WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer management evidentiary

  1. The history of the discovery of the cigarette-lung cancer link: evidentiary traditions, corporate denial, global toll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Robert N

    2012-03-01

    Lung cancer was once a very rare disease, so rare that doctors took special notice when confronted with a case, thinking it a once-in-a-lifetime oddity. Mechanisation and mass marketing towards the end of the 19th century popularised the cigarette habit, however, causing a global lung cancer epidemic. Cigarettes were recognised as the cause of the epidemic in the 1940s and 1950s, with the confluence of studies from epidemiology, animal experiments, cellular pathology and chemical analytics. Cigarette manufacturers disputed this evidence, as part of an orchestrated conspiracy to salvage cigarette sales. Propagandising the public proved successful, judging from secret tobacco industry measurements of the impact of denialist propaganda. As late as 1960 only one-third of all US doctors believed that the case against cigarettes had been established. The cigarette is the deadliest artefact in the history of human civilisation. Cigarettes cause about 1 lung cancer death per 3 or 4 million smoked, which explains why the scale of the epidemic is so large today. Cigarettes cause about 1.5 million deaths from lung cancer per year, a number that will rise to nearly 2 million per year by the 2020s or 2030s, even if consumption rates decline in the interim. Part of the ease of cigarette manufacturing stems from the ubiquity of high-speed cigarette making machines, which crank out 20,000 cigarettes per min. Cigarette makers make about a penny in profit for every cigarette sold, which means that the value of a life to a cigarette maker is about US$10,000. PMID:22345227

  2. THE EVIDENTIARY VALUE OF BALLISTIC EXPERTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhada Pednekar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The science of ‘ballistics’ has been developed to facilitate the examination offirearms, ammunition and other related matter. But the terms ‘ballistics’is generally used to referto the study of the trajectory of bullets or missiles rather than of the missiles (bullets, and themiscible launchers (Guns themselves. More appropriately the phrase ‘Forensic Ballistics’which was first coined by Colonel Goddard, a pioneer in this study, means the systematic studyof the firearms and ammunition used in the commission of crime for the purpose of investigation and identification. It is therefore, necessary for all Police Officers entrusted with theinvestigation of firearms cases to understand the characteristics of firearms and ammunition, and their evidentiary value in crimes.

  3. Epigenomics in cancer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio F Costa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Fabricio F CostaCancer Biology and Epigenomics Program, Children’s Memorial Research Center and Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, 2430 N. Halsted St, Box 220, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: The identification of all epigenetic modifications implicated in gene expression is the next step for a better understanding of human biology in both normal and pathological states. This field is referred to as epigenomics, and it is defined as epigenetic changes (ie, DNA methylation, histone modifications and regulation by noncoding RNAs such as microRNAs on a genomic scale rather than a single gene. Epigenetics modulate the structure of the chromatin, thereby affecting the transcription of genes in the genome. Different studies have already identified changes in epigenetic modifications in a few genes in specific pathways in cancers. Based on these epigenetic changes, drugs against different types of tumors were developed, which mainly target epimutations in the genome. Examples include DNA methylation inhibitors, histone modification inhibitors, and small molecules that target chromatin-remodeling proteins. However, these drugs are not specific, and side effects are a major problem; therefore, new DNA sequencing technologies combined with epigenomic tools have the potential to identify novel biomarkers and better molecular targets to treat cancers. The purpose of this review is to discuss current and emerging epigenomic tools and to address how these new technologies may impact the future of cancer management.Keywords: genomics, epigenomics, epigenetics, DNA methylation, histone modifications, new technologies, cancer management

  4. Including "evidentiary balance" in news media coverage of vaccine risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Christopher E; Dixon, Graham N; Holton, Avery; McKeever, Brooke Weberling

    2015-01-01

    Journalists communicating risk-related uncertainty must accurately convey scientific evidence supporting particular conclusions. Scholars have explored how "balanced" coverage of opposing risk claims shapes uncertainty judgments. In situations where a preponderance of evidence points to a particular conclusion, balanced coverage reduces confidence in such a consensus and heightens uncertainty about whether a risk exists. Using the autism-vaccine controversy as a case study, we describe how journalists can cover multiple sides of an issue and provide insight into where the strength of evidence lies by focusing on "evidentiary balance." Our results suggest that evidentiary balance shapes perceived certainty that vaccines are safe, effective, and not linked to autism through the mediating role of a perception that scientists are divided about whether a link exists. Deference toward science, moreover, moderates these relationships under certain conditions. We discuss implications for journalism practice and risk communication. PMID:25010352

  5. Epigenomics in cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identification of all epigenetic modifications implicated in gene expression is the next step for a better understanding of human biology in both normal and pathological states. This field is referred to as epigenomics, and it is defined as epigenetic changes (ie, DNA methylation, histone modifications and regulation by noncoding RNAs such as microRNAs) on a genomic scale rather than a single gene. Epigenetics modulate the structure of the chromatin, thereby affecting the transcription of genes in the genome. Different studies have already identified changes in epigenetic modifications in a few genes in specific pathways in cancers. Based on these epigenetic changes, drugs against different types of tumors were developed, which mainly target epimutations in the genome. Examples include DNA methylation inhibitors, histone modification inhibitors, and small molecules that target chromatin-remodeling proteins. However, these drugs are not specific, and side effects are a major problem; therefore, new DNA sequencing technologies combined with epigenomic tools have the potential to identify novel biomarkers and better molecular targets to treat cancers. The purpose of this review is to discuss current and emerging epigenomic tools and to address how these new technologies may impact the future of cancer management

  6. 34 CFR 395.13 - Evidentiary hearings and arbitration of vendor complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evidentiary hearings and arbitration of vendor... hearings and arbitration of vendor complaints. (a) The State licensing agency shall specify in writing and... is necessary for the conduct of a full evidentiary hearing or the hearing of an ad hoc...

  7. Management of vulvar cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hullu, J. A.; van der Avoort, I. A. M.; Oonk, M. H. M.; van der Zee, A. G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim The radical surgical approach in the treatment of vulvar cancer patients has led to a favorable prognosis for the majority of the patients with early stage squamous cell cancer. However, the morbidity is impressive, leading to more individualized treatment. The aim of this review is to give an o

  8. Management of vulvar cancers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hullu, J.A. de; Avoort, I.A.M. van der; Oonk, M.H.; Zee, A.G. van der

    2006-01-01

    AIM: The radical surgical approach in the treatment of vulvar cancer patients has led to a favorable prognosis for the majority of the patients with early stage squamous cell cancer. However, the morbidity is impressive, leading to more individualized treatment. The aim of this review is to give an

  9. Contemporary Management of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David; Fradet, Yves

    1991-01-01

    Bladder cancer is currently the fifth most common cancer in Western society, and its incidence appears to be increasing. Important advances have recently occurred in both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to bladder neoplasms. Presentation is not unique, and physician awareness is important to identify patients who are at risk for bladder neoplasia and consequently require further investigation. A diagnostic approach and contemporary management are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4 PMID:21229043

  10. [Management of laryngeal cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunin, F; Rodriguez, J; Cougniot-Lescure, S; Point, D; Jaulerry, C; Brugère, J

    1995-04-01

    With 5,000 cases yearly, laryngeal carcinomas account in France for the third of squamous cell cancers of the upper digestive and respiratory tract. The crude survival rate is 50% at 5 years. Carcinomas of vocal cords are often diagnosed as early stages if dysphonia leads the patients to the ENT specialist within 2 weeks. Cure of the primary is achieved in 90% of the early stages by radiotherapy with narrow fields or partial surgery, with a 80% 5 years survival rate. Advanced tumors are often treated by total laryngectomy and postoperative radiotherapy. Supra-glottic cancers (epiglottis) are more serious. Unilateral dysphagia or upper cervical neck node often delay early diagnosis. A total laryngectomy is the commonest treatment. The 5 years survival rate of 40% is due to local and/or regional failures and metachronous cancers in head and neck, and radiotherapy remains the two major treatments. Primary prevention is based upon suppression of tobacco and reduction of alcoholic consumption, secondary prevention on resection of leucoplakia and close follow-up of patients with chronic laryngitis. PMID:7761753

  11. Therapeutic Management of Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Todosi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a major public health problem worldwide, and a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Correct pretherapeutic staging has the role of guiding the management of colon cancer patients. The diagnosis is guided by the clinical symptoms. Chemotherapy is an important part of colon cancer treatment. Chemotherapy regimens are adapted to tumor stage and patient status and have various side effects and variable survival outcomes. International guidelines recommend different treatments depending on the presence or absence of metastases. The primary goal of treatment in nonmetastatic colon cancer is surgical removal of the tumor which could be the first step of the complex therapy or preceded by neoadjuvant therapy, depending on pretherapeutic staging. In resectable nonmetastatic tumors the preferred surgical procedure is colectomy with en bloc removal of regional lymph nodes. The extent of colectomy should be based on tumor location. The management of metastatic colon cancer also targets the therapeutic approach of the metastatic disease. Therapy is standardized and applied according to tumor stage. Surveillance has a major role in therapeutic success, reason why a time schedule and a protocol adapted to the primary lesion are essential. The goal of implementing the recommendations of international guidelines for the treatment of colon cancer is to provide a uniform treatment for this disease in view of improving overall survival of patients.

  12. Pain Management in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Erdek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A majority of pancreatic cancer patients present with pain at the time of diagnosis. Pain management can be challenging in light of the aggressive nature of this cancer. Apart from conventional pharmacotherapy, timely treatment with neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB has been shown to be of benefit. NCPB has demonstrated efficacious pain control in high quality studies with analgesic effects lasting one to two months. NCPB has also shown to decrease the requirements of narcotics, and thus decrease opioid related side effects. Another option for the control of moderate to severe pain is intrathecal therapy (IT. Delivery of analgesic medications intrathecally allows for lower dosages of medications and thus reduced toxicity. Both of the above mentioned interventional procedures have been shown to have low complication rates, and be safe and effective. Ultimately, comprehensive pancreatic cancer pain management necessitates understanding of pain mechanisms and delivery of sequential validated therapeutic interventions within a multidisciplinary patient care model.

  13. Current management of oral cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Ord

    2008-01-01

    @@ This presentation will summarize some of the current areas of interest in the management of oral cancer. The presentation will be divided into a brief review of epidemiology and diagnosis, with a more extensive discussion regarding the controversial areas in surgery and a review of the adjuvant roles of radiation and chemotherapy.

  14. Assessing the evidentiary value of smokeless powder comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Dana-Marie K; Williams, Mary R; Sigman, Michael E

    2016-02-01

    Gas chromatography-electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS) and physical characteristics data for 726 smokeless reloading powders were analyzed by pairwise comparisons of samples comprising the same product and different products. Pairwise comparisons were restricted to samples having matching kernel shape, color, presence or absence of a perforation and measurements. Discrete results were analyzed for same and different products having matching chemical composition determined from a list of 13 organic components. A continuous score-based likelihood ratio was determined for same and different product comparisons using the Fisher transform of the Pearson correlation between the total ion spectra of the compared samples. Probability distributions for same product and different product comparisons appeared bimodal and were modeled with kernel density distributions. In the discrete and continuous data comparisons, the likelihood ratios for probabilities conditioned on same shape, color, presence/absence of perforation and size were found to provide relatively limited support for either the proposition of same product or different product. Further restricting the pairwise comparisons to samples belonging to the same cluster, as determined by agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis, provided probability distributions for same product and different product comparisons that were more normal, but did not improve the resulting likelihood ratios. These results inform the forensic analyst regarding the evidentiary value of database search results and direct comparisons of recovered and control samples of smokeless powders. PMID:26774249

  15. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials.

  16. Management of oromandibular cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To emphasize the role and importance of multidisciplinary approach in the management of oral cavity can- involving the mandible. Subjects and Methods: A total of 63 patients who had biopsy-proven oromandibular tumors, after thorough assessment/ staging in Joint Head and Neck Oncology Clinic, underwent resection and reconstruction for malignant oral cavity tumors involving the mandible were included in the study. All the resected tumor specimen were sent for histopathology. All the post-resection defects were properly classified and reconstructed by the plastic surgery team. Post-operatively, all the patients underwent adjuvant full dose radiotherapy at the Department of Radiation Oncology. Complications were recorded and managed accordingly. At one year follow-up all the available patients were assessed for functional and aesthetic restoration and recurrences. Results: Out of 63 patients there were 40 males and 23 females (ratio 1.7 : 1) with an average age of 50 years. Tumor-free resection margins could be achieved in 56 patients. In 88% cases tumor was a Squamous cell carcinoma Radical neck dissections were carried on in 27 patients. Radial forearm free flap was used in 27 patients, pectorals major myocutaneous flap in 19, free fibula osteocutaneous flap in 10, rectus-abdominis myocutaneous free flap Implant was used in 3 patients to reconstruct the post-resection defects. There was only one total flap loss and 3 partial flap losses. Implant exposure was encountered in 4 instances with 3 major and 5 minor fistulae. At one year follow-up 56 patients were available. Thirty-seven patients had intelligible speech, 15 patients were taking normal diet in 33 patients there was a satisfactory mandibular contour restoration. Seven patients had recurrences, 2 were raceable and 5 patients had died by that time. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary collaboration is the key to effectively manage this group of extremely debilitating malignancies. (author)

  17. Management of cancer during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although cancer during pregnancy is infrequent, its management is difficult for patients, their families, and their physicians. When termination of the pregnancy is unacceptable, decisions regarding the use of irradiation and chemotherapy are complicated by the well-known high risks of abortion and fetal malformation. This risk is concentrated in the first trimester and varies with the choice of chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of agents. There is only minimal evidence of increased risk of malformation or abortion in the second or third trimester. Recent progress in cancer therapy has made cure a reasonable goal, and for some malignant neoplasms, cure is still possible even when initial therapy is modified or delayed. When cure is a reasonable goal, curative therapy should not be compromised by modification or delay. When treatment for cure or significant palliation is not possible, however, the goal should shift to protection of the fetus from damage by the injudicious use of teratogenic cancer therapy. This report will review the available data that may assist in these difficult decisions. 114 references

  18. Evidentiary requirements to identify potentially acceptable sites (PAS) in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains information on the evidentiary requirements to identify potentially acceptable sites in crystalline rock for waste disposal. Topics addressed include: chronology, key regulatory assumptions, statutory framework for identifying potentially acceptable sites, application of 10 disqualifiers, consideration of favorable and potentially adverse conditions, a composite favorability analysis, and a proposed outline for PAS identification decision document

  19. Pain management in cancer cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palat Gayatri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer of the cervix uteri is a common cause of pain among women. On the physical realm, the cancer may cause somatic [soft tissue and bone], visceral and neuropathic pain [lumbosacral plexopathy]. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy may cause neuropathy too. Psychological, social and cultural factors modify the pain. Evaluation of the individual type of pain and a patient-centred approach are fundamental requirements for rational management. Disease modifying treatment like radiotherapy and chemotherapy must be considered when applicable. Pain control is usually achieved by the use of WHO three-step ladder, remembering that possible association of renal dysfunction would necessitate caution in the use of NSAIDs and opioids. Side effects must be anticipated, prevented when possible, and aggressively treated; nausea and vomiting may already be present, and constipation can worsen pain when there is a pelvic mass. Pain emergencies can be treated by quick titration with intravenous morphine bolus doses. Neuropathic pain may warrant the use of usual adjuvants, with particular reference to cortico-steroids and the NMDA antagonist, ketamine. In intractable pain, many neurolytic procedures are tried, but a solid evidence base to justify their use is lacking. Continuous epidural analgesia with local anaesthetic and opioid may be needed when drug therapy fails, and desperate situations may warrant interventions such as neurolysis. Such physical measures for pain relief must be combined with psychosocial support and adequate explanations to the patient and the family.

  20. Hypnosis: Adjunct Therapy for Cancer Pain Management

    OpenAIRE

    Kravits, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a symptom associated with prolonged recovery from illness and procedures, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care costs. While there have been advances in the management of cancer pain, there is a need for therapeutic strategies that complement pharmaceutical management without significantly contributing to the side-effect profile of these agents. Hypnosis provides a safe and efficacious supplement to pharmaceutical management of cancer pain. One barrier to the regular us...

  1. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G;

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration......-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion, and not...

  2. Evidences in multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last 10 years, a number of important European randomized published studies investigated the optimal management of rectal cancer. In order to define an evidence-based approach of the clinical practice based, an international consensus conference was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO) and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). The aim of this article is to present highlights of multidisciplinary rectal cancer management and to compare the conclusions of the international conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) with the new National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. (authors)

  3. Coping with cancer - managing fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatigue is a feeling of tiredness, weakness, or exhaustion. It is different from drowsiness, which can be ... have trouble taking in nutrients during cancer treatment. Emotional stress. Having cancer can make you feel anxious, ...

  4. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Pain management in cancer survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Sjøgren, Per

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of patients surviving cancer disease has increased in last decades. Consequently, an emerging population with different needs due to long-term or late effects of cancer disease and/or treatment, e.g. chronic pain, is of major concern. EPIDEMIOLOGY: Chronic pain is one of the...... ETIOLOGY: Neuropathic pain seems to be the major pain etiology in cancer survivors and therefore adjuvant analgesics should be the first choice of analgesic treatment. CONTEXT: This article addresses the central aspects of pain epidemiology, mechanisms and the frequent pain syndromes met in cancer...... main problems in this population and prevalence varies between 16% and 50%. Most information derives from breast cancer patients assessed by surveys from national or local institutional databases. A Danish population-based survey estimated that 41.5% of all cancer survivors reported chronic pain. PAIN...

  6. Management of invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscle invasive disease accounts for a quarter of all cases of bladder cancer. A bewildering variety of treatment options are available for patients with this disease, with combinations of surgery and/or radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. This review discusses these treatment options and their relative merits for patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. 22 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  7. Management of Advanced Laryngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Sheahan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx continues to be the commonest head and neck cancer in many Western countries. The larynx plays a key role for many essential functions, including breathing, voice production, airway protection, and swallowing. The goals of laryngeal cancer treatment are thus to provide best possible oncologic control, while optimizing functional outcomes. In recent decades, the treatment paradigm for advanced laryngeal cancer has shifted from one of primary surgery (total laryngectomy as gold standard, toward non-surgical organ-preserving treatment using radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. However, concerns have emerged regarding functional outcomes after chemoradiotherapy, as well as possible decreased overall survival in patients with laryngeal cancer. The purpose of the present review is to review surgical and non-surgical options for treatment of advanced laryngeal cancer, as well as the evidence supporting each of these.

  8. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principles and Management of Adrenal Cancer is a comprehensive presentation of the medical and surgical management of neoplastic diseases of the adrenal glands. It consists of two parts. The first provides an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, pathology, and advances in methods of diagnosis and imaging techniques. The second deals with specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. (orig./MG)

  9. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Katherine; Konety, Badrinath; Ordonez, Maria A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field. PMID:26949522

  10. Evolving management of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jochem van der Voort van Zijp; Harald J Hoekstra; Marc D Basson

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies for colorectal cancer, including total mesorectal excision, the resection of liver and lung metastasis and advances in chemoradiation and foreshadows some interventions that may lie just beyond the frontier. In particular, little is known about the intracellular and extracellular cascades that may influence colorectal cancer cell adhesion and metastasis. Although the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinases and focal adhesion associated proteins in response to integrin-mediated cell matrix binding ("outside in integrin signaling") is well described, the stimulation of cell adhesion by intracellular signals activated by pressure prior to adhesion represents a different signal paradigm. However, several studies have suggested that increased pressure and shear stress activate cancer cell adhesion. Further studies of the pathways that regulate integrin-driven cancer cell adhesion may identify/ways to disrupt these signals or block integrin-mediated adhesion so that adhesion and eventual metastasis can be prevented in the future.

  11. [Surgical management of pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Song Cheol

    2008-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a major problematic concern among all forms of gastrointestinal malignancies because of its poor prognosis. Although significant progress has been made in the surgical treatment in terms of increased resection rate and decreased treatment-related morbidity and mortality, the true survival rate still remains below 5% today. Surgical options for pancreatic cancer are based on the its unique anatomy and physiology, catastrophic tumor biology, experience of surgeon, and status of patients. Four main options exist for the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. These include standard "Whipple" pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), pylorus preserving PD (PPPD), distal pancreatectomy (left-side pancreatectomy), and total pancreatectomy according to the location of tumor. Portal vein involvement by tumor is regarded as an anatomical extension of disease, and en bloc resection of portal vein with tumor is recommended if technically feasible, which is stated in 2002 AJCC tumor staging for pancreatic cancer. In comparison of the survival rates between standard and extended resection of pancreatic head cancer, no significant survival benefit was demonstrated from the prospective reports. PPPD may be superior to standard PD in respect to nutrition and quality of life without any deleterious effect upon long term survival or tumor recurrence. New surgical treatment modalities including modified extended pancreatectomy, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and radical antegrade modular distal pancreatectomy have been tried to improve the patients' survival. However, early diagnosis and treatment remain as key factors for the cure of pancreatic cancer irrespective of various surgical trials. PMID:18349571

  12. Surgical management of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differentiated management of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with lymph node and/or systemic metastases is very much a treatable cancer. Interaction between the surgeon and the nuclear medicine specialist is essential to ensure quality survival in these patient. This review is confined to surgical aspects and is based on experience with 417 patients who were operated for DTC at the Tata Memorial Hospital between 1971 and 1985

  13. Management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Higuera, Oliver; Ghanem, Ismael; Nasimi, Rula; Prieto, Isabel; Koren, Laura; Feliu, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Currently, pancreatic adenocarcinoma mainly occurs after 60 years of age, and its prognosis remains poor despite modest improvements in recent decades. The aging of the population will result in a rise in the incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma within the next years. Thus, the management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly population is gaining increasing relevance. Older cancer patients represent a heterogeneous group with different biological, functional and psychosocial characteristics ...

  14. Hypnosis: adjunct therapy for cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravits, Kathy

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a symptom associated with prolonged recovery from illness and procedures, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care costs. While there have been advances in the management of cancer pain, there is a need for therapeutic strategies that complement pharmaceutical management without significantly contributing to the side-effect profile of these agents. Hypnosis provides a safe and efficacious supplement to pharmaceutical management of cancer pain. One barrier to the regular use of hypnosis is health-care providers' lack of current knowledge of the efficacy and safety of hypnosis. Advanced practitioners who are well-informed about hypnosis have an opportunity to increase the treatment options for patients who are suffering with cancer pain by suggesting to the health-care team that hypnosis be incorporated into the plan of care. Integration of hypnosis into the standard of care will benefit patients, caregivers, and survivors by reducing pain and the suffering associated with it. PMID:25031986

  15. Management of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit; Mahipal; Jessica; Frakes; Sarah; Hoffe; Richard; Kim

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the United States. Surgery remains the only curative option; however only 20% of the patients have resectable disease at the time of initialpresentation. The definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is not uniform but generally denotes to regional vessel involvement that makes it unlikely to have negative surgical margins. The accurate staging of pancreatic cancer requires triple phase computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas. Management of patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer remains unclear. The data for treatment of these patients is primarily derived from retrospective single institution experience. The prospective trials have been plagued by small numbers and poor accrual. Neoadjuvant therapy is recommended and typically consists of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The chemotherapeutic regimens continue to evolve along with type and dose of radiation therapy. Gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil based chemotherapeutic combinations are administered. The type and dose of radiation vary among different institutions. With neoadjuvant treatment, approximately 50% of the patients are able to undergo surgical resections with negative margins obtained in greater than 80% of the patients. Newer trials are attempting to standardize the definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer and treatment regimens. In this review, we outline the definition, imaging requirements and management of patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

  16. Cancer patient supportive care and pain management. Special listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Infectious disease in cancer patients; Immunological aspects of supportive care of cancer patients; Nutritional evaluation and support of cancer patients; Pain management of cancer patients

  17. CONTEMPORARY MANAGEMENT OF SINONASAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robbins, K. Thomas; Ferlito, Alfio; Silver, Carl E.; Takes, Robert P.; Strojan, Primoz; Snyderman, Carl H.; de Bree, Remco; Haigentz, Missak; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Shaha, Ashok R.; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Werner, Jochen A.; Suarez, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background. Sinonasal cancer is a relatively uncommon entity encountered by head and neck oncologists, rhinologists, and skull base surgeons. Recent innovations in surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic modalities raise the question of whether there has been any measurable improvement for treatment ou

  18. Contemporary management of sinonasal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robbins, K.T.; Ferlito, A.; Silver, C.E.; Takes, R.P.; Strojan, P.; Snyderman, C.H.; Bree, R. de; Haigentz Jr., M.; Langendijk, J.A.; Rinaldo, A.; Shaha, A.R.; Hanna, E.Y.; Werner, J.A.; Suarez, C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sinonasal cancer is a relatively uncommon entity encountered by head and neck oncologists, rhinologists, and skull base surgeons. Recent innovations in surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic modalities raise the question of whether there has been any measurable improvement for treatment ou

  19. mTOR inhibition in management of advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shona Nag

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mTOR pathway is becoming increasingly important in several cancers including breast cancer. This review will focus on the role of its inhibition in the management of advanced breast cancer.

  20. Contemporary Clinical Management of Endometrial Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dinkelspiel, Helen E.; Wright, Jason D.; Lewin, Sharyn N.; Herzog, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the contemporary management of endometrial cancer is straightforward in many ways, novel data has emerged over the past decade that has altered the clinical standards of care while generating new controversies that will require further investigation. Fortunately most cases are diagnosed at early stages, but high-risk histologies and poorly differentiated tumors have high metastatic potential with a significantly worse prognosis. Initial management typically requires surgery, but the ...

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Acupuncture in the Management of Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry Liming LIANG

    2005-01-01

    @@ Acupuncture, as a complementary therapy, has been used to manage the cancer associated symptoms of cancer patients. To identify the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in the management of cancer, this review critically analyses the relevant publications including both experimental and clinical studies. The majority of studies suggest that acupuncture effectively relieves some cancer related symptoms such as cancer pain, and some adverse effects caused by the cancer conventional treatments such as nausea, vomiting, neutropenia and xerostomia.

  2. Current management of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Laurberg, Søren; Holm, Thorbjörn

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: A review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the surgical management of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Method: A systematic literature search was undertaken using PubMed, Embase, Web of...

  3. Management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, D O

    2012-11-01

    Although well described, there is limited published data related to management on the coexistence of prostate and rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to describe a single institution\\'s experience with this and propose a treatment algorithm based on the best available evidence.

  4. Diagnosis And Management Of Vulvar Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The aim of this article is to give an overview of the management of vulvar cancer. Methods: Review the literature from database Medline using key words vulvar cancer, surgical therapy, radiotherapy, sentinel node with the emphasis on diagnostics and primary therapy. Results: Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment for early stage squamous cell vulvar cancer (with wide local excision and uni- or bilateral inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy via separate incisions as standard treatment). Primary radiotherapy may be an alternative for the inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy. The sentinel lymph node procedure with the combined technique (preoperative lymphoscintigraphy with 99m technetium-labeled nanocolloid and Patent Blue) is a promising staging technique for patients with vulvar cancer. The clinical implementation of the sentinel lymph node procedure and the role of additional histopathological techniques of the sentinel lymph nodes have to be investigated. In the cases of advanced vulvar cancer chemo radiation eventually followed by surgery is the treatment of first choice for these patients. Conclusions: The radical surgical approach in the treatment of vulvar cancer patients has led to a favorable prognosis for the majority of the patients with early stage cancer. However, the morbidity is impressive, leading to more individualized treatment. The sentinel lymph node procedure and primary radiotherapy are promising methods to reduce morbidity of treatment, but their safety needs to be studied in clinical trials. (author)

  5. Breast cancer management: Past, present and evolving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Akram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is known from ancient time,and the treatment strategy evolved as our understanding of the disease changed with time. In 460 BC Hippocrates described breast cancer as a humoral disease and presently after a lot of studies breast cancer is considered as a local disease with systemic roots. For most of the twentieth century Halsted radical mastectomy was the "established and standardized operation for cancer of the breast in all stages, early or late". New information about tumor biology and its behavior suggested that less radical surgery might be just as effective as the more extensive one. Eventually, with the use of adjuvant therapy likeradiation and systemic therapy, the extent of surgical resection in the breast and axilla got reduced further and led to an era of breast conservation. The radiation treatment of breast cancer has evolved from 2D to 3D Conformal and to accelarated partial breast irradiation, aiming to reduce normal tissue toxicity and overall treatment time. Systemic therapy in the form of hormone therapy, chemotherapy and biological agents is now a well-established modality in treatment of breast cancer. The current perspective of breast cancer management is based on the rapidly evolving and increasingly integrated study on the genetic, molecular , biochemical and cellular basis of disease. The challenge for the future is to take advantage of this knowledge for the prediction of therapeutic outcome and develop therapies and rapidly apply more novel biologic therapeutics.

  6. Conservative management of anal and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of irradiation in the management of anal and rectal cancer has changed during the past ten years. In small epidermoid carcinomas of the anal canal (T1 T2) irradiation is in most departments considered the primary treatment, giving a 5-year survival rate of between 60 and 80% with good sphincter preservation. Even in larger tumors, irradiation can still offer some chance of cure without colostomy. Surgery remains the basic treatment of rectal cancer but irradiation is used in association with surgery in many cases. Radiotherapy is of value in the conservative management of cancer of the rectum in three situations: In small polypoid cancers contact X-ray therapy can give local control in about 90%. In cancers of the middle rectum, preoperative external irradiation may increase the chances of restorative surgery and reduce the risk of local relapse. In inoperable patients, external radiotherapy and/or intracavitary irradiation may cure some patients with infiltrating tumors (T2 T3) without colostomy. (orig.)

  7. Management of locally advanced prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heather Payne

    2009-01-01

    The management of all stages of prostate cancer is an increasingly complex process and involves a variety of available treatments and many disciplines.Despite prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing,the presentation of prostate cancer at a locally advanced stage is common in the UK,accounting for one-third of all new cases.There is no universally accepted definition of locally advanced prostate cancer;the term is loosely used to encompass a spectrum of disease profiles that show high-risk features.Men with high-risk prostate cancer generally have a significant risk of disease progression and cancer-related death if left untreated.High-risk patients,including those with locally advanced disease,present two specific challenges.There is a need for local control as well as a need to treat any microscopic metastases likely to be present but undetectable until disease progression.The optimal treatment approach will therefore often necessitate multiple modalities.The exact combinations,timing and intensity of treatment continue to be strongly debated.Management decisions should be made after all treatments have been discussed by a multidisciplinary team (including urologists,oncologists,radiologists,pathologists and nurse specialists) and after the balance of benefits and side effects of each therapy modality has been considered by the patient with regard to his own individual circumstances.This article reviews the current therapy options.

