WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer management evidentiary

  1. 45 CFR 99.24 - Evidentiary purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evidentiary purpose. 99.24 Section 99.24 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE FOR HEARINGS FOR THE CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Hearing Procedures § 99.24 Evidentiary purpose. The purpose of the...

  2. 19 CFR 210.62 - Evidentiary hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidentiary hearing. 210.62 Section 210.62 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Temporary Relief § 210.62 Evidentiary hearing. An opportunity for a hearing in...

  3. Epigenomics in cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Fabricio F

    2010-01-01

    The identification of all epigenetic modifications implicated in gene expression is the next step for a better understanding of human biology in both normal and pathological states. This field is referred to as epigenomics, and it is defined as epigenetic changes (ie, DNA methylation, histone modifications and regulation by noncoding RNAs such as microRNAs) on a genomic scale rather than a single gene. Epigenetics modulate the structure of the chromatin, thereby affecting the transcription of genes in the genome. Different studies have already identified changes in epigenetic modifications in a few genes in specific pathways in cancers. Based on these epigenetic changes, drugs against different types of tumors were developed, which mainly target epimutations in the genome. Examples include DNA methylation inhibitors, histone modification inhibitors, and small molecules that target chromatin-remodeling proteins. However, these drugs are not specific, and side effects are a major problem; therefore, new DNA sequencing technologies combined with epigenomic tools have the potential to identify novel biomarkers and better molecular targets to treat cancers. The purpose of this review is to discuss current and emerging epigenomic tools and to address how these new technologies may impact the future of cancer management

  4. Cancer and its management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tobias, Jeffrey S; Hochhauser, Daniel; Souhami, Robert L

    2010-01-01

    ... cancer, 328 19 Testicular cancer, 357 20 Thyroid and adrenal cancer, 374 v9781405170154_1_pre.qxd 28/10/09 16:01 Page vi vi Contents 21 Cancer from an unknown primary site, 388 22 Skin cancer, 393 23...

  5. Pain management in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Not only burdened by the limited overall survival, lung cancer patient also suffer from various symptoms, such as pain, that implicated in the quality of life. Cancer pain is a complicated and transiently dynamic symptom that results from multiple mechanisms. This review will describe the pathophysiology of cancer pain and general approach in managing a patient with lung cancer pain. The use of opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and adjuvant analgesia, as part of the pharmacology therapy along with interventional strategy, will also be discussed.

  6. The Evidentiary Value of DNA Fingerprint as Criminal Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussa Masoud Irhouma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of criminal evidence is considered to be one of the greatest challenges that face authorities concerned with fighting crime at all levels. Due to this, authorities try to benefit as much as possible from scientific evidence due to the important role it plays in revealing the identity of criminals or victims in present or past criminal cases against unknown people through the physical traces that are found at the scene of an event, which include biological traces. DNA is one of these scientific evidences which can be benefited from in the field of crime investigation. Despite the importance of DNA technology in this area of work, there is still some debate surrounding its acceptance as criminal evidence. Some experts believe it to be of great importance whereas others cast doubt on its evidentiary value. They attribute this to a number of factors including the experts who are entrusted to examine DNA samples, the laboratories in which DNA analysis takes place, as well as the fact that resorting to DNA as a criminal evidence raises some legal complexities related to the permissibility of using it and the conditions and scope of its use. This paper sheds light on DNA and its evidentiary value among the judiciary in criminal cases by answering a number of questions such as the possibility of forcing a person to undergo DNA analysis or not to do so and to what extent it is to be relied upon as criminal evidence. This paper concluded the importance of DNA and its role in the field of criminal evidence. Despite this, even if the DNA evidence is sufficient in proving the innocence of the accused, it is only an indication that must not be solely relied upon and treated as a single conclusive evidence, particularly in cases that involve prescribed Islamic or retributive punishments.

  7. Management of vulvar cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hullu, J. A.; van der Avoort, I. A. M.; Oonk, M. H. M.; van der Zee, A. G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim The radical surgical approach in the treatment of vulvar cancer patients has led to a favorable prognosis for the majority of the patients with early stage squamous cell cancer. However, the morbidity is impressive, leading to more individualized treatment. The aim of this review is to give an

  8. Management of vulvar cancers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hullu, J.A. de; Avoort, I.A.M. van der; Oonk, M.H.; Zee, A.G. van der

    2006-01-01

    AIM: The radical surgical approach in the treatment of vulvar cancer patients has led to a favorable prognosis for the majority of the patients with early stage squamous cell cancer. However, the morbidity is impressive, leading to more individualized treatment. The aim of this review is to give an

  9. Management of male breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay V. Dimitro v

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The management of male breast cancer is still under discussion due to lack of information from prospective, randomized clinical trials and low incidence of this disease. Current management is based largely on extrapolation from data related to treatment of female breast cancer. Over the last two decades, several review articles have discussed mainly retrospective and anecdotal data related to hormonal and chemotherapy treatment modalities. In this review, we present the most recent information and future considerations related to the management of male breast cancer. In addition to the conventional treatment options we will discuss the possible role of targeted therapy. Establishing a national or global registry for male breast cancer will provide more precise information about the natural history of the disease and will facilitate the design and execution of prospective, randomized multicenter clinical trials.

  10. Contemporary Management of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David; Fradet, Yves

    1991-01-01

    Bladder cancer is currently the fifth most common cancer in Western society, and its incidence appears to be increasing. Important advances have recently occurred in both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to bladder neoplasms. Presentation is not unique, and physician awareness is important to identify patients who are at risk for bladder neoplasia and consequently require further investigation. A diagnostic approach and contemporary management are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4 PMID:21229043

  11. Pain management in cancer survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Sjøgren, Per

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of patients surviving cancer disease has increased in last decades. Consequently, an emerging population with different needs due to long-term or late effects of cancer disease and/or treatment, e.g. chronic pain, is of major concern. EPIDEMIOLOGY: Chronic pain is one of th...... survivors. Pain management strategies are discussed according to the biopsychosocial model and with the rapidly growing number of cancer survivors the establishment of multidisciplinary clinics as a part of comprehensive cancer centers are proposed.......BACKGROUND: The number of patients surviving cancer disease has increased in last decades. Consequently, an emerging population with different needs due to long-term or late effects of cancer disease and/or treatment, e.g. chronic pain, is of major concern. EPIDEMIOLOGY: Chronic pain is one...... of the main problems in this population and prevalence varies between 16% and 50%. Most information derives from breast cancer patients assessed by surveys from national or local institutional databases. A Danish population-based survey estimated that 41.5% of all cancer survivors reported chronic pain. PAIN...

  12. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabizzi, Emanuele [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic Florida, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States); Assef, Mauricio Saab [Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo, Rua Dr. Cesário Motta Jr. #61 Cep: 01221-020, São Paulo (Brazil); Raimondo, Massimo, E-mail: raimondo.massimo@mayo.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic Florida, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States)

    2011-01-31

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used.

  13. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabizzi, Emanuele; Assef, Mauricio Saab; Raimondo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used

  14. Radiotherapy in Cancer Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Wahab, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy has been used for curative or palliative treatment of cancer, either alone or increasingly as part of a multimodality approach in conjunction with chemotherapy, immunotherapy or surgery. Radiation must be delivered in the safest and most effective way. The use of radiologic and nuclear medicine diagnostic techniques, e.g., the use of CT (Computerized Tomography) and PET/CT allow better detection and staging of diseases by displaying both morphological and functional abnormalities within the affected organs and are essential in the process of radiotherapy planning. Technical advances in radiotherapy have allowed better targeting of tumors, sparing of normal tissue and, in the case of radiosurgery, a decrease in the number of treatments. The IAEA Programme in Human Health aims to enhance the capabilities in Member States to address needs related to the treatment of diseases, including cancer, through the application of nuclear techniques. The Programme supports quality assurance in radiation medicine; DIRAC, the only radiation oncology-specific resource database world-wide; significant, innovative education and training programmes through telemedicine and e-learning accessible via the human health campus website. Technical expertise for country– and region–specific technical cooperation radiation-medicine projects is provided to establish or enhance radiation medicine worldwide. (author)

  15. Management of oromandibular cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, M.; Sarwar, S.R.; Aslam, R.; Ansari, T. N.; Ahmad, T.; Ahmad, B.; Ahmed, S.; Gul, A.A.; Rashid, D.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To emphasize the role and importance of multidisciplinary approach in the management of oral cavity can- involving the mandible. Subjects and Methods: A total of 63 patients who had biopsy-proven oromandibular tumors, after thorough assessment/ staging in Joint Head and Neck Oncology Clinic, underwent resection and reconstruction for malignant oral cavity tumors involving the mandible were included in the study. All the resected tumor specimen were sent for histopathology. All the post-resection defects were properly classified and reconstructed by the plastic surgery team. Post-operatively, all the patients underwent adjuvant full dose radiotherapy at the Department of Radiation Oncology. Complications were recorded and managed accordingly. At one year follow-up all the available patients were assessed for functional and aesthetic restoration and recurrences. Results: Out of 63 patients there were 40 males and 23 females (ratio 1.7 : 1) with an average age of 50 years. Tumor-free resection margins could be achieved in 56 patients. In 88% cases tumor was a Squamous cell carcinoma Radical neck dissections were carried on in 27 patients. Radial forearm free flap was used in 27 patients, pectorals major myocutaneous flap in 19, free fibula osteocutaneous flap in 10, rectus-abdominis myocutaneous free flap Implant was used in 3 patients to reconstruct the post-resection defects. There was only one total flap loss and 3 partial flap losses. Implant exposure was encountered in 4 instances with 3 major and 5 minor fistulae. At one year follow-up 56 patients were available. Thirty-seven patients had intelligible speech, 15 patients were taking normal diet in 33 patients there was a satisfactory mandibular contour restoration. Seven patients had recurrences, 2 were raceable and 5 patients had died by that time. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary collaboration is the key to effectively manage this group of extremely debilitating malignancies. (author)

  16. Management of colorectal cancer and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Caroline; Nash, Guy F; Hickish, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is associated with diabetes mellitus and both of these common conditions are often managed together by a surgeon. The surgical focus is usually upon cancer treatment rather than diabetes management. The relationship between colorectal cancer and diabetes is a complex one and can raise problems in both diagnosis and the management of patients with both conditions. This literature review explores the relationship between diabetes, diabetic treatment and colorectal cancer and a...

  17. Incidental gallbladder cancer: what management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidi Mohammed Bouchentouf

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gallbladder cancer (GBC represents 3.8% of all gastrointestinal cancers and usually known to be of a poor prognosis. In 0.2–2.9% of cases, this cancer is found in cholecystectomy specimens. A better understanding of spread mode of this tumor helps a better surgical management. The aim of the present review is to underline the management of GBC based on the comprehension of risk factors and anatomic features. A Medline, PubMed database search was performed to identify articles published from 2000 to 2011 using the keywords ‘carcinoma of gallbladder’, ‘incidental gallbladder cancer’, ‘gallbladder neoplasm’ and ‘cholecystectomy’. Some pathological situations such as chronic lithiasis and biliopancreatic junction abnormalities have been clearly identified as predisposing to GBC. Laparoscopy increases peritoneal and parietal tumor dissemination, thus, it should not be performed when GBC is suspected. Most determinant prognostic factors are nodal, perineural and venous involvement, invasion of the cystic duct and the tumor differentiation. The simple cholecystectomy is sufficient for tumors classified as T1a; for other cancers exceeding the muscularis, radical re-resection is required due to the high risk of recurrence. This aggressive surgery improved the overall survival of patients. There is still no standard adjuvant treatment; patients should be included in prospective trials.

  18. Evidentiary requirements to identify potentially acceptable sites (PAS) in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comella, P.A.; Smith, B.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains information on the evidentiary requirements to identify potentially acceptable sites in crystalline rock for waste disposal. Topics addressed include: chronology, key regulatory assumptions, statutory framework for identifying potentially acceptable sites, application of 10 disqualifiers, consideration of favorable and potentially adverse conditions, a composite favorability analysis, and a proposed outline for PAS identification decision document

  19. Cervical cancer management in Zaria, Nigeria SUMMARY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    24 patients who needed blood transfusion were adequately transfused and only 21.74% of all patients had complete treatment). ... cancer management in this centre with a view to finding ways to improve its management. Methods. All case notes for patients managed for cervical cancer in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching ...

  20. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded

  1. Management of colorectal cancer and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline; Nash, Guy F; Hickish, Tamas

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is associated with diabetes mellitus and both of these common conditions are often managed together by a surgeon. The surgical focus is usually upon cancer treatment rather than diabetes management. The relationship between colorectal cancer and diabetes is a complex one and can raise problems in both diagnosis and the management of patients with both conditions. This literature review explores the relationship between diabetes, diabetic treatment and colorectal cancer and addresses the issues that arise in diagnosing and treating this patient group. By highlighting these difficulties, this review aims to improve understanding and to provide clearer insight into both surgical and non-surgical management.

  2. Management of cancer during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, D.C.; Ringenberg, Q.S.; Yarbro, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Although cancer during pregnancy is infrequent, its management is difficult for patients, their families, and their physicians. When termination of the pregnancy is unacceptable, decisions regarding the use of irradiation and chemotherapy are complicated by the well-known high risks of abortion and fetal malformation. This risk is concentrated in the first trimester and varies with the choice of chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of agents. There is only minimal evidence of increased risk of malformation or abortion in the second or third trimester. Recent progress in cancer therapy has made cure a reasonable goal, and for some malignant neoplasms, cure is still possible even when initial therapy is modified or delayed. When cure is a reasonable goal, curative therapy should not be compromised by modification or delay. When treatment for cure or significant palliation is not possible, however, the goal should shift to protection of the fetus from damage by the injudicious use of teratogenic cancer therapy. This report will review the available data that may assist in these difficult decisions. 114 references

  3. Pain management in cancer cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palat Gayatri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer of the cervix uteri is a common cause of pain among women. On the physical realm, the cancer may cause somatic [soft tissue and bone], visceral and neuropathic pain [lumbosacral plexopathy]. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy may cause neuropathy too. Psychological, social and cultural factors modify the pain. Evaluation of the individual type of pain and a patient-centred approach are fundamental requirements for rational management. Disease modifying treatment like radiotherapy and chemotherapy must be considered when applicable. Pain control is usually achieved by the use of WHO three-step ladder, remembering that possible association of renal dysfunction would necessitate caution in the use of NSAIDs and opioids. Side effects must be anticipated, prevented when possible, and aggressively treated; nausea and vomiting may already be present, and constipation can worsen pain when there is a pelvic mass. Pain emergencies can be treated by quick titration with intravenous morphine bolus doses. Neuropathic pain may warrant the use of usual adjuvants, with particular reference to cortico-steroids and the NMDA antagonist, ketamine. In intractable pain, many neurolytic procedures are tried, but a solid evidence base to justify their use is lacking. Continuous epidural analgesia with local anaesthetic and opioid may be needed when drug therapy fails, and desperate situations may warrant interventions such as neurolysis. Such physical measures for pain relief must be combined with psychosocial support and adequate explanations to the patient and the family.

  4. Cancer pain management-current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Thapa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer pain is still one of the most feared entities in cancer and about 75% of these patients require treatment with opioids for severe pain. The cancer pain relief is difficult to manage in patients with episodic or incidental pain, neuropathic pain, substance abuse and with impaired cognitive or communication skills. This non-systematic review article aims to discuss reasons for under treatment, tools of pain assessment, cancer pain and anxiety and possibly carve new approaches for cancer pain management in future. The current status of World Health Organization analgesic ladder has also been reviewed. A thorough literature search was carried out from 1998 to 2010 for current status in cancer pain management in MEDLINE, WHO guidelines and published literature and relevant articles have been included.

  5. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration......-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion...

  6. Evidences in multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bari, B.; Bosset, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.; Maingon, P.; Valentini, V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 10 years, a number of important European randomized published studies investigated the optimal management of rectal cancer. In order to define an evidence-based approach of the clinical practice based, an international consensus conference was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO) and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). The aim of this article is to present highlights of multidisciplinary rectal cancer management and to compare the conclusions of the international conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) with the new National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. (authors)

  7. Cancer molecular markers: A guide to cancer detection and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Meera; Sandhu, Sardul Singh; Sharma, Anil Kumar

    2018-02-08

    Cancer is generally caused by the molecular alterations which lead to specific mutations. Advances in molecular biology have provided an impetus to the study of cancers with valuable prognostic and predictive significance. Over the hindsight various attempts have been undertaken by scientists worldwide, in the management of cancer; where, we have witnessed a number of molecular markers which allow the early detection of cancers and lead to a decrease in its mortality rate. Recent advances in oncology have led to the discovery of cancer markers that has allowed early detection and targeted therapy of tumors. In this context, current review provides a detail outlook on various molecular markers for diagnosis, prognosis and management of therapeutic response in cancer patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Coping with cancer -- managing fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How severe your fatigue is depends on the type of cancer you have, the stage of cancer, and ... distressed. These emotions can drain your energy and motivation. Medicines. Many of the medicines for treating pain, depression, insomnia, and ...

  9. Controversial Issues in Thyroid Cancer Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, R Michael

    2018-04-13

    The lack of prospective randomized clinical trials for most management topics in differentiated thyroid cancer force us to make management recommendations based on retrospective observational data which is often incomplete, subject to selection bias, and conflicting. Therefore, it is not surprising that many aspects of thyroid cancer management remain controversial and not well defined. This review will examine the controversies surrounding three important topics in thyroid cancer management: (1) the option of thyroid lobectomy as initial therapy for thyroid cancer, (2) the proper use of preoperative neck imaging to optimize the completeness of the initial surgical procedure, and (3) the selective use RAI therapy as remnant ablation, adjuvant treatment or treatment of known persistent/recurrent disease. As thyroid cancer management moves toward a much more risk adapted approach to personalized management recommendations, clinicians and patients must balance the risks and benefits of the potential management options to arrive at a management plan that is optimized based on both patient preferences/values and the philosophy/experience of the local disease management team. Copyright © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  10. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Breast Cancer In Pregnancy: Management Approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reflecting the more advanced stage of the disease at diagnosis. An approach to the management of breast cancer in pregnancy is presented by a case illustration and a review of literature. KEY WORDS: Breast Cancer, ... function tests, haemogram and ultra— sound. She delivered a live female baby weighing 2.8 kilogram's ...

  12. Contemporary management of advanced laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Christopher J; Gourin, Christine G

    2017-10-01

    The treatment of advanced laryngeal cancer has undergone a paradigm shift in recent years, with an increase in chemoradiation for organ preservation and a decrease in primary surgery. This review will summarize the contemporary management of advanced laryngeal cancer and discuss treatment-related toxicity and strategies to improve outcomes. NA.

  13. The medical management of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C.J.; Buchanan, R.

    1988-01-01

    The text is brief and directed primarily to the breast cancer specialist. Topics include epidemiology, screening, prognostic factors, pre- and postoperative assessment, surgery, radiotherapy adjuvant endocrine therapy, and management of advanced disease. Brief chapters also address nonspecific symptoms of advanced disease, male breast cancer, and psychological considerations. Emphasis is on clinical management and review of many published controlled trials. Chapters conclude with short lists of recommendations and long alphabetic lists of reference material from the world literature. Since breast cancer continues to increase gradually in incidence and is most common in the United States, it commands attention

  14. Management of Advanced Laryngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Sheahan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx continues to be the commonest head and neck cancer in many Western countries. The larynx plays a key role for many essential functions, including breathing, voice production, airway protection, and swallowing. The goals of laryngeal cancer treatment are thus to provide best possible oncologic control, while optimizing functional outcomes. In recent decades, the treatment paradigm for advanced laryngeal cancer has shifted from one of primary surgery (total laryngectomy as gold standard, toward non-surgical organ-preserving treatment using radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. However, concerns have emerged regarding functional outcomes after chemoradiotherapy, as well as possible decreased overall survival in patients with laryngeal cancer. The purpose of the present review is to review surgical and non-surgical options for treatment of advanced laryngeal cancer, as well as the evidence supporting each of these.

  15. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadpour, N.

    1987-01-01

    Principles and Management of Adrenal Cancer is a comprehensive presentation of the medical and surgical management of neoplastic diseases of the adrenal glands. It consists of two parts. The first provides an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, pathology, and advances in methods of diagnosis and imaging techniques. The second deals with specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. (orig./MG)

  16. Interventional Analgesic Management of Lung Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Uri; Elgueta, Maria Francisca; Perez, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the four most prevalent cancers worldwide. Comprehensive patient care includes not only adherence to clinical guidelines to control and when possible cure the disease but also appropriate symptom control. Pain is one of the most prevalent symptoms in patients diagnosed with lung cancer; it can arise from local invasion of chest structures or metastatic disease invading bones, nerves, or other anatomical structures potentially painful. Pain can also be a consequence of therapeutic approaches like surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy. Conventional medical management of cancer pain includes prescription of opioids and coadjuvants at doses sufficient to control the symptoms without causing severe drug effects. When an adequate pharmacological medical management fails to provide satisfactory analgesia or when it causes limiting side effects, interventional cancer pain techniques may be considered. Interventional pain management is devoted to the use of invasive techniques such as joint injections, nerve blocks and/or neurolysis, neuromodulation, and cement augmentation techniques to provide diagnosis and treatment of pain syndromes resistant to conventional medical management. Advantages of interventional approaches include better analgesic outcomes without experiencing drug-related side effects and potential for opioid reduction thus avoiding central side effects. This review will describe various pain syndromes frequently described in lung cancer patients and those interventional techniques potentially indicated for those cases.

  17. Contemporary management of sinonasal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robbins, K.T.; Ferlito, A.; Silver, C.E.; Takes, R.P.; Strojan, P.; Snyderman, C.H.; Bree, R. de; Haigentz Jr., M.; Langendijk, J.A.; Rinaldo, A.; Shaha, A.R.; Hanna, E.Y.; Werner, J.A.; Suarez, C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sinonasal cancer is a relatively uncommon entity encountered by head and neck oncologists, rhinologists, and skull base surgeons. Recent innovations in surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic modalities raise the question of whether there has been any measurable improvement for treatment

  18. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Katherine; Konety, Badrinath; Ordonez, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field. PMID:26949522

  19. CONTEMPORARY MANAGEMENT OF SINONASAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robbins, K. Thomas; Ferlito, Alfio; Silver, Carl E.; Takes, Robert P.; Strojan, Primoz; Snyderman, Carl H.; de Bree, Remco; Haigentz, Missak; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Shaha, Ashok R.; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Werner, Jochen A.; Suarez, Carlos

    Background. Sinonasal cancer is a relatively uncommon entity encountered by head and neck oncologists, rhinologists, and skull base surgeons. Recent innovations in surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic modalities raise the question of whether there has been any measurable improvement for treatment

  20. Chemical warfare in Colombia, evidentiary ecologies and senti-actuando practices of justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Kristina

    2018-03-01

    Between 1994 and 2015, militarized aerial fumigation was a central component of US-Colombia antidrug policy. Crop duster planes sprayed a concentrated formula of Monsanto's herbicide, glyphosate, over illicit crops, and also forests, soils, pastures, livestock, watersheds, subsistence food and human bodies. Given that a national peace agreement was signed in 2016 between FARC-EP guerrillas and the state to end Colombia's over five decades of war, certain government officials are quick to proclaim aerial fumigation of glyphosate an issue of the past. Rural communities, however, file quejas (complaints or grievances) seeking compensation from the state for the ongoing effects of the destruction of their licit agro-forestry. At the interfaces of feminist science and technology studies and anthropology, this article examines how evidentiary claims are mobilized when war deeply politicizes and moralizes technoscientific knowledge production. By ethnographically tracking the grievances filed by small farmers, I reveal the extent to which evidence circulating in zones of war - tree seedlings, subsistence crops, GPS coordinates and bureaucratic documents - retains (or not) the imprints of violence and toxicity. Given the systematic rejection of compensation claims, farmers engage in everyday material practices that attempt to transform chemically degraded ecologies. These everyday actualizations of justice exist both alongside and outside contestation over the geopolitically backed violence of state law. Rather than simply contrasting everyday acts of justice with denunciatory claims made against the state, farmers' reparative practices produce an evidentiary ecology that holds the state accountable while also ' senti-actuando' (feel-acting) alternative forms of justice.

  1. Current management of gynecologic cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavazzo, Christos; Minis, Evelyn Eleni; Gkegkes, Ioannis D

    2018-04-27

    Cancer during pregnancy is a particularly challenging complication. The incidence has increased in recent years due to childbering at an advanced maternal age due to career choices and/or the development of reproductive technology. Approximately two thirds of cancer cases during pregnancy are comprised of invasive cervical cancers and breast cancer. Cancer during gestation is characterized by a need for specialized treatment due to major changes in the hormonal profile (estrogen-progesterone), metabolism (enhancement of anabolism), hemodynamic changes (hyperdynamic circulation), immunologic changes (cell mediated and humoral immunity), increased angiogenesis (increased blood flow towards the uterus). Moreover, the management of such patients is based on the trimester of pregnancy, type and stage of cancer and informed consent of the mother based on her wishes. The optimal treatment of cancer during pregnancy remains elusive, as there are limited data from retrospective studies with small samples. As a result, it is crucial that data regarding survival of the women and long-term follow up of the children from different cancer centres and registries be shared. This need is dictated by the fact that the incidence of cancer during pregnancy will continue to rise as child-bearing age continues to increase.

  2. Surgical management of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakih, A.R.; Mistry, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    The differentiated management of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with lymph node and/or systemic metastases is very much a treatable cancer. Interaction between the surgeon and the nuclear medicine specialist is essential to ensure quality survival in these patient. This review is confined to surgical aspects and is based on experience with 417 patients who were operated for DTC at the Tata Memorial Hospital between 1971 and 1985

  3. Hypnosis: Adjunct Therapy for Cancer Pain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravits, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a symptom associated with prolonged recovery from illness and procedures, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care costs. While there have been advances in the management of cancer pain, there is a need for therapeutic strategies that complement pharmaceutical management without significantly contributing to the side-effect profile of these agents. Hypnosis provides a safe and efficacious supplement to pharmaceutical management of cancer pain. One barrier to the regular use of hypnosis is health-care providers’ lack of current knowledge of the efficacy and safety of hypnosis. Advanced practitioners who are well-informed about hypnosis have an opportunity to increase the treatment options for patients who are suffering with cancer pain by suggesting to the health-care team that hypnosis be incorporated into the plan of care. Integration of hypnosis into the standard of care will benefit patients, caregivers, and survivors by reducing pain and the suffering associated with it. PMID:25031986

  4. Management of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, Silke; Attard, Gerhardt; Beer, Tomasz M

    2018-01-01

    some of these topics. OBJECTIVE: To present the report of APCCC 2017. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Ten important areas of controversy in APC management were identified: high-risk localised and locally advanced prostate cancer; "oligometastatic" prostate cancer; castration-naïve and castration...... literature review or meta-analysis. The outcomes of the voting had varying degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of this article, as well as in the detailed voting results recorded in Supplementary data. CONCLUSIONS: The presented expert voting results can be used for support in areas of management...

  5. 21 CFR 10.50 - Promulgation of regulations and orders after an opportunity for a formal evidentiary public hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... public hearing. (2) The person requesting the hearing has a right to an opportunity for a hearing and... action an opportunity for a formal evidentiary public hearing as listed below. The list imparts no right...) on regulations for animal antibiotic drugs and certification requirements. (13) Section 721 (b) and...

  6. A guide to cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Natalie; McGee, Anne; Dunbar, Catherine

    2008-10-01

    Most, if not all, cancer patients require care from community teams at some stage during their disease trajectory. For many of these patients, community nurses and General Practitioners are the main point of contact. Pain is reported by between 55-95% of patients with advanced or terminal disease. Optimal pain control positively impacts on the physical, emotional and functional well-being of the patient. Despite the existence of guidelines (WHO, 1996) (SIGN, 2000) and a wealth of literature on cancer pain management, half of all patients in Western countries still do not receive adequate pain relief. This article looks at the reasons behind this and provides community nurses with an overview of up-to-date information on pain pathophysiology and management, so that the control of cancer pain can be optimized in the community.

  7. Cervical cancer and pregnancy: treatment management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazar, I.; Toth, R.

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy and cervical carcinoma occurring concomitantly causes therapeutic and ethical dilemmas. The management for this situation will depend on the gestational age at the time of diagnosis, disease staging, size of the lesion and the patient’s wish to maintain pregnancy and fertility. Review of the literature suggest that pregnancy does not seem to influence the prognosis of cervical cancer. (author)

  8. Management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, D O

    2012-11-01

    Although well described, there is limited published data related to management on the coexistence of prostate and rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to describe a single institution\\'s experience with this and propose a treatment algorithm based on the best available evidence.

  9. Current management of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Laurberg, Søren; Holm, Thorbjörn

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: A review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the surgical management of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Method: A systematic literature search was undertaken using PubMed, Embase, Web...

  10. Contemporary Management of Primary Distal Urethral Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traboulsi, S.L.; Witjes, J.A.; Kassouf, W.

    2016-01-01

    Primary urethral cancer is one of the rare urologic tumors. Distal urethral tumors are usually less advanced at diagnosis compared with proximal tumors and have a good prognosis if treated appropriately. Low-stage distal tumors can be managed successfully with a surgical approach in men or radiation

  11. Canadian Cancer Risk Management Model: evaluation of cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William K; Wolfson, Michael C; Flanagan, William M; Shin, Janey; Goffin, John; Miller, Anthony B; Asakawa, Keiko; Earle, Craig; Mittmann, Nicole; Fairclough, Lee; Oderkirk, Jillian; Finès, Philippe; Gribble, Stephen; Hoch, Jeffrey; Hicks, Chantal; Omariba, D Walter R; Ng, Edward

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a decision support tool to assess the potential benefits and costs of new healthcare interventions. The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) commissioned the development of a Cancer Risk Management Model (CRMM)--a computer microsimulation model that simulates individual lives one at a time, from birth to death, taking account of Canadian demographic and labor force characteristics, risk factor exposures, and health histories. Information from all the simulated lives is combined to produce aggregate measures of health outcomes for the population or for particular subpopulations. The CRMM can project the population health and economic impacts of cancer control programs in Canada and the impacts of major risk factors, cancer prevention, and screening programs and new cancer treatments on population health and costs to the healthcare system. It estimates both the direct costs of medical care, as well as lost earnings and impacts on tax revenues. The lung and colorectal modules are available through the CPAC Web site (www.cancerview.ca/cancerrriskmanagement) to registered users where structured scenarios can be explored for their projected impacts. Advanced users will be able to specify new scenarios or change existing modules by varying input parameters or by accessing open source code. Model development is now being extended to cervical and breast cancers.

  12. Conservative management of anal and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, J.P.; Romestaing, P.; Montbarbon, X.

    1989-01-01

    The role of irradiation in the management of anal and rectal cancer has changed during the past ten years. In small epidermoid carcinomas of the anal canal (T1 T2) irradiation is in most departments considered the primary treatment, giving a 5-year survival rate of between 60 and 80% with good sphincter preservation. Even in larger tumors, irradiation can still offer some chance of cure without colostomy. Surgery remains the basic treatment of rectal cancer but irradiation is used in association with surgery in many cases. Radiotherapy is of value in the conservative management of cancer of the rectum in three situations: In small polypoid cancers contact X-ray therapy can give local control in about 90%. In cancers of the middle rectum, preoperative external irradiation may increase the chances of restorative surgery and reduce the risk of local relapse. In inoperable patients, external radiotherapy and/or intracavitary irradiation may cure some patients with infiltrating tumors (T2 T3) without colostomy. (orig.)

  13. Management of thrombocytopenia in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaman, Giancarlo; Pieri, Lisa

    2018-04-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common finding in cancer patients and can have different and/or multifactorial pathogenesis. While in solid tumors it occurs often as a consequence of chemotherapy treatment, it is frequently observed at diagnosis in patients with hematological malignancies being aggravated to a potentially life-threatening level during chemotherapy. Other associated conditions (infections, drugs, consumption coagulopathy etc.) can add to influence the degree of thrombocytopenia and the inherent risk of bleeding and they should be recognized and corrected to improve platelet count. Platelet transfusion remains the cornerstone of treatment, but its use should always be weighted taking into consideration the actual risk of bleeding to avoid inappropriate use and wasting of resources. While in hematological malignancies a threshold level of 10,000 platelets/μL is widely accepted as the minimal level prompting prophylactic platelet transfusion, this limit is less frequently observed in patients with solid tumors and platelet transfusions are usually administered for a few days, possibly at a higher platelet level. Alternative treatments for the latter patients including thrombopoietin-mimetic agents are increasingly used and found to be promising. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  15. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokelaar RF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available RF Kokelaar, MD Evans, M Davies, DA Harris, J Beynon Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, UK Abstract: Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer. Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0 resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. Keywords: rectal cancer, exenteration, pelvic sidewall, sacrectomy

  16. Managing Potentially Resectable Metastatic Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, John L.

    2008-01-01

    For patients with metastatic colon cancer, management has evolved from resecting a single liver metastasis and having only one chemotherapy medicine, to resecting multiple metastases including those outside the liver as well as using combination chemotherapy (based on recent supportive trials) to improve outcomes. This success has also raised many questions, including the role of adjuvant chemotherapy to downstage borderline resectable tumors, whether patients who receive preoperative chemoth...

  17. Management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera, Oliver; Ghanem, Ismael; Nasimi, Rula; Prieto, Isabel; Koren, Laura; Feliu, Jaime

    2016-01-14

    Currently, pancreatic adenocarcinoma mainly occurs after 60 years of age, and its prognosis remains poor despite modest improvements in recent decades. The aging of the population will result in a rise in the incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma within the next years. Thus, the management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly population is gaining increasing relevance. Older cancer patients represent a heterogeneous group with different biological, functional and psychosocial characteristics that can modify the usual management of this disease, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, polypharmacy, performance status, comorbidities and organ dysfunction. However, the biological age, not the chronological age, of the patient should be the limiting factor in determining the most appropriate treatment for these patients. Unfortunately, despite the increased incidence of this pathology in older patients, there is an underrepresentation of these patients in clinical trials, and the management of older patients is thus determined by extrapolation from the results of studies performed in younger patients. In this review, the special characteristics of the elderly, the multidisciplinary management of localized and advanced ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and the most recent advances in the management of this condition will be discussed, focusing on surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and palliative care.

  18. Penile Cancer: Contemporary Lymph Node Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jonathan S; Perera, Marlon; Manning, Todd; Bozin, Mike; Cabarkapa, Sonja; Chen, Emily; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2017-06-01

    In penile cancer, the optimal diagnostics and management of metastatic lymph nodes are not clear. Advances in minimally invasive staging, including dynamic sentinel lymph node biopsy, have widened the diagnostic repertoire of the urologist. We aimed to provide an objective update of the recent trends in the management of penile squamous cell carcinoma, and inguinal and pelvic lymph node metastases. We systematically reviewed several medical databases, including the Web of Science® (with MEDLINE®), Embase® and Cochrane databases, according to PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. The search terms used were penile cancer, lymph node, sentinel node, minimally invasive, surgery and outcomes, alone and in combination. Articles pertaining to the management of lymph nodes in penile cancer were reviewed, including original research, reviews and clinical guidelines published between 1980 and 2016. Accurate and minimally invasive lymph node staging is of the utmost importance in the surgical management of penile squamous cell carcinoma. In patients with clinically node negative disease, a growing body of evidence supports the use of sentinel lymph node biopsies. Dynamic sentinel lymph node biopsy exposes the patient to minimal risk, and results in superior sensitivity and specificity profiles compared to alternate nodal staging techniques. In the presence of locoregional disease, improvements in inguinal or pelvic lymphadenectomy have reduced morbidity and improved oncologic outcomes. A multimodal approach of chemotherapy and surgery has demonstrated a survival benefit for patients with advanced disease. Recent developments in lymph node management have occurred in penile cancer, such as minimally invasive lymph node diagnosis and intervention strategies. These advances have been met with a degree of controversy in the contemporary literature. Current data suggest that dynamic sentinel lymph node biopsy provides excellent

  19. Emergency management of acute colonic cancer obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainant, A

    2012-02-01

    Emergency management of obstructing colonic cancer depends on both tumor location and stage, general condition of the patient and surgeon's experience. Right sided or transverse colon obstructing cancers are usually treated by right hemicolectomy-extended if necessary to the transverse colon-with primary anastomosis. For left-sided obstructing cancer, in patients with low surgical risk, primary resection and anastomosis associated with on-table irrigation or manual decompression can be performed. It prevents the confection of a loop colostomy but presents the risk of anastomotic leakage. Subtotal or total colectomy allows the surgeon to encompass distended and fecal-loaded colon, and to perform one-stage resection and anastomosis. Its disadvantage is an increased daily frequency of stools. It must be performed only in cases of diastatic colon perforation or synchronous right colonic cancer. In patients with high surgical risk, Hartmann procedure must be preferred. It allows the treatment of both obstruction and cancer, and prevents anastomotic leakage but needs a second operation to reverse the colostomy. Colonic stenting is clinically successful in up to 90% in specialized groups. It is used as palliation in patients with disseminated disease or bridge to surgery in the others. If stent insertion is not possible, loop colostomy is still indicated in patients at high surgical risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Need for a new skin cancer management strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geer, van der S.; Reijers, H.A.; Tuijl, van H.F.J.M.; Vries, de H.; Krekels, G.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of skin cancer (especially nonmelanoma skin cancer) has increased markedly during the last decades. Skin cancer should be considered a chronic disease. To manage the future costs and quality of care for patients with skin cancer, a revised health strategy is needed. These new

  1. Management of Dysgeusia related to Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DURGESHWORI MUNANKARMI

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Taste change due to cancer is a notorious side effect, adversely affecting appetite and weight. Even though taste change or dysgeusia is one of the major causes of poor nutritional status in cancer survivors, it is not addressed as a significant problem and is often left untreated. The main purpose of this review is to explore current knowledge of pharmacological and behavioral interventions for the treatment of cancer related taste change. Methods: This systematic review was conducted in accordance with PRISMA guidelines to identify original articles on taste change. Multiple databases including; Scopus, Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and all databases via Pro quest were searched for original articles or studies related to taste change caused by cancer or its treatment. Relevant articles were subjected to a full text evaluation and assessed by Critical appraisal skills program (CASP guidelines and the Effective public health practice project (EPHPP instrument. Results: The search revealed 12 eligible studies, six of which were randomized controlled trials. Most of the studies used a standardized validated tool to measure taste change. Dysgeusia is common in cancer, 14 to 100% cancer patient report it. Pharmacological management with zinc remains inconclusive as one study reports it as beneficial and two other studies reported null effect. Few studies suggested dietary modifications such as use of sugary, salty foods that are helpful to reduce the effect of dysgeusia. Conclusion: Dietary counseling and informing the patient well about self-care strategies before treatment has consistently shown positive results on taste change, with strong statistical power. Other potential treatments for dysgeusia such as zinc, amifostine, and megestrol acetate gave inconsistent results.

  2. Cancer Pain Management in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Shalini; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimated that more than 60% of the 14 million new cancer cases worldwide in 2012 were reported in the developing part of the world, including Asia, Africa, Central and South America. Cancer survival rate is poorer in developing countries due to diagnosis at late stage and limited access to timely treatment. Since the disease per se cannot be treated even with the best available treatment modalities, what remains important is symptom management and providing comfort care to these patients. The incidence of pain in advanced stages of cancer approaches 70-80%. Lack of preventive strategies, poverty, illiteracy, and social stigma are the biggest cause of pain suffering and patient presenting in advance stage of their disease. The need for palliative care is expanding due to aging of world's population and increase in the rate of cancer in developed and developing countries. A huge gap remains between demand and current palliative care services. Overcoming barriers to palliative care is a major global health agenda that need immediate attention. Main causes of inadequate pain relief remain lack of knowledge among physician and patients, lack of adequate supply of opioids and other drugs for pain relief, strong bureaucracy involved in terms of procurement, and dispensing of opioids. Beside this, poverty and illiteracy remain the most important factors of increased suffering.

  3. Contemporary Management of Localized Resectable Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommalapati, Anuhya; Tella, Sri Harsha; Goyal, Gaurav; Ma, Wen Wee; Mahipal, Amit

    2018-01-20

    Pancreatic cancer is the third most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Surgical resection with negative margins still constitutes the cornerstone of potentially curative therapy, but is possible only in 15-20% of patients at the time of initial diagnosis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the neoadjuvant approach may improve R0 resection rate in localized resectable and borderline resectable diseases, and potentially downstage locally advanced disease to achieve surgical resection, though the impact on survival is to be determined. Despite advancements in the last decade in developing effective combinational chemo-radio therapeutic options, preoperative treatment strategies, and better peri-operative care, pancreatic cancer continues to carry a dismal prognosis in the majority. Prodigious efforts are currently being made in optimizing the neoadjuvant therapy with a better toxicity profile, developing novel agents, imaging techniques, and identification of biomarkers for the disease. Advancement in our understanding of the tumor microenvironment and molecular pathology is urgently needed to facilitate the development of novel targeted and immunotherapies for this setting. In this review, we detail the current literature on contemporary management of resectable, borderline resectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer with a focus on future directions in the field.

  4. Cervical cancer management in Zaria, Nigeria | Sule | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper\\'s objective was to identify factors influencing cervical cancer management in Zaria with a view to improving the outcome of management. Case notes of patients managed for cervical cancer in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH), Zaria between January 1 1999 and December 31 2003, were ...

  5. Management of endometrial cancer: issues and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, G; Dowdy, S C; Cliby, W A; Ghezzi, F; Rossetti, D; Frigerio, L; Mariani, A

    2016-01-01

    Although endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common gynecologic cancer in developed countries, several aspects of its management are still controversial. In particular, the need to perform lymphadenectomy represents an important matter of discussion. Because of the discordant results in the literature, it is still not possible to draft any definitive conclusions regarding the therapeutic value of lymph node dissection. The present review discusses the role of lymphadenectomy in the setting of EC, risk factors for lymphatic spread, identification of patients at risk for lymph node dissemination, and the current evidence for adjuvant therapies in patients with positive nodes. Reasons for the difficulty in demonstrating any therapeutic value of pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy are also discussed.

  6. Therapeutic management of locally unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard-Bohas, C.; Saurin, J.C.; Mornex, F.

    1997-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer still have bad prognosis. At the time of diagnosis, less than 10 % of patients can undergo surgery with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 2 %. For patients with localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma, the combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy has been shown to control symptoms and to enhance patient survival. This treatment should be proposed to all the patients with good performance status and without icterus. Pain management should be optimized and often need morphinic and co-antalgic (anticonvulsants, steroids) consumption. The celiac plexus block with alcohol gives an excellent pain relief and should be more frequently used. (author)

  7. Contemporary Management of Primary Distal Urethral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traboulsi, Samer L; Witjes, Johannes Alfred; Kassouf, Wassim

    2016-11-01

    Primary urethral cancer is one of the rare urologic tumors. Distal urethral tumors are usually less advanced at diagnosis compared with proximal tumors and have a good prognosis if treated appropriately. Low-stage distal tumors can be managed successfully with a surgical approach in men or radiation therapy in women. There are no clear-cut indications for the choice of the most appropriate treatment modality. Organ-preserving modalities have shown effective and should be used whenever they do not compromise the oncological safety to decrease the physical and psychological trauma of dismemberment or loss of sexual/urinary function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Management of breast cancer following Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolden, Suzanne L.; Carlson, Robert W.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Hancock, Steven L.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, histology, risk factors, treatment, and prognosis of breast cancer occurring after Hodgkin's disease. Materials and Methods: Sixty-five cases of breast cancer in 61 survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma were analyzed. The median age at treatment for Hodgkin's disease was 24.1 [range (R): 13.3 - 71.8] years. Fifty-one percent had received radiotherapy alone, 47% radiation and chemotherapy, and 2% chemotherapy only. Relative and absolute risks were calculated based on 47 invasive breast cancers in 1049 women treated for Hodgkin's disease at Stanford. Results: The median age at diagnosis of breast cancer was 41.9 (R: 23.0 - 79.1) years; 76% of women were premenopausal. The median interval between Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer was 17.6 (R: 1.5 - 32.7) years with an increasing incidence beginning eight years after radiotherapy. The current relative risk of invasive breast cancer following Hodgkin's disease is 4.7 [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.4 - 6.1] with an absolute risk of 29.5 (CI: 18.8 - 40.2) excess cases per 10,000 person-years. Eighty-seven percent of breast cancers occurred in or at the margin of a prior radiotherapy field where a mean dose of 43.5 (R: 24.0 - 51.0) Gy was delivered. There was a family history of breast cancer in 31% of women. Cancers were detected by self examination (66%), screening mammography (27%), and physician examination (7%). Many tumors (60%) were located in the upper outer quadrants, corresponding to the axillary portion of a mantle field. There were seven cases of carcinoma in situ: six DCIS and one LCIS. The histologic distribution of invasive tumors paralleled that reported in the general population: 4% pure lobular, 35% high grade ductal, 45% intermediate grade ductal, 7% low-grade ductal, 4% tubular, 2% medullary, and 2% mucinous. Estrogen receptors were positive in 59% of evaluable cases. While 90% of invasive tumors were smaller than four centimeters, 96% were managed with mastectomy

  9. Recent advances in managing differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamartina, Livia; Grani, Giorgio; Durante, Cosimo; Filetti, Sebastiano

    2018-01-01

    The main clinical challenge in the management of thyroid cancer is to avoid over-treatment and over-diagnosis in patients with lower-risk disease while promptly identifying those patients with more advanced or high-risk disease requiring aggressive treatment. In recent years, novel clinical and molecular data have emerged, allowing the development of new staging systems, predictive and prognostic tools, and treatment approaches. There has been a notable shift toward more conservative management of low- and intermediate-risk patients, characterized by less extensive surgery, more selective use of radioisotopes (for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes), and less intensive follow-up. Furthermore, the histologic classification; tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM) staging; and American Thyroid Association risk stratification systems have been refined, and this has increased the number of patients in the low- and intermediate-risk categories. There is now a need for new, prospective data to clarify how these changing practices will impact long-term outcomes of patients with thyroid cancer, and new follow-up strategies and biomarkers are still under investigation. On the other hand, patients with more advanced or high-risk disease have a broader portfolio of options in terms of treatments and therapeutic agents, including multitarget tyrosine kinase inhibitors, more selective BRAF or MEK inhibitors, combination therapies, and immunotherapy.

  10. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface MM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Megan M Boniface,1 Sachin B Wani,2 Tracey E Schefter,3 Phillip J Koo,4 Cheryl Meguid,1 Stephen Leong,5 Jeffrey B Kaplan,6 Lisa J Wingrove,7 Martin D McCarter1 1Section of Surgical Oncology, Division of GI, Tumor and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Therapeutic and Interventional Endoscopy, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, 4Division of Radiology-Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, 5Division of Medical Oncology, 6Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Denver, 7Department of Food and Nutrition Services, University of Colorado Hospital Cancer Center, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical, and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Keywords: tumor board, upper gastrointestinal malignancies, patient centered

  11. Surgical management of malignant bowel obstruction in recurrent pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Sun Kim

    2017-01-01

    Discussion and conclusion: Palliative surgery improves quality of life in recurrent pancreatic cancer patients and can continue patient’s palliative management. In selected patients, palliative surgery may effective management for progress of survival and quality of life.

  12. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David

    2014-01-01

    . The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility...... study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide...... countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe....

  13. Perioperative management of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The management of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is a challenge. Despite current guidelines, the treatment is suboptimal as illustrated by the high risk of recurrence and progression. Transurethral resection plays a pivotal role in the management of bladder cancer, but the

  14. Cancer Survivors: Managing Your Emotions After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devise your own plan for coping with your emotions. Have an open mind and try different strategies to find out what works best for you. Coping with fear of recurrence. Cancer.Net. ... side effects of cancer treatment. Cancer.Net. http://www.cancer. ...

  15. Management of recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Makoto

    2018-01-01

    Recently, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have become available for the treatment of recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer. However, a number of clinical challenges that impact the use of VEGFR-targeted TKI in daily clinical practice have arisen. Toxicity is considerable, to the extent that most physicians hesitate to start VEGFR-targeted TKI and prefer to continue a watch-and-wait approach until the patient's disease markedly worsens. This delayed use of VEGFR-targeted TKI leads to a higher incidence of serious adverse events than was reported in clinical trials. Moreover, the watch-and-wait approach has several demerits, including a worsening of quality of life, worsening of outcomes in patients of older age or with follicular thyroid cancer and increased risk of brain metastasis or bleeding. Thus, optimal timing for the start of VEGFR-targeted TKI requires careful consideration. Moreover, management of VEGFR-targeted TKI toxicities requires appropriate supportive care, well-organised infrastructure in the outpatient clinic and patient education. Future treatment will progress to precision medicine based on molecular testing. Promotion of precision medicine requires the establishment of a system of easy access to molecular testing and the promotion of translational research for the development of new drugs.

  16. PET in management of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung-Chul

    2004-01-01

    treatment response to primary chemotherapy. Although about 70-80% of patients show clinical response to primary chemotherapy, the pathological response rate is only in the range of 20-30%. The sensitivity and specificity to predict complete pathologic response after the first course of chemotherapy were 90 and 74%, respectively. Therefore, as early as after the first course of therapy responding and non-responding tumors can be differentiated by PET. After initiation of tamoxifen therapy, metabolic uptake is increased in responders (metabolic flare) but on the other hands there is no metabolic flare reaction in non-responders. FDG-PET may be helpful for improving patient management (30-40%) by avoiding ineffective chemotherapy and unnecessary side effects. FDG-PET enables early prediction of response to tamoxifen treatment. F-18 labeled progesterone receptor ligands, 11C-methionine, 18F-fluoro-l-thymidine (FLT) and 11C-tyrosine also have been synthesized for future clinical trial. In patients with unclear elevations of tumor marker (CA 15.3) during follow-up, PET can provide more than 90% sensitivity for the detection of occult recurrent disease. According to the FDG-PET literature survey, management strategy is changed in about 24% due to altered staging and in about 40% due to detection of recurrence in breast cancer. (author)

  17. Thyroid cancer: Natural history, management strategies and outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaha, Ashok R.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: To understand the natural history of thyroid cancer and high risk groups; To define the biological behavior of thyroid cancer and relate it to various prognostic factors and risk groups; To divide the management strategies into conservation, radical surgery and radioactive iodine treatment; To define the role of external radiation therapy and the management of complex and advanced thyroid cancer; To analyze the results of management of anaplastic thyroid cancer and make a plea for combined modality treatment; To define the current role of genetic studies in medullary thyroid cancer. At the end of this refresher course, the attendees will be able to understand the natural history, the prognostic factors and risk groups and surgical and combined modality treatment in thyroid cancer

  18. Management of gastric cancer in Asia: resource-stratified guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Shan, Yan-Shen; Hu, Huang-Ming; Price, Timothy J; Sirohi, Bhawna; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Sano, Takeshi; Yang, Han-Kwang; Zhang, Xiaotian; Park, Sook Ryun; Fujii, Masashi; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2013-11-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer globally, and is the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. About three-quarters of newly diagnosed cases in 2008 were from Asian countries. With a high mortality-to-incidence ratio, management of gastric cancer is challenging. We discuss evidence for optimum management of gastric cancer in aspects of screening and early detection, diagnosis, and staging; endoscopic and surgical intervention; and the concepts of perioperative, postoperative, and palliative chemotherapy and use of molecularly targeted therapy. Recommendations are formulated on the basis of the framework provided by the Breast Health Global Initiative, using the categories of basic, limited, enhanced, and maximum level. We aim to provide a stepwise strategy for management of gastric cancer applicable to different levels of health-care resources in Asian countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Paradigm Shift in the Management Strategy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Keiichi; McAlpine, Jessica N; Lheureux, Stephanie; Matsumura, Noriomi; Oza, Amit M

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis on the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer continues to evolve. Although epithelial ovarian cancer had been assumed to arise from the coelomic epithelium of the ovarian surface, it is now becoming clearer that the majority of serous carcinomas arise from epithelium of the distal fallopian tube, whereas clear cell and endometrioid cancers arise from endometriosis. Molecular and genomic characteristics of epithelial ovarian cancer have been extensively investigated. Our understanding of pathogenesis of the various histologic types of ovarian cancer have begun to inform changes to the strategies for management of epithelial ovarian cancer, which represent a paradigm shift not only for treatment but also for prevention, which previously had not been considered achievable. In this article, we will discuss novel attempts at the prevention of high-grade serous ovarian cancer and treatment strategies for two distinct entities in epithelial ovarian cancer: low-grade serous and clear cell ovarian carcinomas, which are relatively rare and resistant to conventional chemotherapy.

  20. A regional programme to improve skin cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Graham R; Sycamore, Mark J; Shand, Brett I; Simcock, Jeremy W

    2015-12-01

    In 2008, public specialist and general practice services in Canterbury were unable to manage demand for skin cancer treatment. Local clinicians decided the solution was to develop a see-and-treat skin excision clinic staffed by plastic surgeons and general practitioners (GPs), and the introduction of subsidised excisions in general practice. This paper describes the collaboration between clinicians, managers and funders and the results and quality management measures of these initiatives. There is an increasing incidence of skin cancer. GPs in Canterbury were unable to meet increasing demand for skin cancer treatment because some lacked confidence and competence in skin cancer management. There was no public funding for primary care management of skin cancer, driving patients to fully funded secondary care services. Secondary care services were at capacity, with no coordinated programme across primary and secondary care. The programme has resulted in a greater number of skin cancers being treated by the public health system, a reduction in waiting times for treatment, and fewer minor skin lesions being referred to secondary care. Quality measures have been achieved and are improving steadily. Development of the programme has improved working relationships between primary and secondary care clinicians. The strategy was to facilitate the working relationship between primary and secondary care and increase the capacity for skin lesion excisions in both sectors. Skin cancer management can be improved by a coordinated approach between primary and secondary care.

  1. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Multidisciplinary Management at the Colombian National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garavito, Gloria; Llamas O, Augusto; Cadena, Enrique; De Los Reyes, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignant disease of the endocrine system. Two hundred and twenty-one new cases were diagnosed at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia (NCI) in 2006, roughly 4% of all new cancer cases. Weekly multidisciplinary decision-making meetings on thyroid cancer management have been held at the NCI since 1994. This article covers the body of knowledge gathered through 14 years of interdisciplinary collaboration where experience has been combined with the best available evidence.

  2. Bladder cancer: overview and disease management. Part 1: non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Beverley

    2018-05-10

    Part 1 of this two-part article provides an overview of bladder cancer and discusses its management. Since publication of a previous article entitled 'Understanding the role of smoking in the aetiology of bladder cancer' ( Anderson, 2009 ), the author has received many requests for an update. This article provides an overview of bladder cancer and its current management practices, underlining the continued role of smoking as the predominant risk factor in the disease's development. The management of bladder cancer is governed by specific guidelines. Management of non-muscle-invasive cancers, including surgical intervention with transurethral resection, and intravesical therapy using chemotherapy and immunotherapy agents, is discussed. Cystectomy (removal of the bladder), is sometimes necessary. Treatments are effective in reducing tumour recurrence, but the effects of the risks and side-effects on the individual's quality of life can be significant. The prevalence of bladder cancer, and the nature of its management make this cancer one of the most expensive for the NHS to treat. The effectiveness of health promotional strategies in increasing peoples' awareness of their risk of developing the disease, and in enabling them to change long-term health behaviours is discussed. The role of the multidisciplinary team is explored, along with that of the uro-oncology cancer nurse specialist. Part 2 will consider the management of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer.

  3. Surgical management of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamousa Ahmed

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Surgery plays a major role in the management of patients with lung cancer. Surgery is not only the main curative treatment modality in patients with early-stage lung cancer but it also has a significant role in the initial workup for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. This article describes the surgical management of patients with lung cancer. Surgical resection for lung cancer is still regarded as the most effective method for controlling the primary tumor, provided it is resectable for cure and the risks of the procedure are low. The 5-year survival rare following complete resection (R0 of a lung cancer is stage dependent [Table 1]. [1-3] Incomplete resection (R1, R2 rarely, if ever, cures the patient.

  4. Progress in molecular-based management of differentiated thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mingzhao; Haugen, Bryan R; Schlumberger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Substantial developments have occurred in the past 5–10 years in clinical translational research of thyroid cancer. Diagnostic molecular markers, such as RET-PTC, RAS, and BRAFV600E mutations; galectin 3; and a new gene expression classifier, are outstanding examples that have improved diagnosis of thyroid nodules. BRAF mutation is a prognostic genetic marker that has improved risk stratification and hence tailored management of patients with thyroid cancer, including those with conventionally low risks. Novel molecular-targeted treatments hold great promise for radioiodine-refractory and surgically inoperable thyroid cancers as shown in clinical trials; such treatments are likely to become a component of the standard treatment regimen for patients with thyroid cancer in the near future. These novel molecular-based management strategies for thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer are the most exciting developments in this unprecedented era of molecular thyroid-cancer medicine. PMID:23668556

  5. Coordinating cancer care: patient and practice management processes among surgeons who treat breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Steven J; Hawley, Sarah T; Morrow, Monica; Griggs, Jennifer J; Jagsi, Reshma; Hamilton, Ann S; Graff, John J; Friese, Christopher R; Hofer, Timothy P

    2010-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine has called for more coordinated cancer care models that correspond to initiatives led by cancer providers and professional organizations. These initiatives parallel those underway to integrate the management of patients with chronic conditions. We developed 5 breast cancer patient and practice management process measures based on the Chronic Care Model. We then performed a survey to evaluate patterns and correlates of these measures among attending surgeons of a population-based sample of patients diagnosed with breast cancer between June 2005 and February 2007 in Los Angeles and Detroit (N = 312; response rate, 75.9%). Surgeon practice specialization varied markedly with about half of the surgeons devoting 15% or less of their total practice to breast cancer, whereas 16.2% of surgeons devoted 50% or more. There was also large variation in the extent of the use of patient and practice management processes with most surgeons reporting low use. Patient and practice management process measures were positively associated with greater levels of surgeon specialization and the presence of a teaching program. Cancer program status was weakly associated with patient and practice management processes. Low uptake of patient and practice management processes among surgeons who treat breast cancer patients may indicate that surgeons are not convinced that these processes matter, or that there are logistical and cost barriers to implementation. More research is needed to understand how large variations in patient and practice management processes might affect the quality of care for patients with breast cancer.

