been reported in a small subset of microsatellite-stable and hypermutated colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), affecting the proofreading activity of the enzyme and leading to misincorporation of bases during DNA replication. To evaluate the role of POLE mutations in colorectal carcinogenesis, namely in advanced CRC, we searched for somatic mutations by Sanger sequencing in tumor DNA samples from 307 cases. Microsatellite instability and mutation analyses of a panel of oncogenes were performed in the tumors harboring POLE mutations. Three heterozygous mutations were found in two tumors, the c.857C>G, p.Pro286Arg, the c.901G>A, p.Asp301Asn, and the c.1376C>T, p.Ser459Phe. Of the POLE-mutated CRCs, one tumor was microsatellite-stable and the other had low microsatellite instability, whereas KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were found in one tumor each. We conclude that POLE somatic mutations exist but are rare in advanced CRC, with further larger studies being necessary to evaluate its biological and clinical implications. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A locus on 19p13 modifies risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is associated with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S

    2010-01-01

    associations (rs8170, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.26, 95% CI 1.17-1.35; rs2363956 HR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.80-0.89). Genotyping these SNPs in 6,800 population-based breast cancer cases and 6,613 controls identified a similar association with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (rs2363956 per-allele odds ratio (OR...... and 3,949 controls (P(trend) = 1 × 10⁻⁷) to P(trend) = 8 × 10⁻⁵; rs2363956 per-allele OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.74-0.87, P(trend) = 1.1 × 10⁻⁷...

  2. Immunotherapy Targets Common Cancer Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a study of an immune therapy for colorectal cancer that involved a single patient, researchers identified a method for targeting the cancer-causing protein produced by a mutant form of the KRAS gene.

  3. Evaluation of current prediction models for Lynch syndrome: updating the PREMM5 model to identify PMS2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Goverde (Anne); M.C.W. Spaander (Manon); D. Nieboer (Daan); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand); H.J. Dubbink (Erik Jan); C. Tops (Cmj); S.W. Ten Broeke (Sanne W.); M.J. Bruno (Marco); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); A. Wagner (Anja)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractUntil recently, no prediction models for Lynch syndrome (LS) had been validated for PMS2 mutation carriers. We aimed to evaluate MMRpredict and PREMM5 in a clinical cohort and for PMS2 mutation carriers specifically. In a retrospective, clinic-based cohort we calculated predictions for

  4. The Potential Contribution of BRCA Mutations to Early Onset and Familial Breast Cancer in Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdikhakimov, Abdulla; Tukhtaboeva, Mukaddas; Adilov, Bakhtiyar; Turdikulova, Shahlo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and affects approximately 1 out of 8 females in the US. Risk of developing breast cancer is strongly influenced by genetic factors. Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with 5-10% of breast cancer incidence. To reduce the risk of developing cancer and to increase the likelihood of early detection, carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations are offered surveillance programs and effective preventive medical interventions. Identification of founder mutations of BRCA1/2 in high risk communities can have a significant impact on the management of hereditary cancer at the level of the national healthcare systems, making genetic testing more affordable and cost-effective. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients have not been characterized in the Uzbek population. This pilot study aimed to investigate the contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation to early onset and familial cases of breast cancer in Uzbekistan. A total of 67 patients with breast cancer and 103 age-matched disease free controls were included in this study. Utilizing SYBR Green based real-time allele-specific PCR, we have analyzed DNA samples of patients with breast cancer and disease free controls to identify the following BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations: BRCA1 5382insC, BRCA1 4153delA, BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 300T>G, BRCA2 6174delT. Three unrelated samples (4.5%) were found to be positive for the heterozygous 5382insCBRCA1 mutation, representing a possible founder mutation in the Uzbek population, supporting the need for larger studies examining the contribution of this mutation to breast cancer incidence in Uzbekistan. We did not find BRCA1 4153delA, BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 300T>G, and BRCA2 6174delT mutations. This preliminary evidence suggests a potential contribution of BRCA1 5382insC mutation to breast cancer development in Uzbek population. Taking into account a high disease penetrance in carriers of BRCA1 mutation, it seems

  5. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Im, Kate M.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu; Green, Todd; Chow, Clement Y.; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua; Gaudet, Mia M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Shane Pankratz, V.; Guiducci, Candace; Crenshaw, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van Roozendaal, Cees E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez-Segura, Pedro; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Blecharz, Paweł; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Singer, Christian F.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Beattie, Mary S.; Chan, Salina; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Phelan, Catherine; Narod, Steven; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary-Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Durán, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Laitman, Yael; Meindl, Alfons; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Klein, Robert J.; Daly, Mark J.; Friedman, Eitan; Dean, Michael; Clark, Andrew G.; Altshuler, David M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Gold, Bert; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Lynch, Henry T.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Pierotti, Marco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Ripamonti, Carla B.; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Bernard, Loris; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Rookus, M. A.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; Aalfs, C. M.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, M. John; Barton, David; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Randhawa, Kashmir; Barwell, Julian; Patel, Nafisa; Adlard, Julian; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele

  6. Presymptomatic cerebral blood flow changes in CHMP2B mutation carriers of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD-3), measured with MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunau, Line Andersen; Mouridsen, Kim; Rodell, Anders

    2012-01-01

    1 images. Perfusion data were then extracted from seven regions-of-interest, normalised to white matter and statistically compared between carriers and non-carriers. RESULTS: For SE, contrasts between carriers and non-carriers showed significant differences in temporal, occipital and parietal lobes...... and in hippocampus. There was no evidence of changes from baseline to follow-up. For GRE, there were no significant differences between carriers and non-carriers. CONCLUSIONS: Significantly decreased CBF was found in presymptomatic CHMP2B mutation carriers in occipital-and parietal lobes. Comparing SE with GRE, data...

  7. PMS2 mutations in childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Michel; Hayward, Bruce E; Charlton, Ruth; Taylor, Graham R; Glaser, Adam W; Picton, Susan; Cole, Trevor R; Maher, Eamonn R; McKeown, Carole M E; Mann, Jill R; Yates, John R; Baralle, Diana; Rankin, Julia; Bonthron, David T; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2006-03-01

    Until recently, the PMS2 DNA mismatch repair gene has only rarely been implicated as a cancer susceptibility locus. New studies have shown, however, that earlier analyses of this gene have had technical limitations and also that the genetic behavior of mutant PMS2 alleles is unusual, in that, unlike MLH1 or MSH2 mutations, PMS2 mutations show low heterozygote penetrance. As a result, a dominantly inherited cancer predisposition has not been a feature reported in families with PMS2 mutations. Such families have instead been ascertained through childhood-onset cancers in homozygotes or through apparently sporadic colorectal cancer in heterozygotes. We present further information on the phenotype associated with homozygous PMS2 deficiency in 13 patients from six families of Pakistani origin living in the United Kingdom. This syndrome is characterized by café-au-lait skin pigmentation and a characteristic tumor spectrum, including leukemias, lymphomas, cerebral malignancies (such as supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, astrocytomas, and glioblastomas), and colorectal neoplasia with an onset in early adult life. We present evidence for a founder effect in five families, all of which carried the same R802-->X mutation (i.e., arginine-802 to stop) in PMS2. This cancer syndrome can be mistaken for neurofibromatosis type 1, with important management implications including the risk of the disorder occurring in siblings and the likelihood of tumor development in affected individuals.

  8. Cancer3D: understanding cancer mutations through protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta-Pardo, Eduard; Hrabe, Thomas; Godzik, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The new era of cancer genomics is providing us with extensive knowledge of mutations and other alterations in cancer. The Cancer3D database at http://www.cancer3d.org gives an open and user-friendly way to analyze cancer missense mutations in the context of structures of proteins in which they are found. The database also helps users analyze the distribution patterns of the mutations as well as their relationship to changes in drug activity through two algorithms: e-Driver and e-Drug. These algorithms use knowledge of modular structure of genes and proteins to separately study each region. This approach allows users to find novel candidate driver regions or drug biomarkers that cannot be found when similar analyses are done on the whole-gene level. The Cancer3D database provides access to the results of such analyses based on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). In addition, it displays mutations from over 14,700 proteins mapped to more than 24,300 structures from PDB. This helps users visualize the distribution of mutations and identify novel three-dimensional patterns in their distribution. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Carrier screening of RTEL1 mutations in the Ashkenazi Jewish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedick, A M; Shi, L; Jalas, C; Treff, N R; Ekstein, J; Kornreich, R; Edelmann, L; Mehta, L; Savage, S A

    2015-08-01

    Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HH) is a clinically severe variant of dyskeratosis congenita (DC), characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia, microcephaly, intrauterine growth retardation, and severe immunodeficiency in addition to features of DC. Germline mutations in the RTEL1 gene have recently been identified as causative of HH. In this study, the carrier frequency for five RTEL1 mutations that occurred in individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish descent was investigated in order to advise on including them in existing clinical mutation panels for this population. Our screening showed that the carrier frequency for c.3791G>A (p.R1264H) was higher than expected, 1% in the Ashkenazi Orthodox and 0.45% in the general Ashkenazi Jewish population. Haplotype analyses suggested the presence of a common founder. We recommend that the c.3791G>A RTEL1 mutation be considered for inclusion in carrier screening panels in the Ashkenazi population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer risk in the international BRCA1/2 carrier cohort study: a report from EMBRACE, GENEPSO, GEO-HEBON, and the IBCCS Collaborating Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brohet, Richard M.; Goldgar, David E.; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Andrieu, Nadine; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Peock, Susan; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Cook, Margaret; Chu, Carol; Noguès, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Berthet, Pascaline; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Olsson, Håkan; Caldes, Trinidad; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Rookus, Matti A.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE Earlier studies have shown that endogenous gonadal hormones play an important role in the etiology of breast cancer among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. So far, little is known about the safety of exogenous hormonal use in mutation carriers. In this study, we examined the association between

  11. Progression inference for somatic mutations in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif E. Peterson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods were employed to determine progression inference of genomic alterations in commonly occurring cancers. Using cross-sectional TCGA data, we computed evolutionary trajectories involving selectivity relationships among pairs of gene-specific genomic alterations such as somatic mutations, deletions, amplifications, downregulation, and upregulation among the top 20 driver genes associated with each cancer. Results indicate that the majority of hierarchies involved TP53, PIK3CA, ERBB2, APC, KRAS, EGFR, IDH1, VHL, etc. Research into the order and accumulation of genomic alterations among cancer driver genes will ever-increase as the costs of nextgen sequencing subside, and personalized/precision medicine incorporates whole-genome scans into the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Keywords: Oncology, Cancer research, Genetics, Computational biology

  12. Association of two mutations in the CHEK2 gene with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanova, N.; Enben-Dubrowinskaja, N.; Doerk, T.; Feshchenko, S.; Lazyuk, G.I.; Rogov, Yu.I.

    2005-01-01

    Cell-cycle checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) is a central mediator of cellular responses to DNA damage. Ionizing radiation activates the CHEK2 protein via ATM-mediated phosphorylation and activated CHEK2 kinase can phosphorylate several substrates, including Cdc25A, p53 and E2F1, which mediate cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. CHEK2 phosphorylation of the breast cancer susceptibility protein BRCA1 regulates DNA double-strand break repair, and deletion of CHEK2 potentiate the incidence of mammary carcinomas in BRCA1 conditional mutant mice. A truncating variant of CHEK2, the 1100 delC mutation, has been identified as a low-penetrance breast-cancer susceptibility allele. Heterozygous 1100 delC carriers have an approximately 2-fold increased risk for breast cancer. The role of variants in CHEK2 other than 1100 delC is less clear. To assess the role of these CHEK2 variants in breast cancer, we conducted an association study of the I157T and IVS211G>A mutations in breast cancer case-control settings from the Belarus populations. Our series consisted of 424 breast cancer patients and 307 population controls. The missense substitution I157T was identified in 24/424 cases (5.7%) vs. 4/307 controls (1.3%; OR 54.5, 95% CI 1.6-13.2, p 5 0.005) in investigated cohorts. The splicing mutation IVS211G > A was infrequent, being observed 4/424 patients (0.9%). Heterozygous CHEK2 mutation carriers tended to be diagnosed at an earlier age, but these differences did not reach statistical significance. Family history of breast cancer did not differ between carriers and non carriers. Our data indicate that the I157T allele, and possibly the IVS211G > A allele, of the CHEK2 gene contribute to inherited breast cancer susceptibility. (authors)

  13. Germinal and somatic mutations in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, A.G. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The role of germinal and somatic mutations in carcinogenesis leads to the conclusion that environmental carcinogens probably exert their effects via somatic mutations. Susceptibility to this process may itself be genetically determined, so we may deduce that two groups, one genetic and one non-genetic, are included in the 'environmental' class. Other individuals seem to acquire cancer even in the absence of such environmental agents, and these too may be classified into a genetic and a non-genetic group. It has been estimated that in industrial countries, the environmental groups include 70-80% of all cancer cases, but we are only beginning to know how to separate the genetic and non-genetic subgroups. The genetic subgroup of the 'non-environmental' group is very small, probably of the order of magnitude of 1-2% for cancer as a whole. The remainder, about 25%, comprises a non-genetic, non-environmental subgroup that seems to arise as a consequence of 'spontaneous' somatic mutations. The incidence of these 'background' cancers is what we should combat with preventive and therapeutic measures

  14. Targeted prostate cancer screening in men with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 detects aggressive prostate cancer: preliminary analysis of the results of the IMPACT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Anita V; Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Barbachano, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    mutations were offered annual prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, and those with PSA >3 ng/mL, were offered a prostate biopsy. Controls were men age-matched (± 5 years) who were negative for the familial mutation. RESULTS: In total, 300 men were recruited (205 mutation carriers; 89 BRCA1, 116 BRCA2......Study Type - Diagnostic (validating cohort)
Level of Evidence 1b OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of targeted prostate cancer screening in men with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, an international study, IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening...... in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls), was established. This is the first multicentre screening study targeted at men with a known genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. A preliminary analysis of the data is reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Men aged 40-69 years from families with BRCA1 or BRCA2...

  15. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and reproduction: an observational study on the suitability of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for both asymptomatic carriers and breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derks-Smeets, Inge A P; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Mackens, Shari; van Golde, Ron; Paulussen, Aimee D; Dreesen, Jos; Tournaye, Herman; Verdyck, Pieter; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G; Meijer-Hoogeveen, Madelon; De Greve, Jacques; Geraedts, Joep; De Rycke, Martine; Bonduelle, Maryse; Verpoest, Willem M

    2014-06-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a reproductive option for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers wishing to avoid transmission of the predisposition for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) to their offspring. Embryos obtained by in vitro fertilisation (IVF/ICSI) are tested for the presence of the mutation. Only BRCA-negative embryos are transferred into the uterus. The suitability and outcome of PGD for HBOC are evaluated in an observational cohort study on treatments carried out in two of Western-Europe's largest PGD centres from 2006 until 2012. Male carriers, asymptomatic female carriers and breast cancer survivors were eligible. If available, PGD on embryos cryopreserved before chemotherapy was possible. Generic PGD-PCR tests were developed based on haplotyping, if necessary combined with mutation detection. 70 Couples underwent PGD for BRCA1/2. 42/71 carriers (59.2 %) were female, six (14.3 %) of whom have had breast cancer prior to PGD. In total, 145 PGD cycles were performed. 720 embryos were tested, identifying 294 (40.8 %) as BRCA-negative. Of fresh IVF/PGD cycles, 23.9 % resulted in a clinical pregnancy. Three cycles involved PGD on embryos cryopreserved before chemotherapy; two of these women delivered a healthy child. Overall, 38 children were liveborn. Two BRCA1 carriers were diagnosed with breast cancer shortly after PGD treatment, despite negative screening prior to PGD. PGD for HBOC proved to be suitable, yielding good pregnancy rates for asymptomatic carriers as well as breast cancer survivors. Because of two cases of breast cancer shortly after treatment, maternal safety of IVF(PGD) in female carriers needs further evaluation.

  16. Progranulin Levels in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid in Granulin Mutation Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieke H.H. Meeter

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathogenic mutations in the granulin gene (GRN are causative in 5-10% of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD, mostly leading to reduced progranulin protein (PGRN levels. Upcoming therapeutic trials focus on enhancing PGRN levels. Methods: Fluctuations in plasma PGRN (n = 41 and its relationship with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, n = 32 and specific single nucleotide polymorphisms were investigated in pre- and symptomatic GRN mutation carriers and controls. Results: Plasma PGRN levels were lower in carriers than in controls and showed a mean coefficient of variation of 5.3% in carriers over 1 week. Although plasma PGRN correlated with CSF PGRN in carriers (r = 0.54, p = 0.02, plasma only explained 29% of the variability in CSF PGRN. rs5848, rs646776 and rs1990622 genotypes only partly explained the variability of PGRN levels between subjects. Conclusions: Plasma PGRN is relatively stable over 1 week and therefore seems suitable for treatment monitoring of PGRN-enhancing agents. Since plasma PGRN only moderately correlated with CSF PGRN, CSF sampling will additionally be needed in therapeutic trials.

  17. Management of women with BRCA mutations: a 41-year-old woman with a BRCA mutation and a recent history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Nadine

    2011-06-01

    Ms E, a 41-year-old BRCA1 mutation carrier, was diagnosed 4 years ago as having breast cancer and opted for breast-conserving therapy. Prior to receiving chemotherapy, she harvested her eggs through in vitro fertilization and subsequently used preimplantation genetic diagnosis; 3 months ago she delivered a healthy boy. This review examines the prevalence of BRCA mutations in women with breast cancer, as well as current recommendations for surgery and systemic therapy in these women. In particular, the risk of a contralateral breast cancer is reviewed to help guide the choice of prophylactic mastectomies vs breast-conserving therapy. The technology of preimplantation genetic diagnosis and genetic testing in relatives of mutation carriers is discussed.

  18. RNF43 is mutated less frequently in Lynch Syndrome compared with sporadic microsatellite unstable colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Lochlan J; Clendenning, Mark; McKeone, Diane M; Jamieson, Saara H; Balachandran, Samanthy; Borowsky, Jennifer; Liu, John; Kawamata, Futoshi; Bond, Catherine E; Rosty, Christophe; Burge, Matthew E; Buchanan, Daniel D; Leggett, Barbara A; Whitehall, Vicki L J

    2018-01-01

    The WNT signaling pathway is commonly altered during colorectal cancer development. The E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF43, negatively regulates the WNT signal through increased ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the Frizzled receptor. RNF43 has recently been reported to harbor frequent truncating frameshift mutations in sporadic microsatellite unstable (MSI) colorectal cancers. This study assesses the relative frequency of RNF43 mutations in hereditary colorectal cancers arising in the setting of Lynch syndrome. The entire coding region of RNF43 was Sanger sequenced in 24 colorectal cancers from 23 patients who either (i) carried a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH6, MSH2, PMS2), or (ii) showed immunohistochemical loss of expression of one or more of the DNA mismatch repair proteins, was BRAF wild type at V600E, were under 60 years of age at diagnosis, and demonstrated no promoter region methylation for MLH1 in tumor DNA. A validation cohort of 44 colorectal cancers from mismatch repair germline mutation carriers from the Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (ACCFR) were sequenced for the most common truncating mutation hotspots (X117 and X659). RNF43 mutations were found in 9 of 24 (37.5%) Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers. The majority of mutations were frameshift deletions in the G659 G7 repeat tract (29%); 2 cancers (2/24, 8%) from the one patient harbored frameshift mutations at codon R117 (C6 repeat tract) within exon 3. In the ACCFR validation cohort, RNF43 hotspot mutations were identified in 19/44 (43.2%) of samples, which was not significantly different to the initial series. The proportion of mutant RNF43 in Lynch syndrome related colorectal cancers is significantly lower than the previously reported mutation rate found in sporadic MSI colorectal cancers. These findings identify further genetic differences between sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers. This may be because Lynch Syndrome cancers

  19. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor protein regulates the penetrance of frontotemporal lobar degeneration in progranulin mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghidoni, Roberta; Flocco, Rosa; Paterlini, Anna; Glionna, Michela; Caruana, Loredana; Tonoli, Elisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Benussi, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that mutations in the gene encoding for progranulin (GRN) cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and other neurodegenerative diseases leading to dementia has brought renewed interest in progranulin and its functions in the central nervous system. Full length progranulin is preserved from cleavage by secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), one of the smallest serine protease inhibitor circulating in plasma. Herein, we investigated the relationship between circulating SLPI and progranulin in affected and unaffected subjects belonging to 26 Italian pedigrees carrying GRN null mutations. In GRN null mutation carriers, we demonstrated: i) an increase of circulating SLPI levels in affected subjects; ii) an age-related upregulation of the serine-protease inhibitor in response to lifetime progranulin shortage; and iii) a delay in the age of onset in subjects with the highest SLPI protein levels. The study of SLPI and its relation to progranulin suggests the existence of unexpected molecular players in progranulin-associated neurodegeneration.

  20. Incidence of and survival after subsequent cancers in carriers of pathogenic MMR variants with previous cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Pål; Seppälä, Toni; Bernstein, Inge

    2017-01-01

    age 40 to age 70 years were 73% for pathogenic MLH1 (path_MLH1), 76% for path_MSH2 carriers and 52% for path_MSH6 carriers, and for colorectal cancer (CRC) the cumulative incidences were 46%, 48% and 23%, respectively. Crude survival after any subsequent cancer was 82% (95% CI 76% to 87%) and 10-year...

  1. The landscape of cancer genes and mutational processes in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, Philip J.; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Davies, Helen; van Loo, Peter; Greenman, Chris; Wedge, David C.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Martin, Sancha; Varela, Ignacio; Bignell, Graham R.; Yates, Lucy R.; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Beare, David; Butler, Adam; Cheverton, Angela; Gamble, John; Hinton, Jonathan; Jia, Mingming; Jayakumar, Alagu; Jones, David; Latimer, Calli; Lau, King Wai; McLaren, Stuart; McBride, David J.; Menzies, Andrew; Mudie, Laura; Raine, Keiran; Rad, Roland; Chapman, Michael Spencer; Teague, Jon; Easton, Douglas; Langerød, Anita; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Shen, Chen-Yang; tee, Benita Tan Kiat; Huimin, Bernice Wong; Broeks, Annegien; Vargas, Ana Cristina; Turashvili, Gulisa; Martens, John; Fatima, Aquila; Miron, Penelope; Chin, Suet-Feung; Thomas, Gilles; Boyault, Sandrine; Mariani, Odette; Lakhani, Sunil R.; van de Vijver, Marc; van 't Veer, Laura; Foekens, John

    2012-01-01

    All cancers carry somatic mutations in their genomes. A subset, known as driver mutations, confer clonal selective advantage on cancer cells and are causally implicated in oncogenesis(1), and the remainder are passenger mutations. The driver mutations and mutational processes operative in breast

  2. Higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied retrospectively tumor samples of 83 Saudi metastatic CRC patients for KRAS mutations in codon 12 and codon 13, to evaluate the relevance of KRAS mutation positive colorectal cancers with metastatic sites. KRAS mutation was observed in 42.2% (35/83) patients with CRC. The most common mutations were in ...

  3. Germline truncating-mutations in BRCA1 and MSH6 in a patient with early onset endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kast, Karin; Schackert, Hans K; Neuhann, Teresa M; Görgens, Heike; Becker, Kerstin; Keller, Katja; Klink, Barbara; Aust, Daniela; Distler, Wolfgang; Schröck, Evelin

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS) and Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer Syndrome (HNPCC, Lynch Syndrome) are two tumor predisposition syndromes responsible for the majority of hereditary breast and colorectal cancers. Carriers of both germline mutations in breast cancer genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 and in mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 are very rare. We identified germline mutations in BRCA1 and in MSH6 in a patient with increased risk for HBOC diagnosed with endometrial cancer at the age of 46 years. Although carriers of mutations in both MMR and BRCA genes are rare in Caucasian populations and anamnestical and histopathological findings may guide clinicians to identify these families, both syndromes can only be diagnosed through a complete gene analysis of the respective genes

  4. Germline truncating-mutations in BRCA1 and MSH6 in a patient with early onset endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kast, Karin [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Schackert, Hans K [Department of Surgical Research, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Neuhann, Teresa M [Institute for Clinical Genetics, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Medical Genetic Center, Munich (Germany); Görgens, Heike [Department of Surgical Research, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Becker, Kerstin [Institute for Clinical Genetics, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Keller, Katja [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Klink, Barbara [Institute for Clinical Genetics, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Aust, Daniela [Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Distler, Wolfgang [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Schröck, Evelin [Institute for Clinical Genetics, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-11-20

    Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS) and Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer Syndrome (HNPCC, Lynch Syndrome) are two tumor predisposition syndromes responsible for the majority of hereditary breast and colorectal cancers. Carriers of both germline mutations in breast cancer genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 and in mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 are very rare. We identified germline mutations in BRCA1 and in MSH6 in a patient with increased risk for HBOC diagnosed with endometrial cancer at the age of 46 years. Although carriers of mutations in both MMR and BRCA genes are rare in Caucasian populations and anamnestical and histopathological findings may guide clinicians to identify these families, both syndromes can only be diagnosed through a complete gene analysis of the respective genes.