  8. Management of Hormone Deprivation Symptoms After Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Stephanie S; Loprinzi, Charles L; Ruddy, Kathryn J

    2016-08-01

    Cancer survivors often experience symptoms related to hormone deprivation, including vasomotor symptoms, genitourinary symptoms, and sexual health concerns. These symptoms can occur due to natural menopause in midlife women, or they can be brought on by oncologic therapies in younger women or men. We searched PubMed for English-language studies from January 1990 through January 2016 to identify relevant articles on the management of hormone deprivation symptoms, including vasomotor, genitourinary, and sexual symptoms in patients with cancer. The search terms used included hormone deprivation, vasomotor symptoms, hot flash, vaginal dryness, sexual dysfunction, and breast cancer. This manuscript provides a comprehensive description of data supporting the treatment of symptoms associated with hormone deprivation. PMID:27492917

  9. Management of advanced medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadoux, Julien; Pacini, Furio; Tuttle, R Michael; Schlumberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer arises from calcitonin-producing C-cells and accounts for 3-5% of all thyroid cancers. The discovery of a locally advanced medullary thyroid cancer that is not amenable to surgery or of distant metastases needs careful work-up, including measurement of serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen (and their doubling times), in addition to comprehensive imaging to determine the extent of the disease, its aggressiveness, and the need for any treatment. In the past, cytotoxic chemotherapy was used for treatment but produced little benefit. For the past 10 years, tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and RET (rearranged during transfection) have been used when a systemic therapy is indicated for large tumour burden and documented disease progression. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have shown benefits on progression-free survival compared with placebo in this setting, but their toxic effect profiles need thorough clinical management in specialised centres. This Review describes the management and treatment of patients with advanced medullary thyroid cancer with emphasis on current targeted therapies and perspectives to improve patient care. Most treatment responses are transient, emphasising that mechanisms of resistance need to be better understood and that the efficacy of treatment approaches should be improved with combination therapies or other drugs that might be more potent or target other pathways, including immunotherapy. PMID:26608066

  10. Management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera, Oliver; Ghanem, Ismael; Nasimi, Rula; Prieto, Isabel; Koren, Laura; Feliu, Jaime

    2016-01-14

    Currently, pancreatic adenocarcinoma mainly occurs after 60 years of age, and its prognosis remains poor despite modest improvements in recent decades. The aging of the population will result in a rise in the incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma within the next years. Thus, the management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly population is gaining increasing relevance. Older cancer patients represent a heterogeneous group with different biological, functional and psychosocial characteristics that can modify the usual management of this disease, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, polypharmacy, performance status, comorbidities and organ dysfunction. However, the biological age, not the chronological age, of the patient should be the limiting factor in determining the most appropriate treatment for these patients. Unfortunately, despite the increased incidence of this pathology in older patients, there is an underrepresentation of these patients in clinical trials, and the management of older patients is thus determined by extrapolation from the results of studies performed in younger patients. In this review, the special characteristics of the elderly, the multidisciplinary management of localized and advanced ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and the most recent advances in the management of this condition will be discussed, focusing on surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and palliative care. PMID:26811623

  11. Health Management of Breast Cancer Survivors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Li; Juan Chen; Zhendong Chen

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is defined as a chronic disease.Increasing amounts of attention have been paid to the health management of breast cancer survivors. An important issue is how to find the most appropriate method of follow-up in order to detect long-term complications of treatment, local recurrence and distant metastasis and to administer appropriate treatment to the survivors with recurrence in a timely fashion. Different oncology organizations have published guidelines for following up breast cancer survivors. However, there are few articles on this issue in China. Using the published follow-up guidelines,we analyzed their main limitations and discussed the content,follow-up interval and economic benefits of following up breast cancer survivors in an effort to provide suggestions to physicians.Based on a large number of clinical trials, we discussed the role of physical examination, mammography, liver echograph, chest radiography, bone scan and so on. We evaluated the effects of the above factors on detection of distant disease, survival time,improvement in quality of life and time to diagnosis of recurrence.The results of follow-up carried out by oncologists and primary health care physicians were compared. We also analyzed the correlation factors for the cost of such follow-up. It appears that follow-up for breast cancer survivors can be carried out effectively by trained primary health care physicians. If anything unusual arises, the patients should be transferred to specialists.

  12. Diabetes management before and after cancer diagnosis: missed opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Fabian T.; Chukmaitov, Askar S.; Fleming, Steven T.; Anderson, Roger T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the management of comorbidities in cancer patients. This study used population-based data to estimate the guideline concordance rates for diabetes management before and after cancer diagnosis and examined if diabetes management services among cancer patients was associated with characteristics of the hospital where the patient was treated. Methods We linked 2005-2009 Medicare claims data to information on 2,707 breast and colorectal cancers patients in state cancer registry files. Multivariate logistic regression models examined hospital characteristics associated with receipt of diabetes management care after cancer diagnosis. Results The rates of HbAlc testing, LDL-C testing, and retinal eye exam decreased from 72.7%, 79.6%, and 57.9% before cancer diagnosis to 58.3%, 69.5%, and 55.8% after diagnosis. The pre- and post-diagnosis diabetes management care was not significantly different by hospital characteristics in the bivariate analysis except for that the distance between residence and hospital was negatively related to retinal eye exam after diagnosis (P<0.05). The multivariate analysis did not identify any significant differences in diabetes management care after cancer diagnosis by hospital characteristics. Conclusions Cancer patients received fewer diabetes management care after diagnosis than prior to diagnosis, even for those who were treated in large comprehensive centers. This may reflect a missed opportunity to connect diabetic cancer patients to diabetes care. This study provides benchmarks to measure improvements in comorbidity management among cancer patients. PMID:25992371

  13. Update in the management of penile cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge R. Caso

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The management of penile cancer has evolved as less invasive techniques are applied in the treatment of the primary tumor and inguinal lymph nodes. Materials and Methods: Herein we review the literature focusing on advances in the preservation of the phallus as well as less morbid procedures to evaluate and treat the groins. Results: Promising imaging modalities for staging are discussed. New techniques are described and tables provided for penile preservation. We also review the contemporary morbidity of modified surgical forms for evaluation of the inguinal nodes. Conclusions: Advances in surgical technique have made phallic preservation possible in a greater number of primary penile cancers. The groins can be evaluated for metastasis with greater accuracy through new radiologic means as well as with less morbid modified surgical techniques.

  14. Organizing a breast cancer database: data management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Min; Hunt, Kelly K

    2016-06-01

    Developing and organizing a breast cancer database can provide data and serve as valuable research tools for those interested in the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. Depending on the research setting, the quality of the data can be a major issue. Assuring that the data collection process does not contribute inaccuracies can help to assure the overall quality of subsequent analyses. Data management is work that involves the planning, development, implementation, and administration of systems for the acquisition, storage, and retrieval of data while protecting it by implementing high security levels. A properly designed database provides you with access to up-to-date, accurate information. Database design is an important component of application design. If you take the time to design your databases properly, you'll be rewarded with a solid application foundation on which you can build the rest of your application. PMID:27197511

  15. Venous thromboembolism in cancer patients: risk assessment, prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukaye, Deepali N; Brink, Heidi; Baliga, Ragavendra

    2016-03-01

    Thrombosis and thromboembolic events contribute to significant morbidity in cancer patients. Venous thrombosis embolism (which includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) accounts for a large percentage of thromboembolic events. Appropriate identification of cancer patients at high risk for venous thromboembolism and management of thromboembolic event is crucial in improving the quality of care for cancer patients. However, thromboembolism in cancer patients is a complex problem and the management has to be tailored to each individual. The focus of this review is to understand the complex pathology, physiology and risk factors that drive the process of venous thrombosis and embolism in cancer patients and the current guidelines in management. PMID:26919091

  16. Complexities of Adherence and Post-Cancer Lymphedema Management

    OpenAIRE

    Ostby, Pamela L.; Jane M Armer

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management. Up to 40% of 3 million breast cancer survivors in the US will develop BCRL, which has no cure, is irreversible, and requires self-management with regimens that may include multiple components. The complexities of treatment can negatively affect adherence to BCRL self-management which is critical to preventing ...

  17. Therapeutic management of locally unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer still have bad prognosis. At the time of diagnosis, less than 10 % of patients can undergo surgery with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 2 %. For patients with localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma, the combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy has been shown to control symptoms and to enhance patient survival. This treatment should be proposed to all the patients with good performance status and without icterus. Pain management should be optimized and often need morphinic and co-antalgic (anticonvulsants, steroids) consumption. The celiac plexus block with alcohol gives an excellent pain relief and should be more frequently used. (author)

  18. Management of breast cancer following Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, histology, risk factors, treatment, and prognosis of breast cancer occurring after Hodgkin's disease. Materials and Methods: Sixty-five cases of breast cancer in 61 survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma were analyzed. The median age at treatment for Hodgkin's disease was 24.1 [range (R): 13.3 - 71.8] years. Fifty-one percent had received radiotherapy alone, 47% radiation and chemotherapy, and 2% chemotherapy only. Relative and absolute risks were calculated based on 47 invasive breast cancers in 1049 women treated for Hodgkin's disease at Stanford. Results: The median age at diagnosis of breast cancer was 41.9 (R: 23.0 - 79.1) years; 76% of women were premenopausal. The median interval between Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer was 17.6 (R: 1.5 - 32.7) years with an increasing incidence beginning eight years after radiotherapy. The current relative risk of invasive breast cancer following Hodgkin's disease is 4.7 [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.4 - 6.1] with an absolute risk of 29.5 (CI: 18.8 - 40.2) excess cases per 10,000 person-years. Eighty-seven percent of breast cancers occurred in or at the margin of a prior radiotherapy field where a mean dose of 43.5 (R: 24.0 - 51.0) Gy was delivered. There was a family history of breast cancer in 31% of women. Cancers were detected by self examination (66%), screening mammography (27%), and physician examination (7%). Many tumors (60%) were located in the upper outer quadrants, corresponding to the axillary portion of a mantle field. There were seven cases of carcinoma in situ: six DCIS and one LCIS. The histologic distribution of invasive tumors paralleled that reported in the general population: 4% pure lobular, 35% high grade ductal, 45% intermediate grade ductal, 7% low-grade ductal, 4% tubular, 2% medullary, and 2% mucinous. Estrogen receptors were positive in 59% of evaluable cases. While 90% of invasive tumors were smaller than four centimeters, 96% were managed with mastectomy

  19. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David;

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe....... The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a...... feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed...

  20. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface MM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Megan M Boniface,1 Sachin B Wani,2 Tracey E Schefter,3 Phillip J Koo,4 Cheryl Meguid,1 Stephen Leong,5 Jeffrey B Kaplan,6 Lisa J Wingrove,7 Martin D McCarter1 1Section of Surgical Oncology, Division of GI, Tumor and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Therapeutic and Interventional Endoscopy, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, 4Division of Radiology-Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, 5Division of Medical Oncology, 6Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Denver, 7Department of Food and Nutrition Services, University of Colorado Hospital Cancer Center, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical, and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Keywords: tumor board, upper gastrointestinal malignancies, patient centered

  1. Management of bleeding complications in patients with cancer on DOACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Sam; Shrum, Jeffrey; Majeed, Ammar

    2016-04-01

    There has been a concern that major bleeding events (MBE) on direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) will be more difficult to manage than on vitamin K antagonists. Patients with cancer and DOAC-associated bleeding may be even more of a challenge to manage. We therefore reviewed the literature on bleeding in patients with cancer on DOACs. In addition, we performed an analysis of individual patient data from 5 phase III trials on treatment with dabigatran with focus on those with cancer. In 6 randomized trials the risk of MBE in patients with cancer was similar on treatment with DOACs compared to vitamin K antagonists. Bleeding was in the majority of patients managed with supportive therapy alone. In the individual patient data analysis there were no significant differences in use of hemostatic products, transfusion of red cells, effectiveness of management, bleeding-related mortality or 30-day all-cause mortality between patients with cancer treated with dabigatran or with warfarin. Local hemostatic therapy, including resection of the cancer site was more common in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding with cancer than among those without cancer. We conclude that management of bleeding in patients with cancer and on a DOAC does not pose a greater challenge than management of bleeding in patients without cancer. PMID:27067968

  2. Management of solitary and multiple brain metastases from breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Addison Willett; J Ben Wilkinson; Chirag Shah; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2015-01-01

    As local and systemic control of breast cancer improves, metastasis to the brain remains a common event requiring a specialized management approach. Women diagnosed with breast cancer who develop brain metastases have superior overall survival compared to patients with other forms of metastatic carcinoma. This article summarizes some of the unique aspects of care for patients with breast cancer metastases to the brain.

  3. Contemporary management of cancer of the oral cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genden, Eric M.; Silver, Carl E.; Takes, Robert P.; Suárez, Carlos; Owen, Randall P.; Haigentz, Missak; Stoeckli, Sandro J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Rapidis, Alexander D.; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; Rinaldo, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer represents a common entity comprising a third of all head and neck malignant tumors. The options for curative treatment of oral cavity cancer have not changed significantly in the last three decades; however, the work up, the approach to surveillance, and the options for reconstruction have evolved significantly. Because of the profound functional and cosmetic importance of the oral cavity, management of oral cavity cancers requires a thorough understanding of disease progression, approaches to management and options for reconstruction. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most current management options for oral cavity cancers. PMID:20155361

  4. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies tha...

  5. Current Research and Management of Ovarian Cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUMeijiao; SHIWei

    2002-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is ne of the most lethal malignant tumors in China,represents the third most common cancer after cervical cancer and endometrial cancer,and the first leading cause of death from hynaecological cancers.Due to the lack of effective screening strategies and the absence of symptoms in early-stage of disease,over 70% of patients present at an advanced stage.Despite the advances in surgical techniques and conventional chemotheraphy,the prognosis of ovarian cancer has not been improved significantly,and indeed the long-term survival for patients with advanced disease does not exceed 20%.The aetiology of ovarian cancer temains poorly understood.In China,the major focus of research is to clarify the mechanism underlying ovarian cancer,develop more effective life-saving diagnostic and therapeutic measures,and undertake more population-based studies.This article summarizes current research,diagnosis and management of ovarian cancer in China.

  6. Oxycodone controlled release in cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancofiore, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    illustrations of a lower incidence of side-effects in the central nervous system. It is therefore possible to conclude that oxycodone represents a valid alternative to morphine in the management of moderate to severe cancer pain, also as first-line treatment. PMID:18360598

  7. Thyroid cancer: Natural history, management strategies and outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To understand the natural history of thyroid cancer and high risk groups; To define the biological behavior of thyroid cancer and relate it to various prognostic factors and risk groups; To divide the management strategies into conservation, radical surgery and radioactive iodine treatment; To define the role of external radiation therapy and the management of complex and advanced thyroid cancer; To analyze the results of management of anaplastic thyroid cancer and make a plea for combined modality treatment; To define the current role of genetic studies in medullary thyroid cancer. At the end of this refresher course, the attendees will be able to understand the natural history, the prognostic factors and risk groups and surgical and combined modality treatment in thyroid cancer

  8. Cancer risk management decision making for BRCA+ women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonarczyk, Terri Jabaley; Mawn, Barbara E

    2015-01-01

    Women with pathogenic BRCA genetic mutations face high risks for cancer development. Estimates vary among mutation carriers, with lifetime risks ranging from 41% to 90% for breast cancer and 8% to 62% for ovarian cancer. Cancer risk management options for BRCA mutation positive (BRCA+) women have life-altering implications. This qualitative, phenomenological study explored the experience of cancer risk management decision making for women who are unaffected carriers of a BRCA mutation (previvors). Fifteen previvors recruited from Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE), an online informational and support group, were interviewed. Findings consisted of four major themes: the early previvor experience, intense emotional upheaval; the decisional journey, navigating a personal plan for survival; lack of knowledge and experience among health care providers; and support is essential. Findings highlight the different decisional perspectives of previvors based on age and individual factors and the need for increased competence among health care providers. PMID:24470135

  9. Surgical management of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamousa Ahmed

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Surgery plays a major role in the management of patients with lung cancer. Surgery is not only the main curative treatment modality in patients with early-stage lung cancer but it also has a significant role in the initial workup for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. This article describes the surgical management of patients with lung cancer. Surgical resection for lung cancer is still regarded as the most effective method for controlling the primary tumor, provided it is resectable for cure and the risks of the procedure are low. The 5-year survival rare following complete resection (R0 of a lung cancer is stage dependent [Table 1]. [1-3] Incomplete resection (R1, R2 rarely, if ever, cures the patient.

  10. Patients with cancer and family caregivers: management of symptoms caused by cancer or cancer therapy at home

    OpenAIRE

    Hazelwood, Daniela Maria; Koeck, Sabine; Wallner, Martin; Anderson, Kathryn Hoehn; Mayer, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    People are diagnosed with cancer sooner nowadays thanks to increased awareness and improvements in cancer screenings. Patients are able to live longer due to cancer treatment regimens; however, they suffer the consequences of living with cancer and therapy-related symptoms. Symptom management is challenging for both patients and family caregivers. Therefore, family members must be integrated in the patient’s care plan. For this review, a literature search was conducted to determine what types...

  11. Cancer pain management: Basic information for the young pain physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SPS Rana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer pain is multifactorial and complex. The impact of cancer pain is devastating, with increased morbidity and poor quality of life, if not treated adequately. Cancer pain management is a challenging task both due to disease process as well as a consequence of treatment-related side-effects. Optimization of analgesia with oral opioids, adjuvant analgesics, and advanced pain management techniques is the key to success for cancer pain. Early access of oral opioid and interventional pain management techniques can overcome the barriers of cancer pain, with improved quality of life. With timely and proper anticancer therapy, opioids, nerve blocks, and other non-invasive techniques like psychosocial care, satisfactory pain relief can be achieved in most of the patients. Although the WHO Analgesic Ladder is effective for more than 80% cancer pain, addition of appropriate adjuvant drugs along with early intervention is needed for improved Quality of Life. Effective cancer pain treatment requires a holistic approach with timely assessment, measurement of pain, pathophysiology involved in causing particular type of pain, and understanding of drugs to relieve pain with timely inclusion of intervention. Careful evaluation of psychosocial and mental components with good communication is necessary. Barriers to cancer pain management should be overcome with an interdisciplinary approach aiming to provide adequate analgesia with minimal side-effects. Management of cancer pain should comprise not only a physical component but also psychosocial and mental components and social need of the patient. With risk-benefit analysis, interventional techniques should be included in an early stage of pain treatment. This article summarizes the need for early and effective pain management strategies, awareness regarding pain control, and barriers of cancer pain.

  12. Management of solitary and multiple brain metastases from breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addison Willett

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As local and systemic control of breast cancer improves, metastasis to the brain remains a common event requiring a specialized management approach. Women diagnosed with breast cancer who develop brain metastases have superior overall survival compared to patients with other forms of metastatic carcinoma. This article summarizes some of the unique aspects of care for patients with breast cancer metastases to the brain.

  13. Contemporary management of cancer of the oral cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Genden, Eric M.; Ferlito, Alfio; Silver, Carl E.; Takes, Robert P.; Suárez, Carlos; Owen, Randall P.; Haigentz, Missak; Stoeckli, Sandro J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Rapidis, Alexander D.; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; Rinaldo, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer represents a common entity comprising a third of all head and neck malignant tumors. The options for curative treatment of oral cavity cancer have not changed significantly in the last three decades; however, the work up, the approach to surveillance, and the options for reconstruction have evolved significantly. Because of the profound functional and cosmetic importance of the oral cavity, management of oral cavity cancers requires a thorough understanding of disease progression,...

  14. Imaging of lung cancer: Implications on staging and management

    OpenAIRE

    Purandare, Nilendu C; Venkatesh Rangarajan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Accurate assessment of disease extent is important in deciding the optimal treatment approach. To play an important role in the multidisciplinary management of lung cancer patients, it is necessary that the radiologist understands the principles of staging and the implications of radiological findings on the various staging descriptors and eventual treatment decisions.

  15. Imaging of lung cancer: Implications on staging and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilendu C Purandare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Accurate assessment of disease extent is important in deciding the optimal treatment approach. To play an important role in the multidisciplinary management of lung cancer patients, it is necessary that the radiologist understands the principles of staging and the implications of radiological findings on the various staging descriptors and eventual treatment decisions.

  16. Metastatic Bladder Cancer: A Review of Current Management

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Fletcher; Ananya Choudhury; Nooreen Alam

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer continues to result in substantial morbidity and mortality for affected individuals. Advances in the management of metastatic bladder cancer have been limited. Chemotherapy with platinum-based regimes remains the mainstay of first-line treatment. Studies investigating alternative regimes have offered no survival advantage. Targeted therapies may offer benefit either as single agent or in combination with chemotherapy. Symptoms due to metastatic bladder cancer impact patients' q...

  17. Management of the axilla in patients with breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal, Amit

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the changes in management of the axilla in patients with breast cancer in the last decade. It discusses the recent advances, existing controversies and provides evidence-based guidelines for use in clinical practice.

  18. Encouraging Health Information Management Graduates to Pursue Cancer Registry Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The cancer registry profession has grown dramatically since its inception in 1926. Certified tumor registrars (CTRs) have become an integral part of the cancer care team by providing quality cancer data for research, statistical purposes, public health, and cancer control. In addition, CTRs have been found to be valuable in other cancer and health-related fields. Based on the need for high-quality, accurate data, the National Cancer Registrars Association (NCRA), the certification body for CTRs, has increased the educational requirement for eligibility for the CTR certification exam. This has resulted in fewer individuals who are able to meet the requirements for CTR certification. In addition, the existing cancer registry workforce is, on average, older than other allied health professions, and therefore will face an increasing number of retirements in the next few years. The high demand for CTRs, the decreased pool of CTR-eligible applicants, and the aging cancer registry workforce has resulted in an existing shortage that will only get worse as the population ages and the incidence of cancer increases. Health information management (HIM) students are well suited to pursuing further training in the cancer registry field and gaining the CTR credential. HIM students or new graduates have the needed skill set and education to pursue a cancer registry career. There are many avenues HIM educational programs can take to encourage students to pursue CTR certification and a cancer registry career. Including cancer registry functions in courses throughout the HIM curriculum, bringing in cancer registry speakers, encouraging networking, and promoting the cancer registry field and profession in general are just a few of the methods that HIM programs can use to raise awareness of and promote a cancer registry career to their students. Illinois State University has used these methods and has found them to be successful in encouraging a percentage of their graduates to pursue

  19. Management of locally advanced breast cancer: Evolution and current practice

    OpenAIRE

    Rustogi Ashish; Budrukkar Ashwini; Dinshaw Ketayun; Jalali Rakesh

    2005-01-01

    Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) accounts for a sizeable number (30-60%) of breast cancer cases and is a common clinical scenario in developing countries. The treatment of LABC has evolved from single modality treatment, consisting of radical mutilating surgery or higher doses of radiotherapy in inoperable disease to multimodality management, which along with the above two included systemic therapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) has made a tremendous impact on the management of ...

  20. Computerized database management system for breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Kok Swee; Chong, Sze Siang; Tso, Chih Ping; Nia, Mohsen Esmaeili; Chong, Aun Kee; Abbas, Siti Fathimah

    2014-01-01

    Data analysis based on breast cancer risk factors such as age, race, breastfeeding, hormone replacement therapy, family history, and obesity was conducted on breast cancer patients using a new enhanced computerized database management system. My Structural Query Language (MySQL) is selected as the application for database management system to store the patient data collected from hospitals in Malaysia. An automatic calculation tool is embedded in this system to assist the data analysis. The r...

  1. Diagnosis and Management of Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Michael M; Overbeek-Wager, Erika A; Grumbo, Robert J

    2016-03-15

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy. It is the fourth most common cancer in women in the United States after breast, lung, and colorectal cancers. Risk factors are related to excessive unopposed exposure of the endometrium to estrogen, including unopposed estrogen therapy, early menarche, late menopause, tamoxifen therapy, nulliparity, infertility or failure to ovulate, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Additional risk factors are increasing age, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. The most common presentation for endometrial cancer is postmenopausal bleeding. The American Cancer Society recommends that all women older than 65 years be informed of the risks and symptoms of endometrial cancer and advised to seek evaluation if symptoms occur. There is no evidence to support endometrial cancer screening in asymptomatic women. Evaluation of a patient with suspected disease should include a pregnancy test in women of childbearing age, complete blood count, and prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time if bleeding is heavy. Most guidelines recommend either transvaginal ultrasonography or endometrial biopsy as the initial study. The mainstay of treatment for endometrial cancer is total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Radiation and chemotherapy can also play a role in treatment. Low- to medium-risk endometrial hyperplasia can be treated with nonsurgical options. Survival is generally defined by the stage of the disease and histology, with most patients at stage I and II having a favorable prognosis. Controlling risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension could play a role in the prevention of endometrial cancer. PMID:26977831

  2. Gastric cancer in Africa: current management and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asombang, Akwi W; Rahman, Rubayat; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-04-14

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer and second most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Globally, gastric cancer poses a significant public health burden - both economically and socially. In 2008, the economic burden from premature cancer deaths and disability was $895 billion and gastric cancer was the second highest cancer responsible for healthy life lost. With the expected increase in cancer deaths and non-communicable diseases, these costs are expected to rise and impact patient care. World Health Organization, estimates a 15% increase in non-communicable disease worldwide, with more than 20% increase occurring in Africa between 2010 and 2020. Mali, West Africa, is ranked 15(th) highest incidence of gastric cancer worldwide at a rate of 20.3/100000, yet very scarce published data evaluating etiology, prevention or management exist. It is understood that risk factors of gastric cancer are multifactorial and include infectious agents (Helicobacter pylori, Epstein-Barr virus), genetic, dietary, and environmental factors (alcohol, smoking). Interestingly, African patients with gastric cancer are younger, in their 3(rd)-4(th) decade, and present at a late stage of the disease. There is sparse data regarding gastric cancer in Africa due to lack of data collection and under-reporting, which impacts incidence and mortality rates. Currently, GLOBOCAN, an International Agency for Research on Cancer resource, is the most comprehensive available resource allowing comparison between nations. In resource limited settings, with already restricted healthcare funding, data is needed to establish programs in Africa that increase gastric cancer awareness, curtail the economic burden, and improve patient management and survival outcomes. PMID:24833842

  3. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei [Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Westmead Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  4. Cancer and Disease Management: Indications for Action

    OpenAIRE

    Marybeth Regan

    1999-01-01

    In the US, 1 in 3 women and 1 in 2 men will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives. More than 1.2 million individuals are diagnosed with cancer each year while it is estimated that 8.2 million Americans, alive today, have a history of cancer. Cancer diagnosis and treatment accounts for approximately 20% of all healthcare expenditures; this is estimated to be as high as 25% in the year 2010. Rising costs are a result of an aging population, environmental factors, and medical adv...

  5. Road map for pain management in pancreatic cancer: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoud, Marie José; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Antoun, Joelle; El Osta, Lana; Ghosn, Marwan

    2016-08-15

    Beside its poor prognosis and its late diagnosis, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most painful malignancies. Optimal management of pain in this cancer represents a real challenge for the oncologist whose objective is to ensure a better quality of life to his patients. We aimed in this paper to review all the treatment modalities incriminated in the management of pain in pancreatic cancer going from painkillers, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and interventional techniques to agents under investigation and alternative medicine. Although specific guidelines and recommendations for pain management in pancreatic cancer are still absent, we present all the possible pain treatments, with a progression from medical multimodal treatment to radiotherapy and chemotherapy then interventional techniques in case of resistance. In addition, alternative methods such as acupuncture and hypnosis can be added at any stage and seems to contribute to pain relief. PMID:27574552

  6. Image-guided radiotherapy and motion management in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine

    2015-01-01

    In this review, image guidance and motion management in radiotherapy for lung cancer is discussed. Motion characteristics of lung tumours and image guidance techniques to obtain motion information are elaborated. Possibilities for management of image guidance and motion in the various steps of the...

  7. Diagnosis and Management of Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubeni, Chyke A; Doubeni, Anna R; Myers, Allison E

    2016-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer. Less than one-half of patients survive for more than five years after diagnosis. Ovarian cancer affects women of all ages but is most commonly diagnosed after menopause. More than 75% of affected women are diagnosed at an advanced stage because early-stage disease is usually asymptomatic and symptoms of late-stage disease are nonspecific. The strongest risk factors are advancing age and family history of ovarian and breast cancer. Women who have symptoms concerning for ovarian cancer should undergo a physical examination, transvaginal ultrasonography, and measurement of biomarkers such as cancer antigen 125. If results are suspicious for ovarian cancer, the patient should be referred to a gynecologic oncologist. Despite the low rate of early diagnosis, guidelines recommend against routine screening for ovarian cancer in average-risk women because screening, including routine pelvic examinations, is ineffective and associated with harm. However, a recent trial found a potential benefit of annual screening using an algorithm based on serial cancer antigen 125 measurements followed by transvaginal ultrasonography for women at increased risk, as determined by the algorithm. Women with an increased-risk family history should be referred for genetic counseling and, if genetic mutations (e.g., BRCA mutations) are identified, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy can be considered for risk reduction. In both average- and high-risk women, long-term hormonal contraceptive use reduces risk by about 50%. The treatment of ovarian cancer usually involves surgery, with or without intraperitoneal and intravenous chemotherapy. Primary care physicians have important roles in posttreatment surveillance and end-of-life care. PMID:27281838

  8. Radionuclides in the management of thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Buscombe, J R

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear medicine imaging was born over 60 years ago with imaging of thyroid conditions. Most of our present imaging devices were developed for imaging of the thyroid and thyroid cancer. Millions of patients in over 100 countries have been diagnosed and treated for thyroid cancer using nuclear medicine techniques. It remains, however, one of the most dynamic areas of development in nuclear medicine with new roles for positron emission tomography and receptor based imaging. In addition...

  9. Cancer cachexia—pathophysiology and management

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Hajime; Asakawa, Akihiro; Amitani, Haruka; NAKAMURA, NORIFUMI; Inui, Akio

    2013-01-01

    About half of all cancer patients show a syndrome of cachexia, characterized by anorexia and loss of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle mass. Cachexia can have a profound impact on quality of life, symptom burden, and a patient’s sense of dignity. It is a very serious complication, as weight loss during cancer treatment is associated with more chemotherapy-related side effects, fewer completed cycles of chemotherapy, and decreased survival rates. Numerous cytokines have been postulated to pla...

  10. Medical Management of Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, Jessica E; Sherman, Scott K.; O’Dorisio, Thomas M.; Howe, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive form of thyroid cancer, which occurs in both heritable and sporadic forms. Discovery that mutations in the RET protooncogene predispose to familial cases of this disease has allowed for presymptomatic identification of gene carriers and prophylactic surgery to improve the prognosis of these patients. A significant number of patients with the sporadic type of MTC and even with familial disease, still present with nodal or distant metastases, maki...