  6. Cancer pain management: Basic information for the young pain physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SPS Rana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer pain is multifactorial and complex. The impact of cancer pain is devastating, with increased morbidity and poor quality of life, if not treated adequately. Cancer pain management is a challenging task both due to disease process as well as a consequence of treatment-related side-effects. Optimization of analgesia with oral opioids, adjuvant analgesics, and advanced pain management techniques is the key to success for cancer pain. Early access of oral opioid and interventional pain management techniques can overcome the barriers of cancer pain, with improved quality of life. With timely and proper anticancer therapy, opioids, nerve blocks, and other non-invasive techniques like psychosocial care, satisfactory pain relief can be achieved in most of the patients. Although the WHO Analgesic Ladder is effective for more than 80% cancer pain, addition of appropriate adjuvant drugs along with early intervention is needed for improved Quality of Life. Effective cancer pain treatment requires a holistic approach with timely assessment, measurement of pain, pathophysiology involved in causing particular type of pain, and understanding of drugs to relieve pain with timely inclusion of intervention. Careful evaluation of psychosocial and mental components with good communication is necessary. Barriers to cancer pain management should be overcome with an interdisciplinary approach aiming to provide adequate analgesia with minimal side-effects. Management of cancer pain should comprise not only a physical component but also psychosocial and mental components and social need of the patient. With risk-benefit analysis, interventional techniques should be included in an early stage of pain treatment. This article summarizes the need for early and effective pain management strategies, awareness regarding pain control, and barriers of cancer pain.

  7. ACOG Recommendations and Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening and Management

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about ACOG's recommendations for cervical cancer screening and management.

  8. Diagnosis and Management of High Risk Group for Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. To reduce the socioeconomic burden related to gastric cancer, it is very important to identify and manage high risk group for gastric cancer. In this review, we describe the general risk factors for gastric cancer and define high risk group for gastric cancer. We discuss strategies for the effective management of patients for the prevention and early detection of gastric cancer. Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the most significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Therefore, the accurate selection of individuals with AG and IM may be a key strategy for the prevention and/or early detection of gastric cancer. Although endoscopic evaluation using enhanced technologies such as narrow band imaging-magnification, the serum pepsinogen test, Helicobacter pylori serology, and trefoil factor 3 have been evaluated, a gold standard method to accurately select individuals with AG and IM has not emerged. In terms of managing patients at high risk of gastric cancer, it remains uncertain whether H. pylori eradication reverses and/or prevents the progression of AG and IM. Although endoscopic surveillance in high risk patients is expected to be beneficial, further prospective studies in large populations are needed to determine the optimal surveillance interval. PMID:25547086

  9. [Managment of head and neck cancers during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiciński, Krzysztof; Skorek, Andrzej; Stankiewicz, Czesław

    2011-01-01

    The coincidence of malignant disease during pregnancy is uncommon. The incidence of cancer in pregnancy has increased, due to the tendency to postpone childbirth to an older age. Cancer complicates approximately 0.1% of all pregnancies. Managing head and neck cancers during pregnancy requires additional pregnancy-related understanding of the aetiological effect of pregnancy on cancer, knowledge of the direct and indirect effects of cancer on pregnancy, and the effect of diagnostic and treatment modalities on pregnancy. The timing of treatment is an important determinant on foetal wellbeing. A multidisciplinary approach should be adopted to enable parents and clinicians to make the best clinical decision. Clinicians must be cognizant with the ethical dilemmas of treatment. In head and neck cancers, pregnancy has no effect on maternal prognosis when compared to non-pregnant patients matched by age, cancer stage and treatment. Copyright © 2011 Polish Otolaryngology Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner (Poland). All rights reserved.

  10. Nanotechnology in the management of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Kewei; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a major disease with high mortality. All cervical cancers are caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Although preventive vaccines for cervical cancer are successful, treatment of cervical cancer is far less satisfactory because of multidrug resistance and side effects. In this review, we summarize the recent application of nanotechnology to the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer as well as the development of HPV vaccines. Early detection of cervical cancer enables tumours to be efficiently removed by surgical procedures, leading to increased survival rate. The current method of detecting cervical cancer by Pap smear can only achieve 50% sensitivity, whereas nanotechnology has been used to detect HPVs with greatly improved sensitivity. In cervical cancer treatment, nanotechnology has been used for the delivery of anticancer drugs to increase treatment efficacy and decrease side effects. Nanodelivery of HPV preventive and therapeutic vaccines has also been investigated to increase vaccine efficacy. Overall, these developments suggest that nanoparticle-based vaccine may become the most effective way to prevent and treat cervical cancer, assisted or combined with some other nanotechnology-based therapy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Exploring the breast cancer patient journey: do breast cancer survivors need menopause management support?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanna, Nuttan; Buijs, Helene; Pitkin, Joan

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer survivors can be expected to suffer from menopause symptoms with estrogen deprivation due to cancer treatments, in addition to natural menopause-related estrogen loss. To gain an understanding of what support breast cancer patients have when they suffer from menopausal symptoms, and utilize findings to further inform National Health Service (NHS) care provision for breast cancer survivors. Qualitative study with focus group sessions targeting Caucasian and Asian women with breast cancer. Patient stories, with women describing their breast cancer journey and speaking about support received for any menopausal symptoms. Thematic data analysis of transcription. Breast cancer patients were not sure if they had menopausal symptoms or whether this was due to their breast cancer condition or treatment. Patients had an attitude of acceptance of menopausal symptoms and reported trying to cope with these by themselves. This research identifies a need for more information that is culturally sensitive on managing menopause symptoms, both as side-effects of breast cancer treatments as well as for affect on quality of life during the survivorship phase. Our work also gives insight into cultural remedies used for hot flushes by Asian patients, which they consider as 'cooling' foods. Breast cancer patients want to know whether side-effects of cancer treatment persist long term and how these can be managed. There is a need for improved patient support within any new NHS service models that are developed along breast cancer patient pathways, and inclusion of personalized advice for menopause symptoms.

  12. First German disease management program for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    The first disease management program contract for breast cancer in Germany was signed in 2002 between the Association of Regional of Physicians in North-Rhine and the statutory health insurance companies in Rhineland. At the heart of this unique breast cancer disease management program is a patient-centered network of health care professionals. The program's main objectives are: (1) to improve the quality of treatment and post-operative care for breast cancer patients, (2) to provide timely information and consultation empowering the patient to participate in decisionmaking, (3) to improve the interface between inpatient and outpatient care, and (4) to increase the number of breast-conserving surgeries.

  13. Clinical multi-omics strategies for the effective cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Woo, Sang Myung; Myung, Jae Kyung

    2017-08-15

    Cancer is a global health issue as a multi-factorial complex disease, and early detection and novel therapeutic strategies are required for more effective cancer management. With the development of systemic analytical -omics strategies, the therapeutic approach and study of the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis and cancer progression have moved from hypothesis-driven targeted investigations to data-driven untargeted investigations focusing on the integrated diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer in individual patients. Predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine (PPPM) is a promising new approach to reduce the burden of cancer and facilitate more accurate prognosis, diagnosis, as well as effective treatment. Here we review the fundamentals of, and new developments in, -omics technologies, together with the key role of a variety of practical -omics strategies in PPPM for cancer treatment and diagnosis. In this review, a comprehensive and critical overview of the systematic strategy for predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine (PPPM) for cancer disease was described in a view of cancer prognostic prediction, diagnostics, and prevention as well as cancer therapy and drug responses. We have discussed multi-dimensional data obtained from various resources and integration of multisciplinary -omics strategies with computational method which could contribute the more effective PPPM for cancer. This review has provided the novel insights of the current applications of each and combined -omics technologies, which showed their powerful potential for the establishment of PPPM for cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Time trends in axilla management among early breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondos, Adam; Jansen, Lina; Heil, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Background We examined time trends in axilla management among patients with early breast cancer in European clinical settings. Material and methods EUROCANPlatform partners, including population-based and cancer center-specific registries, provided routinely available clinical cancer registry data...... for a comparative study of axillary management trends among patients with first non-metastatic breast cancer who were not selected for neoadjuvant therapy during the last decade. We used an additional short questionnaire to compare clinical care patterns in 2014. Results Patients treated in cancer centers were...... younger than population-based registry populations. Tumor size and lymph node status distributions varied little between settings or over time. In 2003, sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) use varied between 26% and 81% for pT1 tumors, and between 2% and 68% for pT2 tumors. By 2010, SLNB use increased to 79...

  15. Disease management for chronic skin cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van der Geer-Rutten (Simone)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is a rapidly rising problem. In this thesis we show that an enormous gap exists between the official first primary figures available at cancer registries and the actual burden in a dermatology practice. NMSC needs to be regarded as a chronic

  16. Management of pregnancy associated breast cancer | Ohanaka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The peak age incidence for breast cancer in developing countries is 35-45 years, which is part of the reproductive years of our women. As women defer childbearing on account of education and careers, the incidence of pregnancy associated breast cancer is expected to increase. Aim: This study presents 4 ...

  17. Natural biology and management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpato, Kristen R; Tyson, Mark D; Clark, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews the natural biology of noninvasive bladder cancer and its management strategies while summarizing the most recent advances in the field. RECENT FINDINGS: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a tendency to recur and progress. Risk stratification has...... in low-risk patients. SUMMARY: NMIBC represents a variety of disease states and continues to pose management challenges. As our understanding of tumor biology improves and technology advances, achieving better outcomes through individualized care may be possible.......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews the natural biology of noninvasive bladder cancer and its management strategies while summarizing the most recent advances in the field. RECENT FINDINGS: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a tendency to recur and progress. Risk stratification has...... helped triage patients but improved tools, including biomarkers, are still needed. Enhanced endoscopy with photodynamic imaging, narrow band imaging, optical coherence tomography and confocal laser endomicroscopy show promise for diagnosis, risk stratification and disease monitoring. Attempts at better...

  18. Image-guided radiotherapy and motion management in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine

    2015-01-01

    In this review, image guidance and motion management in radiotherapy for lung cancer is discussed. Motion characteristics of lung tumours and image guidance techniques to obtain motion information are elaborated. Possibilities for management of image guidance and motion in the various steps...

  19. New approaches in breast cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romestaing, P.; Rocher, F.; Sentenac, I.; Marquis, I.; Zhu, Y.; Salles, G.; Gerard, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    In current treatment of breast cancer, radiotherapy (RT) plays an important role. It can take place in 3 main situations: after mastectomy, after surgical conservative treatment for infiltrating cancer, and after local excision for intraductal cancer. RT plays a particularly important role in conservative treatment of small breast cancer; the relevance of a boost after 50 Gy will be elucidated in the coming years by the ongoing random trials. More and more the indication of this boost will be individualized according to parameters predicting for the risk of local relapse (age, extensive intraductal carcinoma, or free margin). After mastectomy the benefit interns of survival remains controversial. In large T2 T3 tumors, still often treated by mastectomy, neoadjuvant chemo-, and radiotherapy, should be able to reduce the number of mutilating surgery. (author). 7 refs

  20. An update on the management of breast cancer in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderpuye, V; Grover, S; Hammad, N; PoojaPrabhakar; Simonds, H; Olopade, F; Stefan, D C

    2017-01-01

    There is limited information about the challenges of cancer management and attempts at improving outcomes in Africa. Even though South and North Africa are better resourceds to tackle the burden of breast cancer, similar poor prognostic factors are common to all countries. The five-year overall Survival rate for breast cancer patients does not exceed 60% for any low and middle-income country (LMIC) in Africa. In spite of the gains achieved over the past decade, certain characteristics remain the same such as limited availability of breast conservation therapies, inadequate access to drugs, few oncology specialists and adherence to harmful socio-cultural practices. This review on managing breast cancer in Africa is authored by African oncologists who practice or collaborate in Africa and with hands-on experience with the realities. A search was performed via electronic databases from 1999 to 2016. (PubMed/Medline, African Journals Online) for all literature in English or translated into English, covering the terms "breast cancer in Africa and developing countries". One hundred ninety were deemed appropriate. Breast tumors are diagnosed at earlier ages and later stages than in highincome countries. There is a higher prevalence of triple-negative cancers. The limitations of poor nursing care and surgery, inadequate access to radiotherapy, poor availability of basic and modern systemic therapies translate into lower survival rate. Positive strides in breast cancer management in Africa include increased adaptation of treatment guidelines, improved pathology services including immuno-histochemistry, expansion and upgrading of radiotherapy equipment across the continent in addition to more research opportunities. This review is an update of the management of breast cancer in Africa, taking a look at the epidemiology, pathology, management resources, outcomes, research and limitations in Africa from the perspective of oncologists with local experience.

  1. ACOG Recommendations and Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening and Management

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about ACOG's recommendations for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  2. Management of hepatitis B reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Chung, Raymond T.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation is well documented in previously resolved or inactive HBV carriers who receive cancer chemotherapy. The consequences of HBV reactivation range from self-limited conditions to fulminant hepatic failure and death. HBV reactivation also leads to premature termination of chemotherapy or delay in treatment schedules. This review summarizes current knowledge of management of HBV reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) ...

  3. Molecular Biomarkers in the Clinical Management of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udager, Aaron M; Tomlins, Scott A

    2018-01-08

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common noncutaneous malignancies in men, is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcome. Although the majority of patients harbor indolent tumors that are essentially cured by local therapy, subsets of patients present with aggressive disease or recur/progress after primary treatment. With this in mind, modern clinical approaches to prostate cancer emphasize the need to reduce overdiagnosis and overtreatment via personalized medicine. Advances in our understanding of prostate cancer pathogenesis, coupled with recent technologic innovations, have facilitated the development and validation of numerous molecular biomarkers, representing a range of macromolecules assayed from a variety of patient sample types, to help guide the clinical management of prostate cancer, including early detection, diagnosis, prognostication, and targeted therapeutic selection. Herein, we review the current state of the art regarding prostate cancer molecular biomarkers, emphasizing those with demonstrated utility in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  4. Complementary therapies for symptom management in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aanchal Satija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients are often poly-symptomatic which distressingly affects their quality of lives (QOLs. Alhough, conventional management provides adequate symptom control, yet is coupled with some limitations. Complementary therapies (CTs have shown beneficial effects in cancer patients for symptomatic relief. The aim of this article is to provide evidence-based review of commonly used CTs for symptom management in cancer care. Hypnosis has promising evidence to be used for managing symptoms such as pain, chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, distress, fatigue, and hot flashes. Guided imagery increases comfort and can be used as a psycho-supportive therapy. Meditation substantially improves psychological function, mental health, and QOL. Cognitive behavioral therapies effectively reduce pain, distress, fatigue, anxiety, and depression; and improve subjective sleep outcomes along with mood and QOL. Yoga has short term beneficial effects for anxiety, depression, fatigue, perceived stress, QOL, and well-being. T'ai Chi and qigong are beneficial adjunctive therapies for supportive cancer care, but their role in reducing cancer pain is not well proven. Acupuncture is effective for reducing treatment related side-effects, pain and fatigue. Other therapies such as massage techniques, energy therapies, and spiritual interventions have also demonstrated positive role in managing cancer-related symptoms and improve overall well-being. However, the clinical effectiveness of these therapies for symptom management in cancer patients cannot be concluded due to poor strength of evidence. Nonetheless, these are relatively free from risks and hence can be given along with conventional treatments. Only by tailoring these therapies as per patient's beliefs and preferences, optimal patient-centered holistic care can be provided.

  5. Hypothyroidism after a cancer diagnosis: etiology, diagnosis, complications, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Yvette; Sippel, Rebecca S; Chen, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common disease that is easily treated in the majority of cases, when readily diagnosed; however, presentation of an aggregate of its symptoms is often clinically overlooked or attributed to another disease and can potentially be lethal. Already prevalent in older women, its occurrence in younger patients is rising as a result of radiation therapy, radioactive iodine therapy, and newer antineoplastic agents used to manage various malignancies. The presence of nonspecific constitutional symptoms and neuropsychiatric complaints in cancer patients can be attributed to a myriad of other diagnoses and therapies. Thyroid dysfunction can be easily overlooked in cancer patients because of the complexity of cancer's clinical picture, particularly in the pediatric population. Underdiagnosis can have important consequences for the management of both hypothyroidism and the malignancy. At minimum, quality of life is adversely affected. Untreated hypothyroidism can lead to heart failure, psychosis, and coma and can reduce the effectiveness of potentially life-saving cancer therapies, whereas iatrogenic causes can provoke atrial fibrillation and osteoporosis. Consequently, the diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism in cancer patients are pertinent. We summarize the history, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical diagnosis, and management of hypothyroidism in cancer patients.

  6. Current management of oral cancer. A multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, R A; Blanchaert, R H

    2001-11-01

    Recent basic science discoveries have contributed to our understanding of the etiology of oral cancer and allowed us to consider innovative approaches to therapy. The authors evaluated and summarized current approaches to the management of oral cancer, emphasizing the multidisciplinary team approach to coordinate surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Current concepts in management, including complications of therapy, are described. State-of-the-art surgical techniques can spare patients with oral cancer from much of the morbidity and complications common in the past. The refinement of treatment strategies reduces complications and improves efficacy. Many exciting new clinical trials in the areas of gene therapy and immunomodulation are showing promise. Management of oral cancer has undergone radical change in the past 10 years and continues to evolve rapidly. Discoveries in molecular biology, diagnosis, surgery, radiation therapy and medical oncology have altered many traditional concepts and practices. General dental practitioners need to understand current treatment modalities for oral and pharyngeal cancers to determine to whom they should refer patients for the most appropriate treatment, and to make recommendations regarding complications associated with these cancers.

  7. Controversies in the management of tongue base cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Tongue base cancer is one of the most lethal head and neck cancers. There is considerable controversy in the management of this disease with wide variation of opinion within the literature. METHODS: We discuss the presentation, diagnostic and therapeutic strategies which exist in the literature. Articles were reviewed from 1970 to 2007 within the Medline, Pubmed and Cochrane libraries. CONCLUSIONS: Smokers with a history of persistent unilateral neck pain, even in the absence of clinical signs warrant MRI neck imaging. Tongue base cancer organ preservation therapeutic strategies, radiation and concomitant platinum based chemotherapy, currently optimise oncologic and quality of life outcomes.

  8. Managing cancer risk and decision making after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, A C; Wong, G; Craig, J C; Chapman, J R

    2008-11-01

    Kidney transplant recipients are at higher risk of cancer at most sites, and cancer after transplantation causes considerable morbidity and mortality. To optimize long-term patient outcomes, clinicians balance the prospect of graft failure and dialysis, with competing risks of diabetes, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and the risk of malignancy. In this paper we critically examine the assumptions underpinning primary prevention, immunization, chemoprevention and screening programs, and highlight considerations when applying evidence to the kidney transplant population, and suggest a clinical research agenda that aims to define a rational approach to managing posttransplant cancer risk.

  9. Nutrition in peri-operative esophageal cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhagen, Elles; van Vulpen, Jonna K; van Hillegersberg, Richard; May, Anne M; Siersema, Peter D

    2017-07-01

    Nutritional status and dietary intake are increasingly recognized as essential areas in esophageal cancer management. Nutritional management of esophageal cancer is a continuously evolving field and comprises an interesting area for scientific research. Areas covered: This review encompasses the current literature on nutrition in the pre-operative, peri-operative, and post-operative phases of esophageal cancer. Both established interventions and potential novel targets for nutritional management are discussed. Expert commentary: To ensure an optimal pre-operative status and to reduce peri-operative complications, it is key to assess nutritional status in all pre-operative esophageal cancer patients and to apply nutritional interventions accordingly. Since esophagectomy results in a permanent anatomical change, a special focus on nutritional strategies is needed in the post-operative phase, including early initiation of enteral feeding, nutritional interventions for post-operative complications, and attention to long-term nutritional intake and status. Nutritional aspects of pre-optimization and peri-operative management should be incorporated in novel Enhanced Recovery After Surgery programs for esophageal cancer.

  10. Role of Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in the Management of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric P. Arruda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a rare and typically aggressive form of skin cancer. It most commonly affects the elderly and has a predilection for the sun-exposed skin of the head and neck region. Other etiological factors include immune suppression, organ transplantation, and polyoma virus infection. MCC has a propensity to spread to regional lymphatics with a high locoregional recurrence rate. Since its discovery in 1972, treatment paradigms have shifted, with no consensus on optimal management strategies. Currently, standard of care includes surgical intervention to the primary and locoregional site with adjuvant radiotherapy for high-risk disease. In this paper, we discuss the history, pathology, and epidemiology of this rare disease with a focus on the evidentiary basis of treatment protocols. The use of sentinel lymph node biopsy as a management option will be the focus of this paper.

  11. Role of Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in the Management of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruda, E.P.; Higgins, K.M.; Higgins, K. M.; Higgins, K. M.

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and typically aggressive form of skin cancer. It most commonly affects the elderly and has a predilection for the sun-exposed skin of the head and neck region. Other etiological factors include immune suppression, organ transplantation, and polyoma virus infection. MCC has a propensity to spread to regional lymphatics with a high locoregional recurrence rate. Since its discovery in 1972, treatment paradigms have shifted, with no consensus on optimal management strategies. Currently, standard of care includes surgical intervention to the primary and locoregional site with adjuvant radiotherapy for high-risk disease. In this paper, we discuss the history, pathology, and epidemiology of this rare disease with a focus on the evidentiary basis of treatment protocols. The use of sentinel lymph node biopsy as a management option will be the focus of this paper.

  12. Nanotherapeutic approaches for brain cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz del Burgo, Laura; Hernández, Rosa María; Orive, Gorka; Pedraz, Jose Luis

    2014-07-01

    Around the world, cancer remains one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality. Worldwide, approximately 238,000 new cases of brain and other central nervous system tumors are diagnosed every year. Nanotherapeutic approaches hold tremendous potential for diagnosis and treatment of brain cancer, including the ability to target complex molecular cargoes to the tumor sites and the capacity of crossing the blood-brain barrier and accessing to the brain after systemic administration. A new generation of "smart" nanoparticles has been designed as novel targeted delivery devices for new therapies including gene therapy, anti-angiogenic and thermotherapy. This review highlights the latest research, opportunities and challenges for developing novel nanotherapeutics for treating brain cancers. This comprehensive review highlights the latest research results, opportunities and challenges for developing novel nanotherapeutics for treating brain cancers, with a special focus on "smart" nanoparticles as novel targeted delivery devices for new therapies including gene therapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and localized thermotherapy. © 2014.

  13. MANAGEMENT OF CANCER IN PATIENTS WITH HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    populations of patients with HIV infection that a causal relationship is difficult to exclude. These cancers are associated with declining immune function and are considered to be ... the chemotherapy or radiotherapy is strongly associated with response rates. ... organ dysfunction such as hepatitis, renal failure and respiratory ...

  14. Cancer related fatigue: implementing guidelines for optimal management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Elizabeth J M; Morris, Meg E; McKinstry, Carol E

    2017-07-18

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a key concern for people living with cancer and can impair physical functioning and activities of daily living. Evidence-based guidelines for CRF are available, yet inconsistently implemented globally. This study aimed to identify barriers and enablers to applying a cancer fatigue guideline and to derive implementation strategies. A mixed-method study explored the feasibility of implementing the CRF guideline developed by the Canadian Association for Psychosocial Oncology (CAPO). Health professionals, managers and consumers from different practice settings participated in a modified Delphi study with two survey rounds. A reference group informed the design of the study including the surveys. The first round focused on guideline characteristics, compatibility with current practice and experience, and behaviour change. The second survey built upon and triangulated the first round. Forty-five health practitioners and managers, and 68 cancer survivors completed the surveys. More than 75% of participants endorsed the CAPO cancer related fatigue guidelines. Some respondents perceived a lack of resources for accessible and expert fatigue management services. Further barriers to guideline implementation included complexity, limited practical details for some elements, and lack of clinical tools such as assessment tools or patient education materials. Recommendations to enhance guideline applicability centred around four main themes: (1) balancing the level of detail in the CAPO guideline with ease of use, (2) defining roles of different professional disciplines in CRF management, (3) how best to integrate CRF management into policy and practice, (4) how best to ensure a consumer-focused approach to CRF management. Translating current knowledge on optimal management of CRF into clinical practice can be enhanced by the adoption of valid guidelines. This study indicates that it is feasible to adopt the CAPO guidelines. Clinical application may

  15. Impact of managed care on cancer trial enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, C P; Krumholz, H M

    2005-06-01

    To determine the relationship between managed care market activity and cancer trial enrollment. Trial participant data were obtained from the National Cancer Institute. Participants in cooperative group trials of breast, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer during the years 1996 through 2001 were assigned to counties based on their zip code of residence. Linear regression was used to determine the relationship between county enrollment rate and two measures of county managed care activity (penetration and index of competition [IOC]), adjusting for other county characteristics. In bivariate analysis, there was a strong inverse correlation between trial enrollment rate and IOC (r = -0.23; P penetration, proportion uninsured, and other county characteristics. Counties in the lowest quartile of managed care penetration tended to have lower enrollment rates than the remaining counties (r = -0.05; P = .048), while counties in the second, third, and fourth quartiles of penetration all had similar enrollment rates to one another. Cancer trial enrollment rates were suboptimal across all counties, and counties with higher levels of managed care competition had significantly lower enrollment rates. The relationship between managed care penetration and trial enrollment was less consistent. Future efforts to enhance trial participation should address the potential negative influence of market factors.

  16. Management of low (favourable)-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, H Ballentine

    2011-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Most men who are diagnosed with favourable-risk prostate cancer undergo some form of active intervention, despite evidence that treatment will not improve health outcomes for many. The decision to undergo treatment after diagnosis is, in part, related to the inability to precisely determine the long-term risk of harm without treatment. Nevertheless, physicians should consider patient age, overall health, and preferences for living with cancer and the potential side effects of curative treatments, before recommending a management option. This is especially important for older men, given the high level of evidence that those with low-risk disease are unlikely to accrue any benefit from curative intervention. What is known on the subject: Over treatment of favourable-risk prostate cancer is common, especially among older men. What does the study add: A review of the natural history of favourable-risk prostate cancer in the context of choices for management of the disease. • The management of favourable-risk prostate cancer is controversial, and in the absence of controlled trials to inform best practice, choices are driven by personal beliefs with resultant wide variation in practice patterns. • Men with favourable-risk prostate cancer diagnosed today often undergo treatments that will not improve overall health outcomes. • A shared-decision approach for selecting optimal management of favourable-risk disease should account for patient age, overall health, and preferences for living with cancer and the potential side effects of curative treatments. © 2011 THE AUTHOR. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  17. Radiology in the management of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.J.; Eddleston, B.; Hunter, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to clarify the role of radiology in the evaluation of patients with cancer, in regard to both their extent of initial disease and follow- up studies after treatment. Initial chapters discuss two modalities, nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The rest of the book is devoted to specific organ systems, including chapters on childhood malignancies and radiation therapy planning techniques. Each chapter gives information on the disease, then staging and radiologic information

  18. Cetuximab in the management of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2007-01-01

    Cetuximab, a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets the ligand-binding domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is active in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). As an IgG1 antibody, cetuximab may exert its antitumor efficacy through both EGFR antagonism and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Clinical trials established the role of cetuximab, particularly with irinotecan, in irinotecan-refractory/heavily pretreated patients. More recent studies show promising...

  19. Management of severe urethral complications of prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sean P; McAninch, Jack W; Chi, Thomas; Doyle, Sean M; Master, Viraj A

    2006-12-01

    We present our management of urethral stenosis and rectourinary fistula resulting from prostate cancer therapy. We concentrated on cases refractory to minimally invasive treatment, such as dilation, urethrotomy, and urinary and/or fecal diversion. In our prospectively collected urethral reconstruction database we identified patients who underwent reconstruction of urethral stenosis or rectourinary fistula who also received prior treatment for prostate cancer. We documented demographics, prostate cancer pretreatment characteristics, prostate cancer therapy type, urethral reconstruction type and success. A total of 48 patients met the inclusion criteria, including 16 with rectourinary fistula and 32 with urethral stenosis. Urethral complications followed prior radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, cryotherapy, thermal ablation and any combination of these procedures. Stenosis repair was successful in 23 of 32 cases (73%) and it differed little between anterior and posterior urethral stenosis. Repair was accomplished by anastomotic urethroplasty in 19 cases, flap urethroplasty in 2, perineal urethrostomy in 2 and a urethral stent in 9. Prior external beam radiotherapy was a risk factor for urethral reconstruction failure. Fistula repair was successful in 14 of 15 patients (93%), excluding 1 who died postoperatively. The complexity of fistula management was dictated by fistula size and the presence or absence of coincident urethral stenosis. Urethral stenosis or rectourethral fistula following prostate cancer therapy can be managed by urethral reconstruction, such that normal voiding via the urethra is maintained, rather than abandoning the urethral outlet and performing heterotopic diversion. This can be accomplished with an acceptable rate of failure, given the complexity of the cases.

  20. Hypothyroidism After a Cancer Diagnosis: Etiology, Diagnosis, Complications, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Yvette; Sippel, Rebecca S.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common disease that is easily treated in the majority of cases, when readily diagnosed; however, presentation of an aggregate of its symptoms is often clinically overlooked or attributed to another disease and can potentially be lethal. Already prevalent in older women, its occurrence in younger patients is rising as a result of radiation therapy, radioactive iodine therapy, and newer antineoplastic agents used to manage various malignancies. The presence of nonspecific constitutional symptoms and neuropsychiatric complaints in cancer patients can be attributed to a myriad of other diagnoses and therapies. Thyroid dysfunction can be easily overlooked in cancer patients because of the complexity of cancer’s clinical picture, particularly in the pediatric population. Underdiagnosis can have important consequences for the management of both hypothyroidism and the malignancy. At minimum, quality of life is adversely affected. Untreated hypothyroidism can lead to heart failure, psychosis, and coma and can reduce the effectiveness of potentially life-saving cancer therapies, whereas iatrogenic causes can provoke atrial fibrillation and osteoporosis. Consequently, the diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism in cancer patients are pertinent. We summarize the history, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical diagnosis, and management of hypothyroidism in cancer patients. PMID:24309982

  1. Managing an Older Adult with Cancer: Considerations for Radiation Oncologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Older adults with cancer present a unique set of management complexities for oncologists and radiation oncologists. Prognosis and resilience to cancer treatments are notably dependent on the presence or risk of “geriatric syndromes,” in addition to cancer stage and histology. Recognition, proper evaluation, and management of these conditions in conjunction with management of the cancer itself are critical and can be accomplished by utilization of various geriatric assessment tools. Here we review principles of the geriatric assessment, common geriatric syndromes, and application of these concepts to multidisciplinary oncologic treatment. Older patients may experience toxicities related to treatments that impact treatment effectiveness, quality of life, treatment-related mortality, and treatment compliance. Treatment-related burdens from radiotherapy are increasingly important considerations and include procedural demands, travel, costs, and temporary or permanent loss of functional independence. An overall approach to delivering radiotherapy to an older cancer patient requires a comprehensive assessment of both physical and nonphysical factors that may impact treatment outcome. Patient and family-centered communication is also an important part of developing a shared understanding of illness and reasonable expectations of treatment.

  2. Computerized database management system for breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kok Swee; Chong, Sze Siang; Tso, Chih Ping; Nia, Mohsen Esmaeili; Chong, Aun Kee; Abbas, Siti Fathimah

    2014-01-01

    Data analysis based on breast cancer risk factors such as age, race, breastfeeding, hormone replacement therapy, family history, and obesity was conducted on breast cancer patients using a new enhanced computerized database management system. My Structural Query Language (MySQL) is selected as the application for database management system to store the patient data collected from hospitals in Malaysia. An automatic calculation tool is embedded in this system to assist the data analysis. The results are plotted automatically and a user-friendly graphical user interface is developed that can control the MySQL database. Case studies show breast cancer incidence rate is highest among Malay women, followed by Chinese and Indian. The peak age for breast cancer incidence is from 50 to 59 years old. Results suggest that the chance of developing breast cancer is increased in older women, and reduced with breastfeeding practice. The weight status might affect the breast cancer risk differently. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  3. Prognostic features and markers for testicular cancer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy S Leman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Testicular neoplasm accounts for about 1% of all cancers in men. Over the last 40 years, the incidence of testicular cancer has increased in northern European male populations for unknown reasons. When diagnosed at early stage, testicular cancer is usually curable with a high survival rate. In the past three decades, successful multidisciplinary approaches for the management of testicular cancer have significantly increased patient survival rates. Utilization of tumor markers and accurate prognostic classification has also contributed to successful therapy. In this article, we highlight the most commonly used tumor markers and several potential "novel" markers for testicular cancer as part of the ongoing effort in biomarker research and discovery. In addition, this article also identifies several key prognostic features that have been demonstrated to play a role in predicting relapse. These features include tumor size, rete testis invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and tumor histology. Together with tumor markers, these prognostic factors should be taken into account for risk-adapted management of testicular cancer.

  4. [Case managers experience improved trajectories for cancer patients after implementation of the case manager function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, Karina Rahbek; Nafei, Hanne; Jakobsen, Stine Finne; Gandrup, Per; Knudsen, Janne Lehmann

    2015-06-08

    Case managers are increasingly used to optimize trajectories for patients. This study is based on a questionnaire among case managers in cancer care, aiming at the clarification of the func­tion and its impact on especially patient safety, when handing over the responsibility. The results show a major variation in how the function is organized, the level of competence and the task to be handled. The responsibility has in general been nar­rowed to department level. Overall, the case managers believe that the function has optimized pathways for cancer patients and improved safety, but barriers persist.

  5. Update on Management of Cancer-Related Cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lindsey J; Albrecht, Eliette D; Garcia, Jose M

    2017-01-01

    Cachexia is a metabolic syndrome driven by inflammation and characterized by loss of muscle with or without loss of fat mass. In cancer cachexia, the tumor burden and host response induce increased inflammation, decreased anabolic tone, and suppressed appetite leading to the clinical presentation of reduced body weight and quality of life (QOL). There is no approved treatment for cancer cachexia, and commonly used nutritional and anti-inflammatory strategies alone have proven ineffective for management of symptoms. Several other pharmacological agents are currently in development and have shown promise as a clinical strategy in early-phase trials. Recently, it has been proposed that multimodal strategies, with an anabolic focus, initiated early in the disease/treatment progression may provide the most therapeutic potential for symptom management. Here we review the data from recent clinical trials in cancer cachexia including pharmacological, exercise, and nutritional interventions.

  6. Current Management Strategy for Active Surveillance in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Jamil S; Javier-Desloges, Juan; Tatzel, Stephanie; Bhagat, Ansh; Nguyen, Kevin A; Hwang, Kevin; Kim, Sarah; Sprenkle, Preston C

    2017-02-01

    Active surveillance has been increasingly utilized as a strategy for the management of favorable-risk, localized prostate cancer. In this review, we describe contemporary management strategies of active surveillance, with a focus on traditional stratification schemes, new prognostic tools, and patient outcomes. Patient selection, follow-up strategy, and indication for delayed intervention for active surveillance remain centered around PSA, digital rectal exam, and biopsy findings. Novel tools which include imaging, biomarkers, and genetic assays have been investigated as potential prognostic adjuncts; however, their role in active surveillance remains institutionally dependent. Although 30-50% of patients on active surveillance ultimately undergo delayed treatment, the vast majority will remain free of metastasis with a low risk of dying from prostate cancer. The optimal method for patient selection into active surveillance is unknown; however, cancer-specific mortality rates remain excellent. New prognostication tools are promising, and long-term prospective, randomized data regarding their use in active surveillance will be beneficial.

  7. Cancer management in Sudan: Current status and future perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Sudan is one of the developing countries that face a great challenge with cancer management. About 5700 cases had been seen during year 2007 in Radiation and Isotope Center- Khartoum (RICK) and Institute of Nuclear medicine, Molecular biology, and Oncology (INMO) Wadmedani which are the only ...

  8. Clinicopathological Features and Management of Cancers in Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markku Aarnio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (LS is characterized by an autosomal dominant inheritance of the early onset of colorectal cancer (CRC and endometrial cancer, as well as increased risk for several other cancers including gastric, urinary tract, ovarian, small bowel, biliary tract, and brain tumors. The syndrome is due to a mutation in one of the four DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2. The majority of LS patients and families can now be identified, and the underlying mutation detected using genetic diagnostics. Regular surveillance for CRC and endometrial cancer has proved beneficial for mutation carriers. However, screening for other tumors is also recommended even though experiences in the screening of these tumors is limited. Prophylactic colectomy, prophylactic hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy may be reasonable options for selected patients with LS. This paper describes the features and management of LS.

  9. Novel agents in the management of lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, B

    2012-01-31

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Survival remains poor as approximately 80% of cases present with advanced stage disease. However, new treatments are emerging which offer hope to patients with advanced disease. Insights into cell biology have identified numerous intracellular and extracellular peptides that are pivotal in cancer cell signalling. Disrupting the function of these peptides inhibits intracellular signal transduction and diminishes uncontrolled proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and tumour angiogenesis. The most widely studied signalling pathway is the Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) pathway. EGF signalling can be disrupted at numerous points. Blockade of the cell surface receptor is achieved by the monoclonal antibody cetuximab; intracellular tyrosine kinase activity is inhibited by erlotinib. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) regulates another pathway important for tumour growth. Inhibition of VEGF impairs angiogenesis and disrupts metastatic spread. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF and blocks interaction with its cell surface receptor. Clinical trials have demonstrated that disruption of these signalling pathways can improve survival in advanced lung cancer. New compounds including folate antimetabolites such as pemetrexed, proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib, modified glutathione analogues such as TLK286, and other agents such as epothilones and other small molecules are currently being evaluated in patients with lung cancer. As more and more signalling peptides are targeted for manipulation, it is hoped that a new era is dawning in the treatment of advanced stage lung cancer. This review will focus on emerging new therapies in the management of lung cancer.

  10. Radioiodine and radiotherapy in the management of thyroid cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Radioiodine is an important adjuvant treatment in the management of resectable papillary and follicular thyroid cancers in all patients except those with the best prognostic features. External radiation is also an important adjuvant therapy in these patients, especially those with tumors that extend beyond the thyroid gland and invade the trachea, esophagus, nerves, and blood vessels; it is especially important in treating patients whose tumors do not concentrate radioiodine. Radioiodine may be curative in patients with microscopic distant metastases demonstrated by radioiodine scanning. Even unresectable primary papillary and follicular cancers may be eradicated by combined therapy with radioiodine and radiotherapy. Radioiodine plays no significant role in the treatment of medullary or anaplastic thyroid cancers, but external radiation may eradicate microscopic thyroid bed or nodal disease when persistent disease is indicated by elevated calcitonin levels in medullary thyroid cancer patients. Anaplastic thyroid cancers are usually unresectable and are not eradicated by conventional radiotherapy or by any of the novel radiation techniques, with or without chemotherapy. In all types of thyroid cancer, external radiotherapy may produce beneficial palliative results in patients with distant metastases, but the use of radioiodine should always be explored in papillary and follicular thyroid cancer patients. 30 references

  11. Current trends in the management of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amit R; Campbell, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a review of bladder cancer etiology, diagnosis, and management for WOC nurses. Bladder cancer incidence continues to rise yearly in the United States, and patients with bladder cancer comprise some of the most challenging cases in urologic oncology. Nurses are involved with all aspects of the processes of care for the patient with bladder cancer, from initial diagnosis and treatment to postsurgical care and follow-up. For nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, treatment includes transurethral resection followed by intravesical chemotherapy or immunotherapy to prevent recurrence or progression. Radical cystectomy along with chemotherapy protocols provides a survival advantage for muscle invasive bladder cancer, although the timing of chemotherapy remains controversial. Numerous factors are considered when determining the type of urinary diversion used at the time of radical cystectomy, but patient, family, surgeon, and nursing input are essential for preserving an optimal health-related quality of life and reducing morbidity. Patients with metastatic bladder cancer are generally treated with a cisplatin-based chemotherapy but continue to have a poor prognosis. Newer therapies involving novel molecular-targeted agents provide hope for the future for patients with metastatic disease.

  12. Managing the genomic revolution in cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Doreen; Gocke, Christopher D

    2017-08-01

    Molecular tumor profiling is now a routine part of patient care, revealing targetable genomic alterations and molecularly distinct tumor subtypes with therapeutic and prognostic implications. The widespread adoption of next-generation sequencing technologies has greatly facilitated clinical implementation of genomic data and opened the door for high-throughput multigene-targeted sequencing. Herein, we discuss the variability of cancer genetic profiling currently offered by clinical laboratories, the challenges of applying rapidly evolving medical knowledge to individual patients, and the need for more standardized population-based molecular profiling.

  13. Testicular Cancer: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary L; Werntz, Ryan P; Eggener, Scott E

    2018-03-01

    There were an estimated 8720 new cases of testicular cancer (TC) in the United States in 2016. The cause of the disease is complex, with several environmental and genetic risk factors. Although rare, the incidence has been steadily increasing. Fortunately, substantial advances in treatment have occurred over the last few decades, making TC one of the most curable malignancies. However, because TC typically occurs in younger men, considerations of the treatment impact on fertility, quality of life, and long-term toxicity are paramount; an individualized approach must be taken with patients based on their clinical and pathologic findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Conservative management of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexeus, S; Labastida, R; Dexeus, D

    2005-01-01

    We are currently faced with a progressive delay in the age at which women conceive for the first time. This raises the possibility of the appearance of gynecologic disorders that may affect fertility, including neoplasms of the ovary. Fertility-sparing surgery is defined as the preservation of ovarian tissue in one or both adnexa and/or the uterus. Borderline ovarian tumor should be treated with conservative surgery. Salpingo-oophorectomy, or even ovarian cystectomy, are the procedures of choice, with recurrence rates of 2-3% and up to 20% if a simple cystectomy is performed. Cystectomy is indicated in patients with bilateral borderline tumors or in patients with a residual ovary. Borderline tumors with invasive peritoneal implants behave as an invasive cancer in 10-30% of cases with a survival rate of 10-66% compared with 100% in borderline tumors without invasive implants. Prophylactic oophorectomy is recommended when desire of conception has been accomplished. Conservative surgery in invasive epithelial ovarian cancer is limited to Stage IA, grade 1 tumor, and in some highly selected grade 2 tumors of serous, mucinous or endometrioid type, well-encapsulated and free of adhesions. The standard oncological surgical procedure with preservation of the uterus and normal appearing ovary is recommended. This includes salpingo-oophorectomy, excision of any suspicious peritoneal lesion, multiple peritoneal biopsies, appendectomy (particularly in mucinous tumors), and pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy.

  15. Colorectal cancer: complexities and challenges in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkoff, Neil B

    2007-08-01

    Managed care weighs advances and associated costs to determine whether the combination of longer life at sometimes significantly increased cost represents value. The price of treatment is only 1 factor. To review treatment decision processes for oncologic agents in managed care environments. Price can be exceptionally high for individuals. But if the population size is low, the per-member-per-month (PMPM) impact can be almost negligible, unlike treatments that have moderate costs but are used ubiquitously. Cancer therapies have, for the most part, escaped managed care's notice. For 2007, the national Cancer Institute projects that antineoplastic agents will consume almost a quarter of the overall drug spend. The Medicare population is a unique concern with regard to cancer. Traditionally, Medicare reimbursement of chemotherapeutic agents was based on average wholesale price (AWP) discounting, not the oncologist's purchasing cost. This allowed oncologists to use reimbursement for infusions to support their medical practices. The proposed plan of the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to use average sales price (ASP) plus 6% to reimburse for drugs used in the office setting leads to significant problems. Pharmacy and therapeutics committees will also face challenges: fewer data are available for some agents because they have become available through the U.S. Food and drug administration's Fast Track, Priority review, or accelerated approval processes. Oncology disease management programs must reach out to patients and not necessarily deal with oncology issues directly, but address tangential issues that impact care, especially depression and pain management.

  16. Cancer Care Ontario and integrated cancer programs: portrait of a performance management system and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Siu Mee; Thompson, Leslee J

    2006-01-01

    A performance management system has been implemented by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO). This system allows for the monitoring and management of 11 integrated cancer programs (ICPs) across the Province of Ontario. The system comprises of four elements: reporting frequency, reporting requirements, review meetings and accountability and continuous improvement activities. CCO and the ICPs have recently completed quarterly performance review exercises for the last two quarters of the fiscal year 2004-2005. The purpose of this paper is to address some of the key lessons learned. The paper provides an outline of the CCO performance management system. These lessons included: data must be valid and reliable; performance management requires commitments from both parties in the performance review exercises; streamlining performance reporting is beneficial; technology infrastructure which allows for cohesive management of data is vital for a sustainable performance management system; performance indicators need to stand up to scrutiny by both parties; and providing comparative data across the province is valuable. Critical success factors which would help to ensure a successful performance management system include: corporate engagement from various parts of an organization in the review exercises; desire to focus on performance improvement and avoidance of blaming; and strong data management systems. The performance management system is a practical and sustainable system that allows for performance improvement of cancer care services. It can be a vital tool to enhance accountability within the health care system. The paper demonstrates that the performance management system supports accountability in the cancer care system for Ontario, and reflects the principles of the provincial governments commitment to continuous improvement of healthcare.

  17. Cancer-Related Fatigue in Adolescents and Young Adults After Cancer Treatment: Persistent and Poorly Managed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spathis, Anna; Hatcher, Helen; Booth, Sara; Gibson, Faith; Stone, Paddy; Abbas, Laura; Barclay, Matt; Brimicombe, James; Thiemann, Pia; McCabe, Martin G; Campsey, Rachel; Hooker, Louise; Moss, Wendy; Robson, Jane; Barclay, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    Cancer-related fatigue is the most prevalent and distressing symptom experienced by adolescents and young adults (AYAs). An electronic survey was undertaken to ascertain current fatigue management and perceptions of its effectiveness. Eighty-five percent of responders (68/80) experienced fatigue, and it was worse more than 1 year after cancer treatment ended, compared to fatigue management. Although advice to exercise was the most frequent intervention, the greatest impact of fatigue was on the ability to exercise and most did not find exercise advice helpful. Early intervention is warranted, supporting AYAs to persevere with increasing activity.

  18. Clinical management of gastric cancer: results of a multicentre survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Wen, Feng; Jiang, Yu; Xu, Feng; Feng, Hong; Bi, Feng; Li, Qiu; Li, Nanjing; Wei, Wen; Yao, Wenxiu; Xie, Ke; Hu, Jiankun; Shen, Lida; Ji, Weizheng; Lu, You

    2011-01-01

    The National Comprehensive Cancer Network clinical practice guidelines in oncology-gastric cancer guidelines have been widely used to provide appropriate recommendations for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the adherence of surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists' to the recommended guidelines. A questionnaire asking the treatment options for gastric cancer cases was sent to 394 Chinese oncology specialists, including surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists working in hospitals joined in The Western Cooperative Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of China. The questionnaire involved a series of clinical scenarios regarding the interpretation of surgery, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and advanced treatment planning of gastric cancer. Analysis of 358 respondents (91%) showed variations between each specialization and from the recommended guidelines in the management approaches to specific clinical scenarios. The majority of specialists admitted that less than 50% of patients received multidisciplinary evaluation before treatment. The participants gave different responses to questions involving adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and advanced settings, compared to the recommended guidelines. These results highlight the heterogeneity of the treatment of gastric cancer. Surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists are not adhering to the recommended guidelines

  19. The curative management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Dara O; Martin, Joseph; Small, Cormac; Joyce, Myles R; Faul, Clare M; Kelly, Paul J; O'Riordain, Michael; Gillham, Charles M; Armstrong, John G; Salib, Osama; McNamara, Deborah A; McVey, Gerard; O'Neill, Brian D P

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neoadjuvant “long-course” chemoradiation is considered a standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition to prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy with or without androgen suppression (AS) are well established in prostate cancer management. A retrospective review of ten cases was completed to explore the feasibility and safety of applying these standards in patients with dual pathology. To our knowledge, this is the largest case series of synchronous rectal and prostate cancers treated with curative intent. Methods: Eligible patients had synchronous histologically proven locally advanced rectal cancer (defined as cT3-4Nx; cTxN1-2) and non-metastatic prostate cancer (pelvic nodal disease permissible). Curative treatment was delivered to both sites simultaneously. Follow-up was as per institutional guidelines. Acute and late toxicities were reviewed, and a literature search performed. Results: Pelvic external beam radiotherapy (RT) 45–50.4 Gy was delivered concurrent with 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Prostate total dose ranged from 70.0 to 79.2 Gy. No acute toxicities occurred, excluding AS-induced erectile dysfunction. Nine patients proceeded to surgery, and one was managed expectantly. Three relapsed with metastatic colorectal cancer, two with metastatic prostate cancer. Five patients have no evidence of recurrence, and four remain alive with metastatic disease. With a median follow-up of 2.2 years (range 1.2–6.3 years), two significant late toxicities occurred; G3 proctitis in a patient receiving palliative bevacizumab and a G3 anastomotic stricture precluding stoma reversal. Conclusion: Patients proceeding to synchronous radical treatment of both primary sites should receive 45–50.4 Gy pelvic RT with infusional 5FU. Prostate dose escalation should be given with due consideration to the potential impact of prostate cancer on patient survival, as increasing dose may result in significant late morbidity

  20. Quality Indicators for Global Benchmarking of Localized Prostate Cancer Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampurno, Fanny; Zheng, Jia; Di Stefano, Lydia; Millar, Jeremy L; Foster, Claire; Fuedea, Ferran; Higano, Celestia; Hulan, Hartwig; Mark, Stephen; Moore, Caroline; Richardson, Alison; Sullivan, Frank; Wenger, Neil S; Wittmann, Daniela; Evans, Sue

    2018-03-01

    We sought to develop a core set of clinical indicators to enable international benchmarking of localized prostate cancer management using data available in the TrueNTH (True North) Global Registry. An international expert panel completed an online survey and participated in a face to face meeting. Participants included 3 urologists, 3 radiation oncologists, 2 psychologists, 1 medical oncologist, 1 nurse and 1 epidemiologist with prostate cancer expertise from a total of 7 countries. Current guidelines on prostate cancer treatment and potential quality indicators were identified from a literature review. These potential indicators were refined and developed through a modified Delphi process during which each panelist independently and repeatedly rated each indicator based on importance (satisfying the indicator demonstrated a provision of high quality care) and feasibility (the likelihood that data used to construct the indicator could be collected at a population level). The main outcome measure was items with panel agreement indicted by a disagreement index less 1, median importance 8.5 or greater and median feasibility 9 or greater. The expert panel endorsed 33 indicators. Seven of these 33 prostate cancer quality indicators assessed care relating to diagnosis, 7 assessed primary treatment, 1 assessed salvage treatment and 18 assessed health outcomes. We developed a set of quality indicators to measure prostate cancer care using numerous international evidence-based clinical guidelines. These indicators will be pilot tested in the TrueNTH Global Registry. Reports comparing indicator performance will subsequently be distributed to groups at participating sites with the purpose of improving the consistency and quality of prostate cancer management on a global basis. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javadpour, N.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides information on adrenal diseases of latest developments and guides the clinicians in the care of their patients. The book is divided into two parts. The first section gives an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, markers, pathology, imaging and the current progress in the field. The second edition covers specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. The increasingly significant roles played by steroids, catecholamines, blockers, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are elucidated and discussed. The contents include: Overview of progress; current problems, and perspectives - embryology anatomy, physiology, and biologic markers; pathology; advances in diagnosis; imaging techniques; adrenal disorders in childhood; primary aldosteronism; Cushing's syndrome; carcinoma; pheochromocytoma; neuroblastoma; metastatic disease; surgical management; and subject index.

  2. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadpour, N.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides information on adrenal diseases of latest developments and guides the clinicians in the care of their patients. The book is divided into two parts. The first section gives an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, markers, pathology, imaging and the current progress in the field. The second edition covers specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. The increasingly significant roles played by steroids, catecholamines, blockers, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are elucidated and discussed. The contents include: Overview of progress; current problems, and perspectives - embryology anatomy, physiology, and biologic markers; pathology; advances in diagnosis; imaging techniques; adrenal disorders in childhood; primary aldosteronism; Cushing's syndrome; carcinoma; pheochromocytoma; neuroblastoma; metastatic disease; surgical management; and subject index

  3. New agents for the management of resistant metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anampa, Jesus; Sparano, Joseph A

    2017-12-01

    Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is an incurable disease and treatment is directed towards symptom palliation and survival prolongation. Treatment selection in patients is based on tumor biology, age, comorbidities, performance status, tumor burden, and prior treatment history. Areas covered: This present review summarizes the recent treatment strategies in the management of MBC, highlighting regimens after first-line therapy. Topics discussed include new strategies for endocrine therapy, anti-HER2 therapy, and promising strategies for the management of triple negative breast cancer. Expert opinion: MBC is a heterogeneous entity and despite recent advances, there is significant room for improvement of treatment beyond first-line therapies. Combination regimens that can maximize clinical efficacy while minimizing toxicities are required. Current investigation approaches in advanced stages of clinical development include immunoconjugates, immune checkpoint blockade, novel cyclin-dependent-kinase inhibitors, and PARP inhibitors for MBC associated with germline BRCA mutations. We recommend that every patient with MBC should be evaluated for clinical trial options.

  4. Impact of sarcopenia in the management of urological cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroshi; Koga, Fumitaka

    2017-05-01

    Sarcopenia, the degenerative and systemic loss of skeletal muscle mass, develops as a consequence of the progression of cancer cachexia. Recent studies suggest that sarcopenia may be used as a biomarker in the management of patients with several cancers. Areas covered: In this article, the authors review 1) the methods to simply and optimally evaluate and define sarcopenia using computed tomography images in daily clinical practice and 2) the impact of sarcopenia in the management of urological cancers, specifically focusing on the usefulness in predicting treatment-related complications and prognosis. The authors also discuss the prognostic importance of changes in skeletal muscle mass in the course of treatment and the potential roles of nutritional support and exercise to prevent progression of sarcopenia. Expert commentary: Sarcopenia is associated with treatment-related complications and unfavorable prognosis in urological cancer patients. Nutritional support and exercise might be helpful in improving sarcopenia. The impact of these interventions on clinical outcomes would be elucidated by ongoing or future clinical studies.

  5. Pharmacogenetics and breast cancer management: current status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccolini, Joseph; Fanciullino, Raphaelle; Serdjebi, Cindy; Milano, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    Breast cancer has benefited from a number of innovative therapeutics over the last decade. Cytotoxics, hormone therapy, targeted therapies and biologics can now be given to ensure optimal management of patients. As life expectancy of breast cancer patients has been significantly stretched and that several lines of treatment are now made available, determining the best drug or drug combinations to be primarily given and the best dosing and scheduling for each patient is critical for ensuring an optimal toxicity/efficacy balance. Defining patient's characteristics at the tumor level (pharmacogenomics) and the constitutional level (pharmacogenetics) is a rising trend in oncology. This review covers the latest strategies based upon the search of relevant biomarkers for efficacy, resistance and toxicity to be undertaken at the bedside to shift towards precision medicine in breast cancer patients. In the expanding era of bioguided medicine, identifying relevant and clinically validated biomarkers from the plethora of published material remains an uneasy task. Sorting the variety of genetic and molecular markers that have been investigated over the last decade on their level of evidence and addressing the issue of drug exposure should help to improve the management of breast cancer therapy.

  6. Nuclear medicine in thyroid cancer management: A practical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-03-01

    Thyroid cancers are now being diagnosed at an earlier stage and treatments together with follow-up strategies are more effective. However this is not consistent throughout the world. The practice does differ considerably from country to country and region to region. Many International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Members States can benefit from the lessons learned and improve overall patient management of thyroid cancers. The IAEA has significantly enhanced the capabilities of many Member States in the field of nuclear medicine. Functional imaging using nuclear medicine procedures has become an indispensable tool for the diagnosis, treatment planning and management of patients. In terms of treatment, the use of radioiodine ( 131 I) has been central to thyroid cancer and has been successfully used for over six decades. Over the years the IAEA has also assisted many Member States to develop indigenous manufacturing of radioiodine therefore reducing the barriers for the care of patients. This publication is a culmination of efforts by more than twenty international experts in the field to produce a global perspective on the subject. Views expressed are those of individual experts involved and are intended to assist national or regional authorities in decisions regarding the frameworks for effective treatment of thyroid cancer

  7. Management of fertility preservation in young breast cancer patients in a large breast cancer centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, B; Neunhoeffer, E; Henes, M; Lessmann-Bechle, S; Krämer, B; Fehm, Tanja

    2010-11-01

    The increase of breast cancer in young women under 40 years and the increasing age of women at the time of the birth of their first child underlines the importance to implement counselling for fertility-preserving strategies in the management of breast cancer care. We present the fertility-preserving procedures performed after routine counselling for primary breast cancer patients in a large certified breast cancer centre. Since November 2006, patients aged below 40 years with histologically confirmed breast cancer are routinely counselled on fertility-preserving possibilities before breast surgery and chemotherapy in the fertility centre of the University Women's Hospital in Tuebingen. The recommendations are based on the treatment recommendations of the network FertiPROTEKT. During the last 40 months, 56 primary breast cancer patients were counselled. Forty-one of these patients were hormone receptor positive. Thirty-four patients (63%) underwent fertility-preserving strategies. The majority of the patients (n = 22) decided on ovarian tissue cryopreservation. GnRH protection was performed in 14 patients. In 12 patients an ovarian stimulation protocol was initiated to cryopreserve fertilized or unfertilized oocytes. A combination of different fertility-preserving methods was performed in 12 patients. The preservation of ovarian function and fertility are of great importance to young breast cancer patients. Counselling on fertility-preserving strategies is therefore critical in these patients and should be routinely performed.