  5. Germline truncating-mutations in BRCA1 and MSH6 in a patient with early onset endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kast Karin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS and Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer Syndrome (HNPCC, Lynch Syndrome are two tumor predisposition syndromes responsible for the majority of hereditary breast and colorectal cancers. Carriers of both germline mutations in breast cancer genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 and in mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 are very rare. Case presentation We identified germline mutations in BRCA1 and in MSH6 in a patient with increased risk for HBOC diagnosed with endometrial cancer at the age of 46 years. Conclusions Although carriers of mutations in both MMR and BRCA genes are rare in Caucasian populations and anamnestical and histopathological findings may guide clinicians to identify these families, both syndromes can only be diagnosed through a complete gene analysis of the respective genes.

  6. Germline truncating-mutations in BRCA1 and MSH6 in a patient with early onset endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Karin; Neuhann, Teresa M; Görgens, Heike; Becker, Kerstin; Keller, Katja; Klink, Barbara; Aust, Daniela; Distler, Wolfgang; Schröck, Evelin; Schackert, Hans K

    2012-11-20

    Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS) and Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer Syndrome (HNPCC, Lynch Syndrome) are two tumor predisposition syndromes responsible for the majority of hereditary breast and colorectal cancers. Carriers of both germline mutations in breast cancer genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 and in mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 are very rare. We identified germline mutations in BRCA1 and in MSH6 in a patient with increased risk for HBOC diagnosed with endometrial cancer at the age of 46 years. Although carriers of mutations in both MMR and BRCA genes are rare in Caucasian populations and anamnestical and histopathological findings may guide clinicians to identify these families, both syndromes can only be diagnosed through a complete gene analysis of the respective genes.

  7. Novel germline MSH2 mutation in lynch syndrome patient surviving multiple cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janavicius Ramunas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lynch syndrome (LS individuals are predisposed to a variety of cancers, most commonly colorectal, uterine, urinary tract, ovarian, small bowel, stomach and biliary tract cancers. The risk of extracolonic manifestations appears to be highest in MSH2 mutations carriers. We present a carrier case with a novel MSH2 gene mutation that clearly demonstrates the broad extent of LS phenotypic expression and highlights several important clinical aspects. Current evidence suggests that colorectal tumors from LS patients tend to have better prognoses than their sporadic counterparts, however survival benefits for other cancers encountered in LS are unclear. In this article we describe a family with a novel protein truncating mutation of c.2388delT in the MSH2 gene, particularly focusing on one individual carrier affected with multiple primary cancers who is surviving 25 years on. Our report of multiple primary tumors occurring in the 12-25 years interval might suggest these patients do not succumb to other extracolonic cancers, provided they are regularly followed-up.

  8. Psychological distress in women at risk of hereditary breast/ovarian or HNPCC cancers in the absence of demonstrated mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geirdal, Amy Østertun; Reichelt, Jon G; Dahl, Alv A; Heimdal, Ketil; Maehle, Lovise; Stormorken, Astrid; Møller, Pål

    2005-01-01

    To examine psychological distress in women at risk of familial breast-ovarian cancer (FBOC) or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) with absence of demonstrated mutations in the family (unknown mutation). Two-hundred and fifty three consecutive women at risk of FBOC and 77 at risk of HNPCC and with no present or past history of cancer. They were aware of their risk and had received genetic counseling. Comparisons were made between these two groups, normal controls, and women who were identified to be BRCA1 mutation carriers. The questionnaires Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Impact of Event Scale (IES) were employed to assess psychological distress. No significant differences concerning psychological distress were observed between women with FBOC and women with HNPCC. Compared to mutation carriers for BRCA1, the level of anxiety and depression was significantly higher in the FBOC group with absence of demonstrated mutation. Compared to normal controls, the level of anxiety was higher, while the level of depression was lower in the groups with unknown mutation. Women in the absence of demonstrated mutations have higher anxiety and depression levels than women with known mutation-carrier status. Access to genetic testing may be of psychologically benefit to women at risk for FBOC or HNPCC.

  9. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  10. Risk of breast cancer in women with a CHEK2 mutation with and without a family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Jakubowska, Anna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Masojć, Bartłomiej; Deebniak, Tadeusz; Górski, Bohdan; Blecharz, Paweł; Narod, Steven A; Lubiński, Jan

    2011-10-01

    To estimate the risk of breast cancer in a woman who has a CHEK2 mutation depending on her family history of breast cancer. Seven thousand four hundred ninety-four BRCA1 mutation-negative patients with breast cancer and 4,346 control women were genotyped for four founder mutations in CHEK2 (del5395, IVS2+1G>A, 1100delC, and I157T). A truncating mutation (IVS2+1G>A, 1100delC, or del5395) was present in 227 patients (3.0%) and in 37 female controls (0.8%; odds ratio [OR], 3.6; 95% CI, 2.6 to 5.1). The OR was higher for women with a first- or second-degree relative with breast cancer (OR, 5.0; 95% CI, 3.3 to 7.6) than for women with no family history (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 2.3 to 4.7). If both a first- and second-degree relative were affected with breast cancer, the OR was 7.3 (95% CI, 3.2 to 16.8). Assuming a baseline risk of 6%, we estimate the lifetime risks for carriers of CHEK2 truncating mutations to be 20% for a woman with no affected relative, 28% for a woman with one second-degree relative affected, 34% for a woman with one first-degree relative affected, and 44% for a woman with both a first- and second-degree relative affected. CHEK2 mutation screening detects a clinically meaningful risk of breast cancer and should be considered in all women with a family history of breast cancer. Women with a truncating mutation in CHEK2 and a positive family history of breast cancer have a lifetime risk of breast cancer of greater than 25% and are candidates for magnetic resonance imaging screening and for tamoxifen chemoprevention.

  11. Clinicopathological Correlates in a PRNP P102L Mutation Carrier with Rapidly Progressing Parkinsonism-dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, Chizoba C.; Kalakoti, Piyush; Greenberg, Michael K; Notari, Silvio; Cohen, Yvonne; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Oblak, Adrian L.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Mari, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    Parkinsonism-dystonia is rare in carriers of PRNP P102L mutation. Severity and distribution of prion protein (PrP) deposition may influence the clinical presentation. We present such clinic-pathological correlation in a 56-year-old male with a PRNP P102L mutation associated with a phenotype characterized by rapidly progressing parkinsonism-dystonia. The patient was studied clinically (videotaped exams, brain MRIs); molecular genetically (gene sequence analysis); and neuropathologically (histology, immunohistochemistry) during his 7-month disease course. The patient had parkinsonism, apraxia, aphasia, and dystonia, which progressed rapidly. Molecular genetic analysis revealed PRNP P102L mutation carrier status. Brain MRIs revealed progressive global volume loss and T2/FLAIR hyperintensity in neocortex and basal ganglia. Postmortem examination showed neuronal loss, gliosis, spongiform changes, and PrP deposition in the striatum. PrP immunohistochemistry revealed widespread severe PrP deposition in the thalamus and cerebellar cortex. Based on the neuropathological and molecular-genetic analysis, the rapidly progressing parkinsonism-dystonia correlated with nigrostriatal, thalamic, and cerebellar pathology. PMID:27617269

  12. Breast cancer in patients carrying a germ-line CHEK2 mutation: Outcome after breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Andreas; Doerk, Thilo; Sohn, Christof; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Women carrying mutations in the CHEK2 gene are at an increased breast cancer risk. Data about outcome and prognosis for these patients after standard multimodality treatment are scarce at present. Materials and methods: One-hundred and fifty (150) patients with non-metastasized early-stage breast cancer (T1-2) receiving postoperative radiotherapy following breast-conservative surgery at our department were included in this analysis. Carriers were identified using mutation-specific restriction enzyme-based screening assays in previous investigations. Twenty-five breast cancer patients were heterozygous for one of three CHEK2 gene mutations (I157T, n = 13; 1100delC, n = 10; IVS2+1G > A, n = 2). The comparison group consisted of 125 early-stage breast cancer patients without a CHEK2 gene mutation (non-carriers). Median follow-up was 87 months for the total cohort of patients. Results: Local recurrences occurred in 13 patients (carriers, 3 (12%); non-carriers, 10 (8%)) and distant metastases occurred in 27 patients (carriers, 8 (32%); non-carriers, 19 (15%)). Twenty-five patients had deceased (carriers, 8 (32%); non-carriers, 17 (14%)) with all but 3 deaths related to breast cancer. Actuarial 7-year local relapse-free survival was 86% in carriers versus 90% in non-carriers (p = 0.48). Actuarial metastasis-free, disease-free and overall survival at 7 years were 64% vs. 84% (p = 0.045), 59% vs. 78% (p = 0.07) and 69% vs. 87% (p = 0.10), respectively. In a multivariate step-wise Cox regression analysis presence of a CHEK2 mutation remained a borderline significant discriminator for metastasis-free survival (p = 0.048; OR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.2-1.0) next to T-stage (p = 0.001; OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.6). Conclusions: Heterozygosity for a germline CHEK2 mutation appears to represent an adverse prognostic factor in patients with early-stage breast cancer. If confirmed in larger studies these data may serve as a basis for future surveillance and treatment

  13. Comparison of age at natural menopause in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with a non-clinic-based sample of women in northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wayne T; Beattie, Mary; Chen, Lee-May; Oktay, Kutluk; Crawford, Sybil L; Gold, Ellen B; Cedars, Marcelle; Rosen, Mitchell

    2013-05-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) are related to an increased lifetime risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Although risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy reduces the risk of both cancers, loss of fertility is a major concern. A recent study suggested an association between BRCA1 mutation and occult primary ovarian insufficiency. The objective of the current study was to determine whether BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have an earlier onset of natural menopause compared with unaffected women. White carriers of the BRCA1/2 gene (n = 382) were identified within the Breast Cancer Risk Program Registry at the University of California at San Francisco and compared with non-clinic-based white women in northern California (n = 765). The 2 groups were compared with regard to median age at the time of natural menopause before and after adjustment for known risk factors, and the role of smoking within each group was examined using the Kaplan-Meier approach for unadjusted analyses and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses for adjusted analyses. The median age at the time of natural menopause in the BRCA1/2 carriers was significantly younger than among the unaffected sample (50 years vs 53 years; P < .001). The unadjusted hazard ratio for natural menopause when comparing BRCA1/2 carriers with unaffected women was 4.06 (95% confidence interval, 3.03-5.45) and was 3.98 (95% confidence interval, 2.87-5.53) after adjusting for smoking, parity, and oral contraceptive use. For BRCA1/2 carriers who were current heavy smokers (smoking ≥ 20 cigarettes/day), the median age at natural menopause was 46 years versus 49 years for nonsmokers (P = .027). The BRCA1/2 mutation was associated with a significantly earlier age at natural menopause, and heavy smoking compounded this risk. Because the relationship between menopause and the end of natural fertility is considered to be fixed, these findings suggest the risk of earlier infertility among BRCA1/2 carriers

  14. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H. F.; Wijnen, J. T.; Menko, F. H.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Taal, B. G.; Griffioen, G.; Nagengast, F. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. H.; Bertario, L.; Varesco, L.; Bisgaard, M. L.; Mohr, J.; Fodde, R.; Khan, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers. The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of carriers within

  15. CSF neurofilament light concentration is increased in presymptomatic CHMP2B mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Nina; Roos, Peter; Portelius, Erik

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A rare cause of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a mutation in the CHMP2B gene on chromosome 3 (FTD-3), described in a Danish family. Here we examine whether CSF biomarkers change in the preclinical phase of the disease. METHODS: In this cross-sectional explorative study, we...... analyzed CSF samples from 16 mutation carriers and 14 noncarriers from the Danish FTD-3 family. CSF biomarkers included total tau (t-tau) and neurofilament light chain (NfL) as a marker for neurodegeneration, phosphorylated tau (p-tau) as a marker for tau pathology, β-amyloid (Aβ) 38, 40, and 42 (Aβ38, Aβ......40, and Aβ42) to monitor Aβ metabolism, and YKL-40 as a marker of neuroinflammation. Aβ isoform concentrations were measured using a multiplexed immunoassay; t-tau, p-tau, NfL, and YKL-40 concentrations were measured using sandwich ELISAs. RESULTS: CSF NfL concentration was significantly increased...

  16. Association of TMEM106B gene polymorphism with age at onset in granulin mutation carriers and plasma granulin protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Wang, Jun; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Spiegel, Noah; Bertelsen, Sarah; Mayo, Kevin; Norton, Joanne B; Morris, John C; Goate, Alison

    2011-05-01

    To test whether rs1990622 (TMEM106B) is associated with age at onset (AAO) in granulin (GRN) mutation carriers and with plasma GRN levels in mutation carriers and healthy, elderly individuals. Rs1990622 (TMEM106B) was identified as a risk factor for frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TAR DNA-binding protein inclusions (FTLD-TDP) in a recent genome-wide association. Rs1990622 was genotyped in GRN mutation carriers and tested for association with AAO using the Kaplan-Meier method and a Cox proportional hazards model. Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. Subjects  We analyzed 50 affected and unaffected GRN mutation carriers from 4 previously reported FTLD-TDP families (HDDD1, FD1, HDDD2, and the Karolinska family). The GRN plasma levels were also measured in 73 healthy, elderly individuals. Age at onset and GRN plasma levels. The risk allele of rs1990622 was associated with a mean decrease of the AAO of 13 years (P = 9.9 × 10(-7)) and with lower plasma GRN levels in both healthy older adults (P = 4 × 10(-4)) and GRN mutation carriers (P = .0027). Analysis of the HapMap database identified a nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3173615 (T185S) in perfect linkage disequilibrium with rs1990622. The association of rs1990622 with AAO explains, in part, the wide range in the AAO of disease among GRN mutation carriers. We hypothesize that rs1990622 or another variant in linkage disequilibrium could act in a manner similar to APOE in Alzheimer disease, increasing risk for disease in the general population and modifying AAO in mutation carriers. Our results also suggest that genetic variation in TMEM106B may influence risk for FTLD-TDP by modulating secreted levels of GRN.

  17. TMEM106B gene polymorphism is associated with age at onset in granulin mutation carriers and plasma granulin protein levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Wang, Jun; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Spiegel, Noah; Bertelsen, Sarah; Mayo, Kevin; Norton, Joanne B.; Morris, John C.; Goate, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Objective A recent genome-wide association study for frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TAR DNA-binding protein inclusions (FTLD-TDP), identified rs1990622 (TMEM106B) as a risk factor for FTLD-TDP. In this study we tested whether rs1990622 is associated with age at onset (AAO) in granulin (GRN) mutation carriers and with plasma GRN levels in mutation carriers and healthy elderly individuals. Design Rs1990622 was genotyped in GRN mutation carriers and tested for association with AAO using the Kaplan-Meier and a Cox proportional hazards model. Subjects We analyzed 50 affected and unaffected GRN mutation carriers from four previously reported FTLD-TDP families (HDDD1, FD1, HDDD2 and the Karolinska family). GRN plasma levels were also measured in 73 healthy, elderly individuals. Results The risk allele of rs1990622 is associated with a mean decrease of the age at onset of thirteen years (p=9.9×10−7), with lower plasma granulin levels in both healthy older adults (p = 4×10−4) and GRN mutation carriers (p=0.0027). Analysis of the HAPMAP database identified a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism, rs3173615 (T185S) in perfect linkage disequilibrium with rs1990622. Conclusions The association of rs1990622 with AAO explains, in part, the wide range in the age at onset of disease among GRN mutation carriers. We hypothesize that rs1990622 or another variant in linkage disequilibrium could act in a manner similar to APOE in Alzheimer’s disease, increasing risk for disease in the general population and modifying AAO in mutation carriers. Our results also suggest that genetic variation in TMEM106B may influence risk for FTLD-TDP by modulating secreted levels of GRN. PMID:21220649

  18. White matter hyperintensities are seen only in GRN mutation carriers in the GENFI cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole H. Sudre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic frontotemporal dementia is most commonly caused by mutations in the progranulin (GRN, microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT and chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72 genes. Previous small studies have reported the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH in genetic FTD but this has not been systematically studied across the different mutations. In this study WMH were assessed in 180 participants from the Genetic FTD Initiative (GENFI with 3D T1- and T2-weighed magnetic resonance images: 43 symptomatic (7 GRN, 13 MAPT and 23 C9orf72, 61 presymptomatic mutation carriers (25 GRN, 8 MAPT and 28 C9orf72 and 76 mutation negative non-carrier family members. An automatic detection and quantification algorithm was developed for determining load, location and appearance of WMH. Significant differences were seen only in the symptomatic GRN group compared with the other groups with no differences in the MAPT or C9orf72 groups: increased global load of WMH was seen, with WMH located in the frontal and occipital lobes more so than the parietal lobes, and nearer to the ventricles rather than juxtacortical. Although no differences were seen in the presymptomatic group as a whole, in the GRN cohort only there was an association of increased WMH volume with expected years from symptom onset. The appearance of the WMH was also different in the GRN group compared with the other groups, with the lesions in the GRN group being more similar to each other. The presence of WMH in those with progranulin deficiency may be related to the known role of progranulin in neuroinflammation, although other roles are also proposed including an effect on blood-brain barrier permeability and the cerebral vasculature. Future studies will be useful to investigate the longitudinal evolution of WMH and their potential use as a biomarker as well as post-mortem studies investigating the histopathological nature of the lesions.

  19. Partial loss of heterozygosity events at the mutated gene in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 large genomic rearrangement carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavodna, Katarina; Krivulcik, Tomas; Bujalkova, Maria Gerykova [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlarska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Slamka, Tomas; Martinicky, David; Ilencikova, Denisa [National Cancer Institute, Department of Oncologic Genetics, Klenova 1, 833 01 Bratislava (Slovakia); Bartosova, Zdena [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlarska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2009-11-20

    Depending on the population studied, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes constitute various proportions of the germline mutations that predispose to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). It has been reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the LGR region occurs through a gene conversion mechanism in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 deletion carriers; however, the converted tracts were delineated only by extragenic microsatellite markers. We sought to determine the frequency of LGRs in Slovak HNPCC patients and to study LOH in tumors from LGR carriers at the LGR region, as well as at other heterozygous markers within the gene to more precisely define conversion tracts. The main MMR genes responsible for HNPCC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, were analyzed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) in a total of 37 unrelated HNPCC-suspected patients whose MLH1/MSH2 genes gave negative results in previous sequencing experiments. An LOH study was performed on six tumors from LGR carriers by combining MLPA to assess LOH at LGR regions and sequencing to examine LOH at 28 SNP markers from the MLH1 and MSH2 genes. We found six rearrangements in the MSH2 gene (five deletions and dup5-6), and one aberration in the MLH1 gene (del5-6). The MSH2 deletions were of three types (del1, del1-3, del1-7). We detected LOH at the LGR region in the single MLH1 case, which was determined in a previous study to be LOH-negative in the intragenic D3S1611 marker. Three tumors displayed LOH of at least one SNP marker, including two cases that were LOH-negative at the LGR region. LGRs accounted for 25% of germline MMR mutations identified in 28 Slovakian HNPCC families. A high frequency of LGRs among the MSH2 mutations provides a rationale for a MLPA screening of the Slovakian HNPCC families prior scanning by DNA sequencing. LOH at part of the informative loci confined to the MLH1 or MSH2 gene (heterozygous LGR region, SNP, or

  20. Partial loss of heterozygosity events at the mutated gene in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 large genomic rearrangement carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilencikova Denisa

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depending on the population studied, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs of the mismatch repair (MMR genes constitute various proportions of the germline mutations that predispose to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC. It has been reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH at the LGR region occurs through a gene conversion mechanism in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 deletion carriers; however, the converted tracts were delineated only by extragenic microsatellite markers. We sought to determine the frequency of LGRs in Slovak HNPCC patients and to study LOH in tumors from LGR carriers at the LGR region, as well as at other heterozygous markers within the gene to more precisely define conversion tracts. Methods The main MMR genes responsible for HNPCC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, were analyzed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in a total of 37 unrelated HNPCC-suspected patients whose MLH1/MSH2 genes gave negative results in previous sequencing experiments. An LOH study was performed on six tumors from LGR carriers by combining MLPA to assess LOH at LGR regions and sequencing to examine LOH at 28 SNP markers from the MLH1 and MSH2 genes. Results We found six rearrangements in the MSH2 gene (five deletions and dup5-6, and one aberration in the MLH1 gene (del5-6. The MSH2 deletions were of three types (del1, del1-3, del1-7. We detected LOH at the LGR region in the single MLH1 case, which was determined in a previous study to be LOH-negative in the intragenic D3S1611 marker. Three tumors displayed LOH of at least one SNP marker, including two cases that were LOH-negative at the LGR region. Conclusion LGRs accounted for 25% of germline MMR mutations identified in 28 Slovakian HNPCC families. A high frequency of LGRs among the MSH2 mutations provides a rationale for a MLPA screening of the Slovakian HNPCC families prior scanning by DNA sequencing. LOH at part of the informative loci confined to the MLH1

  1. Partial loss of heterozygosity events at the mutated gene in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 large genomic rearrangement carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavodna, Katarina; Krivulcik, Tomas; Bujalkova, Maria Gerykova; Slamka, Tomas; Martinicky, David; Ilencikova, Denisa; Bartosova, Zdena

    2009-01-01

    Depending on the population studied, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes constitute various proportions of the germline mutations that predispose to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). It has been reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the LGR region occurs through a gene conversion mechanism in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 deletion carriers; however, the converted tracts were delineated only by extragenic microsatellite markers. We sought to determine the frequency of LGRs in Slovak HNPCC patients and to study LOH in tumors from LGR carriers at the LGR region, as well as at other heterozygous markers within the gene to more precisely define conversion tracts. The main MMR genes responsible for HNPCC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, were analyzed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) in a total of 37 unrelated HNPCC-suspected patients whose MLH1/MSH2 genes gave negative results in previous sequencing experiments. An LOH study was performed on six tumors from LGR carriers by combining MLPA to assess LOH at LGR regions and sequencing to examine LOH at 28 SNP markers from the MLH1 and MSH2 genes. We found six rearrangements in the MSH2 gene (five deletions and dup5-6), and one aberration in the MLH1 gene (del5-6). The MSH2 deletions were of three types (del1, del1-3, del1-7). We detected LOH at the LGR region in the single MLH1 case, which was determined in a previous study to be LOH-negative in the intragenic D3S1611 marker. Three tumors displayed LOH of at least one SNP marker, including two cases that were LOH-negative at the LGR region. LGRs accounted for 25% of germline MMR mutations identified in 28 Slovakian HNPCC families. A high frequency of LGRs among the MSH2 mutations provides a rationale for a MLPA screening of the Slovakian HNPCC families prior scanning by DNA sequencing. LOH at part of the informative loci confined to the MLH1 or MSH2 gene (heterozygous LGR region, SNP, or

  2. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes: An Emerging Drug Carrier for Targeting Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Shiv Sankar; Mishra, Arun Kumar; Verma, Navneet; Verma, Anurag; Pandit, Jayanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    During recent years carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted by many researchers as a drug delivery carrier. CNTs are the third allotropic form of carbon-fullerenes which were rolled into cylindrical tubes. To be integrated into the biological systems, CNTs can be chemically modified or functionalised with therapeutically active molecules by forming stable covalent bonds or supramolecular assemblies based on noncovalent interactions. Owing to their high carrying capacity, biocompatibility, and specificity to cells, various cancer cells have been explored with CNTs for evaluation of pharmacokinetic parameters, cell viability, cytotoxicty, and drug delivery in tumor cells. This review attempts to highlight all aspects of CNTs which render them as an effective anticancer drug carrier and imaging agent. Also the potential application of CNT in targeting metastatic cancer cells by entrapping biomolecules and anticancer drugs has been covered in this review. PMID:24872894

  4. Whole-exome sequencing of muscle-invasive bladder cancer identifies recurrent mutations of UNC5C and prognostic importance of DNA repair gene mutations on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kai Lee; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Tamura, Kenji; Antic, Tatjana; Jang, Miran; Montoya, Magdeline; Campanile, Alexa; Yew, Poh Yin; Ganshert, Cory; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Steinberg, Gary D; O'Donnell, Peter H; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2014-12-15

    Because of suboptimal outcomes in muscle-invasive bladder cancer even with multimodality therapy, determination of potential genetic drivers offers the possibility of improving therapeutic approaches and discovering novel prognostic indicators. Using pTN staging, we case-matched 81 patients with resected ≥pT2 bladder cancers for whom perioperative chemotherapy use and disease recurrence status were known. Whole-exome sequencing was conducted in 43 cases to identify recurrent somatic mutations and targeted sequencing of 10 genes selected from the initial screening in an additional 38 cases was completed. Mutational profiles along with clinicopathologic information were correlated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) in the patients. We identified recurrent novel somatic mutations in the gene UNC5C (9.9%), in addition to TP53 (40.7%), KDM6A (21.0%), and TSC1 (12.3%). Patients who were carriers of somatic mutations in DNA repair genes (one or more of ATM, ERCC2, FANCD2, PALB2, BRCA1, or BRCA2) had a higher overall number of somatic mutations (P = 0.011). Importantly, after a median follow-up of 40.4 months, carriers of somatic mutations (n = 25) in any of these six DNA repair genes had significantly enhanced RFS compared with noncarriers [median, 32.4 vs. 14.8 months; hazard ratio of 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.22-0.98; P = 0.0435], after adjustment for pathologic pTN staging and independent of adjuvant chemotherapy usage. Better prognostic outcomes of individuals carrying somatic mutations in DNA repair genes suggest these mutations as favorable prognostic events in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Additional mechanistic investigation into the previously undiscovered role of UNC5C in bladder cancer is warranted. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Association of the germline TP53 R337H mutation with breast cancer in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Kumar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The germline TP53-R337H mutation is strongly associated with pediatric adrenocortical tumors (ACT in southern Brazil; it has low penetrance and limited tissue specificity in most families and therefore is not associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. However, other tumor types, mainly breast cancer, have been observed in carriers of several unrelated kindreds, raising the possibility that the R337H mutation may also contribute to breast tumorigenesis in a genetic background-specific context. Methods We conducted a case-control study to determine the prevalence of the R337H mutation by sequencing TP53 exon 10 in 123 women with breast cancer and 223 age- and sex-matched control subjects from southern Brazil. Fisher's test was used to compare the prevalence of the R337H. Results The R337H mutation was found in three patients but in none of the controls (p = 0.0442. Among the carriers, two had familial history of cancer meeting the Li-Fraumeni-like criteria. Remarkably, tumors in each of these three cases underwent loss of heterozygosity by eliminating the mutant TP53 allele rather than the wild-type allele. Polymorphisms were identified within the TP53 (R72P and Ins16 and MDM2 (SNP309 genes that may further diminish TP53 tumor suppressor activity. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the R337H mutation can significantly increase the risk of breast cancer in carriers, which likely depends on additional cooperating genetic factors. These findings are also important for understanding how low-penetrant mutant TP53 alleles can differentially influence tumor susceptibility.