  11. Capecitabine in the management of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsch BR

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Bradford R Hirsch, S Yousuf ZafarDivision of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: 5-Fluorouracil has been a mainstay in the treatment of colorectal cancer for nearly five decades; however, the use of oral formulations of the medication has been gaining increasing traction since capecitabine was approved for use in adjuvant settings by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2005. The use of capecitabine has since spread to a number of off-label indications, including the treatment of advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer and the neoadjuvant treatment of rectal cancer. In light of increasing utilization, it is critical that clinicians have a firm understanding of the literature supporting capecitabine across various settings as well as the attributes of the drug, such as its dosing recommendations, side-effect profile, and use in the elderly. The purpose of this review is to synthesize the literature in a fashion that can be used to help guide decisions. In a setting of increasing focus on cost, the pharmacoeconomic literature is also briefly reviewed.Keywords: colon cancer, colorectal cancer, rectal cancer, capecitabine, Xeloda

  12. Psychological and Behavioral Approaches to Cancer Pain Management

    OpenAIRE

    Syrjala, Karen L.; Jensen, Mark P.; Mendoza, M Elena; Yi, Jean C.; Fisher, Hannah M.; Keefe, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    This review examines evidence for psychological factors that affect pain across the cancer continuum from diagnosis through treatment and long-term survivorship or end of life. Evidence is convincing that emotional distress, depression, anxiety, uncertainty, and hopelessness interact with pain. Unrelieved pain can increase a desire for hastened death. Patients with cancer use many strategies to manage pain, with catastrophizing associated with increased pain and self-efficacy associated with ...

  13. Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor C; Shewbridge A; Harris J; Green JS

    2013-01-01

    Cath Taylor,1 Amanda Shewbridge,2 Jenny Harris,1 James S Green3,4 1Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London, London UK; 2Breast Cancer Services, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 3Department of Urology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK; 4Department of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University, London, UK Abstract: The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT)-work for breast cancer management ...

  14. Familial breast cancer: management of ‘lower risk' referrals

    OpenAIRE

    Young, D; McLeish, L; Sullivan, F.; Pitkethly, M; M. Reis; Goudie, D; Vysny, H; Ozakinci, G; Steel, M

    2006-01-01

    Up to 40% of referrals from primary care to ‘breast cancer family clinics' prove to be of women whose assessed risk falls below the guidelines' threshold for management in secondary or tertiary care, despite recommendations that they should be screened out at primary care level. A randomised trial, involving 87 such women referred to the Tayside Familial Breast Cancer Service compared two ways of communicating risk information, letter or personal interview. Both were found to be acceptable to...

  15. Perspectives on the clinical management of localized prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Joel B.

    2014-01-01

    If cure is necessary, is it possible and if cure is possible, is it necessary?’ -Willet F. Whitmore Defined broadly, prostate cancer has two states: An indolent histological manifestation of a locally proliferative and invasive process or a clinically relevant, potentially lethal disease. Likewise, the management of clinically localized prostate cancer must address two questions: what sort of disease is this and what needs to be done.

  16. ACOG Recommendations and Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening and Management

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about ACOG's recommendations for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Epidemiology, Detection, and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiubo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available PC (pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of death due to cancer worldwide. The incidence and mortality rates have been increasing year by year worldwide, and this review has analyzed the most recent incidence and mortality data for pancreatic cancer occurrence in China. Several possible risk factors have been discussed here, involving known established risk factors and novel possible risk factors. The development of this cancer is a stepwise progression through intraepithelial neoplasia to carcinoma. Though early and accurate diagnosis is promising based on a combination of recent techniques including tumor markers and imaging modalities, lacking early clinical symptoms makes the diagnosis late. Correct staging is critical because treatment is generally based on this parameter. Treatment options have improved throughout the last decades. However, surgical excision remains the primary therapy and efficacy of conventional chemoradiotherapy for PC is limited. Recently, some novel new therapies have been developed and will be applied in clinics soon. This review will provide an overview of pancreatic cancer, including an understanding of the developments and controversies.

  18. AB008. Management of fertility post cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James

    2016-01-01

    The successful treatment of males with cancer has led to increasing numbers of men and boys interested in life after cancer. One of the top priorities for many of these males is the opportunity to have a family. Most cancer treatments used for common malignancies in men and boys are associated with impaired fertility; for patients receiving alkylating agents or total body irradiation, severe fertility impairment occurs in most patients. While sperm banking for males, even those as young as 12, facing sterilizing cancer treatment can be effective, this approach requires subsequent use of reproductive procedures such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intrauterine insemination to achieve a pregnancy. Most males would prefer to restore their natural ability to father children and avoid these expensive and invasive approaches. No proven method for human male fertility restoration has yet been demonstrated; however, work in many mammalian species and recently in primates has demonstrated that autologous testicular cell transplant (TCT) can restore spermatogenesis after cancer treatment. Promising work in non-primate species has demonstrated the feasibility of in vitro development of mature sperm from neonatal testicular tissue. The safety and efficacy of either approach has not been established in humans. The objective of this lecture is to explore current and future fertility preservation and restoration techniques for males at risk of sterility from medical and surgical treatment.

  19. Key concepts in management of vulvar cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweizig, Susan; Korets, Sharmilee; Cain, Joanna M

    2014-10-01

    Vulvar carcinoma is an uncommon tumor that is seen most often in older women. Subtle symptoms such as pruritus should prompt examination and targeted biopsy in all women as this disease can be successfully treated even in elderly, frail individuals. Vulvar cancer has a bimodal age distribution and is seen in both young and older women with risk factors including human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, smoking, and vulvar skin diseases (i.e., lichen sclerosus). This cancer is staged surgically, with an update in 2009 incorporating prognostic factors. The treatment of vulvar carcinoma has evolved to include more conservative surgical techniques that provide improved cure rates with emphasis on minimizing morbidity. Advanced and metastatic lesions are now treated with chemoradiation which produces substantial cure rates with decreased morbidity. Promising areas of research in vulvar cancer include refinement of sentinel lymph node biopsy, prevention of lymphedema, and preservation of sexual function following treatment. PMID:25151473

  20. Employer-Based Disease Management Programs in Cancer: Experience to Date

    OpenAIRE

    Frederick C. Lee

    2004-01-01

    The cancer disease management field took root in the early 1990s. Health plans in the US seeking to aggressively manage cancer reached out to entrepreneurial start-ups that had infused the general principles of managed care into cancer programs. More than two dozen health plans had adopted some form of cancer disease management by the end of the century. However, employers, witnessing the managed care backlash and experiencing difficulty recruiting an adequate pool of skilled labor during flu...

  1. Controversies in the management of tongue base cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Tongue base cancer is one of the most lethal head and neck cancers. There is considerable controversy in the management of this disease with wide variation of opinion within the literature. METHODS: We discuss the presentation, diagnostic and therapeutic strategies which exist in the literature. Articles were reviewed from 1970 to 2007 within the Medline, Pubmed and Cochrane libraries. CONCLUSIONS: Smokers with a history of persistent unilateral neck pain, even in the absence of clinical signs warrant MRI neck imaging. Tongue base cancer organ preservation therapeutic strategies, radiation and concomitant platinum based chemotherapy, currently optimise oncologic and quality of life outcomes.

  2. Individualized management of advanced bladder cancer: Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Earle F

    2015-04-01

    Despite recent progress in the development of novel targeted therapies in various malignancies, the management of advanced urothelial cancer has changed little over the past 2 decades. Comorbidities inherent to patients with bladder cancer often preclude the use of standard cisplatin-based chemotherapy and underscore the need for individualized treatment recommendations and the development of more effective therapies. This review discusses current issues relevant to the management of patients with locally advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and highlights recent advances in defining molecular aberrations that may ultimately lead to personalized therapeutic decision making. PMID:24332641

  3. Canadian recommendations for the management of breakthrough cancer pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeninck, P.; Gagnon, B.; Gallagher, R.; Henderson, J.D.; Shir, Y.; Zimmermann, C.; Lapointe, B.

    2016-01-01

    Breakthrough cancer pain (btcp) represents an important element in the spectrum of cancer pain management. Because most btcp episodes peak in intensity within a few minutes, speed of medication onset is crucial for proper control. In Canada, several current provincial guidelines for the management of cancer pain include a brief discussion about the treatment of btcp; however, there are no uniform national recommendations for the management of btcp. That lack, accompanied by unequal access to pain medication across the country, contributes to both regional and provincial variability in the management of btcp. Currently, immediate-release oral opioids are the treatment of choice for btcp. This approach might not always offer optimal speed for onset of action and duration to match the rapid nature of an episode of btcp. Novel transmucosal fentanyl formulations might be more appropriate for some types of btcp, but limited access to such drugs hinders their use. In addition, the recognition of btcp and its proper assessment, which are crucial steps toward appropriate treatment selection, remain challenging for many health care professionals. To facilitate appropriate management of btcp, a group of prominent Canadian specialists in palliative care, oncology, and anesthesiology convened to develop a set of recommendations and suggestions to assist Canadian health care providers in the treatment of btcp and the alleviation of the suffering and discomfort experienced by adult cancer patients. PMID:27122974

  4. Propolis in dentistry and oral cancer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagish Kumar L S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis, known as bee glue, is a wax-cum-resin substance, which is created out of a mix of buds from some trees with the substance secreted from the bee′s glands. Its diverse chemical content is responsible for many valuable properties. Multiple applications of propolis have been studied and described in detail for centuries. However, currently available information on propolis is scarce. A literature search in the PubMed database was performed for English language articles, using the search terms propolis, oral health, dentistry, and oral cancer; no restrictions were used for publication dates. The aim of the article was to review propolis and its applications in dentistry including oral cancer.

  5. Adaptive Management of Liver Cancer Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Brock, Kristy K.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive radiation therapy for liver cancer has the potential to reduce normal tissue complications and enable dose escalation, allowing the potential for tumor control in this challenging site. Using adaptive techniques to tailor treatment margins to reflect patient specific breathing motions and image-guidance techniques can reduce the high dose delivered to surrounding normal tissues while ensuring the prescription dose is delivered to the tumor. Several treatment planning and delivery tec...

  6. Laparoscopic Fertility Sparing Management of Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Facchini; Giuseppina Rapacchia; Giulia Montanari; Paolo Casadio; Gianluigi Pilu; Renato Seracchioli

    2014-01-01

    Fertility can be preserved after conservative cervical surgery. We report on a 29-year-old woman who was obese, para 0, and diagnosed with cervical insufficiency at the first trimester of current pregnancy due to a previous trachelectomy. She underwent laparoscopic transabdominal cervical cerclage (LTCC) for cervical cancer. The surgery was successful and she was discharged two days later. The patient underwent a caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation. Laparoscopic surgery ...

  7. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, Gul; Hodgson, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are largely divided into medullary (MTC) and non-medullary (NMTC) cancers , depending on the cell type of origin. Familial non-medullary thyroid cancer (FNMTC) comprises about 5-15% of NMTC and is a heterogeneous group of diseases, including both non-syndromic and syndromic forms. Non-syndromic FNMTC tends to manifest papillary thyroid carcinoma , usually multifocal and bilateral . Several high-penetrance genes for FNMTC have been identified, but they are often confined to a few or single families, and other susceptibility loci appear to play a small part, conferring only small increments in risk. Familial susceptibility is likely to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental influences. The current focus of research in FNMTC is to characterise the susceptibility genes and their role in carcinogenesis. FNMTC can also occur as a part of multitumour genetic syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis , Cowden's disease , Werner's syndrome and Carney complex . These tend to present at an early age and are multicentric and bilateral with distinct pathology. The clinical evaluation of these patients is similar to that for most patients with a thyroid nodule. Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) arises from the parafollicular cells of the thyroid which release calcitonin. The familial form of MTC accounts for 20-25% of cases and presents as a part of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) syndromes or as a pure familial MTC (FMTC). They are caused by germline point mutations in the RET oncogene on chromosome 10q11.2. There is a clear genotype-phenotype correlation, and the aggressiveness of FMTC depends on the specific genetic mutation, which should determine the timing of surgery. PMID:27075347

  8. Capecitabine in the management of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch BR; Zafar SY

    2011-01-01

    Bradford R Hirsch, S Yousuf ZafarDivision of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: 5-Fluorouracil has been a mainstay in the treatment of colorectal cancer for nearly five decades; however, the use of oral formulations of the medication has been gaining increasing traction since capecitabine was approved for use in adjuvant settings by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2005. The use of capecitabine has since spread to a number of off-label indications...

  9. Application of Text Mining in Cancer Symptom Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ji; Donovan, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue continues to be one of the main symptoms that afflict ovarian cancer patients and negatively affects their functional status and quality of life. To manage fatigue effectively, the symptom must be understood from the perspective of patients. We utilized text mining to understand the symptom experiences and strategies that were associated with fatigue among ovarian cancer patients. Through text analysis, we determined that descriptors such as energetic, challenging, frustrating, struggling, unmanageable, and agony were associated with fatigue. Descriptors such as decadron, encourager, grocery, massage, relaxing, shower, sleep, zoloft, and church were associated with strategies to ameliorate fatigue. This study demonstrates the potential of applying text mining in cancer research to understand patients' perspective on symptom management. Future study will consider various factors to refine the results. PMID:27332415

  10. High-Risk Prostate Cancer : From Definition to Contemporary Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastian, Patrick J.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Bossi, Alberto; Briganti, Alberto; Heidenreich, Axel; Freedland, Stephen J.; Montorsi, Francesco; Roach, Mack; Schroder, Fritz; van Poppel, Hein; Stief, Christian G.; Stephenson, Andrew J.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Context: High-risk prostate cancer (PCa) is a potentially lethal disease. It is clinically important to identify patients with high-risk PCa early on because they stand to benefit the most from curative therapy. Because of recent advances in PCa management, a multimodal approach may be advantageous.

  11. Novel agents in the management of lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, B

    2012-01-31

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Survival remains poor as approximately 80% of cases present with advanced stage disease. However, new treatments are emerging which offer hope to patients with advanced disease. Insights into cell biology have identified numerous intracellular and extracellular peptides that are pivotal in cancer cell signalling. Disrupting the function of these peptides inhibits intracellular signal transduction and diminishes uncontrolled proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and tumour angiogenesis. The most widely studied signalling pathway is the Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) pathway. EGF signalling can be disrupted at numerous points. Blockade of the cell surface receptor is achieved by the monoclonal antibody cetuximab; intracellular tyrosine kinase activity is inhibited by erlotinib. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) regulates another pathway important for tumour growth. Inhibition of VEGF impairs angiogenesis and disrupts metastatic spread. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF and blocks interaction with its cell surface receptor. Clinical trials have demonstrated that disruption of these signalling pathways can improve survival in advanced lung cancer. New compounds including folate antimetabolites such as pemetrexed, proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib, modified glutathione analogues such as TLK286, and other agents such as epothilones and other small molecules are currently being evaluated in patients with lung cancer. As more and more signalling peptides are targeted for manipulation, it is hoped that a new era is dawning in the treatment of advanced stage lung cancer. This review will focus on emerging new therapies in the management of lung cancer.

  12. Ovarian Cancer Management: The role of imaging and diagnostic challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharwani, Nishat, E-mail: nishat.bharwani@nhs.net [Barts and the London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Reznek, Rodney H.; Rockall, Andrea G. [Barts and the London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Worldwide, ovarian cancer accounts for 4% of all female cancers with over 190,000 new cases diagnosed each year. The incidence rates vary considerably across the globe with the highest rates seen in Europe and the USA and low rates in Africa and Asia. Ovarian cancer has been termed a 'silent' killer with the majority of patients presenting with advanced disease due to the vague, non-specific nature of the presenting symptoms such as abdominal discomfort and bloating in 50%. The most important determinant of survival for ovarian cancer patients is the disease stage at diagnosis. Therefore there is a thrust for early detection and two large screening trials are currently underway in the UK and USA. Ovarian cancer is most commonly staged using the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) surgical-pathological staging system. Imaging findings are not a formal component of the staging system but in clinical practice they play a significant role in the diagnosis and management of suspected ovarian cancer. Adnexal masses which are shown to have benign features on imaging can undergo simple excision at a local unit by a non-oncological gynaecologist. If a mass has malignant characteristics on imaging, then a radical surgical approach is indicated and this should be performed by a gynaecological oncological surgeon at a specialist cancer centre, as optimal cytoreductive surgery has been reported to improve outcome. This review article discusses the role of various imaging modalities in the initial assessment of an adnexal mass, the contribution to management planning and to the follow-up of patients with ovarian cancer.

  13. Ovarian Cancer Management: The role of imaging and diagnostic challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worldwide, ovarian cancer accounts for 4% of all female cancers with over 190,000 new cases diagnosed each year. The incidence rates vary considerably across the globe with the highest rates seen in Europe and the USA and low rates in Africa and Asia. Ovarian cancer has been termed a 'silent' killer with the majority of patients presenting with advanced disease due to the vague, non-specific nature of the presenting symptoms such as abdominal discomfort and bloating in 50%. The most important determinant of survival for ovarian cancer patients is the disease stage at diagnosis. Therefore there is a thrust for early detection and two large screening trials are currently underway in the UK and USA. Ovarian cancer is most commonly staged using the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) surgical-pathological staging system. Imaging findings are not a formal component of the staging system but in clinical practice they play a significant role in the diagnosis and management of suspected ovarian cancer. Adnexal masses which are shown to have benign features on imaging can undergo simple excision at a local unit by a non-oncological gynaecologist. If a mass has malignant characteristics on imaging, then a radical surgical approach is indicated and this should be performed by a gynaecological oncological surgeon at a specialist cancer centre, as optimal cytoreductive surgery has been reported to improve outcome. This review article discusses the role of various imaging modalities in the initial assessment of an adnexal mass, the contribution to management planning and to the follow-up of patients with ovarian cancer.

  14. Laparoscopic Fertility Sparing Management of Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Facchini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fertility can be preserved after conservative cervical surgery. We report on a 29-year-old woman who was obese, para 0, and diagnosed with cervical insufficiency at the first trimester of current pregnancy due to a previous trachelectomy. She underwent laparoscopic transabdominal cervical cerclage (LTCC for cervical cancer. The surgery was successful and she was discharged two days later. The patient underwent a caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation. Laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive approach associated with less pain and faster recovery, feasible even in obese women.

  15. Laparoscopic fertility sparing management of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Chiara; Rapacchia, Giuseppina; Montanari, Giulia; Casadio, Paolo; Pilu, Gianluigi; Seracchioli, Renato

    2014-04-01

    Fertility can be preserved after conservative cervical surgery. We report on a 29-year-old woman who was obese, para 0, and diagnosed with cervical insufficiency at the first trimester of current pregnancy due to a previous trachelectomy. She underwent laparoscopic transabdominal cervical cerclage (LTCC) for cervical cancer. The surgery was successful and she was discharged two days later. The patient underwent a caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation. Laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive approach associated with less pain and faster recovery, feasible even in obese women. PMID:24696772

  16. Advanced medullary thyroid cancer: pathophysiology and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare malignant tumor originating from thyroid parafollicular C cells. This tumor accounts for 3%–4% of thyroid gland neoplasias. MTC may occur sporadically or be inherited. Hereditary MTC appears as part of the multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2A or 2B, or familial medullary thyroid cancer. Germ-line mutations of the RET proto-oncogene cause hereditary forms of cancer, whereas somatic mutations can be present in sporadic forms of the disease. The RET gene encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in the activation of intracellular signaling pathways leading to proliferation, growth, differentiation, migration, and survival. Nowadays, early diagnosis of MTC followed by total thyroidectomy offers the only possibility of cure. Based on the knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of MTC, new drugs have been developed in an attempt to control metastatic disease. Of these, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent one of the most promising agents for MTC treatment, and clinical trials have shown encouraging results. Hopefully, the cumulative knowledge about the targets of action of these drugs and about the tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated side effects will help in choosing the best therapeutic approach to enhance their benefits

  17. Sympathetic blocks for visceral cancer pain management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Klepstad, Pal; Kurita, Geana Paula; Sjogren, Per; Giarratano, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    The neurolytic blocks of sympathetic pathways, including celiac plexus block (CPB) and superior hypogastric plexus block (SHPB) , have been used for years. The aim of this review was to assess the evidence to support the performance of sympathetic blocks in cancer patients with abdominal visceral...... effects in comparison with a conventional analgesic treatment. In one study patients treated with superior hypogastric plexus block (SHPB) had a decrease in pain intensity and a less morphine consumption, while no statistical differences in adverse effects were found. The quality of these studies was...... generally poor due to several limitations, including sample size calculation, allocation concealment, no intention to treat analysis. However, at least two CPB studies were of good quality. Data regarding the comparison of techniques or other issues were sparse and of poor quality, and evidence could not be...

  18. Diagnosis and Management of Peritoneal Metastases from Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Halkia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The management and the outcome of peritoneal metastases or recurrence from epithelial ovarian cancer are presented. The biology and the diagnostic tools of EOC peritoneal metastasis with a comprehensive approach and the most recent literatures data are discussed. The definition and the role of surgery and chemotherapy are presented in order to focuse on the controversial points. Finally, the paper discusses the new data about the introduction of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC in the treatment of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

  19. Diagnosis and management of peritoneal metastases from ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkia, Evgenia; Spiliotis, John; Sugarbaker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The management and the outcome of peritoneal metastases or recurrence from epithelial ovarian cancer are presented. The biology and the diagnostic tools of EOC peritoneal metastasis with a comprehensive approach and the most recent literatures data are discussed. The definition and the role of surgery and chemotherapy are presented in order to focuse on the controversial points. Finally, the paper discusses the new data about the introduction of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in the treatment of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:22888339

  20. Thyroid Cancer: Burden of Illness and Management of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Brown, Jonas A. de Souza, Ezra EW Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The incidence of thyroid cancer, the most common endocrine malignancy, has increased dramatically in the last fifty years. This article will review the standard approach to thyroid cancer treatment as well as novel therapies under investigation. We will also address potential cost considerations in the management of thyroid cancer.Study Design: A comprehensive literature search was performed.Methods: Review article.Results: The high prevalence of thyroid cancer and the availability of novel therapies for patients with metastatic disease have potential economic implications that have not been well-studied. Because many patients likely have very low morbidity from their cancers, better tools to identify the lowest risk patients are needed in order to prevent overtreatment. Improved risk stratification should include recognizing patients who are unlikely to benefit from radioactive iodine therapy after initial surgery and identifying those with indolent and asymptomatic metastatic disease that are unlikely to benefit from novel therapies. In patients with advanced incurable disease, randomized-controlled studies to assess the efficacy of novel agents are needed to determine if the costs associated with new agents are warranted.Conclusions: Health care costs associated with the increased diagnosis of thyroid cancer remain unknown but are worthy of further research.

  1. Complexities of Adherence and Post-Cancer Lymphedema Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela L. Ostby

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL, a chronic, debilitating, condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management. Up to 40% of 3 million breast cancer survivors in the US will develop BCRL, which has no cure, is irreversible, and requires self-management with regimens that may include multiple components. The complexities of treatment can negatively affect adherence to BCRL self-management which is critical to preventing progressive swelling and infection. The aim of this review of contemporary literature published from 2005–2015 is to examine the complexities of BCRL self-management, to identify adherence-focused studies relevant to BCRL, and to summarize barriers to self-management of BCRL. Six electronic indices were searched from which 120 articles were retrieved; 17 were BCRL-focused; and eight met inclusion criteria. Seventeen of 120 articles identified barriers to self-management of BCRL such as complexities of treatment regimens, symptom burden, balance of time for treatment and life demands, and lack of education and support; however, only eight studies included outcome measures of adherence to BCRL treatment regimens with a subsequent improvement in reduced limb volumes and/or perceptions of self-efficacy and self-regulation. A major limitation is the few number of rigorously developed outcome measures of BCRL adherence. In addition, randomized studies are needed with larger sample sizes to establish adequate levels of evidence for establishing best practice standards for improving adherence to BCRL self-management treatment regimens.

  2. Complexities of Adherence and Post-Cancer Lymphedema Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostby, Pamela L; Armer, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management. Up to 40% of 3 million breast cancer survivors in the US will develop BCRL, which has no cure, is irreversible, and requires self-management with regimens that may include multiple components. The complexities of treatment can negatively affect adherence to BCRL self-management which is critical to preventing progressive swelling and infection. The aim of this review of contemporary literature published from 2005-2015 is to examine the complexities of BCRL self-management, to identify adherence-focused studies relevant to BCRL, and to summarize barriers to self-management of BCRL. Six electronic indices were searched from which 120 articles were retrieved; 17 were BCRL-focused; and eight met inclusion criteria. Seventeen of 120 articles identified barriers to self-management of BCRL such as complexities of treatment regimens, symptom burden, balance of time for treatment and life demands, and lack of education and support; however, only eight studies included outcome measures of adherence to BCRL treatment regimens with a subsequent improvement in reduced limb volumes and/or perceptions of self-efficacy and self-regulation. A major limitation is the few number of rigorously developed outcome measures of BCRL adherence. In addition, randomized studies are needed with larger sample sizes to establish adequate levels of evidence for establishing best practice standards for improving adherence to BCRL self-management treatment regimens. PMID:26580657

  3. Introduction to managing patients with recurrent ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabra, Hani

    2014-12-01

    Ovarian cancer is the 5th most common cancer found in women in the UK. It is the leading cause of death from gynaecological cancer, and is the 4th most common cause of cancer death among UK women. Similar to the majority of other cancers, relative survival rates for ovarian cancer are improving, although 5-year mortality rates remain stubbornly low. The stage of the disease at diagnosis is the single most important determinant of ovarian cancer survival, as many patients first present with advanced disease. Treatment of ovarian cancer involves a combination of 'upfront' primary surgery followed by chemotherapy. Platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy is the recommended standard-of-care first-line chemotherapy, but the majority of patients will relapse with drug-resistant disease within 3-5 years. However, not all patients can continue with platinum combination therapies due to loss of activity or toxicity-related issues, including hypersensitivity, neurotoxicity, alopecia and ototoxicity. Therefore the choice of second-line chemotherapy must take into account factors such as platinum-free treatment interval (PFI); patient's performance status; current symptoms; history of and likely future toxicities while on chemotherapy; dosing schedule requirement; and cost of treatment. A consensus in 2010 established 4 distinct subgroups within the ROC patient population based on the PFI: (platinum sensitive <12 months, partially platinum sensitive 6-12 months, platinum resistant <6 months, and refractory disease ≤4 weeks). Within patients with platinum sensitive disease, those with partially platinum sensitive disease remain the most clinically challenging to manage effectively. Non-platinum based combination therapies, in particular trabectedin with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), offers new options together with a significant survival advantage relative to PLD alone for these patients. PMID:26759525

  4. Introduction to managing patients with recurrent ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani Gabra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the 5th most common cancer found in women in the UK. It is the leading cause of death from gynaecological cancer, and is the 4th most common cause of cancer death among UK women. Similar to the majority of other cancers, relative survival rates for ovarian cancer are improving, although 5-year mortality rates remain stubbornly low. The stage of the disease at diagnosis is the single most important determinant of ovarian cancer survival, as many patients first present with advanced disease. Treatment of ovarian cancer involves a combination of ‘upfront’ primary surgery followed by chemotherapy. Platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy is the recommended standard-of-care first-line chemotherapy, but the majority of patients will relapse with drug-resistant disease within 3-5 years. However, not all patients can continue with platinum combination therapies due to loss of activity or toxicity-related issues, including hypersensitivity, neurotoxicity, alopecia and ototoxicity. Therefore the choice of second-line chemotherapy must take into account factors such as platinum-free treatment interval (PFI; patient's performance status; current symptoms; history of and likely future toxicities while on chemotherapy; dosing schedule requirement; and cost of treatment. A consensus in 2010 established 4 distinct subgroups within the ROC patient population based on the PFI: (platinum sensitive <12 months, partially platinum sensitive 6-12 months, platinum resistant <6 months, and refractory disease ≤4 weeks. Within patients with platinum sensitive disease, those with partially platinum sensitive disease remain the most clinically challenging to manage effectively. Non-platinum based combination therapies, in particular trabectedin with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD, offers new options together with a significant survival advantage relative to PLD alone for these patients.

  5. Serum thyroglobulin in management of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were evaluated before surgery in 36 patients having primary carcinoma of the thyroid and in 603 follow-up patients having differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Serum Tg was elevated in 88.85% of the patients before operation. Amongst the 603 patients analysed, 67 had residual thyroid tissue in the neck region, 259 showed the presence of disease and 277 were free of disease. The false positive rate obtained by serum Tg determination in the disease free group was 14.1% while the false negative rate in the group with disease was 11.7%, making the sensitivity and specificity of serum Tg determination 88.3% and 85.9%, respectively. The median serum Tg levels in patients with metastatic spread in nodes, lungs and bones were 127,581 and 1721 ng/mL, respectively. A comparative analysis of serum Tg determination and whole body radioiodine scanning in 244 patients showed the sensitivity to be 88.5% and 80.7%, respectively. The detection rate was increased to 95.1% by combining both modalities. Serum Tg determination appeared to be more sensitive than whole body scanning. The evaluation of serum Tg determination while patients were on thyroid hormone therapy and in a hypothyroid state indicated that though the sensitivity of detection of cancer increased in the hypothyroid state, this advantage appeared to be marginal in comparison with the morbidity and with the cost effectiveness of whole body radioiodine scanning. (author)

  6. An Implementation Study to Improve Cancer Pain Management in Jordan Using a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Al Qadire, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    An Implementation Study to Improve Cancer Pain Management in Jordan using a Case StudyManaging the symptoms of cancer effectively is one of the most important challenges facing health care providers. Many symptoms are reported by cancer patients, including, pain, depression, distress and change in life style. Pain continues to be the most frequently reported symptom, however, cancer pain is treated inadequately and cancer patients continue to suffer pain. The use of pain assessment tools is e...

  7. Esophageal cancer management controversies: Radiation oncology point of view

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patricia; Tai; Edward; Yu

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal cancer treatment has evolved from single modality to trimodality therapy.There are some controversies of the role,target volumes and dose of radiotherapy(RT)in the literature over decades.The present review focuses primarily on RT as part of the treatment modalities,and highlight on the RT volume and its dose in the management of esophageal cancer.The randomized adjuvant chemoradiation(CRT)trial,intergroup trial(INT 0116)enrolled 559 patients with resected adenocarcinoma of the stomach or gastroesophageal junction.They were randomly assigned to surgery plus postoperative CRT or surgery alone.Analyses show robust treatment benefit of adjuvant CRT in most subsets for postoperative CRT.The Chemoradiotherapy for Oesophageal Cancer Followed by Surgery Study(CROSS)used a lower RT dose of41.4 Gray in 23 fractions with newer chemotherapeutic agents carboplatin and paclitaxel to achieve an excellent result.Target volume of external beam radiation therapy and its coverage have been in debate for years among radiation oncologists.Pre-operative and postoperative target volumes are designed to optimize for disease control.Esophageal brachytherapy is effective in the palliation of dysphagia,but should not be given concomitantly with chemotherapy or external beam RT.The role of brachytherapy in multimodality management requires further investigation.On-going studies of multidisciplinary treatment in locally advanced cancer include:ZTOG1201 trial(a phaseⅡtrial of neoadjuvant and adjuvant CRT)and QUINTETT(a phaseⅢtrial of neoadjuvant vs adjuvant therapy with quality of life analysis).These trials hopefully will shed more light on the future management of esophageal cancer.