  8. Management of menopause in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, A J

    2015-10-01

    Increasing breast cancer incidence and decreasing mortality have highlighted the importance of survivorship issues related to breast cancer. A consideration of the issues related to menopause is therefore of great importance to both women and clinicians. Menopause/menopausal symptoms, with significant negative effects on quality of life and potential long-term health impacts, may in women with breast cancer be associated with: (1) natural menopause occurring concurrently with a breast cancer diagnosis; (2) recurrence of menopausal symptoms following cessation of hormone replacement therapy; (3) treatment-induced menopause (chemotherapy, ovarian ablation/suppression) and adjuvant endocrine therapy. A variety of non-hormonal pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies have been investigated as therapeutic options for menopausal symptoms with mixed results, and ongoing research is required. This review presents a summary of the causes, common problematic symptoms of menopause (vasomotor, genitourinary and sexual dysfunction), and longer-term consequences (cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis) related to menopause. It proposes an evidenced-based multidisciplinary approach to the management of menopause/menopausal symptoms in women with breast cancer.

  9. Evaluation of degarelix in the management of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Van Poppel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hendrik Van PoppelDepartment of Urology, University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven, BelgiumAbstract: Medical castration using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH receptor agonists currently provides the mainstay of androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. Although effective, these agents only reduce testosterone levels after a delay of 14 to 21 days; they also cause an initial surge in testosterone that can stimulate the cancer and lead to exacerbation of symptoms (“clinical flare” in patients with advanced disease. Phase III trial data for the recently approved GnRH receptor blocker, degarelix, demonstrated that it is as effective and well tolerated as GnRH agonists. However, it has a pharmacological profile more closely matching orchiectomy, with an immediate onset of action and faster testosterone and PSA suppression, without a testosterone surge or microsurges following repeated injections. As a consequence, with this GnRH blocker, there is no risk of clinical flare and no need for concomitant antiandrogen flare protection. Degarelix therefore provides a useful addition to the hormonal armamentarium for prostate cancer and offers a valuable new treatment option for patients with hormone-sensitive advanced disease. Here, we review key preclinical and clinical data for degarelix, and look at patient-focused perspectives in the management of prostate cancer.Keywords: degarelix, GnRH receptor antagonist, GnRH receptor blocker, prostate cancer

  10. The management of localized and locally advanced prostate cancer - 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. - The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. - Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. - The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachy therapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. - Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. - Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. - The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  11. Comparative Study of Intelligent Systems for Management of GIT Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labib Nevine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent Systems contribute in the management of different GIT cancer types. The paper discusses different types of intelligent systems, classified according to the medical task achieved, such as early detection, diagnosis and prognosis. It is found out that these types include rule-based and case-based expert systems, artificial neural networks, genetic algorithms, machine learning, in addition to data mining techniques and statistical methods. The study focuses on comparing between different techniques and tools used. The comparison results in identifying the benefits of using data mining techniques for the diagnosis task, since it is based on huge amounts of data in order to discover new patterns hence new predisposing factors. It also points out the use of expert systems in the prognosis task, since this task is mainly based on the specialist experience that should be transferred to less- experienced medical professionals. Based on the previous results, it is recommended to develop an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS that focuses on the early diagnosis of GIT cancers, since managing the disease depends mainly on proper diagnosis, and also to build an expert system that helps transferring GIT cancers management knowledge to medical doctors in different hospitals.

  12. Exploratory study of impact of cancer-related posttraumatic stress symptoms on diabetes self-management among cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Janey; Harris, Yael T; Kronish, Ian M; Wisnivesky, Juan P; Lin, Jenny J

    2018-02-01

    Posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) can be triggered by a diagnosis of a potentially life-threatening illness such as cancer. Little is known about the impact of cancer-related PTSS symptoms on self-management behaviors for comorbid chronic medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus (DM). We recruited patients with DM and a recent diagnosis of early-stage cancer from 2 medical centers in New York City. Cancer-related PTSS were assessed using the Impact of Events Scale (score ≥ 26). DM self-management behaviors (medication adherence, exercise, healthy diet, and glucose testing) were measured 3 months later. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between cancer-related PTSS symptoms and DM self-management behaviors, adjusting for gender, marital status, and anxiety symptoms. Of 56 participants recruited, 33% reported cancer-related PTSS symptoms. Elevated cancer-related PTSS symptoms were associated with lack of healthy diet (odds ratio: 0.08, 95% confidence interval: 0.01-0.62). Early-stage cancer survivors with cancer-related PTSS symptoms were less likely to adhere to some DM self-management behaviors. Providers should recognize the impact of cancer-related PTSS symptoms to better support comorbid disease management in cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Psychological and behavioral approaches to cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjala, Karen L; Jensen, Mark P; Mendoza, M Elena; Yi, Jean C; Fisher, Hannah M; Keefe, Francis J

    2014-06-01

    This review examines evidence for psychological factors that affect pain across the cancer continuum from diagnosis through treatment and long-term survivorship or end of life. Evidence is convincing that emotional distress, depression, anxiety, uncertainty, and hopelessness interact with pain. Unrelieved pain can increase a desire for hastened death. Patients with cancer use many strategies to manage pain, with catastrophizing associated with increased pain and self-efficacy associated with lower pain reports. A variety of psychological and cognitive behavioral treatments can reduce pain severity and interference with function, as indicated in multiple meta-analyses and high-quality randomized controlled trials. Effective methods include education (with coping skills training), hypnosis, cognitive behavioral approaches, and relaxation with imagery. Exercise has been tested extensively in patients with cancer and long-term survivors, but few exercise studies have evaluated pain outcomes. In survivors post-treatment, yoga and hypnosis as well as exercise show promise for controlling pain. Although some of these treatments effectively reduce pain for patients with advanced disease, few have been tested in patients at the end of life. Given the clear indicators that psychological factors affect cancer pain and that psychological and behavioral treatments are effective in reducing varying types of pain for patients with active disease, these methods need further testing in cancer survivors post-treatment and in patients with end-stage disease. Multidisciplinary teams are essential in oncology settings to integrate analgesic care and expertise in psychological and behavioral interventions in standard care for symptom management, including pain. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  14. [Role and management of cancer clinical database in the application of gastric cancer precision medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanfang; Zhou, Zhiwei

    2016-02-01

    Precision medicine is a new medical concept and medical model, which is based on personalized medicine, rapid progress of genome sequencing technology and cross application of biological information and big data science. Precision medicine improves the diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer to provide more convenience through more profound analyses of characteristics, pathogenesis and other core issues in gastric cancer. Cancer clinical database is important to promote the development of precision medicine. Therefore, it is necessary to pay close attention to the construction and management of the database. The clinical database of Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center is composed of medical record database, blood specimen bank, tissue bank and medical imaging database. In order to ensure the good quality of the database, the design and management of the database should follow the strict standard operation procedure(SOP) model. Data sharing is an important way to improve medical research in the era of medical big data. The construction and management of clinical database must also be strengthened and innovated.

  15. Managing cancer and employment: Decisions and strategies used by breast cancer survivors employed in low-wage jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Jennifer E; Nichols, Helen M; Ko, Jungyai; Tracy, J Kathleen; Vanderpool, Robin C

    2017-01-01

    Advances in breast cancer screening and treatment have led to an overall 5-year survival rate of 90%. Many of these cancer cases are diagnosed in working women. Few studies have explicitly examined the cancer-work interface, as experienced by low-wage earning women with breast cancer. This study uses in-depth, semistructured interviews with 24 low-wage breast cancer survivors to identify employment decisions and factors that influenced or enabled these decisions, and examine the individual strategies and workplace supports used to manage the cancer-work interface among a subset of women (n = 13) who continued to work. Future research areas and clinical implications are discussed.

  16. Use of capecitabine in management of early colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available H Hameed, J CassidyBeatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, Scotland, UKAbstract: Capecitabine (Xeloda®, Roche, Basel, Switzerland is a pro-drug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, and it is converted to 5-FU in the cancer cell by enzymatic degradation. The role of capecitabine in colorectal cancer has evolved in the last 15 years. In early trials in the metastatic setting, capecitabine has shown superior response rates compared with those achieved with 5-FU (Mayo Clinic regimen (26% vs 17%, with equivalent progression-free survival and overall survival. In the adjuvant setting, the Xeloda in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Therapy (X-ACT trial demonstrated that capecitabine as a single agent led to improvement in relapse-free survival (hazard ratio: 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.74–0.99, P = 0.04 and was associated with significantly fewer adverse events than 5-FU plus leucovorin (LV, folinic acid. On the basis of the X-ACT trial, capecitabine was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, the National Institute for Clinical Excellence, and the Scottish Medicines Consortium as monotherapy for the adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer. The next step was to incorporate capecitabine into combination therapy. The XELOXA trial studied the combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX vs 5-FU/LV and demonstrated 5-year disease-free survival of 66% for XELOX, compared with 60% for 5-FU/LV. The toxicity profile was also quite comparable in the two arms. So both the single agent use of capecitabine as well as in combination with oxaliplatin can be considered as part of the standard of care in management of early colon cancer in appropriately selected patient groups.Keywords: 5-fluorouracil, 5-FU, leucovorin, folinic acid, LV, XELOX, oxaliplatin, FOLFOX

  17. Can models of self-management support be adapted across cancer types? A comparison of unmet self-management needs for patients with breast or colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Elise; Mackenzie, Lisa; Carey, Mariko; Peek, Kerry; Shepherd, Jan; Evans, Tiffany-Jane

    2018-03-01

    There is an increased focus on supporting patients with cancer to actively participate in their healthcare, an approach commonly termed 'self-management'. Comparing unmet self-management needs across cancer types may reveal opportunities to adapt effective self-management support strategies from one cancer type to another. Given that breast and colorectal cancers are prevalent, and have high survival rates, we compared these patients' recent need for help with self-management. Data on multiple aspects of self-management were collected from 717 patients with breast cancer and 336 patients with colorectal cancer attending one of 13 Australian medical oncology treatment centres. There was no significant difference between the proportion of patients with breast or colorectal cancer who reported a need for help with at least one aspect of self-management. Patients with breast cancer were significantly more likely to report needing help with exercising more, while patients with colorectal cancer were more likely to report needing help with reducing alcohol consumption. When controlling for treatment centre, patients who were younger, experiencing distress or had not received chemotherapy were more likely to report needing help with at least one aspect of self-management. A substantial minority of patients reported an unmet need for self-management support. This indicates that high-quality intervention research is needed to identify effective self-management support strategies, as well as implementation trials to identify approaches to translating these strategies into practice. Future research should continue to explore whether self-management support strategies could be adapted across cancer types.

  18. Recent advances in surgical management of early lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Mao Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The broad application of low-dose computed tomography screening has resulted in the detection of many more cases of early lung cancer than ever before in modern history. Recent advances in the management of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer have focused on making therapy less traumatic, enhancing recovery, and preserving lung function. In this review, we discuss several new modalities associated with minimally invasive surgery for lung cancer. Firstly, less lung parenchyma resection via sublobar resection has become an acceptable alternative to lobectomy in patients with tumors less than 2 cm in size or with poor cardiopulmonary reserve. Secondly, thoracoscopic surgery using a single-portal or needlescopic approach to decrease chest wall trauma is becoming common practice. Thirdly, less invasive anesthesia, using nonintubated techniques, is feasible and safe and is associated with fewer intubation- and ventilator-associated complications. Fourthly, preoperative or intraoperative image-guided localization is an effective modality for identifying small and deep nodules during thoracoscopic surgery. Keywords: Anesthesia, Lung cancer, Nonintubated, Surgery, Thoracoscopy, Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS

  19. Application of artificial intelligence to the management of urological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbod, Maysam F; Catto, James W F; Linkens, Derek A; Hamdy, Freddie C

    2007-10-01

    Artificial intelligence techniques, such as artificial neural networks, Bayesian belief networks and neuro-fuzzy modeling systems, are complex mathematical models based on the human neuronal structure and thinking. Such tools are capable of generating data driven models of biological systems without making assumptions based on statistical distributions. A large amount of study has been reported of the use of artificial intelligence in urology. We reviewed the basic concepts behind artificial intelligence techniques and explored the applications of this new dynamic technology in various aspects of urological cancer management. A detailed and systematic review of the literature was performed using the MEDLINE and Inspec databases to discover reports using artificial intelligence in urological cancer. The characteristics of machine learning and their implementation were described and reports of artificial intelligence use in urological cancer were reviewed. While most researchers in this field were found to focus on artificial neural networks to improve the diagnosis, staging and prognostic prediction of urological cancers, some groups are exploring other techniques, such as expert systems and neuro-fuzzy modeling systems. Compared to traditional regression statistics artificial intelligence methods appear to be accurate and more explorative for analyzing large data cohorts. Furthermore, they allow individualized prediction of disease behavior. Each artificial intelligence method has characteristics that make it suitable for different tasks. The lack of transparency of artificial neural networks hinders global scientific community acceptance of this method but this can be overcome by neuro-fuzzy modeling systems.

  20. Evaluation of degarelix in the management of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Poppel, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    Medical castration using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor agonists currently provides the mainstay of androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. Although effective, these agents only reduce testosterone levels after a delay of 14 to 21 days; they also cause an initial surge in testosterone that can stimulate the cancer and lead to exacerbation of symptoms (“clinical flare”) in patients with advanced disease. Phase III trial data for the recently approved GnRH receptor blocker, degarelix, demonstrated that it is as effective and well tolerated as GnRH agonists. However, it has a pharmacological profile more closely matching orchiectomy, with an immediate onset of action and faster testosterone and PSA suppression, without a testosterone surge or microsurges following repeated injections. As a consequence, with this GnRH blocker, there is no risk of clinical flare and no need for concomitant antiandrogen flare protection. Degarelix therefore provides a useful addition to the hormonal armamentarium for prostate cancer and offers a valuable new treatment option for patients with hormone-sensitive advanced disease. Here, we review key preclinical and clinical data for degarelix, and look at patient-focused perspectives in the management of prostate cancer

  1. [Ultrasound in the management of non-melanoma skin cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Ibáñez, C; Aguilar Bernier, M; de Troya Martín, M

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound plays an important role in the study and management of non-melanoma skin cancer. Among other factors, this technique contributes to the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of these tumours, the establishment of their size and relation to neighbouring structures, the delimitation of surgical margins, and the detection of subclinical and recurrent lesions. The present article analyses the role of cutaneous ultrasound in the field of non-melanoma skin cancer (basal and squamous cell carcinomas, lymphomas and dermatofibrosarcoma) through a literature review. Copyright © 2015 Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Sociodemographic inequalities in barriers to cancer pain management: a report from the American Cancer Society's Study of Cancer Survivors-II (SCS-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Kevin D; Alcaraz, Kassandra I; Kamson, Chelsey; Fallon, Elizabeth A; Smith, Tenbroeck G

    2016-10-01

    Research has increasingly documented sociodemographic inequalities in the assessment and management of cancer-related pain. Most studies have focused on racial/ethnic disparities, while less is known about the impact of other sociodemographic factors, including age and education. We analyzed data from a large, national, population-based study of cancer survivors to examine the influence of sociodemographic factors, and physical and mental health comorbidities on barriers to cancer pain management. The study included data from 4707 cancer survivors in the American Cancer Society's Study of Cancer Survivors-II, who reported experiencing pain from their cancer. A multilevel, socioecological, conceptual framework was used to generate a list of 15 barriers to pain management, representing patient, provider, and system levels. Separate multivariable logistic regressions for each barrier identified sociodemographic and health-related inequalities in cancer pain management, controlling for years since diagnosis, disease stage, and cancer treatment. Two-thirds of survivors reported at least 1 barrier to pain management. While patient-related barriers were most common, the greatest disparities were noted in provider- and system-level barriers. Specifically, inequalities by race/ethnicity, education, age, and physical and mental health comorbidities were observed. Findings indicate survivors who were nonwhite, less educated, older, and/or burdened by comorbidities were most adversely affected. Future efforts in research, clinical practice, and policy should identify and/or implement new strategies to address sociodemographic inequalities in cancer pain management. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Prostate Cancer in Transgender Women: Incidence, Etiopathogenesis, and Management Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deebel, Nicholas A; Morin, Jacqueline P; Autorino, Riccardo; Vince, Randy; Grob, Baruch; Hampton, Lance J

    2017-12-01

    To critically analyze the available evidence regarding the incidence, etiopathogenesis, and management of prostate cancer (CaP) in transgender women. In addition, this article aims to present a recent case report of a transgender woman with a unique presentation at the author's institution. An electronic nonsystematic literature search was performed to identify pertinent studies. PubMed search engine was queried by using the following search terms: "prostate cancer," "male to female transsexual," "transgender patient," "androgen + prostate cancer," "estrogen therapy + prostate cancer," and "health care barrier." In addition, a clinical case managed at our institution was reviewed and critically discussed. Including our case, there have been only 10 documented cases of CaP in transgender women. Additionally, an emerging body of literature has questioned the role of androgens in the development of CaP and suggested that estrogen therapy may not be as protective as initially thought. Therefore, the current evidence suggests that the transgender woman should be screened for CaP the same as a nontransgender men. Barriers to care in the transgender female population include accessing resources, medical knowledge deficits, ethics of transition-related medical care, diagnosing vs pathologizing transgender patients, financial restrictions of the patient, and health system determinants. Although rare, CaP in transgender women has been documented. Both the mechanism and the impact of receiving a bilateral orchiectomy on disease development are unclear. Future study is needed to examine these factors, and to further shape the treatment and screening regimen for these patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. How PET is changing the management of cancer with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Manus, M.

    2005-01-01

    Information from PET scanning is transforming the management of many malignancies and the impact of PET is likely to increase further as new indications are recognised. PET is of particular value in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. These patients rarely undergo invasive surgical staging and therefore imaging is crucial in determining the extent of disease before treatment. More accurate staging with PET means that futile aggressive RT or chcmoRT can be avoided in patients with incurable extensive disease. FDG-PET is of proven value in the staging of common metabolically-active malignancies treated with radiotherapy. These include lung cancer, head and neck cancer, lymphomas and oesophageal carcinoma. It has been shown that PET can improve the selection of patients for radical surgery or radiotherapy in lung cancer and that PET-based staging more accurately predicts survival than conventional staging. For those patients that remain eligible for definitive RT after PET. treatment can be more accurately targeted at the tumour and involved regional nodes. The value of PET for treatment planning is enhanced significantly when PET and CT scans are acquired on a combined PET/CT scanner. Fused PET-CT images can be imported into the radiotherapy planning computer and used to accurately target tumour with the best beam arrangement. After treatment, response may be hard to assess with structural imaging. PET-rcsponse to chemotherapy or radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicts survival in NSCLC more accurately than CT response. However, PET has much more potential than imaging with FDG alone can realise. Markers such as FLT can be used to image proliferation in tumours, misonidazole or FAZA can be used to image hypoxia and labeled metabolites of anti-cancer drugs such as 5-FU can be used to study pharmacokinetics. New combinations of radiation and drugs may emerge that can be selected based on biological characteristics of

  5. Emerging technologies and techniques in the management of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Omar Javed

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The term cancer is used to describe a multitude of diseases all of which are linked by loss of control of normal growth and replication of cells. It is a major cause of death worldwide. If diagnosed early many cancers, particularly tumour such as skin cancers, can be cured by local treatment such as surgery or radiotherapy. Due to local invasion or dissemination of tumors via the lymphatics or blood, majority of solid malignant tumors are not curable by local measures alone. The successful treatment of a patient with cancer involves close co-operation between surgical oncologist, radiation oncologist, medical oncologist, general practitioner, nurses and support care workers, including clinical psychologists. The role of the surgeon is central to this; obtaining tissue for adequate histological analysis and identification of patients who can be cured by resection is a major component of management. Apart from curative resection of primary tumors, excision of secondary deposits can also offer long term disease control. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a common malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract and is the tenth most common cancer for both genders. In the year 2006, in U.S, almost 34 thousand patients developed this disease and in the same year about 32 thousand succumbed to this disease. These figures demonstrate dismal prognosis of the disease and the reasons for the low survival rates are mainly due to aggressive biology, early development of peri-neural infiltration, angio-invasion and wide spread dissemination of the tumour. Despite recent advances in the field of medical and radiation oncology and the introduction of neo-adjuvant regimens surgery remains the single most important modality for the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. This presentation will focus on the current status of surgical treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and highlight the new developments in this field

  6. Management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, Bhadrasain

    1995-01-01

    Objective: To review the general principles and the specific techniques employed in the management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, for the judicious utilization of external radiotherapy, brachytherapy, surgery and chemotherapy, in order to maximize both the cure rates and the quality of life. The oral cavity consists of lips, buccal mucosae, lower and upper alveolar ridges, floor of the mouth, hard palate and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The oropharynx consists of the base of tongue, tonsillar regions, soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall. This anatomical complexity means that the choice of treatment can be significantly influenced by just a few millimeters difference in the site of the origin or spread of the cancer. The choice can be critical not only for the cure but also the patients' subsequent quality of life. It can have a tremendous impact on the appearance, the ability to eat and the ability to talk. The great majority of cancers in the oral cavity and oropharynx are squamous cell carcinomas, but cancers arising from minor salivary glands are not infrequently seen. The staging system, though useful in treatment planning, has shortcomings which will be discussed. For purposes of discussion it is useful to divide the cancers broadly into Early (T1, T2, N0 N1), Advanced Resectable, and Advanced Unresectable. Early cancers can be cured, in a large proportion of the patients, by either surgery or irradiation; the latter is particularly successful when brachytherapy can be employed to administer a significant part of the dose. Brachytherapy is usually not feasible when the cancer involves bone or is in close proximity to it, due to a high risk of osteoradionecrosis. Poor oral hygiene, in general, and poor dentition, in particular, also increases the risk of osteoradionecrosis. It is, therefore, important to be proactive with regard to dental prophylaxis for any patient contemplating irradiation for oral or pharyngeal cancer. Another

  7. Management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, Bhadrasain

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To review the general principles and the specific techniques employed in the management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, for the judicious utilization of external radiotherapy, brachytherapy, surgery and chemotherapy, in order to maximize both the cure rates and the quality of life. The oral cavity consists of lips, buccal mucosae, lower and upper alveolar ridges, floor of the mouth, hard palate and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The oropharynx consists of the base of tongue, tonsillar regions, soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall. This anatomical complexity means that the choice of treatment can be significantly influenced by just a few millimeters difference in the site of the origin or spread of the cancer. The choice can be critical not only for the cure but also the patients' subsequent quality of life. It can have a tremendous impact on the appearance, the ability to eat and the ability to talk. The great majority of cancers in the oral cavity and oropharynx are squamous cell carcinomas, but cancers arising from minor salivary glands are not infrequently seen. The staging system, though useful in treatment planning, has shortcomings which will be discussed. For purposes of discussion it is useful to divide the cancers broadly into Early (T1, T2, N0 N1), Advanced Resectable, and Advanced Unresectable. Early cancers can be cured, in a large proportion of the patients, by either surgery or irradiation; the latter is particularly successful when brachytherapy can be employed to administer a significant part of the dose. Brachytherapy is usually not feasible when the cancer involves bone or is in close proximity to it, due to a high risk of osteoradionecrosis. Poor oral hygiene, in general, and poor dentition, in particular, also increases the risk of osteoradionecrosis. It is, therefore, important to be proactive with regard to dental prophylaxis for any patient contemplating irradiation for oral or pharyngeal cancer. Another

  8. Management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, Bhadrasain

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To review the general principles and the specific techniques employed in the management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, for the judicious utilization of external radiotherapy, brachytherapy, surgery and chemotherapy, in order to maximize both the cure rates and the quality of life. The oral cavity consists of lips, buccal mucosae, lower and upper alveolar ridges, floor of the mouth, hard palate and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The oropharynx consists of the base of tongue, tonsillar regions, soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall. This anatomical complexity means that the choice of treatment can be significantly influenced by just a few millimeters difference in the site of the origin or spread of the cancer. The choice can be critical not only for the cure but also the patients' subsequent quality of life. It can have a tremendous impact on the appearance, the ability to eat and the ability to talk. The great majority of cancers in the oral cavity and oropharynx are squamous cell carcinomas, but cancers arising from minor salivary glands are not infrequently seen. The staging system, though useful in treatment planning, has shortcomings which will be discussed. For purposes of discussion it is useful to divide the cancers broadly into Early (T1, T2, N0 N1), Advanced Resectable, and Advanced Unresectable. Early cancers can be cured, in a large proportion of the patients, by either surgery or irradiation; the latter is particularly successful when brachytherapy can be employed to administer a significant part of the dose. Brachytherapy is usually not feasible when the cancer involves bone or is in close proximity to it, due to a high risk of osteoradionecrosis. Poor oral hygiene, in general, and poor dentition, in particular, also increases the risk of osteoradionecrosis. It is, therefore, important to be proactive with regard to dental prophylaxis for any patient contemplating irradiation for oral or pharyngeal cancer. Another

  9. Surgical Management of Perineural Spread of Head and Neck Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, C Arturo; Mason, Eric; Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-04-01

    The surgical management of perineural spread of head and neck cancers has become an integral part in the contemporary treatment of this pathology. We now understand that tumour spreads within the epineurium and in a continuous fashion. We also can rely on the accuracy of magnetic resonance neurography in detecting and defining the extent of disease. With modern skull base techniques and a greater understanding of the anatomy in this region, specific operations can be designed to help eradicate disease. We review the current approaches and techniques used that enable us to better obtain tumour free margins and hence improve survival.

  10. Systemic Management of Bladder Cancer in Egypt: Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaled, H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Bladder cancer is still the most frequent malignant tumor among Egyptian males. It has a peculiar biologic, clinico-pathologic features and responsiveness to chemotherapy profile than that observed in Western countries. The current review aims to demonstrate the present state of-art in using systemic therapy as part of the management options available to treat such patients at different stages of their disease. Individualizing therapy for these patients based on more rationale basis is the challenge that oncologists must face in the near future

  11. Care for a Patient With Cancer As a Project: Management of Complex Task Interdependence in Cancer Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosman, Julia R; Carlos, Ruth C; Simon, Melissa A; Madden, Debra L; Gradishar, William J; Benson, Al B; Rapkin, Bruce D; Weiss, Elisa S; Gareen, Ilana F; Wagner, Lynne I; Khan, Seema A; Bunce, Mikele M; Small, Art; Weldon, Christine B

    2016-11-01

    Cancer care is highly complex and suffers from fragmentation and lack of coordination across provider specialties and clinical domains. As a result, patients often find that they must coordinate care on their own. Coordinated delivery teams may address these challenges and improve quality of cancer care. Task interdependence is a core principle of rigorous teamwork and is essential to addressing the complexity of cancer care, which is highly interdependent across specialties and modalities. We examined challenges faced by a patient with early-stage breast cancer that resulted from difficulties in understanding and managing task interdependence across clinical domains involved in this patient's care. We used team science supported by the project management discipline to discuss how various task interdependence aspects can be recognized, deliberately designed, and systematically managed to prevent care breakdowns. This case highlights how effective task interdependence management facilitated by project management methods could markedly improve the course of a patient's care. This work informs efforts of cancer centers and practices to redesign cancer care delivery through innovative, practical, and patient-centered approaches to management of task interdependence in cancer care. Future patient-reported outcomes research will help to determine optimal ways to engage patients, including those who are medically underserved, in managing task interdependence in their own care.

  12. Targeted Alpha Therapy Approach to the Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Barry J.; Abbas Rizvi, Syed M.; Qu, Chang F.; Smith, Ross C.

    2011-01-01

    -metastatic pancreatic cancer with over-expression of MUC1 and uPA receptors in post-surgical patients with minimal residual disease. The observation of tumor regression in a Phase I clinical trial of targeted alpha therapy for metastatic melanoma indicates that alpha therapy can regress tumors by a process called tumor anti-vascular alpha therapy (TAVAT). As a consequence, this therapy could be indicated for the management of non-surgical pancreatic cancer tumors

  13. Environmental carcinogenic agents and cancer prevention. Risk assessment and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2013-01-01

    Many agents in our environment have been established as being carcinogenic, and in most cases, the carcinogenic properties of these agents were identified because of high-dose occupational or accidental exposure. Risk characterization, taking into account the dose-response relationship, and exposure assessment are essential for risk assessment and subsequent cancer prevention. Based on scientific risk assessment, risk management should be conducted practically by considering the economic, social, political, and other technical issues and by balancing the risks and benefits. Asbestos and environmental tobacco smoke are typical examples of established carcinogenic agents in the general environment, contributing to low-dose exposure. Further epidemiological studies are required to investigate the carcinogenicity of low-dose exposure to known carcinogenic agents such as arsenic and cadmium through dietary intake, radiation via medical and natural exposure, and air pollution due to diesel exhaust. In contrast, occupational chemical exposure to 1,2-dichloropropane and/or dichloromethane, whose carcinogenicity had not been established, was suggested to cause cholangiocarcinoma among workers involved in offset color proof-printing only after a rare situation of high-dose exposure was unveiled. Continuous monitoring of unusual cancer occurrences in target populations such as workers in occupational and regional settings as well as exposure reduction to suspected carcinogenic agents to levels as low as reasonably achievable is essential for reducing the risk of cancer due to environmental carcinogens. (author)

  14. A selective review of medical cannabis in cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Alexia; Wan, Bo Angela; Malek, Leila; DeAngelis, Carlo; Diaz, Patrick; Lao, Nicholas; Chow, Edward; O'Hearn, Shannon

    2017-12-01

    Insufficient management of cancer-associated chronic and neuropathic pain adversely affects patient quality of life. Patients who do not respond well to opioid analgesics, or have severe side effects from the use of traditional analgesics are in need of alternative therapeutic op-tions. Anecdotal evidence suggests that medical cannabis has potential to effectively manage pain in this patient population. This review presents a selection of representative clinical studies, from small pilot studies conducted in 1975, to double-blind placebo-controlled trials conducted in 2014 that evaluated the efficacy of cannabinoid-based therapies containing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) for reducing cancer-associated pain. A review of literature published on Medline between 1975 and 2017 identified five clinical studies that evaluated the effect of THC or CBD on controlling cancer pain, which have been reviewed and summarised. Five studies that evaluated THC oil capsules, THC:CBD oromucosal spray (nabiximols), or THC oromucosal sprays found some evidence of cancer pain reduction associated with these therapies. A variety of doses ranging from 2.7-43.2 mg/day THC and 0-40 mg/day CBD were administered. Higher doses of THC were correlated with increased pain relief in some studies. One study found that significant pain relief was achieved in doses as low as 2.7-10.8 mg THC in combination with 2.5-10.0 mg CBD, but there was conflicting evidence on whether higher doses provide superior pain relief. Some reported side effects include drowsiness, hypotension, mental clouding, and nausea and vomiting. There is evidence suggesting that medical cannabis reduces chronic or neu-ropathic pain in advanced cancer patients. However, the results of many studies lacked statistical power, in some cases due to limited number of study subjects. Therefore, there is a need for the conduct of further double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials with large sample sizes in order to

  15. Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor C

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cath Taylor,1 Amanda Shewbridge,2 Jenny Harris,1 James S Green3,4 1Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London, London UK; 2Breast Cancer Services, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 3Department of Urology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK; 4Department of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University, London, UK Abstract: The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT-work for breast cancer management has in part evolved due to the increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment decision-making. An MDT approach aims to bring together the range of specialists required to discuss and agree treatment recommendations and ongoing management for individual patients. MDTs are resource-intensive yet we lack strong (randomized controlled trial evidence of their effectiveness. Clinical consensus is generally favorable on the benefits of effective specialist MDT-work. Many studies have shown the benefits of receiving treatment from a specialist center, and evidence continues to accrue from comparative studies of clinical benefits of an MDT approach, including improved survival. Patients’ views of the MDT model of decision-making (and in particular its impact on involvement in decisions about their care have been under-researched. Barriers to effective teamwork and poor decision-making include excessive caseload, low attendance at meetings, lack of leadership, poor communication, role ambiguity, and failure to consider patients’ holistic needs. Breast cancer nurses have a key role in relation to assessing holistic needs, and their specialist contribution has also been associated with improved patient experience and quality of life. This paper examines the evidence for the benefits of MDT-work, in particular for breast cancer. Evidence is considered within a context of growing cancer incidence at a time of increased financial restraint, and it may now be important to

  16. Saree cancer in Indian woman treated successfully with multimodality management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unmesh Vidyadhar Takalkar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Saree is a common, traditional garment of Indian women, wrapped around the waist tightened by a thick cord and with one end draped over the shoulder. Tight knot in the same place, sweat, soiling and continuous use can cause pigmentation, scaling of the waist and even transform to malignancy. We present here a case of saree cancer successfully managed with multimodality therapy. A 50-year-old woman was referred to our hospital (India for itching and non-healing ulcerative lesion on waistline. She was wearing saree continuously for 34 years with knot at the same place. Magnetic resonance images suggested ulcerative growth with lymph node metastasis. She then underwent wide local excision; histopathological examination confirmed it was a squamous cell carcinoma. She therefore received concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She is now (2 years after the completion of treatment in remission state. Awareness of saree cancer among Indian is important to avoid malignant lesions at waistline. Multimodality management with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy is ideal mean for good outcome.

  17. Serum thyroglobulin in the management of patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsano, C.P.; Skosey, C.; DeGroot, L.J.; Refetoff, S.

    1982-01-01

    We have reviewed our experience with the management of patients with thyroid cancer to assess the potential benefits of employing the serum thyroglobulin assay in patient management programs and to determine the optimal conditions for this application. Serum thyroglobulin levels were found to be more reliable when obtained from hypothyroid patients. Levels of thyroglobulin greater than 10 ng/mL appeared to be abnormally elevated in both thyroidectomized patients prior to radioactive iodine therapy (group 1) and in thyroidectomized patients after radioactive iodine therapy (group 2). Elevated thyroglobulin levels were found to be useful indicators of the presence of metastatic disease, whereas normal thyroglobulin levels were reliable indicators of the absence of metastases. In group 1 patients, elevated thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the presence of important total body scan uptake. In group 2 patients, normal thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the absence of total body scan uptake. The serum thyroglobulin assay can substantially reduce the need for repetitive total body scanning in the follow-up of group 2 patients with thyroid cancer

  18. Diagnosis and management of differentiated thyroid cancer using molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Robert L; Ferris, Robert L; Pribitkin, Edmund A; Sherman, Steven I; Steward, David L; Nikiforov, Yuri E

    2013-04-01

    To define molecular biology in clinical practice for diagnosis, surgical management, and prognostication of differentiated thyroid cancer. Ovid Medline 2006-2012 Manuscripts with clinical correlates. Papillary thyroid carcinomas harbor point mutations of the BRAF and RAS genes or RET/PTC rearrangements, all of which activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. These mutually exclusive mutations are found in 70% of PTC. BRAF mutation is found in 45% of papillary thyroid cancer and is highly specific. Follicular carcinomas are known to harbor RAS mutation or PAX8/PPARγ rearrangement. These mutations are also mutually exclusive and identified in 70% of follicular carcinomas. Molecular classifiers measure the expression of a large number of genes on a microarray chip providing a substantial negative predictive value pending further validation. 1) 20% to 30% of cytologically classified Follicular Neoplasms and Follicular Lesion of Undetermined Significance collectively are malignant on final pathology. Approximately 70% to 80% of thyroid lobectomies performed solely for diagnostic purposes are benign. Molecular alteration testing may reduce the number of unnecessary thyroid procedures, 2) may reduce the number of completion thyroidectomies, and 3) may lead to more individualized operative and postoperative management. Molecular testing for BRAF, RAS, RET/PTC, and PAX8/PPARγ for follicular lesion of undetermined significance and follicular neoplasm improve specificity, whereas molecular classifiers may add negative predictive value to fine needle aspiration diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Interview: Cancer pain management: the last decade and looking forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasa, Stein

    2013-11-01

    Stein Kaasa, MD, speaks to Dominic Chamberlain, Assistant Commissioning Editor: Stein Kaasa specializes in oncology and palliative medicine. In 1993 he was appointed as the first professor in palliative medicine in Scandinavia and he was one of the founders of the palliative care unit in Trondheim (Norway). He also was the founder of the European Palliative Care Research Centre. He has been president of the European Association for Palliative Care, coordinator for one EU-funded project and is Work Package Leader of several EU-funded research collaboratives and international partnerships on research and policy development. Kaasa has been an important advocate for evidence-based practice and has worked extensively to get palliative care research on the agenda, both nationally and internationally. Through his role as Cancer Director in Norway he coordinated and led the development of guidelines for different cancer diseases. Important areas of work were the development of regional cancer treatment guidelines and integration of patient disease trajectories into the existing guidelines. Currently he is Vice Managing Director at St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital (Norway), Professor of palliative medicine at the Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology and leads the European Palliative Care Research Centre and chairs the European Association for Palliative Care Research Network. Professor Kaasa has published more than 450 articles and book chapters. He has authored the Nordic Textbook of Palliative Care and is coauthor and editor of the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine. Professor Kaasa advises many international journals - either as an advisory board member or as a reviewer (Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Palliative Medicine, Journal of Palliative Medicine, Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Pain and The Lancet Oncology).

  20. Nutrition management for head and neck cancer patients improves clinical outcome and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Richter, Urs; Betz, C; Hartmann, S; Brands, R C

    2017-12-01

    Up to 80% of patients with head and neck cancers are malnourished because of their lifestyle and the risk factors associated with this disease. Unfortunately, nutrition management systems are not implemented in most head and neck cancer clinics. Even worse, many head and neck surgeons as well as hospital management authorities disregard the importance of nutrition management in head and neck cancer patients. In addition, the often extensive resection and reconstruction required for tumors in the upper aerodigestive tract pose special challenges for swallowing and sufficient food intake, placing special demands on nutrition management. This article presents the basics of perioperative metabolism and nutrition management of head and neck cancer patients and makes recommendations for clinical practice. Implementing a nutrition management system in head and neck cancer clinics will improve the clinical outcome and the survival of the patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Surgical management of prostate cancer metastatic to the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian J; Fox, Benjamin D; Sciubba, Daniel M; Suki, Dima; Tu, Shi Ming; Kuban, Deborah; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Rhines, Laurence D; Rao, Ganesh

    2009-05-01

    Significant improvements in neurological function and pain relief are the benefits of aggressive surgical management of spinal metastatic disease. However, there is limited literature regarding the management of tumors with specific histological features. In this study, a series of patients undergoing spinal surgery for metastatic prostate cancer were reviewed to identify predictors of survival and functional outcome. The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients who were treated with surgery for prostate cancer metastases to the spine between 1993 and 2005 at a single institution. Particular attention was given to initial presentation, operative management, clinical and neurological outcomes, and factors associated with complications and overall survival. Forty-four patients underwent a total of 47 procedures. The median age at spinal metastasis was 66 years (range 50-84 years). Twenty-four patients had received previous external-beam radiation to the site of spinal involvement, with a median dose of 70 Gy (range 30-74 Gy). Frankel scores on discharge were significantly improved when compared with preoperative scores (p = 0.001). Preoperatively, 32 patients (73%) were walking and 33 (75%) were continent. On discharge, 36 (86%) of 42 patients were walking, and 37 (88%) of 42 were continent. Preoperatively, 40 patients (91%) were taking narcotics, with a median morphine equivalent dose of 21.5 mg/day, and 28 patients (64%) were taking steroids, with a median dose of 16 mg/day. At discharge, the median postoperative morphine equivalent dose was 12 mg/day, and the median steroid dose was 0 mg/day (p or = 65 years at the time of surgery was an independent predictor of a postoperative complication (p = 0.005). In selected patients with prostate cancer metastases to the spine, aggressive surgical decompression and spinal reconstruction is a useful treatment option. The results show that on average, neurological outcome is improved and use of analgesics

  2. A Quebec survey of issues in cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Neil; Ayoub, Joseph; Farley, Justine; Foucault, Claudette; Lesage, Pauline; Mayo, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    We report the results of a cancer pain survey mailed to Quebec hematologist-oncologists and palliative care physicians in 1999. The survey was designed to sample views on the current status of pain management and on obstacles to the provision of adequate pain relief for patients. The survey, formulated by an ethics network centered at the Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, was distributed to all members of the Association of Hematologist-Oncologists of Quebec and to all physician members of the Quebec Palliative Care Association. Responses were obtained from 138 Palliative Care Association members (response rate 61%) and 76 hematologist-oncologists (response rate 45%). Major obstacles reported included inadequate assessment of both contributory psychosocial issues and severity of pain, patient reluctance to take opioids, and inadequate access to non-drug techniques for pain relief. Access to opioids was not regarded as a problem. Both groups felt generally competent in their ability to manage various aspects of cancer pain therapy. They gave little credit to their formal medical school or residency training. Fifty-six percent of the palliative care group and 57% of the hemato-oncologists rated their medical school experience as only "poor" or "fair" on a 4-point scale. Residency ratings were modestly better. We conclude that medical faculties should assign a high priority to teaching health professionals patient assessment techniques. Simple symptom assessment scales should be routinely used in oncology/palliative care practice. Medical school training in pain management is not highly regarded and should be enhanced. We also note that, based on response to the scenario of a patient presenting with severe pain, many physicians, while feeling competent in the use of opioids, may be overly conservative in their initial use.

  3. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer: recommendations of the St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillessen, S.; Omlin, A.; Attard, G.; Bono, J.S. de; Efstathiou, E.; Fizazi, K.; Halabi, S.; Nelson, P.S.; Sartor, O.; Smith, M.R.; Soule, H.R.; Akaza, H.; Beer, T.M.; Beltran, H.; Chinnaiyan, A.M.; Daugaard, G.; Davis, I.D.; Santis, M. de; Drake, C.G.; Eeles, R.A.; Fanti, S.; Gleave, M.E.; Heidenreich, A.; Hussain, M.; James, N.D.; Lecouvet, F.E.; Logothetis, C.J.; Mastris, K.; Nilsson, S.; Oh, W.K.; Olmos, D.; Padhani, A.R.; Parker, C.; Rubin, M.A.; Schalken, J.A.; Scher, H.I.; Sella, A.; Shore, N.D.; Small, E.J.; Sternberg, C.N.; Suzuki, H; Sweeney, C.J.; Tannock, I.F.; Tombal, B.

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration-resistant

  4. Review of guidance on recurrence risk management for general practitioners in breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma guidelines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronk, I.; Korevaar, J.C.; Burgers, J.S.; Albreht, T.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2017-01-01

    Background. General practitioners (GPs) will face cancer recurrences more frequently due to the rising number of cancer survivors and greater involvement of GPs in the follow-up care. Currently, GPs are uncertain about managing recurrence risks and may need more guidance. Objective. To explore what

  5. Management of elderly patients with prostate cancer without metastatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Naotaka; Akitake, Masakazu; Ikoma, Saya; Ri, Ken; Masuda, Katsuaki; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Iguchi, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the optimal management for elderly patients with localized and locally advanced prostate cancer (clinical stage: T1-T4N0M0), we reviewed the prognoses. From April 2000 to December 2008, we treated and followed up 175 patients aged 75 years, or older. In almost all of the patients above 79 years of age, endocrine therapy was selected. Among the 75 to 79-year-old patients, the proportion of radiation therapy, including external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-brachytherapy), as well as radical prostatectomy increased. The follow-up period for all the patients was 0 to 106 months (median, 32 months). In the low- and intermediate-risk group, the actuarial biochemical control rate at 60 months for radical prostatectomy and endocrine therapy was 100% and 90%, respectively, and no patients with EBRT combined with endocrine therapy, and HDR-brachytherapy had biochemical failure at 34 and 46 months, respectively. In the high-risk group with 75 to 79-year-old patients, the actuarial biochemical control rate at 60 months for EBRT combined with endocrine therapy, radical prostatectomy and endocrine therapy was 71.4%, 69.0% and 55.7%, respectively, while the actuarial biochemical control rate at 48 months for HDR-brachytherapy was 40.9%. In the high-risk group with patients above 79 years of age, the actuarial biochemical control rate at 60 months for endocrine therapy was 64.5%. Prostate cancer death was recognized only in 1 patient within the high-risk group, treated by endocrine therapy. In all the patients, the overall survival rate at 60 months for EBRT combined with endocrine therapy, HDR-brachytherapy, radical prostatectomy and endocrine therapy was 100%, 100%, 76.4% and 89.5%, respectively. The actuarial biochemical control rate and overall survival rate were not significant among the management options in each risk group. However, the 75 to 79-year-old patients within the high-risk group, who were treated with

  6. Management of cancer-associated thrombosis in people with advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Simon; Johnson, Miriam J

    2012-06-01

    The management of venous thromboembolism in the cancer population is clearly established. Low molecular weight heparin has a greater efficacy than warfarin in the treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis and is recommended as the preferred therapy. However, the evidence informing these recommendations excluded patients with poor prognosis or performance status, thrombocytopenia, bleeding or brain metastases. Furthermore, there is limited data on the management of venous thromboembolism resistant to anticoagulation, a phenomenon frequently encountered in the advanced cancer population. This paper will review the management of cancer-associated thrombosis with a particular focus on challenging clinical situations faced by palliative care teams looking after patients with advanced disease.

  7. The need for hospital care of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by noncurative intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Friis, S; Juel, K

    2000-01-01

    We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy.......We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy....

  8. Management of patients with incurable colorectal cancer: a retrospective audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavanesan, N; Abdalkoddus, M; Yao, C; Lai, C W; Stubbs, B M

    2018-04-13

    Counselling patients and their relatives about non-curative management options in colorectal cancer is difficult because of a paucity of published data. This study aims to determine outcomes in patients unsuitable for curative surgery and the rates of subsequent surgical intervention. This was an analysis of all colorectal cancers managed without curative surgery in a district general hospital from a prospectively maintained cancer registry between 2009 and 2016, as decided by a multidisciplinary team. Primary outcomes were overall survival and secondary outcomes were subsequent intervention rates and impact of tumour stage. In all, 183 patients out of 976 patients (18.8%) were identified. The median age at diagnosis was 81 years [interquartile range (IQR) 71-87 years]. Overall median survival from diagnosis was 205 days (IQR 60-532 days). One-year mortality was 62.3%. Patients were classified into two groups depending on the reason for a non-curable approach: patient-related (PR) or disease-related (DR). The difference in survival between PR (median 277 days, IQR 70-593) and DR (median 179 days, IQR 51-450) was 98 days (P = 0.023). Twenty-four patients were alive at the end of the study period; 19 out of 91 cases in PR (20.8%) and five out of 92 cases in DR (5.4%). Overall intervention rates were 11.9%, with higher rates in the DR group (P = 0.005). Disease stage was not associated with subsequent surgical intervention between the two groups (P = 0.392). Life expectancy for non-curatively managed patients within our unit was 6.8 months with one in nine patients requiring subsequent surgical admission for palliation. This information may be useful when counselling patients with incurable colorectal malignancy. Colorectal Disease © 2018 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. Molecular basis of colorectal cancer: Towards an individualized management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Perea

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC has become a highly relevant condition nowadays. In this respect, advances in the understanding of its molecular basis are key for an adequate management. From the time when the adenoma-carcinoma sequence was formulated as a carcinogenesis model to this day, when, among other things, three major carcinogenic pathways have been identified, the CRC concept has evolved from that of a single disease to the notion that each CRC is a differentiated condition in itself. The suppressor or chromosome instability pathway, the mutator or microsatellite instability pathway, and the methylator or CpG island methylation pathway allow various phenotypes to be identified within CRC. Similarly, the presence of different changes in certain genes confers several behaviors on CRC from both the prognostic and responsive standpoints to specific therapies. However, this apparent complexity does help develop the clinical management of this disease through the identification of novel, more specific therapy targets, and also markers for various behaviors within the condition, which will most likely lead us to an individualized management for these patients.

  10. Use of Ultrasound in the Management of Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lew, John I.; Solorzano, Carmen C.

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the utility of ultrasound in evaluating thyroid nodules, staging thyroid cancer, determining the extent of surgery needed in thyroid cancer patients, and the surveillance of patients treated for thyroid cancer.

  11. Interventions Using Social Media for Cancer Prevention and Management: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Claire Jungyoun; Lee, Young Ji; Demiris, George

    2017-07-27

    Regarding cancer awareness, social media effectively promotes health and supports self-management. Given the diverse study designs, methodologies, and approaches of social media interventions in oncology, it is difficult to determine the effects of social media on cancer prevention and management. We aim to systematically review intervention studies using social media for cancer care. A systematic search, using 7 electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Scopus, EMBASE, and PsycINFO), was conducted to identify surveys and interventions using contemporary social media tools with a focus on cancer. Of the 18 selected studies, 7 were randomized controlled trials. Most studies were conducted for all types of cancer, and some were conducted for breast cancer in the United States, with mostly white female participants. Facebook was the most frequently used platform. Most studies targeted healthy participants providing cancer prevention education. With social media platforms as part of a larger intervention, or the main component of interventions, interventions were overall feasible and showed a significant improvement in cancer prevention and management. Social media tools have the potential to be effective in delivering interventions for cancer prevention and management. However, there was a dearth of studies with rigorous study methodologies to test social media effects on various cancer-related clinical outcomes. Social media use in cancer care will facilitate improved communication and support among patients, caregivers, and clinicians and, ultimately, improved patient care. Clinicians need to carefully harness social media to enhance patient care and clinical outcomes.

  12. Dental management of patients irradiated for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regezi, J.A.; Courtney, R.M.; Kerr, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Management of patients irradiated for oral cancer should include consideration of their oral health prior to, and after, radiation therapy. Data from 130 patients, followed for a period of 1 to 10 years, are presented and evaluated. The philosophy of retention and maintenance of as many teeth as possible is supported by this data. Extraction of teeth with severe periodontal disease after irradiation also proves to be a relatively safe operation. Osteoradionecrosis tends to be limited in extent and is generally well tolerated by the patient when treated conservatively. A treatment regimen is presented that significantly reduces the morbidity from therapeutic irradiation of the jaws. A comprehensive dental evaluation and follow-up plan coupled with patient cooperation are instrumental to the success of this program

  13. Radiation therapy in the management of childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past two decades, multimodality treatment regimens have produced significant improvement in survival rates for most types of childhood cancer. The role of radiation therapy has been critically evaluated in prospective clinical trials that established the importance of irradiation in assuring local and regional control of disease central to ultimate survival. Indications for cranial and craniospinal irradiation in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are reviewed, as is difficult technical factors important for successful management. The role of radiation therapy in neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor is reviewed in the context of tumor biology and increasing data from multi-institutional trials. Interactions of irradiation with surgery and chemotherapy are stressed in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Current results in the more common central nervous tumors of childhood are presented, including the central role of radiation therapy in medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, and craniopharyngioma. Concerns regarding late effects of radiation therapy are balanced with the importance of achieving disease control

  14. PET imaging in the management of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, Tzu-Chen; Lai, Chyong-Huey

    2004-01-01

    FDG-PET has shown its great potential in improving the management of cervical cancer. The dual time-point strategy is attractive and further investigation is needed to justify the lengthening of the imaging line. Early detection of recurrence or more accurate initial staging or re-staging on relapse does not automatically lead to improved long-term survival. Besides, cost-effectiveness analyses of using PET scan should be evaluated. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and cost per life year saved (NT dollars/LYS) is a logical way to validate the benefit of a procedure. However, a potential of cost saving is viable. For example, pelvic exenteration is a highly morbid procedure but also the only way to seek cure in a cervical patient with central recurrence after primary or adjuvant RT

  15. Molecular imaging in the management of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chyong-Huey Lai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and integrated 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET/computed tomography are valuable techniques for assessing prognosis, treatment response after the completion of concurrent chemoradiation, suspicious or documented recurrence, unexplained post therapy elevations in tumor markers, and the response to salvage treatment when managing cervical cancer. However, PET plays a limited role in the primary staging of MRI-defined node-negative patients. Currently, 18F-FDG is still the only tracer approved for routine use, but several novel targeting PET compounds, high-Tesla MRI machines, diffusion-weighted imaging without contrast, and dynamic nuclear polarized-enhanced 13C-MR spectroscopic imaging may hold promising applications.

  16. Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Is Cancer? Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Cancer Statistics Cancer has a major impact on society in ... success of efforts to control and manage cancer. Statistics at a Glance: The Burden of Cancer in ...

  17. Management of advanced pancreatic cancer in daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Piacentini, Paolo; Bonetti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this outcome study was to evaluate the management of advanced pancreatic cancer in a real-world clinical practice; few such experiences have been reported in the literature. A retrospective analysis was performed of all consecutive patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma followed at our medical oncology unit between January 2003 and December 2013. We evaluated 78 patients, mostly with metastatic disease (64.1%). Median follow-up was 10.77 months, by which time 74 patients (94.9%) had died. Median overall survival was 8.29 months. Median age was 67 years. In univariate analysis, pain at onset (p = 0.020), ECOG performance status (p<0.001), stage (p = 0.047), first-line chemotherapy (p<0.001), second-line chemotherapy (p<0.001) and weight loss at diagnosis (p = 0.029) were factors that had an impact on overall survival. In multivariate analysis, the presence of pain at onset (p = 0.043), stage (p = 0.003) and second-line chemotherapy (p = 0.004) were confirmed as independent prognostic factors. Our data, derived from daily clinical practice, confirmed advanced pancreatic cancer as an aggressive malignant disease with a very short expected survival. Second-line treatment seems to provide an advantage in terms of overall survival in patients who showed a partial response as their best response to first-line treatment.

  18. Management of lung cancer brain metastasis: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Srivastava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the improvements in systemic treatment for lung cancer, distant metastasis to sanctuary sites such as brain has become an increasingly more important issue. The management of these patients consists of supportive care and disease-directed treatment. Combined modality treatment (surgical resection or radiosurgery, followed by whole brain radiotherapy of brain metastases has greatly improved the local control of disease in patients with single lesion, good functional performance status, and controlled extracranial disease as demonstrated in prospective randomized studies. For patients with multiple brain metastases, conventional fractionated whole brain radiotherapy continues to be a standard and efficacious treatment. At present, experience with the use of molecularly targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors in nonsmall cell lung cancer patients with activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene and anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene is growing. However, their effectiveness in patients with brain metastases is not well established. In the arena of targeted therapies, vascular endothelial growth factor pathway inhibitors such as bevacizumab have shown some activity in brain metastases. Further prospective studies are necessary to facilitate selection of patient subpopulation for targeted agents in future studies.

  19. Navigating the evidentiary turn in public health: Sensemaking strategies to integrate genomics into state-level chronic disease prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senier, Laura; Smollin, Leandra; Lee, Rachael; Nicoll, Lauren; Shields, Michael; Tan, Catherine

    2018-06-23

    In the past decade, healthcare delivery has faced two major disruptions: the mapping of the human genome and the rise of evidence-based practice. Sociologists have documented the paradigmatic shift towards evidence-based practice in medicine, but have yet to examine its effect on other health professions or the broader healthcare arena. This article shows how evidence-based practice is transforming public health in the United States. We present an in-depth qualitative analysis of interview, ethnographic, and archival data to show how Michigan's state public health agency has navigated the turn to evidence-based practice, as they have integrated scientific advances in genomics into their chronic disease prevention programming. Drawing on organizational theory, we demonstrate how they managed ambiguity through a combination of sensegiving and sensemaking activities. Specifically, they linked novel developments in genomics to a long-accepted public health planning model, the Core Public Health Functions. This made cutting edge advances in genomics more familiar to their peers in the state health agency. They also marshaled state-specific surveillance data to illustrate the public health burden of hereditary cancers in Michigan, and to make expert panel recommendations for genetic screening more locally relevant. Finally, they mobilized expertise to help their internal colleagues and external partners modernize conventional public health activities in chronic disease prevention. Our findings show that tools and concepts from organizational sociology can help medical sociologists understand how evidence-based practice is shaping institutions and interprofessional relations in the healthcare arena. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mitigating Evidentiary Bias in Planning and Policy-Making; Comment on “Reflective Practice: How the World Bank Explored Its Own Biases?”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Parkhurst

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The field of cognitive psychology has increasingly provided scientific insights to explore how humans are subject to unconscious sources of evidentiary bias, leading to errors that can affect judgement and decision-making. Increasingly these insights are being applied outside the realm of individual decision-making to the collective arena of policy-making as well. A recent editorial in this journal has particularly lauded the work of the World Bank for undertaking an open and critical reflection on sources of unconscious bias in its own expert staff that could undermine achievement of its key goals. The World Bank case indeed serves as a remarkable case of a global policy-making agency making its own critical reflections transparent for all to see. Yet the recognition that humans are prone to cognitive errors has been known for centuries, and the scientific exploration of such biases provided by cognitive psychology is now well-established. What still remains to be developed, however, is a widespread body of work that can inform efforts to institutionalise strategies to mitigate the multiple sources and forms of evidentiary bias arising within administrative and policy-making environments. Addressing this gap will require a programme of conceptual and empirical work that supports robust development and evaluation of institutional bias mitigation strategies. The cognitive sciences provides a scientific basis on which to proceed, but a critical priority will now be the application of that science to improve policy-making within those agencies taking responsibility for social welfare and development programmes.

  1. Patient-Provider Communication: Experiences of Low-Wage-Earning Breast Cancer Survivors in Managing Cancer and Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Helen M; Swanberg, Jennifer E; Vanderpool, Robin C

    2018-02-26

    In 2017, there will be more than 250,000 new diagnoses of invasive breast cancer; most cases will occur in working-age women. The goal of this qualitative study was to explore low-wage-earning breast cancer survivors' experiences communicating with their oncology team about cancer and employment issues. Twenty-four low-wage-earning breast cancer survivors in the USA were interviewed in 2012 using a structured interview protocol. Sociodemographic data, cancer history, and patient-provider communication experiences regarding the management of cancer and work were collected. Interviews were analyzed using grounded theory strategy of constant comparative analysis. Low-wage-earning breast cancer survivors' experiences communicating with their oncology team about employment and cancer focused on three dimensions of patient-provider communication: extent, quality, and content. Over 70% of respondents reported no communication or only routine communication with their providers regarding work; three quarters of women reported poor or standard communication quality, and content of work-related communication covered scheduling issues, work absences, continuing to work during treatment, and financial concerns. Communication between oncology care teams and low-wage-earning cancer patients is critical to the successful management of treatment and work responsibilities given the vulnerable employment situation of these women. There is a need for education of oncology team members about how cancer and its treatment can impact employment for all workers, but especially for low-wage workers, thereby allowing the care team to address these issues proactively and help patients successfully manage both cancer treatment and work responsibilities.