  6. Association of the germline TP53 R337H mutation with breast cancer in southern Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assumpção, Juliana G; Zeferino, Luiz Carlos; Dufloth, Rozany M; Brandalise, Silvia Regina; Yunes, José Andres; Seidinger, Ana Luíza; Mastellaro, Maria José; Ribeiro, Raul C; Zambetti, Gerard P; Ganti, Ramapriya; Srivastava, Kumar; Shurtleff, Sheila; Pei, Deqing

    2008-01-01

    The germline TP53-R337H mutation is strongly associated with pediatric adrenocortical tumors (ACT) in southern Brazil; it has low penetrance and limited tissue specificity in most families and therefore is not associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. However, other tumor types, mainly breast cancer, have been observed in carriers of several unrelated kindreds, raising the possibility that the R337H mutation may also contribute to breast tumorigenesis in a genetic background-specific context. We conducted a case-control study to determine the prevalence of the R337H mutation by sequencing TP53 exon 10 in 123 women with breast cancer and 223 age- and sex-matched control subjects from southern Brazil. Fisher's test was used to compare the prevalence of the R337H. The R337H mutation was found in three patients but in none of the controls (p = 0.0442). Among the carriers, two had familial history of cancer meeting the Li-Fraumeni-like criteria. Remarkably, tumors in each of these three cases underwent loss of heterozygosity by eliminating the mutant TP53 allele rather than the wild-type allele. Polymorphisms were identified within the TP53 (R72P and Ins16) and MDM2 (SNP309) genes that may further diminish TP53 tumor suppressor activity. These results demonstrate that the R337H mutation can significantly increase the risk of breast cancer in carriers, which likely depends on additional cooperating genetic factors. These findings are also important for understanding how low-penetrant mutant TP53 alleles can differentially influence tumor susceptibility

  7. Relationship Between Mutations In BRCA1 And BRCA2 Genes And Breast Cancer Prevalence Among Egyptian Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELMAGHRABY, T.K.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer represents the most common cancer of women in the world and it is a biologically heterogeneous disease influenced by complex interactions between multiple genetic and environmental risk factors. In Egypt, breast cancer is classified as the first rank cancer case among women. The present study included 55 patients with breast cancer from Upper Egypt of which 40 patients had sporadic and 15 had familial breast cancers. Mutations in DNA of exons 10 and 11 of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were detected by single strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCPs) and sequencing. Moreover, BRCA1 protein expression was detected by immunostaining technique and correlation between risk factors and incidence rate of breast cancer. The results revealed 5 mutations (unclassified variants); three mutations (60%) were recorded internationally in Breast Information Cancer (BIC), one of them was 1767 C→T(550 Asn→His) and previously recorded in the Arabic world and the other 2 novel mutations were 1663 T→ C(479 Asp→Gly) and del AG 6079. The results obtained in the present study also demonstrated that the increase of the negative immunostaining of ''BRCA1'' protein in the tumour cells of BRCA1 mutation carriers was comparable to familial and sporadic breast cancer non-carrier. Accurate estimation of the relative frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Egyptian breast cancer patients could not be deduced from the results of this relatively small pilot study. More studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to clarify the relation between BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations and the prediction of breast cancer in Egypt.

  8. Plasma fibrin clot properties in the G20210A prothrombin mutation carriers following venous thromboembolism: the effect of rivaroxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janion-Sadowska, Agnieszka; Natorska, Joanna; Siudut, Jakub; Ząbczyk, Michal; Stanisz, Andrzej; Undas, Anetta

    2017-08-30

    We sought to investigate whether the G20210A prothrombin mutation modifies plasma fibrin clot properties in patients after venous thromboembolism (VTE) and how rivaroxaban treatment affects these alterations. We studied 34 prothrombin mutation heterozygous carriers and sex- and age-matched 34 non-carriers, all at least three months since the first VTE episode, before and during treatment with rivaroxaban. Clot permeability (K s ) and clot lysis time (CLT) with or without elimination of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) were assessed at baseline, 2-6 hours (h) after and 20-25 h after intake of rivaroxaban (20 mg/day). At baseline, the prothrombin mutation group formed denser clots (K s -12 %, p=0.0006) and had impaired fibrinolysis (CLT +14 %, p=0.004, and CLT-TAFI +13 %, p=0.03) compared with the no mutation group and were similar to those observed in 15 healthy unrelated prothrombin mutation carriers. The G20210A prothrombin mutation was the independent predictor for K s and CLT before rivaroxaban intake. At 2-6 h after rivaroxaban intake, clot properties improved in both G20210A carriers and non-carriers (K s +38 %, and +37 %, CLT -25 % and -25 %, CLT-TAFI -20 % and -24 %, respectively, all pCLT +17 %, CLT-TAFI +13 %, all p<0.001). Rivaroxaban concentration correlated with fibrin clot properties. After 20-25 h since rivaroxaban intake most clot properties returned to baseline. Rivaroxaban-related differences in clot structure were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy images. In conclusion, rivaroxaban treatment, though improves fibrin clot properties, cannot abolish more prothrombotic fibrin clot phenotype observed in prothrombin mutation carriers following VTE.

  9. Population carrier rates of pathogenic ARSA gene mutations: is metachromatic leukodystrophy underdiagnosed?

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    Agnieszka Ługowska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD is a severe neurometabolic disease caused mainly by deficiency of arylsulfatase A encoded by the ARSA gene. Based on epidemiological surveys the incidence of MLD per 100,000 live births varied from 0.6 to 2.5. Our purpose was to estimate the birth prevalence of MLD in Poland by determining population frequency of the common pathogenic ARSA gene mutations and to compare this estimate with epidemiological data. METHODOLOGY: We studied two independently ascertained cohorts from the Polish background population (N∼3000 each and determined carrier rates of common ARSA gene mutations: c.459+1G>A, p.P426L, p.I179S (cohort 1 and c.459+1G>A, p.I179S (cohort 2. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Taking into account ARSA gene mutation distribution among 60 Polish patients, the expected MLD birth prevalence in the general population (assuming no selection against homozygous fetuses was estimated as 4.0/100,000 and 4.1/100,000, respectively for the 1(st and the 2(nd cohort with a pooled estimate of 4.1/100,000 (CI: 1.8-9.4 which was higher than the estimate of 0.38 per 100,000 live births based on diagnosed cases. The p.I179S mutation was relatively more prevalent among controls than patients (OR = 3.6, P = 0.0082, for a comparison of p.I179S frequency relative to c.459+1G>A between controls vs. patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The observed discrepancy between the measured incidence of metachromatic leukodystrophy and the predicted carriage rates suggests that MLD is substantially underdiagnosed in the Polish population. The underdiagnosis rate may be particularly high among patients with p.I179S mutation whose disease is characterized mainly by psychotic symptoms.

  10. Appreciating the broad clinical features of SMAD4 mutation carriers: a multi-center chart review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wain, K.E.; Ellingson, M.S.; McDonald, J.; Gammon, A.; Roberts, M.; Pichurin, P.; Winship, I.; Riegert-Johnson, D.; Weitzel, J. N.; Lindor, N.M.

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function (LOF) SMAD4 mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JP) and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Some carriers exhibit symptoms of both conditions, leading to the name JP-HHT syndrome. Three families have been reported with connective tissue abnormalities. In order to better understand the spectrum and extent of clinical findings in SMAD4 carriers, medical records of 34 patients (20 families) from five clinical practices were reviewed. Twenty-one percent (7/34) had features suggesting a connective tissue defect: enlarged aortic root (n=3), aortic and mitral insufficiency (n=2), aortic dissection (n=1), retinal detachment (n=1), brain aneurysms (n=1), lax skin and joints (n=1). JP-specific findings were almost uniformly present but variable. Ninety-seven percent had colon polyps that were generally pan-colonic and of variable histology and number. Forty-eight percent (15/31) had extensive gastric polyposis. HHT features were documented in 76% including epistaxis (19/31, 61%), mucocutaneous telangiectases (15/31, 48%), liver arteriovenous malformation (AVM) (6/16, 38%), brain AVM (1/26, 4%), pulmonary AVM (9/17, 53%), and intrapulmonary shunting (14/23, 61%). SMAD4 carriers should be managed for JP and HHT, since symptoms of both are likely yet unpredictable. Connective tissue abnormalities are an emerging component of JP-HHT syndrome, and larger studies are needed to understand these manifestations. PMID:24525918

  11. Telomere length, ATM mutation status and cancer risk in Ataxia-Telangiectasia families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Anne-Laure; Mebirouk, Noura; Cavaciuti, Eve; Le Gal, Dorothée; Lecarpentier, Julie; d'Enghien, Catherine Dubois; Laugé, Anthony; Dondon, Marie-Gabrielle; Labbé, Martine; Lesca, Gaetan; Leroux, Dominique; Gladieff, Laurence; Adenis, Claude; Faivre, Laurence; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Lortholary, Alain; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Dahan, Karin; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Longy, Michel; Buecher, Bruno; Janin, Nicolas; Zattara, Hélène; Berthet, Pascaline; Combès, Audrey; Coupier, Isabelle; Hall, Janet; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Andrieu, Nadine; Lesueur, Fabienne

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have linked constitutive telomere length (TL) to aging-related diseases including cancer at different sites. ATM participates in the signaling of telomere erosion, and inherited mutations in ATM have been associated with increased risk of cancer, particularly breast cancer. The goal of this study was to investigate whether carriage of an ATM mutation and TL interplay to modify cancer risk in ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) families.The study population consisted of 284 heterozygous ATM mutation carriers (HetAT) and 174 non-carriers (non-HetAT) from 103 A-T families. Forty-eight HetAT and 14 non-HetAT individuals had cancer, among them 25 HetAT and 6 non-HetAT were diagnosed after blood sample collection. We measured mean TL using a quantitative PCR assay and genotyped seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) recurrently associated with TL in large population-based studies.HetAT individuals were at increased risk of cancer (OR = 2.3, 95%CI = 1.2-4.4, P = 0.01), and particularly of breast cancer for women (OR = 2.9, 95%CI = 1.2-7.1, P = 0.02), in comparison to their non-HetAT relatives. HetAT individuals had longer telomeres than non-HetAT individuals (P = 0.0008) but TL was not associated with cancer risk, and no significant interaction was observed between ATM mutation status and TL. Furthermore, rs9257445 (ZNF311) was associated with TL in HetAT subjects and rs6060627 (BCL2L1) modified cancer risk in HetAT and non-HetAT women.Our findings suggest that carriage of an ATM mutation impacts on the age-related TL shortening and that TL per se is not related to cancer risk in ATM carriers. TL measurement alone is not a good marker for predicting cancer risk in A-T families. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. The NOD2 3020insC Mutation in Women with Breast Cancer from the Bydgoszcz Region in Poland. First Results

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    Janiszewska Hanna

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The frameshift NOD2 gene mutation 3020insC is predominantly associated with Crohn's disease, but predisposes to many types of common cancers as well. We studied the frequency of this mutant NOD2 allele in 148 breast cancer women from the Bydgoszcz region in Poland. The NOD2 mutation was present in 8.8% of the patients. The mean age at breast cancer diagnosis of the mutation carriers was 43 years. We did not find any mutation in patients diagnosed with breast cancer after the age of 50 years. There was no association of the NOD2 mutation with a strong family history of breast cancer. On the contrary, the mutation frequency (11.4% was two times higher in women from families with a single case of breast cancer and with aggregation of other common types of cancer, especially digestive tract cancers. Low risk of breast cancer in the mutation carriers seems to be confirmed by finding the 3020insC mutation in three healthy parents of probands aged 73, 74 and 83 years, from three separate families.

  13. Primary fibroblasts from CSPα mutation carriers recapitulate hallmarks of the adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Bruno A; Sands, Mark S

    2017-07-24

    Mutations in the co- chaperone protein, CSPα, cause an autosomal dominant, adult-neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (AD-ANCL). The current understanding of CSPα function exclusively at the synapse fails to explain the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) dysfunction in cells from AD-ANCL patients. Here, we demonstrate unexpectedly that primary dermal fibroblasts from pre-symptomatic mutation carriers recapitulate in vitro features found in the brains of AD-ANCL patients including auto-fluorescent storage material (AFSM) accumulation, CSPα aggregates, increased levels of lysosomal proteins and lysosome enzyme activities. AFSM accumulation correlates with CSPα aggregation and both are susceptible to pharmacological modulation of ALP function. In addition, we demonstrate that endogenous CSPα is present in the lysosome-enriched fractions and co-localizes with lysosome markers in soma, neurites and synaptic boutons. Overexpression of CSPα wild-type (WT) decreases lysotracker signal, secreted lysosomal enzymes and SNAP23-mediated lysosome exocytosis. CSPα WT, mutant and aggregated CSPα are degraded mainly by the ALP but this disease-causing mutation exhibits a faster rate of degradation. Co-expression of both WT and mutant CSPα cause a block in the fusion of autophagosomes/lysosomes. Our data suggest that aggregation-dependent perturbation of ALP function is a relevant pathogenic mechanism for AD-ANCL and supports the use of AFSM or CSPα aggregation as biomarkers for drug screening purposes.

  14. Breast cancer in female carriers of ATM gene alterations: outcome of adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Andreas; John, Esther; Doerk, Thilo; Sohn, Christof; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: We analyzed the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients carrying sequence variants in the ATM gene who received postoperative radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery to test whether an increased cellular radiosensitivity may translate into enhanced tumor cell killing and thereby result in an improvement of the therapeutic ratio. Patients and methods: We investigated a cohort of 138 breast cancer patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy following breast conservative surgery for T1 and T2 tumors. Genomic DNA samples of these patients had previously been scanned for mutations in the ATM gene. Follow-up data were available in 135 patients, with a median follow-up of 87 months. Local relapse-free, metastasis-free and overall survival were compared between carriers and non-carriers of a sequence variant in the ATM gene. Results: Twenty patients were found to carry a sequence variant in the ATM gene (truncating, 7; missense, 13). The actuarial 7-year local relapse-free survival of carriers vs. non-carriers were 88 vs. 94% (P=0.34). Actuarial metastasis-free and overall survival after 7 years were 63 vs. 85% (P=0.01) and 73 vs. 89% (P=0.055), respectively. However, the presence of a variant in the ATM gene did not remain a significant discriminator for metastasis-free survival in a multivariate Cox regression analysis (P=0.068). Conclusions: Our results do not support the hypothesis that breast cancer patients carrying a sequence variant in the ATM gene differentially benefit from postoperative radiotherapy. These findings have to be verified using larger number of cases to clarify the clinical consequences of sequence variants in the ATM gene

  15. HER2 activating mutations are targets for colorectal cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuri, Shyam M; Jain, Naveen; Galimi, Francesco; Cottino, Francesca; Leto, Simonetta M; Migliardi, Giorgia; Searleman, Adam C; Shen, Wei; Monsey, John; Trusolino, Livio; Jacobs, Samuel A; Bertotti, Andrea; Bose, Ron

    2015-08-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified HER2 somatic mutations and gene amplification in 7% of patients with colorectal cancer. Introduction of the HER2 mutations S310F, L755S, V777L, V842I, and L866M into colon epithelial cells increased signaling pathways and anchorage-independent cell growth, indicating that they are activating mutations. Introduction of these HER2 activating mutations into colorectal cancer cell lines produced resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab by sustaining MAPK phosphorylation. HER2 mutants are potently inhibited by low nanomolar doses of the irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors neratinib and afatinib. HER2 gene sequencing of 48 cetuximab-resistant, quadruple (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA) wild-type (WT) colorectal cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX) identified 4 PDXs with HER2 mutations. HER2-targeted therapies were tested on two PDXs. Treatment with a single HER2-targeted drug (trastuzumab, neratinib, or lapatinib) delayed tumor growth, but dual HER2-targeted therapy with trastuzumab plus tyrosine kinase inhibitors produced regression of these HER2-mutated PDXs. HER2 activating mutations cause EGFR antibody resistance in colorectal cell lines, and PDXs with HER2 mutations show durable tumor regression when treated with dual HER2-targeted therapy. These data provide a strong preclinical rationale for clinical trials targeting HER2 activating mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. SPOP Mutations in Prostate Cancer across Demographically Diverse Patient Cohorts

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    Mirjam Blattner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recurrent mutations in the Speckle-Type POZ Protein (SPOP gene occur in up to 15% of prostate cancers. However, the frequency and features of cancers with these mutations across different populations is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate SPOP mutations across diverse cohorts and validate a series of assays employing high-resolution melting (HRM analysis and Sanger sequencing for mutational analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: 720 prostate cancer samples from six international cohorts spanning Caucasian, African American, and Asian patients, including both prostate-specific antigen-screened and unscreened populations, were screened for their SPOP mutation status. Status of SPOP was correlated to molecular features (ERG rearrangement, PTEN deletion, and CHD1 deletion as well as clinical and pathologic features. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Overall frequency of SPOP mutations was 8.1% (4.6% to 14.4%, SPOP mutation was inversely associated with ERG rearrangement (P < .01, and SPOP mutant (SPOPmut cancers had higher rates of CHD1 deletions (P < .01. There were no significant differences in biochemical recurrence in SPOPmut cancers. Limitations of this study include missing mutational data due to sample quality and lack of power to identify a difference in clinical outcomes. CONCLUSION: SPOP is mutated in 4.6% to 14.4% of patients with prostate cancer across different ethnic and demographic backgrounds. There was no significant association between SPOP mutations with ethnicity, clinical, or pathologic parameters. Mutual exclusivity of SPOP mutation with ERG rearrangement as well as a high association with CHD1 deletion reinforces SPOP mutation as defining a distinct molecular subclass of prostate cancer.

  17. Imputation of the rare HOXB13 G84E mutation and cancer risk in a large population-based cohort.

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    Thomas J Hoffmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient approach to characterizing the disease burden of rare genetic variants is to impute them into large well-phenotyped cohorts with existing genome-wide genotype data using large sequenced referenced panels. The success of this approach hinges on the accuracy of rare variant imputation, which remains controversial. For example, a recent study suggested that one cannot adequately impute the HOXB13 G84E mutation associated with prostate cancer risk (carrier frequency of 0.0034 in European ancestry participants in the 1000 Genomes Project. We show that by utilizing the 1000 Genomes Project data plus an enriched reference panel of mutation carriers we were able to accurately impute the G84E mutation into a large cohort of 83,285 non-Hispanic White participants from the Kaiser Permanente Research Program on Genes, Environment and Health Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging cohort. Imputation authenticity was confirmed via a novel classification and regression tree method, and then empirically validated analyzing a subset of these subjects plus an additional 1,789 men from Kaiser specifically genotyped for the G84E mutation (r2 = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.37–0.77. We then show the value of this approach by using the imputed data to investigate the impact of the G84E mutation on age-specific prostate cancer risk and on risk of fourteen other cancers in the cohort. The age-specific risk of prostate cancer among G84E mutation carriers was higher than among non-carriers. Risk estimates from Kaplan-Meier curves were 36.7% versus 13.6% by age 72, and 64.2% versus 24.2% by age 80, for G84E mutation carriers and non-carriers, respectively (p = 3.4x10-12. The G84E mutation was also associated with an increase in risk for the fourteen other most common cancers considered collectively (p = 5.8x10-4 and more so in cases diagnosed with multiple cancer types, both those including and not including prostate cancer, strongly suggesting

  18. Mutation analysis of breast cancer gene BRCA among breast cancer Jordanian females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atoum, Manar F.; Al-Kayed, Sameer A.

    2004-01-01

    To screen mutations of the tumor suppressor breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) within 3 exons among Jordanian breast cancer females. A total of 135 Jordanian breast cancer females were genetically analyzed by denaturing gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) for mutation detection in 3 BRCA1 exons (2, 11 and 20) between 2000-2002 in Al-Basheer Hospital, Amman, Jordan. Of the studied patients 50 had a family history of breast cancer, 28 had a family history of cancer other than breast cancer, and 57 had no family history of any cancer. Five germline mutations were detected among breast cancer females with a family history of breast cancers (one in exon 2 and 4 mutations in exon 11). Another germline mutation (within exon 11) was detected among breast cancer females with family history of cancer other than breast cancer, and no mutation was detected among breast cancer females with no family history of any cancer or among normal control females. Screening mutations within exon 2, exon 11 and exon 20 showed that most screened mutations were within BRCA1 exon 11 among breast cancer Jordanian families with a family history of breast cancer. (author)

  19. Mutations and epimutations in the origin of cancer

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    Peltomaeki, Paeivi, E-mail: Paivi.Peltomaki@Helsinki.Fi

    2012-02-15

    Cancer is traditionally viewed as a disease of abnormal cell proliferation controlled by a series of mutations. Mutations typically affect oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes thereby conferring growth advantage. Genomic instability facilitates mutation accumulation. Recent findings demonstrate that activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, as well as genomic instability, can be achieved by epigenetic mechanisms as well. Unlike genetic mutations, epimutations do not change the base sequence of DNA and are potentially reversible. Similar to genetic mutations, epimutations are associated with specific patterns of gene expression that are heritable through cell divisions. Knudson's hypothesis postulates that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes requires two hits, with the first hit occurring either in somatic cells (sporadic cancer) or in the germline (hereditary cancer) and the second one always being somatic. Studies on hereditary and sporadic forms of colorectal carcinoma have made it evident that, apart from genetic mutations, epimutations may serve as either hit or both. Furthermore, recent next-generation sequencing studies show that epigenetic genes, such as those encoding histone modifying enzymes and subunits for chromatin remodeling systems, are themselves frequent targets of somatic mutations in cancer and can act like tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. This review discusses genetic vs. epigenetic origin of cancer, including cancer susceptibility, in light of recent discoveries. Situations in which mutations and epimutations occur to serve analogous purposes are highlighted.

  20. Risk of iron overload in carriers of genetic mutations associated with hereditary haemochromatosis: UK Food Standards Agency workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mamta; Ashwell, Margaret; Sanderson, Peter; Cade, Janet; Moreton, Jennifer; Fairweather-Tait, Susan; Roe, Mark; Marx, Joannes J M; Worwood, Mark; Cook, James D

    2006-10-01

    The UK Food Standards Agency convened a group of expert scientists to review current research investigating diet and carriers of genetic mutations associated with hereditary haemochromatosis. The workshop concluded that individuals who are heterozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene do not appear to respond abnormally to dietary Fe and therefore do not need to change their diet to prevent accumulation of body Fe.

  1. The Norwegian PMS2 founder mutation c.989-1G > T shows high penetrance of microsatellite instable cancers with normal immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindedal, Eli Marie; Aarset, Harald; Bjørnevoll, Inga; Røyset, Elin; Mæhle, Lovise; Stormorken, Astrid; Heramb, Cecilie; Medvik, Heidi; Møller, Pål; Sjursen, Wenche

    2014-01-01

    Using immunohistochemistry (IHC) to select cases for mismatch repair (MMR) genetic testing, we failed to identify a large kindred with the deleterious PMS2 mutation c.989-1G > T. The purpose of the study was to examine the sensitivity of IHC and microsatellite instability-analysis (MSI) to identify carriers of the mutation, and to estimate its penetrance and expressions. All carriers and obligate carriers of the mutation were identified. All cancer diagnoses were confirmed. IHC and MSI-analysis were performed on available tumours. Penetrances of cancers included in the Amsterdam and the Bethesda Criteria, for MSI-high tumours and MSI-high and low tumours were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier algorithm. Probability for co-segregation of the mutation and cancers by chance was 0.000004. Fifty-six carriers or obligate carriers were identified. There was normal staining for PMS2 in 15/18 (83.3%) of tumours included in the AMS1/AMS2/Bethesda criteria. MSI-analysis showed that 15/21 (71.4%) of tumours were MSI-high and 4/21 (19.0%) were MSI-low. Penetrance at 70 years was 30.6% for AMS1 cancers (colorectal cancers), 42.8% for AMS2 cancers, 47.2% for Bethesda cancers, 55.6% for MSI-high and MSI-low cancers and 52.2% for MSI-high cancers. The mutation met class 5 criteria for pathogenicity. IHC was insensitive in detecting tumours caused by the mutation. Penetrance of cancers that displayed MSI was 56% at 70 years. Besides colorectal cancers, the most frequent expressions were carcinoma of the endometrium and breast in females and stomach and prostate in males.