  8. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book provides information on adrenal diseases of latest developments and guides the clinicians in the care of their patients. The book is divided into two parts. The first section gives an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, markers, pathology, imaging and the current progress in the field. The second edition covers specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. The increasingly significant roles played by steroids, catecholamines, blockers, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are elucidated and discussed. The contents include: Overview of progress; current problems, and perspectives - embryology anatomy, physiology, and biologic markers; pathology; advances in diagnosis; imaging techniques; adrenal disorders in childhood; primary aldosteronism; Cushing's syndrome; carcinoma; pheochromocytoma; neuroblastoma; metastatic disease; surgical management; and subject index

  9. An update in breast cancer screening and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Sanjay; Tapia, Grace; Goltsman, David; Beith, Jane

    2016-03-01

    This article provides an overview of the main controversies in a number of key areas of breast cancer management. Relevant studies that have contributed to guide the treatment of this heterogeneous disease in the field of breast screening, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are highlighted. Mammography and ultrasound are the main methods of breast screening. MRI and tomosynthesis are emerging as new screening tools for a selected group of breast cancer patients. From a surgical perspective, oncoplastic techniques and neoadjuvant chemotherapy are improving cosmetic results in breast-conserving surgery. For high-risk patients, controversies still remain regarding prophylactic mastectomies. Finally, the appropriate management of the axilla continues evolving with the increasing role of radiotherapy as an alternative treatment to axillary dissection. PMID:26689336

  10. Nuclear medicine in thyroid cancer management: A practical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid cancers are now being diagnosed at an earlier stage and treatments together with follow-up strategies are more effective. However this is not consistent throughout the world. The practice does differ considerably from country to country and region to region. Many International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Members States can benefit from the lessons learned and improve overall patient management of thyroid cancers. The IAEA has significantly enhanced the capabilities of many Member States in the field of nuclear medicine. Functional imaging using nuclear medicine procedures has become an indispensable tool for the diagnosis, treatment planning and management of patients. In terms of treatment, the use of radioiodine (131I) has been central to thyroid cancer and has been successfully used for over six decades. Over the years the IAEA has also assisted many Member States to develop indigenous manufacturing of radioiodine therefore reducing the barriers for the care of patients. This publication is a culmination of efforts by more than twenty international experts in the field to produce a global perspective on the subject. Views expressed are those of individual experts involved and are intended to assist national or regional authorities in decisions regarding the frameworks for effective treatment of thyroid cancer

  11. Optimal management of bone metastases in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong MH

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available MH Wong, N PavlakisDepartment of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Bone metastasis in breast cancer is a significant clinical problem. It not only indicates incurable disease with a guarded prognosis, but is also associated with skeletal-related morbidities including bone pain, pathological fractures, spinal cord compression, and hypercalcemia. In recent years, the mechanism of bone metastasis has been further elucidated. Bone metastasis involves a vicious cycle of close interaction between the tumor and the bone microenvironment. In patients with bone metastases, the goal of management is to prevent further skeletal-related events, manage complications, reduce bone pain, and improve quality of life. Bisphosphonates are a proven therapy for the above indications. Recently, a drug of a different class, the RANK ligand antibody, denosumab, has been shown to reduce skeletal-related events more than the bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid. Other strategies of clinical value may include surgery, radiotherapy, radiopharmaceuticals, and, of course, effective systemic therapy. In early breast cancer, bisphosphonates may have an antitumor effect and prevent both bone and non-bone metastases. Whilst two important Phase III trials with conflicting results have led to controversy in this topic, final results from these and other key Phase III trials must still be awaited before a firm conclusion can be drawn about the use of bisphosphonates in this setting. Advances in bone markers, predictive biomarkers, multi-imaging modalities, and the introduction of novel agents have ushered in a new era of proactive management for bone metastases in breast cancer.Keywords: breast cancer, bone metastases, bisphosphonates, denosumab, biomarkers, optimal management

  12. Diagnosis and Management of Peritoneal Metastases from Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Evgenia Halkia; John Spiliotis; Paul Sugarbaker

    2012-01-01

    The management and the outcome of peritoneal metastases or recurrence from epithelial ovarian cancer are presented. The biology and the diagnostic tools of EOC peritoneal metastasis with a comprehensive approach and the most recent literatures data are discussed. The definition and the role of surgery and chemotherapy are presented in order to focuse on the controversial points. Finally, the paper discusses the new data about the introduction of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraper...

  13. The team approach in the management of oral cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Rapidis, A. D.; Angelopoulos, A. P.; Langdon, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The management of cancer of the head and neck is so complex that it demands the participation of two teams, one major or curative and the other minor or supportive, and also of the patient. The make-up of these teams and the functions of their members are discussed. The principles of treatment planning along these lines are outlined and the importance of close interdisciplinary collaboration is emphasised.

  14. Integrating new imaging modalities in breast cancer management

    OpenAIRE

    Pouw, B.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aimed to integrate new imaging modalities in breast cancer management. In Part 1 the focus was to assess the current status of radioactive seed localisation (RSL) in clinical practice. Both patients as well as physicians or surgeons rated the technique superior compared to the conventional techniques. It is our expectation that when legislation is simplified and standard protocols for this procedure are available the adaptation rate of this procedure will further increase since le...

  15. [Prevention and management of appetite loss during cancer chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Hideki; Yamada, Mitsugi; Asako, Eri; Kodama, Yukako; Sato, Tsuneo; Nabeya, Yoshihiro

    2014-10-01

    Appetite loss during cancer chemotherapy may lead to malnutrition and a decreased quality of life. To overcome this problem, evidence-based guidelines have been established for chemotherapy-induced emesis and mucositis. However, unsolved issues such as taste alimentation remain. Since the clinical picture of appetite loss is complex, individual management strategies depending on the type of the disease and treatment are required. PMID:25335699

  16. The management of localized and locally advanced prostate cancer - 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. - The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. - Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. - The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachy therapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. - Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. - Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. - The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  17. Management of menopause in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, A J

    2015-10-01

    Increasing breast cancer incidence and decreasing mortality have highlighted the importance of survivorship issues related to breast cancer. A consideration of the issues related to menopause is therefore of great importance to both women and clinicians. Menopause/menopausal symptoms, with significant negative effects on quality of life and potential long-term health impacts, may in women with breast cancer be associated with: (1) natural menopause occurring concurrently with a breast cancer diagnosis; (2) recurrence of menopausal symptoms following cessation of hormone replacement therapy; (3) treatment-induced menopause (chemotherapy, ovarian ablation/suppression) and adjuvant endocrine therapy. A variety of non-hormonal pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies have been investigated as therapeutic options for menopausal symptoms with mixed results, and ongoing research is required. This review presents a summary of the causes, common problematic symptoms of menopause (vasomotor, genitourinary and sexual dysfunction), and longer-term consequences (cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis) related to menopause. It proposes an evidenced-based multidisciplinary approach to the management of menopause/menopausal symptoms in women with breast cancer. PMID:25536007

  18. Evaluation of degarelix in the management of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Van Poppel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hendrik Van PoppelDepartment of Urology, University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven, BelgiumAbstract: Medical castration using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH receptor agonists currently provides the mainstay of androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. Although effective, these agents only reduce testosterone levels after a delay of 14 to 21 days; they also cause an initial surge in testosterone that can stimulate the cancer and lead to exacerbation of symptoms (“clinical flare” in patients with advanced disease. Phase III trial data for the recently approved GnRH receptor blocker, degarelix, demonstrated that it is as effective and well tolerated as GnRH agonists. However, it has a pharmacological profile more closely matching orchiectomy, with an immediate onset of action and faster testosterone and PSA suppression, without a testosterone surge or microsurges following repeated injections. As a consequence, with this GnRH blocker, there is no risk of clinical flare and no need for concomitant antiandrogen flare protection. Degarelix therefore provides a useful addition to the hormonal armamentarium for prostate cancer and offers a valuable new treatment option for patients with hormone-sensitive advanced disease. Here, we review key preclinical and clinical data for degarelix, and look at patient-focused perspectives in the management of prostate cancer.Keywords: degarelix, GnRH receptor antagonist, GnRH receptor blocker, prostate cancer

  19. Role of radiation therapy in lung cancer management - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J-G; Shao, H-J; Jiang, F-E; Huang, Y-D

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Furthermore, more than 50% of lung cancer patients are found affected by distant metastases at the time of diagnosis. On the other hand, 20% of these patients are without regional spread and are good candidates for surgical operation. The remaining 30% represent an intermediate group whose tumors have metastasized up to regional lymph nodes. These remain 30% are the most appropriate candidates for radiation therapy. These patients are also called as "locally advanced lung cancer" or stage III lung cancer patients. In these patients strategy of combination therapy viz. radiation therapy in combination with chemotherapy is also tried by various groups in the recent past for this better management. However, long-term survival is still poor with a 5-year survival in 5-25% of patients. During the last decades, there has been a development in radiation strategies. The present review article focuses on different approaches to optimize radiotherapy for these patients. PMID:27466995

  20. The possibility of clinical sequencing in the management of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Tadayuki; Kanai, Masashi; Matsumoto, Shigemi; Okuno, Yasushi; Muto, Manabu

    2016-05-01

    Comprehensive genomic profiling using next-generation sequencing technologies provides insights into understanding the genomic architecture of human cancer. This new understanding of the cancer genome allows us to identify many more genomic alterations occurring within tumors than before, some of which could be potential therapeutic targets through molecular targeted agents. Currently, a large number of molecular targeted agents are being developed, and consequently, cancer treatment is rapidly shifting from empiric therapy employing cytotoxic anticancer drugs to genotype-directed therapy using molecular targeted agents. In current daily clinical practice, hotspot-based single-gene assays that detect RAS mutations in colorectal cancer or EGFR mutations in non-small cell lung cancer are widely used to identify variants. However, it is becoming evident that more comprehensive genomic analysis is crucial in identifying the patient population that may benefit from molecular targeted therapy and the accelerated development of novel drugs for early clinical trials. For these purposes, an increasing number of gene panel-based targeted sequencing is commercially available in clinical practice from sequencing companies. Despite several challenges in implementing this approach, comprehensive genomic profiling and identification of actionable mutations is likely to become one of the standard options in the management of cancer in the near future. The use of clinical sequencing has the potential to usher a new era in precision medicine for cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we discuss the application of comprehensive genomic profiling using next-generation sequencing technologies in clinical oncology and address the current challenges for its implementation. PMID:26917600

  1. Psychological and behavioral approaches to cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjala, Karen L; Jensen, Mark P; Mendoza, M Elena; Yi, Jean C; Fisher, Hannah M; Keefe, Francis J

    2014-06-01

    This review examines evidence for psychological factors that affect pain across the cancer continuum from diagnosis through treatment and long-term survivorship or end of life. Evidence is convincing that emotional distress, depression, anxiety, uncertainty, and hopelessness interact with pain. Unrelieved pain can increase a desire for hastened death. Patients with cancer use many strategies to manage pain, with catastrophizing associated with increased pain and self-efficacy associated with lower pain reports. A variety of psychological and cognitive behavioral treatments can reduce pain severity and interference with function, as indicated in multiple meta-analyses and high-quality randomized controlled trials. Effective methods include education (with coping skills training), hypnosis, cognitive behavioral approaches, and relaxation with imagery. Exercise has been tested extensively in patients with cancer and long-term survivors, but few exercise studies have evaluated pain outcomes. In survivors post-treatment, yoga and hypnosis as well as exercise show promise for controlling pain. Although some of these treatments effectively reduce pain for patients with advanced disease, few have been tested in patients at the end of life. Given the clear indicators that psychological factors affect cancer pain and that psychological and behavioral treatments are effective in reducing varying types of pain for patients with active disease, these methods need further testing in cancer survivors post-treatment and in patients with end-stage disease. Multidisciplinary teams are essential in oncology settings to integrate analgesic care and expertise in psychological and behavioral interventions in standard care for symptom management, including pain. PMID:24799497

  2. Use of capecitabine in management of early colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available H Hameed, J CassidyBeatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, Scotland, UKAbstract: Capecitabine (Xeloda®, Roche, Basel, Switzerland is a pro-drug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, and it is converted to 5-FU in the cancer cell by enzymatic degradation. The role of capecitabine in colorectal cancer has evolved in the last 15 years. In early trials in the metastatic setting, capecitabine has shown superior response rates compared with those achieved with 5-FU (Mayo Clinic regimen (26% vs 17%, with equivalent progression-free survival and overall survival. In the adjuvant setting, the Xeloda in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Therapy (X-ACT trial demonstrated that capecitabine as a single agent led to improvement in relapse-free survival (hazard ratio: 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.74–0.99, P = 0.04 and was associated with significantly fewer adverse events than 5-FU plus leucovorin (LV, folinic acid. On the basis of the X-ACT trial, capecitabine was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, the National Institute for Clinical Excellence, and the Scottish Medicines Consortium as monotherapy for the adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer. The next step was to incorporate capecitabine into combination therapy. The XELOXA trial studied the combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX vs 5-FU/LV and demonstrated 5-year disease-free survival of 66% for XELOX, compared with 60% for 5-FU/LV. The toxicity profile was also quite comparable in the two arms. So both the single agent use of capecitabine as well as in combination with oxaliplatin can be considered as part of the standard of care in management of early colon cancer in appropriately selected patient groups.Keywords: 5-fluorouracil, 5-FU, leucovorin, folinic acid, LV, XELOX, oxaliplatin, FOLFOX

  3. Management of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Granell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On considering a function-preserving treatment for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer, swallowing is a capital issue. For most of the patients, achieving an effective and safe deglutition will mark the difference between a functional and a dysfunctional outcome. We present an overview of the management of dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients. A brief review on the normal physiology of swallowing is mandatory to analyze next the impact of head and neck cancer and its treatment on the anatomic and functional foundations of deglutition. The approach proposed underlines two leading principles: a transversal one, that is, the multidisciplinary approach, as clinical aspects to be managed in the oncologic patient with oropharyngeal dysphagia are diverse, and a longitudinal one; that is, the concern for preserving a functional swallow permeates the whole process of the diagnosis and treatment, with interventions required at multiple levels. We further discuss the clinical reports of two patients who underwent a supracricoid laryngectomy, a function-preserving surgical technique that particularly disturbs the laryngeal mechanics, and in which swallowing rehabilitation dramatically conditions the functional results.

  4. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in the management of ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Ferrandina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Gabriella Ferrandina1,2, Giacomo Corrado1, Angelo Licameli1, Domenica Lorusso2, Gilda Fuoco1, Salvatore Pisconti3, Giovanni Scambia2 1Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, Catholic University of Campobasso, Campobasso, Italy; 2Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Catholic University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 3Salvatore Pisconti, Oncology Unit, Taranto Hospital, Taranto, Italy Abstract: Among the pharmaceutical options available for treatment of ovarian cancer, much attention has been progressively focused on pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD, whose unique formulation, which entraps conventional doxorubicin in a bilayer lipidic sphere ­surrounded by a polyethylene glycol layer, prolongs the persistence of the drug in the ­circulation and potentiates intratumor drug accumulation. These properties enable this drug to sustain its very favorable toxicity profile and to be used safely in combination with other drugs. PLD has been already approved for treatment of advanced ovarian cancer patients failing first-line platinum-based treatment. Moreover, phase III trials have been already completed, and results are eagerly awaited, which hopefully will expand the range of PLD clinical application in this neoplasia both in front-line treatment, and in the salvage setting in combination with other drugs. Moreover, attempts are continuing to enable this drug to be combined with novel cytotoxic drugs and target-based agents. This review aims at summarizing the available evidence and the new perspectives for the clinical role of PLD in the management of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer.Keywords: pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, ovarian cancer, clinical trials

  5. Management of locally advanced breast cancer: Evolution and current practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustogi Ashish

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC accounts for a sizeable number (30-60% of breast cancer cases and is a common clinical scenario in developing countries. The treatment of LABC has evolved from single modality treatment, consisting of radical mutilating surgery or higher doses of radiotherapy in inoperable disease to multimodality management, which along with the above two included systemic therapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT has made a tremendous impact on the management of LABC. NACT was initiated to institute systemic therapy upfront at the earliest in this group of patients with a high risk of micrometastasis burden. While NACT did not yield a survival advantage, it has however made breast conservation possible in selected group of cases. Large number of studies and many randomised trials have been done in women with LABC in order to improve the therapeutic decisions and also the local control and survival. With this background we have reviewed various treatment options in patients with LABC which should possibly help in guiding the clinicians for optimal management of LABC.

  6. LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF EARLY GASTRIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION This study was performed to check Laparoscopic Surgery in the management of early Gastric Cancer. For that we choose laparoscopic and laparoscopic Assisted Gastrectomies for 119 cases. It was performed during the period from June 1996 to February 2002 in Kameda Medical Center, Kamogawa, Japan. Male and female ratio was 2.78:1. The age range was 48-88 years (65.5. MATERIALS AND METHODS 1. Laparoscopic Intragastric Mucosal Resection (LIMR. 2. Local Resection by Lesion Lifting Method (LLM. 3. Laparoscopy-Assisted Distal Gastrectomy (LADG. 4. Intragastric Mucosal Resection through laparotomy. RESULTS OF THIS STUDY AFTER USING SURGICAL TECHNIQUES ARE AS FOLLOWS- 1. The tear was successfully closed by intragastric hand suturing technique. 2. All the planned laparoscopic procedures were completed in all the cases and the operation was finished after the confirmation of tumor free margins on frozen section biopsy specimen. 3. All resected specimen underwent detailed histopathologic examination. Subsequent diagnosis includes stomach cancer in 106 cases, duodenal cancer in 1 case and stomach adenoma in 5 cases. 8cases of stromal tumors were resected laparoscopically. 4. We have not lost even a single patient in follow up or due to mortality. Five year follow up is present in the first year group. 5. 06 patients who were diagnosed with EGC have been successfully treated with 4 laparoscopic techniques at our institute from June 1996 to February 2002. CONCLUSION We, in our study had no mortality or local recurrence to date but our follow up is obviously too short to draw any conclusions. If patients are selected properly, we on the basis of our study propose that laparoscopic procedures are curative.1,2 When performed by a skilled surgeon, laparoscopic resection is a safe and useful technique in the management of Early Gastric Cancer.

  7. Cancer survivors’ self-efficacy to self-manage in the year following primary treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Claire; Breckons, Matthew; Cotterell, P.; D. Barbosa; Calman, Lynn; Corner, Jessica; Fenlon, Deborah; Foster, R.; Grimmett, Chloe; Richardson, Alison; Smith, P.W.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cancer survivors are increasingly expected to manage the consequences of cancer and its treatment for themselves. There is evidence that self-efficacy is important for successful self-management and that this can be enhanced with support. The purpose of this study was to assess self-efficacy to manage problems in the year following primary treatment. METHODS: This cross-sectional online survey included cancer survivors who had completed their treatment within the past 1...

  8. Management of breakthrough pain in children with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrichsdorf SJ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Stefan J Friedrichsdorf,1,2 Andrea Postier1 1Department of Pain Medicine, Palliative Care and Integrative Medicine, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, 2University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Breakthrough pain in children with cancer is an exacerbation of severe pain that occurs over a background of otherwise controlled pain. There are no randomized controlled trials in the management of breakthrough pain in children with cancer, and limited data and considerable experience indicate that breakthrough pain in this pediatric patient group is common, underassessed, and undertreated. An ideal therapeutic agent would be rapid in onset, have a relatively short duration, and would be easy to administer. A less effective pharmacologic strategy would be increasing a patient's dose of scheduled opioids, because this may increase the risk of oversedation. The most common and effective strategy seems to be multimodal analgesia that includes an immediate-release opioid (eg, morphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, or diamorphine administered intravenously by a patient-controlled analgesia pump, ensuring an onset of analgesic action within minutes. Intranasal fentanyl (or hydromorphone may be an alternative, but no pediatric data have been published yet for commercially available fentanyl transmucosal application systems (ie, sublingual tablets/spray, buccal lozenge/tablet/film, and nasal spray, and these products cannot yet be recommended for use with children with cancer and breakthrough pain. The aim of this paper was to emphasize the dearth of available information on treatment of breakthrough pain in pediatric cancer patients, to describe the treatment protocols we currently recommend based on clinical experience, and to suggest future research on this very important and under-researched topic. Keywords: pediatric, cancer, breakthrough pain, opioid, adjuvant analgesia, integrative medicine

  9. Emerging technologies and techniques in the management of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The term cancer is used to describe a multitude of diseases all of which are linked by loss of control of normal growth and replication of cells. It is a major cause of death worldwide. If diagnosed early many cancers, particularly tumour such as skin cancers, can be cured by local treatment such as surgery or radiotherapy. Due to local invasion or dissemination of tumors via the lymphatics or blood, majority of solid malignant tumors are not curable by local measures alone. The successful treatment of a patient with cancer involves close co-operation between surgical oncologist, radiation oncologist, medical oncologist, general practitioner, nurses and support care workers, including clinical psychologists. The role of the surgeon is central to this; obtaining tissue for adequate histological analysis and identification of patients who can be cured by resection is a major component of management. Apart from curative resection of primary tumors, excision of secondary deposits can also offer long term disease control. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a common malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract and is the tenth most common cancer for both genders. In the year 2006, in U.S, almost 34 thousand patients developed this disease and in the same year about 32 thousand succumbed to this disease. These figures demonstrate dismal prognosis of the disease and the reasons for the low survival rates are mainly due to aggressive biology, early development of peri-neural infiltration, angio-invasion and wide spread dissemination of the tumour. Despite recent advances in the field of medical and radiation oncology and the introduction of neo-adjuvant regimens surgery remains the single most important modality for the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. This presentation will focus on the current status of surgical treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and highlight the new developments in this field

  10. How PET is changing the management of cancer with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information from PET scanning is transforming the management of many malignancies and the impact of PET is likely to increase further as new indications are recognised. PET is of particular value in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. These patients rarely undergo invasive surgical staging and therefore imaging is crucial in determining the extent of disease before treatment. More accurate staging with PET means that futile aggressive RT or chcmoRT can be avoided in patients with incurable extensive disease. FDG-PET is of proven value in the staging of common metabolically-active malignancies treated with radiotherapy. These include lung cancer, head and neck cancer, lymphomas and oesophageal carcinoma. It has been shown that PET can improve the selection of patients for radical surgery or radiotherapy in lung cancer and that PET-based staging more accurately predicts survival than conventional staging. For those patients that remain eligible for definitive RT after PET. treatment can be more accurately targeted at the tumour and involved regional nodes. The value of PET for treatment planning is enhanced significantly when PET and CT scans are acquired on a combined PET/CT scanner. Fused PET-CT images can be imported into the radiotherapy planning computer and used to accurately target tumour with the best beam arrangement. After treatment, response may be hard to assess with structural imaging. PET-rcsponse to chemotherapy or radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicts survival in NSCLC more accurately than CT response. However, PET has much more potential than imaging with FDG alone can realise. Markers such as FLT can be used to image proliferation in tumours, misonidazole or FAZA can be used to image hypoxia and labeled metabolites of anti-cancer drugs such as 5-FU can be used to study pharmacokinetics. New combinations of radiation and drugs may emerge that can be selected based on biological characteristics of

  11. Surgical treatment of lung cancer. On the clinical guideline for the management of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgical treatments of lung cancer are discussed mainly on the evidence-based medicine (EBM)-based Clinical Guideline for the Management of Lung Cancer (revised 2005). Described items are application of surgical treatment, techniques, evidence bases for certain techniques, lymph node excision, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), postoperative therapy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCC), preoperative adjuvant therapy of NSCC, and present state and future of surgical treatment. Comments are mentioned in this order as follows. The operation can be only applicable on physiological and oncological (clinical stage) considerations. For respectable cancer, lobectomy is essentially recommendable. Recommended techniques like bronchoplasty are orderly described with their evidence. Evidence is said to be insufficient to excise lymph nodes and to perform VATS. Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) of early stage NSCC is not a standard, but chemotherapy (CMT) is recommended because evidences have been accumulated until the revision of the guideline. Evidence is said not yet enough to recommend preoperative RT, CMT or RT+CMT as a standard. Studies of diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer are now under remarkable progress as exemplified by 3D therapeutic plan by CT-simulation, heavy ion therapy, stereotactic RT and intra-cavitary RT, and surgery will be still one of multiple modalities. (R.T.)

  12. Management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To review the general principles and the specific techniques employed in the management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, for the judicious utilization of external radiotherapy, brachytherapy, surgery and chemotherapy, in order to maximize both the cure rates and the quality of life. The oral cavity consists of lips, buccal mucosae, lower and upper alveolar ridges, floor of the mouth, hard palate and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The oropharynx consists of the base of tongue, tonsillar regions, soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall. This anatomical complexity means that the choice of treatment can be significantly influenced by just a few millimeters difference in the site of the origin or spread of the cancer. The choice can be critical not only for the cure but also the patients' subsequent quality of life. It can have a tremendous impact on the appearance, the ability to eat and the ability to talk. The great majority of cancers in the oral cavity and oropharynx are squamous cell carcinomas, but cancers arising from minor salivary glands are not infrequently seen. The staging system, though useful in treatment planning, has shortcomings which will be discussed. For purposes of discussion it is useful to divide the cancers broadly into Early (T1, T2, N0 N1), Advanced Resectable, and Advanced Unresectable. Early cancers can be cured, in a large proportion of the patients, by either surgery or irradiation; the latter is particularly successful when brachytherapy can be employed to administer a significant part of the dose. Brachytherapy is usually not feasible when the cancer involves bone or is in close proximity to it, due to a high risk of osteoradionecrosis. Poor oral hygiene, in general, and poor dentition, in particular, also increases the risk of osteoradionecrosis. It is, therefore, important to be proactive with regard to dental prophylaxis for any patient contemplating irradiation for oral or pharyngeal cancer. Another

  13. Management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To review the general principles and the specific techniques employed in the management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, for the judicious utilization of external radiotherapy, brachytherapy, surgery and chemotherapy, in order to maximize both the cure rates and the quality of life. The oral cavity consists of lips, buccal mucosae, lower and upper alveolar ridges, floor of the mouth, hard palate and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The oropharynx consists of the base of tongue, tonsillar regions, soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall. This anatomical complexity means that the choice of treatment can be significantly influenced by just a few millimeters difference in the site of the origin or spread of the cancer. The choice can be critical not only for the cure but also the patients' subsequent quality of life. It can have a tremendous impact on the appearance, the ability to eat and the ability to talk. The great majority of cancers in the oral cavity and oropharynx are squamous cell carcinomas, but cancers arising from minor salivary glands are not infrequently seen. The staging system, though useful in treatment planning, has shortcomings which will be discussed. For purposes of discussion it is useful to divide the cancers broadly into Early (T1, T2, N0 N1), Advanced Resectable, and Advanced Unresectable. Early cancers can be cured, in a large proportion of the patients, by either surgery or irradiation; the latter is particularly successful when brachytherapy can be employed to administer a significant part of the dose. Brachytherapy is usually not feasible when the cancer involves bone or is in close proximity to it, due to a high risk of osteoradionecrosis. Poor oral hygiene, in general, and poor dentition, in particular, also increases the risk of osteoradionecrosis. It is, therefore, important to be proactive with regard to dental prophylaxis for any patient contemplating irradiation for oral or pharyngeal cancer. Another

  14. Management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To review the general principles and the specific techniques employed in the management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, for the judicious utilization of external radiotherapy, brachytherapy, surgery and chemotherapy, in order to maximize both the cure rates and the quality of life. The oral cavity consists of lips, buccal mucosae, lower and upper alveolar ridges, floor of the mouth, hard palate and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The oropharynx consists of the base of tongue, tonsillar regions, soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall. This anatomical complexity means that the choice of treatment can be significantly influenced by just a few millimeters difference in the site of the origin or spread of the cancer. The choice can be critical not only for the cure but also the patients' subsequent quality of life. It can have a tremendous impact on the appearance, the ability to eat and the ability to talk. The great majority of cancers in the oral cavity and oropharynx are squamous cell carcinomas, but cancers arising from minor salivary glands are not infrequently seen. The staging system, though useful in treatment planning, has shortcomings which will be discussed. For purposes of discussion it is useful to divide the cancers broadly into Early (T1, T2, N0 N1), Advanced Resectable, and Advanced Unresectable. Early cancers can be cured, in a large proportion of the patients, by either surgery or irradiation; the latter is particularly successful when brachytherapy can be employed to administer a significant part of the dose. Brachytherapy is usually not feasible when the cancer involves bone or is in close proximity to it, due to a high risk of osteoradionecrosis. Poor oral hygiene, in general, and poor dentition, in particular, also increases the risk of osteoradionecrosis. It is, therefore, important to be proactive with regard to dental prophylaxis for any patient contemplating irradiation for oral or pharyngeal cancer. Another

  15. Targeted Alpha Therapy Approach to the Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -metastatic pancreatic cancer with over-expression of MUC1 and uPA receptors in post-surgical patients with minimal residual disease. The observation of tumor regression in a Phase I clinical trial of targeted alpha therapy for metastatic melanoma indicates that alpha therapy can regress tumors by a process called tumor anti-vascular alpha therapy (TAVAT). As a consequence, this therapy could be indicated for the management of non-surgical pancreatic cancer tumors

  16. Gastric cancer in Africa: Current management and outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Asombang, Akwi W; Rahman, Rubayat; Ibdah, Jamal A.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer and second most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Globally, gastric cancer poses a significant public health burden - both economically and socially. In 2008, the economic burden from premature cancer deaths and disability was $895 billion and gastric cancer was the second highest cancer responsible for healthy life lost. With the expected increase in cancer deaths and non-communicable diseases, these costs are expected to rise and impact ...