  2. Optimizing the Management of High-Risk, Localized Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sundi, Debasish; Jeong, Byong Chang; Lee, Seung Bae; Han, Misop

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer has a high prevalence and a rising incidence in many parts of the world. Although many screen-detected prostate cancers may be indolent, prostate cancer remains a major contributor to mortality in men. Therefore, the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of localized prostate cancer with lethal potential are of great importance. High-risk, localized prostate cancer has multiple definitions. Treatment options that should be individualized to each patient include observation, radi...

  3. Evolution of breast cancer management in Ireland: a decade of change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malone C

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade there has been a paradigm shift in the management of breast cancer, subsequent to revised surgical oncology guidelines and consensus statements which were derived in light of landmark breast cancer clinical trials conducted throughout the latter part of the 20th century. However the sheer impact of this paradigm shift upon all modalities of treatment, and the current trends in management of the disease, are largely unknown. We aimed to assess the changing practices of breast cancer management over the last decade within a specialist tertiary referral Breast Cancer Centre. Methods Comparative analysis of all aspects of the management of breast cancer patients, who presented to a tertiary referral Breast Cancer Centre in 1995/1996 and 2005/2006, was undertaken and measured against The European Society for Surgical Oncology guidelines for the surgical management of mammographically detected lesions [1998]. Results 613 patients' case profiles were analysed. Over the last decade we observed a dramatic increase in incidence of breast cancer [>100%], a move to less invasive diagnostic and surgical therapeutic techniques, as well as increased use of adjuvant therapies. We also witnessed the introduction of immediate breast reconstruction as part of routine practice Conclusion We demonstrate that radical changes have occurred in the management of breast cancer in the last decade, in keeping with international guidelines. It remains incumbent upon us to continue to adapt our practice patterns in light of emerging knowledge and best evidence.

  4. Evolution of breast cancer management in Ireland: a decade of change.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heneghan, Helen M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the last decade there has been a paradigm shift in the management of breast cancer, subsequent to revised surgical oncology guidelines and consensus statements which were derived in light of landmark breast cancer clinical trials conducted throughout the latter part of the 20th century. However the sheer impact of this paradigm shift upon all modalities of treatment, and the current trends in management of the disease, are largely unknown. We aimed to assess the changing practices of breast cancer management over the last decade within a specialist tertiary referral Breast Cancer Centre. METHODS: Comparative analysis of all aspects of the management of breast cancer patients, who presented to a tertiary referral Breast Cancer Centre in 1995\\/1996 and 2005\\/2006, was undertaken and measured against The European Society for Surgical Oncology guidelines for the surgical management of mammographically detected lesions [1998]. RESULTS: 613 patients\\' case profiles were analysed. Over the last decade we observed a dramatic increase in incidence of breast cancer [>100%], a move to less invasive diagnostic and surgical therapeutic techniques, as well as increased use of adjuvant therapies. We also witnessed the introduction of immediate breast reconstruction as part of routine practice CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that radical changes have occurred in the management of breast cancer in the last decade, in keeping with international guidelines. It remains incumbent upon us to continue to adapt our practice patterns in light of emerging knowledge and best evidence.

  5. Hereditary Kidney Cancer Syndromes and Surgical Management of the Small Renal Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kevin A; Syed, Jamil S; Shuch, Brian

    2017-05-01

    The management of patients with hereditary kidney cancers presents unique challenges to clinicians. In addition to an earlier age of onset compared with patients with sporadic kidney cancer, those with hereditary kidney cancer syndromes often present with bilateral and/or multifocal renal tumors and are at risk for multiple de novo lesions. This population of patients may also present with extrarenal manifestations, which adds an additional layer of complexity. Physicians who manage these patients should be familiar with the underlying clinical characteristics of each hereditary kidney cancer syndrome and the suggested surgical approaches and recommendations of genetic testing for at-risk individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sociocultural factors and breast cancer in sub-Saharan Africa: implications for diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Dinah A; Faulkner, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is on the rise in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and efforts at early diagnosis have not been very successful because the public has scant knowledge about the disease, a large percentage of breast cancer cases are diagnosed late and mainly rural SSA women's practice of breast self-examination is poor. In this paper, we argue that an examination of the social and cultural contexts of SSA that influence breast cancer diagnosis and management in the region is needed. We discuss the implications of sociocultural factors, such as gender roles and spirituality, on breast cancer diagnosis and management in SSA.

  7. Cancer pain management and the opioid crisis in America: How to preserve hard-earned gains in improving the quality of cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paice, Judith A

    2018-06-15

    Cancer pain remains a feared consequence of the disease and its treatment. Although prevalent, cancer pain can usually be managed through the skillful application of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. Unfortunately, access to these therapies has been hampered by interventions designed to contain another serious public health problem: the opioid misuse epidemic. This epidemic and the unintended consequences of efforts to control this outbreak are leading to significant barriers to the provision of cancer pain relief. Oncologists and other professionals treating those with cancer pain will require new knowledge and tools to provide safe and effective pain control while preventing additional cases of substance use disorders (SUDs), helping patients in recovery to maintain sobriety, and guiding those not yet in recovery to seek treatment. How do these 2 serious epidemics intersect and affect oncology practice? First, oncology professionals will need to adopt practices to prevent SUDs by assessing risk and providing safe pain care. Second, oncology practices are likely to see an increased number of patients with a current or past SUD, including opioid misuse. Few guidelines exist for the direct management of pain when opioids may be indicated in these individuals. Third, modified prescribing practices along with the education of patients and families are warranted to prevent the exposure of these medications to unintended persons. Finally, advocacy on behalf of those with cancer pain is imperative to avoid losing access to essential therapies, including opioids, for those who might benefit. Cancer 2018;124:2491-7. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  8. Image-derived biomarkers and multimodal imaging strategies for lung cancer management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauter, Alexander W. [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Werner Siemens Imaging Center, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Schwenzer, Nina; Pfannenberg, Christina [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Divine, Mathew R.; Pichler, Bernd J. [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Werner Siemens Imaging Center, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is the most common type of lung cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. For this reason, advances in diagnosis and treatment are urgently needed. With the introduction of new, highly innovative hybrid imaging technologies such as PET/CT, staging and therapy response monitoring in lung cancer patients have substantially evolved. In this review, we discuss the role of FDG PET/CT in the management of lung cancer patients and the importance of new emerging imaging technologies and radiotracer developments on the path to personalized medicine. (orig.)

  9. Review of cancer pain management in patients receiving maintenance methadone therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowley, Dominic

    2011-05-01

    Methadone is commonly used in the treatment of heroin addiction. Patients with a history of opioid misuse or on methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) with cancer often have difficult to manage pain. We studied 12 patients referred to the palliative care service with cancer pain who were on MMT. All had difficult to control pain, and a third required 5 or more analgesic agents. Two patients had documented \\'\\'drug-seeking\\'\\' behavior. Methadone was used subcutaneously as an analgesic agent in 1 patient. We explore why patients on MMT have difficult to manage pain, the optimal management of their pain, and the increasing role of methadone as an analgesic agent in cancer pain.

  10. Managing the changing burden of cancer in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Ramadas, Kunnambath; Qiao, You-lin

    2014-01-01

    Asia accounts for 60% of the world population and half the global burden of cancer. The incidence of cancer cases is estimated to increase from 6.1 million in 2008 to 10.6 million in 2030, due to ageing and growing populations, lifestyle and socioeconomic changes. Striking variations in ethnicity, sociocultural practices, human development index, habits and dietary patterns are reflected in the burden and pattern of cancer in different regions. The existing and emerging cancer patterns and bu...

  11. Evaluation and management of side effects of breast cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhout, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases. Adjuvant systemic therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy and endocrine therapy play an important role in the treatment of breast cancer. These therapies reduce the risk of relapse of breast cancer and increase cure rates. However,

  12. An approach to the management of locally advanced breast cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases. It incorporates a subset of stage IIB (T3N0) disease, stage III disease and inflammatory breast cancer. In the developed world, 7% of breast cancer patients have stage III disease at diagnosis. In developing countries, LABC constitutes ...

  13. Incidence, Pattern and Management of Ovarian Cancer at a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the commonest type of ovarian cancer and is known to be a disease of postmenopausal women.[12]. A global ... received surgery and chemotherapy, as well as the estimated case‑fatality rate for ovarian cancer. Ethical ... The mean ages (SD) at presentation of the different types of ovarian cancer were epithelial 50.3 (13.2).

  14. Complication of radiotherapy in the management of invasive cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cancer of the cervix is not only the second most common cancer affecting women worldwide but is also the most common gynecological cancer in Kenya. An estimated 500,000 cases occur every year of which 80% are from the developing countries. Presentation is usually during late stages requiring ...

  15. Contemporary management of low-risk bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer comprises a heterogeneous group of tumors, the majority of which are non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) at initial presentation. Low-risk bladder cancer--defined as pTa low-grade papillary tumors--is the type of NMIBC with the most favorable oncologic outcome. Although the

  16. MIS in the management of colon and rectal cancer: consensus meeting of the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlachta, Christopher M; Ashamalla, Shady; Smith, Andy

    2013-11-01

    A consensus conference on the role of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in the management of colon and rectal cancer was convened by the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada in Toronto on April 18, 2012. This is a report of the consensus of an invited group of Canadian experts in MIS and surgery of the colon and rectum that addresses the role this technology should play in treatment and also considers advocacy and resources.

  17. Communication Efficacy and Couples’ Cancer Management: Applying a Dyadic Appraisal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Checton, Maria G.; Venetis, Maria K.; Greene, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to apply Berg and Upchurch’s (2007) developmental-conceptual model to understand better how couples cope with cancer. Specifically, we hypothesized a dyadic appraisal model in which proximal factors (relational quality), dyadic appraisal (prognosis uncertainty), and dyadic coping (communication efficacy) predicted adjustment (cancer management). The study was cross-sectional and included 83 dyads in which one partner had been diagnosed with and/or treated for cancer. For both patients and partners, multilevel analyses using the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) indicated that proximal contextual factors predicted dyadic appraisal and dyadic coping. Dyadic appraisal predicted dyadic coping, which then predicted dyadic adjustment. Patients’ confidence in their ability to talk about the cancer predicted their own cancer management. Partners’ confidence predicted their own and the patient’s ability to cope with cancer, which then predicted patients’ perceptions of their general health. Implications and future research are discussed. PMID:25983382

  18. Communication Efficacy and Couples' Cancer Management: Applying a Dyadic Appraisal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Checton, Maria G; Venetis, Maria K; Greene, Kathryn

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to apply Berg and Upchurch's (2007) developmental-conceptual model to understand better how couples cope with cancer. Specifically, we hypothesized a dyadic appraisal model in which proximal factors (relational quality), dyadic appraisal (prognosis uncertainty), and dyadic coping (communication efficacy) predicted adjustment (cancer management). The study was cross-sectional and included 83 dyads in which one partner had been diagnosed with and/or treated for cancer. For both patients and partners, multilevel analyses using the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) indicated that proximal contextual factors predicted dyadic appraisal and dyadic coping. Dyadic appraisal predicted dyadic coping, which then predicted dyadic adjustment. Patients' confidence in their ability to talk about the cancer predicted their own cancer management. Partners' confidence predicted their own and the patient's ability to cope with cancer, which then predicted patients' perceptions of their general health. Implications and future research are discussed.

  19. Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulshine, James L; Avila, Rick; Yankelevitz, David; Baer, Thomas M; Estépar, Raul San Jose; Ambrose, Laurie Fenton; Aldigé, Carolyn R

    2015-05-01

    The Prevent Cancer Foundation Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management was held in New York, NY on May 16 and 17, 2014. The two goals of the Workshop were to define strategies to drive innovation in precompetitive quantitative research on the use of imaging to assess new therapies for management of early lung cancer and to discuss a process to implement a national program to provide high quality computed tomography imaging for lung cancer and other tobacco-induced disease. With the central importance of computed tomography imaging for both early detection and volumetric lung cancer assessment, strategic issues around the development of imaging and ensuring its quality are critical to ensure continued progress against this most lethal cancer.

  20. Do we need regional guidelines for breast cancer management in the MENA region? MENA Breast Cancer Guidelines project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayed, Reham; Hamza, Dina; Abdallah, Heba; Kelany, Mohamed; Tahseen, Amira; Aref, Adel T

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among females worldwide in general and in the Middle East and the North African region (MENA region) in particular. Management of breast cancer in the MENA region faces a lot of challenges, which include younger age at presentation, aggressive behaviour, lack of national breast screening programmes and lack of reliable data registries as well as socioeconomic factors. These factors make applying the international guidelines for breast cancer management very challenging. The aim of this project is to explore the need for a regional breast cancer guideline as well as to screen the clinical practice of breast cancer management in the MENA region. Three web-based designed surveys were sent to more than 600 oncologists in the MENA region from the period of August 2013 to October 2014. Full descriptive data and information regarding the application of international breast cancer guidelines were collected. The software was using the IP address to prevent duplication of collected data. Descriptive analysis and results were shown as numbers and percentages. During the period of the survey, 104 oncologists responded, representing around an 11% response rate. The majority of replies came from Egypt (59 responses (59%)), followed by Saudi Arabia (ten responses (9.6%)). Fifty-one per cent of responders had more than ten years of experience, and further 31.7% had 5-10 years of experience. Seventy-four per cent were working in governmental hospitals, which is our target sector. There was a major defect in having a genetic counsel unit (78.8% declared an absence of this service), presence of a national breast screening programme (55.8% declared an absence of this service), performing sentinel lymph node biopsy (43.3% declared an absence of this service). The need for regional guidelines for the management of breast cancer was agreed upon by 90.6% of responders. There is a clear need to improve the management of breast cancer in the MENA

  1. Cancer Pain Management Education Rectifies Patients' Misconceptions of Cancer Pain, Reduces Pain, and Improves Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Su-Jin; Keam, Bhumsuk; Hyun, Min Kyung; Ju Seo, Jeong; Uk Park, Keon; Oh, Sung Yong; Ahn, Jinseok; Lee, Ja Youn; Kim, JinShil

    2018-03-26

    More than half of the patients have reported improper management of breakthrough cancer pain. Empirical evidence is lacking concerning the effectiveness of cancer pain education on breakthrough pain control. This study aimed to examine the effects of individual pain education on pain control, use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain, quality of life outcomes, and rectification of patients' misconceptions regarding cancer pain. A quasi-experimental design was used. In total, 176 (102 inpatients and 74 outpatients) and 163 (93 inpatients and 70 outpatients) cancer patients completed questionnaires on pain intensity, quality of life, use of short-acting medication for breakthrough pain, and misconceptions about cancer pain and opioid use before and immediately and/or seven days after individual pain education. The mean age of the participants was 60.9 years (±11.2), and 56.3% were male. The most common cancers were lung cancer (17.0%), colon cancer (15.9%), and breast cancer (12.5%). The subjects' reasons for attrition were conditional deterioration, death, or voluntary withdrawal (N = 13, 7.4%). Following the education, there was a significant reduction in overall pain intensity over 24 hours (P < 0.001). The outpatients showed more use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain. Sleep quality change was most significantly associated with intervention; other quality of life aspects (e.g., general feelings and life enjoyment) also improved. Pain education also significantly reduced misconceptions regarding cancer pain management. The present educational intervention was effective in encouraging short-acting analgesic use for breakthrough pain, improving quality of life outcomes, and rectifying patients' misconceptions about analgesic use.

  2. Beyond the visible: Managing heart disease and cancer with nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindly, D. III

    2006-09-01

    Heart disease and cancer are the world's number one and two killers. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), heart disease kills 17 million people a year - almost one third of all deaths worldwide - and cancer causes 7 million deaths every year. Early and accurate diagnosis is vital for effective treatment of both heart disease and cancer. Nuclear medicine techniques are helping to provide the vital information that doctors need to make decisions about treatment and disease management for patients

  3. Practical consensus recommendations regarding the management of hormone receptor positive early breast cancer in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Babu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a leading cause of death among women, and its incidence increases with age. Currently the treatment of breast cancer in older patients is almost identical to their younger counterparts. This expert group used data from published literature, practical experience and opinion of a large group of academic oncologists to arrive at these practical consensus recommendations for the benefit of community oncologists regarding the management of early breast cancer specifically in elderly women.

  4. Exercise for the Management of Side Effects and Quality of Life among Cancer Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Mustian, Karen M.; Sprod, Lisa K.; Palesh, Oxana G.; Peppone, Luke J.; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Mohile, Supriya G.; Carroll, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity may play an important role in the rehabilitation of cancer survivors during and following treatment. Current research suggests numerous beneficial outcomes are experienced in cancer survivors undergoing exercise interventions during or following cancer treatment. Exercise not only plays a role in managing side effects but also improves functional capacity and quality of life. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the oncology literature supporting the use ...

  5. Clinical review: surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Courtney, D

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent and locally advanced colorectal cancers frequently require en bloc resection of involved organs to achieve negative margins. The aim of this review is to evaluate the most current literature related to the surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  6. Tailored approach to management of bilateral breast cancer in Indian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veda Padma Priya Selvakumar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The management of BCC is complex and has to be tailored to the individual based on characteristics of index and second tumor, prior therapy, adjuvant treatment, and risk stratification. Moreover, the concordance of receptor expression is higher in synchronous cancers than metachronous cancers.

  7. Health care professionals' familiarity with non-pharmacological strategies for managing cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaza, C; Sellick, S M; Willan, A; Reyno, L; Browman, G P

    1999-01-01

    Many studies have confirmed unnecessary suffering among cancer patients, due to the inadequate use of analgesic medication and other effective interventions. While pharmacological treatments are appropriately the central component of cancer pain management, the under-utilization of effective nonpharmacological strategies (NPS) may contribute to the problem of pain and suffering among cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to determine health care professionals' familiarity with, and perceptions regarding, NPS for managing cancer pain, and to assess their interest in learning more about NPS as adjuncts to pharmacological analgesics. Two-hundred and fourteen health care professionals were surveyed at two cancer treatment centres in Ontario, Canada. The self-report questionnaire included questions regarding 11 psychological strategies (e.g. imagery) and eight other NPS (e.g. acupuncture). The response rate was 67% (141/214). Subjects were found to be the least familiar with autogenic training, operant conditioning, and cognitive therapy. Other than radiation and surgery, subjects most commonly reported recommending support groups (67%), imagery (54%), music or art therapy (49%) and meditation (43%) for managing cancer pain. Participants were most interested in learning more about acupuncture, massage therapy, therapeutic touch, hypnosis, and biofeedback. Participants were somewhat familiar with most of the 19 NPS presented; however, they use or recommend few NPS for managing cancer pain. Health professionals' interest in NPS has important implications for the supportive care of cancer patients.

  8. The intelligent clinical laboratory as a tool to increase cancer care management productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the causes of cancer, early detection, prevention or treatment need accurate, comprehensive, and timely cancer data. The clinical laboratory provides important cancer information needed for physicians which influence clinical decisions regarding treatment, diagnosis and patient monitoring. Poor communication between health care providers and clinical laboratory personnel can lead to medical errors and wrong decisions in providing cancer care. Because of the key impact of laboratory information on cancer diagnosis and treatment the quality of the tests, lab reports, and appropriate lab management are very important. A laboratory information management system (LIMS) can have an important role in diagnosis, fast and effective access to cancer data, decrease redundancy and costs, and facilitate the integration and collection of data from different types of instruments and systems. In spite of significant advantages LIMS is limited by factors such as problems in adaption to new instruments that may change existing work processes. Applications of intelligent software simultaneously with existing information systems, in addition to remove these restrictions, have important benefits including adding additional non-laboratory-generated information to the reports, facilitating decision making, and improving quality and productivity of cancer care services. Laboratory systems must have flexibility to change and have the capability to develop and benefit from intelligent devices. Intelligent laboratory information management systems need to benefit from informatics tools and latest technologies like open sources. The aim of this commentary is to survey application, opportunities and necessity of intelligent clinical laboratory as a tool to increase cancer care management productivity.

  9. A Survey of Cancer Pain Management Knowledge and Attitudes of British Columbian Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, R; Hawley, P; Yeomans, W

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There are many potential barriers to adequate cancer pain management, including lack of physician education and prescription monitoring programs. The authors surveyed physicians about their specific knowledge of pain management and the effects of the regulation of opioids on their prescribing practices.METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed out to British Columbia physicians who were likely to encounter cancer patients. The survey asked for physicians' opinions about College of Phy...

  10. The role of radiotherapy in the management of cancer patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    Cancer and AIDS are both pandemics: they have an emotional and social impact that goes far beyond the physical disruption they cause. These are usually perceived and addressed as independent disease entities. When these coexist in one patient, however, the appropriate management of the cancer needs to be modified from the standard clinical protocols. New protocols appearing in the radiotherapy literature have been investigative rather than definitive and, with few exceptions, analyse the results of small series of patients. The IAEA has extensive projects in radiation oncology in developing countries. In Africa, there is concern that AIDS related cancers utilise an increasing amount of scarce resources, that they frequently require equipment for the management of superficial tumours, and that inadequate training is available in the management of these cancers. This report developed from the need to address these concerns. An Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on the Relationship between Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Cancer Management Protocols for Developing Countries was convened in October 1999. A reading of this report will show that considerable amount of further investigation is required to respond authoritatively to many of the management decisions that need be made. It is also evident that the greatest number of patients requiring optimal management protocols live in sub-Saharan Africa - a region where research resources are at a minimum. The IAEA has made available limited funding for a research project in determining the intermediate term effects of radiation therapy on the immune system in AIDS related cervical cancer.

  11. The role of radiotherapy in the management of cancer patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    Cancer and AIDS are both pandemics: they have an emotional and social impact that goes far beyond the physical disruption they cause. These are usually perceived and addressed as independent disease entities. When these coexist in one patient, however, the appropriate management of the cancer needs to be modified from the standard clinical protocols. New protocols appearing in the radiotherapy literature have been investigative rather than definitive and, with few exceptions, analyse the results of small series of patients. The IAEA has extensive projects in radiation oncology in developing countries. In Africa, there is concern that AIDS related cancers utilise an increasing amount of scarce resources, that they frequently require equipment for the management of superficial tumours, and that inadequate training is available in the management of these cancers. This report developed from the need to address these concerns. An Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on the Relationship between Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Cancer Management Protocols for Developing Countries was convened in October 1999. A reading of this report will show that considerable amount of further investigation is required to respond authoritatively to many of the management decisions that need be made. It is also evident that the greatest number of patients requiring optimal management protocols live in sub-Saharan Africa - a region where research resources are at a minimum. The IAEA has made available limited funding for a research project in determining the intermediate term effects of radiation therapy on the immune system in AIDS related cervical cancer

  12. Self-management and transitions in women with advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman-Green, Dena; Bradley, Elizabeth H; Knobf, M Tish; Prigerson, Holly; DiGiovanna, Michael P; McCorkle, Ruth

    2011-10-01

    Self-management involves behaviors that individuals perform to handle health conditions. Self-management may be particularly challenging during transitions-shifts from one life phase or status to another, for example, from cure- to noncure-oriented care-because they can be disruptive and stressful. Little is known about individuals' experiences with self-management, especially during transitions. Our purpose was to describe experiences of self-management in the context of transitions among women with advanced breast cancer. We interviewed a purposive sample of 15 women with metastatic breast cancer about their self-management preferences, practices, and experiences, including how they managed transitions. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. The qualitative method of interpretive description was used to code and analyze the data. Participants' mean age was 52 years (range 37-91 years); most were White (80%), married (80%), and college educated (60%). Self-management practices related to womens' health and to communication with loved ones and providers. Participants expressed a range of preferences for participation in self-management. Self-management included developing skills, becoming empowered, and creating supportive networks. Barriers to self-management included symptom distress, difficulty obtaining information, and lack of knowledge about the cancer trajectory. Women identified transitions as shifts in physical, emotional, and social well-being, as when their cancer progressed and there was a need to change therapy. Transitions often prompted changes in how actively women self-managed and were experienced as positive, negative, and neutral. Self-management preferences can vary. Providers should explore and revisit patients' preferences and ability to self-manage over time, particularly during transitions. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  14. [Management of breast cancer in a woman with breast implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacle, S; Lifrange, E; Nizet, J-L

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer, currently one woman on eight, also concerns patients who underwent augmentation surgery. Breast implants have already been the subject of numerous publications concerning the risk of inducing breast cancer or of delaying its diagnosis; however, no significant causal relationship has been established. The purpose of this article is to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic consequences when breast cancer is identified in a patient with breast implants.

  15. Biomarkers for bladder cancer management: present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Wang, Li; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; McBride, Russell; Galsky, Matthew D; Zhu, Jun; Boffetta, Paolo; Zhang, David Y; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and sensitive detection of bladder cancer is critical to diagnose this deadly disease at an early stage, estimate prognosis, predict response to treatment, and monitor recurrence. In past years, laboratory diagnosis and surveillance of urinary bladder cancer have improved significantly. Although urine cytology remains the gold standard test, many new urinary biomarkers have been identified. Furthermore, recent advances in genomic studies of bladder cancer have helped to refine our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, the biological basis for outcome disparities, and to inform more efficient treatment and surveillance strategies. In this article, the established diagnostic tests, newly identified biomarkers and genomic landscape of bladder cancer will be reviewed. PMID:25374904

  16. Physicians' Practice, Attitudes Toward, and Knowledge of Cancer Pain Management in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiongwen; Yu, Chunhua; Feng, Shijian; Yao, Wenxiu; Shi, Huashan; Zhao, Yuwei; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate physicians' current practice, attitudes toward, and knowledge of cancer pain management in China. We conducted a face-to-face survey of physicians (oncologists, internists, hematologists) who are responsible for the care of cancer patient of 11 general hospitals in Sichuan, China between December 2011 and December 2013. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS (SPSS, Chicago, IL) software. A 23-item questionnaire was designed and distributed to 550 physicians in 11 medical facilities in China. Five hundred (90.90%) physicians responded. About one-third (32.6%) of physicians assessed patients' pain rarely, and 85.5% never or occasionally treated patients' cancer pain together with psychologists. More than half of physicians indicated that opioid dose titration in patients with poor pain control and assessment of the cause and severity of pain were urgently needed knowledge for cancer pain management. Inadequate assessment of pain and pain management (63.0%), patients' reluctance to take opioids (62.2%), and inadequate staff knowledge of pain management (61.4%) were the three most frequently cited barriers to physicians' pain management. Physicians' positive attitudes toward cancer pain management need to be encouraged, and active professional analgesic education programs are needed to improve pain management in China. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Rectal bleeding and its management after irradiation for cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Mi Son; Kang, Seung Hee; Kil, Hoon Jong; Oh, Young Taek; Sohn, Jeong Hye; Ryu, Hee Suk; Lee, Kwang Jae; Jung, Hye Young

    2002-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the main treatment modality for uterine cervix cancer. Since the rectum is in the radiation target volume, rectal bleeding is a common late side effect. The study evaluates the risk factors of radiation induced rectal bleeding and discusses its optimal management. A total of 213 patients who completed external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and intracavitary radiation (ICR) between September 1994 and December 1999 were included in this study. No patient had undergone concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Ninety patients received radiotherapy according to a modified hyperfractionated schedule. A midline block was placed at a pelvic dose of between 30.6 Gy to 39.6 Gy. The total parametrial dose from the EBRT was 51 to 59 Gy depending on the extent of their disease. The point A dose from the HDR brachytherapy was 28 Gy to 30 Gy (4 Gy x 7, or 5 Gy x 6). The rectal point dose was calculated either by the ICRU 38 guideline, or by anterior rectal wall point seen on radiographs, with barium contrast. Rectal bleeding was scored by the LENT/SOMA criteria. For the management of rectal bleeding, we opted for observation, sucralfate enema or coagulation based on the frequency or amount of bleeding. The median follow-up period was 39 months (12 ∼ 86 months). The incidence of rectal bleeding was 12.7% (27/213); graded as 1 in 9 patients, grade 2 in 16 and grade 3 in 2. The overall moderate and severe rectal complication rate was 8.5%. Most complications (92.6%) developed within 2 years following completion of radiotherapy (median 16 months). No patient progressed to rectal fistula or obstruction during the follow-up period. In the univariate analysis, three factors correlated with a high incidence of bleeding: an icruCRBED greater than 100 Gy (19.7% vs. 4.2%), an EBRT dose to the parametrium over 55 Gy (22.1% vs. 5.1%) and higher stages of III and IV (31.8% vs. 10.5%). In the multivariate analysis, the icruCRBED was the only significant factor (ρ > 0.0432). The total

  18. Intermittent subcutaneous methadone administration in the management of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Carlos; Vara, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Methadone is a strong opioid analgesic that has been used successfully in cancer pain management. The oral route of administration is generally preferred for opioid analgesics. However that route sometimes cannot be used. Experience with continuous subcutaneous methadone infusions has produced local intolerance. The aim of this study was to analyze the use of intermittent subcutaneous methadone injections. Ten patients whose pain was well-controlled with oral methadone (average dose 30 mg, range 10 to 120 mg) participated in the study. A subcutaneous small vein needle (butterfly) was used exclusively for administration of methadone. Over a period of seven days the local discomfort of each injection was evaluated by means of a Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and the site of infusion was observed. When any degree of erythema or inflammation was seen, the infusion site was changed. The initial subcutaneous dose was the same as the previously administered oral dose. A daily record was kept of the dose used, level of pain, and toxicity symptoms. This close vigilance was aimed at avoiding dosage errors due to variations among individuals in acceptance to previous oral medication. Changes in dosage were allowed according to standard medical criteria. Two patients were withdrawn from the study due to non-painful irritation at the infusion point. Another eight patients tolerated repeated administration of subcutaneous methadone over seven days. Any local irritation from subcutaneous methadone that occurred was managed satisfactorily by changing the infusion site and limiting doses to 30 mg. In seven of 182 repeat administration, injection site changes were necessitated by local irritation. The NRS for local discomfort was 2/10. The two patients who were intolerant of the subcutaneous injections were receiving injected doses which were significantly higher than the others (42 mg as compared to 25 mg). Dose adjustments needed when changing from the oral to the

  19. Australian contemporary management of synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouf, Phillip; Gibbs, Peter; Shapiro, Jeremy; Sockler, Jim; Bell, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    This article outlines the current Australian multidisciplinary treatment of synchronous metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma and assesses the factors that influence patient outcome. This is a retrospective analysis of the prospective 'Treatment of Recurrent and Advanced Colorectal Cancer' registry, describing the patient treatment pathway and documenting the extent of disease, resection of the colorectal primary and metastases, chemotherapy and biological therapy use. Cox regression models for progression-free and overall survival were constructed with a comprehensive set of clinical variables. Analysis was intentionn-ton-treat, quantifying the effect of treatment intent decided at the multidisciplinary team meeting (MDT). One thousand one hundred and nine patients presented with synchronous metastatic disease between July 2009 and November 2015. Median follow-up was 15.8 months; 4.4% (group 1) had already curative resections of primary and metastases prior to MDT, 22.2% (group 2) were considered curative but were referred to MDT for opinion and/or medical oncology treatment prior to resection and 70.2% were considered palliative at MDT (group 3). Overall, 83% received chemotherapy, 55% had their primary resected and 23% had their metastases resected; 13% of resections were synchronous, 20% were staged with primary resected first and 62% had only the colorectal primary managed surgically. Performance status, metastasis resection (R0 versus R1 versus R2 versus no resection), resection of the colorectal primary and treatment intent determined at MDT were the most significant factors for progression-free and overall survival. This is the largest Australian series of synchronous metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma and offers insight into the nature and utility of contemporary practice. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  20. Cancer pain management in China: current status and practice implications based on the ACHEON survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Z

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Zhongjun Xia Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, ChinaPurpose: Cancer pain can seriously impact the quality of life (QoL of patients, and optimal management practices are therefore of paramount importance. The ACHEON survey queried physicians and patients from 10 Asian countries/regions to assess current clinical practices in cancer pain management in Asia. This study presents the data obtained for cancer pain management in mainland China, with an emphasis on practices related to opioid drugs.Materials and methods: In several tertiary hospitals across China, 250 patients experiencing cancer pain and 100 physicians were surveyed on questions designed to assess current cancer pain management practices and cancer pain impact on QoL.Results: The patient survey showed that 88% of patients reported moderate-to-severe cancer pain, with a median duration of 6 months. The physician survey showed that medical school/residency training with regard to cancer pain management was inadequate in ~80% of physicians. A total of 80% of physicians and 67.2% of patients reported that pain scale was used during pain assessment; 84% of physicians expressed that physician-perceived pain severity was not completely consistent with actual pain the patient experienced. Of the 147 patients who recalled the medication received, 83.7% were administered opioid prescriptions. Of the 240 patients who received treatment, 43.8% perceived the inadequacy of controlling pain. The primary barriers from physicians perceived to optimal pain management included patients’ fear of side effects (58%, patients’ fear of addiction (53%, patients’ reluctance to report pain (43%, physicians’ reluctance to prescribe (29%, physicians’ inadequacy of pain assessment (27% and excessive regulation of opioid analgesics (47%.Conclusion: Knowledge of cancer pain management should be strengthened among physicians. Quantitative pain assessment and principle-based pain

  1. [Consensus on clinical diagnosis, treatment and pedigree management of hereditary colorectal cancer in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-23

    Hereditary colorectal cancer can be divded into two categories based on the presence or absence of polyps. The first category is characterized by the development of polyposis, which includes familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP); The second category is nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, which is represented by Lynch syndrome. "Consensus on clinical diagnosis, treatment and pedigree management of hereditary colorectal cancer in China" developed by the Genetics Group of the Committee of Colorectal Cancer, Chinese Anti-cancer Association, is composed of three sections, including hereditary nonpolyposis syndrome, polyposis syndrome as well as genetic evaluation of hereditary colorectal cancer. The consensus aims to provide recommendations on management of the respective hereditary syndromes in terms of definition, clinical and pathological features, diagnostic standards, treatment, and follow-ups. In addition to describing diagnostic and treatment strategies, prophylactic treatment as well as genetic screening and pedigree monitoring is highly recommended. Through the establishment of this expert consensus, we hope to promote better understanding of hereditary colorectal cancer for clinicians and encourage standardized treatment through multidisciplinery approaches, eventually improving clinical treatment and pedigree management of hereditary colorectal cancer in China.

  2. Managing work and cancer treatment: Experiences among survivors of hematological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Maria D; Siminoff, Laura A

    2018-04-16

    The current study was performed to characterize the employment status of survivors of hematological cancer who have an informal caregiver from the time of diagnosis through the first 6 months of treatment. Using a mixed methods approach, semistructured interviews with survivors of hematological cancer were conducted within 6 months of the initiation of cancer treatment. Interviews assessed cancer treatment status, barriers and facilitators to employment, financial and insurance status, and relationship with the primary caregiver. These results are part of a longitudinal study of cancer survivors and informal caregivers. A total of 171 patients were enrolled. Within 6 months of beginning cancer treatments, approximately 35% were no longer employed. Reasons to remain employed included financial need, employee benefits, and a sense of purpose and normalcy. Employer accommodations and supportive colleagues facilitated continued employment. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that having a higher household income, a desire to work, nonphysical job tasks, and congruent survivor-caregiver communication were associated with greater odds of remaining employed. Within 6 months of initiating cancer treatment, the majority of survivors of hematological cancer had maintained employment. Because of the limitations imposed by the physical stress of cancer treatments, as well as the need to maintain employment to continue receiving employee benefits to cover such treatments, survivors of hematological cancer likely would benefit from employment accommodations that are sensitive to their unique needs. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  3. Epidemiology and management of depression in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Depression is the most frequent psychiatric comorbidity in cancer patients especially those in terminal stage. Despite the large amount of studies on depression in cancer patients, there are a lot of unanswered questions with respect to diagnosis, prevalence and treatment. Diagnosing depression in

  4. The management of breast cancer-related lymphoedema

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Definition. Breast cancer-related lymphoedema (BCRL) is a secondary form of lymphoedema and a major complication of post-breast cancer surgery and radiotherapy. It occurs when the network of lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes is damaged by disease, surgery or radiotherapy. The lymph, a protein-rich fluid, then ...

  5. Impact of scintimammography in management of breast cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mammography is the most widely used diagnostic imaging method for screening and diagnosing breast cancer. Nevertheless, this technique has some limitations in that not all breast cancers are evident on mammograms, especially in dense or dysplastic breasts, patients with breast prosthesis or if the patient has ...

  6. Factors associated with management of cervical cancer patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty-seven percent of the cervical cancer patients were referred to Ocean Road Cancer Institute for radiotherapy and or chemotherapy. Patients discharged home for palliative care were 30% and 17% patients died at the hospital. Known HIV positive patients were significantly associated with death and terminal care seen ...

  7. Rectal cancer: Pattern and outcome of management in University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cancer of the colon and rectum was considered to be rare in Africa three to four decades ago. This is no longer true though it is not as common as in Western Europe and North America. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of rectal cancer, its pattern of presentation, diagnosis, treatment and ...

  8. Diet and prostate cancer - a holistic approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, Philippa J; Katz, Aaron E

    2011-10-01

    There is now increasing evidence from epidemiologic surveys and from laboratory, intervention, and case-control studies that diet and lifestyle plays a crucial role in prostate cancer biology and tumorigenesis. This applies to both the development and progression of prostate cancer, although in many cases the specific initiating factors in the diet are poorly understood. Conversely, many nutrients and herbs also show significant promise in helping to treat prostate cancer by slowing progression and reducing recurrence, ultimately reducing the risk of morbidity and mortality from the disease. Furthermore for all grades of prostate cancer, nutritional interventions complement conventional treatment to improve response and quality of life. Slowing or even reversing the progression of, high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia [HGPIN]). with chemo-preventative agents could be the best primary defense against prostate cancer, preventing it from occurring in the first place. The information given in this review about prostate cancer chemoprevention summarizes the key evidence for the role of different dietary components and their effect on prostate cancer prevention and progression. Most nutritional chemoprevention agents also have the added benefit of being beneficial for the cardiovascular system, bone health and for the prevention of other cancers.

  9. Contemporary management of cancer of the oral cavity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genden, E.M.; Ferlito, A.; Silver, C.E.; Takes, R.P.; Suarez, C.; Owen, R.P.; Haigentz Jr, M.; Stoeckli, S.J.; Shaha, A.R.; Rapidis, A.D.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer represents a common entity comprising a third of all head and neck malignant tumors. The options for curative treatment of oral cavity cancer have not changed significantly in the last three decades; however, the work up, the approach to surveillance, and the options for reconstruction

  10. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in breast cancer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvi Radhakrishna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the breast is primarily used as a supplemental tool to breast screening with mammography or ultrasound. A breast MRI is mainly used for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer, to help measure the size of the cancer, look for other tumors in the breast, and to check for tumors in the opposite breast. For certain women at high risk for breast cancer, a screening MRI is recommended along with a yearly mammogram. MRI is known to give some false positive results which mean more test and/or biopsies for the patient. Thus, although breast MRI is useful for women at high risk, it is rarely recommended as a screening test for women at average risk of breast cancer. Also, breast MRI does not show calcium deposits, known as micro-calcifications which can be a sign of breast cancer.

  11. Effect of nurse case management on the treatment of older women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, James S; Satish, Shiva; Anderson, Elizabeth T; Nattinger, Ann B; Freeman, Jean L

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of nurse case management on the treatment of older women with breast cancer. Randomized prospective trial. Sixty surgeons practicing at 13 community and two public hospitals in southeast Texas. Three hundred thirty-five women (166 control and 169 intervention) aged 65 and older newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Women seeing surgeons randomized to the intervention group received the services of a nurse case manager for 12 months after the diagnosis of breast cancer. The primary outcome was the type and use of cancer-specific therapies received in the first 6 months after diagnosis. Secondary outcomes were patient satisfaction and arm function on the affected side 2 months after diagnosis. More women in the intervention group received breast-conserving surgery (28.6% vs 18.7%; P=.031) and radiation therapy (36.0% vs 19.0%; P=.003). Of women undergoing breast-conserving surgery, greater percentages in the case management group received adjuvant radiation (78.3% vs 44.8%; P=.001) and axillary dissection (71.4% vs 44.8%; P=.057). Women in the case management group were also more likely to receive more breast reconstruction surgery (9.3% vs 2.6%, P=.054), and women in the case management group with advanced cancer were more likely to receive chemotherapy (72.7% vs 30.0%, P=.057). Two months after surgery, higher percentages of women in the case manager group had normal arm function (93% vs 84%; P=.037) and were more likely to state that they had a real choice in their treatment (82.2% vs 69.9%, P=.020). Women with indicators of poor social support were more likely to benefit from nurse case management. Nurse case management results in more appropriate management of older women with breast cancer.

  12. Perception and management of cancer among the Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyetunde, M O

    2010-09-01

    Prevalence and mortality rates of cancer are on the increase worldwide. Its management is blurred by misconception in Nigeria particularly. This study therefore examines the Yoruba perception and management of cancer using health belief model as the theoretical framework. The study utilised both qualitative and quantitative approaches. It was carried out in Ibadan metropolis in Nigeria. For the qualitative data a total of 19 Focus group discussions (190 people) among people aged 20 years above 45 in-depth interviews and structured observation were held. For quantitative data, a simple random sampling technique was employed in selecting 450 people at the household level while non-probability sampling was used for the 45 people living with cancer (PLWC) and 75 health care providers. The result showed that cancer is perceived as a major health problem. It is commonly called "Jejere" literally meaning a devouring disease. Cancer is associated with natural causes due to unhealthy life styles such as nutritional pattern and indiscriminate use of both orthodox and traditional drugs. Socio-economic factors of the people determine management of cancer (43.4% and 33.0% for money and occupation respectively).Result showed that (60%) preferred and use the orthodox medical care for various reasons such as precison about treatment positive outcome of care among others. Utilization of modern healthcare however was associated with high cost. Education and occupation have significant relationship with perceived cause of cancer p 0.05) of cancer. The perceived cause of cancer does not have any relationship with the choice of cancer care p > 0.05. The available health care is significant to the choice of cancer care p 0.05. The problems encountered at the health care institutions were not significant to their utilization pattern p > 0.05, in order words, the benefits derived out-weighs the problems. Perception of cancer was not tied to the usual Yoruba perception of diseases. Cancer

  13. Symptom Management & Quality of Life Concept Design | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This video covers a variety of practical considerations for developing a symptom management concept for clinical research. Co-sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Symptom Management and Health Related Quality of Life Steering Committee & the International Society for Quality of Life Research. |

  14. Managing occupations in everyday life for people with advanced cancer living at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Brandt, Åse; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2017-01-01

    occupations in everyday life and 2) Self-developed strategies to manage occupations. Significance: The findings suggest that people with advanced cancer should be supported to a greater extent in finding ways to manage familiar as well as new and more personally meaningful occupations to enhance quality...

  15. A Survey of Cancer Pain Management Knowledge and Attitudes of British Columbian Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Gallagher

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There are many potential barriers to adequate cancer pain management, including lack of physician education and prescription monitoring programs. The authors surveyed physicians about their specific knowledge of pain management and the effects of the regulation of opioids on their prescribing practices.

  16. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: An Innovation in Immunotherapy for the Treatment and Management of Patients with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dine, Jennifer; Gordon, RuthAnn; Shames, Yelena; Kasler, Mary Kate; Barton-Burke, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Cancer survival rates are generally increasing in the United States. These trends have been partially attributed to improvement in therapeutic strategies. Cancer immunotherapy is an example of one of the newer strategies used to fight cancer, which primes or activates the immune system to produce antitumor effects. The first half of this review paper concisely describes the cell mechanisms that control antitumor immunity and the major immunotherapeutic strategies developed to target these mechanisms. The second half of the review discusses in greater depth immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently demonstrated tremendous promise for the treatment of diverse solid tumor types, including melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer, and others. More specifically, the mechanisms of action, side effects, and patient and family management and education concerns are discussed to provide oncology nurses up-to-date information relevant to caring for cancer-affected patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Future directions for cancer immunotherapy are considered.

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine in cancer pain management: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life (QoL encompasses the physical, psychosocial, social and spiritual dimensions of life lived by a person. Cancer pain is one of the physical component has tremendous impact on the QoL of the patient. Cancer pain is multifaceted and complex to understand and managing cancer pain involves a tool box full of pharmacological and non pharmacological interventions but still there are 50-70% of cancer patients who suffer from uncontrolled pain and they fear pain more than death. Aggressive surgeries, radiotherapy and chemotherapy focus more on prolonging the survival of the patient failing to realize that the QoL lived also matters equally. This paper reviews complementary and alternative therapy approaches for cancer pain and its impact in improving the QoL of cancer patients.

  18. Managing occupations in everyday life for people with advanced cancer living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Hanne; Brandt, Åse; Wæhrens, Eva E; la Cour, Karen

    2017-01-01

    People with advanced cancer are able to live for extended periods of time. Advanced cancer can cause functional limitations influencing the ability to manage occupations. Although studies have shown that people with advanced cancer experience occupational difficulties, there is only limited research that specifically explores how these occupational difficulties are managed. To describe and explore how people with advanced cancer manage occupations when living at home. A sub-sample of 73 participants from a larger occupational therapy project took part in the study. The participants were consecutively recruited from a Danish university hospital. Qualitative interviews were performed at the homes of the participants. Content analysis was applied to the data. Managing occupations were manifested in two main categories; (1) Conditions influencing occupations in everyday life and (2) Self-developed strategies to manage occupations. The findings suggest that people with advanced cancer should be supported to a greater extent in finding ways to manage familiar as well as new and more personally meaningful occupations to enhance quality of life.

  19. Cancer pain management by radiotherapists: a survey of radiation therapy oncology group physicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleeland, Charles S.; Janjan, Nora A.; Scott, Charles B.; Seiferheld, Wendy F.; Curran, Walter J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) physicians were surveyed to determine their approach to and attitudes toward cancer pain management. Methods and Materials: Physicians completed a questionnaire assessing their estimates of the magnitude of pain as a specific problem for cancer patients, their perceptions of the adequacy of pain management, and their report of how they manage pain in their own practice setting. Results: Eighty-three percent believed the majority of cancer patients with pain were undermedicated. Forty percent reported that pain relief in their own practice setting was poor or fair. Assessing a case scenario, 23% would wait until the patient's prognosis was 6 months or less before starting maximal analgesia. Adjuvants and prophylactic side effect management were underutilized in the treatment plan. Barriers to pain management included poor pain assessment (77%), patient reluctance to report pain (60%), patient reluctance to take analgesics (72%), and staff reluctance to prescribe opioids (41%). Conclusions: Physicians' perceptions of barriers to cancer pain management remain quite stable over time, and physicians continue to report inadequate pain treatment education. Future educational efforts should target radiation oncologists as an important resource for the treatment of cancer pain

  20. Modern management of the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, K A

    2000-07-01

    The cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome is common, occurring in 80% of patients with advanced-stage cancer, and it is one of the most frequent causes of death in patients with cancer. It is a complex problem involving abnormalities in protein, carbohydrate, and fat metabolism. Tumors have both direct and indirect effects that result in anorexia and weight loss. The disease burden does not necessarily correlate with the degree of cachexia. In addition to the physical manifestations, the resulting abnormalities have a significant psychologic effect on patients and their families. Although there is no treatment to reverse the process, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic measures can enhance food intake and improve quality of life.

  1. Comparative indicators for cancer network management in England: Availability, characteristics and presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Michel P

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2000, the national cancer plan for England created 34 cancer networks, new organisational structures to coordinate services across populations varying between a half and three million people. We investigated the availability of data sets reflecting measures of structure, process and outcome that could be used to support network management. Methods We investigated the properties of national data sets relating to four common cancers – breast, colorectal, lung and prostate. We reviewed the availability and completeness of these data sets, identified leading items within each set and put them into tables of the 34 cancer networks. We also investigated methods of presentation. Results The Acute Hospitals Portfolio and the Cancer Standards Peer Review recorded structural characteristics at hospital and cancer service level. Process measures included Hospital Episode Statistics, recording admissions, and Hospital Waiting-List data. Patient outcome measures included the National Survey of Patient Satisfaction for cancer, and cancer survival, drawn from cancer registration. Data were drawn together to provide an exemplar indicator set a single network, and methods of graphical presentation were considered. Conclusion While not as yet used together in practice, comparative indicators are available within the National Health Service in England for use in performance assessment by cancer networks.

  2. Molecular epigenetics in the management of ovarian cancer: Are we investigating a rational clinical promise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha eNguyen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics is essentially a phenotypical change in gene expression without any alteration of the DNA sequence; the emergence of epigenetics in cancer research and mainstream oncology is fueling new hope. However, it is not yet known whether this knowledge will translate to improved clinical management of ovarian cancer. In this malignancy, women are still undergoing chemotherapy similar to what was approved in 1978, which to this day represents one of the biggest breakthroughs for treating ovarian cancer. While liquid tumors are benefitting from epigenetically-related therapies, solid tumors like ovarian cancer are not (yet?. Herein we will review the science of molecular epigenetics, especially DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNA, but also include transcription factors since they, too, are important in ovarian cancer. Preclinical and clinical research on the role of epigenetic modifications is summarized as well. Sadly, ovarian cancer remains an idiopathic disease, for the most part, and there are many areas of patient management which could benefit from improved technology. This review will also highlight the evidence suggesting that epigenetics may have preclinical utility in pharmacology and clinical applications for prognosis and diagnosis. Lastly, drugs currently in clinical trials (i.e. histone deacetylase inhibitors are discussed along with the promise for epigenetics in the exploitation of chemoresistance. Whether epigenetics will ultimately be the answer to better management in ovarian cancer is currently unknown; what we have now is hope.

  3. Spect-CT and PET: CT in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Shoukat H.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: With the advancement and evolution in medical technology notably imaging there has been a sea change in the overall management strategy of most of the cancers of human body. The present day functional, imaging with PET and MRI enables us to pick up a tumour at its cellular stage. Molecular imaging and nanotechnology have further added to this expanding armamentarium of cancer imaging and treatment. Thyroid cancer is one such cancer where the cutting edge biotechnology has dramatically changed the management profile of a disease. Thyroid cancer can safely be classified as one of the cancers which if optimally managed is curable. Hybrid and fusion imaging like SPECT-CT and PET-CT with their superior sensitivity and specificity have greatly improved the accuracy of disease detection and reduced drastically the false positive disease sites. Disease not detected by conventional planar imaging can now be detected and also anatomically localized using hybrid imaging modalities of SPECT-CT and PET-CT. An accurate detection and precise localization improves image interpretation and a treatment optimization in the curable cancer of thyroid

  4. Management of cancer pain--a survey of current practice in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyannwo, A; Amanor-Boadu, S D

    2001-12-01

    A comprehensive management plan for cancer pain is yet to be formulated in the West African sub region despite the priority that the World Health Organisation (WHO) has devoted to the problem over the past decade. As a prerequisite to our cancer pain management curriculum development a structured questionnaire on cancer pain management practice was administered to 80 Fellows attending the Annual Scientific Conference of the West African College of Surgeons in 1996. They were asked how often they treated cancer patients, the causes of cancer pain, their methods of assessment and therapeutic measures and complications of management techniques. Forty-four fellows from Nigeria, Ghana, Liberia and Sierra Leone, all consultants and trainers, responded to the questionnaire. About 80% of them treated cancer patients all the time. Specific anti-cancer therapy such as surgery, chemotherapy and hormone therapy were available in the four countries but radiotherapy was only available in two centers in Nigeria. The respondents estimated that 70-90% of their patients had severe pain at presentation. Pain was thought by 52% of respondents to be due to cancer and its treatment while 47% thought it was due to cancer and the fear of dying. Pain assessment was mostly by the verbal rating scale, only 20% included psychological measurement in their schedules. Oral preparations of strong opioids were not available in most countries andfor severe pain, the parenteral route was employed. Only 18% knew about the 'by the clock' dosing schedule. The study revealed that the standard of practice of the respondents falls below accepted practice. There is thus an urgent need for the formal education of personnel involved in the care of these patients.

  5. Molecular alterations in endometrial cancer : implications for clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelloo, E.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decades, advances have been made in the treatment of endometrial cancer. The clinicopathological risk stratification for postoperative therapy has considerably reduced overtreatment by refining indications and introducing treatment with fewer side effects. Despite refinement in the use

  6. Clinical impact of molecular analysis on thyroid cancer management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wreesmann, Volkert B.; Singh, Bhuvanesh

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid cancer constitutes a progressive continuum of disease ranging from indolent well-differentiated carcinomas to aggressive poorly differentiated carcinomas and universally fatal anaplastic carcinomas. The wide divergence in clinical behavior is poorly predicted for by current

  7. The management of breast cancer-related lymphoedema

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If BCRL is not detected and treated in its early stages, it becomes chronic and ... breast cancer diagnosis and treatment; however, it may occur at any stage during the .... dermatological problems are important to minimise the risk of infection.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging for clinical management of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To update the 2012 ESGAR consensus guidelines on the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. METHODS: Fourteen abdominal imaging experts from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdomin...

  9. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Cotter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field.

  10. Management of cancer pain: 1. Wider implications of orthodox analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SK

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Susannah K Lee,1 Jill Dawson,2 Jack A Lee,3 Gizem Osman,4 Maria O Levitin,5 Refika Mine Guzel,5 Mustafa BA Djamgoz5,61Pomona College, Claremont, CA, USA; 2Healthcare Communications Consultancy, Danville, CA, USA; 3College of Arts and Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA; 4Department of Chemical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK; 5Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Neuroscience Solutions to Cancer Research Group, South Kensington Campus, Imperial College London, London, UK; 6Cyprus International University, Biotechnology Research Centre, Haspolat, North Cyprus, Mersin, TurkeyAbstract: In this review, the first of two parts, we first provide an overview of the orthodox analgesics used commonly against cancer pain. Then, we examine in more detail the emerging evidence for the potential impact of analgesic use on cancer risk and disease progression. Increasing findings suggest that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, particularly aspirin, may reduce cancer occurrence. However, acetaminophen may raise the risk of some hematological malignancies. Drugs acting upon receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and GABA “mimetics” (eg, gabapentin appear generally safe for cancer patients, but there is some evidence of potential carcinogenicity. Some barbiturates appear to slightly raise cancer risks and can affect cancer cell behavior in vitro. For cannabis, studies suggest an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, larynx, and possibly lung. Morphine may stimulate human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis; it is not clear whether this might cause harm or produce benefit. The opioid, fentanyl, may promote growth in some tumor cell lines. Opium itself is an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma and possibly cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung. It is concluded that analgesics currently prescribed for cancer pain can

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Coping with Your Feelings During Advanced Cancer Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer and Caregivers Questions ... Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer ...

  12. Neuropathic pain in people with cancer (part 2): pharmacological and non-pharmacological management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverner, Tarnia

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the management of neuropathic pain associated with cancer and to provide helpful clinical advice for nurses working with patients who may have neuropathic pain. While cancer pain is a mixed-mechanism pain, this article will focus only on neuropathic pain management. The impact of neuropathic pain on patients' quality of life is great and while many patients recover from their cancer, a significant number continue to suffer from a neuropathic pain syndrome. Management of neuropathic pain is significantly different from management of nociceptive pain with respect to pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies. Neuropathic pain is complex, and as such requires complex management using pharmacological as well as non-pharmacological approaches. Specific drugs for neuropathic pain may be effective for some patients, but not all; therefore, ongoing and comprehensive assessment and management are required. Furthermore, these patients may require trials of several drugs before they find one that works for them. It is important for nurses to understand neuropathic pain, its manifestation, impact on quality of life and management when nursing patients with neuropathic pain associated with cancer.