  2. Effect of BRCA1/2 mutation on short-term and long-term breast cancer survival: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Ha; Park, Sue K; Park, Boyoung; Kim, Sung-Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Son, Byung Ho; Yoo, Keun-Young; Kang, Daehee

    2010-07-01

    Reports of BRCA genetic mutations and risk of death or recurrence are inconsistent. This study aimed to compare overall and disease-free breast cancer survival rates between BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and non-carriers for short-term and long-term outcomes separately. We searched the PUBMED and EMBASE databases and retrieved 452 articles using keywords that included breast cancer, BRCA mutation, and survival. Seventeen articles were selected for systematic review and among them 11 were included in our meta-analysis. We used the random-effects model to calculate the summary hazard ratio and corresponding 95% confidence interval. BRCA1 mutation carriers had significantly lower short-term and long-term overall survival rates (OSR) relative to non-carriers (HR = 1.92 [95% CI = 1.45-2.53]; 1.33 [1.12-1.58], respectively), while both short-term and long-term OSR of BRCA2 carriers did not differ from non-carriers (HR = 1.30 [95% CI = 0.95-1.76]; 1.12 [95% CI = 0.86-1.45], respectively). For short-term progression-free survival rate (PFSR), BRCA1 mutation carriers had a significantly lower rate than non-carriers (HR = 1.54 [95% CI = 1.12-2.12]), while BRCA2 mutation carriers had a similar PFSR (HR = 1.23 [95% CI = 0.96-1.58]). For long-term PFSRs, we found no significant results. Our results suggest that BRCA1 mutation decreases short-term and long-term OSRs and short-term PFSR, however, BRCA2 mutation does not affect either short-term or long-term survival rate, which is attributed to the different carcinogenic pathways for BRCA1 and BRCA2.

  3. Performance of mitochondrial DNA mutations detecting early stage cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakupciak, John P; Srivastava, Sudhir; Sidransky, David; O'Connell, Catherine D; Maragh, Samantha; Markowitz, Maura E; Greenberg, Alissa K; Hoque, Mohammad O; Maitra, Anirban; Barker, Peter E; Wagner, Paul D; Rom, William N

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) have been associated with cancer and many other disorders. These mutations can be point mutations or deletions, or admixtures (heteroplasmy). The detection of mtDNA mutations in body fluids using resequencing microarrays, which are more sensitive than other sequencing methods, could provide a strategy to measure mutation loads in remote anatomical sites. We determined the mtDNA mutation load in the entire mitochondrial genome of 26 individuals with different early stage cancers (lung, bladder, kidney) and 12 heavy smokers without cancer. MtDNA was sequenced from three matched specimens (blood, tumor and body fluid) from each cancer patient and two matched specimens (blood and sputum) from smokers without cancer. The inherited wildtype sequence in the blood was compared to the sequences present in the tumor and body fluid, detected using the Affymetrix Genechip ® Human Mitochondrial Resequencing Array 1.0 and supplemented by capillary sequencing for noncoding region. Using this high-throughput method, 75% of the tumors were found to contain mtDNA mutations, higher than in our previous studies, and 36% of the body fluids from these cancer patients contained mtDNA mutations. Most of the mutations detected were heteroplasmic. A statistically significantly higher heteroplasmy rate occurred in tumor specimens when compared to both body fluid of cancer patients and sputum of controls, and in patient blood compared to blood of controls. Only 2 of the 12 sputum specimens from heavy smokers without cancer (17%) contained mtDNA mutations. Although patient mutations were spread throughout the mtDNA genome in the lung, bladder and kidney series, a statistically significant elevation of tRNA and ND complex mutations was detected in tumors. Our findings indicate comprehensive mtDNA resequencing can be a high-throughput tool for detecting mutations in clinical samples with potential applications for cancer detection, but it is

  4. Appreciating the broad clinical features of SMAD4 mutation carriers: a multicenter chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wain, Karen E; Ellingson, Marissa S; McDonald, Jamie; Gammon, Amanda; Roberts, Maegan; Pichurin, Pavel; Winship, Ingrid; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas L; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Lindor, Noralane M

    2014-08-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function SMAD4 mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Some carriers exhibit symptoms of both conditions, leading to juvenile polyposis-hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome. Three families have been reported with connective tissue abnormalities. To better understand the spectrum and extent of clinical findings in SMAD4 carriers, medical records of 34 patients (20 families) from five clinical practices were reviewed. Twenty-one percent of the patients (7/34) had features suggesting a connective tissue defect: enlarged aortic root (n = 3), aortic and mitral insufficiency (n = 2), aortic dissection (n = 1), retinal detachment (n = 1), brain aneurysms (n = 1), and lax skin and joints (n = 1). Juvenile polyposis-specific findings were almost uniformly present but variable. Ninety-seven percent of the patients had colon polyps that were generally pan-colonic and of variable histology and number. Forty-eight percent of the patients (15/31) had extensive gastric polyposis. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia features, including epistaxis (19/31, 61%), mucocutaneous telangiectases (15/31, 48%), liver arteriovenous malformation (6/16, 38%), brain arteriovenous malformation (1/26, 4%), pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (9/17, 53%), and intrapulmonary shunting (14/23, 61%), were documented in 76% of the patients. SMAD4 carriers should be managed for juvenile polyposis and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia because symptoms of both conditions are likely yet unpredictable. Connective tissue abnormalities are an emerging component of juvenile polyposis-hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome, and larger studies are needed to understand these manifestations.

  5. Two different BRCA2 mutations found in a multigenerational family with a history of breast, prostate, and lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caporale DA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Diane A Caporale, Erica E SwensonDepartment of Biology, University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point, Stevens Point, WI, USAAbstract: Breast and lung cancer are two of the most common malignancies in the United States, causing approximately 40,000 and 160,000 deaths each year, respectively. Over 80% of hereditary breast cancer cases are due to mutations in two breast cancer predisposition genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. These are tumor-suppressor genes associated with DNA repair. Since the discovery of these two genes in the mid-1990s, several other breast cancer predisposition genes have been identified, such as the CHEK2 gene encoding a regulator of BRCA1. Recently, studies have begun investigating the roles of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene expression in lung cancer. We conducted a family-based case study that included a bloodline of Italian heritage with several cases of breast cancer and associated cancers (prostate and stomach through multiple generations and on a nonblood relative of Scottish/Irish descent who was consecutively diagnosed with breast and lung cancer. Cancer history and environmental risk factors were recorded for each family member. To investigate possible genetic risks, we screened for mutations in specific hypervariable regions of the BRCA1, BRCA2, and CHEK2 genes. DNA was extracted and isolated from the individuals' hair follicles and cheek cells. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR, allele-specific PCR, and DNA sequencing were performed to identify and verify the presence or absence of mutations in these regions. Genotypes of several family members were determined and carriers of mutations were identified. Here we report for the first time the occurrence of two different BRCA2 frameshift mutations within the same family. Specifically, three Italian family members were found to be carriers of the BRCA2-c.2808_2811delACAA (3036delACAA mutation, a 4-nucleotide deletion in exon 11, which is a truncated mutation that causes deleterious function of

  6. Hereditary cancer genes are highly susceptible to splicing mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soemedi, Rachel; Maguire, Samantha; Murray, Michael F.; Monaghan, Sean F.

    2018-01-01

    Substitutions that disrupt pre-mRNA splicing are a common cause of genetic disease. On average, 13.4% of all hereditary disease alleles are classified as splicing mutations mapping to the canonical 5′ and 3′ splice sites. However, splicing mutations present in exons and deeper intronic positions are vastly underreported. A recent re-analysis of coding mutations in exon 10 of the Lynch Syndrome gene, MLH1, revealed an extremely high rate (77%) of mutations that lead to defective splicing. This finding is confirmed by extending the sampling to five other exons in the MLH1 gene. Further analysis suggests a more general phenomenon of defective splicing driving Lynch Syndrome. Of the 36 mutations tested, 11 disrupted splicing. Furthermore, analyzing past reports suggest that MLH1 mutations in canonical splice sites also occupy a much higher fraction (36%) of total mutations than expected. When performing a comprehensive analysis of splicing mutations in human disease genes, we found that three main causal genes of Lynch Syndrome, MLH1, MSH2, and PMS2, belonged to a class of 86 disease genes which are enriched for splicing mutations. Other cancer genes were also enriched in the 86 susceptible genes. The enrichment of splicing mutations in hereditary cancers strongly argues for additional priority in interpreting clinical sequencing data in relation to cancer and splicing. PMID:29505604

  7. Hereditary cancer genes are highly susceptible to splicing mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy L Rhine

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Substitutions that disrupt pre-mRNA splicing are a common cause of genetic disease. On average, 13.4% of all hereditary disease alleles are classified as splicing mutations mapping to the canonical 5' and 3' splice sites. However, splicing mutations present in exons and deeper intronic positions are vastly underreported. A recent re-analysis of coding mutations in exon 10 of the Lynch Syndrome gene, MLH1, revealed an extremely high rate (77% of mutations that lead to defective splicing. This finding is confirmed by extending the sampling to five other exons in the MLH1 gene. Further analysis suggests a more general phenomenon of defective splicing driving Lynch Syndrome. Of the 36 mutations tested, 11 disrupted splicing. Furthermore, analyzing past reports suggest that MLH1 mutations in canonical splice sites also occupy a much higher fraction (36% of total mutations than expected. When performing a comprehensive analysis of splicing mutations in human disease genes, we found that three main causal genes of Lynch Syndrome, MLH1, MSH2, and PMS2, belonged to a class of 86 disease genes which are enriched for splicing mutations. Other cancer genes were also enriched in the 86 susceptible genes. The enrichment of splicing mutations in hereditary cancers strongly argues for additional priority in interpreting clinical sequencing data in relation to cancer and splicing.

  8. Mutational analysis and clinical correlation of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Andrea L; Borger, Darrell R; Szymonifka, Jackie; Ryan, David P; Wo, Jennifer Y; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Kwak, Eunice L; Allen, Jill N; Wadlow, Raymond C; Zhu, Andrew X; Murphy, Janet E; Faris, Jason E; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Haigis, Kevin M; Ellisen, Leif W; Iafrate, Anthony J; Hong, Theodore S

    2014-05-15

    Early identification of mutations may guide patients with metastatic colorectal cancer toward targeted therapies that may be life prolonging. The authors assessed tumor genotype correlations with clinical characteristics to determine whether mutational profiling can account for clinical similarities, differences, and outcomes. Under Institutional Review Board approval, 222 patients with metastatic colon adenocarcinoma (n = 158) and rectal adenocarcinoma (n = 64) who underwent clinical tumor genotyping were reviewed. Multiplexed tumor genotyping screened for >150 mutations across 15 commonly mutated cancer genes. The chi-square test was used to assess genotype frequency by tumor site and additional clinical characteristics. Cox multivariate analysis was used to assess the impact of genotype on overall survival. Broad-based tumor genotyping revealed clinical and anatomic differences that could be linked to gene mutations. NRAS mutations were associated with rectal cancer versus colon cancer (12.5% vs 0.6%; P colon cancer (13% vs 3%; P = .024) and older age (15.8% vs 4.6%; P = .006). TP53 mutations were associated with rectal cancer (30% vs 18%; P = .048), younger age (14% vs 28.7%; P = .007), and men (26.4% vs 14%; P = .03). Lung metastases were associated with PIK3CA mutations (23% vs 8.7%; P = .004). Only mutations in BRAF were independently associated with decreased overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.27; P = .029). The current study suggests that underlying molecular profiles can differ between colon and rectal cancers. Further investigation is warranted to assess whether the differences identified are important in determining the optimal treatment course for these patients. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  9. Risk-reducing salpingectomy with delayed oophorectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers: Patients' and professionals' perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M. de; Harmsen, M.G.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Hermens, R.P.M.G.; Hullu, J.A. de

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify influencing factors of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and their professionals for risk-reducing salpingectomy (RRS) with delayed oophorectomy (RRO) as a substitute for risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) and for study participation on this concept. METHODS: A qualitative

  10. Affected female carriers of MTM1 mutations display a wide spectrum of clinical and pathological involvement: delineating diagnostic clues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biancalana, V.; Scheidecker, S.; Miguet, M.; Laquerriere, A.; Romero, N.B.; Stojkovic, T.; Neto, O. Abath; Mercier, S.; Voermans, N.C.; Tanner, L.; Rogers, C.; Ollagnon-Roman, E.; Roper, H.; Boutte, C.; Ben-Shachar, S.; Lornage, X.; Vasli, N.; Schaefer, E.; Laforet, P.; Pouget, J.; Moerman, A.; Pasquier, L.; Marcorelle, P.; Magot, A.; Kusters, B.; Streichenberger, N.; Tranchant, C.; Dondaine, N.; Schneider, R.; Gasnier, C.; Calmels, N.; Kremer, V.; Nguyen, K. Van; Perrier, J.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Carlier, P.; Carlier, R.Y.; Thompson, J.; Boland, A.; Deleuze, J.F.; Fardeau, M.; Zanoteli, E.; Eymard, B.; Laporte, J.

    2017-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), a severe congenital myopathy, is caused by mutations in the MTM1 gene located on the X chromosome. A majority of affected males die in the early postnatal period, whereas female carriers are believed to be usually asymptomatic. Nevertheless, several affected

  11. Lipoprotein profiles in human heterozygote carriers of a functional mutation P297S in scavenger receptor class B1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ljunggren, Stefan A.; Levels, Johannes H. M.; Hovingh, Kees; Holleboom, Adriaan G.; Vergeer, Menno; Argyri, Letta; Gkolfinopoulou, Christina; Chroni, Angeliki; Sierts, Jeroen A.; Kastelein, John J.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Lindahl, Mats; Karlsson, Helen

    2015-01-01

    The scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is an important HDL receptor involved in cholesterol uptake and efflux, but its physiological role in human lipoprotein metabolism is not fully understood. Heterozygous carriers of the SR-B1(P297S) mutation are characterized by increased HDL cholesterol

  12. PIK3CA mutations frequently coexist with RAS and BRAF mutations in patients with advanced cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Janku

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations of PIK3CA, RAS (KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF have been identified in various malignancies, and activate the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/RAF/MEK pathways, respectively. Both pathways are critical drivers of tumorigenesis.Tumor tissues from 504 patients with diverse cancers referred to the Clinical Center for Targeted Therapy at MD Anderson Cancer Center starting in October 2008 were analyzed for PIK3CA, RAS (KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations using polymerase chain reaction-based DNA sequencing.PIK3CA mutations were found in 54 (11% of 504 patients tested; KRAS in 69 (19% of 367; NRAS in 19 (8% of 225; and BRAF in 31 (9% of 361 patients. PIK3CA mutations were most frequent in squamous cervical (5/14, 36%, uterine (7/28, 25%, breast (6/29, 21%, and colorectal cancers (18/105, 17%; KRAS in pancreatic (5/9, 56%, colorectal (49/97, 51%, and uterine cancers (3/20, 15%; NRAS in melanoma (12/40, 30%, and uterine cancer (2/11, 18%; BRAF in melanoma (23/52, 44%, and colorectal cancer (5/88, 6%. Regardless of histology, KRAS mutations were found in 38% of patients with PIK3CA mutations compared to 16% of patients with wild-type (wtPIK3CA (p = 0.001. In total, RAS (KRAS, NRAS or BRAF mutations were found in 47% of patients with PIK3CA mutations vs. 24% of patients wtPIK3CA (p = 0.001. PIK3CA mutations were found in 28% of patients with KRAS mutations compared to 10% with wtKRAS (p = 0.001 and in 20% of patients with RAS (KRAS, NRAS or BRAF mutations compared to 8% with wtRAS (KRAS, NRAS or wtBRAF (p = 0.001.PIK3CA, RAS (KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations are frequent in diverse tumors. In a wide variety of tumors, PIK3CA mutations coexist with RAS (KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutations.

  13. Reproductive Decision-Making in MMR Mutation Carriers After Results Disclosure: Impact of Psychological Status in Childbearing Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffour, Jacqueline; Combes, Audrey; Crapez, Evelyne; Boissière-Michot, Florence; Bibeau, Frédéric; Senesse, Pierre; Ychou, Marc; Courraud, Julie; de Forges, Hélène; Roca, Lise

    2016-06-01

    Reproductive techniques such as prenatal diagnosis (PND) or preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), although debated, are legally forbidden in France in case of Lynch syndrome. The preference of mutation carriers about their reproductive options is not systematically considered in France. We aimed to prospectively assess the reproductive preferences of mismatch repair mutation carriers consulting in our institution (2003-2010, n = 100). We also considered the short- and long-term post-disclosure psychological impact using the Impact of Events Scale-Revised questionnaire to measure the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in those patients. Complete data were obtained for 34 respondents (17 males, 17 females, median age of 33.5 years [22-59]). Seventeen respondents (57 %) preferred spontaneous natural conception versus 28 % and 35 % choosing PND and PGD, respectively. At results disclosure, respondents mainly explained their distress by fear of premature death (43 %) and transmitting mutated genes (42 %). One year later, this last fear remained predominant in 55 % of subjects. None of the main socio-demographical, psychological or medical variables (including fear of transmitting mutations) was significantly associated with the reproductive preferences. Results disclosure had a real and time-decreasing psychological impact on mutation carriers. Reproductive techniques, expected to decrease the hereditary risk, were not significantly preferred to natural conception.

  14. Correlation of ophthalmic examination with carrier status in females potentially harboring a severe Norrie disease gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif O; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Meyer, Brian

    2008-04-01

    To correlate ophthalmic findings with carrier status for a severe Norrie disease (ND) gene mutation (C95F). Prospective interventional case series. Six potential carriers and 1 obligate carrier from a family harboring the mutation. An ophthalmologist blind to the pedigree performed a full ophthalmic examination for the 7 asymptomatic family members. A peripheral blood sample was collected from each for ND gene sequencing. Ophthalmic examination findings (with attention to the presence or absence of retinal findings) and results of ND gene sequencing. Three carriers were identified by molecular genetics, and all 3 of them had peripheral retinal abnormality. However, 3 of the 4 genetically identified noncarriers also exhibited peripheral retinal abnormality. Two of these noncarriers with retinal findings were the offspring of a confirmed noncarrier. The genetically identified noncarrier with a normal peripheral retinal examination was the daughter of an obligate carrier. The presence of peripheral retinal changes was not useful for carrier prediction in a family harboring ND. There are likely additional loci responsible for phenotypic expression.

  15. Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.

  16. Lethal mutagenesis: targeting the mutator phenotype in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Edward J; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2010-10-01

    The evolution of cancer and RNA viruses share many similarities. Both exploit high levels of genotypic diversity to enable extensive phenotypic plasticity and thereby facilitate rapid adaptation. In order to accumulate large numbers of mutations, we have proposed that cancers express a mutator phenotype. Similar to cancer cells, many viral populations, by replicating their genomes with low fidelity, carry a substantial mutational load. As high levels of mutation are potentially deleterious, the viral mutation frequency is thresholded at a level below which viral populations equilibrate in a traditional mutation-selection balance, and above which the population is no longer viable, i.e., the population undergoes an error catastrophe. Because their mutation frequencies are fine-tuned just below this error threshold, viral populations are susceptible to further increases in mutational load and, recently this phenomenon has been exploited therapeutically by a concept that has been termed lethal mutagenesis. Here we review the application of lethal mutagenesis to the treatment of HIV and discuss how lethal mutagenesis may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of solid cancers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhimin; Liu, Lina; Li, Mei; Wang, Zhaohui; Feng, Lu; Zhang, Qiuping; Cheng, Shihua; Lu, Shen

    2011-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Kirsten-RAS (KRAS) mutations have been identified as predictors of response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer. We aimed to screen the mutations of both genes in gastric carcinoma to detect the suitability of EGFR TKIs for patients with gastric carcinoma. We screened EGFR mutation in exons 19-21 and KRAS mutation in exon 2 in 58 gastric adenocarcinomas from China using high resolution melting analysis (HRMA). Positive samples were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Three EGFR missense mutations (5.2%) and 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, Q787Q, 37.9%) were identified. To our knowledge, we report for the first time three mutation patterns of EGFR, Y801C, L858R and G863D, in gastric carcinoma. Two samples with EGFR mutation were mucinous adenocarcinoma. These three samples were collected from male patients aged over 75 years old. The frequency of KRAS mutation was 10.3% (6/58). The exclusiveness of EGFR and KRAS mutations was proven for the first time in gastric cancer. Gastric carcinoma of the mucinous adenocarcinoma type collected from older male patients may harbour EGFR mutations. The small subset of gastric adenocarcinoma patients may respond to EGFR TKIs.

  18. Systematic Analysis of Splice-Site-Creating Mutations in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyka G. Jayasinghe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: For the past decade, cancer genomic studies have focused on mutations leading to splice-site disruption, overlooking those having splice-creating potential. Here, we applied a bioinformatic tool, MiSplice, for the large-scale discovery of splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs across 8,656 TCGA tumors. We report 1,964 originally mis-annotated mutations having clear evidence of creating alternative splice junctions. TP53 and GATA3 have 26 and 18 SCMs, respectively, and ATRX has 5 from lower-grade gliomas. Mutations in 11 genes, including PARP1, BRCA1, and BAP1, were experimentally validated for splice-site-creating function. Notably, we found that neoantigens induced by SCMs are likely several folds more immunogenic compared to missense mutations, exemplified by the recurrent GATA3 SCM. Further, high expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 was observed in tumors with SCMs, suggesting candidates for immune blockade therapy. Our work highlights the importance of integrating DNA and RNA data for understanding the functional and the clinical implications of mutations in human diseases. : Jayasinghe et al. identify nearly 2,000 splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs from over 8,000 tumor samples across 33 cancer types. They provide a more accurate interpretation of previously mis-annotated mutations, highlighting the importance of integrating data types to understand the functional and the clinical implications of splicing mutations in human disease. Keywords: splicing, RNA, mutations of clinical relevance

  19. Presymptomatic breast cancer in Egypt: role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes mutations detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashishe Mervat M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the most common diseases affecting women. Inherited susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are considered in breast, ovarian and other common cancers etiology. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified that confer a high degree of breast cancer risk. Objective Our study was performed to identify germline mutations in some exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer in females. Methods This study was applied on Egyptian healthy females who first degree relatives to those, with or without a family history, infected with breast cancer. Sixty breast cancer patients, derived from 60 families, were selected for molecular genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The study also included 120 healthy first degree female relatives of the patients, either sisters and/or daughters, for early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer mutation carriers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes of all the studied subjects. Universal primers were used to amplify four regions of the BRCA1 gene (exons 2,8,13 and 22 and one region (exon 9 of BRCA2 gene using specific PCR. The polymerase chain reaction was carried out. Single strand conformation polymorphism assay and heteroduplex analysis were used to screen for mutations in the studied exons. In addition, DNA sequencing of the normal and mutated exons were performed. Results Mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were detected in 86.7% of the families. Current study indicates that 60% of these families were attributable to BRCA1 mutations, while 26.7% of them were attributable to BRCA2 mutations. Results showed that four mutations were detected in the BRCA1 gene, while one mutation was detected in the BRCA2 gene. Asymptomatic relatives, 80(67% out of total 120, were mutation carriers. Conclusions BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes mutations are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer. BRCA mutations

  20. Reproductive Endocrinologists' Utilization of Genetic Counselors for Oncofertility and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) Treatment of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetsch, Allison L; Wicklund, Catherine; Clayman, Marla L; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2016-06-01

    Genetic counselors believe fertility preservation and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) discussions to be a part of their role when counseling BRCA1/2 mutation-positive patients. This study is the first to explore reproductive endocrinologists' (REI) practices and attitudes regarding involvement of genetic counselors in the care of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers seeking fertility preservation and PGD. A survey was mailed to 1000 REIs from Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility (SREI), an American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) affiliate group. A 14.5 % response rate was achieved; data was analyzed using SPSS software. The majority of participating REIs were found to recommend genetic counseling to cancer patients considering fertility preservation (82 %) and consult with a genetic counselor regarding PGD for hereditary cancer syndromes (92 %). Additionally, REIs consult genetic counselors regarding PGD patient counseling (88 %), genetic testing (78 %), and general genetics questions (66 %). Two areas genetic counselors may further aid REIs are: elicitation of family history, which is useful to determine fertility preservation and PGD intervention timing (32 % of REIs utilize a cancer family history to determine intervention timing); and, interpretation of variants of uncertain significance (VOUS) as cancer panel genetic testing becomes more common (36 % of REIs are unfamiliar with VOUS). Given our findings, the Oncofertility Consortium® created an online resource for genetic counselors focused on fertility preservation education and communication strategies.