  17. Environmental carcinogenic agents and cancer prevention. Risk assessment and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many agents in our environment have been established as being carcinogenic, and in most cases, the carcinogenic properties of these agents were identified because of high-dose occupational or accidental exposure. Risk characterization, taking into account the dose-response relationship, and exposure assessment are essential for risk assessment and subsequent cancer prevention. Based on scientific risk assessment, risk management should be conducted practically by considering the economic, social, political, and other technical issues and by balancing the risks and benefits. Asbestos and environmental tobacco smoke are typical examples of established carcinogenic agents in the general environment, contributing to low-dose exposure. Further epidemiological studies are required to investigate the carcinogenicity of low-dose exposure to known carcinogenic agents such as arsenic and cadmium through dietary intake, radiation via medical and natural exposure, and air pollution due to diesel exhaust. In contrast, occupational chemical exposure to 1,2-dichloropropane and/or dichloromethane, whose carcinogenicity had not been established, was suggested to cause cholangiocarcinoma among workers involved in offset color proof-printing only after a rare situation of high-dose exposure was unveiled. Continuous monitoring of unusual cancer occurrences in target populations such as workers in occupational and regional settings as well as exposure reduction to suspected carcinogenic agents to levels as low as reasonably achievable is essential for reducing the risk of cancer due to environmental carcinogens. (author)

  18. Metabolic therapy: a new paradigm for managing malignant brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Flores, Roberto; Poff, Angela M; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Mukherjee, Purna

    2015-01-28

    Little progress has been made in the long-term management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), considered among the most lethal of brain cancers. Cytotoxic chemotherapy, steroids, and high-dose radiation are generally used as the standard of care for GBM. These procedures can create a tumor microenvironment rich in glucose and glutamine. Glucose and glutamine are suggested to facilitate tumor progression. Recent evidence suggests that many GBMs are infected with cytomegalovirus, which could further enhance glucose and glutamine metabolism in the tumor cells. Emerging evidence also suggests that neoplastic macrophages/microglia, arising through possible fusion hybridization, can comprise an invasive cell subpopulation within GBM. Glucose and glutamine are major fuels for myeloid cells, as well as for the more rapidly proliferating cancer stem cells. Therapies that increase inflammation and energy metabolites in the GBM microenvironment can enhance tumor progression. In contrast to current GBM therapies, metabolic therapy is designed to target the metabolic malady common to all tumor cells (aerobic fermentation), while enhancing the health and vitality of normal brain cells and the entire body. The calorie restricted ketogenic diet (KD-R) is an anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic metabolic therapy that also reduces fermentable fuels in the tumor microenvironment. Metabolic therapy, as an alternative to the standard of care, has the potential to improve outcome for patients with GBM and other malignant brain cancers. PMID:25069036

  19. Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor C

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cath Taylor,1 Amanda Shewbridge,2 Jenny Harris,1 James S Green3,4 1Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London, London UK; 2Breast Cancer Services, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 3Department of Urology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK; 4Department of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University, London, UK Abstract: The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT-work for breast cancer management has in part evolved due to the increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment decision-making. An MDT approach aims to bring together the range of specialists required to discuss and agree treatment recommendations and ongoing management for individual patients. MDTs are resource-intensive yet we lack strong (randomized controlled trial evidence of their effectiveness. Clinical consensus is generally favorable on the benefits of effective specialist MDT-work. Many studies have shown the benefits of receiving treatment from a specialist center, and evidence continues to accrue from comparative studies of clinical benefits of an MDT approach, including improved survival. Patients’ views of the MDT model of decision-making (and in particular its impact on involvement in decisions about their care have been under-researched. Barriers to effective teamwork and poor decision-making include excessive caseload, low attendance at meetings, lack of leadership, poor communication, role ambiguity, and failure to consider patients’ holistic needs. Breast cancer nurses have a key role in relation to assessing holistic needs, and their specialist contribution has also been associated with improved patient experience and quality of life. This paper examines the evidence for the benefits of MDT-work, in particular for breast cancer. Evidence is considered within a context of growing cancer incidence at a time of increased financial restraint, and it may now be important to

  20. Serum thyroglobulin in the management of patients with thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsano, C.P.; Skosey, C.; DeGroot, L.J.; Refetoff, S.

    1982-04-01

    We have reviewed our experience with the management of patients with thyroid cancer to assess the potential benefits of employing the serum thyroglobulin assay in patient management programs and to determine the optimal conditions for this application. Serum thyroglobulin levels were found to be more reliable when obtained from hypothyroid patients. Levels of thyroglobulin greater than 10 ng/mL appeared to be abnormally elevated in both thyroidectomized patients prior to radioactive iodine therapy (group 1) and in thyroidectomized patients after radioactive iodine therapy (group 2). Elevated thyroglobulin levels were found to be useful indicators of the presence of metastatic disease, whereas normal thyroglobulin levels were reliable indicators of the absence of metastases. In group 1 patients, elevated thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the presence of important total body scan uptake. In group 2 patients, normal thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the absence of total body scan uptake. The serum thyroglobulin assay can substantially reduce the need for repetitive total body scanning in the follow-up of group 2 patients with thyroid cancer.

  1. Serum thyroglobulin in the management of patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have reviewed our experience with the management of patients with thyroid cancer to assess the potential benefits of employing the serum thyroglobulin assay in patient management programs and to determine the optimal conditions for this application. Serum thyroglobulin levels were found to be more reliable when obtained from hypothyroid patients. Levels of thyroglobulin greater than 10 ng/mL appeared to be abnormally elevated in both thyroidectomized patients prior to radioactive iodine therapy (group 1) and in thyroidectomized patients after radioactive iodine therapy (group 2). Elevated thyroglobulin levels were found to be useful indicators of the presence of metastatic disease, whereas normal thyroglobulin levels were reliable indicators of the absence of metastases. In group 1 patients, elevated thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the presence of important total body scan uptake. In group 2 patients, normal thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the absence of total body scan uptake. The serum thyroglobulin assay can substantially reduce the need for repetitive total body scanning in the follow-up of group 2 patients with thyroid cancer

  2. Advancements in the Management of Pancreatic Cancer: 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer still remains a significant, unresolved therapeutic challenge and is the most lethal type of gastrointestinal cancer with a 5-year survival rate of 5%. Adjuvant chemotherapy remains to be gemcitabine alone, though fluorouracil offers the same survival and role of radiation remains controversial. Nevertheless, only a few patients survive for at least 5 years after R0 resection and adjuvant therapy. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer remains an area that requires multi-disciplinary approach. Neoadjuvant therapy very likely plays a role to downstage to a resectable state in these subgroup patients. There are different treatment approaches to locally advanced pancreatic cancer management, including single or multi-agent chemotherapy, chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation, or immediate concurrent chemoradiation. Most patients need palliative treatment. Once pancreatic cancer becomes metastatic, it is uniformly fatal with an overall survival of generally 6 months from time of diagnosis. Gemcitabine has been the standard since 1997. FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, leucovorin has already shown superiority over gemcitabine in both progression-free survival and overall survival, but this regimen is suitable only for selected patients in ECOG performance status 0-1. FOLFIRINOX has already trickled down to the clinic in various modifications and in different patient groups, both locally advanced and metastatic. Many targeted agents, including bevacizumab, cetuximab showed negative results, except mild benefit with addition of erlotinib with gemcitabine, which was not considered clinically significant. There is no consensus regarding treatment in the second-line setting. It will be true to say that there was a real medical breakthrough with regards to improving the prognosis of pancreatic cancer as of 2013 with the results of MPACT study. In this study, patients whoreceived nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine lived a

  3. Oral Mucositis Prevention and Management by Therapeutic Laser in Head and Neck Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Fekrazad, Reza; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Oral mucositis is considered a severe complication in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy for head and neck cancer. The aim of this review study was to assess the effect of low level laser therapy for prevention and management of oral mucositis in cancer patients.

  4. Managing cancer-related fatigue in men with prostate cancer: a systematic review of non-pharmacological interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, David; Lopez, Violeta; Aromataris, Edoardo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to synthesize the best available evidence informing the effectiveness of non-pharmacological interventions for managing cancer-related fatigue in men treated for prostate cancer. This review considered experimental studies that included men with prostate cancer (regardless of staging, previous treatment or comorbidities), aged 18 years and over who were undergoing any treatment, or had completed any treatment for prostate cancer within the previous 12 months. Three interventions were identified for the management of cancer-related fatigue in men with prostate cancer. Evidence from five studies including 447 participants demonstrates the effectiveness of physical activity, both aerobic and resistance exercise, and from three studies including 153 participants suggesting the benefits of psychosocial interventions including education and cognitive behavioural therapy. Health professionals require knowledge of a range of effective interventions aimed at reducing cancer-related fatigue in men with prostate cancer and should incorporate those interventions into their patient management. Although physical activity appears to show the greatest benefit, other non-pharmacological interventions such as education and cognitive behavioural therapy have demonstrated benefit and should also be considered as a strategy in treating this debilitating side effect of cancer and its treatment. PMID:24237792

  5. The need for hospital care of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by noncurative intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Friis, S; Juel, K;

    2000-01-01

    We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy.......We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy....

  6. Individualized dosimetry in the management of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim. This paper analyzes the available data on the dosimetric approach and describes the use of dosimetry in the Division of Nuclear Medicine of the National Cancer Institute in Milan. Dosimetry is rarely performed when planning radio-iodine activity, although most of the available guidelines do mention this possibility, without giving any well defined indication. Aim of the present research was to validate the usefulness of dosimetry in the management of metastatic thyroid cancer. Benua (1962) set the limit of blood absorbed dose at 2 Gy to avoid hematological toxicity. Maxon (1983) determined at 80 Gy the dose to achieve complete destruction of a metastatic lesion. Dorn (2003) combined red marrow and lesion dosimetry showing that high activity administrations with less that 3 Gy to the red marrow are a safe and more effective with respect to fixed activities administrations. Lee (2008) reported 50% responses with high activity administrations based on blood dosimetry, in 47 patients which were unsuccessfully previously treated with fixed activities. Sgouros (2005) and Song (2006) introduced key parameters as Biological Effective Dose and Uniform Equivalent Dose in order to describe the effects of continuos low dose rate irradiation and non uniform activity uptake, typical of nuclear medicine treatments. Methods: Red marrow and lesion dosimetry (planar view) were performed during the treatment, without changing the fixed activity schema. Results: This experience demonstrate first of all, that dosimetry is feasible in the clinical routine, and that it can provide the clinician with important information, no matter its often quoted limited numerical accuracy. A total of 17/20 lesion doses below 80 Gy have been detected. Three/17 (doses between 40 and 80 Gy) disappeared in the follow-up scintigram. Two/17 were undetectable at computed tomography or nuclear magnetic resonance. These data suggest that repetition of treatment on a lesion drastically reduces its uptake

  7. Use of Ultrasound in the Management of Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lew, John I.; Solorzano, Carmen C

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the utility of ultrasound in evaluating thyroid nodules, staging thyroid cancer, determining the extent of surgery needed in thyroid cancer patients, and the surveillance of patients treated for thyroid cancer.

  8. Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Is Cancer? Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Cancer Statistics Cancer has a major impact on society in ... success of efforts to control and manage cancer. Statistics at a Glance: The Burden of Cancer in ...

  9. ENDOCRINE DILEMMA: Managing menopausal symptoms after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, John

    2016-03-01

    Managing the symptoms of menopause after a diagnosis of breast cancer offers some unique clinical challenges. For some women, vasomotor symptoms can be severe and debilitating, and hormone therapy is at least relatively contraindicated. Non-oestrogen therapies for hot flushes include SSRIs, clonidine, gabapentin and perhaps black cohosh extracts. Vulvovaginal atrophy can usually be alleviated by simple moisturizers, although some may need specialized physiotherapy such as vaginal dilators. In a small number, topical oestrogens may be the only treatment that works. The CO2 laser may be a novel, non-oestrogen therapy to alleviate this unpleasant symptom. Bone loss can be accelerated in some patients on AIs or those who had early menopause induced by chemotherapy. PMID:26466611

  10. Update on the Management of Pancreatic Cancer in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shin Yin; Sissoko, Moussa; Hartshorn, Kevan L

    2016-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is more common in older adults, who are underrepresented in clinical trials and frequently under treated. Chronological age alone should not deter clinicians from offering treatment to geriatric patients, as they are a heterogeneous population. Geriatric assessment, frailty assessment tools, and toxicity risk scores help clinicians select appropriate patients for therapy. For resectable disease, surgery can be safe but should be done at a high-volume center. Adjuvant therapy is important; though there remains controversy on the role of radiation, chemotherapy is well studied and efficacious. In locally advanced unresectable disease, chemoradiation or chemotherapy alone is an option. Neoadjuvant therapy improves the chances of resectability in borderline resectable disease. Chemotherapy extends survival in metastatic disease, but treatment goals and risk-benefit ratios have to be clarified. Adequate symptom management and supportive care are important. There are now many new treatment strategies and novel therapies for this disease. PMID:27492426

  11. Anti-angiogenesis therapies: their potential in cancer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Eichholz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Andrew Eichholz, Shairoz Merchant, Andrew M GayaDepartment of Clinical Oncology, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, United KingdomAbstract: Angiogenesis plays an important role in normal animal growth and development. This process is also vital for the growth of tumors. Angiogenesis inhibitors have a different mechanism of action to traditional chemotherapy agents and radiation therapy. The angiogenesis inhibitors can act synergistically with conventional treatments and tend to have non-overlapping toxicities. There are four drugs which have a proven role in treating cancer patients. Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to and neutralizes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Sunitinib and sorafenib inhibit multiple tyrosine kinase receptors that are important for angiogenesis. Thalidomide inhibits the activity of basic fibroblast growth factor-2 (bFGF. The licensed indications and the supporting evidence are discussed. Other drugs are currently being tested in clinical trials and the most promising of these drugs are discussed. Aflibercept, also known as VEGF-trap, is a recombinant fusion protein that binds to circulating VEGF. The vascular disrupting agents act by targeting established blood vessels. These exciting new treatments have the potential to transform the management of cancer.Keywords: angiogenesis, bevacizumab, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, thalidomide, aflibercept, vascular disrupting agents

  12. Multidisciplinary neoadjuvant management for potentially curable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the U.S. Despite advances in surgical technique, radiotherapy technologies, and chemotherapeutics, the 5-year survival rate remains approximately 20% for the 15% of patients who are eligible for surgical resection. The majority of this group suffers metastatic recurrence. However, despite advances in therapies for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, only surgery has consistently proven to improve long-term survival. Various combinations of chemotherapy, biologic-targeted therapy, and radiotherapy have been evaluated in different settings to improve outcomes. In this context, a neoadjuvant (preoperative) treatment strategy offers numerous potential benefits: (1) ensuring delivery of early, systemic therapy, (2) improving selection of patients for surgical therapy with truly localized disease, (3) potential downstaging of the neoplasm facilitating a negative margin resection in patients with locally advanced disease, and (4) providing a superior clinical trial mechanism capable of rapid assessment of the efficacy of novel therapeutics. This article reviews the recent trends in the management of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with a particular emphasis on a multidisciplinary neoadjuvant approach to treatment

  13. Multisciplinary management of patients with liver metastasis from colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Greef, Kathleen; Rolfo, Christian; Russo, Antonio; Chapelle, Thiery; Bronte, Giuseppe; Passiglia, Francesco; Coelho, Andreia; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Peeters, Marc

    2016-08-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have been till now the main therapeutic strategies for disease control and improvement of the overall survival. Twenty-five per cent (25%) of CRC patients have clinically detectable liver metastases at the initial diagnosis and approximately 50% develop liver metastases during their disease course. Twenty-thirty per cent (20%-30%) are CRC patients with metastases confined to the liver. Some years ago various studies showed a curative potential for liver metastases resection. For this reason some authors proposed the conversion of unresectable liver metastases to resectable to achieve cure. Since those results were published, a lot of regimens have been studied for resectability potential. Better results could be obtained by the combination of chemotherapy with targeted drugs, such as anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However an accurate selection for patients to treat with these regimens and to operate for liver metastases is mandatory to reduce the risk of complications. A multidisciplinary team approach represents the best way for a proper patient management. The team needs to include surgeons, oncologists, diagnostic and interventional radiologists with expertise in hepatobiliary disease, molecular pathologists, and clinical nurse specialists. This review summarizes the most important findings on surgery and systemic treatment of CRC-related liver metastases. PMID:27621569

  14. Cancer Carepartners: Improving patients' symptom management by engaging informal caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira Maria J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have found that cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy can effectively manage their own symptoms when given tailored advice. This approach, however, may challenge patients with poor performance status and/or emotional distress. Our goal is to test an automated intervention that engages a friend or family member to support a patient through chemotherapy. Methods/Design We describe the design and rationale of a randomized, controlled trial to assess the efficacy of 10 weeks of web-based caregiver alerts and tailored advice for helping a patient manage symptoms related to chemotherapy. The study aims to test the primary hypothesis that patients whose caregivers receive alerts and tailored advice will report less frequent and less severe symptoms at 10 and 14 weeks when compared to patients in the control arm; similarly, they will report better physical function, fewer outpatient visits and hospitalizations related to symptoms, and greater adherence to chemotherapy. 300 patients with solid tumors undergoing chemotherapy at two Veteran Administration oncology clinics reporting any symptom at a severity of ≥4 and a willing informal caregiver will be assigned to either 10 weeks of automated telephonic symptom assessment (ATSA alone, or 10 weeks of ATSA plus web-based notification of symptom severity and problem solving advice to their chosen caregiver. Patients and caregivers will be surveyed at intake, 10 weeks and 14 weeks. Both groups will receive standard oncology, hospice, and palliative care. Discussion Patients undergoing chemotherapy experience many symptoms that they may be able to manage with the support of an activated caregiver. This intervention uses readily available technology to improve patient caregiver communication about symptoms and caregiver knowledge of symptom management. If successful, it could substantially improve the quality of life of veterans and their families during the stresses of

  15. INTERSPHINCTERIC TOTAL PROCTECTOMY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF LOW RECTAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Montori

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of lower rectal cancer is still controversial. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended. There are a lot of surgical techniques for lower rectal cancer (abdomino-perineal rectal resection, nerve sparing technique, total mesorectal excision, intersphincteric total proctectomy, trans-anal anastomosis etc.. In this paper it is presented the intersphincteric total proctectomy. The key points for sphincter preservation surgery are: a good knowledge of anal function pathophysiology, 2 cm distal adequate margin (or 1 cm for neo-adjuvant treated patients, total mesorectal excision, colo-anal anastomosis, nerve sparing proctectomy. The colo-anal anastomosis is the last step of the intersphincteric total proctectomy. Neo-adjuvant therapy is also indicated. The selection criteria and the technique of intersphincteric total proctectomy is presented. Between 1987-2002 this procedure was made at 120 patients with lower rectal cancer. The postoperative specific complications were: pelvic peritonitis (n=1 and anal stenosis (n=4. No anastomotic leak was encountered. 9 patients were classified in stage 0, 48 in stage I, 26 in stage II and 37 in stage III (UICC clasification. The 5 years survival rate was 97.4% for stages 0 and I, 71.3% for stages II and III. The functional results revealed a good continence in 77.5%, incontinence of liquid stools in 12.5%, incontinence for flatus in 7.5%, local recurrence in 2.5% and sexual or urological disfunction in 5%. Conclusions: Preoperative radiotherapy and sphincter preservation surgery (intersphincteric proctectomy provide good control of distal rectal cancer. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy seems to improve oncologic results with minimal additional morbidity. Our 6-8 week post-radiotherapy interval maximizes tumor shrinkage reducing the risks of radiation-induced complications. Intersphincteric proctectomy according to our experience reduces post-operative complications and risk of local

  16. Management of biochemical recurrence after primary treatment of prostate cancer: A systematic review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Punnen, S; Cooperberg, MR; D'Amico, AV; Karakiewicz, PI; Moul, JW; Scher, HI; Schlomm, T; Freedland, SJ

    2013-01-01

    Context Despite excellent cancer control with the treatment of localized prostate cancer (PCa), some men will experience a recurrence of disease. The optimal management of recurrent disease remains uncertain. Objective To systematically review recent literature regarding management of biochemical recurrence after primary treatment for localized PCa. Evidence acquisition A comprehensive systematic review of the literature was performed from 2000 to 2012 to identify articles pertaining to manag...

  17. Managing occupations in everyday life for people with advanced cancer at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Brandt, Åse; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen;

    Background: People with advanced cancer are increasingly able to live for extended periods of time. Advanced cancer influences the ability to manage occupations in the everyday life. Although studies have showed that people with advanced cancer experience occupational difficulties, there are...... limited research that more specifically explore how these are managed. The objective was to describe and explore how people with advanced cancer manage occupations at home. Material and methods: A qualitative descriptive design was applied. 73 participants were consecutively recruited from a Danish...... “Everyday life under change” and two sub-categories 1) Appling strategies to manage occupations in everyday life and 2) Preserving a meaningful everyday life. Significance: The findings suggest that people with advanced cancer, to a greater extent, should be supported in exploring familiar as well as new...

  18. Evolution of breast cancer management in Ireland: a decade of change.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heneghan, Helen M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the last decade there has been a paradigm shift in the management of breast cancer, subsequent to revised surgical oncology guidelines and consensus statements which were derived in light of landmark breast cancer clinical trials conducted throughout the latter part of the 20th century. However the sheer impact of this paradigm shift upon all modalities of treatment, and the current trends in management of the disease, are largely unknown. We aimed to assess the changing practices of breast cancer management over the last decade within a specialist tertiary referral Breast Cancer Centre. METHODS: Comparative analysis of all aspects of the management of breast cancer patients, who presented to a tertiary referral Breast Cancer Centre in 1995\\/1996 and 2005\\/2006, was undertaken and measured against The European Society for Surgical Oncology guidelines for the surgical management of mammographically detected lesions [1998]. RESULTS: 613 patients\\' case profiles were analysed. Over the last decade we observed a dramatic increase in incidence of breast cancer [>100%], a move to less invasive diagnostic and surgical therapeutic techniques, as well as increased use of adjuvant therapies. We also witnessed the introduction of immediate breast reconstruction as part of routine practice CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that radical changes have occurred in the management of breast cancer in the last decade, in keeping with international guidelines. It remains incumbent upon us to continue to adapt our practice patterns in light of emerging knowledge and best evidence.

  19. Sociocultural factors and breast cancer in sub-Saharan Africa: implications for diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Dinah A; Faulkner, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is on the rise in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and efforts at early diagnosis have not been very successful because the public has scant knowledge about the disease, a large percentage of breast cancer cases are diagnosed late and mainly rural SSA women's practice of breast self-examination is poor. In this paper, we argue that an examination of the social and cultural contexts of SSA that influence breast cancer diagnosis and management in the region is needed. We discuss the implications of sociocultural factors, such as gender roles and spirituality, on breast cancer diagnosis and management in SSA. PMID:26757491

  20. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in the management of ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staropoli, Nicoletta; Ciliberto, Domenico; Botta, Cirino; Fiorillo, Lucia; Grimaldi, Anna; Lama, Stefania; Caraglia, Michele; Salvino, Angela; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynecological tumors. Carboplatin/paclitaxel represents the cornerstone of front-line treatment. Instead, there is no consensus for management of recurrent/progressive disease, in which pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) ± carboplatin is widely used. We performed a systematic review and metaanalysis to evaluate impact of PLD-based compared with no-PLD-based regimens in the ovarian cancer treatment. Data were extracted from randomized trials comparing PLD-based treatment to any other regimens in the January 2000–January 2013 time-frame. Study end-points were overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), response rate (RR), CA125 response, and toxicity. Hazard ratios (HRs) of OS and PFS, with 95% CI, odds ratios (ORs) of RR and risk ratios of CA125 response and grade 3–4 toxicity, were extracted. Data were pooled using fixed and random effect models for selected endpoints. Fourteen randomized trials for a total of 5760 patients were selected and included for the final analysis, which showed no OS differences for PLD-based compared with other regimens (pooled HR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.88–1.02; P = 0.132) and a significant PFS benefit of PLD-based schedule (HR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.86–0.96; P = 0.001), particularly in second-line (HR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.75–0.91) and in platinum-sensitive (HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.74–0.94) subgroups. This work confirmed the peculiar tolerability profile of this drug, moreover no difference was observed for common hematological toxicities and for RR, CA125 response. PLD-containing regimens do not improve OS when compared with any other schedule in all phases of disease. A marginal PFS advantage is observed only in platinum-sensitive setting and second-line treatment. PMID:24658024

  1. Review of cancer pain management in patients receiving maintenance methadone therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowley, Dominic

    2011-05-01

    Methadone is commonly used in the treatment of heroin addiction. Patients with a history of opioid misuse or on methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) with cancer often have difficult to manage pain. We studied 12 patients referred to the palliative care service with cancer pain who were on MMT. All had difficult to control pain, and a third required 5 or more analgesic agents. Two patients had documented \\'\\'drug-seeking\\'\\' behavior. Methadone was used subcutaneously as an analgesic agent in 1 patient. We explore why patients on MMT have difficult to manage pain, the optimal management of their pain, and the increasing role of methadone as an analgesic agent in cancer pain.

  2. Image-derived biomarkers and multimodal imaging strategies for lung cancer management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauter, Alexander W. [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Werner Siemens Imaging Center, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Schwenzer, Nina; Pfannenberg, Christina [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Divine, Mathew R.; Pichler, Bernd J. [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Werner Siemens Imaging Center, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is the most common type of lung cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. For this reason, advances in diagnosis and treatment are urgently needed. With the introduction of new, highly innovative hybrid imaging technologies such as PET/CT, staging and therapy response monitoring in lung cancer patients have substantially evolved. In this review, we discuss the role of FDG PET/CT in the management of lung cancer patients and the importance of new emerging imaging technologies and radiotracer developments on the path to personalized medicine. (orig.)

  3. The Current and Evolving Role of PET in Personalized Management of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Esther; Yanamadala, Anusha; Cheng, Gang; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2016-07-01

    Using tumor genomic profiling information has revolutionized the landscape of personalized treatment of lung cancer. The management of lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer particularly is influenced by discoveries of activating mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor and targeted therapies with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, fusion genes involving anaplastic lymphoma kinase, and targeted therapies for Kristen-Rat-Sarcoma and MET protooncogenes. PET imaging plays an important role in assessing the biologic behavior of lung cancer and defining response to therapy. This review summarizes genomic discoveries in lung cancer and their implications for functional PET imaging. PMID:27321029

  4. Image-derived biomarkers and multimodal imaging strategies for lung cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is the most common type of lung cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. For this reason, advances in diagnosis and treatment are urgently needed. With the introduction of new, highly innovative hybrid imaging technologies such as PET/CT, staging and therapy response monitoring in lung cancer patients have substantially evolved. In this review, we discuss the role of FDG PET/CT in the management of lung cancer patients and the importance of new emerging imaging technologies and radiotracer developments on the path to personalized medicine. (orig.)

  5. Race, Poverty May Affect Early Stage Breast Cancer Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Breast Cancer Health Disparities Women's Health Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breast Cancer Health Disparities Women's Health About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  6. 2014 Korean Liver Cancer Study Group-National Cancer Center Korea Practice Guideline for the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The guideline for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was first developed in 2003 and revised in 2009 by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group and the National Cancer Center, Korea. Since then, many studies on HCC have been carried out in Korea and other countries. In particular, a substantial body of knowledge has been accumulated on diagnosis, staging, and treatment specific to Asian characteristics, especially Koreans, prompting the proposal of new strategies. Accordingly, the n...

  7. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MANAGEMENT OF ORAL CANCER – SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Jatin P. Shah; Gil, Ziv

    2008-01-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, with a high prevalence in South Asia. Tobacco and alcohol consumption remain the most dominant etiologic factors, however HPV has been recently implicated in oral cancer. Surgery is the most well established mode of initial definitive treatment for a majority of oral cancers. The factors that affect choice of treatment are related to the tumor and the patient. Primary site, location, size, proximity to bone, and depth of infiltration are ...

  8. Contemporary management of low-risk bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer comprises a heterogeneous group of tumors, the majority of which are non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) at initial presentation. Low-risk bladder cancer--defined as pTa low-grade papillary tumors--is the type of NMIBC with the most favorable oncologic outcome. Although the ris

  9. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Management of mucositis during therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the purposes of an oral care protocol, the major components of an oral care regimen, and oral care protocols and studies done to date. Many questions remain in the area of optimal oral care for the patient experiencing mucositis as a sequela of cancer treatment. Research is needed on types and use of mouth rinses, effective, harmless, and pleasant lip lubricants, appropriate analgesic and anti-inflammatory combinations, and the effectiveness of a variety of devices for oral cleansing, to name a few areas. As outpatient oncology services grow, oral care protocols must be developed to meet the needs of ambulatory patient populations. Oral care regimens must be safe, easy to use, and economical as well as effective to ensure patient and staff compliance. Research on the management of mucositis must be conducted in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Finally, in order to obtain sufficient sample sizes and optimize data collection, these studies will need to be conducted by multidisciplinary teams (including dentists, oncologists, radiation therapists, and nurses) across multiple sites. Not until large-scale clinical trials are done on the treatment of mucositis will we be able to optimize the therapeutic regimen for the patient. 43 references

  10. Beyond the visible: Managing heart disease and cancer with nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heart disease and cancer are the world's number one and two killers. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), heart disease kills 17 million people a year - almost one third of all deaths worldwide - and cancer causes 7 million deaths every year. Early and accurate diagnosis is vital for effective treatment of both heart disease and cancer. Nuclear medicine techniques are helping to provide the vital information that doctors need to make decisions about treatment and disease management for patients

  11. Exercise for the Management of Side Effects and Quality of Life among Cancer Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Mustian, Karen M.; Sprod, Lisa K.; Palesh, Oxana G.; Peppone, Luke J.; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Mohile, Supriya G.; Carroll, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity may play an important role in the rehabilitation of cancer survivors during and following treatment. Current research suggests numerous beneficial outcomes are experienced in cancer survivors undergoing exercise interventions during or following cancer treatment. Exercise not only plays a role in managing side effects but also improves functional capacity and quality of life. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the oncology literature supporting the use ...

  12. Skin care management in cancer patients: an evaluation of quality of life and tolerability

    OpenAIRE

    Haley, Ann Cameron; Calahan, Cara; Gandhi, Mona; West, Dennis P.; Rademaker, Alfred; Lacouture, Mario E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study is to evaluate quality of life (QoL) and tolerability of three articles specifically developed for cancer skin care management (skin moisturizer, face moisturizer, and face wash). Methods Participants were cancer patients (n = 99) receiving systemic anticancer therapies and/or radiotherapy at Northwestern University. Subjects were assessed at the initial visit for adverse skin reactions based on the National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria fo...

  13. Morphine mouthwash for the management of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Sarvizadeh; Simin Hemati; Mohsen Meidani; Moghtada Ashouri; Mahnaz Roayaei; Armindokht Shahsanai

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral mucositis is a debilitating side effect of cancer treatment for which there is not much successful treatments at yet. We evaluated the effectiveness of topical morphine compared with a routine mouthwash in managing cancer treatment-induced mucositis. Materials and Methods: Thirty head and neck cancer patients with severe mucositis (World Health Organization Grade III or IV) were randomized into the morphine and magic mouthwash groups. Patients received morphine sulfate 2%...

  14. Surveillance Recommendations in Reducing Risk of and Optimally Managing Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Ostby, Pamela L.; Jane M Armer; Dale, Paul S.; Margaret J. Van Loo; Cassie L. Wilbanks; Stewart, Bob R.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, and disfiguring condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management of symptoms. It has been reported that over 40% of the 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States may meet the criteria for BCRL during their lifetimes. Ongoing surveillance, beginning with pre-operative assessment, has been effective in identifying subclinical ly...

  15. Circulating Cell-Free Tumour DNA in the Management of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn Francis; Sandra Stein

    2015-01-01

    With the development of new sensitive molecular techniques, circulating cell-free tumour DNA containing mutations can be identified in the plasma of cancer patients. The applications of this technology may result in significant changes to the care and management of cancer patients. Whilst, currently, these “liquid biopsies” are used to supplement the histological diagnosis of cancer and metastatic disease, in the future these assays may replace the need for invasive procedures. Applications ...

  16. Venous Thromboembolism in Cancer Patients Undergoing Major Abdominal Surgery: Prevention and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Bhavana Bhagya Rao; Kalayarasan, R.; Vikram Kate; Ananthakrishnan, N

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is an important risk factor for venous thrombosis. Venous thromboembolism is one of the most common complications of cancer and the second leading cause of death in these patients. Recent research has given insight into mechanism and various risk factors in cancer patients which predispose to thromboembolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the prophylaxis, diagnosis, and management of venous thromboembolism in these patients.