  13. How do I best manage insomnia and other sleep disorders in older adults with cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Kah Poh; Burhenn, Peggy; Hurria, Arti; Zachariah, Finly; Mohile, Supriya Gupta

    2016-11-01

    Insomnia is common in older adults with cancer, with a reported prevalence of 19-60% in prior studies. Cancer treatments are associated with increased risk of insomnia or aggravation of pre-existing insomnia symptoms, and patients who are receiving active cancer treatments are more likely to report insomnia. Insomnia can lead to significant physical and psychological consequences with increased mortality. We discuss physiological sleep changes in older adults, and illustrated the various sleep disorders. We present a literature review on the prevalence and the effects of insomnia on the quality of life in older adults with cancer. We discuss the risk factors and presented a theoretical framework of insomnia in older adults with cancer. We present a case study to illustrate the assessment and management of insomnia in older adults with cancer, comparing and contrasting a number of tools for sleep assessment. There are currently no guidelines on the treatment of sleep disorders in older adults with cancer. We present an algorithm developed at the City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center by a multidisciplinary team for managing insomnia, using evidence-based pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of side effects during and post-treatment in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesh, Oxana; Scheiber, Caroline; Kesler, Shelli; Mustian, Karen; Koopman, Cheryl; Schapira, Lidia

    2018-03-01

    Cancer-related fatigue, insomnia, and cancer-related cognitive impairment are commonly experienced symptoms that share psychological and physical manifestations. One or more of these symptoms will affect nearly all patients at some point during their course of treatment or survivorship. These side effects are burdensome and reduce patients' quality of life well beyond their cancer diagnosis and associated care treatments. Cancer-related fatigue, insomnia, and cancer-related cognitive impairment are likely to have multiple etiologies that make it difficult to identify the most effective method to manage them. In this review, we summarized the information on cancer-related fatigue, insomnia, and cancer-related cognitive impairment incidence and prevalence among breast cancer patients and survivors as well as recent research findings on pharmaceutical, psychological, and exercise interventions that have shown effectiveness in the treatment of these side effects. Our review revealed that most current pharmaceutical interventions tend to ameliorate symptoms only temporarily without addressing the underlying causes. Exercise and behavioral interventions are consistently more effective at managing chronic symptoms and possibly address an underlying etiology. Future research is needed to investigate effective interventions that can be delivered directly in clinic to a large portion of patients and survivors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with lung cancer: prevalence, impact and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyratos D

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dionisios Spyratos, Eleni Papadaki, Sofia Lampaki, Theodoros Kontakiotis Pulmonary Department, Lung Cancer Oncology Unit, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer share a common etiological factor (cigarette smoking and usually coexist in everyday clinical practice. The prevalence of COPD among newly diagnosed patients with lung cancer sometimes exceeds 50%. COPD is an independent risk factor (2–4 times higher than non-COPD subjects for lung cancer development.The presence of emphysema in addition to other factors (e.g., smoking history, age could be incorporated into risk scores in order to define the most appropriate target group for lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography. Clinical management of patients with coexistence of COPD and lung cancer requires a multidisciplinary oncology board that includes a pulmonologist. Detailed evaluation (lung function tests, cardiopulmonary exercise test and management (inhaled drugs, smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation of COPD should be taken into account for lung cancer treatment (surgical approach, radiotherapy. Keywords: lung cancer, COPD, coexistence, risk factor, therapy decisions 

  16. Coping with pediatric cancer: strategies employed by children and their parents to manage cancer-related stressors during treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, Aimee K; Clawson, Kathleen J; Alderfer, Melissa A; Marsac, Meghan L

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric cancer patients and their families face significant physical, emotional, and psychosocial challenges. Few studies have investigated how children manage these challenges and how parents may help in the process. This qualitative study aimed to explore common cancer-related stressors for children and to examine child coping and parental assistance in coping with these stressors during treatment. Fifteen children undergoing cancer treatment and their parents participated in semistructured interviews. Four themes emerged capturing cancer-related stressors: cancer treatment/side effects, distressing emotions, disruption in daily routines, and social challenges. Six themes emerged regarding child coping strategies that were classified within an approach/avoidance coping framework. Approach coping strategies included the following: cognitive restructuring, relaxation, practical strategies, seeking social support, and emotional expression. Distraction was the only avoidant coping strategy. Parents tended to encourage approach coping strategies (eg, cognitive restructuring, social support). Within families, few coping strategies were reported (child: M = 1.47, SD = 0.99; parent: M = 3.33, SD = 1.18), suggesting that early family-based interventions teaching coping techniques for cancer-related stressors may be beneficial.

  17. Incidence, management, and course of cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algaba, Alicia; Guerra, Iván; Marín-Jiménez, Ignacio; Quintanilla, Elvira; López-Serrano, Pilar; García-Sánchez, María Concepción; Casis, Begoña; Taxonera, Carlos; Moral, Ignacio; Chaparro, María; Martín-Rodríguez, Daniel; Martín-Arranz, María Dolores; Manceñido, Noemí; Menchén, Luis; López-Sanromán, Antonio; Castaño, Ángel; Bermejo, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] are at increased risk for developing some types of neoplasia. Our aims were to determin the risk for cancer in patients with IBD and to describe the relationship with immunosuppressive therapies and clinical management after tumor diagnosis. Retrospective, multicenter, observational, 5-year follow-up, cohort study. Relative risk [RR] of cancer in the IBD cohort and the background population, therapeutic strategies, and cancer evolution were analyzed. A total of 145 cancers were diagnosed in 133 of 9100 patients with IBD (global cumulative incidence 1.6% vs 2.4% in local population; RR = 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57-0.78). Patients with IBD had a significantly increased RR of non-melanoma skin cancer [RR = 3.85; 2.53-5.80] and small bowel cancer [RR = 3.70; 1.23-11.13]. After cancer diagnosis, IBD treatment was maintained in 13 of 27 [48.1%] patients on thiopurines, in 2 of 3 on methotrexate [66.6%], none on anti-TNF-α monotherapy [n = 6] and 4 of 12 [33.3%] patients on combined therapy. Rate of death and cancer remission during follow-up did not differ [p > 0.05] between patients who maintained the treatment compared with patients who withdrew [5% vs 8% and 95% vs 74%, respectively]. An association between thiopurines [p = 0.20] or anti-TNF-α drugs [p = 0.77] and cancer was not found. Patients with IBD have an increased risk for non-melanoma skin cancer and small bowel cancer. Immunosuppresive therapy is not related to a higher overall risk for cancer or worse tumor evolution in patients who maintain these drugs after cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Challenges associated with the management of gynecological cancers in a tertiary hospital in South East Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyoke CA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chukwuemeka Anthony Iyoke,1 George Onyemaechi Ugwu,1 Euzebus Chinonye Ezugwu,1 Frank Okechukwu Ezugwu,2 Osaheni Lucky Lawani,3 Azubuike Kanayo Onyebuchi3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Park Lane, Enugu, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria Background: There are reports of increasing incidence of gynecological cancers in developing countries and this trend increases the need for more attention to gynecological cancer care in these countries. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the presentation and treatment of gynecological cancers and identify barriers to successful gynecological cancer treatment in a tertiary hospital in South East Nigeria. Methods: This study was a retrospective longitudinal analysis of the presentation and treatment of histologically diagnosed primary gynecological cancers from 2000 to 2010. Analysis was by descriptive and inferential statistics at the 95% level of confidence using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17 software. Results: Records of 200 gynecological cancers managed during the study period were analyzed. Over 94% of cervical cancers presented in advanced stages of the disease and received palliative/symptomatic treatment. Only 1.9% of cervical cancer patients had radical surgical intervention, and postoperative mortality from these radical surgeries was 100%. Approximately 76% of patients with ovarian cancer had debulking surgery as the mainstay of treatment followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative mortality from ovarian cancer surgery was 63%. Cutting edge cytotoxic drugs were not used as chemotherapy for ovarian and chorionic cancers. Compliance with chemotherapy was poor, with over 70% of ovarian cancer patients failing to complete the

  19. Emerging targets in cancer management: role of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cojoc M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Monica Cojoc,1 Claudia Peitzsch,1 Franziska Trautmann,1 Leo Polishchuk,2 Gennady D Telegeev,2 Anna Dubrovska11OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden, Germany; 2Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, UkraineAbstract: The chemokine CXCL12 (SDF-1 and its cell surface receptor CXCR4 were first identified as regulators of lymphocyte trafficking to the bone marrow. Soon after, the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis was proposed to regulate the trafficking of breast cancer cells to sites of metastasis. More recently, it was established that CXCR4 plays a central role in cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and dissemination in the majority of malignant diseases. The stem cell concept of cancer has revolutionized the understanding of tumorigenesis and cancer treatment. A growing body of evidence indicates that a subset of cancer cells, referred to as cancer stem cells (CSCs, plays a critical role in tumor initiation, metastatic colonization, and resistance to therapy. Although the signals generated by the metastatic niche that regulate CSCs are not yet fully understood, accumulating evidence suggests a key role of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis. In this review we focus on physiological functions of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling pathway and its role in cancer and CSCs, and we discuss the potential for targeting this pathway in cancer management.Keywords: epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cancer stem cells, metastasis

  20. Current management of liver metastases of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainieri Breedy, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    Colon cancer has been one of the major tumors in the world, both men and women; and it is constituted the third most commonly diagnosed tumor, with approximately 1.2 million of new cases per year. This cancer type is considered of great importance in Costa Rica and has occupied the fifth place. Age is the main risk factor, followed by environmental, diabetic and genetic factors. An IV colon cancer has been manifested with any T, with any N and metastases. Metastases from colon cancer to liver can be classified according to whether have been synchronous (20 to 25%) or metachronous (15 to 29%). In turn, they can be synchronous, resectable or unresectable or mechanical resectable or unresectable. The liver has been the most common site of metastases, and the status of this organ has been an important determinant of overall survival in patients with advanced disease. Half of the patients developed metastases during the course of the disease. Metastases has represented the leading cause of death from this tumor. With the advent of new surgical techniques, new anesthetic care, new chemotherapeutic and molecular agents, together with new radiofrequency modalities and ablative treatment, the approach of metastases from colon cancer to the liver has been shown to be decisive in the prolongation of survival of the patient, who in the past was considered a terminal patient [es

  1. Survey of HNPCC Management Analysis of Responses from 18 International Cancer Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Elizabeth

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Eighteen international cancer centres responded to a questionnaire designed to determine clinic practices regarding the management of Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC. Areas covered include definition, clinical intakes, pre-genetic testing for microsatellite instability (MSI or expression of mismatch repair (MMR genes by immunohistochemistry (IHC, mutational analysis, consent practices, counselling, surveillance planning, and surgical decision making. In the absence of a firm evidence base, some management practices were variable, with local access to funding and other resources being influential. More consistent responses were evident for management practices with a stronger evidence base from previous clinical research. This document provides important information to guide the management of HNPCC patients, allow comparisons to be made between the approaches of various clinics to HNPCC families, and define management issues that need to be addressed in clinical research.

  2. Communication Efficacy and Couples’ Cancer Management: Applying a Dyadic Appraisal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Checton, Maria G.; Venetis, Maria K.; Greene, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to apply Berg and Upchurch’s (2007) developmental-conceptual model to understand better how couples cope with cancer. Specifically, we hypothesized a dyadic appraisal model in which proximal factors (relational quality), dyadic appraisal (prognosis uncertainty), and dyadic coping (communication efficacy) predicted adjustment (cancer management). The study was cross-sectional and included 83 dyads in which one partner had been diagnosed with and/or treated ...

  3. Integrating pulmonary rehabilitation into the multidisciplinary management of lung cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Perez, Hiram; Nana-Sinkam, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer related deaths. It is increasingly recognized that a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and management of patients with lung cancer represents the ideal model for health care delivery. Given the high incidence of comorbid lung disease in lung cancer patients, strategies targeted at improving or optimizing these conditions may improve outcomes. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has proven to be a useful management strategy for patients with chronic lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension. PR improves both exercise capacity and dyspnea. The effects of PR have also been studied in patients with lung cancer prior to and following surgical resection. Investigators have demonstrated significant improvements in six minute walk distance and lower extremity strength. In addition, patient recovery time is shorter when inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation is integrated prior to or following surgery. There are also positive reports regarding the benefits of exercise training in lung cancer patients receiving definite chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Pilot studies have demonstrated improvement in dyspnea scores as well as exercise capacity objectively measured by six minute walk distance. PR also offers an educational component in which patients have the opportunity to be educated regarding management of their disease as well as discuss goals of care. PR can be included as the standard of care for patients with advanced lung cancer with the goal of optimizing quality of life. Here, we provide a review of the current knowledge regarding PR in the management of patients with lung cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Management Options in Advanced Prostate Cancer: What is the Role for Sipuleucel-T?

    OpenAIRE

    Bitting, Rhonda L.; Armstrong, Andrew J.; George, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Most prostate cancer-related deaths occur in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Until recently, only therapy with docetaxel and prednisone has been shown to prolong survival in men with metastatic CRPC. With the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approvals of sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, and abiraterone acetate, all based on improvement in overall survival, the landscape for management of men with metastatic CRPC has dramatically changed. In this review ...

  5. Novel findings about management of gastric cancer: A summary from 10th IGCC

    OpenAIRE

    Penon, Danila; Cito, Letizia; Giordano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The Tenth International Gastric Cancer Congress (IGCC) was held in Verona, Italy, from June 19 to 22, 2013. The meeting enclosed various aspects of stomach tumor management, including both tightly clinical approaches, and topics more related to basic research. Moreover, an overview on gastrointestinal stromal tumors was provided too, although here not discussed. Here we will discuss some topics related to molecular biology of gastric cancer (GC), inherent to prognostic, diagnostic and therape...

  6. Managing One's Symptoms: A Qualitative Study of Low-Income African Americans With Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Katherine A; Sterk, Claire E; Quest, Tammie E; DiIorio, Colleen; Vena, Catherine; Bauer-Wu, Susan

    2016-01-01

    African Americans endure disproportionately high advanced cancer rates and also are disproportionately represented in the lower socioeconomic strata. These individuals work to manage symptoms in order to function and have a satisfactory quality of life. The purpose of this study was to discover what low-income African American adults with advanced cancer do on a day-to-day basis to relieve and manage symptoms. This study viewed the individuals as experts and asked them not what they are told to do, but rather what they actually do. A purposive sample of 27 individuals participated in semistructured interviews conducted by 2 research interviewers. This qualitative descriptive approach used content analysis to develop themes to describe symptom self-management. Participants described 2 approaches: making continual adjustments and finding stability through spirituality. In seeking comfort from the distress of their symptoms, they were constantly altering their activities and fine-tuning strategies. They adjusted medical regimens and changed the speed and selection of daily activities, including comfort measures and diet modifications. In contrast, their spirituality was a consistent presence in their lives that provided balance to their unstable symptom experience. This study illustrates that people with advanced cancer actively engage in multiple complex self-management strategies in response to symptoms. As providers assess how individuals manage their symptoms, they must find ways to support those efforts. Providers then will recognize the challenges faced by advanced cancer patients in obtaining the best quality of life while managing multiple symptoms, activities, and family responsibilities.

  7. Current Operative Management of Breast Cancer: An Age of Smaller Resections and Bigger Cures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostas, J.W.; Dyess, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Surgical resection was the first effective treatment for breast cancer and remains the most important treatment modality for curative intent. Refinements in operative techniques along with the use of adjuvant radiotherapy and advanced chemotherapeutic agents have facilitated increasingly focused breast cancer operations. Surgical management of breast cancer has shifted from extensive and highly morbid procedures, to the modern concept obtaining the best possible cosmetic result in tandem with the appropriate oncological resection. An ever-growing comprehension of breast cancer biology has led to substantial advances in molecular diagnosis and targeted therapies. An emerging frontier involves the breast cancer microenvironment, as a thorough understanding, while currently lacking, represents a critical opportunity for diagnosis and treatment. Collectively, these improvements will continue to push all therapeutic interventions, including operative, toward the goal of becoming more focused, targeted, and less morbid

  8. Targeted therapies with companion diagnostics in the management of breast cancer: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Meagan B

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a multifaceted disease exhibiting both intertumoral and intratumoral heterogeneity as well as variable disease course. Over 2 decades of research has advanced the understanding of the molecular substructure of breast cancer, directing the development of new therapeutic strategies against these actionable targets. In vitro diagnostics, and specifically companion diagnostics, have been integral in the successful development and implementation of these targeted therapies, such as those directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Lately, there has been a surge in the development, commercialization, and marketing of diagnostic assays to assist in breast cancer patient care. More recently, multigene signature assays, such as Oncotype DX, MammaPrint, and Prosigna, have been integrated in the clinical setting in order to tailor decisions on adjuvant endocrine and chemotherapy treatment. This review provides an overview of the current state of breast cancer management and the use of companion diagnostics to direct personalized approaches in the treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Development and validation of risk models and molecular diagnostics to permit personalized management of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xia; Ye, Yuanqing; Wu, Xifeng

    2014-01-01

    Despite the advances made in cancer management over the past few decades, improvements in cancer diagnosis and prognosis are still poor, highlighting the need for individualized strategies. Toward this goal, risk prediction models and molecular diagnostic tools have been developed, tailoring each step of risk assessment from diagnosis to treatment and clinical outcomes based on the individual's clinical, epidemiological, and molecular profiles. These approaches hold increasing promise for delivering a new paradigm to maximize the efficiency of cancer surveillance and efficacy of treatment. However, they require stringent study design, methodology development, comprehensive assessment of biomarkers and risk factors, and extensive validation to ensure their overall usefulness for clinical translation. In the current study, the authors conducted a systematic review using breast cancer as an example and provide general guidelines for risk prediction models and molecular diagnostic tools, including development, assessment, and validation. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  10. Successful management of a difficult cancer pain patient by appropriate adjuvant and morphine titration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv PS Rana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphine has been used for many years to relieve cancer pain. Oral morphine (in either immediate release or modified release form remains the analgesic of choice for moderate or severe cancer pain. The dose of oral morphine is titrated up to achieve adequate relief from pain with minimal side effects. Antidepressant and anticonvulsant drugs, when used in addition to conventional analgesics, give excellent relief from cancer pain. Most cancer pain responds to pharmacological measures with oral morphine but some pain like neuropathic and bony pain, pain in children and elderly age group, and advanced malignancy pain are very difficult to treat. Here, we report the management of a similar patient of severe cancer pain and the difficulty that we came across during dose titration of oral morphine and adjuvant analgesic.

  11. Lymphoedema management in breast cancer-related lymphoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joanne

    2013-04-01

    Due to developments in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, survival rates are rising. This leads to a population of mainly women, who also experience breast cancer-related lymphoedema (BCRL). Long after the cancer has been treated, lymphoedema persists at a time when individuals have returned to work. Large limb volumes can present a problem to these individuals and innovative treatments are needed, in order to retain as much normality as possible and reduce excessive limb volumes that patients can experience with lymphoedema long after treatment. It is also important that these treatments do not disrupt daily living and, for some, work-life balance. With the introduction of wrap around compression systems and collaborative working with the patient, it is possible to achieve an acceptable outcome to those patients with these issues. This approach leads to patient satisfaction and stabilisation of limb volume to within acceptable limits for these patients, in conjunction with the therapist.

  12. Challenges of drug resistance in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheikh, Rizwan

    2012-02-01

    The current treatment of choice for metastatic pancreatic cancer involves single-agent gemcitabine or a combination of gemcitabine with capecitabine or erlotinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Only 25–30% of patients respond to this treatment and patients who do respond initially ultimately exhibit disease progression. Median survival for pancreatic cancer patients has reached a plateau due to inherent and acquired resistance to these agents. Key molecular factors implicated in this resistance include: deficiencies in drug uptake, alteration of drug targets, activation of DNA repair pathways, resistance to apoptosis and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, for newer agents including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, overexpression of signaling proteins, mutations in kinase domains, activation of alternative pathways, mutations of genes downstream of the target and\\/or amplification of the target represent key challenges for treatment efficacy. Here we will review the contribution of known mechanisms and markers of resistance to key pancreatic cancer drug treatments.

  13. National Economic Conditions and Patient Insurance Status Predict Prostate Cancer Diagnosis Rates and Management Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Adam B; Conti, Rena M; Eggener, Scott E

    2016-05-01

    The recent Great Recession from December 2007 to June 2009 presents a unique opportunity to examine whether the incidence of nonpalpable prostate cancer decreases while conservative management for nonpalpable prostate cancer increases during periods of national economic hardship. We derived rates of national monthly diagnosis and conservative management for screen detected, nonpalpable prostate cancer and patient level insurance status from the SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results) database from 2004 to 2011. We derived monthly statistics on national unemployment rates, inflation, median household income and S&P 500® closing values from government sources. Using linear and logistic multivariable regression we measured the correlation of national macroeconomic conditions with prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment patterns. We evaluated patient level predictors of conservative management to determine whether being insured by Medicaid or uninsured increased the use of conservative management. Diagnosis rates correlated positively with the S&P 500 monthly close (coefficient 24.90, 95% CI 6.29-43.50, p = 0.009). Conservative management correlated negatively with median household income (coefficient -49.13, 95% CI -69.29--28.98, p management compared to that in men with private insurance. As indicated by a significant interaction term being diagnosed during the Great Recession increased the Medicaid insurance predictive value of conservative management (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.02-1.68, p = 0.037). National economic hardship was associated with decreased diagnosis rates of nonpalpable prostate cancer and increased conservative management. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of Skin Cancer in the High-Risk Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, James W; Sutton, Adam; Wysong, Ashley

    2016-12-01

    Skin cancer is the most common of human cancers and outnumbers all other types of cancer combined in the USA by over threefold. The majority of non-melanoma skin cancers are easily treated with surgery or locally destructive techniques performed under local anesthesia in the cost-effective outpatient setting. However, there is a subset of "high-risk" cases that prove challenging in terms of morbidity, mortality, adjuvant treatment required, as well as overall cost to the health care system. In our opinion, the term "high risk" when applied to skin cancer can mean one of three things: a high-risk tumor with aggressive histologic and/or clinical features with an elevated risk for local recurrence or regional/distant metastasis, a high-risk patient with the ongoing development of multiple skin cancers, and a high-risk patient based on immunosuppression. We have recently proposed classifying NMSC as a chronic disease in a certain subset of patients. Although no consensus definition exists for a chronic disease in medicine, there are three components that are present in most definitions: duration of at least 1 year, need for ongoing medical care, and functional impairment and/or alteration of activities of daily living (ADLs) and quality of life (QOL). Immunosuppression can refer to exogenous (organ or stem cell transplant patients,) or endogenous (HIV, leukemia, lymphoma, genodermatoses with DNA mismatch repair problems or other immunosuppression) causes. These patients are at risk for high-risk tumors and/or the development of multiple tumors.

  15. Predicting, preventing and managing persistent pain after breast cancer surgery:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Kristin L; Kehlet, Henrik; Belfer, Inna

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery (PPBCS) is increasingly recognized as a potential problem facing a sizeable subset of the millions of women who undergo surgery as part of their treatment of breast cancer. Importantly, an increasing number of studies suggest that individual variation...... in psychosocial factors such as catastrophizing, anxiety, depression, somatization and sleep quality play an important role in shaping an individual's risk of developing PPBCS. This review presents evidence for the importance of these factors and puts them within the context of other surgical, medical...

  16. Management of stage IV rectal cancer: Palliative options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnekleiv-Kelly, Sean M; Kennedy, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with rectal cancer present with metastatic disease. Many of these patients have symptoms of bleeding or obstruction. Several treatment options are available to deal with the various complications that may afflict these patients. Endorectal stenting, laser ablation, and operative resection are a few of the options available to the patient with a malignant large bowel obstruction. A thorough understanding of treatment options will ensure the patient is offered the most effective therapy with the least amount of associated morbidity. In this review, we describe various options for palliation of symptoms in patients with metastatic rectal cancer. Additionally, we briefly discuss treatment for asymptomatic patients with metastatic disease. PMID:21412493

  17. Adjuvant vaginal brachytherapy as a part of management in early endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellas-Ślęczka, Sylwia; Wojcieszek, Piotr; Białas, Brygida

    2012-12-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most frequent cancer of female genital tract. Metro- and menorrhagia or postmenopausal bleeding results in its early presentation. It allows radical treatment. However, controversies remain on surgery coverage or adjuvant therapies in early endometrial women cancer. Optimal management should minimize intervention instead of aggressive approach, as showed by recent studies. There is a role for brachytherapy as an adjuvant irradiation. Crucial publications including PORTEC-1, GOG 99, MRC ASTEC, ASTEC/EN.5, PORTEC-2 or Italian lymphadenectomy trial are discussed. Moreover, there is attention paid on adjuvant vaginal brachytherapy analyses for the past fifteen years.

  18. European Society of Gynaecological Oncology Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Vulvar Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oonk, Maaike H M; Planchamp, François; Baldwin, Peter

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to develop clinically relevant and evidence-based guidelines as part of European Society of Gynaecological Oncology's mission to improve the quality of care for women with gynecologic cancers across Europe. METHODS: The European Society of Gynaecological...... Oncology Council nominated an international development group made of practicing clinicians who provide care to patients with vulvar cancer and have demonstrated leadership and interest in the management of patients with vulvar cancer (18 experts across Europe). To ensure that the statements are evidence...

  19. Pain management: a review of organisation models with integrated processes for the management of pain in adult cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink-Huis, Anita; van Achterberg, Theo; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2008-08-01

    This paper reports a review of the literature conducted to identify organisation models in cancer pain management that contain integrated care processes and describe their effectiveness. Pain is experienced by 30-50% of cancer patients receiving treatment and by 70-90% of those with advanced disease. Efforts to improve pain management have been made through the development and dissemination of clinical guidelines. Early improvements in pain management were focussed on just one or two single processes such as pain assessment and patient education. Little is known about organisational models with multiple integrated processes throughout the course of the disease trajectory and concerning all stages of the care process. Systematic review. The review involved a systematic search of the literature, published between 1986-2006. Subject-specific keywords used to describe patients, disease, pain management interventions and integrated care processes, relevant for this review were selected using the thesaurus of the databases. Institutional models, clinical pathways and consultation services are three alternative models for the integration of care processes in cancer pain management. A clinical pathway is a comprehensive institutionalisation model, whereas a pain consultation service is a 'stand-alone' model that can be integrated in a clinical pathway. Positive patient and process outcomes have been described for all three models, although the level of evidence is generally low. Evaluation of the quality of pain management must involve standardised measurements of both patient and process outcomes. We recommend the development of policies for referrals to a pain consultation service. These policies can be integrated within a clinical pathway. To evaluate the effectiveness of pain management models standardised outcome measures are needed.

  20. The management of breakthrough cancer pain--educational needs a European nursing survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengström, Y; Rundström, C; Geerling, J; Pappa, T; Weisse, I; Williams, S C; Zavratnik, B; Rustøen, T

    2014-01-01

    Poorly managed cancer pain is well known to profoundly impact the patient's daily life and interfere with quality of life. Nurses who cared for patients with cancer from 12 European countries participated in a survey of breakthrough cancer pain practice. The purpose was to investigate how nurses assess breakthrough cancer pain, use of standardised tools, confidence in supporting patients and awareness of medications. Responses from 1241 participants showed country variations. The majority of the sample was female, Germany had the highest proportion of male nurses (21.0%), followed by Greece (15.8%). A significantly larger proportion of nurses with longer experience and more education (78.8%) used a comprehensive definition of breakthrough cancer pain. Significant variations in training were found; 71% of Finnish nurses had received training compared with 6% of Greek nurses. Training and using a standardised assessment tool was associated with a significant increase in the nurses' perceived ability to distinguish between breakthrough and background pain. Nurses in countries with the highest proportion of training were most confident in supporting patients. In conclusion, there still exists problems with effective management of patients' breakthrough cancer pain, continuing inability to define the difference between background and breakthrough cancer pain leads to poor treatment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Imaging Management of Breast Density, a Controversial Risk Factor for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Shannon; Williams, Angela; Weinfurtner, Jared; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-04-01

    Breast density is well recognized as an independent risk factor for the development of breast cancer. However, the magnitude of risk is controversial. As the public becomes increasingly aware of breast density as a risk factor, legislation and notification laws in relation to breast density have become common throughout the United States. Awareness of breast density as a risk factor for breast cancer presents new challenges for the clinician in the approach to the management and screening of women with dense breasts. The evidence and controversy surrounding breast density as a risk factor for the development of breast cancer are discussed. Common supplemental screening modalities for breast cancer are also discussed, including tomosynthesis, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging. A management strategy for screening women with dense breasts is also presented. The American College of Radiology recognizes breast density as a controversial risk factor for breast cancer, whereas the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recognizes breast density as a modest risk factor. Neither organization recommends the routine use of supplemental screening in women with dense breasts without considering additional patient-related risk factors. Breast density is a poorly understood and controversial risk factor for the development of breast cancer. Mammography is a screening modality proven to reduce breast cancer-related mortality rates and is the single most appropriate tool for population-based screening. Use of supplemental screening modalities should be tailored to individual risk assessment.

  2. Role of scintimammography in post surgical management of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, P.S.; Bhatia, S.; Gupta, A.; Sharma, P.K.; Kumar, R.; Pandey, K.K.

    2004-01-01

    Tetrofosmin separately. To summarise, scintimammographic interpretation, being independent of tissue density, will be of use in the post surgical management of breast cancer in detection of both recurrent and residual disease. This can also be used to exclude multifocal / multicentric disease as more and more breast conserving surgery will be the rule rather than an exception, in times to come, in carefully selected cases. (author)

  3. Health-related quality of life and satisfaction with case management in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ya-Hui; Chai, Hsiu-Ying; Lin, Yu-Fen; Wang, Chao-Hui; Chen, Shu-Ching

    2017-12-01

    To (i) investigate the characteristics of health-related quality of life and satisfaction with case management and (ii) to identify factors associated with health-related quality of life in cancer survivors. The level of health-related quality of life can reflect treatment efficacy and satisfaction with cancer care. A cross-sectional study design was adopted. Subjects from the outpatient setting of a cancer centre in northern Taiwan were recruited by consecutive sampling. A set of questionnaires were employed, including a background information form, case management service satisfaction survey (CMSS) and The European Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). Descriptive statistics were used to examine levels of health-related quality of life and satisfaction with case management. Pearson's correlation was used to identify relationships between treatment characteristics, satisfaction with case management and health-related quality of life. Multiple stepwise regression was used to identify factors associated with health-related quality of life. A total of 252 cancer patients were recruited. The three lowest scores for items of health-related quality of life were mobility, self-care and usual activities. Cancer survivors with higher mobility, less pain and discomfort, and lower anxiety and depression were more likely to have better health-related quality of life. Mobility, pain and discomfort, and anxiety and depression are important predictive factors of high health-related quality of life in cancer survivors. In clinical care, patients' physical mobility, pain and discomfort, and anxiety and depression are important indicators of health-related quality of life. Case managers should include self-care and symptom management into survivorship care plans to improve health-related quality of life during survival after treatment concludes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Pre-Radiation dental considerations and management for head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufta, Kenneth; Forman, Michael; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Sollecito, Thomas P; Panchal, Neeraj

    2018-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) is accompanied by a high rate of morbidity, and complications can have a lifelong, profound impact on both patients and caregivers. Radiation-related injury to the hard and soft tissue of the head and neck can significantly decrease patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study is to provide patent-specific guidelines for managing the oral health and related side effects of HNC patients treated with radiation therapy. Based on reviewed articles retrieved on the PubMed database, guidelines for management of the oral health of this patient population were organized into three separate categories: cancer, patient, and dentition. The location, type, and staging of the cancer, along with the radiation used to treat the cancer significantly impact dental treatment. Several unique patient characteristics such as motivation, presence of support system, socioeconomic status, nutrition, and race have all been found to affect outcomes. Dental disease and available supportive dental management was found to significantly impact treatment and quality of life in this patient population. By comprehensively assessing unique cancer, patient, and dental-related factors, this review provides individualized evidence-based guidelines on the proper management of this complex and vulnerable patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Managing post-therapy fatigue for cancer survivors using energy conservation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Hon Keung; Mitcham, Maralynne; Morgan, Larissa

    2006-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the effectiveness of energy conservation training to help post-therapy cancer survivors manage their fatigue. Twelve post-therapy cancer survivors were randomly assigned to an energy conservation training or usual care control (6 in each group). Participants in the intervention group received 1 to 2 hours of individual, face-to-face energy conservation training from an occupational therapist followed by once-a-week telephone monitoring sessions in the subsequent three weeks. Participants in the control group received standard care from their oncologist. Analysis of pre- and post-training data from the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS) revealed significant reduction only in the sensory subscale of the PFS (Z = 2.21; p = 0.027) for the intervention group; but no significant reduction in the four subscale or total scores of the PFS for the control group. Findings demonstrate partial support for the effectiveness of energy conservation training in helping post-therapy cancer survivors manage their fatigue. Energy conservation training seems to be a viable strategy for managing cancer-related fatigue, though its efficacy is modest. Incorporating specific energy restoration strategies such as relaxation and meditation for future research may help advance the growing body of knowledge in symptom management for post-therapy cancer survivors.

  6. Assessment of Adequacy of Pain Management and Analgesic Use in Patients With Advanced Cancer Using the Brief Pain Inventory and Pain Management Index Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harminder Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this cross-sectional, noninterventional, 6-month observational study was to assess the adequacy of pain management in patients with cancer admitted to the Oncology Department of Guru Gobind Singh Medical College in Faridkot, India. Methods and Materials: A total of 348 patients with cancer were recruited for evaluation of the prevalence of inadequate cancer pain management using the Brief Pain Inventory Pain Management Index. Results: The current study included 127 males (36.5% and 221 females (63.5%. The most prevalent cancer type was genitourinary; 268 patients (77% had inadequately managed pain. A significant correlation was observed between poorly managed pain and age groups, analgesic used, and body mass index. Conclusion: Our observation of inadequate pain management among 77% of patients indicates that pain management was insufficient in three quarters of the patients in this study. Accumulating data regarding the inadequacy of cancer pain management is crucial to improve symptom management. Better management of pain not only alleviates pain symptoms but also increases the quality of life for patients with cancer.

  7. Melanotic Xp11 Translocation Renal Cancer Managed With Radical Nephrectomy and IVC Tumor Thrombectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyad S. Khourdaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancer is a rarely observed neoplasm primarily affecting adolescents and young adults. Given the paucity of data describing this malignancy, its natural history and subsequent long-term management are not well understood. We report a case of melanotic Xp11 translocation with tumor thrombus extension managed with radical nephrectomy and inferior vena cava (IVC tumor thrombectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report to describe use of conventional tumor thrombectomy techniques in a patient with melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancer.

  8. Physician-related barriers to cancer pain management with opioid analgesics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Sjøgren, Per; Møldrup, Claus

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of studies on physician-related barriers to cancer pain management with opioid analgesics. METHODS: A literature search was conducted in PUBMED, using a combined text word and MeSH heading search strategy. Those articles whose full...... texts were not available in PUBMED were retrieved from the electronic databases of specific journals. RESULTS: Sixty-five relevant articles, published in the period from 1986 to 2006, were identified. Physicians' barriers to cancer pain management were studied in questionnaire surveys and in the reviews...

  9. Fanconi anaemia: genetics, molecular biology, and cancer – implications for clinical management in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M; Chandler, K; Tischkowitz, M; Meyer, S

    2015-07-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an inherited disease with congenital and developmental abnormalities, cross-linker hypersensitivity and extreme cancer predisposition. With better understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of the disease, and improved clinical management, FA has been transformed from a life-limiting paediatric disease to an uncommon chronic condition that needs lifelong multidisciplinary management, and a paradigm condition for the understanding of the gene-environment interaction in the aetiology of congenital anomalies, haematopoiesis and cancer development. Here we review genetic, molecular and clinical aspects of FA, and discuss current controversies and future prospects. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A systematic review of dental disease management in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, C.H.L.; Hu, S.; Haverman, T.M.; Stokman, M.; Napeñas, J.J.; Bos-den Braber, J.; Gerber, E.; Geuke, M.; Vardas, E.; Waltimo, T.; Jensen, S.B.; Saunders, D.P.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: This systematic review aims to update on the prevalence of odontogenic-related infections and the efficacy of dental strategies in preventing dental-related complications in cancer patients since the 2010 systematic review. Review method: A literature search was conducted in the

  11. A systematic review of dental disease management in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, Catherine H L; Hu, Shijia; Haverman, Thijs; Stokman, Monique; Napeñas, Joel J; Braber, Jacolien Bos-den; Gerber, Erich; Geuke, Margot; Vardas, Emmanouil; Waltimo, Tuomas; Jensen, Siri Beier; Saunders, Deborah P

    INTRODUCTION: This systematic review aims to update on the prevalence of odontogenic-related infections and the efficacy of dental strategies in preventing dental-related complications in cancer patients since the 2010 systematic review. REVIEW METHOD: A literature search was conducted in the

  12. An approach to the management of locally advanced breast cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    female, aspects surrounding family planning ... surgery and is the current standard of care ... In the developed world, 7% of breast cancer patients have stage III disease at diagnosis. In ... of chemotherapy compared with adjuvant therapy.[6]. Regimens. Historically, regimens based on ... immunohistochemical approach. The.

  13. Obesity in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Call for Early Weight Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Parsons, Susan K

    2015-09-01

    A high prevalence of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions has been increasingly recognized in childhood cancer survivors. In particular, survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been found to be at risk of becoming overweight or obese early in treatment, with increases in weight maintained throughout treatment and beyond. Nutrition plays an important role in the etiology of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions and is among the few modifiable factors that can prevent or delay the early onset of these chronic conditions. However, nutritional intake in childhood cancer survivors has not been adequately examined and the evidence is built on data from small cohorts of survivors. In addition, the long-term impact of cancer diagnosis and treatment on survivors' nutritional intake as well as how survivors' nutritional intake is associated with chronic health conditions have not been well quantified in large-scale studies. Promoting family-based healthy lifestyles, preferably at a sensitive window of unhealthy weight gain, is a priority for preventing the early onset of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions in childhood cancer survivors. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. Osteoporosis management in patients with breast cancer : EMAS position statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trémollieres, Florence A; Ceausu, Iuliana; Depypere, Herman; Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Mueck, Alfred; Pérez-López, Faustino R; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Senturk, Levent M; Simoncini, Tommaso; Stevenson, John C; Stute, Petra; Rees, Margaret

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the first-line recommended standard of care for postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Because they cause a profound suppression of estrogen levels, concerns regarding their potential to increase the risk of fracture were rapidly raised. There is

  15. Breast Cancer Screening in a Low Income Managed Care Populaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    early to know for sure if these things affect breast cancer risk. can help prevent heart disease and osteoporosis after menopause. .,.- Experts generally...firmly in small massaging motions with the pads of your fingers (not the tips). Don’t forget the area in your armpit. Gently squeeze the nipple. Switch

  16. Management of Locally Advanced Cancer Cervix an Indian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J K; Chauhan, Richa

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer has a major impact on the lives of Indian women with an estimated 122, 844 new cases of cervical cancer in the year 2012. About 80% of these cases present in a locally advanced stage leading to high morbidity and mortality. Because of lack of public awareness and infrastructure for screening and early detection in developing countries, this late presentation is likely to continue in the coming years. Radiation therapy has been the treatment of choice for patients with locally advanced cancer cervix. Many clinical trials and meta-analyses have shown a significant improvement in overall and progression-free survival with decreased local and distant recurrences with the use of concurrent chemotherapy with radiation. Most of these trials have been done in women from developed countries where the patient and disease profile are entirely different from ours. Recently, few trials from India have also shown promising results in locally advanced cancer cervix with concurrent chemoradiotherapy but toxicities remain a major concern. Further exploration is required for the use of concurrent chemo radiation prior to incorporating it into routine clinical practice.

  17. Novel agents in the management of castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Chaturvedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is a leading cause of cancer mortality in men and despite high cure rates with surgery and/or radiation, 30-40% of patients will eventually develop advanced disease. Androgen deprivation is the first line therapy for standard of care for men with advanced disease. Eventually however all men will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Insight into the molecular mechanisms of androgen resistance has led to the development of alternative novel hormonal agents. Newer hormonal agents such as abiraterone, enzalutamide and TOK-001; and the first cancer vaccine, Sipuleucel T have been approved for use in men with CRPC. The recognition of the importance of bone health and morbidity associated with skeletal related events has led to the introduction of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B-ligand inhibitor denosumab. Other molecularly targeted therapies have shown promise in pre-clinical studies, but this has not consistently translated into clinical efficacy. It is increasingly evident that CRPC is a heterogeneous disease and an individualized approach directed at identifying primary involvement of specific pathways could maximize the benefit from targeted therapies. This review focuses on targeted therapy for PCa with special emphasis on therapies that have been Food and Drug Administration approved for use in men with CRPC.

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical ... Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs ...

  19. Ghrelin for the management of cachexia associated with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Mahalaqua Nazli; Shankar, Anuraj H; Kirubakaran, Richard; Gaidhane, Abhay; Gaidhane, Shilpa; Simkhada, Padam; Quazi Syed, Zahiruddin

    2018-02-28

    Cancer sufferers are amongst the most malnourished of all the patient groups. Studies have shown that ghrelin, a gut hormone can be a potential therapeutic agent for cachexia (wasting syndrome) associated with cancer. A variety of mechanisms of action of ghrelin in people with cancer cachexia have been proposed. However, safety and efficacy of ghrelin for cancer-associated cachexia have not been systematically reviewed. The aim of this review was to assess whether ghrelin is associated with better food intake, body composition and survival than other options for adults with cancer cachexia. To assess the efficacy and safety of ghrelin in improving food intake, body composition and survival in people with cachexia associated with cancer. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase without language restrictions up to July 2017. We also searched for ongoing studies in trials registers, performed handsearching, checked bibliographic references of relevant articles and contacted authors and experts in the field to seek potentially relevant research. We applied no restrictions on language, date, or publication status. We included randomised controlled (parallel-group or cross-over) trials comparing ghrelin (any formulation or route of administration) with placebo or an active comparator in adults (aged 18 years and over) who met any of the international criteria for cancer cachexia. Two review authors independently assessed studies for eligibility. Two review authors then extracted data and assessed the risk of bias for individual studies using standard Cochrane methodology. For dichotomous variables, we planned to calculate risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and for continuous data, we planned to calculate mean differences (MD) with 95% CI. We assessed the evidence using GRADE and created 'Summary of findings' tables. We screened 926 individual references and identified three studies that satisfied the inclusion criteria. Fifty-nine participants (37 men and 22

  20. Pain management in cancer center inpatients: a cluster randomized trial to evaluate a systematic integrated approach—The Edinburgh Pain Assessment and Management Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Fallon, M; Walker, J; Colvin, L; Rodriguez, A; Murray, G; Sharpe, M

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Pain is suboptimally managed in patients with cancer. We aimed to compare the effect of a policy of adding a clinician-delivered bedside pain assessment and management tool (Edinburgh Pain Assessment and management Tool [EPAT]) to usual care (UC) versus UC alone on pain outcomes. Patients and Methods In a two-arm, parallel group, cluster randomized (1:1) trial, we observed pain outcomes in 19 cancer centers in the United Kingdom and then randomly assigned the centers to eithe...

  1. Systematic Review of the Use of Phytochemicals for Management of Pain in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Harrison

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain in cancer therapy is a common condition and there is a need for new options in therapeutic management. While phytochemicals have been proposed as one pain management solution, knowledge of their utility is limited. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review of the biomedical literature for the use of phytochemicals for management of cancer therapy pain in human subjects. Of an initial database search of 1,603 abstracts, 32 full-text articles were eligible for further assessment. Only 7 of these articles met all inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The average relative risk of phytochemical versus control was 1.03 [95% CI 0.59 to 2.06]. In other words (although not statistically significant, patients treated with phytochemicals were slightly more likely than patients treated with control to obtain successful management of pain in cancer therapy. We identified a lack of quality research literature on this subject and thus were unable to demonstrate a clear therapeutic benefit for either general or specific use of phytochemicals in the management of cancer pain. This lack of data is especially apparent for psychotropic phytochemicals, such as the Cannabis plant (marijuana. Additional implications of our findings are also explored.

  2. The Effect of Stress Management Model in Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabakhshi Koolaee, Anahita; Falsafinejad, Mohammad Reza; Akbari, Mohammd Esmaeil

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer associates with severs severe distress and stress. Since Because of that, the stress management program can train necessary skills to cope with stress; therefore, the current study investigates the effectiveness of stress management on enhancement of quality of life. The aim of the current study is to examine the effectiveness of stress management model in quality of life for breast cancer patients. This research is a quasi-experimental study with pre and post-tests. The 21 subjects were selected from cancer institute of Imam Khomeini in Tehran in 2014. The participants were allocated to two matched groups based on their pre-test scores. They were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. Stress management was conducted with the experimental group during 10 sessions. Then the questionnaire was administered at post-test. Statistical analysis was conducted by using the independent t-test and analysis of variance. The research instrument was the core quality of life questionnaire QLQ-C30. The results of the independent t-test showed that there is a significant difference between the pretest and post-test scores in the experimental group (P stress management can change the irrational and distortion thoughts. So, it enhances the quality of life in breast cancer patients.

  3. Optimal management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ntekim, Atara; Campbell, Oladapo; Rothenbacher, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients has challenges mainly due to the concerns on immune status. At present, their mode of management is similar to HIV-seronegative patients involving the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy concurrently as indicated. HIV infection, cancer, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy lower immunity through reduction in CD4 cell counts. At present there are no treatment guidelines for HIV-positive patients. This study was done to systematically review the literature on cervical cancer management in HIV-positive patients and treatment outcomes. A systematic literature search was done in the major databases to identify studies on the management of HIV-positive patients with cervical cancer. Identified studies were assessed for eligibility and inclusion in the review following the guidelines of The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews and CRD's (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) guidance for undertaking reviews in health care. Eight eligible studies were identified from the literature. Three of them were prospective while five were retrospective studies. Notably, the average age at diagnosis of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients was a decade lower than in seronegative patients. There was no difference in distribution of stages of disease at presentation between HIV-positive and negative patients. Mild acute toxicity (Grades 1 and 2) was higher in HIV-positive patients than in HIV-negative patients in hematopoietic system. In the grades 3 and 4 reactions, anemia was reported in 4% versus 2% while gastrointestinal reactions were reported in 5% versus 2% respectively. In general, patients who were started early on HAART had higher rates of treatment completion. The study supports the suggestion that HAART should be commenced early at cervical cancer diagnosis in HIV-positive patients diagnosed with cervical cancer to ensure less toxicity and better treatment compliance

  4. Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Among Medicaid Beneficiaries: The Role of Physician Payment and Managed Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabik, Lindsay M; Dahman, Bassam; Vichare, Anushree; Bradley, Cathy J

    2018-05-01

    Medicaid-insured women have low rates of cancer screening. There are multiple policy levers that may influence access to preventive services such as screening, including physician payment and managed care. We examine the relationship between each of these factors and breast and cervical cancer screening among nonelderly nondisabled adult Medicaid enrollees. We combine individual-level data on Medicaid enrollment, demographics, and use of screening services from the Medicaid Analytic eXtract files with data on states' Medicaid-to-Medicare fee ratios and estimate their impact on screening services. Higher physician fees are associated with greater screening for comprehensive managed care enrollees; for enrollees in fee-for-service Medicaid, the findings are mixed. Patient participation in primary care case management is a significant moderator of the relationship between physician fees and the rate of screening, as interactions between enrollee primary care case management status and the Medicaid fee ratio are consistently positive across models of screening.

  5. Management of advanced colon cancer in a community hospital--impact of age on clinical management and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogili, Sujatha; Yousaf, Mobeen; Nadaraja, Nagendra; Woodlock, Timothy

    2012-09-01

    Colon cancer is more common in the elderly than in younger and middle-aged people. Cancer clinical trials focus more on younger patients and the management of elderly patients with advanced disease is still unclear. We studied all patients presenting with colon adenocarcinoma metastasis to liver at a community teaching hospital from Dec 2000 through Dec 2007 by a retrospective review of Tumor Registry data and patient chart review with focus on age, clinical management, decision making, and survival. Sixty-seven patients with a median age of 69 and a male to female ratio of 31:36 were identified. The patients with obstructive symptoms and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status on presentation though varied little by age, smaller proportion of elderly patients underwent resection of the primary bowel tumor in the presence of liver metastases with ten of 16 (63%) aged 80 or greater being managed without surgery. The percentage of patient's preference to physician's preference for patients not undergoing the primary bowel resection increased for older age group. Median survival decreased significantly with age (p management, decision-making autonomy, and survival are apparent in this study, and there was an increasing trend of patient's involvement in decision making as the age increases and, thus, affecting the age-related clinical management.

  6. Optimal management of cancer anorexia–cachexia syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argilés, Josep M; Olivan, Mireia; Busquets, Sílvia; López-Soriano, Francisco Javier

    2010-01-01

    According to a recent consensus, cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome associated with underlying illness and characterized by loss of muscle with or without loss of fat mass. The prominent clinical feature of cachexia is weight loss. Cachexia occurs in the majority of cancer patients before death and it is responsible for the deaths of 22% of cancer patients. Although bodyweight is the most important endpoint of any cachexia treatment, body composition, physical performance and quality of life should be monitored. From the results presented here, one can speculate that a single therapy may not be completely successful in the treatment of cachexia. From this point of view, treatments involving different combinations are more likely to be successful. The objectives of any therapeutic combination are two-fold: an anticatabolic aim directed towards both fat and muscle catabolism and an anabolic objective leading to the synthesis of macromolecules such as contractile proteins

  7. Optimal management of cancer anorexia–cachexia syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argilés, Josep M, E-mail: jargiles@ub.edu; Olivan, Mireia; Busquets, Sílvia; López-Soriano, Francisco Javier [Departament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-01-22

    According to a recent consensus, cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome associated with underlying illness and characterized by loss of muscle with or without loss of fat mass. The prominent clinical feature of cachexia is weight loss. Cachexia occurs in the majority of cancer patients before death and it is responsible for the deaths of 22% of cancer patients. Although bodyweight is the most important endpoint of any cachexia treatment, body composition, physical performance and quality of life should be monitored. From the results presented here, one can speculate that a single therapy may not be completely successful in the treatment of cachexia. From this point of view, treatments involving different combinations are more likely to be successful. The objectives of any therapeutic combination are two-fold: an anticatabolic aim directed towards both fat and muscle catabolism and an anabolic objective leading to the synthesis of macromolecules such as contractile proteins.

  8. Vulvar cancer: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkatout I

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Alkatout,1 Melanie Schubert,1 Nele Garbrecht,2 Marion Tina Weigel,1 Walter Jonat,1 Christoph Mundhenke,1 Veronika Günther1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Institute for Pathology, University Hospitals Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany Epidemiology: Vulvar cancer can be classified into two groups according to predisposing factors: the first type correlates with a HPV infection and occurs mostly in younger patients. The second group is not HPV associated and occurs often in elderly women without neoplastic epithelial disorders. Histology: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is the most common malignant tumor of the vulva (95%. Clinical features: Pruritus is the most common and long-lasting reported symptom of vulvar cancer, followed by vulvar bleeding, discharge, dysuria, and pain. Therapy: The gold standard for even a small invasive carcinoma of the vulva was historically radical vulvectomy with removal of the tumor with a wide margin followed by an en bloc resection of the inguinal and often the pelvic lymph nodes. Currently, a more individualized and less radical treatment is suggested: a radical wide local excision is possible in the case of localized lesions (T1. A sentinel lymph node (SLN biopsy may be performed to reduce wound complications and lymphedema. Prognosis: The survival of patients with vulvar cancer is good when convenient therapy is arranged quickly after initial diagnosis. Inguinal and/or femoral node involvement is the most significant prognostic factor for survival. Keywords: vulvar cancer, HPV infection, radical vulvectomy, groin dissection, sentinel lymph node biopsy, overall survival

  9. The management of differentiated thyroid cancer in Europe in 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldet, L.; Jaffiol, C.; Percheron, C.; Manderscheid, J.-C.; Coste-Seignovert, B.; Glinoer, D.

    1989-01-01

    In order to know how thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancers are investigated and treated in 1988, an international inquiry was performed by mean of a questionnaire based on a well-defined case report of a 35-year-old female with a solitary small thyroid nodule. Clinicians were asked to indicate their diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to the reported case and to some variations. Analysis of the 157 responses from thyroid experts showed that three in vitro tests (sensitive-TSH, free T 4 and total T 4 ) and three in vivo tests ( 99m Tc or radioiodide scintiscan, fine needle aspiration and ultrasonography) were performed most frequently. In the case of a solid and cold nodule and in the absence of fine needle aspiration results, 19% of respondents advocated suppressive therapy and 81% surgery. In the same clinical case, but whom fine needle aspiration had been performed and cytology was benign, surgery was advocated by 24%, suppressive therapy by 48% and a regular follow-up without treatment by 28% of respondents. When surgery was performed and the diagnosis was a differentiated thyroid cancer, (near) total thyroidectomy was more frequently chosen than partial thyroidectomy in both papillary (60 and 40%, respectively, of respondents) and follicular (74 and 26%, respectively, of respondents) cancers; 80% of clinicians did not change their surgical technique in relation to histological type of the tumour. Total thyroidectomy was more often recommended in most of the clinical or anatomical variations compared with the basic case repot. Pre- og postoperative hormonal therapy was initiated with L-T 4 and TSH suppression was controlled by sensitive-TSH and thyroblobulin determinations. After total thyroidectomy, 131 I was used with similar modalities for papillary and follicular cancers to ablate a thyroid remnant. (author)

  10. Optimal management of cancer anorexia–cachexia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M Argilés

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Josep M Argilés, Mireia Olivan, Sílvia Busquets, Francisco Javier López-SorianoDepartament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: According to a recent consensus, cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome associated with underlying illness and characterized by loss of muscle with or without loss of fat mass. The prominent clinical feature of cachexia is weight loss. Cachexia occurs in the majority of cancer patients before death and it is responsible for the deaths of 22% of cancer patients. Although bodyweight is the most important endpoint of any cachexia treatment, body composition, physical performance and quality of life should be monitored. From the results presented here, one can speculate that a single therapy may not be completely successful in the treatment of cachexia. From this point of view, treatments involving different combinations are more likely to be successful. The objectives of any therapeutic combination are two-fold: an anticatabolic aim directed towards both fat and muscle catabolism and an anabolic objective leading to the synthesis of macromolecules such as contractile proteins.Keywords: wasting, cancer, anorexia, nutraceuticals, drugs

  11. Positron emission tomography: a new paradigm in cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paez Gutierrez, Diana Isabel; De los Reyes, Amelia; Llamas Olier, Augusto

    2007-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is currently building a positron emission tomography facility that will house a cyclotron and a PET fusion scanner. lt should be operational as of december 2007, being a cancer dedicated national referral center, the NCI should provide both positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals and medical services to institutions and patients nationwide. PET technology provides metabolic information that has been documented to be useful in patient care. The properties of positron decay allow accurate imaging of the in vivo distribution of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. a wide array of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals has been used to characterize multiple physiologic and pathologic states. The major clinical PET applications are in cancer patients using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). FDG, an analogue of glucose, accumulates in most tumors in a greater amount than it does in normal tissue. PET is being used in diagnosis and follow-up of several malignancies, and the list of articles supporting its use continues to grow. in this article, the instrumentation aspects of PET are described and most of the clinical applications in oncology are described

  12. A systematic review of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies: management strategies and economic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S.B.; Pedersen, A.M.L.; Vissink, A.

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to assess the literature for management strategies and economic impact of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies and to determine the quality of evidence-based management recommendations. The electronic databases of MEDLINE/PubMed and E......This systematic review aimed to assess the literature for management strategies and economic impact of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies and to determine the quality of evidence-based management recommendations. The electronic databases of MEDLINE......, amifostine, muscarinic agonist stimulation, oral mucosal lubricants, acupuncture, and submandibular gland transfer. There is evidence that salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies can be prevented or symptoms be minimized to some degree, depending on the type of cancer treatment...... formulas, submandibular gland transfer, acupuncture, hyperbaric oxygen treatment, management strategies in pediatric cancer populations, and the economic consequences of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia...

  13. Care managers' views on death and caring for older cancer patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Miho; Kanai, Emi; Kitagawa, Akiko; Hattori, Keiko

    2013-12-01

    Care managers (CMs) have an important role in coordinating care for cancer patients who are in the end-of-life stage; however, little is known about their views of death and their experiences while caring for older cancer patients. This study was conducted to examine CMs' views of death and caring for older cancer patients in a home care setting in Japan. Convenience sampling was undertaken, and 35 offices from 43 approached services agreed to participate. The final valid sample included responses from 136 CMs (90.7%). Most CMs, including nurses, care workers, home helpers, and social workers in home care settings, experienced difficulty in managing the care of cancer patients in the end-of-life stage. Respondents reported a wide array of experiences with end-of-life care, care management, and seminar attendance, and their ages and Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scores were associated factors. Moreover, multiple regression analysis indicated that better attitudes toward caring for the dying were positively associated with seminar attendance. These results suggest that CMs need education about palliative and end-of-life care in order to promote good home care for cancer patients.

  14. Workload and time management in central cancer registries: baseline data and implication for registry staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Susan A; Mulvihill, Linda; Herrera, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    The Workload and Time Management Survey of Central Cancer Registries was conducted in 2011 to assess the amount of time spent on work activities usually performed by cancer registrars. A survey including 39 multi-item questions,together with a work activities data collection log, was sent by email to the central cancer registry (CCR) manager in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Twenty-four central cancer registries (47%) responded to the survey.Results indicate that registries faced reductions in budgeted staffing from 2008-2009. The number of source records and total cases were important indicators of workload. Four core activities, including abstracting at the registry, visual editing,case consolidation, and resolving edit reports, accounted for about half of registry workload. We estimate an average of 12.4 full-time equivalents (FTEs) are required to perform all cancer registration activities tracked by the survey; however,estimates vary widely by registry size. These findings may be useful for registries as a benchmark for their own registry workload and time-management data and to develop staffing guidelines.

  15. Managing the impact of posttreatment fatigue on the family: breast cancer survivors share their experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Julianne S; Bellin, Melissa H; Scarvalone, Susan; Appling, Sue; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2011-06-01

    With improvements in both early detection and treatments for breast cancer, the number of survivors has increased dramatically in recent decades. One of the most common lingering symptoms posttreatment for cancer survivors is chronic fatigue. Based on family stress theory and Rolland's typology of illness, this qualitative study extends our understanding of the impact of persistent posttreatment fatigue on families and how breast cancer survivors manage the family issues that arise because of this chronic stressor. Participants included 35 female survivors of breast cancer (mean age = 54 years) who experienced fatigue after the completion of active cancer treatment, with the exception of long-term hormonal therapy. Data were generated from (a) observations of group sessions from a randomized controlled fatigue intervention designed to reduce fatigue in breast cancer survivors, (b) individual in-depth interviews, and (c) family sessions. Qualitative analysis revealed two broad themes that illustrate how the survivors manage the impact of fatigue on their families: Interpreting the meaning of the fatigue and Dealing with the inability to perform family roles. Study findings describe the difficulties in family adaptation when the family is not able to assign a clear meaning to a chronic symptom posttreatment and build upon family stress theory by highlighting interrelationships among communication patterns and role shifts in the family system. ©2011 APA

  16. [Issues involving breast cancer management in Senegal: a cross-sectional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, Serigne Modou Kane; Gueye, Mamour; Coulbary, Sophie Aminata; Diouf, Alassane; Moreau, Jean Charles

    2016-01-01

    At a time when innovative therapies in breast cancer multiply, poorer countries such as Senegal are still lag far behind in the overall management of this type of cancer. In Senegal, although the treatment of advanced breast cancer is now well codified, survival and morbidity outcomes are still mediocre in view of diagnostic delays and of sometimes expensive and poorly tolerated mutilating treatments become necessary. With respect to advanced cancers, the challenges will lie in building of palliative care centres and in developing multidisciplinary approaches to improve quality of life and to support patients. On the other hand, with respect to preclinical or potentially curable cancers, the challenges are immense given the importance of early detection, localisation and diagnosis (stereotactic or ultrasound guided biopsy) but also of precision surgery and of complete resection (indexing - excision ensuring a margin of healthy tissue and specimen radiograph) while minimizing complications such as those of classic dissection (sentinel lymph node biopsy). Our health structures are not always prepared to achieve these goals. This is a situational analysis of the contextual obstacles that still exist and add a burden on the overall management of breast cancer in Senegal.