  1. Reproductive Endocrinologists’ Utilization of Genetic Counselors for Oncofertility and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) Treatment of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetsch, Allison L.; Wicklund, Catherine; Clayman, Marla L.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic counselors believe fertility preservation and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) discussions to be a part of their role when counseling BRCA1/2 mutation-positive patients. This study is the first to explore reproductive endocrinologists’ (REI) practices and attitudes regarding involvement of genetic counselors in the care of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers seeking fertility preservation and PGD. A survey was mailed to 1000 REIs from Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility (SREI), an American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) affiliate group. A 14.5 % response rate was achieved; data was analyzed using SPSS software. The majority of participating REIs were found to recommend genetic counseling to cancer patients considering fertility preservation (82 %) and consult with a genetic counselor regarding PGD for hereditary cancer syndromes (92 %). Additionally, REIs consult genetic counselors regarding PGD patient counseling (88 %), genetic testing (78 %), and general genetics questions (66 %). Two areas genetic counselors may further aid REIs are: elicitation of family history, which is useful to determine fertility preservation and PGD intervention timing (32 % of REIs utilize a cancer family history to determine intervention timing); and, interpretation of variants of uncertain significance (VOUS) as cancer panel genetic testing becomes more common (36 % of REIs are unfamiliar with VOUS). Given our findings, the Oncofertility Consortium® created an online resource for genetic counselors focused on fertility preservation education and communication strategies. PMID:26567039

  2. A simple algebraic cancer equation: calculating how cancers may arise with normal mutation rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibata Darryl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this article is to present a relatively easy to understand cancer model where transformation occurs when the first cell, among many at risk within a colon, accumulates a set of driver mutations. The analysis of this model yields a simple algebraic equation, which takes as inputs the number of stem cells, mutation and division rates, and the number of driver mutations, and makes predictions about cancer epidemiology. Methods The equation [p = 1 - (1 - (1 - (1 - udkNm ] calculates the probability of cancer (p and contains five parameters: the number of divisions (d, the number of stem cells (N × m, the number of critical rate-limiting pathway driver mutations (k, and the mutation rate (u. In this model progression to cancer "starts" at conception and mutations accumulate with cell division. Transformation occurs when a critical number of rate-limiting pathway mutations first accumulates within a single stem cell. Results When applied to several colorectal cancer data sets, parameter values consistent with crypt stem cell biology and normal mutation rates were able to match the increase in cancer with aging, and the mutation frequencies found in cancer genomes. The equation can help explain how cancer risks may vary with age, height, germline mutations, and aspirin use. APC mutations may shorten pathways to cancer by effectively increasing the numbers of stem cells at risk. Conclusions The equation illustrates that age-related increases in cancer frequencies may result from relatively normal division and mutation rates. Although this equation does not encompass all of the known complexity of cancer, it may be useful, especially in a teaching setting, to help illustrate relationships between small and large cancer features.

  3. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations in the Brazilian Jewish population justifies a carrier screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rozenberg

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurologic degeneration, fatal in early childhood. In the Ashkenazi Jewish population the disease incidence is about 1 in every 3,500 newborns and the carrier frequency is 1 in every 29 individuals. Carrier screening programs for Tay-Sachs disease have reduced disease incidence by 90% in high-risk populations in several countries. The Brazilian Jewish population is estimated at 90,000 individuals. Currently, there is no screening program for Tay-Sachs disease in this population. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program in the Brazilian Jewish population by determining the frequency of heterozygotes and the acceptance of the program by the community. SETTING: Laboratory of Molecular Genetics - Institute of Biosciences - Universidade de São Paulo. PARTICIPANTS: 581 senior students from selected Jewish high schools. PROCEDURE: Molecular analysis of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations by PCR amplification of genomic DNA, followed by restriction enzyme digestion. RESULTS: Among 581 students that attended educational classes, 404 (70% elected to be tested for Tay-Sachs disease mutations. Of these, approximately 65% were of Ashkenazi Jewish origin. Eight carriers were detected corresponding to a carrier frequency of 1 in every 33 individuals in the Ashkenazi Jewish fraction of the sample. CONCLUSION: The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease carriers among the Ashkenazi Jewish population of Brazil is similar to that of other countries where carrier screening programs have led to a significant decrease in disease incidence. Therefore, it is justifiable to implement a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program for the Brazilian Jewish population.

  4. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations in the Brazilian Jewish population justifies a carrier screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, R; Pereira, L da V

    2001-07-05

    Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurologic degeneration, fatal in early childhood. In the Ashkenazi Jewish population the disease incidence is about 1 in every 3,500 newborns and the carrier frequency is 1 in every 29 individuals. Carrier screening programs for Tay-Sachs disease have reduced disease incidence by 90% in high-risk populations in several countries. The Brazilian Jewish population is estimated at 90,000 individuals. Currently, there is no screening program for Tay-Sachs disease in this population. To evaluate the importance of a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program in the Brazilian Jewish population by determining the frequency of heterozygotes and the acceptance of the program by the community. Laboratory of Molecular Genetics--Institute of Biosciences--Universidade de São Paulo. 581 senior students from selected Jewish high schools. Molecular analysis of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations by PCR amplification of genomic DNA, followed by restriction enzyme digestion. Among 581 students that attended educational classes, 404 (70%) elected to be tested for Tay-Sachs disease mutations. Of these, approximately 65% were of Ashkenazi Jewish origin. Eight carriers were detected corresponding to a carrier frequency of 1 in every 33 individuals in the Ashkenazi Jewish fraction of the sample. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease carriers among the Ashkenazi Jewish population of Brazil is similar to that of other countries where carrier screening programs have led to a significant decrease in disease incidence. Therefore, it is justifiable to implement a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program for the Brazilian Jewish population.

  5. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations and incident cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, T; Husemoen, L L N; Thyssen, J P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) could have opposing effects on cancer risk, as mutations are associated with both 10% higher serum vitamin D levels, which may protect against cancer, and with impaired skin barrier function, which may lead to higher cancer...... (HR 1·09, 95% CI 0·61-1·94), urinary cancer (HR 1·30, 95% CI 0·51-3·29), malignant melanoma (HR 1·03, 95% CI 0·41-2·58) and NMSC (HR 0·70, 95% CI 0·47-1·05). Among participants aged over 60 years at baseline, we found statistically significant lower risks of all cancers and NMSC among FLG mutation...

  6. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I. [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Johar Town, Lahore (Pakistan); Chaudri, M.S. [Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Shakoori, A.R. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-11-29

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients.

  7. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A.; Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I.; Chaudri, M.S.; Shakoori, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients

  8. Phenotype comparison of MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers in a cohort of 1,914 individuals undergoing clinical genetic testing in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Kastrinos (Fay); E.M. Stoffel (Elena); J. Balmana (Judith); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); R. Mercado (Rowena); S. Syngal (Sapna)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Aims: Lynch syndrome is caused by germ-line mismatch repair gene mutations. We examined the phenotypic differences between MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutation carriers and whether mutation type (point versus large rearrangement) affected phenotypic expression. Methods: This is a

  9. Outcomes of annual surveillance imaging in an adult and paediatric cohort of succinate dehydrogenase B mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufton, Nicola; Shapiro, Lucy; Srirangalingam, Umasuthan; Richards, Polly; Sahdev, Anju; Kumar, Ajith V; McAndrew, Lorraine; Martin, Lee; Berney, Daniel; Monson, John; Chew, Shern L; Waterhouse, Mona; Druce, Maralyn; Korbonits, Márta; Metcalfe, Karl; Drake, William M; Storr, Helen L; Akker, Scott A

    2017-02-01

    For 'asymptomatic carriers' of the succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) gene mutations, there is currently no consensus as to the appropriate modality or frequency of surveillance imaging. We present the results of a surveillance programme of SDHB mutation carriers. Review of clinical outcomes of a surveillance regimen in patients identified to have an SDHB gene mutation, based on annual MRI, in a single UK tertiary referral centre. A total of 92 patients were identified with an SDHB gene mutation. a total of 27 index patients presented with symptoms, and 65 patients were identified as asymptomatic carriers. Annual MRI of the abdomen, with alternate year MRI of the neck, thorax and pelvis. Presence of an SDHB-related tumour included paraganglioma (PGL), phaeochromocytoma (PCC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). A total of 43 PGLs, eight PCCs and one RCC occurred in the 27 index patients (23 solitary, four synchronous, five metachronous). A further 15 SDHB-related tumours (11 PGLs, three RCCs, one GIST) were identified in the asymptomatic carriers on surveillance screening (25% of screened carriers): 10 on the first surveillance imaging and five on subsequent imaging 2-6 years later. A total of 11 patients had malignant disease. SDHB-related tumours are picked up as early as 2 years after initial negative surveillance scan. We believe the high malignancy rate and early identification rate of tumours justifies the use of 1-2 yearly imaging protocols and MRI-based imaging could form the mainstay of surveillance in this patient group thereby minimizing radiation exposure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Carbon nanotubes as cancer therapeutic carriers and mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kuk Hui; Hong, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have received increasing attention in biomedical fields because of their unique structures and properties, including high aspect ratios, large surface areas, rich surface chemical functionalities, and size stability on the nanoscale. Particularly, they are attractive as carriers and mediators for cancer therapy. Through appropriate functionalization, CNTs have been used as nanocarriers for anticancer drugs including doxorubicin, camptothecin, carboplatin, cisplatin, paclitaxel, Pt(II), and Pt(IV), and genes including plasmid DNA, small-interfering RNA, oligonucleotides, and RNA/DNA aptamers. CNTs can also deliver proteins and immunotherapy components. Using combinations of light energy, they have also been applied as mediators for photothermal therapy and photodynamic therapy to directly destroy cancer cells without severely damaging normal tissue. If limitations such as a long-term cytotoxicity in the body, lack of size uniformity during the synthetic process, loading deviations for drug–CNT complexes, and release controllability at the target point are overcome, CNTs will become one of the strongest tools that are available for various other biomedical fields as well as for cancer therapy. PMID:27785021

  11. The role of mutation in the new cancer paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prehn Richmond T

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The almost universal belief that cancer is caused by mutation may gradually be giving way to the belief that cancer begins as a cellular adaptation that involves the local epigenetic silencing of various genes. In my own interpretation of the new epigenetic paradigm, the genes epigenetically suppressed are genes that normally serve in post-embryonic life to suppress and keep suppressed those other genes upon which embryonic development depends. Those other genes, if not silenced or suppressed in the post-embryonic animal, become, I suggest, the oncogenes that are the basis of neoplasia. Mutations that occur in silenced genes supposedly go unrepaired and are, therefore, postulated to accumulate, but such mutations probably play little or no causative role in neoplasia because they occur in already epigenetically silenced genes. These mutations probably often serve to make the silencing, and therefore the cancer, epigenetically irreversible.

  12. Colorectal cancer incidence in path_MLH1 carriers subjected to different follow-up protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seppälä, Toni; Pylvänäinen, Kirsi; Evans, Dafydd Gareth

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in carriers of pathogenic MLH1 variants (path_MLH1) despite follow-up with colonoscopy including polypectomy.......We have previously reported a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in carriers of pathogenic MLH1 variants (path_MLH1) despite follow-up with colonoscopy including polypectomy....

  13. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allory, Yves; Beukers, Willemien; Sagrera, Ana

    2014-01-01

    for detection of recurrences in urine in patients with urothelial bladder cancer (UBC). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A set of 111 UBCs of different stages was used to assess TERT promoter mutations by Sanger sequencing and TERT messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by reverse transcription...... surveillance after diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive UBC (n=194), was tested using a SNaPshot assay. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Association of mutation status with age, sex, tobacco, stage, grade, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutation, progression-free survival, disease...... frequent among FGFR3 mutant tumors (p=0.0002). There was no association between TERT mutations and mRNA expression (p=0.3). Mutations were not associated with clinical outcome. In urine, TERT mutations had 90% specificity in subjects with hematuria but no bladder tumor, and 73% in recurrence-free UBC...

  14. Progression of subtle motor signs in PINK1 mutation carriers with mild dopaminergic deficit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggers, C; Schmidt, A; Hagenah, J

    2010-01-01

    While homozygous mutations in the PINK1 gene cause recessively inherited early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), heterozygous mutations have been suggested as a susceptibility factor.......While homozygous mutations in the PINK1 gene cause recessively inherited early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), heterozygous mutations have been suggested as a susceptibility factor....

  15. Identification of Constrained Cancer Driver Genes Based on Mutation Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoparnig, Thomas; Fried, Patrick; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2015-01-01

    Cancer drivers are genomic alterations that provide cells containing them with a selective advantage over their local competitors, whereas neutral passengers do not change the somatic fitness of cells. Cancer-driving mutations are usually discriminated from passenger mutations by their higher degree of recurrence in tumor samples. However, there is increasing evidence that many additional driver mutations may exist that occur at very low frequencies among tumors. This observation has prompted alternative methods for driver detection, including finding groups of mutually exclusive mutations and incorporating prior biological knowledge about gene function or network structure. Dependencies among drivers due to epistatic interactions can also result in low mutation frequencies, but this effect has been ignored in driver detection so far. Here, we present a new computational approach for identifying genomic alterations that occur at low frequencies because they depend on other events. Unlike passengers, these constrained mutations display punctuated patterns of occurrence in time. We test this driver–passenger discrimination approach based on mutation timing in extensive simulation studies, and we apply it to cross-sectional copy number alteration (CNA) data from ovarian cancer, CNA and single-nucleotide variant (SNV) data from breast tumors and SNV data from colorectal cancer. Among the top ranked predicted drivers, we find low-frequency genes that have already been shown to be involved in carcinogenesis, as well as many new candidate drivers. The mutation timing approach is orthogonal and complementary to existing driver prediction methods. It will help identifying from cancer genome data the alterations that drive tumor progression. PMID:25569148

  16. BRCA Mutation Frequency and Patterns of Treatment Response in BRCA Mutation–Positive Women With Ovarian Cancer: A Report From the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Kathryn; Fereday, Sian; Meldrum, Cliff; deFazio, Anna; Emmanuel, Catherine; George, Joshy; Dobrovic, Alexander; Birrer, Michael J.; Webb, Penelope M.; Stewart, Colin; Friedlander, Michael; Fox, Stephen; Bowtell, David; Mitchell, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations in women with ovarian cancer is unclear; reports vary from 3% to 27%. The impact of germ-line mutation on response requires further investigation to understand its impact on treatment planning and clinical trial design. Patients and Methods Women with nonmucinous ovarian carcinoma (n = 1,001) enrolled onto a population-based, case-control study were screened for point mutations and large deletions in both genes. Survival outcomes and responses to multiple lines of chemotherapy were assessed. Results Germ-line mutations were found in 14.1% of patients overall, including 16.6% of serous cancer patients (high-grade serous, 22.6%); 44% had no reported family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Patients carrying germ-line mutations had improved rates of progression-free and overall survival. In the relapse setting, patients carrying mutations more frequently responded to both platin- and nonplatin-based regimens than mutation-negative patients, even in patients with early relapse after primary treatment. Mutation-negative patients who responded to multiple cycles of platin-based treatment were more likely to carry somatic BRCA1/2 mutations. Conclusion BRCA mutation status has a major influence on survival in ovarian cancer patients and should be an additional stratification factor in clinical trials. Treatment outcomes in BRCA1/2 carriers challenge conventional definitions of platin resistance, and mutation status may be able to contribute to decision making and systemic therapy selection in the relapse setting. Our data, together with the advent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor trials, supports the recommendation that germ-line BRCA1/2 testing should be offered to all women diagnosed with nonmucinous, ovarian carcinoma, regardless of family history. PMID:22711857

  17. Safety of American Heart Association-recommended minimum exercise for desmosomal mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Abhishek C; Te Riele, Anneline S J M; Tichnell, Crystal; Murray, Brittney; Bhonsale, Aditya; Tandri, Harikrishna; Judge, Daniel P; Calkins, Hugh; James, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    Endurance exercise is associated with adverse outcomes in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C). Exercise recommendations for family members remain undetermined. The purposes of this study were to determine if (1) endurance exercise (Bethesda class C) and exercise intensity (metabolic equivalent hours per year [MET-Hr/year]) increase the likelihood of fulfilling 2010 Task Force Criteria and ventricular arrhythmias/implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shock (ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation [VT/VF]), and (2) exercise restriction to the American Heart Association (AHA)-recommended minimum for healthy adults is associated with favorable outcomes of at-risk family members. Twenty-eight family members of 10 probands inheriting a PKP2 mutation were interviewed about exercise from age 10. Exercise threshold to maintain overall health was based on the 2007 AHA guidelines of a minimum 390 to 650 MET-Hr/year. After adjustment for age, sex, and family membership, both participation in endurance athletics (odds ratio [OR] 7.4, P = .03) and higher-intensity exercise (OR = 4.2, P = .004) were associated with diagnosis (n = 13). Endurance athletes were also significantly more likely to develop VT/VF (n = 6, P = .02). Family members who restricted exercise at or below the upper bound of the AHA goal (≤650 MET-Hr/year) were significantly less likely to be diagnosed (OR = 0.07, P = .002) and had no VT/VF. At diagnosis and first VT/VF, family members had accumulated 2.8-fold (P = .002) and 3.5-fold (P = .03), respectively, greater MET-Hr exercise than the AHA-recommended minimum. Those who developed VT/VF had performed particularly high-intensity exercise in adolescence compared to unaffected family members (age 10-14: P = .04; age 14-19: P = .02). The results of this study suggest restricting unaffected desmosomal mutation carriers from endurance and high-intensity athletics but potentially not from AHA

  18. Peripheral retinopathy in offspring of carriers of Norrie disease gene mutations. Possible transplacental effect of abnormal Norrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz-Hittner, H A; Ferrell, R E; Sims, K B; Fernandez, K M; Gemmell, B S; Satriano, D R; Caster, J; Kretzer, F L

    1996-12-01

    The Norrie disease (ND) gene (Xp11.3) (McKusick 310600) consists of one untranslated exon and two exons partially translated as the Norrie disease protein (Norrin). Norrin has sequence homology and computer-predicted tertiary structure of a growth factor containing a cystine knot motif, which affects endothelial cell migration and proliferation. Norrie disease (congenital retinal detachment), X-linked primary retinal dysplasia (congenital retinal fold), and X-linked exudative vitreoretinopathy (congenital macular ectopia) are allelic disorders. Blood was drawn for genetic studies from members of two families to test for ND gene mutations. Sixteen unaffected family members were examined ophthalmologically. If any retinal abnormality were identified, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography was performed. Family A had ND (R109stp), and family B had X-linked exudative vitreoretinopathy (R121L). The retinas of 11 offspring of carrier females were examined: three of seven carrier females, three of three otherwise healthy females, and one of one otherwise healthy male had peripheral inner retinal vascular abnormalities. The retinas of five offspring of affected males were examined: none of three carrier females and none of two otherwise healthy males had this peripheral retinal finding. Peripheral inner retinal vascular abnormalities similar to regressed retinopathy of prematurity were identified in seven offspring of carriers of ND gene mutations in two families. These ophthalmologic findings, especially in four genetically healthy offspring, strongly support the hypothesis that abnormal Norrin may have an adverse transplacental (environmental) effect on normal inner retinal vasculogenesis.

  19. B-Raf mutation: a key player in molecular biology of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M A; Salajegheh, A; Smith, R A; Lam, A K-Y

    2013-12-01

    B-Raf is one of the more commonly mutated proto-oncogenes implicated in the development of cancers. In this review, we consider the mechanisms and clinical impacts of B-Raf mutations in cancer and discuss the implications for the patient in melanoma, thyroid cancer and colorectal cancer, where B-Raf mutations are particularly common. © 2013.

  20. Polymorphism and mutation analysis of genomic DNA on cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    DNA repair is a universal process in living cells that maintains the structural integrity of chromosomal DNA molecules in face of damage. A deficiency in DNA damage repair is associated with an increased cancer risk by increasing a mutation frequency of cancer-related genes. Variation in DNA repair capacity may be genetically determined. Therefore, we searched single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in major DNA repair genes. This led to the finding of 600 SNPs and mutations including many novel SNPs in Japanese population. Case-control studies to explore the contribution of the SNPs in DNA repair genes to the risk of lung cancer revealed that five SNPs are associated with lung carcinogenesis. One of these SNPs is found in RAD54L gene, which is involved in double-strand DNA repair. We analyzed and reported activities of Rad54L protein with SNP and mutations. (authors)

  1. Age-related cancer mutations associated with clonal hematopoietic expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingchao; Lu, Charles; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D.; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Wendl, Michael C.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Yellapantula, Venkata; Miller, Christopher A.; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Welch, John S.; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Several genetic alterations characteristic of leukemia and lymphoma have been detected in the blood of individuals without apparent hematological malignancies. We analyzed blood-derived sequence data from 2,728 individuals within The Cancer Genome Atlas, and discovered 77 blood-specific mutations in cancer-associated genes, the majority being associated with advanced age. Remarkably, 83% of these mutations were from 19 leukemia/lymphoma-associated genes, and nine were recurrently mutated (DNMT3A, TET2, JAK2, ASXL1, TP53, GNAS, PPM1D, BCORL1 and SF3B1). We identified 14 additional mutations in a very small fraction of blood cells, possibly representing the earliest stages of clonal expansion in hematopoietic stem cells. Comparison of these findings to mutations in hematological malignancies identified several recurrently mutated genes that may be disease initiators. Our analyses show that the blood cells of more than 2% of individuals (5–6% of people older than 70 years) contain mutations that may represent premalignant, initiating events that cause clonal hematopoietic expansion. PMID:25326804

  2. Population-based statistical inference for temporal sequence of somatic mutations in cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Je-Keun; Kim, Tae-Min

    2018-04-20

    It is well recognized that accumulation of somatic mutations in cancer genomes plays a role in carcinogenesis; however, the temporal sequence and evolutionary relationship of somatic mutations remain largely unknown. In this study, we built a population-based statistical framework to infer the temporal sequence of acquisition of somatic mutations. Using the model, we analyzed the mutation profiles of 1954 tumor specimens across eight tumor types. As a result, we identified tumor type-specific directed networks composed of 2-15 cancer-related genes (nodes) and their mutational orders (edges). The most common ancestors identified in pairwise comparison of somatic mutations were TP53 mutations in breast, head/neck, and lung cancers. The known relationship of KRAS to TP53 mutations in colorectal cancers was identified, as well as potential ancestors of TP53 mutation such as NOTCH1, EGFR, and PTEN mutations in head/neck, lung and endometrial cancers, respectively. We also identified apoptosis-related genes enriched with ancestor mutations in lung cancers and a relationship between APC hotspot mutations and TP53 mutations in colorectal cancers. While evolutionary analysis of cancers has focused on clonal versus subclonal mutations identified in individual genomes, our analysis aims to further discriminate ancestor versus descendant mutations in population-scale mutation profiles that may help select cancer drivers with clinical relevance.

  3. BRCA mutations and their influence on pathological complete response and prognosis in a clinical cohort of neoadjuvantly treated breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderle, Marius; Gass, Paul; Häberle, Lothar; Flesch, Vivien M; Rauh, Claudia; Bani, Mayada R; Hack, Carolin C; Schrauder, Michael G; Jud, Sebastian M; Emons, Julius; Erber, Ramona; Ekici, Arif B; Hoyer, Juliane; Vasileiou, Georgia; Kraus, Cornelia; Reis, Andre; Hartmann, Arndt; Lux, Michael P; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander

    2018-05-03

    BRCA1/2 mutations influence the molecular characteristics and the effects of systemic treatment of breast cancer. This study investigates the impact of germline BRCA1/2 mutations on pathological complete response and prognosis in patients receiving neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy. Breast cancer patients were tested for a BRCA1/2 mutation in clinical routine work and were treated with anthracycline-based or platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy between 1997 and 2015. These patients were identified in the tumor registry of the Breast Center of the University of Erlangen (Germany). Logistic regression and Cox regression analyses were performed to investigate the associations between BRCA1/2 mutation status, pathological complete response, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Among 355 patients, 59 had a mutation in BRCA1 or in BRCA2 (16.6%), 43 in BRCA1 (12.1%), and 16 in BRCA2 (4.5%). Pathological complete response defined as "ypT0; ypN0" was observed in 54.3% of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, but only in 22.6% of non-carriers. The adjusted odds ratio was 2.48 (95% CI 1.26-4.91) for BRCA1/2 carriers versus non-carriers. Patients who achieved a pathological complete response had better disease-free survival and overall survival rates compared with those who did not achieve a pathological complete response, regardless of BRCA1/2 mutation status. BRCA1/2 mutation status leads to better responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer. Pathological complete response is the main predictor of disease-free survival and overall survival, independently of BRCA1/2 mutation status.