  17. Has PET-imaging changed the scenario in cancer management in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET imaging changed the scenario of cancer management in India. With the help of institutes like Bhabha Atomic Research Centre and Radiation Medical Centre it would have been impossible to extend services to the needy at economical price

  18. Clinical review: surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Courtney, D

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent and locally advanced colorectal cancers frequently require en bloc resection of involved organs to achieve negative margins. The aim of this review is to evaluate the most current literature related to the surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  19. Current Usage of Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Management of Breast Cancer: A Practitioner's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Luke; Cochrane, Suzanne; Zhu, Xiaoshu

    2016-09-01

    Introduction This qualitative study seeks to explore the role within the context of Australian breast cancer oncology treatments that traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practitioners play in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods Semistructured interviews were used on 2 groups: the first group was TCM practitioners who were recognized experts in breast cancer, and the second group consisted of TCM practitioners who treated breast cancer as part of their practice but were not recognized experts. Data analysis was achieved through grounded theory with open coding. Results The main themes reported on here are the following: the role of TCM in the biomedical management of breast cancer, TCM strategies for the management of breast cancer, and the perceived holistic approach of the TCM practitioner and the importance of a TCM diagnosis in the role of breast cancer care. Discussion The role of TCM in biomedical breast cancer management is a supportive one; however, this role is difficult as there is a lack of understanding of TCM by biomedical practitioners. The viewpoints of practitioners differed on key strategies of TCM: diagnosis, and treatment protocols. Patients sought the holistic approach of TCM practitioners as they felt it addressed all aspects of their health and not just the symptoms relating to breast cancer. Conclusion The lack of an integrated medicine approach in relation to TCM makes it difficult to demonstrate the value of the contribution TCM can make to biomedicine in the field of breast care oncology. Effectiveness studies are needed that can accurately represent TCM in this field. PMID:26420777

  20. Clinical endpoints for developing pharmaceuticals to manage patients with sporadic or genetic risk of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rial, Nathaniel S; Zell, Jason A.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Gerner, Eugene W.

    2012-01-01

    To reduce the morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer, current clinical practice focuses on screening for early detection and polypectomy as a form of secondary prevention, complemented with surgical interventions when appropriate. No pharmaceutical agent is currently approved for use in clinical practice for the management of patients with risk of colorectal cancer. This article will review earlier attempts to develop pharmaceuticals for use in managing patients with sporadic or genet...

  1. Patient and caregiver perspectives on managing pain in advanced cancer: A qualitative longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Hackett, J; Godfrey, M.; Bennett, MI

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in treatment of pain in advanced cancer, it remains a major source of suffering with adverse effects on patients’ life quality. There is increasing understanding of its multi-dimensional nature and the variable responsiveness of medication to complex pain. Less clear is how patients and their caregivers respond to, and manage pain complexity. Aim: To explore patients’ and carers’ experiences of advanced cancer pain and the processes that they engage in to manage p...

  2. A Survey of Cancer Pain Management Knowledge and Attitudes of British Columbian Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, R; Hawley, P.; Yeomans, W

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There are many potential barriers to adequate cancer pain management, including lack of physician education and prescription monitoring programs. The authors surveyed physicians about their specific knowledge of pain management and the effects of the regulation of opioids on their prescribing practices.METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed out to British Columbia physicians who were likely to encounter cancer patients. The survey asked for physicians' opinions about College of Phy...

  3. Diabetes Management and Self-Care Education for Hospitalized Patients With Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Leak, Ashley; Davis, Ellen D.; Houchin, Laura B.; Mabrey, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Managing diabetes can be a daunting task for patients with cancer. Empowerment-based diabetes education and motivational interviewing are complementary approaches. Oncology nurses may feel unprepared to teach patients and their families about self-care for diabetes, but they provide individualized information on symptom management of cancer throughout hospitalization and at discharge. The essential self-care issues include food, exercise, medication, blood glucose monitoring, prevention, reco...

  4. Successful management of elderly breast cancer patients treated without radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson John FR

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer in the elderly may follow a less aggressive course. There are data suggesting that radiotherapy (RT following breast conserving surgery (BCS for invasive carcinoma may not be necessary in some elderly patients. The addition of RT to surgery might constitute an imposition to such patients due to age-related factors. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of BCS without adjuvant RT in this group of patients. Patients and methods A retrospective review of 92 elderly (median age 75 years; range: 70 – 87 years patients (analysed as 93 'patients' due to one patient having bilateral cancers managed in a dedicated breast clinic and who underwent BCS for invasive carcinoma was carried out. Eighty-three patients did not receive postoperative RT to the breast (no-RT group whereas the remaining 10 had RT (RT-group. Results The median age in this group was 75 (range 70 – 87 years. The mean tumour size was 18 mm with a median follow-up of 37 (range 6 – 142 months. In the no RT group, adjuvant endocrine therapy with tamoxifen was given to 40/53 patients. No patients in the oestrogen receptor (ER negative group received tamoxifen. The local recurrence (LR rate in this group was 8.4% (2.4% per year, n = 7/83, with median time to LR of 17 months. In this no-RT group LR was correlated to ER status (2/53 ER+, 5/26ER-, p = 0.024 and margins of excision (n = 1/54 >5 mm, 2/17 1–5 mm, 4/12 Conclusion It would appear that omission of RT following successful BCS in elderly patients with ER positive tumours receiving adjuvant tamoxifen may be acceptable. The LR rate as shown in this retrospective study is highly comparable to that of younger patients treated by conventional therapy. This concept is now being evaluated prospectively following a change in treatment practice.

  5. The role of radiotherapy in the management of cancer patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer and AIDS are both pandemics: they have an emotional and social impact that goes far beyond the physical disruption they cause. These are usually perceived and addressed as independent disease entities. When these coexist in one patient, however, the appropriate management of the cancer needs to be modified from the standard clinical protocols. New protocols appearing in the radiotherapy literature have been investigative rather than definitive and, with few exceptions, analyse the results of small series of patients. The IAEA has extensive projects in radiation oncology in developing countries. In Africa, there is concern that AIDS related cancers utilise an increasing amount of scarce resources, that they frequently require equipment for the management of superficial tumours, and that inadequate training is available in the management of these cancers. This report developed from the need to address these concerns. An Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on the Relationship between Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Cancer Management Protocols for Developing Countries was convened in October 1999. A reading of this report will show that considerable amount of further investigation is required to respond authoritatively to many of the management decisions that need be made. It is also evident that the greatest number of patients requiring optimal management protocols live in sub-Saharan Africa - a region where research resources are at a minimum. The IAEA has made available limited funding for a research project in determining the intermediate term effects of radiation therapy on the immune system in AIDS related cervical cancer

  6. Positron Emission Tomography in the Management of Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in men and the second most common cancer in women. Globally it remains the most commonly diagnosed cancer at 1.35 million, representing 12.4% of all new cancers. Almost half (49.9%) of the lung cancer cases occur in the developing countries of the world, which is a big change since 1980, when it was estimated that 69% were in developed countries. Although lung cancer is the most deadly of all the cancers, it is the only major cancer that does not have a widely accepted screening test. Lung cancer often presents as a solitary pulmonary nodule on chest radiographs, which are usually performed on patients as a preoperative screening test, or as a part of routine health screening, often in the absence of symptoms. Incidental detection can occur in up to 12% of cases in asymptomatic cases. It is clear that there is a need for the accurate diagnosis of these lesions. In recent years Positron early and Emission Tomography (PET) holds early and promise as a noninvasive investigative tool for the evaluation of lung cancer. 18F-FDG PET is currently indicated for the characterization of lung lesions, staging of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), detection of distant metastases, and diagnosis of recurrent disease. PET/CT studies are also being increasingly employed in radiotherapy treatment also planning. Furthermore PET also plays an important role in monitoring of treatment response. On the face of it a PET-CT study may appear expensive. But in the overall context, PET/CT is cost-effective in the treatment of Lung cancer. The modality is the best discriminator of disease load if used in the correct clinical setting. It can do away with the need for multiple, many times needless investigations. It can reduce the number of futile operations, unwarranted interventions, as well as over and under treatments of lung cancer. (author)

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Understanding Cancer ... Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types ...

  8. Novel Management of Oral Cancer: A Paradigm of Predictive Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Sudbø, Jon

    2004-01-01

    The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is strong. Oral cancer is a major global threat to public health with 300,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide on an annual basis. Notably, the great morbidity and mortality rates of this devastating disease have not improved in decades. Oral cancer development is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field carcinogenesis and intraepithelial clonal spread. Biomarkers of genomic instability, such as aneuploidy a...

  9. Incidence and Management of Colorectal Cancer in Liver Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Nishihori, Taiga; Strazzabosco, Mario; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplant recipients are at an increased risk of developing de novo malignancies because of the prolonged immunosuppression necessary to avoid acute and chronic rejections. Skin cancers and lymphoproliferative diseases are the most common malignancies, but the overall incidence of colon cancer in this patient population does differ from that of the general population. Therefore, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health concern in liver transplant recipients. Furthermore, there are uni...

  10. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one’s overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The ...

  11. Use of capecitabine in management of early colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy J; Hameed H

    2011-01-01

    H Hameed, J CassidyBeatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, Scotland, UKAbstract: Capecitabine (Xeloda®, Roche, Basel, Switzerland) is a pro-drug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and it is converted to 5-FU in the cancer cell by enzymatic degradation. The role of capecitabine in colorectal cancer has evolved in the last 15 years. In early trials in the metastatic setting, capecitabine has shown superior response rates compared with those achieved with 5-FU (Mayo Clinic regimen) (26% ...

  12. Familial Renal Cancer: Molecular Genetics and Surgical Management

    OpenAIRE

    Barrisford, Glen W.; Singer, Eric A; Rosner, Inger L.; Marston Linehan, W.; Gennady Bratslavsky

    2011-01-01

    Familial renal cancer (FRC) is a heterogeneous disorder comprised of a variety of subtypes. Each subtype is known to have unique histologic features, genetic alterations, and response to therapy. Through the study of families affected by hereditary forms of kidney cancer, insights into the genetic basis of this disease have been identified. This has resulted in the elucidation of a number of kidney cancer gene pathways. Study of these pathways has led to the development of novel targeted mole...

  13. Real-Time Motion Management of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Tobias

    The aim of radiation therapy is to deliver a radiation dose to the tumour that is high enough for all cancer cells to be killed, while sparing healthy organs to such an extent that the side effects are as low as possible. Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men in Denmark......, and for prostate cancer treatments, the proximity of the bladder and rectum makes radiotherapy treatment of this site a challenging task. Furthermore, the prostate may move during the radiation delivery and treatment margins are necessary to ensure that it is still receiving the intended dose. The main aim...

  14. An integrated, population-based framework for knowledge management for cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Neil A; Craighead, Peter; Esmail, Rosmin

    2010-01-01

    Cancer control organizations commonly refer to the critical role of clinical practice guidelines to support the best possible cancer care. But how can a cancer care program ensure the systematic implementation of those guidelines? The goals of this article are to describe the process of developing a cancer control system driven by knowledge management, to highlight the key elements of this system and to foster discussion on the implementation of such frameworks. In order to promote best cancer practices within an expanded radiation service model for the province of Alberta, we developed an integrated conceptual framework for knowledge management. We identified six key elements of a knowledge management framework for the cancer program: evidence-based provincial guidelines, funding decisions, harmonized care pathways, targeted knowledge transfer projects, performance measurement and feedback to the system. We are establishing a process to characterize the explicit linkages and accountabilities between each of these elements as part of a broader cancer care quality agenda. We will implement the framework to support the start-up of the first of three new radiation treatment services in the province. The basic elements of a guidelines-supported cancer care system are not in doubt; how to unambiguously engage them within an integrated care system remains an area of intense interest. PMID:20523153

  15. Managing Health Care After Cancer Treatment: A Wellness Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Moye, Jennifer; Langdon, Maura; Jones, Janice M.; Haggstrom, David; Naik, Aanand D.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients and health care providers lack awareness of both the existence of, and treatments for, lingering distress and disability after treatment. A cancer survivorship wellness plan can help ensure that any referral needs for psychosocial and other restorative care after cancer treatment are identified.

  16. Epidemiology and management of depression in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Depression is the most frequent psychiatric comorbidity in cancer patients especially those in terminal stage. Despite the large amount of studies on depression in cancer patients, there are a lot of unanswered questions with respect to diagnosis, prevalence and treatment. Diagnosing depression in c

  17. Contemporary management of cancer of the oral cavity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genden, E.M.; Ferlito, A.; Silver, C.E.; Takes, R.P.; Suarez, C.; Owen, R.P.; Haigentz Jr, M.; Stoeckli, S.J.; Shaha, A.R.; Rapidis, A.D.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer represents a common entity comprising a third of all head and neck malignant tumors. The options for curative treatment of oral cavity cancer have not changed significantly in the last three decades; however, the work up, the approach to surveillance, and the options for reconstruction h

  18. Co-Managing Patients with Type 1 Diabetes and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Conor J; Thosani, Sonali; Ortiz, Marjorie; Levesque, Celia; Varghese, Sigi S; Lavis, Victor R

    2016-08-01

    The life expectancy of people with type 1 diabetes is improving and now approaches that of those without diabetes. As this population ages, a growing number will be diagnosed with and treated for cancer. Cancer treatments can drastically affect insulin requirement and glycemic control through multiple mechanisms including high doses of glucocorticoids and targeted therapies that directly interfere with cellular pathways involved in the action of insulin. Patients with cancer frequently also have alterations in gastrointestinal motility or appetite and require supplemental enteral or parenteral nutrition. Few studies have evaluated these patients directly, but data on patients with and without diabetes suggest that glycemic control may play a larger role in cancer outcomes than is often recognized. Collaboration between the treating oncologist and diabetologist allows people with diabetes to receive the most effective therapies for their cancers without undue risk of hypoglycemia or adverse outcomes due to hyperglycemia. PMID:27319323

  19. Cancer pain management by radiotherapists: a survey of radiation therapy oncology group physicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) physicians were surveyed to determine their approach to and attitudes toward cancer pain management. Methods and Materials: Physicians completed a questionnaire assessing their estimates of the magnitude of pain as a specific problem for cancer patients, their perceptions of the adequacy of pain management, and their report of how they manage pain in their own practice setting. Results: Eighty-three percent believed the majority of cancer patients with pain were undermedicated. Forty percent reported that pain relief in their own practice setting was poor or fair. Assessing a case scenario, 23% would wait until the patient's prognosis was 6 months or less before starting maximal analgesia. Adjuvants and prophylactic side effect management were underutilized in the treatment plan. Barriers to pain management included poor pain assessment (77%), patient reluctance to report pain (60%), patient reluctance to take analgesics (72%), and staff reluctance to prescribe opioids (41%). Conclusions: Physicians' perceptions of barriers to cancer pain management remain quite stable over time, and physicians continue to report inadequate pain treatment education. Future educational efforts should target radiation oncologists as an important resource for the treatment of cancer pain

  20. Geriatric assessment with management in cancer care: Current evidence and potential mechanisms for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Allison; Allore, Heather; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Mohile, Supriya G; Williams, Grant R; Chapman, Andrew; Extermann, Martine; Olin, Rebecca L; Targia, Valerie; Mackenzie, Amy; Holmes, Holly M; Hurria, Arti

    2016-07-01

    Older adults with cancer represent a complex patient population. Geriatric assessment (GA) is recommended to evaluate the medical and supportive care needs of this group. "GA with management" is a term encompassing the resultant medical decisions and interventions implemented in response to vulnerabilities identified on GA. In older, non-cancer patients, GA with management has been shown to improve a variety of outcomes, such as reducing functional decline and health care utilization. However, the role of GA with management in the older adult with cancer is less well established. Rigorous clinical trials of GA with management are necessary to develop an evidence base and support its use in the routine oncology care of older adults. At the recent U-13 conference, "Design and Implementation of Intervention Studies to Improve or Maintain Quality of Survivorship in Older and/or Frail Adults with Cancer," a session was dedicated to developing research priorities in GA with management. Here we summarize identified knowledge gaps in GA with management studies for older patients with cancer and propose areas for future research. PMID:27197915

  1. Knowledge, Practices, and Perceived Barriers Regarding Cancer Pain Management Among Physicians and Nurses In Korea: A Nationwide Multicenter Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun Jung Jho; Yeol Kim; Kyung Ae Kong; Dae Hyun Kim; Eun Jeong Nam; Jin Young Choi; Sujin Koh; Kwan Ok Hwang; Sun Kyung Baek; Eun Jung Park

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Medical professionals’ practices and knowledge regarding cancer pain management have often been cited as inadequate. This study aimed to evaluate knowledge, practices and perceived barriers regarding cancer pain management among physicians and nurses in Korea. Methods A nationwide questionnaire survey was administered to physicians and nurses involved in the care of cancer patients. Questionnaire items covered pain assessment and documentation practices, knowledge regarding cancer pai...

  2. Complementary and alternative medicine in cancer pain management: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life (QoL encompasses the physical, psychosocial, social and spiritual dimensions of life lived by a person. Cancer pain is one of the physical component has tremendous impact on the QoL of the patient. Cancer pain is multifaceted and complex to understand and managing cancer pain involves a tool box full of pharmacological and non pharmacological interventions but still there are 50-70% of cancer patients who suffer from uncontrolled pain and they fear pain more than death. Aggressive surgeries, radiotherapy and chemotherapy focus more on prolonging the survival of the patient failing to realize that the QoL lived also matters equally. This paper reviews complementary and alternative therapy approaches for cancer pain and its impact in improving the QoL of cancer patients.

  3. Cancer treatment-related cardiac toxicity: prevention, assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanous, Ibrahim; Dillon, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Cancer therapies, especially anthracyclines and monoclonal antibodies, have been linked with increased rates of cardiotoxicity. The development of some cardiac side effects happens over several months, and changes in ejection fraction can be detected long before permanent damage or disability occurs. Advanced heart failure could be averted with better and earlier detection. Methodologies for early detection of cardiac changes include stress echocardiograms, cardiac velocity measurements, radionuclide imaging, cardiac MRI and several potential biomarkers. Many agents have been described for prophylaxis of cardiac events precipitated by cancer therapy. Prophylactic use of beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors may be considered for use with trastuzumab in breast cancer as tolerated. Recovery of cardiac function is possible early after the injury from a cancer therapy. Late complications for coronary artery disease, hypertension and arrhythmia are underappreciated. Treatments for severe cancer therapy-related cardiac complications follow the existing paradigms for congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease, although outcomes for cancer patients differ from outcomes for non-cancer patients. PMID:27372782

  4. Management and Outcomes of Male Breast Cancer in Zaria, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamu Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Male breast cancer is an uncommon disease accounting for only 1% of all breast cancers. We present the evaluation, treatment and outcome of male patients seen with breast cancer in our institution. Male patients that had histological diagnosis of breast cancer from 2001 to 2010 were retrospectively evaluated. After evaluation patients were treated with modified radical mastectomy. Combination chemotherapy was given to patients with positive axillary lymph nodes. Radiotherapy and hormonal therapy were also employed. There were 57 male patients with breast cancer which accounted for 9% of all breast cancers seen during the study period. Their mean age was 59 ± 2.3 years. The mean tumor diameter was 13 ± 2.5 cm. Fifty three (93% patients presented with advanced disease including 15 with distant metastasis. Four patients with stage II disease were treated with modified radical mastectomy, chemotherapy and tamoxifen. Of the 30 patients with sage III disease that had modified radical mastectomy, complete axillary clearance and tumor free margins were achieved in 25. Overall 21 (36.8% patients were tumor free at one year. Overall 5-year survival was 22.8%. In conclusion, male patients with breast cancer present with advanced disease which is associated with poor outcome of treatment.

  5. Management of Hormone-Sensitive and Hormone-Refractory Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago

    1998-11-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is a significant health problem in the United States and is the focus of increasing attention in our society. With the aging of the US population, it is likely that prostate cancer will continue to grow in importance. The options for systemic therapy of metastatic prostate cancer should be familiar to physicians, including nonspecialists, whose patients seek their advice and counsel. METHODS: Past and recent literature was surveyed to provide an understanding of the systemic treatment of advanced prostate cancer. The author presents a review of the systemic treatment of metastatic prostate cancer in different clinical circumstances and addresses the current status of chemotherapy in the management of advanced prostate cancer. RESULTS: Early androgen deprivation used over prolonged periods appears to be modestly superior to delayed androgen deprivation with a small potential survival advantage and an advantage in delaying disease progression in advanced prostate cancer. Patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer may benefit from secondary hormonal therapy (eg, adrenal enzyme inhibitors, antiandrogens, glucocorticoids) and chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: The choices of therapy for metastatic prostate cancer depend on individual patient preference. Patients and physicians should be aware of the possible side effects associated with the therapeutics options for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:10761100

  6. Spect-CT and PET: CT in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: With the advancement and evolution in medical technology notably imaging there has been a sea change in the overall management strategy of most of the cancers of human body. The present day functional, imaging with PET and MRI enables us to pick up a tumour at its cellular stage. Molecular imaging and nanotechnology have further added to this expanding armamentarium of cancer imaging and treatment. Thyroid cancer is one such cancer where the cutting edge biotechnology has dramatically changed the management profile of a disease. Thyroid cancer can safely be classified as one of the cancers which if optimally managed is curable. Hybrid and fusion imaging like SPECT-CT and PET-CT with their superior sensitivity and specificity have greatly improved the accuracy of disease detection and reduced drastically the false positive disease sites. Disease not detected by conventional planar imaging can now be detected and also anatomically localized using hybrid imaging modalities of SPECT-CT and PET-CT. An accurate detection and precise localization improves image interpretation and a treatment optimization in the curable cancer of thyroid

  7. A comparative study of pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer: Risk factors, presentation, characteristics and management

    OpenAIRE

    Surakasula, Aruna; Nagarjunapu, Govardhana Chary; Raghavaiah, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Breast cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide and is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in Indian women. This study evaluates the differences between pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer women regarding risk factors, nature of disease presentation, tumor characteristics, and management. Methods: This is a prospective observational study, conducted in the Oncology Department of St. Ann's Cancer Hospital, for a period of 6 months from January to August 2012. Data ...

  8. Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer (Cancer Care Ontario Guideline): American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, RC; Rumble, RB; Loblaw, DA; Finelli, A.; Ehdaie, B; Cooperberg, MR; Morgan, SC; Tyldesley, S; Haluschak, JJ; Tan, W.; Justman, S; Jain, S

    2016-01-01

    To endorse Cancer Care Ontario's guideline on Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines developed by other professional organizations.The Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The ASCO Endorsement Panel then reviewed the content and the recommenda...

  9. Radical lymphadenectomy in the management of early gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, N; Karat, D; Scott, D J; Raimes, S A; Griffin, S M

    1996-10-01

    Lymph node metastasis in patients with early gastric cancer was evaluated prospectively to determine whether radical (D2) lymphadenectomy is appropriate in such cases. Twenty-eight (18 per cent) of 156 patients having surgery for gastric cancer had early disease. Lymph node metastasis was found in 12 of the 28 patients. Metastasis was more likely in submucosal than mucosal early gastric cancer (nine of 14 versus three of 14; P = 0.024, Fisher's exact test). In two of three patients with metastasis at the N2 level, the N1 nodes were entirely clear. This study shows a higher incidence of lymph node metastasis than has been reported previously in both the UK and Japan. The high incidence of lymph node metastasis in early gastric cancer supports the continuing use of radical lymphadenectomy in patients who are fit for such major surgery. PMID:8944462

  10. Understanding and Managing Erectile Dysfunction in Patients Treated for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annam, Kiran; Voznesensky, Maria; Kreder, Karl J

    2016-04-01

    Cancer can cause sexual adverse effects by direct and indirect pathways. It can involve sexual organs, indirectly affect body image, or cause fatigue or depression with subsequent effects on libido. Erectile dysfunction (ED), the inability to obtain or maintain an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse, can also result from adverse effects of cancer treatment, such as fatigue, pain, or anxiety about therapy. In addition, depressed feelings about having cancer can affect sexuality, causing a range of signs and symptoms that can lead to ED. Chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation can all cause sexual adverse effects. Additional factors that play a role include patient age and degree of ED before starting cancer treatment. In this article, we discuss how chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation affect erectile function as well as possible treatment options for ED. PMID:27072383

  11. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Cotter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field.

  12. Non-surgical management of stage I lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gore, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Stage I lung cancer has a high cure rate with surgery, although many patients are not surgical candidates due to comorbid conditions. Historically, non-operative treatment has been disappointing. New and promising ablative therapies offer a curative option.

  13. Multidisciplinary Teams in the Management of Rectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Obias, Vincent J.; Reynolds, Harry L.

    2007-01-01

    A myriad of advances in the treatment of rectal cancer have been achieved over the last few decades. The introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) has resulted in significant improvements in local recurrence. Surgical education on the technique has made it the standard of care. Radiation and chemotherapy combined with TME have improved results even further with stage II and III cancers. Sphincter-sparing techniques, reservoir procedures, local treatment advances, minimally invasive tech...

  14. Management of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Defining the Role of Capecitabine

    OpenAIRE

    Lynda R. Wiseman; Katherine A. Lyseng-Williamson

    2005-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), one of the most common cancers, is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and medical costs. Treatment options in metastatic CRC are largely palliative, and aim to provide symptom relief, improve health-related quality of life, and prolong survival. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for metastatic disease. Fluorouracil/leucovorin with or without oxaliplatin or irinotecan is the most widely used regimen. These agents are administered intravenously (b...

  15. Challenges in the Management of Older Patients with Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dotan, Efrat; Browner, Ilene; Hurria, Arti; Denlinger, Crystal

    2012-01-01

    The majority of patients with colon cancer are over the age of 65. Their treatment poses multiple challenges to the oncologist, as these patients may have age-related comorbidities, polypharmacy, and physical or physiologic changes associated with older age. These challenges include limited data on the ability to predict tolerance to anti-cancer therapy and the appropriate use of treatment modalities in the setting of comorbidity and concurrent frailty. The low number of older patients enroll...

  16. Cannabinoids for Symptom Management and Cancer Therapy: The Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mellar P

    2016-07-01

    Cannabinoids bind not only to classical receptors (CB1 and CB2) but also to certain orphan receptors (GPR55 and GPR119), ion channels (transient receptor potential vanilloid), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Cannabinoids are known to modulate a multitude of monoamine receptors. Structurally, there are 3 groups of cannabinoids. Multiple studies, most of which are of moderate to low quality, demonstrate that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and oromucosal cannabinoid combinations of THC and cannabidiol (CBD) modestly reduce cancer pain. Dronabinol and nabilone are better antiemetics for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) than certain neuroleptics, but are not better than serotonin receptor antagonists in reducing delayed emesis, and cannabinoids have largely been superseded by neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists and olanzapine; both cannabinoids have been recommended for breakthrough nausea and vomiting among other antiemetics. Dronabinol is ineffective in ameliorating cancer anorexia but does improve associated cancer-related dysgeusia. Multiple cancers express cannabinoid receptors directly related to the degree of anaplasia and grade of tumor. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that cannabinoids may have anticancer activity. Paradoxically, cannabinoid receptor antagonists also have antitumor activity. There are few randomized smoked or vaporized cannabis trials in cancer on which to judge the benefits of these forms of cannabinoids on symptoms and the clinical course of cancer. Smoked cannabis has been found to contain Aspergillosis. Immunosuppressed patients should be advised of the risks of using "medical marijuana" in this regard. PMID:27407130

  17. Geriatric assessment with management in cancer care: Current evidence and potential mechanisms for future research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Allison; Allore, Heather; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Mohile, Supriya G.; Williams, Grant R.; Chapman, Andrew; Extermann, Martine; Olin, Rebecca L.; Targia, Valerie; Mackenzie, Amy; Holmes, Holly M.; Hurria, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Older adults with cancer represent a complex patient population. Geriatric assessment (GA) is recommended to evaluate the medical and supportive care needs of this group. “GA with management” is a term encompassing the resultant medical decisions and interventions implemented in response to vulnerabilities identified on GA. In older, non-cancer patients, GA with management has been shown to improve a variety of outcomes, such as reducing functional decline and health care utilization. However, the role of GA with management in the older adult with cancer is less well established. Rigorous clinical trials of GA with management are necessary to develop an evidence base and support its use in the routine oncology care of older adults. At the recent U-13 conference, “Design and Implementation of Intervention Studies to Improve or Maintain Quality of Survivorship in Older and/or Frail Adults with Cancer,” a session was dedicated to developing research priorities in GA with management. Here we summarize identified knowledge gaps in GA with management studies for older patients with cancer and propose areas for future research. PMID:27197915

  18. Challenges associated with the management of gynecological cancers in a tertiary hospital in South East Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyoke CA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chukwuemeka Anthony Iyoke,1 George Onyemaechi Ugwu,1 Euzebus Chinonye Ezugwu,1 Frank Okechukwu Ezugwu,2 Osaheni Lucky Lawani,3 Azubuike Kanayo Onyebuchi3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Park Lane, Enugu, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria Background: There are reports of increasing incidence of gynecological cancers in developing countries and this trend increases the need for more attention to gynecological cancer care in these countries. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the presentation and treatment of gynecological cancers and identify barriers to successful gynecological cancer treatment in a tertiary hospital in South East Nigeria. Methods: This study was a retrospective longitudinal analysis of the presentation and treatment of histologically diagnosed primary gynecological cancers from 2000 to 2010. Analysis was by descriptive and inferential statistics at the 95% level of confidence using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17 software. Results: Records of 200 gynecological cancers managed during the study period were analyzed. Over 94% of cervical cancers presented in advanced stages of the disease and received palliative/symptomatic treatment. Only 1.9% of cervical cancer patients had radical surgical intervention, and postoperative mortality from these radical surgeries was 100%. Approximately 76% of patients with ovarian cancer had debulking surgery as the mainstay of treatment followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative mortality from ovarian cancer surgery was 63%. Cutting edge cytotoxic drugs were not used as chemotherapy for ovarian and chorionic cancers. Compliance with chemotherapy was poor, with over 70% of ovarian cancer patients failing to complete the

  19. [Operational Management of Multidisciplinary Organ-Based Tumor Units in Our Cancer Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Tsujie, Masanori; Ichimura, Noriko; Yukawa, Masao; Inoue, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Owing to the advances in diagnosis and treatment, it is imperative to develop a multidisciplinary approach for the management of cancer patients. In our cancer center, multidisciplinary organ-based tumor units have been organized for team medical care. These units consist of cancer specialists from multiple departments including medical oncology, surgery, radiology, histopathology, and nursing. Members of each unit regularly conduct meetings to discuss diagnostic and therapeutic aspects, as well as to report the progress of cancer patients. Co-operation with the counseling and support center, utilization of the computerized medical record system, and using brochures for advertisement, all play important roles in adequate management of multidisciplinary organ-based tumor units. PMID:27210090

  20. Optimal management of asymptomatic workers at high risk of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, P A; Ringen, K; Hemstreet, G P

    1986-01-01

    Many cohorts of industrial workers at increased risk of occupationally induced bladder cancer are still in the preclinical disease stage. A large proportion of workers in these populations have been exposed to aromatic amines, but have not yet experienced the average latent period for bladder cancer. A need exists for definition of what constitutes optimal management for asymptomatic workers in these cohorts. Promising advances in the epidemiology, pathology, detection, and treatment of bladder cancer pressure for a reassessment of current practices and the application of the most current scientific knowledge. Some of these apparent advances, however, have not yet been rigorously evaluated. The time has come to evaluate these advances so that their application can occur while high risk cohorts are still amenable to and likely to benefit from intervention. This commentary calls for such an evaluation leading to a comprehensive approach to managing cohorts at high risk of bladder cancer. PMID:3950777

  1. The endoscopist's role in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeffrey H; Cassani, Lisa S; Bhosale, Priya; Ross, William A

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal malignancies with little improvement in survival over the past several decades in spite of advances in imaging, risk factor identification, surgical technique and chemotherapy. This disappointing outcome is mainly due to failures to make an early diagnosis. In fact, the majority of the patients present with inoperable advanced stages of the disease. Though some of the new tumor markers are promising, we are still in search of the one that has a high sensitivity and accuracy, yet is inexpensive and easy to obtain. The paradigm of management has shifted from up-front surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy to neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery, especially for borderline resectable cancers and even for some resectable cancers. In this article, we will critically assess the limitations of tumor markers and review the advancements in endoscopic techniques in the management of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27087265

  2. Survey of HNPCC Management Analysis of Responses from 18 International Cancer Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Elizabeth

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Eighteen international cancer centres responded to a questionnaire designed to determine clinic practices regarding the management of Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC. Areas covered include definition, clinical intakes, pre-genetic testing for microsatellite instability (MSI or expression of mismatch repair (MMR genes by immunohistochemistry (IHC, mutational analysis, consent practices, counselling, surveillance planning, and surgical decision making. In the absence of a firm evidence base, some management practices were variable, with local access to funding and other resources being influential. More consistent responses were evident for management practices with a stronger evidence base from previous clinical research. This document provides important information to guide the management of HNPCC patients, allow comparisons to be made between the approaches of various clinics to HNPCC families, and define management issues that need to be addressed in clinical research.