  17. Breast cancer diagnosis: biographical disruption, emotional experiences and strategic management in Thai women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Suwankhong, Dusanee

    2015-09-01

    In this article we draw on Bury's theory of biographical disruption to discuss the meanings of, and emotional experiences related to, being diagnosed with breast cancer among southern Thai women. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviewing and drawing methods, were used to collect data from 20 women with breast cancer. The women perceived breast cancer to be a rhok raai; an evil or dread disease. They believed that breast cancer would lead to death. The disruption in their biography occurred when they detected abnormalities indicating breast cancer. The women's narratives revealed their chaotic lives upon this diagnosis and the news precipitated in them shock, fear, anxiety and loss of hope. Although they experienced chaos and disruption, the women cultivated strategies that helped them cope with their experiences by accepting their fate and adhering to Buddhist beliefs and practices. Through their narratives of biographical disruption, the women in our study offer healthcare providers knowledge that could lead to an appreciation of their needs and concerns. This knowledge is crucial for health professionals who wish to provide emotional support to women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer in Thailand and elsewhere. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  18. Managing anemia with epoetin alfa in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velenik, V.; Oblak, I.; Kodre, V.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Anemia is one of the most challenging problems in clinical oncology due to its high prevalence among the patients with malignant diseases. The purposes of our study were: (1) to assess the potential of epoetin alfa therapy to prevent the decline in Hb concentrations that typically accompanies chemotherapy/ radiotherapy (ChT/RT) of the patients with rectal cancer; (2) to test the hypothesis that the use of epoetin alfa significantly reduces the transfusion requirements in the patients with rectal cancer treated with ChT/RT after surgery, and (3) to evaluate the safety profile of the administration of epoetin alfa in the clinical setting. Methods. Sixty patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled. Group A consisted of 39 patients with Hb concentrations ≤13 g/dl at the start of ChT/RT following surgery, and group B of 17 patients with Hb concentrations ≥13 g/dl at the start of ChT/RT following surgery, but whose Hb concentrations fell below 13 g/dl during the ChT/RT protocol. The starting dose of epoetin alfa in both groups was 10,000 IU subcutaneously (sc) three times a week (tiw). The following major parameters were evaluated: (1) change in Hb concentrations relative to the baseline as measured at 4-week intervals, (2) allogenic blood transfusion requirements in relation to Hb concentrations, and (3) incidence and severity of adverse events and their potential relationship to epoetin alfa administration. Results. The study protocol was completed in 56/60 patients. In group A, a statistically significant increase in Hb concentration (p<0.001) was observed after the first 4 weeks of epoetin alfa treatment compared to the baseline values, with the mean increase of Hb concentration of 1.97 g/dl ± 0.91 g/dl and Hb concentrations remained significantly increased through the whole study (p=0.0017). In group B, a continuous decrease in Hb concentrations was observed during the first weeks of therapy, reaching the level of

  19. Cost of Care for the Initial Management of Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercow, Alexandra S; Chen, Ling; Chatterjee, Sudeshna; Tergas, Ana I; Hou, June Y; Burke, William M; Ananth, Cande V; Neugut, Alfred I; Hershman, Dawn L; Wright, Jason D

    2017-12-01

    To examine the cost of care during the first year after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer, estimate the sources of cost, and explore the out-of-pocket costs. We performed a retrospective cohort study of women with ovarian cancer diagnosed from 2009 to 2012 who underwent both surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy using the Truven Health MarketScan database. This database is comprised of patients covered by commercial insurance sponsored by more than 100 employers in the United States. Medical expenditures, including physician reimbursement, for a 12-month period beginning on the date of surgery were estimated. All payments were examined, including out-of-pocket costs for patients. Payments were divided into expenditures for inpatient care, outpatient care (including chemotherapy), and outpatient drug costs. The 12-month treatment period was divided into three phases: surgery to 30 days (operative period), 1-6 months (adjuvant therapy), and 6-12 months after surgery. The primary outcome was the overall cost of care within the first year of diagnosis of ovarian cancer; secondary outcomes included assessment of factors associated with cost. A total of 26,548 women with ovarian cancer who underwent surgery were identified. After exclusion of patients with incomplete insurance enrollment or coverage, those who did not undergo chemotherapy, and those with capitated plans, our cohort consisted of 5,031 women. The median total medical expenditures per patient during the first year after the index procedure were $93,632 (interquartile range $62,319-140,140). Inpatient services accounted for $30,708 (interquartile range $20,102-51,107; 37.8%) in expenditures, outpatient services $52,700 (interquartile range $31,210-83,206; 58.3%), and outpatient drug costs $1,814 (interquartile range $603-4,402; 3.8%). The median out-of-pocket expense was $2,988 (interquartile range $1,649-5,088). This included $1,509 (interquartile range $705-2,878) for outpatient services, $589 (interquartile range

  20. Prevalence, putative mechanisms, and current management of sleep problems during chemotherapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palesh O

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxana Palesh,1 Luke Peppone,2 Pasquale F Innominato,3–5 Michelle Janelsins,2 Monica Jeong,1 Lisa Sprod,7 Josee Savard,6 Max Rotatori,1 Shelli Kesler,1 Melinda Telli,1 Karen Mustian21Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA; 3INSERM, UMRS 776, Biological Rhythms and Cancers, Villejuif, France; 4Faculty of Medicine, Universite Paris Sud, le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France; 5APHP, Chronotherapy Unit, Department of Oncology, Paul Brousse Hospital, Villejuif, France; 6Laval University, Quebec, Canada; 7University of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC, USAAbstract: Sleep problems are highly prevalent in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. This article reviews existing evidence on etiology, associated symptoms, and management of sleep problems associated with chemotherapy treatment during cancer. It also discusses limitations and methodological issues of current research. The existing literature suggests that subjectively and objectively measured sleep problems are the highest during the chemotherapy phase of cancer treatments. A possibly involved mechanism reviewed here includes the rise in the circulating proinflammatory cytokines and the associated disruption in circadian rhythm in the development and maintenance of sleep dysregulation in cancer patients during chemotherapy. Various approaches to the management of sleep problems during chemotherapy are discussed with behavioral intervention showing promise. Exercise, including yoga, also appear to be effective and safe at least for subclinical levels of sleep problems in cancer patients. Numerous challenges are associated with conducting research on sleep in cancer patients during chemotherapy treatments and they are discussed in this review. Dedicated intervention trials, methodologically sound and sufficiently powered, are needed to test current and novel treatments of sleep problems in cancer patients

  1. HYPNOSIS FOR SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P.; Gralow, Julie R.; Braden, Alan; Gertz, Kevin J.; Fann, Jesse R.; Syrjala, Karen L.

    2018-01-01

    Eight women who were in treatment for breast cancer (n = 4) or breast cancer survivors (n = 4), presenting with 1 or more of 4 symptoms (chronic pain, fatigue, hot flashes, and sleep difficulties), were given 4 to 5 sessions of self-hypnosis training for symptom management. Analyses revealed (a) significant pre- to posttreatment decreases in pain intensity, fatigue, and sleep problems and (b) that pain intensity continued to decrease from posttreatment to 6-month follow-up. Although there was a slight increase in fatigue severity and sleep problems from posttreatment to 6-month follow-up, the follow-up scores did not return to pretreatment levels. The findings provide initial support for using hypnosis to manage symptoms in women who are breast cancer survivors. Clinical trials evaluating hypnosis efficacy over and above other treatments are warranted. PMID:22443523

  2. Clinical guidelines for management of thyroid nodule and cancer during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofré, Juan Carlos; Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Alvarez-Escolá, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Special considerations are warranted in management of thyroid nodule and thyroid cancer during pregnancy. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach of thyroid nodules follows the standard practice in non-pregnant women. On the other hand, differentiated thyroid cancer management during pregnancy poses a number of challenges for the mother and fetus. The available data show that pregnancy is not a risk factor for thyroid cancer development or recurrence, although flare-ups cannot be completely ruled out in women with active disease. If surgery is needed, it should be performed during the second term or, preferably, after delivery. A majority of pregnant patients with low-risk disease only need adjustment in levothyroxine therapy. However, women with increased serum thyroglobulin levels before pregnancy or structural disease require regular thyroglobulin measurements and neck ultrasound throughout pregnancy. Pregnancy is an absolute contraindication for radioactive iodine administration. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Contemporary management of locally advanced rectal cancer: Resolving issues, controversies and shifting paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacion, Aeris Jane D; Park, Youn Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2018-02-01

    Advancements in rectal cancer treatment have resulted in improvement only in locoregional control and have failed to address distant relapse, which is the predominant mode of treatment failure in rectal cancer. As the efficacy of conventional chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) reaches a plateau, the need for alternative strategies in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) has grown in relevance. Several novel strategies have been conceptualized to address this issue, including: 1) neoadjuvant induction and consolidation chemotherapy before CRT; 2) neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone to avoid the sequelae of radiation; and 3) nonoperative management for patients who achieved pathological or clinical complete response after CRT. This article explores the issues, recent advances and paradigm shifts in the management of LARC and emphasizes the need for a personalized treatment plan for each patient based on tumor stage, location, gene expression and quality of life.

  4. Application of microvascular free osteocutaneous flaps in the management of post-radiation recurrent oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, I.B.; Manktelow, R.T.; Zuker, R.M.; Boyd, B.

    1985-01-01

    Fifty-nine patients underwent free flap osteocutaneous reconstruction that consisted of flaps of the dorsum of the foot in 26 patients and iliac crest flaps in 33 with a success rate of 92 percent and a mortality rate of 1.6 percent. These flaps, which require the expertise of microvascular surgeons, are time-consuming and complicate operating room and time management, but they represent a remarkable advance in reconstruction that can facilitate cosmetic and functional recovery of the patient. In particular, they promote healing in radiation-recurrent oral cancer and represent a definitive form of management for established radionecrosis of the mandible. The large volume of tissue available with iliac crest osteocutaneous grafts permits the management of patients with extensive cancer involving the skin, mucosa, and bone, but cancer control may still be disappointing and there is a need for improved adjuvant chemotherapy protocols. This technique appears to be a dependable, repeatable, and significant advance in management of the patient with head and neck cancer

  5. Information needs of cancer patients and survivors regarding diet, exercise and weight management: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James-Martin, G; Koczwara, B; Smith, E L; Miller, M D

    2014-05-01

    While advanced cancer is often associated with weight loss, curative cancer treatment is often associated with weight gain. Weight gain during treatment may be associated with greater risk of cancer recurrence and development of lifestyle diseases. Currently, limited resources are available to cancer patients focussed on weight control. This study assessed the information needs of patients undergoing curative chemotherapy regarding diet, exercise and weight management for the purpose of developing weight management resources. Focus groups were held with oncology practitioners, patients and survivors to determine current information provision and needs. Focus groups highlighted a perception that information provision regarding diet, exercise and weight management is insufficient and no routine assessment of weight occurs during chemotherapy. Barriers to information provision described included lack of resources and time, and practitioners' uncertainty regarding appropriate messages to provide. Patients wanted more information regarding diet, exercise and weight during treatment time. The findings of this study suggest an increase in provision of diet, exercise and weight management information is needed. This information should be evidence-based and delivered at an appropriate time by the preferred health care professional. It would also be beneficial to implement protocols regarding assessment of weight during treatment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Oncological Management and Pregnancy Outcomes in Women Diagnosed With Cancer During Pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verheecke, Magali; Van Calsteren, Kristel; Fruscio, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Aims The effect of the increased awareness of the potential to treat cancer during pregnancy is currently unknown. Therefore we aimed to analyse the oncological management and the obstetrical and neonatal outcomes of patients treated in the last 20 years by members of the International Network...

  7. Managing occupations in everyday life for people with advanced cancer at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Brandt, Åse; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    “Everyday life under change” and two sub-categories 1) Appling strategies to manage occupations in everyday life and 2) Preserving a meaningful everyday life. Significance: The findings suggest that people with advanced cancer, to a greater extent, should be supported in exploring familiar as well as new...

  8. Psychological and behavioural predictors of pain management outcomes in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the phenomenon of patient-related barriers to cancer pain management and address them more effectively in interventional studies, a theoretical model related to psychological aspects of pain experience and pain-related behaviours was elaborated. The aim of the study was to an......To better understand the phenomenon of patient-related barriers to cancer pain management and address them more effectively in interventional studies, a theoretical model related to psychological aspects of pain experience and pain-related behaviours was elaborated. The aim of the study...... was to analyse the impact of patient-related barriers on cancer pain management outcomes following this model. Thirty-three patients responded to the Brief Pain Inventory Pain scale, the Danish Barriers Questionnaire II (DBQ-II), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), the Danish version of Patient...... was explained by patients' emotional distress (symptoms of anxiety and depression) and that pain relief was explained by cognitive barriers. In conclusion, interventions in emotional distress and patients' concerns may supposedly result in better cancer pain management outcomes....

  9. Management of Liver Cancer Argon-helium Knife Therapy with Functional Computer Tomography Perfusion Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; Shu, Shengjie; Li, Jinping; Jiang, Huijie

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the change in blood perfusion of liver cancer following argon-helium knife treatment with functional computer tomography perfusion imaging. Twenty-seven patients with primary liver cancer treated with argon-helium knife and were included in this study. Plain computer tomography (CT) and computer tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging were conducted in all patients before and after treatment. Perfusion parameters including blood flows, blood volume, hepatic artery perfusion fraction, hepatic artery perfusion, and hepatic portal venous perfusion were used for evaluating therapeutic effect. All parameters in liver cancer were significantly decreased after argon-helium knife treatment (p knife therapy. Therefore, CTP imaging would play an important role for liver cancer management followed argon-helium knife therapy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Multi-agent systems: effective approach for cancer care information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2013-01-01

    Physicians, in order to study the causes of cancer, detect cancer earlier, prevent or determine the effectiveness of treatment, and specify the reasons for the treatment ineffectiveness, need to access accurate, comprehensive, and timely cancer data. The cancer care environment has become more complex because of the need for coordination and communication among health care professionals with different skills in a variety of roles and the existence of large amounts of data with various formats. The goals of health care systems in such a complex environment are correct health data management, providing appropriate information needs of users to enhance the integrity and quality of health care, timely access to accurate information and reducing medical errors. These roles in new systems with use of agents efficiently perform well. Because of the potential capability of agent systems to solve complex and dynamic health problems, health care system, in order to gain full advantage of E- health, steps must be taken to make use of this technology. Multi-agent systems have effective roles in health service quality improvement especially in telemedicine, emergency situations and management of chronic diseases such as cancer. In the design and implementation of agent based systems, planning items such as information confidentiality and privacy, architecture, communication standards, ethical and legal aspects, identification opportunities and barriers should be considered. It should be noted that usage of agent systems only with a technical view is associated with many problems such as lack of user acceptance. The aim of this commentary is to survey applications, opportunities and barriers of this new artificial intelligence tool for cancer care information as an approach to improve cancer care management.

  11. Symptom management strategies for men with early-stage prostate cancer: results from the Prostate Cancer Patient Education Program (PC PEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Alok; Kowalkowski, Marc A; Hart, Tae; Goltz, Heather Honoré; Hoffman, David J; Knight, Sara J; Caroll, Peter R; Latini, David M

    2013-12-01

    While the literature on prostate cancer health-related quality of life has grown extensively, little is known about symptom management strategies used by men to manage treatment-related side effects and the effectiveness of those strategies. We collected 628 symptom management reports from 98 men treated for localized prostate cancer. Participants were recruited from email lists and a prostate cancer clinic in Northern California. Data were collected using the Critical Incident Technique. Symptom management reports were assigned to categories of urinary, sexual, bowel, mental health, systemic, or "other." We calculated descriptive statistics by symptom type and management strategy effectiveness. The most common symptoms were urinary (26 %) and sexual (23 %). Participants' symptom management strategies varied widely, from medical and surgical interventions (20 %) to behavioral strategies (11 %) to diet and lifestyle interventions (12 %). The effectiveness of symptom management strategies varied, with sexual symptoms being managed effectively only 47 % of the time to mental health symptom management strategies considered effective 89 % of the time. Doing nothing was a commonly reported (15 %) response to symptoms and was effective only 14 % of the time. Men report the least effectiveness in symptom management for sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment. Including men's experience with managing treatment side effects may be an important way to improve survivorship programs and make them more acceptable to men. More work is needed to find out why men frequently do nothing in response to symptoms when effective solutions exist and how providers can successfully engage such men.

  12. Potential of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics for management of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Maya; Ambalam, Padma; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Pithva, Sheetal; Kothari, Charmy; Patel, Arti T.; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Dave, J.M.; Vyas, B.R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and is the fourth most common malignant neoplasm in USA. Escaping apoptosis and cell mutation are the prime hallmarks of cancer. It is apparent that balancing the network between DNA damage and DNA repair is critical in preventing carcinogenesis. One-third of cancers might be prevented by nutritious healthy diet, maintaining healthy weight and physical activity. In this review, an attempt is made to abridge the role of carcinogen in colorectal cancer establishment and prognosis, where special attention has been paid to food-borne mutagens and functional role of beneficial human gut microbiome in evading cancer. Further the significance of tailor-made prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics in cancer management by bio-antimutagenic and desmutagenic activity has been elaborated. Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host. Prebiotics are a selectively fermentable non-digestible oligosaccharide or ingredient that brings specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microflora, conferring health benefits. Synbiotics are a combination of probiotic bacteria and the growth promoting prebiotic ingredients that purport “synergism.” PMID:23511582

  13. Managing fatigue after cancer treatment: development of RESTORE, a web-based resource to support self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C; Calman, L; Grimmett, C; Breckons, M; Cotterell, P; Yardley, L; Joseph, J; Hughes, S; Jones, R; Leonidou, C; Armes, J; Batehup, L; Corner, J; Fenlon, D; Lennan, E; Morris, C; Neylon, A; Ream, E; Turner, L; Richardson, A

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to co-create an evidence-based and theoretically informed web-based intervention (RESTORE) designed to enhance self-efficacy to live with cancer-related fatigue (CRF) following primary cancer treatment. A nine-step process informed the development of the intervention: (1) review of empirical literature; (2) review of existing patient resources; (3) establish theoretical framework; (4) establish design team with expertise in web-based interventions, CRF and people affected by cancer; (5) develop prototype intervention; (6) user testing phase 1; (7) refinement of prototype; (8) user testing phase 2; and (9) develop final intervention. Key stakeholders made a critical contribution at every step of intervention development, and user testing, which involved an iterative process and resulted in the final intervention. The RESTORE intervention has five sessions; sessions 1 and 2 include an introduction to CRF and goal setting. Sessions 3-5 can be tailored to user preference and are designed to cover areas of life where CRF may have an impact: home and work life, personal relationships and emotional adjustment. It is feasible to systematically 'co-create' an evidence-based and theory-driven web-based self-management intervention to support cancer survivors living with the consequences of cancer and its treatment. This is the first account of the development of a web-based intervention to support self-efficacy to manage CRF. An exploratory trial to test the feasibility and acceptability of RESTORE is now warranted. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Surgical management for early-stage bilateral breast cancer patients in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-jian Chen

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the current surgical management strategy for bilateral breast cancer (BBC patients and to assess the changes in this strategy in China.This is a retrospective review of all patients with early-stage BBC who underwent surgical treatment at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center between June 2007 and June 2014.A total of 15,337 patients with primary breast cancer were identified. Of these patients, 218 (1.5% suffered from synchronous bilateral breast cancer (sBBC, and 296 (2.0% suffered from metachronous bilateral breast cancer (mBBC. Patients with a lobular carcinoma component, those with estrogen receptor-positive cancer, and those with an accompanying sclerosing adenosis in the affected breast tended to develop BBC. The rates of bilateral mastectomy, breast conserving therapy, reconstruction, and combined surgeries were 86.2%, 6.4%, 3.7%, and 3.7%, respectively, for patients with sBBC and 81.1%, 4.4%, 3.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, for patients with mBBC. The interval between bilateral cancers, age at first diagnosis of breast cancer, histopathological type, and stage have significant impacts on the choice of surgery for patients with BBC.Bilateral mastectomy was the dominant surgical management for patients with BBC in China, despite the increased application of breast reconstruction surgery observed in recent years. Bilateral prosthetic breast reconstruction was the ideal choice for patients with sBBC. Chinese surgeons should take responsibility for patient education and inform their patients about their surgical options.

  15. Effectiveness of knowledge translation interventions to improve cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Greta G; Olivo, Susan Armijo; Biondo, Patricia D; Stiles, Carla R; Yurtseven, Ozden; Fainsinger, Robin L; Hagen, Neil A

    2011-05-01

    Cancer pain is prevalent, yet patients do not receive best care despite widely available evidence. Although national cancer control policies call for education, effectiveness of such programs is unclear and best practices are not well defined. To examine existing evidence on whether knowledge translation (KT) interventions targeting health care providers, patients, and caregivers improve cancer pain outcomes. A systematic review and meta-analysis were undertaken to evaluate primary studies that examined effects of KT interventions on providers and patients. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. Five studies reported interventions targeting health care providers, four focused on patients or their families, one study examined patients and their significant others, and 16 studies examined patients only. Seven quantitative comparisons measured the statistical effects of interventions. A significant difference favoring the treatment group in least pain intensity (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.44, 1.42) and in usual pain/average pain (95% CI: 0.13, 0.74) was observed. No other statistical differences were observed. However, most studies were assessed as having high risk of bias and failed to report sufficient information about the intervention dose, quality of educational material, fidelity, and other key factors required to evaluate effectiveness of intervention design. Trials that used a higher dose of KT intervention (characterized by extensive follow-up, comprehensive educational program, and higher resource allocation) were significantly more likely to have positive results than trials that did not use this approach. Further attention to methodological issues to improve educational interventions and research to clarify factors that lead to better pain control are urgently needed. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High risk bladder cancer: current management and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Leliveld

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the pattern of care in patients with high risk non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC in the Comprehensive Cancer Center North-Netherlands (CCCN and to assess factors associated with the choice of treatment, recurrence and progression free survival rates. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 412 patients with newly diagnosed high risk NMIBC. Clinical, demographic and follow-up data were obtained from the CCCN Cancer Registry and a detailed medical record review. Uni and multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors related to choice of treatment and 5 year recurrence and progression free survival. RESULTS: 74/412 (18% patients with high risk NMIBC underwent a transurethral resection (TUR as single treatment. Adjuvant treatment after TUR was performed in 90.7% of the patients treated in teaching hospitals versus 71.8 % in non-teaching hospitals (p 80 years OR 0.1 p = 0.001 and treatment in non-teaching hospitals (OR 0.25; p < 0.001 were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. Tumor recurrence occurred in 191/392 (49% and progression in 84 /392 (21.4% patients. The mean 5-years progression free survival was 71.6% (95% CI 65.5-76.8. CONCLUSION: In this pattern of care study in high risk NMIBC, 18% of the patients were treated with TUR as single treatment. Age and treatment in non-teaching hospitals were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. None of the variables sex, age, comorbidity, hospital type, stage and year of treatment was associated with 5 year recurrence or progression rates.

  17. A systematic review of dental disease management in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Catherine H L; Hu, Shijia; Haverman, Thijs

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This systematic review aims to update on the prevalence of odontogenic-related infections and the efficacy of dental strategies in preventing dental-related complications in cancer patients since the 2010 systematic review. REVIEW METHOD: A literature search was conducted in the dat....../treatment protocols. The use of chlorhexidine, fluoride mouth rinses as well as composite resin, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GIC), and amalgam restorations over conventional GIC in post head and neck radiation patients who are compliant fluoride users is recommended....

  18. International Cancer of the Pancreas Screening (CAPS) Consortium summit on the management of patients with increased risk for familial pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canto, Marcia Irene; Harinck, Femme; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Poley, Jan-Werner; Kamel, Ihab; Nio, Yung; Schulick, Richard S.; Bassi, Claudio; Kluijt, Irma; Levy, Michael J.; Chak, Amitabh; Fockens, Paul; Goggins, Michael; Bruno, Marco; Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio; Bartsch, Detlef; Biermann, Katharina; Brentnall, Terri; Dite, Petr; Donahue, Timothy; Early, Dayna; Farrell, James; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Frucht, Harold; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Geurts, Jenny; Hamell, Pascal; Iglesias-Garcia, Julio; Klein, Alison; Kloeppel, Guenter; Lachter, Jesse; Langer, Peter; Lee, Jeffrey; Levy, Michael; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Margolis, Daniel; Ohtsuka, Takao; Olson, Sara; Petersen, Gloria; Savides, Thomas; Syngal, Sapna; Tamm, Eric; Tanaka, Masao; Vasen, Hans; Wagner, Anja; Wang, Huamin; Williams, David; Yamao, Kenjii

    2013-01-01

    Screening individuals at increased risk for pancreatic cancer (PC) detects early, potentially curable, pancreatic neoplasia. To develop consortium statements on screening, surveillance and management of high-risk individuals with an inherited predisposition to PC. A 49-expert multidisciplinary

  19. Targeting autophagy in cancer management – strategies and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozpolat, Bulent; Benbrook, Doris M

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process involving lysosomal degradation of intracellular components, damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and toxic aggregates, reducing oxidative stress and protecting cells from damage. The process is also induced in response to various conditions, including nutrient deprivation, metabolic stress, hypoxia, anticancer therapeutics, and radiation therapy to adapt cellular conditions for survival. Autophagy can function as a tumor suppressor mechanism in normal cells and dysregulation of this process (ie, monoallelic Beclin-1 deletion) may lead to malignant transformation and carcinogenesis. In tumors, autophagy is thought to promote tumor growth and progression by helping cells to adapt and survive in metabolically-challenged and harsh tumor microenvironments (ie, hypoxia and acidity). Recent in vitro and in vivo studies in preclinical models suggested that modulation of autophagy can be used as a therapeutic modality to enhance the efficacy of conventional therapies, including chemo and radiation therapy. Currently, more than 30 clinical trials are investigating the effects of autophagy inhibition in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted agents in various cancers. In this review, we will discuss the role, molecular mechanism, and regulation of autophagy, while targeting this process as a novel therapeutic modality, in various cancers

  20. PREVALENCE, MECHANISMS, AND MANAGEMENT OF CANCER-RELATED COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janelsins, Michelle C.; Kesler, Shelli R.; Ahles, Tim A.; Morrow, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the current literature on cancer-related cognitive impairment (CRCI) with a focus on prevalence, mechanisms, and possible interventions for CRCI in those who receive adjuvant chemotherapy for non-central nervous system tumors and is primarily focused on breast cancer. CRCI is characterized as deficits in areas of cognition including memory, attention, concentration, and executive function. Development of CRCI can impair quality of life and impact treatment decisions. CRCI is highly prevalent; these problems can be detected in up to 30% of patients prior to chemotherapy; up to 75% of patients report some form of CRCI during treatment, and CRCI is still present in up to 35% of patients many years following completion of treatment. While the trajectory of CRCI is becoming better understood, the mechanisms underlying the development of CRCI are still obscure; however, host characteristics, immune dysfunction, neural toxicity, and genetics may play key roles in the development and trajectory of CRCI. Intervention research is limited, though strategies to maintain function are being studied with promising preliminary findings. This review highlights key research being conducted in these areas, both in patient populations and in animals, which will ultimately result in better understanding and effective treatments for CRCI. PMID:24716504

  1. Positron emission tomography in the management of cervix cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonardel, G.; Gontier, E.; Soret, M.; Dechaud, C.; Fayolle, M.; Foehrenbach, H.; Chargari, C.; Bauduceau, O.

    2009-01-01

    Since its introduction in clinical practice in the 1990 s, positron emission tomography (PET), usually with 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-F.D.G.), has become an important imaging modality in patients with cancer. For cervix carcinoma, F.D.G.-PET is significantly more accurate than computed tomography (CT) and is recommended for loco-regional lymph node and extra pelvic staging. The metabolic dimension of the technique provides additional prognostic information. Ongoing studies now concentrate on more advanced clinical applications, such as the planning of radiotherapy, the response evaluation after the induction of therapy, the early detection of recurrence. Technical innovations, such as PET cameras with better spatial resolution and hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT), available now on the whole territory, provide both anatomic and metabolic information in the same procedure. From the point of view of biological metabolism, new radiopharmaceutical probes are being developed. Those hold promise for future refinements in this field. This article reviews the current applications of F.D.G.-PET in patients with cervix cancer. (authors)

  2. Rectum. Strategy for management of cancer of the rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, W.D.; Chenery, S.A.G.; Hawkins, N.V.; Cummings, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    Cancer of the rectum, with few exceptions, has in the past been treated surgically, with results which are now being questioned and with results which have demonstrated that there has been no improvement in the past 40 years. The concept that curative irradiation might be a real challenge to surgery is of very recent origin. Thus the pattern of referral to the Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) has, in the past, been restricted to those patients considered unsuitable for surgery for one reason or another. The most common reason for referral to PMH has been ''inoperability''. Patients unfortunate enough to be diagnosed with surgically inoperable cancers are in the main, those with tumours which have already invaded pelvic structures, making surgical excision impossible. Another group of patients are those with associated medical conditions and of an age which would make a very large operation hazardous. These two groups can be considered to be technically inoperable and technically operable; the former group is younger (median age 66) than the latter (median age 72). The prognosis is much better in the older ''technically operable'' group, and it appears from preliminary studies that the results of irradiation are probably as good as surgery

  3. Principles of management of recurrence of breast cancer after tamoxifen therapy (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool, I.

    1999-01-01

    The management of recurrence of breast cancer after Tamoxifen therapy needs special attention. The recurrence can be local or distant. The patient, should be thoroughly investigated to find out exact sites of recurrences. Local recurrence is managed by excision, skin grafting or various types of flaps. If extensive radiation is administrated or if not given previously. The distant recurrence in patients who have had adjuvant menopausal status, sites of recurrence while life threatening or not and previous response. The patients who are post menopausal have responded to previous Tamoxifen therapy, long DFI and soft tissues and bony metastasis are best managed by Aromatase inhibitors i.e. Letrozole. (author)

  4. Management of recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piran, Siavash; Schulman, Sam

    2018-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs in 10-20%% of patients with cancer and is associated with significant mortality and morbidity in these patients. The current standard of care recommended by international guidelines is to use low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for 6months for the management of cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), which is based on evidence from randomized controlled trials demonstrating that LMWH significantly reduced the risk of recurrent VTE compared with vitamin K antagonists. However, patients with CAT have a high risk of VTE recurrence of up to 20% despite receiving anticoagulation. Reasons for recurrent VTE may include non-compliance, temporary cessation of therapy due to bleeding or for procedures, inadequate dosing, cancer progression, and the presence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Management of patients with CAT and recurrent VTE is not well defined. Management strategies for recurrent VTE include switching to LMWH if an oral anticoagulant is employed, dose escalation of LMWH, or as a last resort option consider insertion of a vena cava filter. In this review, we discuss the acute, long-term, and extended management of CAT, risk factors for recurrent VTE, and management of recurrent VTE. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 2014 Korean Liver Cancer Study Group-National Cancer Center Korea Practice Guideline for the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The guideline for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was first developed in 2003 and revised in 2009 by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group and the National Cancer Center, Korea. Since then, many studies on HCC have been carried out in Korea and other countries. In particular, a substantial body of knowledge has been accumulated on diagnosis, staging, and treatment specific to Asian characteristics, especially Koreans, prompting the proposal of new strategies. Accordingly, the new guideline presented herein was developed on the basis of recent evidence and expert opinions. The primary targets of this guideline are patients with suspicious or newly diagnosed HCC. This guideline provides recommendations for the initial treatment of patients with newly diagnosed HCC. PMID:25995680

  6. Real-Time Motion Management of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Tobias

    of this thesis is to manage prostate motion in real-time by aligning the radiation beam to the prostate using the novel dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking method. Specifically, the delivered dose with tracking was compared to the planned dose, and the impact of treatment plan complexity and limitations...

  7. Usefulness of 18FDG PET in the management of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belhocine, T.; Rigo, P.

    2002-01-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the second most common gynaecological cancer worldwide. Despite substantial advances in screening the pre-invasive forms, the management of women suffering from invasive cervical carcinomas remains problematic. In pre-treatment staging, the evaluation of the loco-regional and distant extent of the disease, according to the international federation of gynecology and obstetrics, has shown to be sub-optimal. After treatment, the routine surveillance protocol, based on a physical examination at the control visits and clinically oriented conventional imaging procedures, most often fails to accurately detect a recurrent disease. Its sensitivity is particularly low for asymptomatic women. On the other hand, the clinical value of positron emission tomography using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose in the field of oncology is nowadays firmly established. In many tumour types, including the gynaecological cancers such as breast cancer and ovarian cancer, the metabolic imaging has proved to play a determinant role in both the pre-treatment and post-treatment evaluation. In the present review-article, we analyse in the light of the literature data and our experience, the potential contribution of positron emission tomography using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose in the management of cervical cancer. (authors)

  8. Contemporary management of voice and swallowing disorders in patients with advanced lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Grainne C; Carding, Paul N; Bhosle, Jaishree; Roe, Justin W G

    2015-06-01

    Advanced lung cancer can cause changes to swallowing and communication function. Direct tumour invasion, dyspnoea and deconditioning can all impact on swallowing function and communication. Cancer treatment, if administered, may cause or compound symptoms. In this study, the nature of swallowing and communication difficulties in patients with advanced lung cancer will be discussed, and management options including medical management, speech and language therapy (SLT) intervention, and surgical interventions will be considered. Advanced lung cancer can result in voice and swallowing difficulties, which can increase symptom burden and significantly impact on quality of life (QOL). There is a growing evidence base to support the use of injection laryngoplasty under local anaesthetic to offer immediate improvement in voice, swallowing and overall QOL. There is limited literature on the nature and extent of voice and swallowing impairment in patients with lung cancer. Well designed studies with robust and sensitive multidimensional dysphagia and dysphonia assessments are required. Outcome studies examining interventions with clearly defined treatment goals are required. These studies should include both functional and patient-reported outcome measures to develop the evidence base and to ensure that interventions are both timely and appropriate.

  9. Conservative management of anal and rectal cancer. The role of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerard, J.P.; Romestaing, P.; Montbarbon, X. (Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France). Dept. of Radiotherapy)

    1989-01-01

    The role of irradiation in the management of anal and rectal cancer has changed during the past ten years. In small epidermoid carcinomas of the anal canal (T1 T2) irradiation is in most departments considered the primary treatment, giving a 5-year survival rate of between 60 and 80% with good sphincter preservation. Even in larger tumors, irradiation can still offer some chance of cure without colostomy. Surgery remains the basic treatment of rectal cancer but irradiation is used in association with surgery in many cases. Radiotherapy is of value in the conservative management of cancer of the rectum in three situations: In small polypoid cancers contact X-ray therapy can give local control in about 90%. In cancers of the middle rectum, preoperative external irradiation may increase the chances of restorative surgery and reduce the risk of local relapse. In inoperable patients, external radiotherapy and/or intracavitary irradiation may cure some patients with infiltrating tumors (T2 T3) without colostomy. (orig.).

  10. Parents' Voice in Managing the Pain of Children with Cancer during Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariyana, Rina; Allenidekania, Allenidekania; Nurhaeni, Nani

    2018-01-01

    Pain experienced by children can adversely affect their growth and development. Pain is a major health problem for cancer patients and remains an unresolved problem. To know how the experiences of mothers managing their children's pain during palliative care following cancer diagnosis. Pain experienced by children can adversely affect their growth and development. Using qualitative methods within a descriptive phenomenological approach, in-depth interviews were conducted with parents (mostly mothers) of eight children diagnosed with cancer. The data were collected using the snowball sampling method. Participants experienced in managing the pain of children with cancer. Analysis of the results identified 8 themes: the dimensions of pain experienced by children undergoing palliative care; mothers' physical and psychological responses; mothers' emotional responses; barriers encountered by mothers when taking care of their child at home; mothers' interventions to reduce their child's pain; mothers' efforts to distract their child from pain; giving encouragement when the child is in pain; and mothers' efforts and prayers to make their child comfort. It can be concluded that the child's pain is the main cause of mothers' stress and pressure and also affects the daily lives of mothers and children. Along with the most effective intervention, nurses need to provide mothers and children with adequate information about cancer pain.

  11. Parents' voice in managing the pain of children with cancer during palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Mariyana

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pain experienced by children can adversely affect their growth and development. Pain is a major health problem for cancer patients and remains an unresolved problem.Aim: To know how the experiences of mothers managing their children's pain during palliative care following cancer diagnosis.Background: Pain experienced by children can adversely affect their growth and development.Subject and Methods: Using qualitative methods within a descriptive phenomenological approach, in-depth interviews were conducted with parents (mostly mothers of eight children diagnosed with cancer. The data were collected using the snowball sampling method.Results: Participants experienced in managing the pain of children with cancer. Analysis of the results identified 8 themes: the dimensions of pain experienced by children undergoing palliative care; mothers' physical and psychological responses; mothers' emotional responses; barriers encountered by mothers when taking care of their child at home; mothers' interventions to reduce their child's pain; mothers' efforts to distract their child from pain; giving encouragement when the child is in pain; and mothers' efforts and prayers to make their child comfort.Conclusion: It can be concluded that the child's pain is the main cause of mothers' stress and pressure and also affects the daily lives of mothers and children. Along with the most effective intervention, nurses need to provide mothers and children with adequate information about cancer pain.

  12. Kinesiology taping as an adjunct for pain management in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Gourav; Rebanks, Jonathan; Briggs, Michelle; Johnson, Mark I

    2016-07-14

    We present the case of a 46-year-old woman who developed severe pain described as 'tearing' and 'searing' in the left side of the mid-trapezius region near the thoracic 8 vertebra (T8). The patient had undergone surgery for T8 fracture which had resulted from metastasis (secondary breast cancer). A community nurse referred the patient for physiotherapy assessment and treatment for her musculoskeletal pain and related symptoms that had affected her mobility and functional activities. The patient was treated with soft tissue therapy with the addition of kinesiology taping on follow-up visits. Kinesiology tape was applied over her left side trapezius region and left shoulder. The patient reported significant reductions in pain severity and felt greater control and stability over her left shoulder region, which resulted in better function and overall quality of life measures. She did not report any adverse effects. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Management of non-small cell lung cancer with oligometastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaruz, Liza C; Kubicek, Gregory J; Socinski, Mark A

    2012-08-01

    Patients with oligometastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) present a potential opportunity for curative therapy; however, the challenge remains the definitive treatment of their localized disease and ablation of their limited overt metastatic sites of disease. In selecting patients with oligometastatic NSCLC for definitive therapy, proper staging through radiographic studies, including PET and brain MRI, and the pathologic staging of the mediastinal lymph nodes and potential sites of metastatic disease, are critical. With that in mind, the available literature suggests that in highly selected patients with solitary metastases to the brain, adrenals and other organs, long term survival may be achieved with combined definitive therapy of both the primary lung tumor and the solitary metastatic site.

  14. Valvular Heart Disease in Cancer Patients: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Merrill H; Jahangir, Eiman; Polin, Nichole M

    2017-07-01

    Cardiac valvular disease as consequence of radiation and chemotherapy during treatment for malignancy is growing in its awareness. While the overwhelming emphasis in this population has been on the monitoring and preservation of left ventricular systolic function, we are now developing a greater appreciation for the plethora of cardiac sequelae beyond this basic model. To this end many institutions across the country have developed cardio-oncology programs, which are collaborative practices between oncologists and cardiologists in order to minimize a patient's cardiovascular risk while allowing them to receive the necessary treatment for their cancer. These programs also help to recognize early nuanced treatment complications such as valvular heart disease, and provide consultation for the most appropriate course of action. In this article we will discuss the etiology, prevalence, diagnosis, and current treatment options of valvular heart disease as the result of chemotherapy and radiation.

  15. Real-Time Motion Management of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Tobias

    , and for prostate cancer treatments, the proximity of the bladder and rectum makes radiotherapy treatment of this site a challenging task. Furthermore, the prostate may move during the radiation delivery and treatment margins are necessary to ensure that it is still receiving the intended dose. The main aim...... of the MLC on the performance of DMLC tracking were investigated. We found that for prostate motion, the main tracking error arose from the finite leaf width affecting the MLCs ability to construct the desired shape. Furthermore, we also attempted to model prostate motion using a random walk model. We found...... that for the slow and drifting motion, the model could satisfactory replicate the motion of the prostate, while the rapid and transient prostate motion observed in some cases was challenging for the model. We therefore added simulated transient motion to the random walk model, which slightly improved the results...

  16. Endoscopic Management of Tumor Bleeding from Inoperable Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Il

    2015-01-01

    Tumor bleeding is not a rare complication in patients with inoperable gastric cancer. Endoscopy has important roles in the diagnosis and primary treatment of tumor bleeding, similar to its roles in other non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases. Although limited studies have been performed, endoscopic therapy has been highly successful in achieving initial hemostasis. One or a combination of endoscopic therapy modalities, such as injection therapy, mechanical therapy, or ablative therapy, can be used for hemostasis in patients with endoscopic stigmata of recent hemorrhage. However, rebleeding after successful hemostasis with endoscopic therapy frequently occurs. Endoscopic therapy may be a treatment option for successfully controlling this rebleeding. Transarterial embolization or palliative surgery should be considered when endoscopic therapy fails. For primary and secondary prevention of tumor bleeding, proton pump inhibitors can be prescribed, although their effectiveness to prevent bleeding remains to be investigated. PMID:25844339

  17. Contemporary management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall’Era, Marc A; Cheng, Liang; Pan, Chong-Xian

    2012-01-01

    The current standard treatment for muscle-invasive nonmetastatic bladder cancer is neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy. However, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is not widely accepted even with level 1 evidence. Adjuvant chemotherapy should be discussed if patients have not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery and have high-risk pathologic features. Although not considered standard of care, bladder-sparing therapy can be considered for highly selected patients and for those medically unfit for surgery. Even though there are no level 1 data, the treatment outcomes for highly select patients given bladder-sparing therapy appear promising, with many patients retaining a functional bladder. Personalized chemotherapy is currently being actively pursued to target the underlying molecular changes and tailor to individual needs. PMID:22845409

  18. Ginger augmented chemotherapy: A novel multitarget nontoxic approach for cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Roopali; Rida, Padmashree C G; Kucuk, Omer; Aneja, Ritu

    2016-06-01

    Cancer, referred to as the 'disease of civilization', continues to haunt humanity due to its dreadful manifestations and limited success of therapeutic interventions such as chemotherapy in curing the disease. Although effective, chemotherapy has repeatedly demonstrated inadequacy in disease management due to its debilitating side effects arising from its deleterious nonspecific effects on normal healthy cells. In addition, development of chemoresistance due to mono-targeting often results in cessation of chemotherapy. This urgently demands development and implementation of multitargeted alternative therapies with mild or no side effects. One extremely promising strategy that yet remains untapped in the clinic is augmenting chemotherapy with dietary phytochemicals or extracts. Ginger, depository of numerous bioactive molecules, not only targets cancer cells but can also mitigate chemotherapy-associated side effects. Consequently, combination therapy involving ginger extract and chemotherapeutic agents may offer the advantage of being efficacious with reduced toxicity. Here we discuss the remarkable and often overlooked potential of ginger extract to manage cancer, the possibility of developing ginger-based combinational therapies, and the major roadblocks along with strategies to overcome them in clinical translation of such inventions. We are optimistic that clinical implementation of such combination regimens would be a much sought after modality in cancer management. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, V.; Aristei, C.; Glimelius, B.; Minsky, B.D.; Beets-Tan, R.G.; Borras, J.M.; Haustermans, K.; Maingon, P.; Overgaard, J.; Pahlman, L.; Quirke, P.; Schmoll, H.J.; Sebag-Montefiore, D.; Taylor, I.; Cutsem, E. van; Velde, C. van de; Cellini, N.; Latini, P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: During the first decade of the 21st century a number of important European randomized studies were published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence from the literature, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer

  20. [Therapeutic education in oncology: involving patient in the management of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérol, David; Toutenu, Pauline; Lefranc, Anne; Régnier, Véronique; Chvetzoff, Gisèle; Saltel, Pierre; Chauvin, Franck

    2007-03-01

    The notion of therapeutic education was only recently introduced in cancer. Although the term is commonly used, no standard definition exists for the concept and principles of therapeutic education and its efficacy remains to be assessed. Therapeutic education is complementary to the healthcare approach and aims to get the patients more involved in their disease and the treatment decision-making process. This discipline, placed at the interface of human and social sciences, was first developed for the management of chronic diseases (diabetes, asthma). It derives from the principle that involving patients in their own care and management can help them better adjust to life with a chronic disease. The lengthening survival time of cancer patients, which contributes to making cancer a chronic disease, as well as changes in the patient-caregiver relationship contribute to the development of therapeutic education in cancer. Pilot studies, conducted principally in the United States, evaluating the side effects of chemotherapy and the management of pain, have demonstrated that such educational programs could improve patient quality of life and decrease the side effects of treatments. The success of these programs depends on several parameters: taking into account patient's opinion in the elaboration and preparation of the programs; involving skilled multidisciplinary teams engaged in iterative educational actions; having recourse to methodological tools to evaluate the impact of implemented programs. Consistent with the World Health Organization guidelines, research should be conducted in France in order to elaborate and implement cancer-specific education programs and evaluate their potential benefit. Patient education programs on pain, fatigue, nutrition and treatment compliance are currently being developed at Saint-Etienne Regional Resource Centre for cancer information, prevention and education, within the framework of the Canceropole Lyon Auvergne Rhône-Alpes.

  1. Difficulties encountered managing nodules detected during a computed tomography lung cancer screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Giulia; Bellomi, Massimo; Scanagatta, Paolo; Preda, Lorenzo; Rampinelli, Cristiano; Guarize, Juliana; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Leo, Francesco; Solli, Piergiorgio; Masullo, Michele; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2008-09-01

    The main challenge of screening a healthy population with low-dose computed tomography is to balance the excessive use of diagnostic procedures with the risk of delayed cancer detection. We evaluated the pitfalls, difficulties, and sources of mistakes in the management of lung nodules detected in volunteers in the Cosmos single-center screening trial. A total of 5201 asymptomatic high-risk volunteers underwent screening with multidetector low-dose computed tomography. Nodules detected at baseline or new nodules at annual screening received repeat low-dose computed tomography at 1 year if less than 5 mm, repeat low-dose computed tomography 3 to 6 months later if between 5 and 8 mm, and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography if more than 8 mm. Growing nodules at the annual screening received low-dose computed tomography at 6 months and computed tomography-positron emission tomography or surgical biopsy according to doubling time, type, and size. During the first year of screening, 106 patients underwent lung biopsy and 91 lung cancers were identified (70% were stage I). Diagnosis was delayed (false-negative) in 6 patients (stage IIB in 1 patient, stage IIIA in 3 patients, and stage IV in 2 patients), including 2 small cell cancers and 1 central lesion. Surgical biopsy revealed benign disease (false-positives) in 15 cases (14%). Positron emission tomography sensitivity was 88% for prevalent cancers and 70% for cancers diagnosed after first annual screening. No needle biopsy procedures were performed in this cohort of patients. Low-dose computed tomography screening is effective for the early detection of lung cancers, but nodule management remains a challenge. Computed tomography-positron emission tomography is useful at baseline, but its sensitivity decreases significantly the subsequent year. Multidisciplinary management and experience are crucial for minimizing misdiagnoses.

  2. Management of chyle leakage after thyroidectomy, cervical lymph node dissection, in patients with thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Inhye; Her, Nayoon; Choe, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jee Soo; Kim, Jung-Han

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence and pattern of chyle leakage after thyroidectomy and/or cervical lymph node dissection and to establish management protocols for chyle leakage. Patients who underwent surgical management for thyroid cancer were analyzed retrospectively. For this study, 131 patients with chyle leakage were identified; the overall incidence was 0.9%. Of them, 43.7% of patients underwent central neck dissection without lateral neck dissection, and chyle leakage was easily controlled with conservative management. Patients whose chyle drainage was reduced by >50% after dietary modification had a significantly shorter hospital stay (P leakage after central compartment dissection even without lateral neck dissection was not rare, but was easily controlled with conservative management. Surgical management should be considered if the drainage amount does not decrease by >50% of the original amount of the day of detection after 2 days of NPO. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Updates on the Management of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer (NMSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Fahradyan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs are the most common malignancy worldwide, of which 99% are basal cell carcinomas (BCCs and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs of skin. NMSCs are generally considered a curable diseases, yet they currently pose an increasing global healthcare problem due to rising incidence. This has led to a shift in emphasis on prevention of NMSCs with development of various skin cancer prevention programs worldwide. This article aims to summarize the most recent changes and advances made in NMSC management with a focus on prevention, screening, diagnosis, and staging.

  4. The tale of two stories: Challenges and innovations in breast cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry-Tillman, Ronda S

    2018-06-01

    The keynote address The Tale of Two Stories: Challenges and Innovations in Breast Cancer Management presented on March 19-20, 2017 at the celebratory Festschrift Lecture in honor of the great Dr. LaSalle Leffall's on behalf of his impact and contributions to the field of Breast cancer science and treatment as a leader, surgeon, and mentor. This presentation and follow up opinion paper in the field of Breast Disease highlights the challenges that have baffled us and the innovations that have changed and translated into outcomes and those that have not. Where do they parallel and what are the gaps? Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Management of locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniali, Peter C; Hrinczenko, Borys; Al-Janadi, Anas

    2014-02-28

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Sixty percent are diagnosed over the age of 65 years and 36% are 75 years or older. At diagnosis, approximately 58% of patients will have locally advanced and metastatic disease, for which systemic chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients is more challenging due to multiple factors, including disabling co-morbidities as well as a decline in organ function. Cancer treatment of elderly patients is often associated with more toxicities that may lead to frequent hospitalizations. In locally advanced disease, fewer older patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy despite survival benefit and similar toxicity when compared to their younger counterparts. A survival benefit is also observed in the palliative chemotherapy setting for elderly patients with metastatic disease. When treating elderly patients with colon cancer, one has to consider drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Since chronological age is a poor marker of a patient's functional status, several methods of functional assessment including performance status and activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental ADL, or even a comprehensive geriatric assessment, may be used. There is no ideal chemotherapy regimen that fits all elderly patients and so a regimen needs to be tailored for each individual. Important considerations when treating elderly patients include convenience and tolerability. This review will discuss approaches to the management of elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer.

  6. Late presentation and management of South Asian breast cancer patients in West Yorkshire, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Sreekumar Sundara; Lim, Jennifer N W; Haq, Anwar

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to bridge the knowledge gap and improve our understanding of the late presentation and management of breast cancer among South Asian women of non-oriental origin (SA) living in the United Kingdom. Retrospective review of the breast cancer waiting list data-base held at Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS trust was undertaken to identify SA women diagnosed with breast cancer from January 2000 to August 2007. We identified 41 (2.5%) SA women among 1,630 patients diagnosed with breast cancer during this period and 36 were included (median age=53.5 years, range=32-84). Only 19% (n=7) were screen detected and 81% (n=29) presented thorough symptomatic breast clinic. In the latter, 66% (n=19) were in the screening age group and 45% (n=13) presented beyond 8 weeks (late presentation). In our cohort, 91% (n=29) patients had advanced disease (TNM stage 2 and 3) resulting in a high mastectomy rate of 61% (n=22). 19% (n=7) died as a direct result of cancer and the remaining 78% (n=28) remains disease free following treatment thus far. The delay in presentation and poor national breast screening programme uptake among the SA women resulted in advanced disease at diagnosis. There is need for increasing the breast cancer awareness as well as encouraging breast screening among SA women in the UK.

  7. Evidentiary standards for forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Angi M; Crowder, Christian M

    2009-11-01

    As issues of professional standards and error rates continue to be addressed in the courts, forensic anthropologists should be proactive by developing and adhering to professional standards of best practice. There has been recent increased awareness and interest in critically assessing some of the techniques used by forensic anthropologists, but issues such as validation, error rates, and professional standards have seldom been addressed. Here we explore the legal impetus for this trend and identify areas where we can improve regarding these issues. We also discuss the recent formation of a Scientific Working Group for Forensic Anthropology (SWGANTH), which was created with the purposes of encouraging discourse among anthropologists and developing and disseminating consensus guidelines for the practice of forensic anthropology. We believe it is possible and advisable for anthropologists to seek and espouse research and methodological techniques that meet higher standards to ensure quality and consistency in our field.

  8. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being shipped, and will otherwise maintain it as nearly as possible in its original condition.The recommendations provided are short-term solutions to the problems of shipping evidence, and have considered only currently commercially available containers. These containers may not be appropriate for all cases. Design, testing, and certification of new transportation containers would be necessary to provide a container appropriate for all cases.Table 1 provides a summary of the recommendations for each class of hazardous material.Table 1: Summary of RecommendationsContainerCost1-quart paint can with ArmlockTM seal ringLabelMaster(r)%242.90 eachHazard Class 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9 Small ContainersTC Hazardous Material Transport ContainerCurrently in Use4 DraftDraftDraftTable 1: Summary of Recommendations (continued)ContainerCost55-gallon open or closed-head steel drumsAll-Pak, Inc.%2458.28 - %2473.62 eachHazard Class 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9 Large Containers95-gallon poly overpack LabelMaster(r)%24194.50 each1-liter glass container with plastic coatingLabelMaster(r)%243.35 - %243.70 eachHazard Class 6 Division 6.1 Poisonous by Inhalation (PIH) Small ContainersTC Hazardous Material Transport ContainerCurrently in Use20 to 55-gallon PIH overpacksLabelMaster(r)%24142.50 - %24170.50 eachHazard Class 6 Division 6.1 Poisonous by Inhalation (PIH) Large Containers65 to 95-gallon poly overpacksLabelMaster(r)%24163.30 - %24194.50 each1-liter transparent containerCurrently in UseHazard Class 6 Division 6.2 Infectious Material Small ContainersInfectious Substance ShipperSource Packaging of NE, Inc.%24336.00 eachNone Commercially AvailableN/AHazard Class 6 Division 6.2 Infectious Material Large ContainersNone Commercially Available N/A5

  9. Guide to clinical PET in oncology: Improving clinical management of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    information on clinical PET in oncology for nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists and clinical practitioners. Possible ideas for cost effectiveness of clinical PET in oncology are mentioned. The information is also intended to be useful in decision making to improve clinical management of cancer patients when allocating resources dedicated to the health care system. This is a critical issue that is important for the development of both clinical oncology and nuclear medicine in IAEA member states. The IAEA can be instrumental in the advancement of programmes which focus on the IAEA's coordinated research projects and technical cooperation project

  10. Differences in clinician understanding and management of early menopause after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayakhot, P; Teede, H J; Gibson-Helm, M; Vincent, A

    2013-08-01

    Investigation of clinicians' understanding of early menopause diagnosis/management in women with breast cancer. A cross-sectional study of 176 randomly recruited Australian clinicians (35 gynecologists, 35 endocrinologists, 36 oncologists, 35 breast surgeons and 35 general practitioners (GPs)) involved in the care of women with breast cancer. This questionnaire study utilized an index case to assess understanding of early menopause diagnosis and management. Analysis involved descriptive statistics, χ² tests and Student's t-test. Significant differences between clinician groups regarding diagnostic criteria for early menopause were observed; gynecologists, endocrinologists and GPs selected amenorrhea > 12 months, whereas oncologists and breast surgeons selected elevated serum follicle stimulating hormone level (p breast surgeons (57%), gynecologists (54%) and endocrinologists (49%) compared to oncologists (28%) or GPs (9%) (p = 0.0001). Exercise (63%) and nutrition (66%) were selected by most gynecologists for treatment of hot flushes, whereas endocrinologists (91%), oncologists (94%), breast surgeons (69%) and GPs (63%) prescribed venlafaxine. Hormone therapy was mainly prescribed by breast surgeons (43%) compared to other groups (p = 0.001). Most clinicians reported that the main problem with menopausal therapies was failure to resolve hot flushes. Exercise, lifestyle and stress management were recommended by all clinician groups for treatment of anxiety/depression. This exploratory study demonstrated a lack of consensus between clinician groups in their investigation, diagnosis and management of early menopause in women with breast cancer, with implications for both diagnosis and treatment.

  11. [Challenges for home care services in the pain management of cancer patients : A qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnass, I; Krutter, S; Nestler, N

    2018-03-21

    People with cancer are increasingly supported by home care services. Pain is a relevant symptom of these diseases and nurses of home care services are involved in the treatment. The German National Expert Standard "Pain management in nursing" includes evidence-based recommendations for the implementation of adequate pain management. Considering the given structural conditions of home care services, nurses describe both barriers and challenges with the implementation. By means of five guideline-based discussion groups, nurses of 14 home care services were questioned about the challenges they had experienced in pain management. The questioning focuses on the level of implementation of the recommendation for each aspect: pain assessment, pharmacological pain therapy, non-pharmacological pain therapy, pain-related side effects, information, training, and counseling in the care of people with cancer. A qualitative content analysis was conducted. On the one hand, the results illustrate a need for further knowledge and possibilities, e.g., for the assessment of pain as a multidimensional phenomenon and, on the other hand, that the conditions for continuous pain monitoring of cancer patients in home care services are limited. The need for short-term reconciliation with the treatment team and the practitioners proved to be more difficult than the cooperation with the palliative care network. Involvement of family members is important to ensure uninterrupted treatment. Beside knowledge and competencies regarding nursing care, structures and processes for interprofessional pain management need further development and research.