  4. Direct Transcriptional Consequences of Somatic Mutation in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Shlien

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Disordered transcriptomes of cancer encompass direct effects of somatic mutation on transcription, coordinated secondary pathway alterations, and increased transcriptional noise. To catalog the rules governing how somatic mutation exerts direct transcriptional effects, we developed an exhaustive pipeline for analyzing RNA sequencing data, which we integrated with whole genomes from 23 breast cancers. Using X-inactivation analyses, we found that cancer cells are more transcriptionally active than intermixed stromal cells. This is especially true in estrogen receptor (ER-negative tumors. Overall, 59% of substitutions were expressed. Nonsense mutations showed lower expression levels than expected, with patterns characteristic of nonsense-mediated decay. 14% of 4,234 rearrangements caused transcriptional abnormalities, including exon skips, exon reusage, fusions, and premature polyadenylation. We found productive, stable transcription from sense-to-antisense gene fusions and gene-to-intergenic rearrangements, suggesting that these mutation classes drive more transcriptional disruption than previously suspected. Systematic integration of transcriptome with genome data reveals the rules by which transcriptional machinery interprets somatic mutation.

  5. Psychosocial impact of undergoing prostate cancer screening for men with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Saya, Sibel; Page, Elizabeth C; Myhill, Kathryn; Thomas, Sarah; Pope, Jennifer; Chamberlain, Anthony; Hart, Rachel; Glover, Wayne; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J; Helfand, Brian T; Hutten Selkirk, Christina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Longmuir, Mark; Eccles, Diana M; Gadea, Neus; Brewer, Carole; Barwell, Julian; Salinas, Monica; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Tischkowitz, Marc; Henderson, Alex; Evans, David Gareth; Buys, Saundra S; Eeles, Rosalind A; Aaronson, Neil K

    2018-05-26

    To report the baseline results of a longitudinal psychosocial study that forms part of the IMPACT study, a multi-national investigation of targeted prostate cancer (PCa) screening among men with a known pathogenic germline mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Men enrolled in the IMPACT study were invited to complete a questionnaire at collaborating sites prior to each annual screening visit. The questionnaire included sociodemographic characteristics and the following measures: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Impact of Event Scale (IES), 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36), Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer, Cancer Worry Scale-Revised, risk perception and knowledge. The results of the baseline questionnaire are presented. A total of 432 men completed questionnaires: 98 and 160 had mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, respectively, and 174 were controls (familial mutation negative). Participants' perception of PCa risk was influenced by genetic status. Knowledge levels were high and unrelated to genetic status. Mean scores for the HADS and SF-36 were within reported general population norms and mean IES scores were within normal range. IES mean intrusion and avoidance scores were significantly higher in BRCA1/BRCA2 carriers than in controls and were higher in men with increased PCa risk perception. At the multivariate level, risk perception contributed more significantly to variance in IES scores than genetic status. This is the first study to report the psychosocial profile of men with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations undergoing PCa screening. No clinically concerning levels of general or cancer-specific distress or poor quality of life were detected in the cohort as a whole. A small subset of participants reported higher levels of distress, suggesting the need for healthcare professionals offering PCa screening to identify these risk factors and offer additional information and support to men seeking PCa screening. © 2018 The Authors BJU

  6. Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in patients with breast cancer with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Adriana; Finch, Amy; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Lynch, Henry T; Ainsworth, Peter J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Greenblatt, Ellen; Singer, Christian; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2013-11-01

    To determine the likelihood of long-term amenorrhea after treatment with chemotherapy in women with breast cancer who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. We conducted a multicenter survey of 1,954 young women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who were treated for breast cancer. We included premenopausal women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 26 and 47 years of age. We determined the age of onset of amenorrhea after breast cancer for women who were and were not treated with chemotherapy, alone or with tamoxifen. We considered chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea to have occurred when the patient experienced ≥ 2 years of amenorrhea, commencing within 2 years of initiating chemotherapy, with no resumption of menses. Of the 1,426 women who received chemotherapy, 35% experienced long-term amenorrhea. Of the 528 women who did not receive chemotherapy, 5.3% developed long-term amenorrhea. The probabilities of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea were 7.2% for women diagnosed before age 30 years, 33% for women age 31 to 44 years, and 79% for women diagnosed after age 45 years (P trend amenorrhea was higher for women who received tamoxifen than for those who did not (52% v 29%; P amenorrhea in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The risk of induced long-term amenorrhea does not seem to be greater among mutation carriers than among women who do not carry a mutation.

  7. Olaparib Approved for Breast Cancers with BRCA Gene Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved olaparib (Lynparza®) to treat metastatic breast cancers that have inherited mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes as well as a companion diagnostic test for selecting candidates for the therapy.

  8. Mutations in the AXIN1 gene in advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yardy, George W; Bicknell, David C; Wilding, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt signalling pathway directs aspects of embryogenesis and is thought to contribute to maintenance of certain stem cell populations. Disruption of the pathway has been observed in many different tumour types. In bowel, stomach, and endometrial cancer, this is usually due to mutation of genes...

  9. Activating mutation in MET oncogene in familial colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schildkraut Joellen M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developed countries, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC is 5%, and it is the second leading cause of death from cancer. The presence of family history is a well established risk factor with 25-35% of CRCs attributable to inherited and/or familial factors. The highly penetrant inherited colon cancer syndromes account for approximately 5%, leaving greater than 20% without clear genetic definition. Familial colorectal cancer has been linked to chromosome 7q31 by multiple affected relative pair studies. The MET proto-oncogene which resides in this chromosomal region is considered a candidate for genetic susceptibility. Methods MET exons were amplified by PCR from germline DNA of 148 affected sibling pairs with colorectal cancer. Amplicons with altered sequence were detected with high-resolution melt-curve analysis using a LightScanner (Idaho Technologies. Samples demonstrating alternative melt curves were sequenced. A TaqMan assay for the specific c.2975C >T change was used to confirm this mutation in a cohort of 299 colorectal cancer cases and to look for allelic amplification in tumors. Results Here we report a germline non-synonymous change in the MET proto-oncogene at amino acid position T992I (also reported as MET p.T1010I in 5.2% of a cohort of sibling pairs affected with CRC. This genetic variant was then confirmed in a second cohort of individuals diagnosed with CRC and having a first degree relative with CRC at prevalence of 4.1%. This mutation has been reported in cancer cells of multiple origins, including 2.5% of colon cancers, and in Conclusions Although the MET p.T992I genetic mutation is commonly found in somatic colorectal cancer tissues, this is the first report also implicating this MET genetic mutation as a germline inherited risk factor for familial colorectal cancer. Future studies on the cancer risks associated with this mutation and the prevalence in different at-risk populations will

  10. Sentinel and other mutational effects in offspring of cancer survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvihill, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    To date, no agent has been documented to cause germ cell mutation in human beings, with the possible exception of radiation causing abnormal meiotic chromosomes in testes. For studies in humans, mutation epidemiologists prefer the cohort approach, starting with an exposed population and looking for mutations that may be expressed in offspring as variants in health, chromosomes, proteins, or nucleic acids. Currently patients with cancer are the cohort exposed to the largest doses of potential mutagens, i.e., radiotherapy and drugs. In 12 large studies with over 825 patients and 1573 pregnancies, 46 (4%) of 1240 liveborns had a major birth defect, a rate comparable to that in the general population. One of these was a classic sentinel phenotype, i.e., a new sporadic case of a dominant mendelian syndrome. In collaboration with 5 U.S. cancer registries, we interviewed a retrospective cohort of 2383 patients diagnosed with cancer under age 20 years, from 1945 through 1975. Records were sought to verify major genetic disease, defined as a cytogenetic or single gene disorder or 1 of 15 isolated birth defects. In 2308 offspring of survivors, 5 had a chromosomal syndrome, 11 had a single gene disorder, and 62 had at least one major malformation. Among 4722 offspring of sibling controls, the respective numbers were 7, 12, and 127, nonsignificant differences. 7% of the parents of the offspring with possibly new mutations received potentially mutagenic therapy, compared with 12% of parents of normal children. Since pregnancy in or by cancer survivors is still a rare event, future efforts to document germ cell mutation may be best studied through international cooperation coupled with diverse laboratory measures of mutation

  11. Risk modeling and screening for BRCA1 mutations among Filipino breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nato, Alejandro Q. Jr.

    2003-03-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene, type 1(BRCA1) has been thought to be responsible for ∼45% of families with multiple breast carcinomas and for ∼80% of breast and ovarian cancer families. In this study, we investigated 34 familial Filipino breast cancer (BC) patients to: (a) estimate breast cancer risks and BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probabilities using risk assessment and prior probability models, respectively; (b) screen for putative polymorphisms at selected smaller exons of BRCA1 by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis; (c) screen for truncated mutations at BRCA1 exon 11 by radioactive protein truncation test (PTT); and (d) estimate posterior probabilities upon incorporation of screening results. SSCP analysis revealed 8 unique putative polymorphisms. Low prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exon 2, 5, 17, and 22 may indicate probable mutations. Contrastingly, high prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exons 13, 15, and 16 may suggest true polymorphisms which are biologically insignificant. PTT, DHPLC, and sequence analyses revealed a novel mutation in exon 11 involving GT insertion that resulted to a stop codon which generated a 29.7 kDa truncated protein product. This is the second documented mutation in BRCA1 exon 11 in a Filipino BC patient since 1998. Initial genotype-phenotype correlations in Filipino BC patients may be elucidated based on screening tests performed. Our results corroborate the findings of a study on unselected incident Filipino BC cases where the reported prevalence of BRCA1 mutation is low. The higher prevalence of putative polypmorphisms may be attributed to the increased stringency in patient prospecting. The Gail, Claus, and BRCAPRO models can be utilized to estimate BC risk in unaffected high-risk individuals but validation is needed. Most of the BRCAPRO and Myriad.com prior probability estimates coincide with the presence of BRCA1 mutation and/or putative polymorphisms. This pioneering

  12. Risk modeling and screening for BRCA1 mutations among Filipino breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nato, Jr, Alejandro Q

    2003-03-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene, type 1(BRCA1) has been thought to be responsible for {approx}45% of families with multiple breast carcinomas and for {approx}80% of breast and ovarian cancer families. In this study, we investigated 34 familial Filipino breast cancer (BC) patients to: (a) estimate breast cancer risks and BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probabilities using risk assessment and prior probability models, respectively; (b) screen for putative polymorphisms at selected smaller exons of BRCA1 by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis; (c) screen for truncated mutations at BRCA1 exon 11 by radioactive protein truncation test (PTT); and (d) estimate posterior probabilities upon incorporation of screening results. SSCP analysis revealed 8 unique putative polymorphisms. Low prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exon 2, 5, 17, and 22 may indicate probable mutations. Contrastingly, high prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exons 13, 15, and 16 may suggest true polymorphisms which are biologically insignificant. PTT, DHPLC, and sequence analyses revealed a novel mutation in exon 11 involving GT insertion that resulted to a stop codon which generated a 29.7 kDa truncated protein product. This is the second documented mutation in BRCA1 exon 11 in a Filipino BC patient since 1998. Initial genotype-phenotype correlations in Filipino BC patients may be elucidated based on screening tests performed. Our results corroborate the findings of a study on unselected incident Filipino BC cases where the reported prevalence of BRCA1 mutation is low. The higher prevalence of putative polypmorphisms may be attributed to the increased stringency in patient prospecting. The Gail, Claus, and BRCAPRO models can be utilized to estimate BC risk in unaffected high-risk individuals but validation is needed. Most of the BRCAPRO and Myriad.com prior probability estimates coincide with the presence of BRCA1 mutation and/or putative polymorphisms. This

  13. The risk of extra-colonic, extra-endometrial cancer in the Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, Patrice; Vasen, Hans F A; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    persons missing crucial information, cohort included 6,041 members of 261 families with LS-associated MLH1 or MSH2 mutations. All were either mutation carriers by test, probable mutation carriers (endometrial/colorectal cancer-affected), or first-degree relatives of these. Among mutation carriers...

  14. TP53 Mutations in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Mogi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is frequently mutated in human cancers. Abnormality of the TP53 gene is one of the most significant events in lung cancers and plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of lung epithelial cells. Human lung cancers are classified into two major types, small cell lung cancer (SCLC and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The latter accounts for approximately 80% of all primary lung cancers, and the incidence of NSCLC is increasing yearly. Most clinical studies suggest that NSCLC with TP53 alterations carries a worse prognosis and may be relatively more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. A deep understanding of the role of TP53 in lung carcinogenesis may lead to a more reasonably targeted clinical approach, which should be exploited to enhance the survival rates of patients with lung cancer. This paper will focus on the role of TP53 in the molecular pathogenesis, epidemiology, and therapeutic strategies of TP53 mutation in NSCLC.

  15. Targeted cancer exome sequencing reveals recurrent mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenedini, E; Bernardis, I; Artusi, V; Artuso, L; Roncaglia, E; Guglielmelli, P; Pieri, L; Bogani, C; Biamonte, F; Rotunno, G; Mannarelli, C; Bianchi, E; Pancrazzi, A; Fanelli, T; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, G; Ferrari, S; Manfredini, R; Vannucchi, A M; Tagliafico, E

    2014-01-01

    With the intent of dissecting the molecular complexity of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), we designed a target enrichment panel to explore, using next-generation sequencing (NGS), the mutational status of an extensive list of 2000 cancer-associated genes and microRNAs. The genomic DNA of granulocytes and in vitro-expanded CD3+T-lymphocytes, as a germline control, was target-enriched and sequenced in a learning cohort of 20 MPN patients using Roche 454 technology. We identified 141 genuine somatic mutations, most of which were not previously described. To test the frequency of the identified variants, a larger validation cohort of 189 MPN patients was additionally screened for these mutations using Ion Torrent AmpliSeq NGS. Excluding the genes already described in MPN, for 8 genes (SCRIB, MIR662, BARD1, TCF12, FAT4, DAP3, POLG and NRAS), we demonstrated a mutation frequency between 3 and 8%. We also found that mutations at codon 12 of NRAS (NRASG12V and NRASG12D) were significantly associated, for primary myelofibrosis (PMF), with highest dynamic international prognostic scoring system (DIPSS)-plus score categories. This association was then confirmed in 66 additional PMF patients composing a final dataset of 168 PMF showing a NRAS mutation frequency of 4.7%, which was associated with a worse outcome, as defined by the DIPSS plus score. PMID:24150215

  16. Systematic Analysis of Splice-Site-Creating Mutations in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Reyka G; Cao, Song; Gao, Qingsong; Wendl, Michael C; Vo, Nam Sy; Reynolds, Sheila M; Zhao, Yanyan; Climente-González, Héctor; Chai, Shengjie; Wang, Fang; Varghese, Rajees; Huang, Mo; Liang, Wen-Wei; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Sengupta, Sohini; Li, Zhi; Payne, Samuel H; Fenyö, David; Miner, Jeffrey H; Walter, Matthew J; Vincent, Benjamin; Eyras, Eduardo; Chen, Ken; Shmulevich, Ilya; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2018-04-03

    For the past decade, cancer genomic studies have focused on mutations leading to splice-site disruption, overlooking those having splice-creating potential. Here, we applied a bioinformatic tool, MiSplice, for the large-scale discovery of splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs) across 8,656 TCGA tumors. We report 1,964 originally mis-annotated mutations having clear evidence of creating alternative splice junctions. TP53 and GATA3 have 26 and 18 SCMs, respectively, and ATRX has 5 from lower-grade gliomas. Mutations in 11 genes, including PARP1, BRCA1, and BAP1, were experimentally validated for splice-site-creating function. Notably, we found that neoantigens induced by SCMs are likely several folds more immunogenic compared to missense mutations, exemplified by the recurrent GATA3 SCM. Further, high expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 was observed in tumors with SCMs, suggesting candidates for immune blockade therapy. Our work highlights the importance of integrating DNA and RNA data for understanding the functional and the clinical implications of mutations in human diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. p53 gene mutation hotspots in skin cancer and ultraviolet induced mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehata, Hironobu

    1998-01-01

    Presence of certain hotspots is known in the mutation of p53 gene in skin cancer, which are codons 177, 196, 245, 248, 278 and 282 located in the exon 5-8. In these regions, mutations like C to T and CC to TT are frequent and thereby suggest that they are resulted from pyrimidine-dimers produced by ultraviolet light (UV). In cyclobutane pyrimidine dimerization (CPD), conversion of cytosine to thymine by deamination is suggested to be the primary reaction. Although studies using UVC (254 nm) suggesting that the mutation hotspots are low repair efficiency regions could not completely explain the all hotspots, those using UVB and sunlight (UVB and UVA) revealed that CPD was efficiently produced even in such regions as not explained by studies with UVC alone. Therefore, the latter studies are conceivably reasonable since the skin cancer is induced by natural sunlight. Exon 5-8 DNA is completely methylated and the absorption coefficient of 5-methylcytosine is 5-6 times as large as that of cytosine at wavelength around 290 nm. These indicate the importance of UVB in mutation of mammalian cells possessing the ability to methylate DNA. (K.H.)

  18. Assessment of SLX4 Mutations in Hereditary Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohela Shah

    Full Text Available SLX4 encodes a DNA repair protein that regulates three structure-specific endonucleases and is necessary for resistance to DNA crosslinking agents, topoisomerase I and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors. Recent studies have reported mutations in SLX4 in a new subtype of Fanconi anemia (FA, FA-P. Monoallelic defects in several FA genes are known to confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancers.To determine if SLX4 is involved in breast cancer susceptibility, we sequenced the entire SLX4 coding region in 738 (270 Jewish and 468 non-Jewish breast cancer patients with 2 or more family members affected by breast cancer and no known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. We found a novel nonsense (c.2469G>A, p.W823* mutation in one patient. In addition, we also found 51 missense variants [13 novel, 23 rare (MAF1%], of which 22 (5 novel and 17 rare were predicted to be damaging by Polyphen2 (score = 0.65-1. We performed functional complementation studies using p.W823* and 5 SLX4 variants (4 novel and 1 rare cDNAs in a human SLX4-null fibroblast cell line, RA3331. While wild type SLX4 and all the other variants fully rescued the sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC, campthothecin (CPT, and PARP inhibitor (Olaparib the p.W823* SLX4 mutant failed to do so.Loss-of-function mutations in SLX4 may contribute to the development of breast cancer in very rare cases.

  19. Distinct fibrosis pattern in desmosomal and phospholamban mutation carriers in hereditary cardiomyopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepehrkhouy, Shahrzad; Gho, Johannes M.I.H.; van Es, René; Harakalova, Magdalena; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Dooijes, Dennis; van der Smagt, Jasper J.; Buijsrogge, Marc P.; Hauer, Richard N.W.; Goldschmeding, Roel; de Weger, Roel A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Vink, Aryan

    2017-01-01

    Background Desmosomal and phospholamban (PLN) mutations are associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. Ultimately, most cardiomyopathic hearts develop significant cardiac fibrosis. Objective To compare the fibrosis patterns of desmosomal and p. Arg14del PLN–associated cardiomyopathies with the

  20. Carriers with functional null mutations in LAMA3 have localized enamel abnormalities due to haploinsufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gostynska, Katarzyna B.; Yuen, Wing Yan; Pasmooij, Anna Maria Gerdina; Stellingsma, Cornelius; Pas, Hendri H.; Lemmink, Henny; Jonkman, Marcel F.

    2017-01-01

    The hereditary blistering disease junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is always accompanied by structural enamel abnormalities of primary and secondary dentition, characterized as amelogenesis imperfecta. Autosomal recessive mutations in LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 encoding the heterotrimer laminin

  1. MUTATIONS OF THE SMARCB1 GENE IN HUMAN CANCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Mikhaylenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, the full exome sequencing helped to reveal a  set of mutations in the genes that are not oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes by definition, but play an important role in carcinogenesis and encode proteins involved in chromatin remodeling. Among chromatin remodeling systems, which operate through the ATP-dependent mechanism, the complex SWI/ SNF attracts the great attention. The complex consists of the catalytic ATPase (SMARCA2/4, a group of conservative core subunits (SMARCB1, SMARCC1/2, and variant subunits. Abnormalities in the genes coding for each of these components have been identified as driver mutations in various human tumors. The SMARCB1 gene is of interest for practical oncogenetics, with its typical genotype-phenotype correlations. Germinal inactivating mutations (frameshift insertions/deletions, full deletions of the gene, nonsense mutations lead to development of rhabdoid tumors in the kidneys and the brain in children in their first years of life, or even in utero. These tumors are highly malignant (Rhabdoid Tumor Predisposition Syndrome 1 – RTPS1. If a mutation carrier survives his/hers four years of life without manifestation RTPS1 with a missense mutation or has the mutation in the "hot spot" of the first or the last exon, then he/she will not develop rhabdoid tumors, but after 20 years of life, shwannomatosis may develop as multiple benign tumors of peripheral nerves. Finally, some point mutations in the exons 8–9 can result in Coffin-Siris syndrome characterized by mental retardation and developmental disorders, but no neoplasms. In this regard, rational referral of patients for direct DNA diagnostics of each of the described disease entities plays an important role, based on respective minimal criteria, as well as necessity of further development of NGS technologies (full genome and full exome sequencing that are able to sequence not only individual exons, but all candidate genes of the

  2. A novel deleterious PTEN mutation in a patient with early-onset bilateral breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradella, Laura Maria; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Turchetti, Daniela; Evangelisti, Cecilia; Ligorio, Claudia; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Neri, Iria; Zuntini, Roberta; Amato, Laura Benedetta; Ferrari, Simona; Martelli, Alberto Maria

    2014-01-01

    An early age at Breast Cancer (BC) onset may be a hallmark of inherited predisposition, but BRCA1/2 mutations are only found in a minority of younger BC patients. Among the others, a fraction may carry mutations in rarer BC genes, such as TP53, STK11, CDH1 and PTEN. As the identification of women harboring such mutations allows for targeted risk-management, the knowledge of associated manifestations and an accurate clinical and family history evaluation are warranted. We describe the case of a woman who developed an infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the right breast at the age of 32, a contralateral BC at age 36 and another BC of the right breast at 40. When she was 39 years-old, during a dermatological examination, mucocutaneous features suggestive of Cowden Syndrome, a disorder associated to germ-line PTEN mutations, were noticed. PTEN genetic testing revealed the novel c.71A > T (p.Asp24Val) mutation, whose deleterious effect, suggested by conservation data and in silico tools, was definitely demonstrated by the incapacity of mutant PTEN to inhibit Akt phosphorylation when used to complement PTEN-null cells. In BC tissue, despite the absence of LOH or somatic mutations of PTEN, Akt phosphorylation was markedly increased in comparison to normal tissue, thus implying additional somatic events into the deregulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and, presumably, into carcinogenesis. Hence, known oncogenic mutations in PIK3CA (exons 10 and 21) and AKT1 (exon 2) were screened in tumor DNA with negative results, which suggests that the responsible somatic event(s) is a different, uncommon one. This case stresses the importance of clinical/genetic assessment of early-onset BC patients in order to identify mutation carriers, who are at high risk of new events, so requiring tailored management. Moreover, it revealed a novel PTEN mutation with pathogenic effect, pointing out, however, the need for further efforts to elucidate the molecular steps of PTEN

  3. Statistical method on nonrandom clustering with application to somatic mutations in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejto Paul A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cancer is caused by the accumulation of tumor-specific mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressors that confer a selective growth advantage to cells. As a consequence of genomic instability and high levels of proliferation, many passenger mutations that do not contribute to the cancer phenotype arise alongside mutations that drive oncogenesis. While several approaches have been developed to separate driver mutations from passengers, few approaches can specifically identify activating driver mutations in oncogenes, which are more amenable for pharmacological intervention. Results We propose a new statistical method for detecting activating mutations in cancer by identifying nonrandom clusters of amino acid mutations in protein sequences. A probability model is derived using order statistics assuming that the location of amino acid mutations on a protein follows a uniform distribution. Our statistical measure is the differences between pair-wise order statistics, which is equivalent to the size of an amino acid mutation cluster, and the probabilities are derived from exact and approximate distributions of the statistical measure. Using data in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database, we have demonstrated that our method detects well-known clusters of activating mutations in KRAS, BRAF, PI3K, and β-catenin. The method can also identify new cancer targets as well as gain-of-function mutations in tumor suppressors. Conclusions Our proposed method is useful to discover activating driver mutations in cancer by identifying nonrandom clusters of somatic amino acid mutations in protein sequences.