  3. Emerging targets in cancer management: role of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cojoc M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Monica Cojoc,1 Claudia Peitzsch,1 Franziska Trautmann,1 Leo Polishchuk,2 Gennady D Telegeev,2 Anna Dubrovska11OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden, Germany; 2Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, UkraineAbstract: The chemokine CXCL12 (SDF-1 and its cell surface receptor CXCR4 were first identified as regulators of lymphocyte trafficking to the bone marrow. Soon after, the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis was proposed to regulate the trafficking of breast cancer cells to sites of metastasis. More recently, it was established that CXCR4 plays a central role in cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and dissemination in the majority of malignant diseases. The stem cell concept of cancer has revolutionized the understanding of tumorigenesis and cancer treatment. A growing body of evidence indicates that a subset of cancer cells, referred to as cancer stem cells (CSCs, plays a critical role in tumor initiation, metastatic colonization, and resistance to therapy. Although the signals generated by the metastatic niche that regulate CSCs are not yet fully understood, accumulating evidence suggests a key role of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis. In this review we focus on physiological functions of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling pathway and its role in cancer and CSCs, and we discuss the potential for targeting this pathway in cancer management.Keywords: epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cancer stem cells, metastasis

  4. Women’s Views on Handling and Managing Their Breast Cancer in Pakistan: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Najma Naz; Sabiha Khanum; Grace Teresinha Marcon Dal Sasso; Maria de Lourdes de Souza

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examine and analyze the experiences of women and their perceptions on handling and managing their breast cancer. Seven women from Peshawar, Pakistan who had breast cancer and have been cured, were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis of their life stories was performed using a computerized software Atlas.ti. In the coding process, 128 codes were initially developed. These codes were then grouped into 12 categories, which were then further refined into 8 theoretically gr...

  5. Role of intranasal fentanyl in breakthrough pain management in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Leppert, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    Wojciech LeppertDepartment of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, PolandAbstract: Fentanyl is a strong opioid analgesic, which is commonly used in the form of a transdermal patch for the treatment of chronic cancer pain. An intranasal route of fentanyl administration is a novel treatment for breakthrough cancer pain (BTCP). The prevalence, assessment, and management of BTCP is outlined in this paper, and basic pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, dos...

  6. Physician-related barriers to cancer pain management with opioid analgesics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Sjøgren, Per; Møldrup, Claus;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of studies on physician-related barriers to cancer pain management with opioid analgesics. METHODS: A literature search was conducted in PUBMED, using a combined text word and MeSH heading search strategy. Those articles whose full...... texts were not available in PUBMED were retrieved from the electronic databases of specific journals. RESULTS: Sixty-five relevant articles, published in the period from 1986 to 2006, were identified. Physicians' barriers to cancer pain management were studied in questionnaire surveys and in the reviews...... review revealed mostly general and common physician-related barriers to cancer pain management: concerns about side effects to opioids, prescription of not efficient doses of opioids, and very poor prescription for the treatment of side effects from opioids. In the future, the evaluation of the influence...

  7. Targeted therapies with companion diagnostics in the management of breast cancer: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Meagan B

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a multifaceted disease exhibiting both intertumoral and intratumoral heterogeneity as well as variable disease course. Over 2 decades of research has advanced the understanding of the molecular substructure of breast cancer, directing the development of new therapeutic strategies against these actionable targets. In vitro diagnostics, and specifically companion diagnostics, have been integral in the successful development and implementation of these targeted therapies, such as those directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Lately, there has been a surge in the development, commercialization, and marketing of diagnostic assays to assist in breast cancer patient care. More recently, multigene signature assays, such as Oncotype DX, MammaPrint, and Prosigna, have been integrated in the clinical setting in order to tailor decisions on adjuvant endocrine and chemotherapy treatment. This review provides an overview of the current state of breast cancer management and the use of companion diagnostics to direct personalized approaches in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26858530

  8. Successful management of a difficult cancer pain patient by appropriate adjuvant and morphine titration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv PS Rana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphine has been used for many years to relieve cancer pain. Oral morphine (in either immediate release or modified release form remains the analgesic of choice for moderate or severe cancer pain. The dose of oral morphine is titrated up to achieve adequate relief from pain with minimal side effects. Antidepressant and anticonvulsant drugs, when used in addition to conventional analgesics, give excellent relief from cancer pain. Most cancer pain responds to pharmacological measures with oral morphine but some pain like neuropathic and bony pain, pain in children and elderly age group, and advanced malignancy pain are very difficult to treat. Here, we report the management of a similar patient of severe cancer pain and the difficulty that we came across during dose titration of oral morphine and adjuvant analgesic.

  9. Current Operative Management of Breast Cancer: An Age of Smaller Resections and Bigger Cures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgical resection was the first effective treatment for breast cancer and remains the most important treatment modality for curative intent. Refinements in operative techniques along with the use of adjuvant radiotherapy and advanced chemotherapeutic agents have facilitated increasingly focused breast cancer operations. Surgical management of breast cancer has shifted from extensive and highly morbid procedures, to the modern concept obtaining the best possible cosmetic result in tandem with the appropriate oncological resection. An ever-growing comprehension of breast cancer biology has led to substantial advances in molecular diagnosis and targeted therapies. An emerging frontier involves the breast cancer microenvironment, as a thorough understanding, while currently lacking, represents a critical opportunity for diagnosis and treatment. Collectively, these improvements will continue to push all therapeutic interventions, including operative, toward the goal of becoming more focused, targeted, and less morbid

  10. Challenges of drug resistance in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheikh, Rizwan

    2012-02-01

    The current treatment of choice for metastatic pancreatic cancer involves single-agent gemcitabine or a combination of gemcitabine with capecitabine or erlotinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Only 25–30% of patients respond to this treatment and patients who do respond initially ultimately exhibit disease progression. Median survival for pancreatic cancer patients has reached a plateau due to inherent and acquired resistance to these agents. Key molecular factors implicated in this resistance include: deficiencies in drug uptake, alteration of drug targets, activation of DNA repair pathways, resistance to apoptosis and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, for newer agents including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, overexpression of signaling proteins, mutations in kinase domains, activation of alternative pathways, mutations of genes downstream of the target and\\/or amplification of the target represent key challenges for treatment efficacy. Here we will review the contribution of known mechanisms and markers of resistance to key pancreatic cancer drug treatments.

  11. [Management of secondary lymphedema in patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenczl, Enikő

    2016-03-27

    Due to the increased number of cancer patients and the progress in cancer treatment, there are more cases with cancer-related lymphedema. Lymphedema treatment became part of oncological patients' care. Basic therapy for lymphedema is the complex decongestive therapy, which should be embedded into the patient's comprehensive medical care and should always be determined individually. Results of therapy are influenced by the experience of the doctor and the physiotherapist in lymphedema care, patient's complience, tumor behavior and the accompanying diseases. Lymphedema is a chronic disease, requires lifelong follow-up and treatment. For prevention and better care, it would be important to inform patients about lymphedema risk and appropriate life-style (e.g. weight control) preoperatively and during oncological follow-up. Early diagnosis is important. Lymphedema treatment should be integrated into palliative programmes. If therapy is started in time, complications may be avoided, healthcare costs may be reduced and better quality of life may be achieved. PMID:26996895

  12. MASCC/ISOO clinical practice guidelines for the management of mucositis secondary to cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lalla, Rajesh V; Bowen, Joanne; Barasch, Andrei;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mucositis is a highly significant, and sometimes dose-limiting, toxicity of cancer therapy. The goal of this systematic review was to update the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer and International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) Clinical Practice Guidelines...... clinicians provide evidence-based management of mucositis secondary to cancer therapy....... criteria. The body of evidence for each intervention, in each treatment setting, was assigned a level of evidence, based on previously published criteria. Guidelines were developed based on the level of evidence, with 3 possible guideline determinations: recommendation, suggestion, or no guideline possible...

  13. Current practice of radioiodine treatment in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This prospective, observational study of a cohort of thyroid cancer patients in Germany focusses on the ''real-world'' practice in the management of thyroid cancer patients. This report includes data from 2376 patients with primary differentiated thyroid carcinoma first diagnosed in the year 1996. The study reveals considerable differences in actual practice concerning surgery and radioiodine treatment. The results indicate that consensus is lacking with respect to the multimodality treatment approach for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Our analysis represents the most current and comprehensive national assessment of presenting patient characteristics, diagnostic tests, treatment and complications for thyroid cancer. (orig.)

  14. Charting a course through the CEAs: diagnosis and management of medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Christopher W; Bendinelli, Cino; McGrath, Shaun

    2016-09-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an uncommon thyroid cancer that requires a high index of suspicion to facilitate diagnosis of early-stage disease amenable to surgical cure. The challenges of diagnosis, as well as management in the setting of persistent disease, are explored in the context of a case presenting with the incidental finding of elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and an (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18) F-FDG-PET)-positive thyroid incidentaloma detected following treatment of colorectal cancer. Strategies to individualize prognosis, and emerging PET-based imaging modalities, particularly the potential role of (18) F-DOPA-PET in staging, are reviewed. PMID:27230389

  15. Circulating Cell-Free Tumour DNA in the Management of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Glenn; Stein, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    With the development of new sensitive molecular techniques, circulating cell-free tumour DNA containing mutations can be identified in the plasma of cancer patients. The applications of this technology may result in significant changes to the care and management of cancer patients. Whilst, currently, these “liquid biopsies” are used to supplement the histological diagnosis of cancer and metastatic disease, in the future these assays may replace the need for invasive procedures. Applications include the monitoring of tumour burden, the monitoring of minimal residual disease, monitoring of tumour heterogeneity, monitoring of molecular resistance and early diagnosis of tumours and metastatic disease. PMID:26101870

  16. Circulating Cell-Free Tumour DNA in the Management of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Francis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of new sensitive molecular techniques, circulating cell-free tumour DNA containing mutations can be identified in the plasma of cancer patients. The applications of this technology may result in significant changes to the care and management of cancer patients. Whilst, currently, these “liquid biopsies” are used to supplement the histological diagnosis of cancer and metastatic disease, in the future these assays may replace the need for invasive procedures. Applications include the monitoring of tumour burden, the monitoring of minimal residual disease, monitoring of tumour heterogeneity, monitoring of molecular resistance and early diagnosis of tumours and metastatic disease.

  17. Strategies for managing breast cancer risk after the menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ruth; Harvie, Michelle; Howell, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Postmenopausal women in Western societies are conscious of breast cancer as a potential cause of death and ill health, which they wish to avoid with the advice of their doctors. Yet many factors that predispose women to the development of cancer will have been laid down before the menopause, in their genetic makeup or during their adolescent years. Even in middle age it is important to take account of the intrinsic level of risk, and to give women advice tailored to their own individual risk level. This results from their family history, previous diseases such as benign breast disease, and previous treatment for breast cancer or Hodgkin's disease. For those at the highest level of risk, strategies will include regular screening, prophylactic mastectomy, and the use of chemoprevention agents, such as tamoxifen. These women should avoid hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and control their menopausal symptoms and osteoporosis through the use of other agents now available - venlafaxine for menopausal symptoms and bisphosphonates for osteoporosis. Raloxifene is an agent under trial that may be valuable for breast cancer control as well as for osteoporosis. Women at standard population risk will require less robust preventive strategies, which will include screening and lifestyle modification. Their decisions regarding HRT should now be modified by recent evidence of associated risks. Recent studies show that tibolone causes less mammographic density and has a lower relative risk of breast cancer than combined estrogen/progestogen preparations. There is limited evidence that controlling obesity, participating in exercise and adopting a diet low in fats and high in fruit and vegetables will alter risk at this age. These precautions will, however, reduce the risk of other diseases common in this age group, such as hypertension, heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Alcohol, even in small amounts, is a risk factor for breast cancer. Given the cardioprotective

  18. Risk Management and Medico-Legal Issues in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Charles J; Green, Victoria L

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is a leading source of malpractice claims for radiologists and gynecologists. Delay in or failure to diagnosis was the second most common cause for allegations of malpractice and failure to diagnosis breast cancer accounted for the majority of these claims. The amount paid in indemnity for such claims was only second to claims paid for neurologically impaired newborns. Issues involved in documentation and communication are reviewed with a focus on specific medical legal cases. Obstetrician gynecologists must remain cognizant of the potential for liability. PMID:27101242

  19. Molecular nuclear medicine in the management of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Background: SERUM thyroglobulin (Tg) is an established tumor marker used in the management of patients with a diagnosis of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). However, a number of technical problems impair the clinical utility of this test. These problems include a lack of method standardization, inadequate sensitivity, lack of interassay reproducibility, ''hook'' effects when measuring high concentrations, and Tg autoantibody (TgAb) interference. Recently, progress has been made in overcoming some of these limitations. For example, a collaborative effort has now produced an international Tg standard (CRM 457, BCR Brussels). RIAs are being replaced by more sensitive immunometric assay (IMA) methods with faster turn-around times, and recommendations for improving interassay precision and detecting hook effects have recently been published. The present study was carried out to evaluate the accuracy of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) /thyroglobulin (Tg) test among differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients with persistent disease and low thyroglobulin levels. Methods and materials: Concentration of TSH and Tg was investigated using RIA. A series of 13 DTC patients was selected because they had proven persistent disease associated with low Tg levels ( 5.0 micro g/I at the last THST withdrawal. We measured serum Tg and TSH levels on days 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 4, 7, 10 and 15 after the first of a 2-day course of intramuscular rhTSH injections. Serum Tg values were variable in terms of both peak and time-course. Results: Detectable serum Tg levels were recorded on day 4 in all patients. However, among these 13 patients, the peak Tg value was reached earlier than day 4 in three patients and later in two others. In one patient, Tg level at day 2 was higher (3.0 micro g/l) than at day 4 (1.8 micro g/1). In six of the 13 patients studied we compared Tg values after rhTSH to those subsequently obtained after THST withdrawal: in five of them Tg values were two to three

  20. The influence of family history on prostate cancer risk: implications for clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madersbacher, Stephan; Alcaraz, Antonio; Emberton, Mark; Hammerer, Peter; Ponholzer, Anton; Schröder, Fritz H; Tubaro, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    • The most recent evidence for the link between a family history of prostate cancer and individual risk for future disease was examined, with the aim of understanding what the existence and nature of a family history of prostate cancer does to a man's risk of developing the disease. • Our findings highlighted the clear association between a family history of prostate cancer and increased risk of developing the disease; with a greater proximity of relatedness, greater number of family members affected and/or earlier age at diagnosis of the family member elevating risk further. • These findings have important clinical implications for the identification and subsequent management of men deemed to be at increased risk of developing prostate cancer. The evidence for prostate cancer risk reduction with the mono 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) finasteride in a low-risk population and, more recently, with the dual 5ARI dutasteride in a population at increased risk of developing the disease, has potential to expand management options for men at risk of developing prostate cancer beyond more frequent and/or earlier surveillance. • Given that family history can be easily assessed in routine clinical practice, it should be regarded as an important parameter to consider alongside PSA level for prostate cancer risk assessment. PMID:21166744

  1. Management of the lymph nodes in penile cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyns, Chris F; Fleshner, Neil; Sangar, Vijay; Schlenker, Boris; Yuvaraja, Thyavihally B; van Poppel, Hendrik

    2010-08-01

    A comprehensive literature study was conducted to evaluate the levels of evidence (LEs) in publications on the diagnosis and staging of penile cancer. Recommendations from the available evidence were formulated and discussed by the full panel of the International Consultation on Penile Cancer in November 2008. The final grades of recommendation (GRs) were assigned according to the LE of the relevant publications. The following consensus recommendations were accepted. Fine needle aspiration cytology should be performed in all patients (with ultrasound guidance in those with nonpalpable nodes). If the findings are positive, therapeutic, rather than diagnostic, inguinal lymph node dissection (ILND) can be performed (GR B). Antibiotic treatment for 3-6 weeks before ILND in patients with palpable inguinal nodes is not recommended (GR B). Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are not useful in patients with nonpalpable nodes. However, they can be used in those with large, palpable inguinal nodes (GR B). The statistical probability of inguinal micrometastases can be estimated using risk group stratification or a risk calculation nomogram (GR B). Surveillance is recommended if the nomogram probability of positive nodes is .5 [50%] or primary tumor grade 2-3 or T2-T4 or cN1-N2, or with lymphovascular invasion), bilateral ILND should be performed (GR B). ILND can be performed at the same time as penectomy, instead of 2-6 weeks later (GR C). SNB based on the anatomic position can be performed, provided the patient is willing to accept the potential false-negative rate of /=2 nodes on one side, contralateral limited ILND with frozen section analysis can be performed, with complete ILND if the frozen section analysis findings are positive (GR B). If clinically suspicious inguinal metastases develop during surveillance, complete ILND should be performed on that side only (GR B), and SNB or limited ILND with frozen section analysis on the

  2. What next? Managing lymph nodes in men with penile cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Leveridge, Michael; Siemens, D. Robert; Morash, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The management of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the penis is often daunting given its rarity and subsequent lack of high-level evidence to support our decision-making. This culminates in the complex surgical issues involving the management of the regional lymph nodes, which is of critical importance to both quantity and quality of life for these patients. This review aims to highlight the decisive issues surrounding the management of the pelvic and inguinal lymph nodes in the setti...

  3. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines for Evaluation and Management of Cardiovascular Complications of Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virani, Sean A; Dent, Susan; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Clarke, Brian; Davis, Margot K; Jassal, Davinder S; Johnson, Christopher; Lemieux, Julie; Paterson, Ian; Sebag, Igal A; Simmons, Christine; Sulpher, Jeffrey; Thain, Kishore; Thavendiranathan, Paaldinesh; Wentzell, Jason R; Wurtele, Nola; Côté, Marc André; Fine, Nowell M; Haddad, Haissam; Hayley, Bradley D; Hopkins, Sean; Joy, Anil A; Rayson, Daniel; Stadnick, Ellamae; Straatman, Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Modern treatment strategies have led to improvements in cancer survival, however, these gains might be offset by the potential negative effect of cancer therapy on cardiovascular health. Cardiotoxicity is now recognized as a leading cause of long-term morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. This guideline, authored by a pan-Canadian expert group of health care providers and commissioned by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, is intended to guide the care of cancer patients with established cardiovascular disease or those at risk of experiencing toxicities related to cancer treatment. It includes recommendations and important management considerations with a focus on 4 main areas: identification of the high-risk population for cardiotoxicity, detection and prevention of cardiotoxicity, treatment of cardiotoxicity, and a multidisciplinary approach to cardio-oncology. All recommendations align with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Key recommendations for which the panel provides a strong level of evidence include: (1) that routine evaluation of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and optimal treatment of preexisting cardiovascular disease be performed in all patients before, during, and after receiving cancer therapy; (2) that initiation, maintenance, and/or augmentation of antihypertensive therapy be instituted per the Canadian Hypertension Educational Program guidelines for patients with preexisting hypertension or for those who experience hypertension related to cancer therapy; and (3) that investigation and management follow current Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure guidelines for cancer patients who develop clinical heart failure or an asymptomatic decline in left ventricular ejection fraction during or after cancer treatment. This guideline provides guidance to clinicians on contemporary best practices for the cardiovascular care of cancer patients. PMID:27343741

  4. Supporting self-management of pain by patients with advanced cancer::Views of palliative care professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Nicholas D.; Closs, S. José; Flemming, Katherine Ann; Bennett, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the views of specialist palliative care professionals on patient self-management of cancer pain in order to inform the development of a new educational intervention to support self-management. Methods: Qualitative research using focus group interviews. Results: Participants viewed self-management of cancer pain as desirable and achievable but also as something that could be problematic. Challenges to self-management were perceived in: patient attitudes and behaviours, pr...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Financial Toxicity ... Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Understanding Cancer What ... Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types Adolescents ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources What Is ... Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources Cancer Types ...

  8. Managing population health to prevent and detect cancer and non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Heather; Shin, Hai Rim; Forman, David; Stevanovic, Vladimir; Park, Sohee; Burton, Robert; Varghese, Cherian; Ullrich, Andreas; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    The goals of cancer control strategies are generally uniform across all constituencies and are to reduce cancer incidence, reduce cancer mortality, and improve quality of life for those affected by cancer. A well-constructed strategy will ensure that all of its elements can ultimately be connected to one of these goals. When a cancer control strategy is being implemented, it is essential to map progress towards these goals; without mapping progress, it is impossible to assess which components of the strategy require more attention or resources and which are not having the desired effect and need to be re-evaluated. In order to monitor and evaluate these strategies, systems need to be put in place to collect data and the appropriate indicators of performance need to be identified. Session 2 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on how to manage population health to prevent and detect cancers and non-communicable diseases through two plenary presentations and four interactive workshop discussions: 1) registries, measurement, and management in cancer control; 2) use of information for planning and evaluating screening and early detection programs; 3) alternative models for promoting community health, integrated care and illness management; and 4) control of non-communicable diseases. Workshop discussions highlighted that population based cancer registries are fundamental to understanding the cancer burden within a country. However, many countries in Africa, Asia, and South/ Central America do not have them in place. A new global initiative is underway, which brings together several international agencies, and aims to establish six IARC regional registration resource centres over the next five years. These will provide training, support, infrastructure and advocacy to local networks of cancer registries, and, it is hoped, improve the host countries' ability to assess and act on cancer issues within their jurisdictions. Multiple methods of

  9. Update on epidemiology classification, and management of thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitham Gheriani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer represents approximately 0.5–1% of all human malignancy1. In the UK the incidence of thyroid cancer is 2-3 per 100,000 populations 2. In geographical areas of low iodine intake and in areas exposed to nuclear disasters the incidence of thyroid cancer is higher. Benign thyroid conditions are much more common. In the UK approximately 8 % of the population have nodular thyroid disease2. Nodular thyroid disease increases with age and is also more common in females and in geographical areas of low iodine intake. Primary thyroid malignancy can be broadly divided into 2 groups. The first group, which generally have much better prognosis, are the well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma, which includes papillary carcinoma, follicular carcinoma and Hürthle cell tumours. The second group includes the poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma like medullary thyroid carcinoma and the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Other rare tumours such as sarcomas, lymphomas and the extremely rare primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid should be included in the second group. Secondary or metastatic thyroid cancer can be from breast, lung, colon and kidney malignancies.

  10. Novel agents in the management of castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Chaturvedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is a leading cause of cancer mortality in men and despite high cure rates with surgery and/or radiation, 30-40% of patients will eventually develop advanced disease. Androgen deprivation is the first line therapy for standard of care for men with advanced disease. Eventually however all men will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Insight into the molecular mechanisms of androgen resistance has led to the development of alternative novel hormonal agents. Newer hormonal agents such as abiraterone, enzalutamide and TOK-001; and the first cancer vaccine, Sipuleucel T have been approved for use in men with CRPC. The recognition of the importance of bone health and morbidity associated with skeletal related events has led to the introduction of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B-ligand inhibitor denosumab. Other molecularly targeted therapies have shown promise in pre-clinical studies, but this has not consistently translated into clinical efficacy. It is increasingly evident that CRPC is a heterogeneous disease and an individualized approach directed at identifying primary involvement of specific pathways could maximize the benefit from targeted therapies. This review focuses on targeted therapy for PCa with special emphasis on therapies that have been Food and Drug Administration approved for use in men with CRPC.

  11. Systematic Review of the Use of Phytochemicals for Management of Pain in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Harrison

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain in cancer therapy is a common condition and there is a need for new options in therapeutic management. While phytochemicals have been proposed as one pain management solution, knowledge of their utility is limited. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review of the biomedical literature for the use of phytochemicals for management of cancer therapy pain in human subjects. Of an initial database search of 1,603 abstracts, 32 full-text articles were eligible for further assessment. Only 7 of these articles met all inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The average relative risk of phytochemical versus control was 1.03 [95% CI 0.59 to 2.06]. In other words (although not statistically significant, patients treated with phytochemicals were slightly more likely than patients treated with control to obtain successful management of pain in cancer therapy. We identified a lack of quality research literature on this subject and thus were unable to demonstrate a clear therapeutic benefit for either general or specific use of phytochemicals in the management of cancer pain. This lack of data is especially apparent for psychotropic phytochemicals, such as the Cannabis plant (marijuana. Additional implications of our findings are also explored.

  12. Screening for prostate cancer: How to manage in 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobel B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available National Societies usually recommend screening for Prostate Cancer (PC with Serum Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA and digital rectal examination annually beginning at age 50. In high risk population including men with a family history of PC or African population screening should start at age of 45 years. PSA has been widely used to detect PC despite the fact that PSA is not specific for PC. Over the years serum PSA level of greater than 4,0ng/ml was considered the threshold to perform prostate biopsy, searching for PC. In 2005 the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT demonstrated that the cut-off of 4,0ng/ml for PSA is not anymore adapted1 due to the fact that this survey found in 15% of men with PSA < or = 4,0ng/ml a prostate cancer on sextant biopsies. Today the value of PSA and the cut-off for Prostate biopsy is questioned suggesting that PSA level higher than 2,6ng/ml must be the case to propose Prostate Biopsy. Catalona confirms that approximately 25% to 30% of men with PSA 2,6 to 4,0ng/ml have prostate cancer2. Schröder and Gosselaar3 assert that screening for PC at low PSA levels (<4,0ng/ml risks to detect clinically insignificant cancers which are no threat to man. So far in the year 2006 screening for PC demonstrates accumulating evidences of efficacy but persistent uncertainty4. The major question for an urologist at work when facing a young men searching early diagnosis of PC is: at which level of PSA do we have to perform rectal biopsy ?.

  13. Optimal management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients has challenges mainly due to the concerns on immune status. At present, their mode of management is similar to HIV-seronegative patients involving the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy concurrently as indicated. HIV infection, cancer, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy lower immunity through reduction in CD4 cell counts. At present there are no treatment guidelines for HIV-positive patients. This study was done to systematically review the literature on cervical cancer management in HIV-positive patients and treatment outcomes. A systematic literature search was done in the major databases to identify studies on the management of HIV-positive patients with cervical cancer. Identified studies were assessed for eligibility and inclusion in the review following the guidelines of The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews and CRD's (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) guidance for undertaking reviews in health care. Eight eligible studies were identified from the literature. Three of them were prospective while five were retrospective studies. Notably, the average age at diagnosis of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients was a decade lower than in seronegative patients. There was no difference in distribution of stages of disease at presentation between HIV-positive and negative patients. Mild acute toxicity (Grades 1 and 2) was higher in HIV-positive patients than in HIV-negative patients in hematopoietic system. In the grades 3 and 4 reactions, anemia was reported in 4% versus 2% while gastrointestinal reactions were reported in 5% versus 2% respectively. In general, patients who were started early on HAART had higher rates of treatment completion. The study supports the suggestion that HAART should be commenced early at cervical cancer diagnosis in HIV-positive patients diagnosed with cervical cancer to ensure less toxicity and better treatment compliance

  14. Application of integrative information system improves the quality and effectiveness of cancer case management

    OpenAIRE

    Lee PY; Chang TR

    2015-01-01

    Pei-Yi Lee,1,2 Tsue-Rung Chang11Department of Nursing, MacKay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Nursing, MacKay Medical College, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Cancer case management provides consecutive care during the entire process through diagnosis to treatment and follow-up. We established an integrative information system with integration of the health information system. This integrative information system shortened the time spent on case screening, follow-up data management, ...

  15. Electronic patient self-assessment and management (SAM): A novel framework for cancer survivorship

    OpenAIRE

    Tighe Foss; Carroll Peter R; Cooperberg Matthew R; Basch Ethan; Salz Talya; Vickers Andrew J; Eastham James; Rosen Raymond C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background We propose a novel framework for management of cancer survivorship: electronic patient Self-Assessment and Management (SAM). SAM is a framework for transfer of information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice. Methods Patients who participate in the SAM system are contacted by email at regular intervals and asked...

  16. Management of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Brandon; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2015-03-01

    In 2014, prostate cancer will affect roughly 15 % of American men during their lifetimes with about 230,000 new cases and 29,000 deaths per year. If required, most can be treated with curative surgery or radiotherapy. Upon relapse, androgen deprivation therapy (intermittent or continuous) is the cornerstone of treatment for hormone-sensitive disease. Response is variable and treatment is associated with a significant risk of toxicity. Recently, significant advances in survival have been demonstrated with chemohormonal therapy in men with high-volume disease. In addition, new findings have informed the approach to preventing bone complications in patients on therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Devising clinical prediction tools and biomarkers is needed to select patients most likely to benefit from certain therapies and allow for a personalized approach. PMID:25677237

  17. Integrative therapies in cancer: modulating a broad spectrum of targets for cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Keith I; Block, Penny B; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte

    2015-03-01

    Integrative medicine is an approach to health and healing that "makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches, health care professionals, and disciplines to achieve optimal health and healing." A comprehensive integrative medicine intervention for cancer patients typically includes nutritional counseling, biobehavioral strategies, and promotion of physical activity, as well as dietary supplements including herbs, nutraceuticals, and phytochemicals. A broad-spectrum intervention of this type may contribute uniquely to improvement in cancer outcomes through its impact on a wide variety of relevant molecular targets, including effects on multiple cancer hallmarks. Hallmarks that may be particularly affected include genetic instability, tumor-promoting inflammation, deregulated metabolism, and immune system evasion. Because of their susceptibility to manipulation by diet, exercise, and supplementation, these may be characterized as metabolic hallmarks. Research on the use of comprehensive integrative approaches can contribute to the development of systems of multitargeted treatment regimens and would help clarify the combined effect of these approaches on cancer outcomes. PMID:25601968

  18. FDG PET IN THE MANAGEMENT OF LUNG CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin KM Tse; Helene Reich; Jane Alavi; Abass Alavi

    1997-01-01

    We describe a patient with newly diagnosed limy cancer. Staging was performed with CT and mediastinoscopy. FDG PET scan was performed and confirmed increased metabolic activity in the primary tumor as well as the hilar lymph node. Seven months after initial presentation, the patient was found to have two lytic lesions in the pelvis on plain radiograph. Hone scan was negative but PET demonstrated FOG uptake in one lesion. The possible utility of whole body FDG PET in detecting osseous metastas...