  12. Management Guidelines for Children with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gary L; Waguespack, Steven G; Bauer, Andrew J; Angelos, Peter; Benvenga, Salvatore; Cerutti, Janete M; Dinauer, Catherine A; Hamilton, Jill; Hay, Ian D; Luster, Markus; Parisi, Marguerite T; Rachmiel, Marianna; Thompson, Geoffrey B; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-07-01

    Previous guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules and cancers were geared toward adults. Compared with thyroid neoplasms in adults, however, those in the pediatric population exhibit differences in pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and long-term outcomes. Furthermore, therapy that may be recommended for an adult may not be appropriate for a child who is at low risk for death but at higher risk for long-term harm from overly aggressive treatment. For these reasons, unique guidelines for children and adolescents with thyroid tumors are needed. A task force commissioned by the American Thyroid Association (ATA) developed a series of clinically relevant questions pertaining to the management of children with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Using an extensive literature search, primarily focused on studies that included subjects ≤18 years of age, the task force identified and reviewed relevant articles through April 2014. Recommendations were made based upon scientific evidence and expert opinion and were graded using a modified schema from the United States Preventive Services Task Force. These inaugural guidelines provide recommendations for the evaluation and management of thyroid nodules in children and adolescents, including the role and interpretation of ultrasound, fine-needle aspiration cytology, and the management of benign nodules. Recommendations for the evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of children and adolescents with DTC are outlined and include preoperative staging, surgical management, postoperative staging, the role of radioactive iodine therapy, and goals for thyrotropin suppression. Management algorithms are proposed and separate recommendations for papillary and follicular thyroid cancers are provided. In response to our charge as an independent task force appointed by the ATA, we developed recommendations based on scientific evidence and expert opinion for the management of thyroid nodules and DTC in

  13. Clinical Management and Burden of Prostate Cancer: A Markov Monte Carlo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Chiranjeev; Aprikian, Armen; Cury, Fabio; Chevalier, Simone; Dragomir, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common non-skin cancer among men in developed countries. Several novel treatments have been adopted by healthcare systems to manage PCa. Most of the observational studies and randomized trials on PCa have concurrently evaluated fewer treatments over short follow-up. Further, preceding decision analytic models on PCa management have not evaluated various contemporary management options. Therefore, a contemporary decision analytic model was necessary to address limitations to the literature by synthesizing the evidence on novel treatments thereby forecasting short and long-term clinical outcomes. Objectives To develop and validate a Markov Monte Carlo model for the contemporary clinical management of PCa, and to assess the clinical burden of the disease from diagnosis to end-of-life. Methods A Markov Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate the management of PCa in men 65 years and older from diagnosis to end-of-life. Health states modeled were: risk at diagnosis, active surveillance, active treatment, PCa recurrence, PCa recurrence free, metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer, overall and PCa death. Treatment trajectories were based on state transition probabilities derived from the literature. Validation and sensitivity analyses assessed the accuracy and robustness of model predicted outcomes. Results Validation indicated model predicted rates were comparable to observed rates in the published literature. The simulated distribution of clinical outcomes for the base case was consistent with sensitivity analyses. Predicted rate of clinical outcomes and mortality varied across risk groups. Life expectancy and health adjusted life expectancy predicted for the simulated cohort was 20.9 years (95%CI 20.5–21.3) and 18.2 years (95% CI 17.9–18.5), respectively. Conclusion Study findings indicated contemporary management strategies improved survival and quality of life in patients with PCa. This model could be used

  14. Economic evaluation of monoclonal antibody in the management of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezat SW

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to determine the cost of colorectal cancer (CRC management and compare the cost effectiveness of cetuximab and bevacizumab in the management of CRC. Method: This economic evaluation study from a societal perspective involves collecting resource utilization data based on the clinical pathway of colorectal cancer management. The cost calculated includes drugs, human resources, administrative, investigations as well as capital cost. Patient’s cost was also calculated based on an interview with colorectal cancer patients. Effectiveness estimates for monoclonal antibody (cetuximab and bevacizumab treatment were modeled from study respondents based on references from other studies. Results: Cost of treating a case of colorectal cancer in stage I is RM13,623 (RM12,467-RM14,777, stage II RM19,753 (RM16,734-RM23,520, stage III RM24,972 (RM20,291-RM29,654 and stage IV RM27, 163 (RM23, 192-RM31,133. Cost of CRC management increase with the increasing stage of the disease (Kruskal Wallis, X2=106, p<0.001. Based on estimates of 2671 new cases of CRC, the incremental cost of cetuximab is RM20, 556 480 and bevacizumab is RM7,557,953 at 50% stage III and IV as compared to the conventional chemotherapy. The incremental cost per quality adjusted life years gained for cetuximab is RM38,869 and RM14,290 for bevacizumab. Although both types of monoclonal antibody are considered cost effective (based on WHO guidelines of less than three times of GDP, bevacizumab is considered more cost effective than cetuximab. Cost effectiveness was sensitive to the percentage of late stages of CRC. Conclusions: Cost of treating late stage of CRC is high and bevacizumab are more cost effective compared to cetuximab in the management of the late stage of CRC.

  15. Impact of the lung oncology multidisciplinary team meetings on the management of patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Kim Ann; Campbell, Belinda A; Duplan, Danny; Ball, David; David, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are increasingly regarded as a component of multidisciplinary cancer care. We aimed to prospectively measure the impact of MDT meetings on clinicians' management plans for lung oncology patients, and the implementation rate of the meeting recommendations. Consecutive patient cases presented at the weekly lung oncology MDT meetings were prospectively enrolled. Investigators compared the clinicians' management plans pre-meeting with the consensus plans post-meeting. The meeting was considered to have an impact on management plans if ≥1 of the following changes were detected: tumor stage, histology, treatment intent or treatment modality, or if additional investigations were recommended. Investigators reviewed hospital patient records at 4 months to determine if the meeting recommendations were implemented. Reasons for non-implementation were also recorded. Of the 55 eligible cases, the MDT meeting changed management plans in 58% (CI 45-71%; P management plans for lung oncology patients. The majority of MDT recommendations (72%) were implemented into patient care. These findings provide further evidence to support the role of MDT meetings as an essential part of the decision-making process for the optimal multidisciplinary management of patients with cancer. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Health Services for Management of Chronic Non-Cancer Pain in Kuwait: A Case Study Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakha, S Fatima; Pennefather, Peter; Badr, Hanan E; Mailis-Gagnon, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The experience of chronic pain is universal, yet pain management services delivered by health professionals vary substantially, depending on the context and patient. This review is a part of a series that has examined the issue of chronic non-cancer pain services and management in different global cities. The review is structured as a case study of the availability of management services for people living with chronic non-cancer pain within the context of the Kuwaiti health systems, and the cases are built from evidence in the published literature identified through a comprehensive review process. The evolution of the organizational structure of the public and private health systems in Kuwait is described. These are discussed in terms of their impact on the delivery of comprehensive chronic pain management service by health professionals in Kuwait. This review also includes a description of chronic pain patient personas to highlight expected barriers as well as compliance issues with services likely to be encountered in Kuwait. The case study analysis and persona descriptions illustrate a need to move beyond pain symptom management towards considering the entire person and his/her individual experience of pain such that health care success is judged by enhancement of patient well-being rather than access to services. A road map for improving integrative chronic pain management in Kuwait is discussed. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Morphine and oxycodone in the management of cancer pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalso, E.; Vainio, A.; Rosenberg, P.H.; Mattila, M.J.; Seppaelae, T.

    1990-01-01

    Morphine and oxycodone were administered to ten patients suffering from severe cancer pain in a double-blind cross-over study. The patients titrated themselves pain-free, first intravenously, using a patient-controlled analgesia device, and then orally. Each titration phase lasted for 48 hours. Blood samples were drawn after 36 hr of each administration phase. The plasma levels of morphine, morphine-6- and morphine-3 glucuronides were determined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), whereas the oxycodone samples were assayed with gas chromatography (GC). Twin samples were analyzed for plasma opioid activity with a radioreceptor assay (RRA) using 3 H-dihydromorphien and 3 H-naloxone as radioligands. Adequate analgesia was achieved with both morphine and oxycodone. About 30% more oxycodone was needed intravenously, whereas 25% less oxycodone than morphine was consumed orally. There was a good linear correlation between the morphine concentrations measured with HPLC and RRA. The mean morphine-6-glucuronide to morphine concentration ratio was 2.3 after intravenous and 4.6 after oral administration. Results from RRA indicate that oxycodone in vivo is a potent μ-agonist and that a least part of its analgesic action is mediated by active metabolites. In vitro morphine glucuronides enhanced morphine in displacing radioligands from the opioid receptors, thus suggesting their complex interactions in vivo. (author)

  18. Radiotherapy in the management of cervical cancer in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindegaard, J.C.; Thranov, I.R.; Engelholm, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and fourteen elderly patients (median 75.5 years, range 70.0-85.9) consecutively referred for curative radiotherapy in the period 1987-1996 were prospectively followed with regard to tumour control and complications. The importance of age, stage (FIGO), tumour size, histology, tumour fixation, haemoglobin, concurrent disease, performance status (WHO) and type of radiotherapy were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Treatment was completed as planned in 68%, delayed in 29% and stopped prematurely in 3%. The frequency of grade 3 late complications was 11% and the actuarial probability at 5 years was 20%. Overall 5-year survival according to FIGO was 61% (I), 34% (II) and 25% (III). Cox multivariate analysis identified tumour size as independent prognostic factor for tumour control, disease-free survival and overall survival. FIGO stage was predictive for late grade 2 complications. We were unable to identify significant factors with respect to grade 3 complications. Age was not a significant parameter for any of the investigated endpoints. Elderly patients in good performance status with advanced cancer of the uterine may tolerate radical radiotherapy with acceptable morbidity and reasonable survival. Radiotherapy may also be a good alternative in early stage disease for surgically unfit elderly patients. (author)

  19. Locoregional Treatment Outcomes After Multimodality Management of Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bristol, Ian J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Strom, Eric A.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Domain, Delora; Singletary, S. Eva; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Yu, T.-K.; Terrefe, Welela; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine outcomes for patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) treated with multimodality therapy, to identify factors associated with locoregional recurrence, and to determine which patients may benefit from radiation dose escalation. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 256 consecutive patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated at our institution between 1977 and 2004. Results: The 192 patients who were able to complete the planned course of chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation had significantly better outcomes than the 64 patients who did not. The respective 5-year outcome rates were: locoregional control (84% vs. 51%), distant metastasis-free survival (47% vs. 20%), and overall survival (51% vs. 24%) (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Univariate factors significantly associated with locoregional control in the patients who completed plan treatment were response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgical margin status, number of involved lymph nodes, and use of taxanes. Increasing the total chest-wall dose of postmastectomy radiation from 60 Gy to 66 Gy significantly improved locoregional control for patients who experienced less than a partial response to chemotherapy, patients with positive, close, or unknown margins, and patients <45 years of age. Conclusions: Patients with IBC who are able to complete treatment with chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation have a high probability of locoregional control. Escalation of postmastectomy radiation dose to 66 Gy appears to benefit patients with disease that responds poorly to chemotherapy, those with positive, close, or unknown margin status, and those <45 years of age

  20. Aspirin in the Management of Patients with Prostate Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascan, Bianca; Marignol, Laure

    2018-04-01

    Aspirin has cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2)-mediated anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant properties that may confer a positive effect in preventing and limiting the progression of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer has been shown to have poor treatment outcomes due to therapeutic resistance; therefore, COX2 inhibition caused by aspirin could represent an opportunity to augment current therapies. This is particularly of interest to patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) where inflammation is a common side-effect. This review discusses the evidence for the potential role of aspirin in the management of patients with prostate cancer undergoing RT. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. The Role of Interventional Oncology in the Management of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duka, Ejona, E-mail: ejonaduka@hotmail.com; Ierardi, Anna Maria, E-mail: amierardi@yahoo.it; Floridi, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.floridi@gmail.com; Terrana, Alberto, E-mail: albertoterrana@libero.it; Fontana, Federico, E-mail: fede.fontana@libero.it [Insubria University, Radiology Department (Italy); Carrafiello, Gianpaolo, E-mail: gcarraf@gmail.com [University of Milan, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Department (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Interventional radiological procedures for diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer have become increasingly important. Imaging-guided percutaneous biopsy has become the modality of choice for diagnosing lung cancer, and in the era of target therapies, it is an useful tool to define earlier patient-specific tumor phenotypes. In functionally inoperable patients, especially the ablative procedures are potentially curative alternatives to surgery. In addition to thermally ablative treatment, selective chemoembolization by a vascular access allows localized therapy. These treatments are considered for patients in a reduced general condition which does not allow systemic chemotherapy. The present article reviews the role of interventional oncology in the management of primary lung cancer, focusing on the state of the art for each procedure.

  2. From a Content Delivery Portal to a Knowledge Management System for Standardized Cancer Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlue, Danijela; Mate, Sebastian; Haier, Jörg; Kadioglu, Dennis; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Breil, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous tumor documentation and its challenges of interpretation of medical terms lead to problems in analyses of data from clinical and epidemiological cancer registries. The objective of this project was to design, implement and improve a national content delivery portal for oncological terms. Data elements of existing handbooks and documentation sources were analyzed, combined and summarized by medical experts of different comprehensive cancer centers. Informatics experts created a generic data model based on an existing metadata repository. In order to establish a national knowledge management system for standardized cancer documentation, a prototypical tumor wiki was designed and implemented. Requirements engineering techniques were applied to optimize this platform. It is targeted to user groups such as documentation officers, physicians and patients. The linkage to other information sources like PubMed and MeSH was realized.

  3. Diagnosis and management of testicular cancer the European point of view

    CERN Document Server

    Krege, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the views of leading European experts on the diagnosis and management of testicular cancer, with coverage of current hot topics in the field. It opens by providing an overview of the recommendations in the most recent consensus paper from the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group, which is based on interdisciplinary cooperation among urologists, medical oncologists, radio-oncologists, pathologists, and basic scientists. The remainder of the book focuses on areas of controversy in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of testicular cancer. In each case the evidence base is discussed and results from the most recent studies are reviewed, drawing attention to new findings that might alter treatment recommendations. The treatment-related chapters cover a broad range of issues, including the best approach in patients with poor-prognosis and recurrent disease and those with long-term toxicities. Relevant aspects of survivorship care are also addressed. The book will help clinicians and prac...

  4. Genetics and Genomics: Discovery, Validation, and Utility of Novel Tools for management of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W. Shindel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomics is the science of how genes influence human health and disease states. It differs from traditional genetic screening in that the transcriptional activity (or other markers in full panels of related genes are studied. Compared to simple genetic testing, assessment of expression levels in a panel of genes provides a more nuanced and holistic understanding of genetic modulation of human disease. Genomic testing may be used to great effect in resolving controversial questions on detection and treatment of prostate cancer. Genomic tests are currently in use for numerous facets of prostate cancer care, including screening, biopsy, and treatment planning. The clinical validity (predictive capacity of these assays has been well established; studies on clinical utility (i.e. usefulness of these tests in guiding patient/provider decisions have shown promising results. Men’s health specialists should be familiar with the role genomic testing will play in contemporary management of prostate cancer.

  5. The prevention, detection and management of cancer treatment-induced cardiotoxicity: a meta-review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, Aaron; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Lawrence, Petra; Clark, Robyn A

    2015-01-01

    The benefits associated with some cancer treatments do not come without risk. A serious side effect of some common cancer treatments is cardiotoxicity. Increased recognition of the public health implications of cancer treatment-induced cardiotoxicity has resulted in a proliferation of systematic reviews in this field to guide practice. Quality appraisal of these reviews is likely to limit the influence of biased conclusions from systematic reviews that have used poor methodology related to clinical decision-making. The aim of this meta-review is to appraise and synthesise evidence from only high quality systematic reviews focused on the prevention, detection or management of cancer treatment-induced cardiotoxicity. Using Cochrane methodology, we searched databases, citations and hand-searched bibliographies. Two reviewers independently appraised reviews and extracted findings. A total of 18 high quality systematic reviews were subsequently analysed, 67 % (n = 12) of these comprised meta-analyses. One systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence regarding the utility of cardiac biomarkers for the detection of cardiotoxicity. The following strategies might reduce the risk of cardiotoxicity: 1) The concomitant administration of dexrazoxane with anthracylines; 2) The avoidance of anthracyclines where possible; 3) The continuous administration of anthracyclines (>6 h) rather than bolus dosing; and 4) The administration of anthracycline derivatives such as epirubicin or liposomal-encapsulated doxorubicin instead of doxorubicin. In terms of management, one review focused on medical interventions for treating anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity during or after treatment of childhood cancer. Neither intervention (enalapril and phosphocreatine) was associated with statistically significant improvement in ejection fraction or mortality. This review highlights the lack of high level evidence to guide clinical decision-making with respect to the detection

  6. Surgical management of oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Nuria M; Varela, Gonzalo; Jiménez, Marcelo F

    2016-11-01

    The oligometastatic stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) offers a new surgical opportunity. New reported data is showing that surgery can offer a reasonable benefit, in terms of long-term survival, to some patients. The advantages of surgical treatment rely on a more adequate patient selection and a better understanding of the biology of these tumors. Currently, mediastinal involvement of the primary tumor can be identified as the most important prognostic variable after curative-intent of synchronous or metachronous metastasis. It seems clear that the routine use of combined FDG-PET and CT will help to detect the more favorable cohort of oligometastatic patients. As expected, pathological T staging of the primary tumor and the completeness of its resection are also crucial factors influencing final results. The real benefit of the local treatment over synchronous or metachronous metastasis is controversial with series showing better outcomes for metachronous lesions than for synchronous and others offering equal results. Also non conclusive results appear when analyzing different sites of metastasis. Retrospective series tend to show different outcomes depending on the affected organ while usually no differences are found in prospective ones. Most of the current evidence is based on retrospective studies on patients collected along extended periods of time. That represents a great limitation to the knowledge on this topic. Some prospective analyses have added some insight, but still the quality of the evidence is too low to allow drawing robust conclusions. As frequently concluded, prospective well designed investigation is requested to ascertain the value of surgery in this specific population of patients with extended NSCLC.

  7. Management and Surgical Outcomes of Concurrent Tuberculosis and Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evman, Serdar; Baysungur, Volkan; Alpay, Levent; Uskul, Bahadir; Misirlioglu, Aysun Kosif; Kanbur, Serda; Dogruyol, Talha

    2017-10-01

    Background  Concurrent pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and lung cancer are rarely encountered in Western countries; however, it is more common in developing countries. We aim to share the diagnostic and treatment approaches in this study. Materials and Methods  Clinical files of all patients undergoing lung resection for non-small cell carcinoma with concurrent pulmonary TB between February 2006 and December 2012 were investigated retrospectively in terms of patient characteristics, operation methods, definite pathology and stage of tumor, postoperative treatment schemes, and associated complications. Results  TB was detected in 17 (1.3%) of 1,266 operated carcinoma patients. Eleven had squamous cell carcinoma and six had adenocarcinoma. Mean age was 54.9 years. Two patients received anti-TB treatment preoperatively. Fifteen patients were given anti-TB treatment postoperatively, as soon as definite microbiological confirmation was obtained, and concurrently given adjuvant therapy after 3 weeks of sole four-drug TB treatment. Pneumonectomy was performed in four (23.5%), sleeve lobectomy in three (17.6%), lobectomy in eight (47%), and bilobectomy in two (11.7%) patients. Postoperative complications occurred in four (23.5%) patients, with bronchopleural fistula being seen in only one pneumonectomy patient. No postoperative mortality or reactivation of TB was seen. Mean survival time was 32 ± 2 months. Conclusion  Resection following a 3-week anti-TB treatment or concurrent anti-TB and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy does not constitute an additional postoperative risk for patients with concomitant lung malignancy and pulmonary TB. The determination of optimum treatment for these patients presents a challenge in developing countries, where TB is still a common disease. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Time trends, improvements and national auditing of rectal cancer management over an 18-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodeda, K; Johansson, R; Zar, N; Birgisson, H; Dahlberg, M; Skullman, S; Lindmark, G; Glimelius, B; Påhlman, L; Martling, A

    2015-09-01

    The main aims were to explore time trends in the management and outcome of patients with rectal cancer in a national cohort and to evaluate the possible impact of national auditing on overall outcomes. A secondary aim was to provide population-based data for appraisal of external validity in selected patient series. Data from the Swedish ColoRectal Cancer Registry with virtually complete national coverage were utilized in this cohort study on 29 925 patients with rectal cancer diagnosed between 1995 and 2012. Of eligible patients, nine were excluded. During the study period, overall, relative and disease-free survival increased. Postoperative mortality after 30 and 90 days decreased to 1.7% and 2.9%. The 5-year local recurrence rate dropped to 5.0%. Resection margins improved, as did peri-operative blood loss despite more multivisceral resections being performed. Fewer patients underwent palliative resection and the proportion of non-operated patients increased. The proportions of temporary and permanent stoma formation increased. Preoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy became more common as did multidisciplinary team conferences. Variability in rectal cancer management between healthcare regions diminished over time when new aspects of patient care were audited. There have been substantial changes over time in the management of patients with rectal cancer, reflected in improved outcome. Much indirect evidence indicates that auditing matters, but without a control group it is not possible to draw firm conclusions regarding the possible impact of a quality control registry on faster shifts in time trends, decreased variability and improvements. Registry data were made available for reference. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. A chronic care ostomy self-management program for cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krouse, Robert S; Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Wendel, Christopher S; Cobb, Martha D; Tallman, Nancy J; Ercolano, Elizabeth; Sun, Virginia; Hibbard, Judith H; Hornbrook, Mark C

    2016-05-01

    Individuals with ostomies experience extensive changes in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and daily routine. Patients and families are typically forced to use trial and error to improve self-management. This is a longitudinal one-group design pilot study of a five-session ostomy self-care curriculum based on the Chronic Care Model to improve HRQOL and self-management for cancer survivors with ostomies. Participants were surveyed to evaluate each session. Multiple instruments were administered to examine outcomes at baseline, post-intervention, and at 6-month follow-up (Patient Activation Measure, self-efficacy, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Ways of Coping, Group Health Association of America Satisfaction with ostomy care survey, and the City of Hope Quality of Life Ostomy). Changes from pre-intervention to post-intervention and pre-intervention to follow-up were evaluated with paired t-tests. Text responses were coded and evaluated for important themes and recommendations. Thirty-eight subjects participated in the study. Most had a history of rectal cancer (60.5%) or bladder cancer (28.9%). Participants rated the overall program high (4.4-4.8 on 5-point scale). Text feedback indicated that participants enjoyed the group forums, wanted more participants, and more hands-on training. Scores on multiple surveys were shown to be improved and sustained, including patient activation (p = 0.0004), self-efficacy (p = 0.006), total HRQOL (p = 0.01), physical well-being (p = 0.005), and social well-being (p = 0.002). Survivor anxiety was significantly reduced by follow-up (p = 0.047). This self-management ostomy program can help cancer survivors with ostomies adapt to their stoma. Initiating this program in the community setting would be beneficial to many cancer survivors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Non-visit-based cancer screening using a novel population management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, Steven J; Zai, Adrian H; Ashburner, Jeffrey M; Chang, Yuchiao; Percac-Lima, Sanja; Levy, Douglas E; Chueh, Henry C; Grant, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    Advances in information technology (IT) now permit population-based preventive screening, but the best methods remain uncertain. We evaluated whether involving primary care providers (PCPs) in a visit-independent population management IT application led to more effective cancer screening. We conducted a cluster-randomized trial involving 18 primary care practice sites and 169 PCPs from June 15, 2011, to June 14, 2012. Participants included adults eligible for breast, cervical, and/or colorectal cancer screening. In practices randomized to the intervention group, PCPs reviewed real-time rosters of their patients overdue for screening and provided individualized contact (via a letter, practice delegate, or patient navigator) or deferred screening (temporarily or permanently). In practices randomized to the comparison group, overdue patients were automatically sent reminder letters and transferred to practice delegate lists for follow-up. Intervention patients without PCP action within 8 weeks defaulted to the automated control version. The primary outcome was adjusted average cancer screening completion rates over 1-year follow-up, accounting for clustering by physician or practice. Baseline cancer screening rates (80.8% vs 80.3%) were similar among patients in the intervention (n = 51,071) and comparison group (n = 52,799). Most intervention providers used the IT application (88 of 101, 87%) and users reviewed 7984 patients overdue for at least 1 cancer screening (73% sent reminder letter, 6% referred directly to a practice delegate or patient navigator, and 21% deferred screening). In addition, 6128 letters were automatically sent to patients in the intervention group (total of 12,002 letters vs 16,378 letters in comparison practices; P management IT application resulted in similar cancer screening rates compared with an automated reminder system, but fewer patients were sent reminder letters. This suggests that PCPs were able to identify and exclude from contact

  11. Pilot Survey of Breast Cancer Management in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verna D.N.K. Vanderpuye

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To understand the current state of breast cancer management in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: We conducted an anonymous online survey of breast cancer management among African Organization for Research and Treatment in Cancer (AORTIC members by using a 42-question structured questionnaire in both English and French in 2013. Results: Twenty members from 19 facilities in 14 countries responded to the survey. Twelve members (60% belonged to a multidisciplinary breast cancer team. Radiotherapy equipment was available in seven facilities (36%, but equipment had down time at least once a week in four facilities. Available chemotherapy drugs included methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, fluorouracil, anthracyclines, and vincristine, whereas trastuzumab, taxanes, vinorelbine, and gemcitabine were available in few facilities. Core-needle biopsy was available in 16 facilities (84%; mammogram, in 17 facilities (89%; computed tomography scan, in 15 facilities (79%; magnetic resonance imaging, in 11 facilities (58%; and bone scans, in nine facilities (47%. It took an average of 1 to 3 weeks to report histopathology. Immunohistochemistry was available locally in eight facilities (42%, outside hospitals but within the country in seven facilities (37%, and outside the country in four facilities (21%. Thirteen facilities (68% performed axillary node dissections as part of a breast protocol. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was the most common therapy for locally advanced breast cancer in 13 facilities (68%. In three facilities (16%, receptor status did not influence the prescription of hormone treatment. Conclusion: This pilot survey suggests that AORTIC members in sub-Saharan Africa continue to make gains in the provision of access to multidisciplinary breast cancer care, but the lack of adequate pathology and radiotherapy services is a barrier. Focused attention on in-country and regional training needs and improvement of health systems deliverables is urgently

  12. Contemporary Management of Borderline Resectable and Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaib, Walid L; Ip, Andrew; Cardona, Kenneth; Alese, Olatunji B; Maithel, Shishir K; Kooby, David; Landry, Jerome; El-Rayes, Bassel F

    2016-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas remains a highly lethal disease, with less than 5% survival at 5 years. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) and locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) account for approximately 30% of newly diagnosed cases of PC. The objective of BRPC therapy is to downstage the tumor to allow resection; the objective of LAPC therapy is to control disease and improve survival. There is no consensus on the definitions of BRPC and LAPC, which leads to major limitations in designing clinical trials and evaluating their results. A multimodality approach is always needed to ensure proper utilization and timing of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery in the management of this disease. Combination chemotherapy regimens (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, and gemcitabine [FOLFIRINOX] and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel) have improved overall survival in metastatic disease. The role of combination chemotherapy regimens in BRPC and LAPC is an area of active investigation. There is no consensus on the dose, modality, and role of radiation therapy in the treatment of BRPC and LAPC. This article reviews the literature and highlights the areas of controversy regarding management of BRPC and LAPC. Pancreatic cancer is one of the worst cancers with regard to survival, even at early stages of the disease. This review evaluates all the evidence for the stages in which the cancer is not primarily resectable with surgery, known as borderline resectable or locally advanced unresectable. Recently, advancements in radiation techniques and use of better combination chemotherapies have improved survival and tolerance. There is no consensus on description of stages or treatment sequences (chemotherapy, chemoradiation, radiation), nor on the best chemotherapy regimen. The evidence behind the treatment paradigm for these stages of pancreatic cancer is summarized. ©AlphaMed Press.

  13. Supporting cancer patients in illness management: usability evaluation of a mobile app.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Jelena; Kaufman, David R; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-08-13

    Mobile phones and tablets currently represent a significant presence in people's everyday lives. They enable access to different information and services independent of current place and time. Such widespread connectivity offers significant potential in different app areas including health care. Our goal was to evaluate the usability of the Connect Mobile app. The mobile app enables mobile access to the Connect system, an online system that supports cancer patients in managing health-related issues. Along with symptom management, the system promotes better patient-provider communication, collaboration, and shared decision making. The Connect Mobile app enables access to the Connect system over both mobile phones and tablets. The study consisted of usability tests of a high fidelity prototype with 7 cancer patients where the objectives were to identify existing design and functionality issues and to provide patients with a real look-and-feel of the mobile system. In addition, we conducted semistructured interviews to obtain participants' feedback about app usefulness, identify the need for new system features and design requirements, and measure the acceptance of the mobile app and its features within everyday health management. The study revealed a total of 27 design issues (13 for mobile apps and 14 for tablet apps), which were mapped to source events (ie, errors, requests for help, participants' concurrent feedback, and moderator observation). We also applied usability heuristics to identify violations of usability principles. The majority of violations were related to enabling ease of input, screen readability, and glanceability (15 issues), as well as supporting an appropriate match between systems and the real world (7 issues) and consistent mapping of system functions and interactions (4 issues). Feedback from participants also showed the cancer patients' requirements for support systems and how these needs are influenced by different context-related factors

  14. Expanding perspective on music therapy for symptom management in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Noah; Bradt, Joke; Kesslick, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Symptom management is a frequently researched treatment topic in music therapy and cancer care. Representations in the literature of music interventions for symptom management, however, have often overlooked the human experiences shaping those symptoms. This may result in music therapy being perceived as a linear intervention process that does not take into account underlying experiences that contribute to symptom experiences. This study explored patient experiences underlying symptoms and symptom management in cancer care, and examined the role of music therapy in that clinical process. This study analyzed semi-structured, open-ended exit interviews obtained from 30 participants during a randomized controlled trial investigating the differential impact of music therapy versus music medicine interventions on symptom management in participants with cancer. Interviews were conducted by a research assistant not involved with the clinical interventions. Exit interview transcripts for 30 participants were analyzed using an inductive, latent, constructivist method of thematic analysis. Three themes-Relaxation, Therapeutic relationship, and Intrapersonal relating-capture elements of the music therapy process that (a) modified participants' experiences of adjustments in their symptoms and (b) highlighted the depth of human experience shaping their symptoms. These underlying human experiences naturally emerged in the therapeutic setting, requiring the music therapist's clinical expertise for appropriate support. Symptom management extends beyond fluctuation in levels and intensity of a surface-level symptom to incorporate deeper lived experiences. The authors provide recommendations for clinical work, entry-level training as related to symptom management, implications for evidence-based practice in music therapy, and methodology for future mixed methods research. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Radiotherapy in the management of non-metastatic prostate cancer: Current standards and future opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: The intent of this course is to review issues involved in the management of non-metastatic prostate cancer and to clarify the role of external beam radiotherapy, the use of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormonal therapy in conjunction with the radiation, the management of patients with regional metastases and recurrent disease following surgery and radiation. At the end of this course, participants should be able to fluently discuss management issues and strategies across the entire spectrum of non-metastatic prostate cancer. - Pre-treatment prognostic factors including clinical stage, grade, and pre-treatment PSA, will be presented and their relative value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. Strategies to be discussed include standard dose radiation, escalated dose radiation, particle radiation and the use of adjuvant and neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy. - The process of simulation and field design will be presented, the value of CT-based treatment planning, beams-eye view design and the relative value of three-dimensional treatment planning will be discussed. - The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with this will also be presented so that what constitutes an adequate simulation and margin of treatment can be clarified. - The management of newly diagnosed patients, covering the range of low stage/low grade to locally advanced prostate cancer will be discussed. - The relative value of increasing dose, the relative value of using neo-adjuvant and/or adjuvant hormone therapy and the indications for escalated dose will be presented. - Strategies for managing post-prostatectomy patients will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant and therapeutic irradiation for biochemical failure will be presented and a strategy for management will be discussed. - How to deal with patients with residual disease post radiation will be discussed and the relative value of cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy or hormonal therapy will

  16. Developing a complex intervention for the outpatient management of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, June; Bozas, George; Stephens, Andrew; Johnson, Miriam; Avery, Ged; O'Toole, Lorcan; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2013-06-27

    Most patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) spend 5-7 days in hospital even though only 4.5% will develop serious complications during this time. In particular, the group of patients with incidentally diagnosed PE (i-PE) includes many patients with low risk features potentially ideal for outpatient management; however the evidence for their optimal management is lacking hence relative practices may vary considerably. We describe the development process, components, links and function of a nurse-led service for the management of patients with i-PE, developed in accordance to the UK Medical Research Council complex intervention guidance. Phase 0 (Theoretical underpinning): The Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) was selected for patient risk assessment and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guideline for the management of PE in cancer patients (2007) was selected as quality measure. Historical registry and audit data from our centre regarding i-PE incidence and management for the period between 2006 and 2009 illustrating the then current practices were reviewed. Phase 1 (Modelling): Modelling of the pathway included the following: a) Identification of training needs, planning and implementation of training schemes and development of transferable competencies and training materials. b) Mapping patient pathways and flow and c) Production of key documentation and Standard Operating Procedures for the delivery of the service. Phase 2 (Implementation and testing of the intervention): During the initial 12 months of implementation, remedial action was taken to address identified deficiencies regarding patient referral to the pathway, compliance with treatment protocol, patient follow up, selection challenges from the use of PESI in cancer patients and challenges regarding the "first-pass" identification of i-PE. We have developed and piloted a complex intervention to manage cancer patients with incidental PE in an outpatient setting. Adherence to evidence

  17. A review of the surgical management of breast cancer: plastic reconstructive techniques and timing implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosson, Gedge D; Magarakis, Michael; Shridharani, Sachin M; Stapleton, Sahael M; Jacobs, Lisa K; Manahan, Michele A; Flores, Jaime I

    2010-07-01

    The oncologic management of breast cancer has evolved over the past several decades from radical mastectomy to modern-day preservation of chest and breast structures. The increased rate of mastectomies over recent years made breast reconstruction an integral part of the breast cancer management. Plastic surgery now offers patients a wide variety of reconstruction options from primary closure of the skin flaps to performance of microvascular and autologous tissue transplantation. Well-coordinated partnerships between surgical oncologists, plastic surgeons, and patients address concerns of tumor control, cosmesis, and patients' wishes. The gamut of breast reconstruction options is reviewed, particularly noting state-of-the-art techniques, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various timing modalities.

  18. Potential biomarker panels in overall breast cancer management: advancements by multilevel diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotra, Shantanu; Yeghiazaryan, Kristina; Golubnitschaja, Olga

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer (BC) prevalence has reached an epidemic scale with half a million deaths annually. Current deficits in BC management include predictive and preventive approaches, optimized screening programs, individualized patient profiling, highly sensitive detection technologies for more precise diagnostics and therapy monitoring, individualized prediction and effective treatment of BC metastatic disease. To advance BC management, paradigm shift from delayed to predictive, preventive and personalized medical services is essential. Corresponding step forwards requires innovative multilevel diagnostics procuring specific panels of validated biomarkers. Here, we discuss current instrumental advancements including genomics, proteomics, epigenetics, miRNA, metabolomics, circulating tumor cells and cancer stem cells with a focus on biomarker discovery and multilevel diagnostic panels. A list of the recommended biomarker candidates is provided.

  19. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljubran, Ali; Abusamra, Ashraf; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Rabah, Danny; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Alkushi, Hussain; Al-Mansour, Mubarak; Alharbi, Hulayel; Eltijani, Amin; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Alsharm, Abdullah; Ahmad, Imran; Murshid, Esam

    2018-01-01

    This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation and medical and surgical management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7 th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence levels based on a comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors) who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Local factors, such as availability, logistic feasibility, and familiarity of various treatment modalities, have been taken into consideration. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health-care policymakers in the management of patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate.

  20. Primary care physician management, referral, and relations with specialists concerning patients at risk for cancer due to family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M E; Flynn, B S; Stockdale, A

    2013-01-01

    Risk stratification based on family history is a feature of screening guidelines for a number of cancers and referral guidelines for genetic counseling/testing for cancer risk. Our aim was to describe primary care physician perceptions of their role in managing cancer risk based on family history. Structured interviews were conducted by a medical anthropologist with primary care physicians in 3 settings in 2 north-eastern states. Transcripts were systematically analyzed by a research team to identify major themes expressed by participants. Forty interviews were conducted from May 2003 through May 2006. Physicians provided a diversity of views on roles in management of cancer risk based on family history, management practices and patient responses to risk information. They also provided a wide range of perspectives on criteria used for referral to specialists, types of specialists referred to and expected management roles for referred patients. Some primary care physicians appeared to make effective use of family history information for cancer risk management, but many in this sample did not. Increased focus on efficient assessment tools based on recognized guidelines, accessible guides to management options, and patient education and decision aids may be useful directions to facilitate broader use of family history information for cancer risk management. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical Information Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources ... Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs and Medical Information Advance Directives Using ...

  2. Current Advances in Thyroid Cancer Management. Are We Ready for the Epidemic Rise of Diagnoses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Rusinek

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A rising incidence of thyroid cancers (TCs mainly small tumors, observed during recent years, lead to many controversies regarding treatment strategies. TCs represent a distinct molecular background and clinical outcome. Although in most cases TCs are characterized by a good prognosis, there are some aggressive forms, which do not respond to standard treatment. There are still some questions, which have to be resolved to avoid dangerous simplifications in the clinical management. In this article, we focused on the current advantages in preoperative molecular diagnostic tests and histopathological examination including noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP. We discussed the controversies regarding the extent of thyroid surgery and adjuvant radioiodine therapy, as well as new treatment modalities for radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC. Considering medullary thyroid cancer (MTC, we analyzed a clinical management based on histopathology and RET (ret proto-oncogene mutation genotype, disease follow-up with a special attention to serum calcitonin doubling time as an important prognostic marker, and targeted therapy applied in advanced MTC. In addition, we provided some data regarding anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC, a highly lethal neoplasm, which lead to death in nearly 100% of patients due to the lack of effective treatment options.

  3. Contemporary management of patients with penile cancer and lymph node metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Andrew; Diorio, Gregory J; Pettaway, Curtis; Master, Viraj; Spiess, Philippe E

    2017-06-01

    Penile cancer is a rare disease that causes considerable physical and psychological patient morbidity, especially at advanced stages. Patients with low-stage nodal metastasis can achieve durable survival with surgery alone, but those with extensive locoregional metastasis have overall low survival. Contemporary management strategies for lymph node involvement in penile cancer aim to minimize the morbidity associated with traditional radical inguinal lymphadenectomy through appropriate risk stratification while optimizing oncological outcomes. Modified (or superficial) inguinal lymph node dissection and dynamic sentinel lymph node biopsy are diagnostic modalities that have been recommended in patients with high-risk primary penile tumours and nonpalpable inguinal lymph nodes. In addition, advances in minimally invasive and robot-assisted lymphadenectomy techniques are being investigated in patients with penile cancer and might further decrease lymphadenectomy-related adverse effects. The management of patients with advanced disease has evolved to include multimodal treatment with systemic chemotherapy before surgical intervention and can include adjuvant chemotherapy after pelvic lymphadenectomy. The role of radiotherapy in the neoadjuvant or adjuvant setting remains largely unclear, owing to a lack of high-level evidence of possible benefits. New targeted therapies have shown efficacy in squamous cell carcinomas of other sites and might also prove effective in patients with penile cancer.

  4. Quo vadis radiotherapy? Technological advances and the rising problems in cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Barry J; Bezak, Eva; Marcu, Loredana G

    2013-01-01

    Despite the latest technological advances in radiotherapy, cancer control is still challenging for several tumour sites. The survival rates for the most deadly cancers, such as ovarian and pancreatic, have not changed over the last decades. The solution to the problem lies in the change of focus: from local treatment to systemic therapy. The aim of this paper is to present the current status as well as the gaps in radiotherapy and, at the same time, to look into potential solutions to improve cancer control and survival. The currently available advanced radiotherapy treatment techniques have been analysed and their cost-effectiveness discussed. The problem of systemic disease management was specifically targeted. Clinical studies show limited benefit in cancer control from hadron therapy. However, targeted therapies together with molecular imaging could improve treatment outcome for several tumour sites while controlling the systemic disease. The advances in photon therapy continue to be competitive with the much more expensive hadron therapy. To justify the cost effectiveness of proton/heavy ion therapy, there is a need for phase III randomised clinical trials. Furthermore, the success of systemic disease management lies in the fusion between radiation oncology technology and microbiology.

  5. Pain management of opioid-treated cancer patients in hospital settings in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorff, L.; Peuckmann, V.; Sjøgren, Per

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance and quality of cancer pain management in hospital settings. METHODS: Anaesthesiologists specialised in pain and palliative medicine studied pain management in departments of oncology and surgery. Study days were randomly chosen and patients treated with oral opioids......-treated patients in hospital settings: however, focussing on average pain intensity, the outcome seems favourable compared with other countries. Pain mechanisms were seldom examined and adjuvant drugs were not specifically used for neuropathic pain. Opioid dosing intervals and supplemental opioid doses were most...

  6. Poster - 26: Electronic Waiting Room Management for a busy Cancer Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kildea, John; Hijal, Tarek [McGill University Health Center (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    We describe an electronic waiting room management system that we have developed and deployed in our cancer centre. Our system connects with our electronic medical records systems, gathers data for a machine learning algorithm to predict future patient waiting times, and is integrated with a mobile phone app. The system has been in operation for over nine months and has led to reduced lines, calmer waiting rooms and overwhelming patient and staff satisfaction.

  7. Proactive strategies for regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer: implications for optimal patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan G

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gazala Khan,1 Rebecca A Moss,2 Fadi Braiteh,3,4 Marc Saltzman5 1Department of Hematology and Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USA; 2Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USA; 3US Oncology Research, Las Vegas, NV, USA; 4Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA; 5Innovative Medical Research of South Florida, Inc, Aventura, FL, USA Abstract: Regorafenib is a broad-spectrum oral multikinase inhibitor that targets several angiogenic, oncogenic, and stromal receptor tyrosine kinases that support the tumor microenvironment. Results from the pivotal Phase III Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated with Regorafenib or Placebo After Failure of Standard Therapy (CORRECT trial showed that the addition of regorafenib to best supportive care resulted in a significant improvement in median overall survival and progression-free survival compared with placebo plus best supportive care in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC following all available approved therapies. Thus, regorafenib is the first oral multikinase inhibitor indicated for mCRC; it currently has approval in the USA, EU, Japan, Canada, and Singapore for the treatment of mCRC patients who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, and, if the tumor is KRAS wild-type, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. In this review, we highlight regorafenib's mechanism of action, present key efficacy data from the CORRECT trial, and discuss how to proactively manage common adverse events (eg, hand-foot skin reaction, hypertension, oral mucositis, diarrhea, and fatigue experienced by patients receiving regorafenib. Increased awareness of potential adverse events associated with regorafenib and the implementation of proactive strategies to prevent, monitor, and manage these

  8. An ethnographic study of barriers to cancer pain management and opioid availability in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebaron, Virginia; Beck, Susan L; Maurer, Martha; Black, Fraser; Palat, Gayatri

    2014-05-01

    The world's global cancer burden disproportionally affects lower income countries, where 80% of patients present with late-stage disease and have limited access to palliative care and effective pain-relieving medications, such as morphine. Consequently, millions die each year with unrelieved pain. Objective. The objective of this study was to examine barriers to opioid availability and cancer pain management in India, with an emphasis on the experiences of nurses, who are often the front-line providers of palliative care. Methods. Fifty-nine participants were recruited using a purposive, snowball sampling strategy. Ethnographic data collection included in-depth, semistructured interviews (n = 54), 400+ hours of participant observation, and review of documents over 9 months at a government cancer hospital in South India. Systematic qualitative analysis led to identification of key barriers that are exemplified by representative quotes. Results. Morphine is more available at this study site than in most of India, but access is limited to patients seen by the palliative care service, and significant gaps in supply still occur. Systems to measure and improve pain outcomes are largely absent. Key barriers related to pain management include the role of nursing, opioid misperceptions, bureaucratic hurdles, and sociocultural/infrastructure challenges. Implications. Interventions must streamline process details of morphine procurement, work within the existing sociocultural infrastructure to ensure opioids reach patients most in need, target unexpected audiences for symptom management education, and account for role expectations of health care providers. Conclusion. Macro- and micro-level policy and practice changes are needed to improve opioid availability and cancer pain management in India.

  9. PSA testing anxiety, psychological morbidity, and PSA utility in the management of prostate cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Micsunescu, Anamaria Elia

    2017-01-01

    Anecdotal reports from urologists and medical oncologists have suggested that patients with prostate cancer (PCa) often present with anxiety related to ongoing monitoring of their PSA levels as part of their disease management. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to determine the prevalence and severity of prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing anxiety in a population of patients with either localised or metastatic PCa living in Australia. Other aspects of psychological morbidit...

  10. Covered Bronchial Stent Insertion to Manage Airway Obstruction with Hemoptysis Caused by Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sae Ah; Kim, Do Hyeong [Dankook University College of Medicine, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Jen, Gyeong Sik [Bundang CHA General Hospital, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Malignant airway obstruction and hemoptysis are common in lung cancer patients. Recently, airway stent is commonly used to preserve airway in malignant airway obstruction. Hemoptysis can be managed through various methods including conservative treatment, endobronchial tamponade, bronchoscopic intervention, embolization and surgery. In our case studies, we sought to investigate the effectiveness of airway stents for re-opening the airway as well as tamponade effects in four patients with malignant airway obstruction and bleeding caused by tumors or lymph node invasions.

  11. Radiation therapy in the management of locally advanced and disseminated breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, F.C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation theraoy should be fully used in the management of advanced breast cancer. Locally advanced primary or recurrent carcinoma, with limited extent, should be treated aggressively, aimed at permanent control. Palliative treatment of incurable or metastatic lesions relieves symptoms and improves patient's quality of survival. Some metastatic lesions involving vital structures may create emergencies. Prompt institution of radiation therapy may reverse the serious complication and save the patient's life

  12. Poster - 26: Electronic Waiting Room Management for a busy Cancer Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kildea, John; Hijal, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    We describe an electronic waiting room management system that we have developed and deployed in our cancer centre. Our system connects with our electronic medical records systems, gathers data for a machine learning algorithm to predict future patient waiting times, and is integrated with a mobile phone app. The system has been in operation for over nine months and has led to reduced lines, calmer waiting rooms and overwhelming patient and staff satisfaction.

  13. Impact of (18)F-Fluoride PET on Intended Management of Patients with Cancers Other Than Prostate Cancer: Results from the National Oncologic PET Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillner, Bruce E; Siegel, Barry A; Hanna, Lucy; Duan, Fenghai; Shields, Anthony F; Quinn, Bruce; Coleman, R Edward

    2014-07-01

    The National Oncologic PET Registry prospectively assessed the impact of PET with (18)F-sodium fluoride (NaF PET) on intended management of Medicare patients with suspected or known osseous metastasis. We report our findings for cancers other than prostate and make selected comparisons to our previously reported prostate cancer cohort. Data were collected from both referring and interpreting physicians before and after NaF PET in patients (age ≥ 65 y) stratified for initial staging (IS; n = 570), for suspected first osseous metastasis (FOM; n = 1,814; breast, 781 [43%]; lung, 380 [21%]; and all other cancers, 653 [36%]), and for suspected progression of osseous metastasis (POM; n = 435). The dominant indication was bone pain. If NaF PET were unavailable, conventional bone scintigraphy would have been ordered in 85% of patients. In IS, 28% of patients had suspected or confirmed nonosseous metastasis. If neither conventional bone scintigraphy nor NaF PET were available, referring physicians would have ordered other advanced imaging more than 70% of the time rather than initiate treatment for suspected FOM (11%-16%) or POM (18%-22%). When intended management was classified as either treatment or nontreatment, the intended management change for each cancer type was highest in POM, lower in IS, and lowest in FOM. For suspected FOM, intended management change was lower in breast (24%), lung (36%), or other cancers (31%), compared with prostate cancer (44%) (P definite metastases) frequencies were similar across cancer types. After normal/benign/equivocal PET results, 15% of breast, 30% lung, and 38% prostate cancer patients had treatment, likely reflecting differences in management of nonosseous disease. For patients with definite metastasis on NaF PET, nonprostate, compared with prostate, cancer patients had post-PET plans for more frequent biopsy, alternative imaging, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. In the smaller IS and POM cohorts, differences among cancer types

  14. Usability and feasibility of health IT interventions to enhance Self-Care for Lymphedema Symptom Management in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei R. Fu, PhD, RN, FAAN

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: This usability study provided evidence on breast cancer survivor's acceptance and highly positive evaluation of TOLF's usability as well as feasibility of using technologically-driven delivery model to enhance self-care strategies for lymphedema symptom management.

  15. Critical appraisal of the use of regorafenib in the management of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Festino, Lucia; Fabozzi, Alessio; Manzo, Anna; Gambardella, Valentina; Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; De Vita, Ferdinando; Orditura, Michele; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Morgillo, Floriana

    2013-01-01

    The lack of valid clinical management options for patients affected by metastatic colorectal cancer, which has progressed after all approved standard treatments, has lead to research into new active molecules. Regorafenib is an oral small-molecule multi kinase inhibitor, binding to several intracellular kinases, with powerful inhibitory activity against vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR-1,VEGFR-2, and VEGFR-3), platelet-derived growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, Raf, TIE-2, and the kinases KIT, RET, and BRAF. The antitumor activity of regorafenib has been tested in vitro and in vivo, and inhibition of tumor growth has been observed in several cancer models, particularly colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The most frequent adverse events of grade 3 or higher related to regorafenib were hand-foot skin reaction, fatigue, diarrhea, hypertension, and rash or desquamation. Only a few Phase I–II trials, and most recently a Phase III trial in pretreated colorectal cancer, have been carried out to date. Several ongoing trials are testing the efficacy of regorafenib in combination with chemotherapy. At this point in time, regorafenib is the first small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor to gain approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for pretreated metastatic colorectal cancer patients

  16. A Novel Role for Raloxifene Nanomicelles in Management of Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Taurin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Of patients with castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, less than 25–33% survive more than five years. Recent studies have implicated estrogen, acting either alone or synergistically with androgens in the development of castrate resistant prostate cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, as well as a limited number of clinical trials, have highlighted the potential of selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene (Ral for the treatment of castrate resistant prostate cancer. However, the poor oral bioavailability and metabolism of selective estrogen receptor modulators limit their efficiency in clinical application. To overcome these limitations, we have used styrene co-maleic acid (SMA micelle to encapsulate raloxifene. Compared to free drug, SMA-Ral micelles had 132 and 140% higher cytotoxicity against PC3 and DU 145 prostate cell lines, respectively. SMA-Ral effectively inhibits cell cycle progression, increases apoptosis, and alters the integrity of tumor spheroid models. In addition, the micellar system induced changes in expression and localization of estrogen receptors, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and downstream effectors associated with cell proliferation and survival. Finally, SMA-Ral treatment decreased migration and invasion of castrate resistant prostate cancer cell lines. In conclusion, SMA-Ral micelles can potentially benefit new strategies for clinical management of castrate resistant prostate cancer.

  17. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy in the management of ovarian cancer: focus on carboplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurie Markman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Maurie MarkmanUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAAbstract: Both pre-clinical studies and phase 1–2 clinical trials have provided strong support for the potential role of regional drug delivery in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer, a disease process whose major manifestations remain largely localized to the peritoneal cavity in the majority of individuals with this malignancy. The results of 3 phase 3 randomized trials have revealed the favorable impact of primary cisplatin-based intraperitoneal chemotherapy in women who initiate drug treatment with small-volume residual ovarian cancer following an attempt at optimal surgical cytoreduction. Concerns have been raised regarding the toxicity of regional treatment, particularly the side-effect profile associated with cisplatin. One rational approach to improving the tolerability of intraperitoneal chemotherapy is to substitute carboplatin for cisplatin. This review discusses the rationale for and data supporting regional treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer, and highlights the potential role for intraperitoneal carboplatin in this clinical setting.Keywords: ovarian cancer, intraperitoneal chemotherapy, cisplatin, carboplatin

  18. The case for focal brachytherapy for the management of low grade prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.; Enari, E.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Radical therapy of low to intermediate prostate cancer patients can cause substantial adverse events relating to genitourinary and rectal toxicity. Yet there is little evidence that such treatment results in increased life expectancy. On the other hand, watchful waiting is associated with active surveillance and the patient must accept that the cancer remains untreated and has a risk of progression. Focal therapy of low grade prostate cancer provides an intermediate approach to the management of this cancer. The approach is to treat only those positive segments on biopsy and so reduce the likelihood of adverse events. However, continued surveillance is required because of the increased risk of disease progression. Focal therapy needs to be evaluated using available ablative therapies. Recent studies of focal HIFU for 20 patients showed PSA reduced from 7.3 to 1.5 ng/mL at 12 months. 1/20 patients had inadequate erections and 2120 required pads. 17/19 had no histological evidence of cancer and none had evidence of high volume or Gleason = 7 cancer in the treated lobe. Seed brachytherapy is commonly used for radical prostate treatment of low volume disease. As the same template can be used for seed therapy as is used for biopsy, the technique is ideally suited for focal brachytherapy. As any treatment involving less than the entire gland involves the risk of leaving viable cancer cells outside the treatment zone, a phase 3 randomised clinical trial between radical and focal brachytherapy is advocated to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of the latter relative to radical therapy.

  19. Prognostic Biomarkers Used for Localised Prostate Cancer Management: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Pierre-Jean; Allory, Yves; Gauchez, Anne-Sophie; Asselain, Bernard; Beuzeboc, Philippe; de Cremoux, Patricia; Fontugne, Jacqueline; Georges, Agnès; Hennequin, Christophe; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Massard, Christophe; Millet, Ingrid; Murez, Thibaut; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Rouvière, Olivier; Kassab-Chahmi, Diana; Rozet, François; Descotes, Jean-Luc; Rébillard, Xavier

    2017-03-07

    Prostate cancer stratification is based on tumour size, pretreatment PSA level, and Gleason score, but it remains imperfect. Current research focuses on the discovery and validation of novel prognostic biomarkers to improve the identification of patients at risk of aggressive cancer or of tumour relapse. This systematic review by the Intergroupe Coopérateur Francophone de Recherche en Onco-urologie (ICFuro) analysed new evidence on the analytical validity and clinical validity and utility of six prognostic biomarkers (PHI, 4Kscore, MiPS, GPS, Prolaris, Decipher). All available data for the six biomarkers published between January 2002 and April 2015 were systematically searched and reviewed. The main endpoints were aggressive prostate cancer prediction, additional value compared to classical prognostic parameters, and clinical benefit for patients with localised prostate cancer. The preanalytical and analytical validations were heterogeneous for all tests and often not adequate for the molecular signatures. Each biomarker was studied for specific indications (candidates for a first or second biopsy, and potential candidates for active surveillance, radical prostatectomy, or adjuvant treatment) for which the level of evidence (LOE) was variable. PHI and 4Kscore were the biomarkers with the highest LOE for discriminating aggressive and indolent tumours in different indications. Blood biomarkers (PHI and 4Kscore) have the highest LOE for the prediction of more aggressive prostate cancer and could help clinicians to manage patients with localised prostate cancer. The other biomarkers show a potential prognostic value; however, they should be evaluated in additional studies to confirm their clinical validity. We reviewed studies assessing the value of six prognostic biomarkers for prostate cancer. On the basis of the available evidence, some biomarkers could help in discriminating between aggressive and non-aggressive tumours with an additional value compared to the

  20. The Impact of a National Guideline on the Management of Cancer Pain on the Practice of Pain Assessment and Registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besse, K.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Vissers, K.; Engels, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch clinical practice guideline on the diagnosis and management of pain in patients with cancer was published in 2008 and intensively promoted to healthcare professionals who see patients with cancer. One of the most important recommendations is the systematic registering of the pain and its

  1. Electronic patient self-assessment and management (SAM): a novel framework for cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J; Salz, Talya; Basch, Ethan; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Carroll, Peter R; Tighe, Foss; Eastham, James; Rosen, Raymond C

    2010-06-17

    We propose a novel framework for management of cancer survivorship: electronic patient Self-Assessment and Management (SAM). SAM is a framework for transfer of information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice. Patients who participate in the SAM system are contacted by email at regular intervals and asked to complete validated questionnaires online. Patient responses on these questionnaires are then analyzed in order to provide patients with real-time, online information about their progress and to provide them with tailored and standardized medical advice. Patient-level data from the questionnaires are ported in real time to the patient's health care provider to be uploaded to clinic notes. An initial version of SAM has been developed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) for aiding the clinical management of patients after surgery for prostate cancer. Pilot testing at MSKCC and UCSF suggests that implementation of SAM systems are feasible, with no major problems with compliance (> 70% response rate) or security. SAM is a conceptually simple framework for passing information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice.