  4. Hot spot mutations in Finnish non-small cell lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Nevala, Satu; Sarhadi, Virinder Kaur; Rönty, Mikko; Kettunen, Eeva; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Wolff, Henrik; Knuuttila, Aija; Knuutila, Sakari

    2016-09-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a common cancer with a poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to screen Finnish NSCLC tumor samples for common cancer-related mutations by targeted next generation sequencing and to determine their concurrences and associations with clinical features. Sequencing libraries were prepared from DNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor material of 425 patients using the AmpliSeq Colon and Lung panel covering mutational hot spot regions of 22 cancer genes. Sequencing was performed with the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Data analysis of the hot spot mutations revealed mutations in 77% of the patients, with 7% having 3 or more mutations reported in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database. Two of the most frequently mutated genes were TP53 (46%) and KRAS (25%). KRAS codon 12 mutations were the most recurrently occurring mutations. EGFR mutations were significantly associated with adenocarcinoma, female gender and never/light-smoking history; CTNNB1 mutations with light ex-smokers, PIK3CA and TP53 mutations with squamous cell carcinoma, and KRAS with adenocarcinoma. TP53 mutations were most prevalent in current smokers and ERBB2, ERBB4, PIK3CA, NRAS, NOTCH1, FBWX7, PTEN and STK11 mutations occurred exclusively in a group of ever-smokers, however the association was not statistically significant. No mutation was found that associated with asbestos exposure. Finnish NSCLC patients have a similar mutation profile as other Western patients, however with a higher frequency of BRAF mutations but a lower frequency of STK11 and ERBB2 mutations. Moreover, TP53 mutations occurred frequently with other gene mutations, most commonly with KRAS, MET, EGFR and PIK3CA mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Finding cancer driver mutations in the era of big data research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Rebecca C; Wong, Jason W H

    2018-04-02

    In the last decade, the costs of genome sequencing have decreased considerably. The commencement of large-scale cancer sequencing projects has enabled cancer genomics to join the big data revolution. One of the challenges still facing cancer genomics research is determining which are the driver mutations in an individual cancer, as these contribute only a small subset of the overall mutation profile of a tumour. Focusing primarily on somatic single nucleotide mutations in this review, we consider both coding and non-coding driver mutations, and discuss how such mutations might be identified from cancer sequencing datasets. We describe some of the tools and database that are available for the annotation of somatic variants and the identification of cancer driver genes. We also address the use of genome-wide variation in mutation load to establish background mutation rates from which to identify driver mutations under positive selection. Finally, we describe the ways in which mutational signatures can act as clues for the identification of cancer drivers, as these mutations may cause, or arise from, certain mutational processes. By defining the molecular changes responsible for driving cancer development, new cancer treatment strategies may be developed or novel preventative measures proposed.

  6. Nanomaterial-based drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    This brief summarizes different types of organic and inorganic nanomaterials for drug delivery in cancer therapy. It highlights that precisely designed nanomaterials will be the next-generation therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  7. A prospective investigation of predictive and modifiable risk factors for breast cancer in unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinan, Emer M; Hussey, Juliette; McGarrigle, Sarah A; Healy, Laura A; O’Sullivan, Jacintha N; Bennett, Kathleen; Connolly, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide. The lifetime risk of a woman being diagnosed with breast cancer is approximately 12.5%. For women who carry the deleterious mutation in either of the BRCA genes, BRCA1 or BRCA2, the risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer is significantly increased. In recent years there has been increased penetrance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 associated breast cancer, prompting investigation into the role of modifiable risk factors in this group. Previous investigations into this topic have relied on participants recalling lifetime weight changes and subjective methods of recording physical activity. The influence of obesity-related biomarkers, which may explain the link between obesity, physical activity and breast cancer risk, has not been investigated prospectively in this group. This paper describes the design of a prospective cohort study investigating the role of predictive and modifiable risk factors for breast cancer in unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers. Participants will be recruited from breast cancer family risk clinics and genetics clinics. Lifestyle risk factors that will be investigated will include body composition, metabolic syndrome and its components, physical activity and dietary intake. PBMC telomere length will be measured as a potential predictor of breast cancer occurrence. Measurements will be completed on entry to the study and repeated at two years and five years. Participants will also be followed annually by questionnaire to track changes in risk factor status and to record cancer occurrence. Data will be analysed using multiple regression models. The study has an accrual target of 352 participants. The results from this study will provide valuable information regarding the role of modifiable lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer in women with a deleterious mutation in the BRCA gene. Additionally, the study will attempt to identify potential blood biomarkers which may be predictive

  8. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Brohet, Richard M; Tops, Carli M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. METHODS: Data were collected from 98...... PMS2 families ascertained from family cancer clinics that included a total of 2,548 family members and 377 proven mutation carriers. To adjust for potential ascertainment bias, a modified segregation analysis model was used to calculate colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC) risks....... Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. RESULTS: The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52...

  9. Biology of lung cancer: genetic mutation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    At present, most cases of unresectable cancer cannot be cured. Genetic mutations, EMT, and cancer stem cells are three major issues linked to poor prognosis in such cases, all connected by inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity. Issues on inter-/intra-tumor heterogeneity of genetic mutation could be resolved with recent and future technologies of deep sequencers, whereas, regarding such issues as the "same genome, different epigenome/phenotype", we expect to solve many of these problems in the future through further research in stem cell biology. We herein review and discuss the three major issues in the biology of cancers, especially from the standpoint of stem cell biology.

  10. Is thyroidectomy necessary in RET mutations carriers of the familial medullary thyroid carcinoma syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H S; Torring, H; Godballe, C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The results and consequences of genetic testing in a family with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) are described. METHODS: In the screening of relatives, serum calcitonin is replaced by RET mutation analysis that was performed in families suspected of hereditary medullary th...

  11. White matter hyperintensities are seen only in GRN mutation carriers in the GENFI cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sudre, C.H. (Carole H.); M. Bocchetta (Martina); D.M. Cash (David M); D.L. Thomas (David L); Woollacott, I. (Ione); Dick, K.M. (Katrina M.); J.C. van Swieten (John); B. Borroni (Barbara); D. Galimberti (Daniela); M. Masellis (Mario); M.C. Tartaglia (Maria Carmela); J.B. Rowe (James); M.J. Graff (Maud J.L.); F. Tagliavini (Fabrizio); G.B. Frisoni (Giovanni B.); R. Laforce (Robert); E. Finger (Elizabeth); A. De Mendonça (Alexandre); S. Sorbi (Sandro); S. Ourselin (Sebastien); M.J. Cardoso (Manuel Jorge); J.D. Rohrer (Jonathan D)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractGenetic frontotemporal dementia is most commonly caused by mutations in the progranulin (GRN), microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) genes. Previous small studies have reported the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities

  12. Progranulin Levels in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid in Granulin Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.H.H. Meeter (Lieke H.H.); Patzke, H. (Holger); Loewen, G. (Gordon); E.G.P. Dopper (Elise); Y. Pijnenburg (Yolande); A.S. Thornton (Andrew); J.C. van Swieten (John)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pathogenic mutations in the granulin gene (GRN) are causative in 5-10% of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), mostly leading to reduced progranulin protein (PGRN) levels. Upcoming therapeutic trials focus on enhancing PGRN levels. Methods: Fluctuations in plasma PGRN

  13. Genotype-phenotype associations in filaggrin loss-of-function mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landeck, Lilla; Visser, Maaike; Kezic, Sanja; John, Swen M.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) have been reported to be associated with specific phenotypic characteristics such as hyperlinearity and keratosis pilaris. To study phenotypic features in patients with occupational irritant contact eczema of the hands in relation to FLG

  14. DaT-SPECT assessment depicts dopamine depletion among asymptomatic G2019S LRRK2 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Artzi

    Full Text Available Identification of early changes in Dopamine-Transporter (DaT SPECT imaging expected in the prodromal phase of Parkinson's disease (PD, are usually overlooked. Carriers of the G2019S LRRK2 mutation are known to be at high risk for developing PD, compared to non-carriers. In this work we aimed to study early changes in Dopamine uptake in non-manifesting PD carriers (NMC of the G2019S LRRK2 mutation using quantitative DaT-SPECT analysis and to examine the potential for early prediction of PD. Eighty Ashkenazi-Jewish subjects were included in this study: eighteen patients with PD; thirty-one NMC and thirty-one non-manifesting non-carriers (NMNC. All subjects underwent a through clinical assessment including evaluation of motor, olfactory, affective and non-motor symptoms and DaT-SPECT imaging. A population based DaT-SPECT template was created based on the NMNC cohort, and data driven volumes-of-interest (VOIs were defined. Comparisons between groups were performed based on VOIs and voxel-wise analysis. The striatum area of all three cohorts was segmented into four VOIs, corresponding to the right/left dorsal and ventral striatum. Significant differences in clinical measures were found between patients with PD and non-manifesting subjects with no differences between NMC and NMNC. Significantly lower uptake (p<0.001 was detected in the right and left dorsal striatum in the PD group (2.2±0.3, 2.3±0.4 compared to the NMC (4.2±0.6, 4.3±0.5 and NMNC (4.5±0.6, 4.6±0.6, and significantly (p = 0.05 lower uptake in the right dorsal striatum in the NMC group compared to NMNC. Converging results were obtained using voxel-wise analysis. Two NMC participants, who later phenoconverted into PD, demonstrated reduced uptake mainly in the dorsal striatum. No significant correlations were found between the DaT-SPECT uptake in the different VOIs and clinical and behavioral assessments in the non-manifesting groups. This study shows the clinical value of

  15. BRCA2, EGFR, and NTRK mutations in mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancers with MSH2 or MLH1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deihimi, Safoora; Lev, Avital; Slifker, Michael; Shagisultanova, Elena; Xu, Qifang; Jung, Kyungsuk; Vijayvergia, Namrata; Ross, Eric A; Xiu, Joanne; Swensen, Jeffrey; Gatalica, Zoran; Andrake, Mark; Dunbrack, Roland L; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2017-06-20

    Deficient mismatch repair (MMR) and microsatellite instability (MSI) contribute to ~15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs). We hypothesized MSI leads to mutations in DNA repair proteins including BRCA2 and cancer drivers including EGFR. We analyzed mutations among a discovery cohort of 26 MSI-High (MSI-H) and 558 non-MSI-H CRCs profiled at Caris Life Sciences. Caris-profiled MSI-H CRCs had high mutation rates (50% vs 14% in non-MSI-H, P MLH1-mutant CRCs showed higher mutation rates in BRCA2 compared to non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (38% vs 6%, P MLH1-mutant CRCs included 75 unique mutations not known to occur in breast or pancreatic cancer per COSMIC v73. Only 5 deleterious BRCA2 mutations in CRC were previously reported in the BIC database as germ-line mutations in breast cancer. Some BRCA2 mutations were predicted to disrupt interactions with partner proteins DSS1 and RAD51. Some CRCs harbored multiple BRCA2 mutations. EGFR was mutated in 45.5% of MSH2/MLH1-mutant and 6.5% of non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (P MLH1-mutant CRC including NTRK1 I699V, NTRK2 P716S, and NTRK3 R745L. Our findings have clinical relevance regarding therapeutic targeting of BRCA2 vulnerabilities, EGFR mutations or other identified oncogenic drivers such as NTRK in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs or other tumors with mismatch repair deficiency.

  16. A Site Specific Model And Analysis Of The Neutral Somatic Mutation Rate In Whole-Genome Cancer Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertl, Johanna; Guo, Qianyun; Rasmussen, Malene Juul

    2017-01-01

    Detailed modelling of the neutral mutational process in cancer cells is crucial for identifying driver mutations and understanding the mutational mechanisms that act during cancer development. The neutral mutational process is very complex: whole-genome analyses have revealed that the mutation ra...

  17. A Study on BRCA1/2 Mutations, Hormone Status and HER-2 Status in Korean Women with Early-onset Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Doo Ho; Jin, So Young; Lee, Dong Wha; Kim, Eun Seog; Kim, Yong Ho

    2008-01-01

    Women with breast cancer diagnosed at an age of 40 years or younger have a greater prevalence of germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations than the prevalence of women with breast cancer diagnosed at older ages. Several immunohistochemical characteristics have been identified in breast cancers from studies of Caucasian women with BRCA1/2 mutations having familial or early-onset breast cancers. The aim of this study is to determine whether early-onset breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, who were not selected from a family history, could be distinguished by the use of immunohistochemical methods and could be distinguished from breast cancer in women of a similar age without a germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. We also analyzed the prognostic difference between BRCA1/2 related and BRCA1/2 non-related patients by the use of univariate and multivariate analysis. Breast cancer tissue specimens from Korean women with early-onset breast cancers were studied using a tumor tissue microarray. Immunohistochemical staining of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER-2, as well as the histology and grade of these specimens, were compared. The prognostic impact of immunohistochemical and histological factors as well as the BRCA1/2 mutation status was investigated separately. There were 14 cases and 16 deleterious BRCA1/2 mutations among 101 patients tested. A family history (4/14) and bilateral breast cancers (3/9) were high risk factors for BRCA1/2 mutations. BRCA1/2- associated cancers demonstrated more expression of ER-negative (19.4% versus 5.1%, p=0.038) and HER-2 negative than BRCA1/2 negative tumors, especially for tumors with BRCA1 tumors The BRCA1/2 mutation rate for patients with triple negative tumors (negative expression of ER, PR and HER-2) was 24.2%. Tumor size, nodal status, and HER-2 expression status were significantly associated with disease free survival, as determined by univariate and multivariate analysis, but the BRCA1/2 status was

  18. Activating HER2 mutations in HER2 gene amplification negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Ron; Kavuri, Shyam M; Searleman, Adam C; Shen, Wei; Shen, Dong; Koboldt, Daniel C; Monsey, John; Goel, Nicholas; Aronson, Adam B; Li, Shunqiang; Ma, Cynthia X; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R; Ellis, Matthew J

    2013-02-01

    Data from 8 breast cancer genome-sequencing projects identified 25 patients with HER2 somatic mutations in cancers lacking HER2 gene amplification. To determine the phenotype of these mutations, we functionally characterized 13 HER2 mutations using in vitro kinase assays, protein structure analysis, cell culture, and xenograft experiments. Seven of these mutations are activating mutations, including G309A, D769H, D769Y, V777L, P780ins, V842I, and R896C. HER2 in-frame deletion 755-759, which is homologous to EGF receptor (EGFR) exon 19 in-frame deletions, had a neomorphic phenotype with increased phosphorylation of EGFR or HER3. L755S produced lapatinib resistance, but was not an activating mutation in our experimental systems. All of these mutations were sensitive to the irreversible kinase inhibitor, neratinib. These findings show that HER2 somatic mutation is an alternative mechanism to activate HER2 in breast cancer and they validate HER2 somatic mutations as drug targets for breast cancer treatment. We show that the majority of HER2 somatic mutations in breast cancer patients are activating mutations that likely drive tumorigenesis. Several patients had mutations that are resistant to the reversible HER2 inhibitor lapatinib, but are sensitive to the irreversible HER2 inhibitor, neratinib. Our results suggest that patients with HER2 mutation–positive breast cancers could benefit from existing HER2-targeted drugs.

  19. Germline mutations in 40 cancer susceptibility genes among Chinese patients with high hereditary risk breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junyan; Jing, Ruilin; Wei, Hongyi; Wang, Minghao; Qi, Xiaowei; Liu, Haoxi; Liu, Jian; Ou, Jianghua; Jiang, Weihua; Tian, Fuguo; Sheng, Yuan; Li, Hengyu; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Ruishan; Guan, Aihua; Liu, Ke; Jiang, Hongchuan; Ren, Yu; He, Jianjun; Huang, Weiwei; Liao, Ning; Cai, Xiangjun; Ming, Jia; Ling, Rui; Xu, Yan; Hu, Chunyan; Zhang, Jianguo; Guo, Baoliang; Ouyang, Lizhi; Shuai, Ping; Liu, Zhenzhen; Zhong, Ling; Zeng, Zhen; Zhang, Ting; Xuan, Zhaoling; Tan, Xuanni; Liang, Junbin; Pan, Qinwen; Chen, Li; Zhang, Fan; Fan, Linjun; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Xinhua; Li, Jingbo; Chen, Chongjian; Jiang, Jun

    2018-05-12

    Multigene panel testing of breast cancer predisposition genes have been extensively conducted in Europe and America, which is relatively rare in Asia however. In this study, we assessed the frequency of germline mutations in 40 cancer predisposition genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, among a large cohort of Chinese patients with high hereditary risk of BC. From 2015 to 2016, consecutive BC patients from 26 centers of China with high hereditary risk were recruited (n=937). Clinical information was collected and next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed using blood samples of participants to identify germline mutations. In total, we acquired 223 patients with putative germline mutations, including 159 in BRCA1/2, 61 in 15 other BC susceptibility genes and 3 in both BRCA1/2 and non-BRCA1/2 gene. Major mutant non-BRCA1/2 genes were TP53 (n=18), PALB2 (n=11), CHEK2 (n=6), ATM (n=6), and BARD1 (n=5). No factors predicted pathologic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes when treated as a whole. TP53 mutations were associated with HER-2 positive BC and younger age at diagnosis; and CHEK2 and PALB2 mutations were enriched in patients with luminal BC. Among high hereditary risk Chinese BC patients, 23.8% contained germline mutations, including 6.8% in non-BRCA1/2 genes. TP53 and PALB2 had a relatively high mutation rates (1.9% and 1.2%). Although no factors predicted for detrimental mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes, some clinical features were associated with mutations of several particular genes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 UICC.

  20. Detection of EGFR mutations with mutation-specific antibodies in stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viteri Santiago

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunohistochemistry (IHC with mutation-specific antibodies may be an ancillary method of detecting EGFR mutations in lung cancer patients. Methods EGFR mutation status was analyzed by DNA assays, and compared with IHC results in five non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines and tumor samples from 78 stage IV NSCLC patients. Results IHC correctly identified del 19 in the H1650 and PC9 cell lines, L858R in H1975, and wild-type EGFR in H460 and A549, as well as wild-type EGFR in tumor samples from 22 patients. IHC with the mAb against EGFR with del 19 was highly positive for the protein in all 17 patients with a 15-bp (ELREA deletion in exon 19, whereas in patients with other deletions, IHC was weakly positive in 3 cases and negative in 9 cases. IHC with the mAb against the L858R mutation showed high positivity for the protein in 25/27 (93% patients with exon 21 EGFR mutations (all with L858R but did not identify the L861Q mutation in the remaining two patients. Conclusions IHC with mutation-specific mAbs against EGFR is a promising method for detecting EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients. However these mAbs should be validated with additional studies to clarify their possible role in routine clinical practice for screening EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients.

  1. Exome mutation burden predicts clinical outcome in ovarian cancer carrying mutated BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    drugs and relative to non-mutation carriers present a favorable clinical outcome following therapy. Genome sequencing studies have shown a high number of mutations in the tumor genome in patients carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (mBRCA). The present study used exome-sequencing and SNP 6 array data...... between low Nmut and shorter PFS and OS in mBRCA HGSOC by Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses. The association was also significant when the analysis was limited to germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutated patients with SNP array-determined loss of heterozygosity of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 locus in the tumors....... In the mBRCA HGSOC tumors, Nmut was correlated with the genome fraction with loss of heterozygosity and with number of telomeric allelic imbalance, genomic measures evaluating chromosomal instability. However, no significant association between Nmut and PFS or OS was found in HGSOC carrying wild-type BRCA1...

  2. TP53 mutation spectrum in smokers and never smoking lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Rita Halvorsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: TP53 mutations are among the most common mutations found in lung cancers, identified as an independent prognostic factor in many types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and prognostic impact of TP53 mutations in never-smokers and in different histological subtypes of lung cancer.Methods: We analysed tumour tissue from 394 non-small cell carcinomas including adenocarcinomas (n=229, squamous cell carcinomas (n=112, large cell carcinomas (n=30 and others (n=23 for mutations in TP53 by the use of Sanger sequencing (n=394 and next generation sequencing (n=100. Results: TP53 mutations were identified in 47.2% of the samples, with the highest frequency (65% of mutations among squamous cell carcinomas. Among never-smokers, 36% carried a TP53 mutation, identified as a significant independent negative prognostic factor in this subgroup. For large cell carcinomas, a significantly prolonged progression free survival was found for those carrying a TP53 mutation. In addition, the frequency of frameshift mutations was doubled in squamous cell carcinomas (20.3% compared to adenocarcinomas (9.1%.Conclusion: TP53 mutation patterns differ between the histological subgroups of lung cancers, as also influenced by smoking history. This indicates that the histological subtypes in lung cancer are genetically different, and that smoking-induced TP53 mutations may have a different biological impact than TP53 mutations occurring in never-smokers.

  3. When knowledge of a heritable gene mutation comes out of the blue: treatment-focused genetic testing in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, B; Quinn, V F; Gleeson, M; Kirk, J; Tucker, K M; Rahman, B; Saunders, C; Watts, K J; Peate, M; Geelhoed, E; Barlow-Stewart, K; Field, M; Harris, M; Antill, Y C; Mitchell, G

    2016-11-01

    Selection of women for treatment-focused genetic testing (TFGT) following a new diagnosis of breast cancer is changing. Increasingly a patient's age and tumour characteristics rather than only their family history are driving access to TFGT, but little is known about the impact of receiving carrier-positive results in individuals with no family history of cancer. This study assesses the role of knowledge of a family history of cancer on psychosocial adjustment to TFGT in both women with and without mutation carrier-positive results. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with 20 women who had undergone TFGT, and who had been purposively sampled to represent women both family history and carrier status, and subjected to a rigorous qualitative analysis. It was found that mutation carriers without a family history reported difficulties in making surgical decisions quickly, while in carriers with a family history, a decision regarding surgery, electing for bilateral mastectomy (BM), had often already been made before receipt of their result. Long-term adjustment to a mutation-positive result was hindered by a sense of isolation not only by those without a family history but also those with a family history who lacked an affected relative with whom they could identify. Women with a family history who had no mutation identified and who had not elected BM reported a lack of closure following TFGT. These findings indicate support deficits hindering adjustment to positive TFGT results for women with and without a family history, particularly in regard to immediate decision-making about risk-reducing surgery.

  4. Obesity, Aspirin, and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Carriers of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Movahedi, Mohammad; Bishop, D Timothy; Macrae, Finlay

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In the general population, increased adiposity is a significant risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), but whether obesity has similar effects in those with hereditary CRC is uncertain. This prospective study investigated the association between body mass index and cancer risk...... was 25.0 months, and mean follow-up was 55.7 months. RESULTS: During follow-up, 55 of 937 participants developed CRC. For obese participants, CRC risk was 2.41× (95% CI, 1.22 to 4.85) greater than for underweight and normal-weight participants (reference group), and CRC risk increased by 7% for each 1-kg....../m(2) increase in body mass index. The risk of all LS-related cancers in obese people was 1.77× (95% CI, 1.06 to 2.96; P = .03) greater than for the reference group. In subgroup analysis, obesity was associated with 3.72× (95% CI, 1.41 to 9.81) greater CRC risk in patients with LS with MLH1 mutation...

  5. Identification and Functional Testing of ERCC2 Mutations in a Multi-national Cohort of Patients with Familial Breast- and Ovarian Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Rump

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing application of gene panels for familial cancer susceptibility disorders will probably lead to an increased proposal of susceptibility gene candidates. Using ERCC2 DNA repair gene as an example, we show that proof of a possible role in cancer susceptibility requires a detailed dissection and characterization of the underlying mutations for genes with diverse cellular functions (in this case mainly DNA repair and basic cellular transcription. In case of ERCC2, panel sequencing of 1345 index cases from 587 German, 405 Lithuanian and 353 Czech families with breast and ovarian cancer (BC/OC predisposition revealed 25 mutations (3 frameshift, 2 splice-affecting, 20 missense, all absent or very rare in the ExAC database. While 16 mutations were unique, 9 mutations showed up repeatedly with population-specific appearance. Ten out of eleven mutations that were tested exemplarily in cell-based functional assays exert diminished excision repair efficiency and/or decreased transcriptional activation capability. In order to provide evidence for BC/OC predisposition, we performed familial segregation analyses and screened ethnically matching controls. However, unlike the recently published RECQL example, none of our recurrent ERCC2 mutations showed convincing co-segregation with BC/OC or significant overrepresentation in the BC/OC cohort. Interestingly, we detected that some deleterious founder mutations had an unexpectedly high frequency of > 1% in the corresponding populations, suggesting that either homozygous carriers are not clinically recognized or homozygosity for these mutations is embryonically lethal. In conclusion, we provide a useful resource on the mutational landscape of ERCC2 mutations in hereditary BC/OC patients and, as our key finding, we demonstrate the complexity of correct interpretation for the discovery of "bonafide" breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  6. Profile of Mutations in the Reverse Transcriptase and Overlapping Surface Genes of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) in Treatment-Naïve Indonesian HBV Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamani, Laura Navika; Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Wasityastuti, Widya; Rinonce, Hanggoro Tri; Widasari, Dewiyani Indah; Juniastuti; Lusida, Maria Inge; Soetjipto; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2017-11-22

    Mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome are an important factor in low therapeutic effectiveness. Nonetheless, the prevalence of these mutations in HBV strains isolated previously in Indonesia has not been systematically examined. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the profile of mutations in the RT region and the associations of these mutations with amino acid changes in the surface protein in the virus of treatment-naïve Indonesian HBV carriers. Overall, 96 sequences of the full-length Indonesian HBV genomes (genotype B, n = 54; genotype C, n = 42) were retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Naturally occurring primary and/or compensatory drug resistance mutations were found in 6/54 (11.1%) genotype B strains and in 1/42 (2.4%) genotype C strains. The potential mutations underlying resistance to a nucleos(t)ide analog and/or pretreatment mutations were more frequent in both genotypes but more frequent in genotype C strains than in genotype B strains. The A-B interdomain region in the RT gene was more frequently mutated in genotype C than in genotype B (3.51 ± 2.53 vs. 1.08 ± 1.52, P < 0.001). Knowledge about the mutational profiles of the RT gene and changes in the surface protein may help clinicians to select the most appropriate antiviral drug and vaccination or HBV immunoglobulin regimen for management of HBV infection in Indonesia.

  7. Inhibition of Mutation: A Novel Approach to Preventing and Treating Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Romesberg, Floyd E

    2007-01-01

    .... Specific biochemical pathways are responsible for introducing mutation to the genome. Using drug(s) to inhibit one or more of these proteins and thereby prevent cancer is a novel and unique cancer prevention approach...

  8. Mutations in ATM, Radiation Exposure and Breast Cancer Risk Among Black and White Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schubert, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    .... An important and unresolved question of breast cancer etiology is whether there are other genes which have a more moderate effect on breast cancer risk, possibly involving more women than do other inherited mutations...

  9. Mutations in ATM, Radiation Exposure and Breast Cancer Risk Among Black and White Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, Mary

    1997-01-01

    .... An important and unresolved question of breast cancer etiology is whether there are other genes which have a more moderate effect on breast cancer risk, possibly involving more women than do other inherited mutations...

  10. Mutations in ATM, Radiation Exposure and Breast Cancer Risk Among Black and White Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schubert, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    .... An important and unresolved question of breast cancer etiology is whether there are other genes which have a more moderate effect on breast cancer risk, possibly involving more women than do other inherited mutations...

  11. Identification of coding and non-coding mutational hotspots in cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piraino, Scott W; Furney, Simon J

    2017-01-05

    The identification of mutations that play a causal role in tumour development, so called "driver" mutations, is of critical importance for understanding how cancers form and how they might be treated. Several large cancer sequencing projects have identified genes that are recurrently mutated in cancer patients, suggesting a role in tumourigenesis. While the landscape of coding drivers has been extensively studied and many of the most prominent driver genes are well characterised, comparatively less is known about the role of mutations in the non-coding regions of the genome in cancer development. The continuing fall in genome sequencing costs has resulted in a concomitant increase in the number of cancer whole genome sequences being produced, facilitating systematic interrogation of both the coding and non-coding regions of cancer genomes. To examine the mutational landscapes of tumour genomes we have developed a novel method to identify mutational hotspots in tumour genomes using both mutational data and information on evolutionary conservation. We have applied our methodology to over 1300 whole cancer genomes and show that it identifies prominent coding and non-coding regions that are known or highly suspected to play a role in cancer. Importantly, we applied our method to the entire genome, rather than relying on predefined annotations (e.g. promoter regions) and we highlight recurrently mutated regions that may have resulted from increased exposure to mutational processes rather than selection, some of which have been identified previously as targets of selection. Finally, we implicate several pan-cancer and cancer-specific candidate non-coding regions, which could be involved in tumourigenesis. We have developed a framework to identify mutational hotspots in cancer genomes, which is applicable to the entire genome. This framework identifies known and novel coding and non-coding mutional hotspots and can be used to differentiate candidate driver regions from

  12. Mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and other breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in Central and South American populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Lilian; Morales, Sebastian; de Mayo, Tomas; Gonzalez-Hormazabal, Patricio; Carrasco, Valentina; Godoy, Raul

    2017-10-06

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignancy among women worldwide. A major advance in the understanding of the genetic etiology of BC was the discovery of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) genes, which are considered high-penetrance BC genes. In non-carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, disease susceptibility may be explained of a small number of mutations in BRCA1/2 and a much higher proportion of mutations in ethnicity-specific moderate- and/or low-penetrance genes. In Central and South American populations, studied have focused on analyzing the distribution and prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations and other susceptibility genes that are scarce in Latin America as compared to North America, Europe, Australia, and Israel. Thus, the aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge regarding pathogenic BRCA variants and other BC susceptibility genes. We conducted a comprehensive review of 47 studies from 12 countries in Central and South America published between 2002 and 2017 reporting the prevalence and/or spectrum of mutations and pathogenic variants in BRCA1/2 and other BC susceptibility genes. The studies on BRCA1/2 mutations screened a total of 5956 individuals, and studies on susceptibility genes analyzed a combined sample size of 11,578 individuals. To date, a total of 190 different BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations in Central and South American populations have been reported in the literature. Pathogenic mutations or variants that increase BC risk have been reported in the following genes or genomic regions: ATM, BARD1, CHECK2, FGFR2, GSTM1, MAP3K1, MTHFR, PALB2, RAD51, TOX3, TP53, XRCC1, and 2q35.

  13. Challenging a dogma: co-mutations exist in MAPK pathway genes in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grellety, Thomas; Gros, Audrey; Pedeutour, Florence; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Duranton-Tanneur, Valerie; Italiano, Antoine; Soubeyran, Isabelle

    2016-10-01

    Sequencing of genes encoding mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway proteins in colorectal cancer (CRC) has established as dogma that of the genes in a pathway only a single one is ever mutated. We searched for cases with a mutation in more than one MAPK pathway gene (co-mutations). Tumor tissue samples of all patients presenting with CRC, and referred between 01/01/2008 and 01/06/2015 to three French cancer centers for determination of mutation status of RAS/RAF+/-PIK3CA, were retrospectively screened for co-mutations using Sanger sequencing or next-generation sequencing. We found that of 1791 colorectal patients with mutations in the MAPK pathway, 20 had a co-mutation, 8 of KRAS/NRAS, and some even with a third mutation. More than half of the mutations were in codons 12 and 13. We also found 3 cases with a co-mutation of NRAS/BRAF and 9 with a co-mutation of KRAS/BRAF. In 2 patients with a co-mutation of KRAS/NRAS, the co-mutation existed in the primary as well as in a metastasis, which suggests that co-mutations occur early during carcinogenesis and are maintained when a tumor disseminates. We conclude that co-mutations exist in the MAPK genes but with low frequency and as yet with unknown outcome implications.

  14. Contribution of the TP53 R337H mutation to the cancer burden in southern Brazil: Insights from the study of 55 families of children with adrenocortical tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellaro, Maria J; Seidinger, Ana L; Kang, Guolian; Abrahão, Renata; Miranda, Eliana C M; Pounds, Stanley B; Cardinalli, Izilda A; Aguiar, Simone S; Figueiredo, Bonald C; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Brandalise, Silvia R; Yunes, José A; Barros-Filho, Antônio de A; Ribeiro, Raul C

    2017-08-15

    The tumor protein p53 (TP53) arginine-to-histidine mutation at codon 337 (R337H) predisposes children to adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) and, rarely, to other childhood tumors, but its impact on adult cancer remains undetermined. The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency and types of cancer in relatives of children with ACT who carry the TP53 R337H mutation. TP53 R337H testing was offered to relatives of probands with ACT. The parental lineage segregating the R337H mutation was identified in all families. The frequency and distribution of cancer types were compared according to R337H status. The authors' data also were compared with those publicly available for children with TP53 mutations other than R337H. The mean and median follow-up times for the probands with ACT were 11.2 years and 9.7 years (range, 3-32 years), respectively. During this time, cancer was diagnosed in 12 of 81 first-degree relatives (14.8%) carrying the R337H mutation but in only 1 of 94 noncarriers (1.1%; P = .0022). At age 45 years, the cumulative risk of cancer was 21% (95% confidence interval, 5%-33%) in carriers and 2% (95% confidence interval, 0%-4%) in noncarriers (P = .008). The frequency of cancer was higher in the R337H segregating lineages than in the nonsegregating lineages (249 of 1410 vs 66 of 984 individuals; P cancer were the most common types. TP53 R337H carriers have a lifelong predisposition to cancer with a bimodal age distribution: 1 peak, represented by ACT, occurs in the first decade of life, and another peak of diverse cancer types occurs in the fifth decade. The current findings have implications for genetic counseling and surveillance of R337H carriers. Cancer 2017;123:3150-58. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  15. OGG1 Mutations and Risk of Female Breast Cancer: Meta-Analysis and Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashif Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In first part of this study association between OGG1 polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility was explored by meta-analysis. Second part of the study involved 925 subjects, used for mutational analysis of OGG1 gene using PCR-SSCP and sequencing. Fifteen mutations were observed, which included five intronic mutations, four splice site mutations, two 3′UTR mutations, three missense mutations, and a nonsense mutation. Significantly (pG and 3′UTR variant g.9798848G>A. Among intronic mutations, highest (~15 fold increase in breast cancer risk was associated with g.9793680G>A (p<0.009. Similarly ~14-fold increased risk was associated with Val159Gly (p<0.01, ~17-fold with Gly221Arg (p<0.005, and ~18-fold with Ser326Cys (p<0.004 in breast cancer patients compared with controls, whereas analysis of nonsense mutation showed that ~13-fold (p<0.01 increased breast cancer risk was associated with Trp375STOP in patients compared to controls. In conclusion, a significant association was observed between OGG1 germ line mutations and breast cancer risk. These findings provide evidence that OGG1 may prove to be a good candidate of better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer.

  16. Cancer risks and immunohistochemical profiles linked to the Danish MLH1 Lynch syndrome founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Ladelund, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Founder mutations with a large impact in distinct populations have been described in Lynch syndrome. In Denmark, the MLH1 c.1667+2_1667_+8TAAATCAdelinsATTT mutation accounts for 25 % of the MLH1 mutant families. We used the national Danish hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer register...... to estimate the cumulative lifetime risks for Lynch syndrome-associated cancer in 16 founder mutation families with comparison to 47 other MLH1 mutant families. The founder mutation conferred comparable risks for colorectal cancer (relative risks, RR, of 0.99 for males and 0.79 for females) and lower risks...... in 68 % with extensive inter-tumor variability despite the same underlying germline mutation. In conclusion, the Danish MLH1 founder mutation that accounts for a significant proportion of Lynch syndrome and is associated with a lower risk for extracolonic cancers....

  17. Mutations in TP53 tumor suppressor gene in wood dust-related sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Bornholdt, Jette; Heikkilä, Pirjo

    2010-01-01

    The causal role of work-related exposure to wood dust in the development of sinonasal cancer has long been established by numerous epidemiologic studies. To study molecular changes in these tumors, we analyzed TP53 gene mutations in 358 sinonasal cancer cases with or without occupational exposure...... affected the ORs only slightly. Smoking did not influence the occurrence of TP53 mutation; however, it was associated with multiple mutations (p = 0.03). As far as we are aware, this is the first study to demonstrate a high prevalence of TP53 mutation-positive cases in a large collection of sinonasal...... cancers with data on occupational exposure. Our results indicate that mutational mechanisms, in particular TP53 mutations, are associated with work-related exposure to wood dust in sinonasal cancer....

  18. Decrease in specific micronutrient intake in colorectal cancer patients with tumors presenting Ki-ras mutation

    OpenAIRE

    JORDI SALAS; NURIA LASO; SERGI MAS; M. JOSE LAFUENTE; XAVIER CASTERAD; MANUEL TRIAS; ANTONIO BALLESTA; RAFAEL MOLINA; CARLOS ASCASO; SHICHUN ZHENG; JOHN K. WIENCKE; AMALIA LAFUENTE

    2004-01-01

    Decrease in specific micronutrient intake in colorectal cancer patients with tumors presenting Ki-ras mutation BACKGROUND: The diversity of the Mediterranean diet and the heterogeneity of acquired genetic alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) led us to examine the possible association between dietary factors and mutations, such as Ki-ras mutations, in genes implicated in the pathogenesis of these neoplasms. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study was based on 246 cases and 296 controls. For th...

  19. Refined histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status: A large-scale analysis of breast cancer characteristics from the BCAC, CIMBA, and ENIGMA consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); F.J. Couch (Fergus); M. Parsons (Marilyn); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); S. Healey (Sue); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); E. Hahnen (Eric); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Steinemann (Doris); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); S.D. Ellis (Steve); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); J. Perkins (Jo); D.G. Evans (Gareth); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Adlard; R. Davidson (Rosemarie); T.J. Cole (Trevor); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Pasini (Barbara); L. Papi (Laura); L. Varesco (Liliana); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K. Offitt (Kenneth); A. Jakubowska (Anna); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; J. Rantala (Johanna); Å. Borg (Åke); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A. Miron (Alexander); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); T. Caldes (Trinidad); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A.E. Toland (Amanda); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Montagna (Marco); J. Garber (Judy); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); A. Osorio (Ana); R.E. Factor (Rachel E.); M.B. Terry (Mary B.); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad); N. Tung (Nadine); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); F. Blows (Fiona); A.M. Dunning (Alison); E. Provenzano (Elena); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); S. Verhoef; P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A.B. Ekici (Arif); D.J. Slamon (Dennis); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A. Muranen (Taru); P. Heikkilä (Päivi); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); J.E. Olson (Janet); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); E.M. John (Esther); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); D. van West; U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); L. Durcan (Lorraine); L. Jones (Louise); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Johnson (Nichola); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); A.L. Bane (Anita L.); G. Glendon (Gord); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); L. Baglietto (Laura); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Dörk (Thilo); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); H. Surovy (Harald); R. Yang (Rongxi); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.M. Collée (Margriet); J.W.M. Martens (John); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Joseph (Vijai); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); A. González-Neira (Anna); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Zamora (Pilar); J. Benítez (Javier); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); D. Zaffaroni (D.); M. Barile (Monica); F. Capra (Fabio); P. Radice (Paolo); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D. Goldgar (David)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The distribution of histopathological features of invasive breast tumors in BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation carriers differs from that of individuals with no known mutation. Histopathological features thus have utility for mutation prediction, including statistical

  20. Retinal vascular abnormalities and dragged maculae in a carrier with a new NDP mutation (c.268delC) that caused severe Norrie disease in the proband.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Phoebe; Shankar, Suma P; Duncan, Jacque; Slavotinek, Anne; Stone, Edwin M; Rutar, Tina

    2010-02-01

    Norrie disease (ND) is caused by mutations in the ND pseudoglioma (NDP) gene (MIM 300658) located at chromosome Xp11.4-p11.3. ND is characterized by abnormal retinal vascular development and vitreoretinal disorganization presenting at birth. Systemic manifestations include sensorineural deafness, progressive mental disorder, behavioral and psychological problems, growth failure, and seizures. Other vitreoretinopathies that are associated with NDP gene mutations include X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, Coats disease, persistent fetal vasculature, and retinopathy of prematurity. Phenotypic variability associated with NDP gene mutations has been well documented in affected male patients. However, there are limited data on signs in female carriers, with mild peripheral retinal abnormalities reported in both carrier and noncarrier females of families with NDP gene mutations. Here, we report a family harboring a single base-pair deletion, c.268delC, in the NDP gene causing a severe ND phenotype in the male proband and peripheral retinal vascular abnormalities with dragged maculae similar to those observed in familial exudative vitreoretinopathy in his carrier mother. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pathogenic mutations of the human mitochondrial citrate carrier SLC25A1 lead to impaired citrate export required for lipid, dolichol, ubiquinone and sterol synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majd, Homa; King, Martin S; Smith, Anthony C; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2018-01-01

    Missense mutations of the human mitochondrial citrate carrier, encoded by the SLC25A1 gene, lead to an autosomal recessive neurometabolic disorder characterised by neonatal-onset encephalopathy with severe muscular weakness, intractable seizures, respiratory distress, and lack of psychomotor development, often resulting in early death. Here, we have measured the effect of all twelve known pathogenic mutations on the transport activity. The results show that nine mutations abolish transport of citrate completely, whereas the other three reduce the transport rate by >70%, indicating that impaired citrate transport is the most likely primary cause of the disease. Some mutations may be detrimental to the structure of the carrier, whereas others may impair key functional elements, such as the substrate binding site and the salt bridge network on the matrix side of the carrier. To understand the consequences of impaired citrate transport on metabolism, the substrate specificity was also determined, showing that the human citrate carrier predominantly transports citrate, isocitrate, cis-aconitate, phosphoenolpyruvate and malate. Although D-2- and L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria is a metabolic hallmark of the disease, it is unlikely that the citrate carrier plays a significant role in the removal of hydroxyglutarate from the cytosol for oxidation to oxoglutarate in the mitochondrial matrix. In contrast, computer simulations of central metabolism predict that the export of citrate from the mitochondrion cannot be fully compensated by other pathways, restricting the cytosolic production of acetyl-CoA that is required for the synthesis of lipids, sterols, dolichols and ubiquinone, which in turn explains the severe disease phenotypes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Circulating mutational portrait of cancer: manifestation of aggressive clonal events in both early and late stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solid tumors residing in tissues and organs leave footprints in circulation through circulating tumor cells (CTCs and circulating tumor DNAs (ctDNA. Characterization of the ctDNA portraits and comparison with tumor DNA mutational portraits may reveal clinically actionable information on solid tumors that is traditionally achieved through more invasive approaches. Methods We isolated ctDNAs from plasma of patients of 103 lung cancer and 74 other solid tumors of different tissue origins. Deep sequencing using the Guardant360 test was performed to identify mutations in 73 clinically actionable genes, and the results were associated with clinical characteristics of the patient. The mutation profiles of 37 lung cancer cases with paired ctDNA and tumor genomic DNA sequencing were used to evaluate clonal representation of tumor in circulation. Five lung cancer cases with longitudinal ctDNA sampling were monitored for cancer progression or response to treatments. Results Mutations in TP53, EGFR, and KRAS genes are most prevalent in our cohort. Mutation rates of ctDNA are similar in early (I and II and late stage (III and IV cancers. Mutation in DNA repair genes BRCA1, BRCA2, and ATM are found in 18.1% (32/177 of cases. Patients with higher mutation rates had significantly higher mortality rates. Lung cancer of never smokers exhibited significantly higher ctDNA mutation rates as well as higher EGFR and ERBB2 mutations than ever smokers. Comparative analysis of ctDNA and tumor DNA mutation data from the same patients showed that key driver mutations could be detected in plasma even when they were present at a minor clonal population in the tumor. Mutations of key genes found in the tumor tissue could remain in circulation even after frontline radiotherapy and chemotherapy suggesting these mutations represented resistance mechanisms. Longitudinal sampling of five lung cancer cases showed distinct changes in ctDNA mutation portraits that

  3. Detection of p53 gene mutations in bronchial biopsy samples of patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irshad, S.; Nawaz, T.

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue. It is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1.2 million deaths annually. The goal of this study was to detect the p53 gene mutations in lung cancer, in local population of Lahore, Pakistan. These mutations were screened in the bronchial biopsy lung cancer tissue samples. For this purpose microtomed tissue sections were collected. Following DNA extraction from tissue sections, the p53 mutations were detected by amplifying Exon 7 (145 bp) and Exon 8 (152 bp) of the p53 gene. PCR then followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for screening the p53 gene mutations. This results of SSCP were visualized of silver staining. The results showed different banding pattern indicating the presence of mutation. Majority of the mutations were found in Exon 7. Exon 7 of p53 gene may be the mutation hotspot in lung cancer. In lung cancer, the most prevalent mutations of p53 gene are G -> T transversions; other types of insertions and deletions are also expected, however, the exact nature of mutations in presented work could be confirmed by direct sequencing. (author)

  4. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warangkana Lohcharoenkal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

  5. Protein nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

  6. Actigraphy Detects Greater Intra-Individual Variability During Gait in Non-Manifesting LRRK2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Lieneke; Lim, Andrew S; Visanji, Naomi P; Huang, Jana; Ghate, Taneera; Mestre, Tiago A; AlDakheel, Amaal; Connolly, Barbara S; Gasca-Salas, Carmen; Kern, Drew S; Jain, Jennifer; Slow, Elizabeth J; Pondal, Margarita; Faust-Socher, Achinoam; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Tomlinson, George; Lang, Anthony E; Marras, Connie

    2018-01-01

    With recent advances in the search for disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD) the importance of identifying prodromal markers becomes greater. Non-manifesting LRRK2 mutation carriers (NMC) are at risk for developing PD, and provide a population in which to identify possible markers. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that NMC have differences in daily activity, fragmentation of sleep, arm swing asymmetry, and movement variability during walking, detectable by actigraphy, as compared to matched control subjects. Eleven NMC, fourteen PD patients (4 LRRK2-PD, 10 idiopathic PD (iPD)), and twenty-nine controls wore wristbands containing an accelerometer for seven days, and performed a daily walking task. Outcome measures included daily activity, fragmentation of activity, fragmentation of sleep, arm swing asymmetry during walking, and intra-individual variability. Compared to healthy controls, both NMC and LRRK2/iPD showed higher intra-individual variability in activity during walking compared to healthy controls. Individuals with LRRK2-PD/iPD, but not NMC, tend to have lower activity levels, more arm swing asymmetry and less increase of arm swing with transition from slow to faster walking speed compared to healthy controls. Higher intra-individual variability of gait-associated movements might be a useful biomarker of prodromal PD. These results encourage replication in a larger sample and longitudinal analysis is warranted.

  7. Splice site mutations in mismatch repair genes and risk of cancer in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that splice site variations in MSH2 and MLH1 are associated with increased risk of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and of cancer in general in the general population. In a cohort of 154 HNPCC patients with sequenced MSH2 and MLH1, we identified four...... possible splice-site mutations, which we subsequently genotyped in more than 9,000 individuals from the general population. Allele frequencies in the general population were 0 % for 942+3A>T in MSH2, 0.05 % for 307-19A>G, 0.005 % for 1,667+(2-8)del(taaatca);ins(attt), and 4.4 % for 1039-8T>A in MLH1. Odds...... ratios for HNPCC in a case-control design were 419 (95 % CI: 53-18,900) for 942+3A>T in MSH2, 19 (5-72) for 307-19A>G, 194 (21-1,768) for 1,667+(2-8)del(taaatca); ins(attt), and 0.3 (0.1-0.7) for 1,039-8T>A in MLH1. In the general population, incidence rate ratios for 1,039-8T>A carriers versus...

  8. Somatic mutation analysis of MYH11 in breast and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhopuro, Pia; Karhu, Auli; Winqvist, Robert; Waltering, Kati; Visakorpi, Tapio; Aaltonen, Lauri A

    2008-01-01

    MYH11 (also known as SMMHC) encodes the smooth-muscle myosin heavy chain, which has a key role in smooth muscle contraction. Inversion at the MYH11 locus is one of the most frequent chromosomal aberrations found in acute myeloid leukemia. We have previously shown that MYH11 mutations occur in human colorectal cancer, and may also be associated with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. The mutations found in human intestinal neoplasia result in unregulated proteins with constitutive motor activity, similar to the mutant myh11 underlying the zebrafish meltdown phenotype characterized by disrupted intestinal architecture. Recently, MYH1 and MYH9 have been identified as candidate breast cancer genes in a systematic analysis of the breast cancer genome. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of somatic MYH11 mutations in two common tumor types; breast and prostate cancers. A total of 155 breast cancer and 71 prostate cancer samples were analyzed for those regions in MYH11 (altogether 8 exons out of 42 coding exons) that harboured mutations in colorectal cancer in our previous study. In breast cancer samples only germline alterations were observed. One prostate cancer sample harbored a frameshift mutation c.5798delC, which we have previously shown to result in a protein with unregulated motor activity. Little evidence for a role of somatic MYH11 mutations in the formation of breast or prostate cancers was obtained in this study

  9. Frequency of CHEK2 mutations in a population based, case–control study of breast cancer in young women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrichsen, Danielle M; Malone, Kathleen E; Doody, David R; Daling, Janet R; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2004-01-01

    The cell-cycle checkpoint kinase (CHEK)2 protein truncating mutation 1100delC has been associated with increased risk for breast or prostate cancer. Multiple studies have found an elevated frequency of the 1100delC variant in specific stratifications of breast cancer patients with a family history of the disease, including BRCA1/BRCA2 negative families and families with a history of bilateral disease or male breast cancer. However, the 1100delC mutation has only been investigated in a few population-based studies and none from North America. We report here on the frequency of three CHEK2 variants that alter protein function – 1100delC, R145W, and I175T – in 506 cases and 459 controls from a population based, case–control study of breast cancer conducted in young women from western Washington. There was a suggestive enrichment in the 1100delC variant in the cases (1.2%) as compared with the controls (0.4%), but this was based on small numbers of carriers and the differences were not statistically significant. The 1100delC variant was more frequent in cases with a first-degree family history of breast cancer (4.3%; P = 0.02) and slightly enriched in cases with a family history of ovarian cancer (4.4%; P = 0.09). The CHEK2 variants are rare in the western Washington population and, based on accumulated evidence across studies, are unlikely to be major breast cancer susceptibility genes. Thus, screening for the 1100delC variant may have limited usefulness in breast cancer prevention programs in the USA

  10. Risk of gynecologic cancers in Danish hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boilesen, Astrid Elisabeth Bruun; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Bernstein, Inge

    2008-01-01

    , clinical and MMR gene mutation data were retrieved. RESULTS: In a total of 105 cases of endometrial cancer, there was no significant difference in MSH2, MSH6 and MLH1 mutation carrier frequency. Compared to the general population, mutation carriers had a 20 times increase in lifetime risk of endometrial...

  11. Identification of Variant-Specific Functions of PIK3CA by Rapid Phenotyping of Rare Mu