  2. Effectiveness of Teach-Back Self-Management Training Program on Happiness of Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadidarrehsima, Sudabeh; Rahnama, Mozhgan; Afshari, Mahdi; Asadi Bidmeshki, Elahe

    2016-10-01

    Self-management training is one of the ways to empower patients to cope with disease. The aim of this before-and-after quasi-experimental study was to determine effects of a teach-back self-management training method on breast cancer patient happiness. Fifty breast cancer patients who visited the Park-e Neshat Limited Surgery Clinic in Kerman, Iran were randomly divided into intervention and control groups after convenience sampling and checking for inclusion eligibility. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Oxford Happiness Inventory before and after teach-back training and analyzed using SPSS 23. Findings showed no significant difference between mean happiness scores in the two groups before the intervention. However, after the intervention, the mean happiness score in the intervention group increased from 37.2 to 62.9, while it decreased from 41.4 to 29.8 in the control group. These changes were statistically significant (phappiness levels in breast cancer patients. Therefore, the use of this method is recommended to improve self-management and increase happiness. Creative Commons Attribution License

  3. Electronic patient self-assessment and management (SAM: a novel framework for cancer survivorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tighe Foss

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We propose a novel framework for management of cancer survivorship: electronic patient Self-Assessment and Management (SAM. SAM is a framework for transfer of information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice. Methods Patients who participate in the SAM system are contacted by email at regular intervals and asked to complete validated questionnaires online. Patient responses on these questionnaires are then analyzed in order to provide patients with real-time, online information about their progress and to provide them with tailored and standardized medical advice. Patient-level data from the questionnaires are ported in real time to the patient's health care provider to be uploaded to clinic notes. An initial version of SAM has been developed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF for aiding the clinical management of patients after surgery for prostate cancer. Results Pilot testing at MSKCC and UCSF suggests that implementation of SAM systems are feasible, with no major problems with compliance (> 70% response rate or security. Conclusion SAM is a conceptually simple framework for passing information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice.

  4. Spanish consensus for the management of patients with advanced radioactive iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Galofré, Juan Carlos; Grande, Enrique; Zafón Llopis, Carles; Ramón y Cajal Asensio, Teresa; Navarro González, Elena; Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula; Santamaría Sandi, Javier; Gómez Sáez, José Manuel; Capdevila, Jaume

    2016-04-01

    Approximately one third of the patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) who develop structurally-evident metastatic disease are refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI). Most deaths from thyroid cancer occur in these patients. The main objective of this consensus is to address the most controversial aspects of management of these patients. On behalf of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology & Nutrition (SEEN) and the Spanish Group for Orphan and Infrequent Tumors (GETHI), the Spanish Task Force for Thyroid Cancer, consisting of endocrinologists and oncologists, reviewed the relevant literature and prepared a series of clinically relevant questions related to management of advanced RAI-refractory DTC. Ten clinically relevant questions were identified by the task force. In answering to these 10 questions, the task force included recommendations regarding the best definition of refractoriness; the best therapeutic options including watchful waiting, local therapies, and systemic therapy (e.g. kinase inhibitors), when sodium iodide symporter (NIS) restoration may be expected; and how recent advances in molecular biology have increased our understanding of the disease. In response to our appointment as a task force by the SEEN and GHETI, we developed a consensus to help in clinical management of patients with advanced RAI-refractory DTC. We think that this consensus will provide helpful and current recommendations that will help patients with this disorder to get optimal medical care. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. [China expert consensus on the management of dyslipidemia in postmenopausal patients with early-stage breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-23

    Estrogen has an impact on the type of lipoproteins and the blood lipid levels, thus protecting the cardiovascular system. Postmenopausal breast cancer patients suffer a significant decrease in estrogen levels due to both physiological changes and the use of drugs, and thus have a higher risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, strict lipid management is required for postmenopausal breast cancer patients receiving endocrine therapy. However, no guidelines have been developed in terms of lipid management and intervention for postmenopausal breast cancer patients. The Chinese expert group of multidisciplinary management of dyslipidemia in breast cancer patients with endocrine therapy, after deep investigation into the management of dyslipidemia in postmenopausal patients with early-stage breast cancer, has developed the China Expert Consensus on Dyslipidemia Management in Postmenopausal Patients with Early-stage Breast Cancer. The Consensus clearly defines the goals and measures of interventions for dyslipidemia, hoping to effectively reduce the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal breast cancer patients and further improve the long-term survival of the patients.

  6. Evaluation of hypnotherapy in pain management of cancer patients: A clinical trial from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Kumar Sharma

    2017-01-01

    study indicates that hypnotherapeutic interventions are effective in the management of pain in individuals with cancer.

  7. The work of nurse case managers in a cancer and cardiovascular disease risk screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Jacqueline; Schutt, Russell K; Gall, Gail B; Cruz, Elizabeth Riley; Woodford, Mary Lou

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual model of nursing and health policy-based study was to identify the frequency and correlates of activities performed by nurse case managers. Massachusetts Women's Health Network (WHN) contracting organization sites for breast and cervical cancer and cardiovascular disease risk screening. Twenty nurse case managers were interviewed. More time was spent performing client service activities than bureaucratic activities. Frequently performed client service activities were tracking test results, finding/connecting with clients, assessing client needs, and educating clients. The most frequently performed activity was documenting services; the least, discharging clients. Client service activity frequency was correlated with client caseload size, social barriers, overall workload, satisfaction with the way activities are carried out in the WHN, special training in WHN policies and procedures, and contracting organization service delivery arrangements. Bureaucratic activity frequency was correlated with caseload size, workload, months as a WHN case manager, system barriers, satisfaction with the way activities were carried out in the WHN, and special training. Documentation requires a great deal of WHN nurse case managers' time, which perhaps could be more productively spent with clients. Thus, more efficient ways to document services need to be identified. Additional research is needed to determine similarities and differences in activities performed by WHN nurse case managers and other case managers working in cancer and cardiovascular disease screening programs. Strategies need to be identified to remove all barriers that interfere with performance of case manager practice activities. Strategies are needed to reduce client fear of bills, overcome scheduling constraints, and improve translation services to lessen language barriers to effective communication.

  8. Clinicians' Perspectives on Managing Symptom Clusters in Advanced Cancer: A Semistructured Interview Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Skye T; Butow, Phyllis N; Agar, Meera; Lovell, Melanie R; Boyle, Frances; Stockler, Martin; Forster, Benjamin C; Tong, Allison

    2016-04-01

    Managing symptom clusters or multiple concurrent symptoms in patients with advanced cancer remains a clinical challenge. The optimal processes constituting effective management of symptom clusters remain uncertain. To describe the attitudes and strategies of clinicians in managing multiple co-occurring symptoms in patients with advanced cancer. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 48 clinicians (palliative care physicians [n = 10], oncologists [n = 6], general practitioners [n = 6], nurses [n = 12], and allied health providers [n = 14]), purposively recruited from two acute hospitals, two palliative care centers, and four community general practices in Sydney, Australia. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis and adapted grounded theory. Six themes were identified: uncertainty in decision making (inadequacy of scientific evidence, relying on experiential knowledge, and pressure to optimize care); attunement to patient and family (sensitivity to multiple cues, prioritizing individual preferences, addressing psychosocial and physical interactions, and opening Pandora's box); deciphering cause to guide intervention (disaggregating symptoms and interactions, flexibility in assessment, and curtailing investigative intrusiveness); balancing complexities in medical management (trading off side effects, minimizing mismatched goals, and urgency in resolving severe symptoms); fostering hope and empowerment (allaying fear of the unknown, encouraging meaning making, championing patient empowerment, and truth telling); and depending on multidisciplinary expertise (maximizing knowledge exchange, sharing management responsibility, contending with hierarchical tensions, and isolation and discontinuity of care). Management of symptom clusters, as both an art and a science, is currently fraught with uncertainty in decision making. Strengthening multidisciplinary collaboration, continuity of care, more pragmatic planning of clinical trials to address more than one

  9. The acute oncologist’s role in managing patients with cancer and other comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Shankland

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: An Acute Oncology Service (AOS is paramount to providing timely and improved pathways of care for patients who are admitted to hospital with cancer-related problems or suspected cancer. Objective: To establish an AOS pilot study to decide how best to implement such a service locally. Methods: The AOS, which included collaboration between the oncology and palliative care teams at the Northern General Hospital in Sheffield, UK, ensured that the majority of oncology patients in the region received timely assessment by an oncologist if they became acutely unwell as a result of their cancer or its treatment. The AOS consisted of a thrice-weekly ward round, and daily telephone advice service. Results: We report on patient data during the first 12 months of the pilot study. Delivery of the AOS enhanced communication between the services and provided inter-professional education and support, resulting in earlier oncological team involvement in the management of patients with cancer admitted under other teams, as well as provision of advice to patients and their caregivers and families. Provision of the AOS shortened the mean length of hospital stay by 6 days. Two case studies are presented to illustrate the typical challenges faced when managing these patients. Conclusions: Establishment of the AOS enabled effective collaboration between the oncology and other clinical teams to provide a rapid and streamlined referral pathway of patients to the AOS. Locally, this process has been supported by the development of acute oncology protocols, which are now in use across the local cancer network.

  10. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Aristei, Cynthia; Glimelius, Bengt; Minsky, Bruce D.; Beets-Tan, Regina; Borras, Jose M.; Haustermans, Karin; Maingon, Philippe; Overgaard, Jens; Pahlman, Lars; Quirke, Phil; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Taylor, Irving; Van Cutsem, Eric; Velde, Cornelius Van de; Cellini, Numa; Latini, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: During the first decade of the 21st century a number of important European randomized studies were published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence from the literature, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: Looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). Methods: Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. The document was available to all Committee members as a web-based document customized for the consensus process. Eight chapters were identified: epidemiology, diagnostics, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatment toxicity and quality of life, follow-up, and research questions. Each chapter was subdivided by a topic, and a series of statements were developed. Each member commented and voted, sentence by sentence thrice. Sentences upon which an agreement was not reached after voting round no. 2 were openly debated during a Consensus Conference in Perugia (Italy) from 11 December to 13 December 2008. A hand-held televoting system collected the opinions of both the Committee members and the audience after each debate. The Executive Committee scored percentage consensus based on three categories: 'large consensus', 'moderate consensus', and 'minimum consensus'. Results: The total number of the voted sentences was 207. Of the 207, 86% achieved large consensus, 13% achieved moderate consensus, and only 3 (1%) resulted in minimum consensus. No statement was disagreed by more than 50% of the members. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the members, and the majority was voted on by >85%. Conclusions: This Consensus Conference represents an expertise opinion process that may help shape future programs, investigational protocols, and guidelines

  11. Saw Palmetto for Symptom Management During Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Gwen K; Sikorskii, Alla; Safikhani, Abolfazl; McVary, Kevin T; Herman, James

    2016-06-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs) affect 75%-80% of men undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer. To determine the safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and preliminary efficacy of Serenoa repens commonly known as saw palmetto (SP) for management of LUTS during RT for prostate cancer. The dose finding phase used the time-to-event continual reassessment method to evaluate safety of three doses (320, 640, and 960 mg) of SP. Dose-limiting toxicities were assessed for 22 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events for nausea, gastritis, and anorexia. The exploratory randomized controlled trial phase assessed preliminary efficacy of the MTD against placebo. The primary outcome of LUTS was measured over 22 weeks using the International Prostate Symptom Score. Additional longitudinal assessments included quality of life measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate. The dose finding phase was completed by 27 men who reported no dose-limiting toxicities and with 20 participants at the MTD of 960 mg daily. The exploratory randomized controlled trial phase included 21 men, and no statistically significant differences in the International Prostate Symptom Score were observed. The prostate-specific concerns score of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate improved in the SP group (P = 0.03). Of 11 men in the placebo group, two received physician-prescribed medications to manage LUTS compared with none of the 10 men in the SP group. SP at 960 mg may be a safe herbal supplement, but its efficacy in managing LUTS during RT needs further investigation. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ixabepilone: a new treatment option for the management of taxane-resistant metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobham, Marta Vallee; Donovan, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Ixabepilone (Ixempra ® ; Bristol-Myers Squibb) is a novel microtubule stabilizing agent recently approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). This article focuses on considerations for ixabepilone administration and adverse event (AE) management, drawing from the biomedical literature indexed in PubMed, published abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings, and the manufacturer’s prescribing information for ixabepilone. Administered as monotherapy or in combination with capecitabine in clinical studies, ixabepilone demonstrated positive clinical response rates, prolonged progression-free survival, and a favorable safety profile in patients with MBC. Treatment-related AEs were predictable and manageable with dose modification, treatment interruption, and active management. As ixabepilone undergoes development in earlier lines of breast cancer therapy and in other solid tumors, oncology nurses will encounter more and more patients receiving ixabepilone therapy. If nurses are acquainted with the unique management strategies associated with ixabepilone treatment, as detailed herein, patients are more likely to receive the full benefit of therapy

  13. Systems Support Mapping in Guiding Self-Management in Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-26

    Cancer Survivor; Stage I Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage II Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v8

  14. A systematic review of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies: management strategies and economic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Vissink, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    , amifostine, muscarinic agonist stimulation, oral mucosal lubricants, acupuncture, and submandibular gland transfer. There is evidence that salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies can be prevented or symptoms be minimized to some degree, depending on the type of cancer treatment....... Management guideline recommendations are provided for IMRT, amifostine, muscarinic agonist stimulation, oral mucosal lubricants, acupuncture, and submandibular gland transfer. Fields of sparse literature identified included effects of gustatory and masticatory stimulation, specific oral mucosal lubricant...... formulas, submandibular gland transfer, acupuncture, hyperbaric oxygen treatment, management strategies in pediatric cancer populations, and the economic consequences of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia...

  15. A pilot videoconference group stress management program in cancer survivors: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Eric S; Partridge, Ann H; Blackmon, Jaime E; Morgan, Evan; Recklitis, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a challenging experience and there is evidence that psychosocial interventions are effective at improving adjustment following treatment. At our cancer center, 14 cancer survivors (breast, prostate and blood cancers) completed a four-session cognitive-behavioral stress program. The first session was delivered at the survivor's local cancer center, where they were provided with a loaner tablet. The three subsequent sessions were delivered through group-based videoconference on the tablet. Session content was supplemented with a tailored ebook, designed specifically for this program. Participants provided feedback about the program as well as a standardized measure of perceived stress. Despite evidence that psychosocial programs are effective, there are significant barriers to dissemination, particularly for those residing in rural areas who do not live near academic medical centers where such programming is more readily available. Our experiences delivering a group-based videoconference program in cancer survivors are described, including positives and challenges associated with its design and implementation. Study participants enrolled from across four different US states, and the majority reported at least a 30-minute commute to their cancer center. This travel burden played a meaningful role in their desire to participate in our videoconference-based program. Although participants reported that session content was well suited to addressing stress management concerns, and session facilitators were able to effectively teach program techniques (eg progressive muscle relaxation, cognitive-reframing) and that the program was helpful overall, only modest improvements in perceived stress were seen. Participants noted challenges of the delivery including feeling disconnected from others, difficulty focusing, technical problems, and a desire for a longer program. Thus, although the novel delivery of a group-based, psychosocial program using tablet

  16. Contemporary management of prostate cancer: a practice survey of Ontario genitourinary radiation oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, George; D'Souza, David; Crook, Juanita; Malone, Shawn; Sathya, Jinka; Morton, Gerard

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To survey radiation oncology practice in the utilization of hormonal and radiation therapy in the primary, adjuvant and salvage treatment of localized prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Genitourinary radiation oncologists practicing in Ontario were invited to participate in a practice survey examining staging, hormonal and radiation management, and radiation technique for a variety of common clinical scenarios. Background demographic information was collected on all respondents. The survey consisted of three cases relating to the hormonal/radiation management of low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer as well as two adjuvant and one salvage post-prostatectomy scenarios. The survey response rate was 70% (26/37). Results: Clinicians were more likely to utilize laboratory and imaging studies for staging as the risk categorization increased. Low-risk disease was managed with radiation alone in 26/26 (70 Gy in 65%, 74-79.8 Gy in 35%). Intermediate-risk disease was managed with radiation (70 Gy in 46%, 74-79.8 Gy in 54%) with neoadjuvant hormones in 58%. All respondents managed high-risk disease with adjuvant hormones in addition to radiation therapy (70-71 Gy in 85%, and 76 Gy in 15%). In the pT3a, margin negative (PSA undetectable) scenario, most individuals would not recommend adjuvant radiation (73%). If margins were positive, 30% would still not recommend adjuvant radiation. In the salvage scenario (slowly rising PSA 4 years post-prostatectomy for pT2a close margin disease), all respondents would manage with radiation therapy. Hormones were not routinely recommended in the initial management of the adjuvant and salvage scenarios. Radiation doses utilized for both adjuvant and salvage treatment ranged from 60-70 Gy (median 66 Gy). Conclusions: General agreement exists for the management of low- and high-risk disease and in the post-prostatectomy salvage setting. Use of dose-escalation and neoadjuvant hormones in the intermediate

  17. Critical appraisal of the use of regorafenib in the management of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Festino L

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lucia Festino*, Alessio Fabozzi*, Anna Manzo, Valentina Gambardella, Erika Martinelli, Teresa Troiani, Ferdinando De Vita, Michele Orditura, Fortunato Ciardiello, Floriana Morgillo Division of Medical Oncology, Department of clinical and experimental medicine and surgery "F. Magrassi e A. Lanzara", Second University of Naples, Napoli, Italy*These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The lack of valid clinical management options for patients affected by metastatic colorectal cancer, which has progressed after all approved standard treatments, has lead to research into new active molecules. Regorafenib is an oral small-molecule multi kinase inhibitor, binding to several intracellular kinases, with powerful inhibitory activity against vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR-1,VEGFR-2, and VEGFR-3, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, Raf, TIE-2, and the kinases KIT, RET, and BRAF. The antitumor activity of regorafenib has been tested in vitro and in vivo, and inhibition of tumor growth has been observed in several cancer models, particularly colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The most frequent adverse events of grade 3 or higher related to regorafenib were hand-foot skin reaction, fatigue, diarrhea, hypertension, and rash or desquamation. Only a few Phase I–II trials, and most recently a Phase III trial in pretreated colorectal cancer, have been carried out to date. Several ongoing trials are testing the efficacy of regorafenib in combination with chemotherapy. At this point in time, regorafenib is the first small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor to gain approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for pretreated metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Keywords: colorectal cancer, angiogenesis, regorafenib

  18. Managing the risk of cancer in Cowden syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammami Sonia

    2012-07-01

    including surveillance and management plans for these patients should be distinguished from those of the general population, and may lead to a more timely diagnosis and treatment of cancers associated with this syndrome.

  19. Management of Cervical Cancer: Strategies for Limited-Resource Centres - A Guide for Radiation Oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among women globally, even though it is the cancer with the greatest demonstrated potential for secondary prevention. In some regions of the world the incidence is alarmingly high, such as in sub-Saharan Africa, some countries in Latin America, India and South-East Asia. This disease is highly preventable and curable at a relatively low risk and low cost when screening of asymptomatic women is available, together with appropriate diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. In developing clinical guidelines, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has selected forms of cancer or clinical situations that are very common in low and middle income Member States and for which radiation oncologists consistently express a need for guidance. Clinical guidelines for the management of cervical cancer do exist in the published literature. However, these guidelines have usually been developed in and for affluent environments where all modern diagnosis and treatment modalities are available for the practitioner. In limited resource environments, the radiation oncologist is faced with the question, what would be the minimally acceptable line of action with the limited resources available? Clinical guidelines focusing on low and middle income countries provide a practical tool to these practitioners. This publication is aimed at the radiation oncologist working in centres with limited resources and treating a large number of patients with cervical cancer on a daily basis. The approach and techniques are intended to be simple, feasible and resource sparing to the extent that this is possible when dealing with a complex treatment modality. The Division of Human Health is placing special emphasis on the subject of cervical cancer, which is addressed not only in this guide but also in regional training courses and coordinated research projects on the subject

  20. 'It was all intertwined': Illness representations and self-management in patients with cancer and anxiety/depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Emma M; Scott, Jennifer L; Schüz, Natalie; Sanderson, Kristy; Schüz, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Cancer and anxiety/depression frequently co-occur, leading to poorer outcomes for these illnesses. However, the majority of existing research investigates how participants view single illnesses alone. This study aimed to explore the content of individuals' multimorbid representations and how these relate to their coping behaviours and self-management strategies for cancer and anxiety/depression. A semi-structured qualitative research design with theoretical thematic analysis. Multimorbid illness representations, coping behaviours, and self-management strategies. In interviews with 21 participants multimorbid representations varied, three participants viewed cancer and anxiety/depression as unrelated, five participants were uncertain about the relationship between cancer and anxiety/depression, and the majority of participants perceived cancer and anxiety/depression as related. This third group of participants often described relationships as causal, with representations having both positive and negative influences on coping behaviours and self-management strategies. Representations were shown to change over the course of the cancer experience, with fear of cancer recurrence and the influence of participants' most challenging illness also discussed. People hold multimorbid illness representations that can influence self-management. An awareness of these representations by researchers, health professionals, and patients is important for the creation of future interventions that aim to improve and maintain patient wellbeing.

  1. Understanding requirements of novel healthcare information systems for management of advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagholikar, Amol S; Fung, Maggie; Nelson, Colleen C

    2012-01-01

    Effective management of chronic diseases is a global health priority. A healthcare information system offers opportunities to address challenges of chronic disease management. However, the requirements of health information systems are often not well understood. The accuracy of requirements has a direct impact on the successful design and implementation of a health information system. Our research describes methods used to understand the requirements of health information systems for advanced prostate cancer management. The research conducted a survey to identify heterogeneous sources of clinical records. Our research showed that the General Practitioner was the common source of patient's clinical records (41%) followed by the Urologist (14%) and other clinicians (14%). Our research describes a method to identify diverse data sources and proposes a novel patient journey browser prototype that integrates disparate data sources.

  2. Family caregivers of palliative cancer patients at home: the puzzle of pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anita; Cohen, S Robin; Carnevale, Franco A; Ezer, Hélène; Ducharme, Francine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to understand the processes used by family caregivers to manage the pain of cancer patients at home. A total of 24 family caregivers participated. They were recruited using purposeful then theoretical sampling. The data sources were taped, transcribed (semi-structured) interviews and field notes. Data analysis was based on Strauss and Corbin's (1998) requirements for open, axial, and selective coding. The result was an explanatory model titled "the puzzle of pain management," which includes four main processes: "drawing on past experiences"; "strategizing a game plan"; "striving to respond to pain"; and "gauging the best fit," a decision-making process that joins the puzzle pieces. Understanding how family caregivers assemble their puzzle pieces can help health care professionals make decisions related to the care plans they create for pain control and help them to recognize the importance of providing information as part of resolving the puzzle of pain management.

  3. Comparison of Western and Asian Guidelines Concerning the Management of Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellino, Gianluca; Warren, Oliver; Mills, Sarah; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Tekkis, Paris P; Kontovounisios, Christos

    2018-02-01

    Guidelines are important to standardize treatments and optimize outcomes. Several societies have published authoritative guidelines for patients with colon cancer, and a certain degree of variation can be predicted. This study aims to compare Western and Asian guidelines for the management of colon cancer. A literature review was performed following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines for studies published between 2010 and 2017 by the online resources from the official Web sites of the societies/panels. Sources included guidelines by European Society of Medical Oncology, the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum, and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Only full-text studies and the latest guidelines dealing with colon cancer were included. Studies and guidelines were separately assessed by 2 authors, who independently identified discrepancies and areas for further research. These were discussed and agreed with by all the authors. The recommendations of the guidelines of each society were compared, seeking discrepancies and potential areas for improvement. Endoscopic techniques for the management of early colon cancer are discussed in detail in the Asian guidelines. Asian guidelines advocate extended (D3) lymphadenectomy on a routine basis in T3/T4 and in selected T2 patients, whereas such an approach is still under investigation in Western countries. Only US guidelines describe neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. All the guidelines recommend adjuvant treatment in selected stage II patients, but agreement exists that this is performed without solid evidence, because better outcomes are hypothesized based on studies including stage III or stage II/III patients. The role of cytoreductive surgery with intra-abdominal chemotherapy is dubious, and European guidelines only recommend it in the setting of trials. Asian guidelines endorse an aggressive surgical approach to peritoneal disease. Only US

  4. A novel computer based expert decision making model for prostate cancer disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Martin B; Forman, Ernest H; Bayazit, Yildirim; Einstein, Douglas B; Resnick, Martin I; Stovsky, Mark D

    2005-12-01

    We propose a strategic, computer based, prostate cancer decision making model based on the analytic hierarchy process. We developed a model that improves physician-patient joint decision making and enhances the treatment selection process by making this critical decision rational and evidence based. Two groups (patient and physician-expert) completed a clinical study comparing an initial disease management choice with the highest ranked option generated by the computer model. Participants made pairwise comparisons to derive priorities for the objectives and subobjectives related to the disease management decision. The weighted comparisons were then applied to treatment options to yield prioritized rank lists that reflect the likelihood that a given alternative will achieve the participant treatment goal. Aggregate data were evaluated by inconsistency ratio analysis and sensitivity analysis, which assessed the influence of individual objectives and subobjectives on the final rank list of treatment options. Inconsistency ratios less than 0.05 were reliably generated, indicating that judgments made within the model were mathematically rational. The aggregate prioritized list of treatment options was tabulated for the patient and physician groups with similar outcomes for the 2 groups. Analysis of the major defining objectives in the treatment selection decision demonstrated the same rank order for the patient and physician groups with cure, survival and quality of life being more important than controlling cancer, preventing major complications of treatment, preventing blood transfusion complications and limiting treatment cost. Analysis of subobjectives, including quality of life and sexual dysfunction, produced similar priority rankings for the patient and physician groups. Concordance between initial treatment choice and the highest weighted model option differed between the groups with the patient group having 59% concordance and the physician group having only 42

  5. Reduction of Cancer-Specific Thought Intrusions and Anxiety Symptoms With a Stress Management Intervention Among Women Undergoing Treatment for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Michael H.; Wimberly, Sarah R.; Lechner, Suzanne C.; Kazi, Aisha; Sifre, Tammy; Urcuyo, Kenya R.; Phillips, Kristin; Smith, Roselyn G.; Petronis, Vida M.; Guellati, Sophie; Wells, Kurrie A.; Blomberg, Bonnie; Carver, Charles S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective After surgery for breast cancer, many women experience anxiety relating to the cancer that can adversely affect quality of life and emotional functioning during the year postsurgery. Symptoms such as intrusive thoughts may be ameliorated during this period with a structured, group-based cognitive behavior intervention. Method A 10-week group cognitive behavior stress management intervention that included anxiety reduction (relaxation training), cognitive restructuring, and coping skills training was tested among 199 women newly treated for stage 0-III breast cancer. They were then followed for 1 year after recruitment. Results The intervention reduced reports of thought intrusion, interviewer ratings of anxiety, and emotional distress across 1 year significantly more than was seen with the control condition. The beneficial effects were maintained well past the completion of adjuvant therapy. Conclusions Structured, group-based cognitive behavior stress management may ameliorate cancer-related anxiety during active medical treatment for breast cancer and for 1 year following treatment. Group-based cognitive behavior stress management is a clinically useful adjunct to offer to women treated for breast cancer. PMID:17012691

  6. Complexity of care and strategies of self-management in patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ose D

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dominik Ose,1,2 Eva C Winkler,3 Sarah Berger,1 Ines Baudendistel,1 Martina Kamradt,1 Felicitas Eckrich,1 Joachim Szecsenyi1 1Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 2Department of Population Health, Health System Innovation and Research, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3Program for Ethics and Patient-oriented Care in Oncology, National Centre for Tumour Diseases, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Purpose: Given the inherent complexity of cancer care, in which personal, social, and clinical aspects accumulate and interact over time, self-management support need to become more comprehensive. This study has the following two aims: 1 to analyze and describe the complexity of individual patient situations and 2 to analyze and describe already established self-management strategies of patients to handle this complexity.Methods: A qualitative study was conducted. Ten focus groups were performed collecting perspectives of the following three user groups: patients with colorectal cancer (n=12 and representatives from support groups (n=2, physicians (n=17, and other health care professionals (HCPs; n=16. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.Results: The results showed that cancer patients are struggling with the complexity of their individual situations characterized by the 1 “complexity of disease”, 2 “complexity of care”, and 3 “complexity of treatment-related data”. To deal with these multifaceted situations, patients have established several individual strategies. These strategies are “proactive demanding” (eg, to get support and guidance or a meaningful dialog with the doctor, “proactive behavior” (eg, preparation of visits, and “proactive data management” (eg, in terms of merging treatment-related data and to disseminate these to their health care providers.Conclusion: Patients with colorectal cancer

  7. Managing hospital supplies: process reengineering at Gujarat Cancer Research Institute, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, K V

    2006-01-01

    Aims to give an overview of the re-engineering of processes and structures at Gujarat Cancer Research Institute (GCRI), Ahmedabad. A general review of the design, development and implementation of reengineered systems in order to address concerns about the existing systems. Findings GCRI is a comprehensive cancer care center with 550 beds and well equipped with modern diagnostic and treatment facilities. It serves about 200,000 outpatients and 16,000 inpatients annually. The approach to a better management of hospital supplies led to the design, development, and implementation of an IT-based reengineered and integrated purchase and inventory management system. The new system has given GCRI a saving of about 8 percent of its annual costs of purchases, and improved the availability of materials to the user departments. Shows that the savings obtained are used not only for buying more hospital supplies, but also to buy better quality of hospital supplies, and thereby satisfactorily address the GCRI responsibility towards meeting its social obligations for cancer care.

  8. Adverse event management of oral mucositis in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Sabine; Kosse, Jens; Loibl, Sibylle; Jackisch, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a clinically important and frequent adverse event (AE) associated with cancer treatment with conventional chemotherapy as well as new targeted agents. Incidence and severity of OM vary from treatment to treatment and from patient to patient. The pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced OM can be divided into 5 phases. OM induced by targeted therapies differs among other things in appearance, course, concomitant AEs and toxicity, and thus could be perceived as an entity distinct from chemotherapy-induced OM with an innate pathogenic mechanism. OM has a severe impact on a patient's quality of life (QoL) by causing complications such as pain and discomfort. Even more important are associated restrictions in nutrition and hydration. Thus, the efficacy of cancer therapy might be impaired due to the necessity of dose delays and dose reductions. Numerous preventive and therapeutic approaches have been evaluated, but currently no single agent has changed the standard of care in preventing and treating OM. Thus, the current management has evolved from clinical experience rather than clinical evidence. This article will review the AE 'OM' induced by breast cancer treatment with chemotherapy and targeted agents in order to provide practical guidance for management and prevention.

  9. Does Specialty Bias Trump Evidence in the Management of High-risk Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishan, Amar U; Duchesne, Gillian; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Saigal, Christopher; Rettig, Matthew; Steinberg, Michael L; King, Christopher R

    2018-06-01

    The objective was to query how specialty influences treatment recommendations for high-risk prostate cancer in 3 clinical settings: upfront management, postoperative management, and management of biochemical recurrences (BCRs) after radiotherapy (RT). We hypothesized that specialty bias would manifest in all settings, trumping available evidence. A survey of practicing urologists and radiation oncologists was distributed through electronic mail. Questions pertained to upfront management, postoperative treatment, and local salvage for postradiation BCRs. The associations between 26 selected categorical responses and specialty were assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Training level/expertise, practice setting, percentage of consultation caseload consisting of prostate cancer, and nationality were set as effect modifiers. One thousand two hundred fifty-three physicians (846 radiation oncologists and 407 urologists) completed the survey. Radiation oncologists were more likely to recommend adjuvant RT and consider it to be underutilized, and more likely to recommend salvage RT at lower prostate-specific antigen thresholds (P<0.0001). Urologists were more likely to recommend salvage radical prostatectomy or cryoablation for local salvage after RT, whereas radiation oncologists were more likely to recommend RT-based modalities and more likely to report that local salvage was underutilized after RT (P<0.0001). Urologists were more likely to report that upfront radical prostatectomy was a better definitive treatment (P<0.0001), whereas radiation oncologists were more likely to report the opposite (P=0.005). Specialty biases permeate recommendations for upfront management and management in the postoperative and post-RT BCR setting, irrespective of available evidence. These data reveal the critical need for multidisciplinary clinics and cross-specialty training as potential solutions for overcoming specialty bias.

  10. Assessing the impact of FDG-PET in the management of anal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Brandon T.; Joon, Daryl Lim; Khoo, Vincent; Quong, George; Chao, Michael; Wada, Morikatsu; Joon, Michael Lim; See, Andrew; Feigen, Malcolm; Rykers, Kym; Kai, Cynleen; Zupan, Eddy; Scott, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of FDG-PET in anal cancer for staging and impact on radiotherapy planning (RTP), response and detection of recurrent disease. Methods and materials: Fifty histopathological anal cancer patients were reviewed between 1996 and 2006. The median age was 58 years (range 36-85) with 19 males:31females. Clinical assessment with CT was compared to PET. Impact on management, disease response, recurrence and metastases was evaluated. Results: The non-PET staging was Stage I(8), Stage II(18), Stage III(22), and Stage IV(2)s. The primary was strongly FDG avid in 98% with non-excised tumors compared to CT (58%). PET upstaged 17% with unsuspected pelvic/inguinal nodal disease. Pre-treatment PET identified 11 additional by involved nodal groups in 48 patients causing RTP amendments in 19%. Post-treatment PETs at median 17 weeks (range 9-28) showed complete responses in 20 (80%) and 5 (20%) partial responses (PR). PRs were biopsy positive in 2 and negative in 3. Fifteen had follow-up scans of which all nine PETs detected recurrences were pathologically confirmed. Conclusions: Anal cancer is FDG-PET avid. PET upstages 17% and changes the RTP in 19%. PET can aid in anal cancer staging and identification of residual disease, recurrent/metastatic disease but warrants further prospective studies

  11. Benefit risk assessment and update on the use of docetaxel in the management of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alken S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Scheryll Alken, Catherine M KellyDepartment of Medical Oncology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, IrelandAbstract: The objective of this paper is to review the data supporting the use of docetaxel in the treatment of breast cancer, focusing on pharmacokinetics, efficacy in adjuvant and metastatic trials alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic and targeted agents, and the toxicity of docetaxel in comparison to paclitaxel. Docetaxel is a semisynthetic product derived from the European yew tree Taxus baccata L. It promotes the assembly of microtubules, stabilizes them, and thereby prevents their depolymerization. Docetaxel has been incorporated into neo-adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, both with and without anthracyclines. The inclusion of taxanes such as docetaxel in polychemotherapy regimens in early breast cancer is associated with a statistically significant reduction in mortality. As a single agent, docetaxel is highly active in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. In first-line treatment of metastatic breast cancer, the combination of docetaxel and capecitabine was associated with an improvement in overall survival; however, toxicity was higher. The toxicity profile of docetaxel has been well documented and is predictable; the most frequent adverse effects are neutropenia and febrile neutropenia. Taxane-specific adverse effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, are also expected but are manageable with appropriate dosing and scheduling.Keywords: taxanes, docetaxel, clinical trial, adverse effects, peripheral neuropathy, neutropenia

  12. Benefit risk assessment and update on the use of docetaxel in the management of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alken, Scheryll; Kelly, Catherine M

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the data supporting the use of docetaxel in the treatment of breast cancer, focusing on pharmacokinetics, efficacy in adjuvant and metastatic trials alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic and targeted agents, and the toxicity of docetaxel in comparison to paclitaxel. Docetaxel is a semisynthetic product derived from the European yew tree Taxus baccata L. It promotes the assembly of microtubules, stabilizes them, and thereby prevents their depolymerization. Docetaxel has been incorporated into neo-adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, both with and without anthracyclines. The inclusion of taxanes such as docetaxel in polychemotherapy regimens in early breast cancer is associated with a statistically significant reduction in mortality. As a single agent, docetaxel is highly active in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. In first-line treatment of metastatic breast cancer, the combination of docetaxel and capecitabine was associated with an improvement in overall survival; however, toxicity was higher. The toxicity profile of docetaxel has been well documented and is predictable; the most frequent adverse effects are neutropenia and febrile neutropenia. Taxane-specific adverse effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, are also expected but are manageable with appropriate dosing and scheduling

  13. Clinical practice guidelines for the surgical management of colon cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic and Cypriot Colorectal Cancer Study Group by the HeSMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xynos, Evaghelos; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Triantopoulou, Charina; Tekkis, Paris; Vini, Louiza; Tzardi, Maria; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Chrysou, Evangelia; Dervenis, Christos; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Ziras, Nikolaos; Karachaliou, Niki; Zoras, Odysseas; Agalianos, Christos; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable improvement in the management of colon cancer, there is a great deal of variation in the outcomes among European countries, and in particular among different hospital centers in Greece and Cyprus. Discrepancy in the approach strategies and lack of adherence to guidelines for the management of colon cancer may explain the situation. The aim was to elaborate a consensus on the multidisciplinary management of colon cancer, based on European guidelines (ESMO and EURECCA), and also taking into account local special characteristics of our healthcare system. Following discussion and online communication among members of an executive team, a consensus was developed. Statements entered the Delphi voting system on two rounds to achieve consensus by multidisciplinary international experts. Statements with an agreement rate of ≥80% achieved a large consensus, while those with an agreement rate of 60-80% a moderate consensus. Statements achieving an agreement of colon cancer were subjected to the Delphi methodology. Voting experts were 109. The median rate of abstain per statement was 10% (range: 0-41%). In the end of the voting process, all statements achieved a consensus by more than 80% of the experts. A consensus on the management of colon cancer was developed by applying the Delphi methodology. Guidelines are proposed along with algorithms of diagnosis and treatment. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, and adherence to guidelines is emphasized.

  14. Self-management support and eHealth for patients and informal caregivers confronted with advanced cancer : An online focus group study among nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slev, Vina N.; Pasman, H. Roeline W.; Eeltink, Corien M.; Van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F.; Verdonck-De Leeuw, Irma M.; Francke, Anneke L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Self-management by patients and informal caregivers confronted with advanced cancer is not self-evident. Therefore they might need self-management support from nurses. This article reports on nurses' perspectives on self-management support for people confronted with advanced cancer, and

  15. Improving communication in cancer pain management nursing: a randomized controlled study assessing the efficacy of a communication skills training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canivet, Delphine; Delvaux, Nicole; Gibon, Anne-Sophie; Brancart, Cyrielle; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Razavi, Darius

    2014-12-01

    Effective communication is needed for optimal cancer pain management. This study assessed the efficacy of a general communication skills training program for oncology nurses on communication about pain management. A total of 115 nurses were randomly assigned to a training group (TG) or control group (CG). The assessment included the recording of interviews with a simulated cancer patient at baseline for both groups and after training (TG) or 3 months after baseline (CG). Two psychologists rated the content of interview transcripts to assess cancer pain management communication. Group-by-time effects were measured using a generalized estimating equation. Trained nurses asked the simulated patient more questions about emotions associated with pain (relative rate [RR] = 4.28, p = 0.049) and cognitions associated with pain treatment (RR = 3.23, p management (RR = 0.40, p = 0.006) compared with untrained nurses. The general communication skills training program improved only a few of the communication strategies needed for optimal cancer pain management in nursing. General communication skills training programs should be consolidated using specific modules focusing on communication skills related to cancer pain management.

  16. Appropriate Use of FDG-PET for the Management of Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The use of PET (positron emission tomography) has become the standard quality of care for optimal management of patients with cancer. The availability of the hybrid PET/CT (positron emission tomography/computed tomography) scanner has further improved the utility of PET scanning and provides additional benefits both to patients and to the health system. This publication addresses the important issue of appropriateness of the application of PET/CT procedures in different clinical scenarios for many cancers. It is a resource for specialists in nuclear medicine and oncology, and aims to make reliable information widely available to those Member States where PET programmes are still in their planning phase or where the use of PET scanning is limited.

  17. Ovarian cancer: contribution of radiation therapy to patient management: Erskine Memorial Lecture, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Ovarian cancer may be treated with radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, or a combination. To evaluate the contribution of radiation therapy to patient management the cure rate must be estimated; data are presented suggesting that the 5-year survival rate provides a reasonable estimate of the cure rate. A study of patients treated since 1971 showed that stage and postoperative residuum could be used to divide patients into two subgroups, a poor prognosis group and a good prognosis group; a multifactorial grouping of patients in the good prognosis group who were treated postoperatively with radiation therapy only was further able to divide patients into low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups. Studies of radiation therapy for different subgroups are discussed; abdominopelvic irradiation has been shown to improve survival for approximately one-third of patients with cancer of the ovary

  18. Palliative Radiotherapy in the Local Management of Stage IVB Esophageal Cancer: Factors Affecting Swallowing and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Gen; Yamazaki, Hideya; Aibe, Norihiro; Masui, Koji; Tatekawa, Kotoha; Sasaki, Naomi; Kimoto, Takuya; Nishimura, Takeshi; Nakashima, Akihiro; Takenaka, Tadashi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Yamada, Kei

    2017-06-01

    To clarify the role of external-beam radiotherapy in the local management of state IVB esophageal cancer. We reviewed records of 31 patients with histopathologically-proven squamous cell carcinoma who underwent radiotherapy for their primary lesion. The change in dysphagia score from before to after treatment was assessed. Nutritional support-free survival (NSFS) was also evaluated. The median overall survival was 6 months. The overall rate of improvement in dysphagia score was 73% (23/31). The median NSFS was 5 months. Age at presentation esophageal cancer is an effective treatment option for dysphagia. Factors highly associated with improvement of swallowing are age, tumor location, and tumor length. Response to radiotherapy is the most important factor in improving NSFS. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  19. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer

  20. Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Management of Breast-Cancer-Related Lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Fakhari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast-cancer-related lymphedema is a significant morbidity mostly observed following primary treatments for breast cancer (surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy (1. Multiple complications might accompany lymphedema including cosmetic deformity, psychological disorders, consistent pain, and consequently decreased quality of life. Treatment  mostly focuses on reducing edema and its subsequent pain; however, no definite treatment has been hitherto introduced (2. Surgical approaches in the management of lymphedema are efficient including physiologic methods (e.g. flap interposition, lymph transfer, and lymphatic bypass and reductive techniques (e.g. liposuction (3. While the former mostly targets at reducing lymphedema through restoring lymphatic drainage, the latter aims at removing fibrofatty tissues which contribute to lymph stasis. Microsurgical variation of lymphatic bypass has gained popularity, in which the accumulated lymph in the lymphedematous limb is redirected. Non-surgical approaches are also practiced in most cases. Comprehensive decongestive therapy, consisting of skin care, exercise, special bandaging and massage, is the most frequently used non-surgical approach efficacy of which could be enhanced in combination with self-management strategies (4. Recently newer techniques have been introduced to tackle lymphedema and its associated pain. Manual lymph drainage, stellate ganglion block, acupuncture, deep oscillation, and pneumatic compression have been efficiently used in several studies. Moreover, significant short-term progress has been reported following other modalities such as low-level laser therapy (5. The complexity of breast-cancer-related lymphedema and its complications necessitates a multidisciplinary approach with the primary goal of easing the burden of the disease on the breast cancer patients. In addition, developing special guidelines encompassing these multidisciplinary approaches and providing educational and

  1. Contemporary management of men with high-risk localized prostate cancer in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, A B; Matulewicz, R S; Schaeffer, E M; Liauw, S L; Feinglass, J M; Eggener, S E

    2017-09-01

    Surgery and radiation-based therapies are standard management options for men with clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer (PCa). Contemporary patterns of care are unknown. We hypothesize the use of surgery has steadily increased in more recent years. Using the National Cancer Data Base for 2004-2013, all men diagnosed with high-risk localized PCa were identified using National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. Temporal trends in initial management were assessed. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate demographic and clinical factors associated with undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). In total, 127 391 men were identified. Use of RP increased from 26% in 2004 to 42% in 2013 (adjusted risk ratio (RR) 1.51, 95% CI 1.42-1.60, P<0.001), while external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) decreased from 49% to 42% (P<0.001). African American men had lower odds of undergoing RP (unadjusted rate of 28%, adjusted RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.66-0.72, <0.001) compared to White men (37%). Age was inversely associated with likelihood of receiving RP. Having private insurance was significantly associated with the increased use of RP (vs Medicare, adjusted odds ratio 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.08, P=0.015). Biopsy Gleason scores 8-10 with and without any primary Gleason 5 pattern were associated with decreased odds of RP (vs Gleason score ⩽6, both P<0.001). Academic and comprehensive cancer centers were more likely to perform RP compared to community hospitals (both P<0.001). The likelihood of receiving RP for high-risk PCa dramatically increased from 2004 to 2013. By 2013, the use of RP and EBRT were similar. African American men, elderly men and those without private insurance were less likely to receive RP.

  2. Management of anemia and iron deficiency in a cancer center in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laï-Tiong, Florence; Brami, Cloé; Dubroeucq, Olivier; Scotté, Florian; Curé, Hervé; Jovenin, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Anemia affects most patients treated for cancer by chemotherapy. It is a known major contributor to fatigue and loss of quality of life and is likely to have a negative effect on prognosis and mortality from cancer. The main purpose of this study was to characterize the management of anemia and iron deficiency in a French oncology day-care center. A retrospective study was conducted between May and November 2012 in the oncology day unit of the Jean Godinot Cancer Center (France). The 133 patients included were all over the age of 18 and being treated by chemotherapy and had mild, moderate, or severe anemia. Over half (58%) the patients were shown to be receiving no specific treatment for anemia. Iron balance was assessed in 71 patients and iron deficiency diagnosed in 37. Stepwise logistic regression showed that patients with severe to moderate anemia were nearly four times more likely to have an iron balance assessment than those with mild anemia (OR, 3.78; 95% CI, 1.84-7.76; P = 0.0003). Classical logistic regression shows that older patients (≥70) are three times less likely to have an iron balance assessment than patients anemia and iron deficiency, and the associated quality-of-life concerns, has yet to be defined for patients with cancer. Screening and treatment of mild to moderate anemia are inadequate, despite the advent of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Large scale, multicenter studies are required to define a clear medical framework for the management of anemia and iron deficiency.

  3. Low level laser therapy (photobiomodulation) for the management of breast cancer-related lymphedema: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, G. David; Liu, Lizhou; Chapple, Cathy; Petrich, Simone; Anders, Juanita J.; Tumilty, Steve

    2018-04-01

    Breast cancer related lymphedema (BCRL) is prevalent among breast cancer survivors, and may be painful and disfiguring with associated psychological impact. Previous research shows increasing use of low level laser therapy (LLLT), now commonly referred to as photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy for managing BCRL, in countries including the United States and Australia. However, conclusions were limited by the paucity, heterogeneity, and poor quality of previous studies. LLLT (PBM) has been barely used in clinical practice in New Zealand, and no clinical studies on LLLT (PBM) for BCRL have been conducted in this country. In order to promote this potentially useful treatment modality for BCRL patients, the Laser Lymphedema Trial Team at the University of Otago conducted a program to assess the effectiveness of LLLT (PBM) in management of BCRL. The program comprises three phases including a systematic review (completed), a feasibility study (completed), and a full-scale randomized controlled trial (proposed). This current paper provides an update on the program. Based upon the systematic review, LLLT (PBM) is considered a potentially effective treatment approach for women with BCRL; the review also indicated the need for further research including exploration of the relevance of dosage and other LLLT (PBM) parameters. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is feasible to conduct a fully powered RCT to definitively test the effectiveness of the additional use of LLLT (PBM) in the management of BCRL, and 114 participants will be needed at baseline in the main study. Currently, the full-scale RCT is under preparation.

  4. Clinical roundtable monograph: effective management of quality of life in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Twelves; Gradishar, William J; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Bramsen, Betsy; Lurie, Robert H

    2014-02-01

    Quality of life is accepted as an important consideration in the management of patients with metastatic breast cancer, which remains incurable. Recent clinical trials of newer agents, such as eribulin and trastuzumab emtansine, have incorporated quality of life analyses. Quality of life is impacted by multiple patient-related, disease-related, and treatment-related factors. Therapies most beneficial for maintaining or improving quality of life include those that can effectively reduce tumor burden and tumor-related symptoms, but have toxicity profiles that are well tolerated and easily managed. Overall outcomes of patients with metastatic breast cancer improve when therapy is focused not only on the disease itself, but also on the goals of minimizing diseaserelated and treatment-related symptoms. A paradigm shift now reflected in major guidelines is the incorporation of palliative care strategies earlier in the course of metastatic disease management. The selection and sequence of treatments should be made in cooperation with the patient and after consideration of her particular priorities.

  5. Proactive strategies for regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer: implications for optimal patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Gazala; Moss, Rebecca A; Braiteh, Fadi; Saltzman, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Regorafenib is a broad-spectrum oral multikinase inhibitor that targets several angiogenic, oncogenic, and stromal receptor tyrosine kinases that support the tumor microenvironment. Results from the pivotal Phase III Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated with Regorafenib or Placebo After Failure of Standard Therapy (CORRECT) trial showed that the addition of regorafenib to best supportive care resulted in a significant improvement in median overall survival and progression-free survival compared with placebo plus best supportive care in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) following all available approved therapies. Thus, regorafenib is the first oral multikinase inhibitor indicated for mCRC; it currently has approval in the USA, EU, Japan, Canada, and Singapore for the treatment of mCRC patients who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, and, if the tumor is KRAS wild-type, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. In this review, we highlight regorafenib’s mechanism of action, present key efficacy data from the CORRECT trial, and discuss how to proactively manage common adverse events (eg, hand-foot skin reaction, hypertension, oral mucositis, diarrhea, and fatigue) experienced by patients receiving regorafenib. Increased awareness of potential adverse events associated with regorafenib and the implementation of proactive strategies to prevent, monitor, and manage these events early in the course of treatment will be instrumental in ensuring optimal patient management and continuation of regorafenib therapy

  6. Management of Biochemical Recurrence after Primary Localized Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, Oussama M.; Raj, Ganesh V.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically localized prostate cancer is typically managed by well established therapies like radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, and external beam radiation therapy. While many patients can be cured with definitive local therapy, some will have biochemical recurrence (BCR) of disease detected by a rising serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Management of these patients is nuanced and controversial. The natural history indicates that a majority of patients with BCR will not die from prostate cancer but from other causes. Despite this, a vast majority of patients with BCR are empirically treated with non-curable systemic androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), with its myriad of real and potential side effects. In this review article, we examined the very definition of BCR after definitive local therapy, the current status of imaging studies in its evaluation, the need for additional therapies, and the factors involved in the decision making in the choice of additional therapies. This review aims to help clinicians with the management of patients with BCR. The assessment of prognostic factors including absolute PSA level, time to recurrence, PSA kinetics, multivariable nomograms, imaging, and biopsy of the prostatic bed may help stratify the patients into localized or systemic recurrence. Patients with low-risk of systemic disease may be cured by a salvage local therapy, while those with higher risk of systemic disease may be offered the option of ADT or a clinical trial. An algorithm incorporating these factors is presented.

  7. Guideline-based management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC represents a broad spectrum of disease, the hallmarks of which include disease recurrence and progression. Clinicians have a number of surgical and therapeutic options at their disposal when treating this disease, and the underlying evidence continues to evolve. A number of professional organizations have invested in the development of clinical practice guidelines to guide patient management. Materials and Methods: We review and summarize four major guidelines, the American Urological Association, the European Association of Urology, the International Consultation on Urological Disease and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Results: Guideline panels differed in their composition, methodological approach and structure of recommendations. Despite this, many recommendations were similar between various panels, although differences are present in panel recommendations related to initial diagnosis and treatment, adjuvant therapy and disease surveillance. Conclusions: Guideline recommendations are similar at many decision points that clinicians face when managing NMIBC, although they are far from uniform. While future prospective, well-designed studies will hopefully clarify NMIBC management, urologists ultimately must rely on a combination of evidence-based recommendations, which they should seek to integrate with patients' values and preferences and the individual circumstances to provide the best possible patient care.

  8. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

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    Price, Jeremy G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.Stock@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ≥grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ≥grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following

  9. Managing symptoms during cancer treatments: evaluating the implementation of evidence-informed remote support protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Dawn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of cancer treatment-related symptoms is an important safety issue given that symptoms can become life-threatening and often occur when patients are at home. With funding from the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, a pan-Canadian steering committee was established with representation from eight provinces to develop symptom protocols using a rigorous methodology (CAN-IMPLEMENT©. Each protocol is based on a systematic review of the literature to identify relevant clinical practice guidelines. Protocols were validated by cancer nurses from across Canada. The aim of this study is to build an effective and sustainable approach for implementing evidence-informed protocols for nurses to use when providing remote symptom assessment, triage, and guidance in self-management for patients experiencing symptoms while undergoing cancer treatments. Methods A prospective mixed-methods study design will be used. Guided by the Knowledge to Action Framework, the study will involve (a establishing an advisory knowledge user team in each of three targeted settings; (b assessing factors influencing nurses’ use of protocols using interviews/focus groups and a standardized survey instrument; (c adapting protocols for local use, ensuring fidelity of the content; (d selecting intervention strategies to overcome known barriers and implementing the protocols; (e conducting think-aloud usability testing; (f evaluating protocol use and outcomes by conducting an audit of 100 randomly selected charts at each of the three settings; and (g assessing satisfaction with remote support using symptom protocols and change in nurses’ barriers to use using survey instruments. The primary outcome is sustained use of the protocols, defined as use in 75% of the calls. Descriptive analysis will be conducted for the barriers, use of protocols, and chart audit outcomes. Content analysis will be conducted on interviews/focus groups and usability testing

  10. Contemporary management of penile cancer: greater than 15 year MSKCC experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Kelvin A; Winer, Andrew; Sfakianos, John P; Poon, Stephen A; Kent, Matthew; Bernstein, Melanie; Russo, Paul; Dalbagni, Guido

    2014-04-01

    Penile cancer is a rare malignancy, and few guidelines are available to define treatment paradigms. For greater understanding of the natural history of surgically treated penile cancer, we analyzed the experience at our institution. Using an institutional database, we identified 127 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the penis from 1995-2011. Cancer-specific survival (CSS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Survival data were compared using the log-rank test. The difference in risk of cancer-specific death by lymph node status and histological grade was determined by univariate Cox regression analysis. Five year CSS for pTis, pT1, pT2, and pT3/4 was 100%, 84% (95% CI 58%-95%), 54% (95% CI 33%-71%), and 54% (95% CI 25%-76%), respectively (p ≤ .005). Three year CSS for patients with N0, N+, and Nx disease was 90% (95% CI 47%-99%), 65% (95% CI 47%-79%), and 86% (95% CI 73%-93%), respectively (p = .03). The receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy did not change per 5 year period over the 16 years of our study. Median follow up was 2.8 years. Penile cancer patients with advanced disease had poor survival. Tumor stage and nodal status were significant predictors of CSS. Penis-sparing approaches may be considered for most patients; however, pathological stage and grade dictate the management and ultimate outcome. Further studies are necessary to clarify the benefits of chemotherapy in this disease.

  11. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

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    Zhou, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Janz, Nancy K. [Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sabel, Michael S. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational

  12. Contemporary Management of Penile Cancer: Greater than 15-Year MSKCC Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Kelvin A.; Winer, Andrew; Sfakianos, John P.; Poon, Stephen A.; Kent, Matthew; Bernstein, Melanie; Russo, Paul; Dalbagni, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Penile cancer is a rare malignancy, and few guidelines are available to define treatment paradigms. For greater understanding of the natural history of surgically treated penile cancer, we analyzed experience at our institution. Materials and Methods Using an institutional database, we identified 127 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the penis from 1995 – 2011. Cancer-specific survival (CSS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Survival data were compared using the log-rank test. The difference in risk of cancer-specific death by lymph node status and histological grade was determined by univariate Cox regression analysis. Results Five-year CSS for pTis, pT1, pT2, and pT3/4 was 100%, 84% (95% CI 58%-95%), 54% (95% CI 33%-71%), and 54% (95% CI 25%-76%), respectively (P ≤ .005). Three-year CSS for patients with N0, N+, and Nx disease was 90% (95% CI 47%-99%), 65% (95% CI 47%-79%), and 86% (95% CI 73%-93%), respectively (P = .03). The receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy did not change per 5 year period over the 16 years of our study. Median follow-up was 2.8 years. Conclusions Penile cancer patients with advanced disease had poor survival. Tumor stage and nodal status were significant predictors of CSS. Penis-sparing approaches may be considered for most patients; however, pathological stage and grade dictate the management and ultimate outcome. Further studies are necessary to clarify the benefits of chemotherapy in this disease. PMID:24775572

  13. Hospice Use and Pain Management in Elderly Nursing Home Residents With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, Jacob N; Tjia, Jennifer; Lapane, Kate L

    2017-03-01

    Pain management is suboptimal in nursing homes. To estimate the extent to which receipt of hospice in nursing homes (NHs) increases the receipt of pain management for residents with cancer at the end of life. Study participants included Medicare beneficiaries with cancer who were NH residents in the last 90 days of life in 2011-2012 (n = 78,160). Residents in pain on hospice were matched to like residents without hospice by facility, type of pain assessment (self-report/staff assessment), and weeks until death (9064 matched strata, 16,968 unique residents). Minimum Data Set 3.0 provided information on residents' pain prevalence and receipt of pain management (scheduled analgesics, as needed [pro re nata {PRN}] medication, nonpharmacologic interventions). We developed conditional logistic models to estimate the association between hospice use and pain management, stratified by self-reported and staff-assessed pain. We found that pain prevalence was higher in residents using hospice versus those without hospice (e.g., residents who self-reported pain: hospice: 59.9%, 95% CIs = 59.3%-60.5%; nonhospice: 50.0%, 95% CI = 49.4%-50.6%). In matched analyses, untreated pain was uncommon (self-reported pain: 2.9% and 5.6% in hospice users and nonusers, respectively). Hospice use was associated with receipt of scheduled analgesics (self-reported: adjusted odds ratio = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.73-1.971) and PRN medication (self-reported: adjusted odds ratio = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.20-1.43). Pain prevalence and the association between hospice and pain management were similar in residents with staff-assessed pain. Untreated pain at the end of life among residents with cancer in NHs is unusual. Hospice is associated with increased pain management among those with documented pain. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2-65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  15. The impact of a dedicated multidisciplinary team on the management of early rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)</