  19. Optimal management of bone metastases in breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wong MH; Pavlakis N

    2011-01-01

    MH Wong, N PavlakisDepartment of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Bone metastasis in breast cancer is a significant clinical problem. It not only indicates incurable disease with a guarded prognosis, but is also associated with skeletal-related morbidities including bone pain, pathological fractures, spinal cord compression, and hypercalcemia. In recent years, the mechanism of bone metastasis has been further elucidated. Bone metastasis involves a ...

  20. Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Cath

    2013-01-01

    Cath Taylor,1 Amanda Shewbridge,2 Jenny Harris,1 James S Green3,4 1Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London, London UK; 2Breast Cancer Services, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 3Department of Urology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK; 4Department of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University, London, UK Abstract: The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT)-work for breast cance...

  1. Update in palliative management of hormone refractory cancer of prostate

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Pratipal; Srivastava, Aneesh

    2007-01-01

    Hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) is an incurable disease and as in the pressure sensitive adhesive era the median survival of patients is increasing, these men increasingly develop symptomatic problems as a result of advanced local and or metastatic disease during their progression to death. Recently, it has been shown that it is possible to improve survival in this group of patients with use of chemotherapy which reinforces the need of better options in palliative care. We discus th...

  2. Vulvar cancer: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkatout I

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Alkatout,1 Melanie Schubert,1 Nele Garbrecht,2 Marion Tina Weigel,1 Walter Jonat,1 Christoph Mundhenke,1 Veronika Günther1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Institute for Pathology, University Hospitals Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany Epidemiology: Vulvar cancer can be classified into two groups according to predisposing factors: the first type correlates with a HPV infection and occurs mostly in younger patients. The second group is not HPV associated and occurs often in elderly women without neoplastic epithelial disorders. Histology: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is the most common malignant tumor of the vulva (95%. Clinical features: Pruritus is the most common and long-lasting reported symptom of vulvar cancer, followed by vulvar bleeding, discharge, dysuria, and pain. Therapy: The gold standard for even a small invasive carcinoma of the vulva was historically radical vulvectomy with removal of the tumor with a wide margin followed by an en bloc resection of the inguinal and often the pelvic lymph nodes. Currently, a more individualized and less radical treatment is suggested: a radical wide local excision is possible in the case of localized lesions (T1. A sentinel lymph node (SLN biopsy may be performed to reduce wound complications and lymphedema. Prognosis: The survival of patients with vulvar cancer is good when convenient therapy is arranged quickly after initial diagnosis. Inguinal and/or femoral node involvement is the most significant prognostic factor for survival. Keywords: vulvar cancer, HPV infection, radical vulvectomy, groin dissection, sentinel lymph node biopsy, overall survival

  3. Vulvar cancer: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

    OpenAIRE

    Alkatout, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Ibrahim Alkatout,1 Melanie Schubert,1 Nele Garbrecht,2 Marion Tina Weigel,1 Walter Jonat,1 Christoph Mundhenke,1 Veronika Günther1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Institute for Pathology, University Hospitals Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany Epidemiology: Vulvar cancer can be classified into two groups according to predisposing factors: the first type correlates with a HPV infection and occurs mostly in younger patients. The second group is not HPV associat...

  4. Vulvar cancer: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

    OpenAIRE

    Alkatout I; Schubert M; Garbrecht N; Weigel MT; Jonat W; Mundhenke C; Günther V

    2015-01-01

    Ibrahim Alkatout,1 Melanie Schubert,1 Nele Garbrecht,2 Marion Tina Weigel,1 Walter Jonat,1 Christoph Mundhenke,1 Veronika Günther1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Institute for Pathology, University Hospitals Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany Epidemiology: Vulvar cancer can be classified into two groups according to predisposing factors: the first type correlates with a HPV infection and occurs mostly in younger patients. The second group is not HPV associated a...

  5. Challenges in the management of stage II colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dotan, Efrat; Cohen, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately one-third of patients diagnosed with early stage colorectal cancer (CRC) will present with lymph node involvement (stage III) and about one-quarter with transmural bowel wall invasion but negative lymph nodes (stage II). Adjuvant chemotherapy targets micrometastatic disease to improve disease-free and overall survival. While beneficial for stage III patients, the role of adjuvant chemotherapy is unestablished in Stage II. This likely relates to the improved outcome of these pati...

  6. Contemporary management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dall’Era, Marc A; Cheng, Liang; Pan, Chong-xian

    2012-01-01

    The current standard treatment for muscle-invasive nonmetastatic bladder cancer is neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy. However, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is not widely accepted even with level 1 evidence. Adjuvant chemotherapy should be discussed if patients have not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery and have high-risk pathologic features. Although not considered standard of care, bladder-sparing therapy can be considered for highly selected p...

  7. Focal Therapy in the Management of Prostate Cancer: An Emerging Approach for Localized Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Takeo Nomura; Hiromitsu Mimata

    2012-01-01

    A widespread screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has led increased diagnosis of localized prostate cancer along with a reduction in the proportion of advanced-stage disease at diagnosis. Over the past decade, interest in focal therapy as a less morbid option for the treatment of localized low-risk prostate cancer has recently been renewed due to downward stage migration. Focal therapy stands midway between active surveillance and radical treatments, combining minimal morbidity with...

  8. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for interventional pain management in cancer pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Bhatnagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intractable cancer pain not amenable to standard oral or parenteral analgesics is a horrifying truth in 10-15% of patients. Interventional pain management techniques are an indispensable arsenal in pain physician′s armamentarium for severe, intractable pain and can be broadly classified into neuroablative and neuromodulation techniques. An array of neurolytic techniques (chemical, thermal, or surgical can be employed for ablation of individual nerve fibers, plexuses, or intrathecalneurolysis in patients with resistant pain and short life-expectancy. Neuraxial administration of drugs and spinal cord stimulation to modulate or alter the pain perception constitutes the most frequently employed neuromodulation techniques. Lately, there is a rising call for early introduction of interventional techniques in carefully selected patients simultaneously or even before starting strong opioids. After decades of empirical use, it is the need of the hour to head towards professionalism and standardization in order to secure credibility of specialization and those practicing it. Even though the interventional management has found a definite place in cancer pain, there is a dearth of evidence-based practice guidelines for interventional therapies in cancer pain. This may be because of paucity of good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating their safety and efficacy in cancer pain. Laying standardized guidelines based on existing and emerging evidence will act as a foundation step towards strengthening, credentialing, and dissemination of the specialty of interventional cancer pain management. This will also ensure an improved decision-making and quality of life (QoL of the suffering patients.

  9. Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Interventional Pain Management in Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Sushma; Gupta, Maynak

    2015-01-01

    Intractable cancer pain not amenable to standard oral or parenteral analgesics is a horrifying truth in 10-15% of patients. Interventional pain management techniques are an indispensable arsenal in pain physician's armamentarium for severe, intractable pain and can be broadly classified into neuroablative and neuromodulation techniques. An array of neurolytic techniques (chemical, thermal, or surgical) can be employed for ablation of individual nerve fibers, plexuses, or intrathecalneurolysis in patients with resistant pain and short life-expectancy. Neuraxial administration of drugs and spinal cord stimulation to modulate or alter the pain perception constitutes the most frequently employed neuromodulation techniques. Lately, there is a rising call for early introduction of interventional techniques in carefully selected patients simultaneously or even before starting strong opioids. After decades of empirical use, it is the need of the hour to head towards professionalism and standardization in order to secure credibility of specialization and those practicing it. Even though the interventional management has found a definite place in cancer pain, there is a dearth of evidence-based practice guidelines for interventional therapies in cancer pain. This may be because of paucity of good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating their safety and efficacy in cancer pain. Laying standardized guidelines based on existing and emerging evidence will act as a foundation step towards strengthening, credentialing, and dissemination of the specialty of interventional cancer pain management. This will also ensure an improved decision-making and quality of life (QoL) of the suffering patients. PMID:26009665

  10. Targeting autophagy in cancer management – strategies and developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozpolat B

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bulent Ozpolat,1 Doris M Benbrook2 1Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas – Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oklahoma HSC, Oklahoma City, OK, USA Abstract: Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process involving lysosomal degradation of intracellular components, damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and toxic aggregates, reducing oxidative stress and protecting cells from damage. The process is also induced in response to various conditions, including nutrient deprivation, metabolic stress, hypoxia, anticancer therapeutics, and radiation therapy to adapt cellular conditions for survival. Autophagy can function as a tumor suppressor mechanism in normal cells and dysregulation of this process (ie, monoallelic Beclin-1 deletion may lead to malignant transformation and carcinogenesis. In tumors, autophagy is thought to promote tumor growth and progression by helping cells to adapt and survive in metabolically-challenged and harsh tumor microenvironments (ie, hypoxia and acidity. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies in preclinical models suggested that modulation of autophagy can be used as a therapeutic modality to enhance the efficacy of conventional therapies, including chemo and radiation therapy. Currently, more than 30 clinical trials are investigating the effects of autophagy inhibition in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted agents in various cancers. In this review, we will discuss the role, molecular mechanism, and regulation of autophagy, while targeting this process as a novel therapeutic modality, in various cancers. Keywords: autophagy inhibition, chemotherapy, tumor microenvironment

  11. Multimodality management of resectable gastric cancer: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helen; Shum; Lakshmi; Rajdev

    2014-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the stomach carries a poor prognosis and is the second most common cause of cancer death worldwide. It is recommended that surgical resection with a D1 or a modified D2 gastrectomy(with at least 15 lymph nodes removed for examination), be performed in the United States, though D2 lymphadenectomies should be performed at experienced centers. A D2 lymphadenectomy is the recommended procedure in Asia. Although surgical resection is considered the definitive treatment, rates of recurrences are high, necessitating the need for neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy. This review article aims to outline and summarize some of the pivotal trials that have defined optimal treatment options for non-metastatic non-cardia gastric cancer. Some of the most notable trials include the INT-0116 trial, which established a benefit in concurrent chemoradiation and adjuvant chemotherapy. This was again confirmed in the ARTIST trial, especially in patients with nodal involvement. Later, the Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy trial provided evidence for the use of perioperative chemotherapy. Targeted agents such as ramucirumab and trastuzumab are also being investigated for use in locally advanced gastric cancers after demonstrating a benefit in the metastatic setting. Given the poor response rate of this difficult disease to various treatment modalities, numerous studies are currently ongoing in an attempt to define a more effective therapy, some of which are briefly introduced in this review as well.

  12. Use of ultrasound in the management of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, John I; Solorzano, Carmen C

    2010-01-01

    The use of ultrasound for thyroid cancer has evolved dramatically over the last few decades. Since the late 1960s, ultrasound has become essential in the examination of the thyroid gland with the increased availability of high-frequency linear array transducers and computer-enhanced imaging capabilities of modern day portable ultrasound equipment in a clinic- or office-based setting. As a noninvasive, rapid, and easily reproducible imaging study, ultrasound has been demonstrated to have a broadened utility beyond the simple confirmation of thyroid nodules and their sizes. Recently, office-based ultrasound has become an integral part of clinical practice, where it has demonstrated overwhelming benefits to patients being evaluated and treated for thyroid cancer. Ultrasound has become useful in the qualitative characterization of thyroid nodules based on benign or malignant features. On the basis of such classifications and the relative risk for thyroid malignancy, the need for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, preoperative and intraoperative staging, lymph node mapping, and the extent of surgery can subsequently be determined. Furthermore, ultrasound has additional value in the surveillance of patients treated for thyroid cancer. PMID:20215358

  13. Optimal management of cancer anorexia–cachexia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M Argilés

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Josep M Argilés, Mireia Olivan, Sílvia Busquets, Francisco Javier López-SorianoDepartament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: According to a recent consensus, cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome associated with underlying illness and characterized by loss of muscle with or without loss of fat mass. The prominent clinical feature of cachexia is weight loss. Cachexia occurs in the majority of cancer patients before death and it is responsible for the deaths of 22% of cancer patients. Although bodyweight is the most important endpoint of any cachexia treatment, body composition, physical performance and quality of life should be monitored. From the results presented here, one can speculate that a single therapy may not be completely successful in the treatment of cachexia. From this point of view, treatments involving different combinations are more likely to be successful. The objectives of any therapeutic combination are two-fold: an anticatabolic aim directed towards both fat and muscle catabolism and an anabolic objective leading to the synthesis of macromolecules such as contractile proteins.Keywords: wasting, cancer, anorexia, nutraceuticals, drugs

  14. Positron emission tomography: a new paradigm in cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is currently building a positron emission tomography facility that will house a cyclotron and a PET fusion scanner. lt should be operational as of december 2007, being a cancer dedicated national referral center, the NCI should provide both positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals and medical services to institutions and patients nationwide. PET technology provides metabolic information that has been documented to be useful in patient care. The properties of positron decay allow accurate imaging of the in vivo distribution of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. a wide array of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals has been used to characterize multiple physiologic and pathologic states. The major clinical PET applications are in cancer patients using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). FDG, an analogue of glucose, accumulates in most tumors in a greater amount than it does in normal tissue. PET is being used in diagnosis and follow-up of several malignancies, and the list of articles supporting its use continues to grow. in this article, the instrumentation aspects of PET are described and most of the clinical applications in oncology are described

  15. Value of whole-body FDG PET in management of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging provides physiologic and metabolic information that characterizes lesions that are indeterminate by CT. FDG PET imaging is sensitive to the detection of lung cancer in patients who have indeterminate lesions on CT, whereas low grade malignancy such as bronchioloalveolar carcinoma and carcinoid may be negative on FDG PET. The specificity of PET imaging is less than its sensitivity because some inflammatory processes, such as active granulomatous infections, avidly accumulate FDG. This possibility should be kept in mind in the analysis of PET studies of glucose metabolism aimed at differentiating malignant from benign solitary pulmonary nodules. FDG uptake is considered to be a good marker of cell differentiation, proliferative potential, aggressiveness, and the grade of malignancy in patients with lung cancer. FDG PET accurately stages the distribution of lung cancer. Several studies have documented the increased accuracy of PET compared with CT in the evaluation of the hilar and mediastinal lymphnode status in patients with lung cancer. Whole-body PET studies detect metastatic disease that is unsuspected by conventional imaging. Management changes have been reported in up to 41% of patients on the basis of the results of whole-body studies. Whole-body FDG PET is also useful for the detection of recurrence. Several studies have indicated that the degree of FDG uptake in primary lung cancer can be used as an independent prognostic factor. Thus, whole-body FDG PET is clinically very useful in the management of lung cancer. (author)

  16. Breast cancer diagnosis: biographical disruption, emotional experiences and strategic management in Thai women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Suwankhong, Dusanee

    2015-09-01

    In this article we draw on Bury's theory of biographical disruption to discuss the meanings of, and emotional experiences related to, being diagnosed with breast cancer among southern Thai women. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviewing and drawing methods, were used to collect data from 20 women with breast cancer. The women perceived breast cancer to be a rhok raai; an evil or dread disease. They believed that breast cancer would lead to death. The disruption in their biography occurred when they detected abnormalities indicating breast cancer. The women's narratives revealed their chaotic lives upon this diagnosis and the news precipitated in them shock, fear, anxiety and loss of hope. Although they experienced chaos and disruption, the women cultivated strategies that helped them cope with their experiences by accepting their fate and adhering to Buddhist beliefs and practices. Through their narratives of biographical disruption, the women in our study offer healthcare providers knowledge that could lead to an appreciation of their needs and concerns. This knowledge is crucial for health professionals who wish to provide emotional support to women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer in Thailand and elsewhere. PMID:25922881

  17. The relationship between pain management and psychospiritual distress in patients with advanced cancer following admission to a palliative care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ya-Ping; Wu, Chih-Hsun; Chiu, Tai-Yuan; Chen, Ching-Yu; Morita, Tatsuya; Hung, Shou-Hung; Huang, Sin-Bao; Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Tsai, Jaw-Shiun

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many cross-sectional studies have demonstrated the association between cancer pain and psychospiritual distress, the time-dependent relationship has not been fully explored. For that reason, this study aims to investigate the time-dependent relationship between psychospiritual distress and cancer pain management in advanced cancer patients. Methods This is a prospective observational study. Two hundred thirty-seven advanced cancer patients were recruited from a palliative ...

  18. A practical review of magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation and management of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of mortality in women worldwide. Staging and management of cervical cancer has for many years been based on clinical exam and basic imaging such as intravenous pyelogram and x-ray. Unfortunately, despite advances in radiotherapy and the inclusion of chemotherapy in the standard plan for locally advanced disease, local control has been unsatisfactory. This situation has changed only recently with the increasing implementation of magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. The purpose of this article is therefore to provide an overview of the benefits of MRI in the evaluation and management of cervical cancer for both external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy and to provide a practical approach if access to MRI is limited

  19. Place of isotope scans in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer. About 300 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to evaluate the contribution of isotope scanning at diagnostic dose before treatment by 131I (iodine 131) in the management of the thyroid differentiated cancer. Conclusions: the extension assessment is often better evaluated by the post therapy scanning. In lack of cerebral or pulmonary metastases suspicion with thyroglobulin 5 ng/m L, initial scanning is recommended. (N.C.)

  20. Application of microvascular free osteocutaneous flaps in the management of post-radiation recurrent oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-nine patients underwent free flap osteocutaneous reconstruction that consisted of flaps of the dorsum of the foot in 26 patients and iliac crest flaps in 33 with a success rate of 92 percent and a mortality rate of 1.6 percent. These flaps, which require the expertise of microvascular surgeons, are time-consuming and complicate operating room and time management, but they represent a remarkable advance in reconstruction that can facilitate cosmetic and functional recovery of the patient. In particular, they promote healing in radiation-recurrent oral cancer and represent a definitive form of management for established radionecrosis of the mandible. The large volume of tissue available with iliac crest osteocutaneous grafts permits the management of patients with extensive cancer involving the skin, mucosa, and bone, but cancer control may still be disappointing and there is a need for improved adjuvant chemotherapy protocols. This technique appears to be a dependable, repeatable, and significant advance in management of the patient with head and neck cancer

  1. Stress and Activity Management: Group Treatment for Cancer Patients and Spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Richard L.; Schag, Cyndie Coscarelli

    1985-01-01

    Studied 51 ambulatory patients with commonly occurring cancers and 25 of their spouses to evaluate a group stress and activity management treatment program. Found support for unique effects of the treatment intervention, but also support for improvement in psychosocial adjustment for patients and spouses with the passage of time. (Author/MCF)

  2. How Stress Management Improves Quality of Life after Treatment for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Michael H.; Lechner, Suzanne C.; Kazi, Aisha; Wimberly, Sarah R.; Sifre, Tammy; Urcuyo, Kenya R.; Phillips, Kristin; Gluck, Stefan; Carver, Charles S.

    2006-01-01

    The range of effects of psychosocial interventions on quality of life among women with breast cancer remains uncertain. Furthermore, it is unclear which components of multimodal interventions account for such effects. To address these issues, the authors tested a 10-week group cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention among 199 women…

  3. Evidence-Based Assessment in Case Management to Improve Abnormal Cancer Screen Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourlekis, Betsy; Ell, Kathleen; Padgett, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe an evidence-based assessment protocol for intensive case management to improve screening diagnostic follow-up developed through a research project in breast and cervical cancer early detection funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Three components of an evidence-based approach to assessment are presented…

  4. A pilot study on the quality of data management in a cancer clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, E. van der; Velden, J.W. van der; Siers, A.; Hamersma, E.A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Twelve institutional data managers were asked to independently code the data from a patient chart of one patient in an ovarian cancer trial. They abstracted data from the medical record and filled out three types of trial forms (on-study, chemotherapy, and summary forms). The analysis of the process

  5. Application of microvascular free osteocutaneous flaps in the management of post-radiation recurrent oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, I.B.; Manktelow, R.T.; Zuker, R.M.; Boyd, B.

    1985-10-01

    Fifty-nine patients underwent free flap osteocutaneous reconstruction that consisted of flaps of the dorsum of the foot in 26 patients and iliac crest flaps in 33 with a success rate of 92 percent and a mortality rate of 1.6 percent. These flaps, which require the expertise of microvascular surgeons, are time-consuming and complicate operating room and time management, but they represent a remarkable advance in reconstruction that can facilitate cosmetic and functional recovery of the patient. In particular, they promote healing in radiation-recurrent oral cancer and represent a definitive form of management for established radionecrosis of the mandible. The large volume of tissue available with iliac crest osteocutaneous grafts permits the management of patients with extensive cancer involving the skin, mucosa, and bone, but cancer control may still be disappointing and there is a need for improved adjuvant chemotherapy protocols. This technique appears to be a dependable, repeatable, and significant advance in management of the patient with head and neck cancer.

  6. Advances in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer with follicular cell strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Slimène, Faouzi; Mhiri, Aida; Ben Ali, Moez; Slimène, Hédia; Ben Raies, Nouzha; Karboua, Esma; Schlumberger, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The management of nodules and thyroid cancer is evolving. The aim is to individualize the treatment, decreasing aggression in the forms low risk and instead seeking new therapeutic options in advanced disease. This update shows the main recent advances in this field. PMID:27575497

  7. Prevalence, putative mechanisms, and current management of sleep problems during chemotherapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palesh O

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxana Palesh,1 Luke Peppone,2 Pasquale F Innominato,3–5 Michelle Janelsins,2 Monica Jeong,1 Lisa Sprod,7 Josee Savard,6 Max Rotatori,1 Shelli Kesler,1 Melinda Telli,1 Karen Mustian21Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA; 3INSERM, UMRS 776, Biological Rhythms and Cancers, Villejuif, France; 4Faculty of Medicine, Universite Paris Sud, le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France; 5APHP, Chronotherapy Unit, Department of Oncology, Paul Brousse Hospital, Villejuif, France; 6Laval University, Quebec, Canada; 7University of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC, USAAbstract: Sleep problems are highly prevalent in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. This article reviews existing evidence on etiology, associated symptoms, and management of sleep problems associated with chemotherapy treatment during cancer. It also discusses limitations and methodological issues of current research. The existing literature suggests that subjectively and objectively measured sleep problems are the highest during the chemotherapy phase of cancer treatments. A possibly involved mechanism reviewed here includes the rise in the circulating proinflammatory cytokines and the associated disruption in circadian rhythm in the development and maintenance of sleep dysregulation in cancer patients during chemotherapy. Various approaches to the management of sleep problems during chemotherapy are discussed with behavioral intervention showing promise. Exercise, including yoga, also appear to be effective and safe at least for subclinical levels of sleep problems in cancer patients. Numerous challenges are associated with conducting research on sleep in cancer patients during chemotherapy treatments and they are discussed in this review. Dedicated intervention trials, methodologically sound and sufficiently powered, are needed to test current and novel treatments of sleep problems in cancer patients

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Talking about Advanced Cancer Coping with Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer and Caregivers Questions ... Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer ...

  9. Pain characteristics and management of inpatients admitted to a comprehensive cancer centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, G P; Tange, U B; Farholt, H; Sonne, N M; Strömgren, A S; Ankersen, L; Kristensen, L; Bendixen, L; Grønvold, Mogens; Petersen, M A; Nordly, M; Christrup, L; Niemann, C; Sjøgren, P

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: This prospective, cross-sectional study aimed to assess cancer pain and its management in an inpatient setting at a comprehensive cancer centre in Denmark. METHODS: One hundred and eighty-eight inpatients with cancer were invited to participate (May/June 2011). Demographics, diagnoses, World...... Health Organization performance status, health-related quality of life, pain and data regarding analgesic treatment were registered. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-four (71.3%) patients agreed to participate in the study. Most frequent diagnoses were leukaemia (27.6%) and lung cancer (14.2%). A high.......5%. Adjuvant medication was sparsely used and not always correctly indicated. Out of 88 patients with pain, 62.5% were left untreated according to the Electronic Medication System. Higher health-related quality of life was associated with lower pain intensity. The use of opioids with or without adjuvants was...

  10. Multi-agent systems: effective approach for cancer care information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2013-01-01

    Physicians, in order to study the causes of cancer, detect cancer earlier, prevent or determine the effectiveness of treatment, and specify the reasons for the treatment ineffectiveness, need to access accurate, comprehensive, and timely cancer data. The cancer care environment has become more complex because of the need for coordination and communication among health care professionals with different skills in a variety of roles and the existence of large amounts of data with various formats. The goals of health care systems in such a complex environment are correct health data management, providing appropriate information needs of users to enhance the integrity and quality of health care, timely access to accurate information and reducing medical errors. These roles in new systems with use of agents efficiently perform well. Because of the potential capability of agent systems to solve complex and dynamic health problems, health care system, in order to gain full advantage of E- health, steps must be taken to make use of this technology. Multi-agent systems have effective roles in health service quality improvement especially in telemedicine, emergency situations and management of chronic diseases such as cancer. In the design and implementation of agent based systems, planning items such as information confidentiality and privacy, architecture, communication standards, ethical and legal aspects, identification opportunities and barriers should be considered. It should be noted that usage of agent systems only with a technical view is associated with many problems such as lack of user acceptance. The aim of this commentary is to survey applications, opportunities and barriers of this new artificial intelligence tool for cancer care information as an approach to improve cancer care management. PMID:24460364

  11. Potential of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics for management of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Maya; Ambalam, Padma; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Pithva, Sheetal; Kothari, Charmy; Patel, Arti T; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Dave, J M; Vyas, B R M

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and is the fourth most common malignant neoplasm in USA. Escaping apoptosis and cell mutation are the prime hallmarks of cancer. It is apparent that balancing the network between DNA damage and DNA repair is critical in preventing carcinogenesis. One-third of cancers might be prevented by nutritious healthy diet, maintaining healthy weight and physical activity. In this review, an attempt is made to abridge the role of carcinogen in colorectal cancer establishment and prognosis, where special attention has been paid to food-borne mutagens and functional role of beneficial human gut microbiome in evading cancer. Further the significance of tailor-made prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics in cancer management by bio-antimutagenic and desmutagenic activity has been elaborated. Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host. Prebiotics are a selectively fermentable non-digestible oligosaccharide or ingredient that brings specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microflora, conferring health benefits. Synbiotics are a combination of probiotic bacteria and the growth promoting prebiotic ingredients that purport "synergism." PMID:23511582

  12. Surgical management for early-stage bilateral breast cancer patients in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-jian Chen

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the current surgical management strategy for bilateral breast cancer (BBC patients and to assess the changes in this strategy in China.This is a retrospective review of all patients with early-stage BBC who underwent surgical treatment at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center between June 2007 and June 2014.A total of 15,337 patients with primary breast cancer were identified. Of these patients, 218 (1.5% suffered from synchronous bilateral breast cancer (sBBC, and 296 (2.0% suffered from metachronous bilateral breast cancer (mBBC. Patients with a lobular carcinoma component, those with estrogen receptor-positive cancer, and those with an accompanying sclerosing adenosis in the affected breast tended to develop BBC. The rates of bilateral mastectomy, breast conserving therapy, reconstruction, and combined surgeries were 86.2%, 6.4%, 3.7%, and 3.7%, respectively, for patients with sBBC and 81.1%, 4.4%, 3.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, for patients with mBBC. The interval between bilateral cancers, age at first diagnosis of breast cancer, histopathological type, and stage have significant impacts on the choice of surgery for patients with BBC.Bilateral mastectomy was the dominant surgical management for patients with BBC in China, despite the increased application of breast reconstruction surgery observed in recent years. Bilateral prosthetic breast reconstruction was the ideal choice for patients with sBBC. Chinese surgeons should take responsibility for patient education and inform their patients about their surgical options.

  13. High risk bladder cancer: current management and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Leliveld

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the pattern of care in patients with high risk non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC in the Comprehensive Cancer Center North-Netherlands (CCCN and to assess factors associated with the choice of treatment, recurrence and progression free survival rates. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 412 patients with newly diagnosed high risk NMIBC. Clinical, demographic and follow-up data were obtained from the CCCN Cancer Registry and a detailed medical record review. Uni and multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors related to choice of treatment and 5 year recurrence and progression free survival. RESULTS: 74/412 (18% patients with high risk NMIBC underwent a transurethral resection (TUR as single treatment. Adjuvant treatment after TUR was performed in 90.7% of the patients treated in teaching hospitals versus 71.8 % in non-teaching hospitals (p 80 years OR 0.1 p = 0.001 and treatment in non-teaching hospitals (OR 0.25; p < 0.001 were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. Tumor recurrence occurred in 191/392 (49% and progression in 84 /392 (21.4% patients. The mean 5-years progression free survival was 71.6% (95% CI 65.5-76.8. CONCLUSION: In this pattern of care study in high risk NMIBC, 18% of the patients were treated with TUR as single treatment. Age and treatment in non-teaching hospitals were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. None of the variables sex, age, comorbidity, hospital type, stage and year of treatment was associated with 5 year recurrence or progression rates.

  14. Breast cancer: Postoperative irradiation and management of locally advanced disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: This course will review current indications for postoperative irradiation, present a videotape demonstration of a simulation technique for comprehensive chest wall/nodal irradiation, and discuss multimodality approaches to the difficult problem of locally advanced breast cancer. As part of an expanding role for the radiation oncologist in the treatment of all stages of breast cancer, recent data has inspired a reevaluation of chest wall and nodal irradiation following mastectomy. A decade ago, adjuvant irradiation was considered by many oncologists to be of no survival advantage or perhaps even harmful. Studies leading to this conclusion will be reviewed with special attention to the inadequacies and flawed constructs which biased these studies against adjuvant chest wall/nodal irradiation. The Fischer hypothesis or 'new paradigm' will be challenged. Can improvement in local control result in improved survival? If the goal of treatment is simply to reduce local-regional recurrence, a three-field technique covering the chest wall and supraclavicular nodes may suffice. But if the goal is an improvement in survival based on the treatment of all locoregional sites which may not be sterilized by chemotherapy and mastectomy, a more complex set of fields is required. Based on this premise, we designed a 5-field technique of comprehensive chest wall and nodal irradiation. Simulation of these fields will be demonstrated on videotape. Treatment strategies for both non-inflammatory and inflammatory non-metastatic breast cancer will be presented. Current recommendations include various combinations of chemohormonotherapy, radiation therapy, and mastectomy, but controversies abound regarding the proper sequencing of these modalities, whether breast conservation therapy can be offered to patients who have a dramatic response to systemic therapy, and whether or not any one of these treatment modalities can be dropped under specific clinical scenarios

  15. Breast cancer: Postoperative irradiation and management of locally advanced disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: This course will review current indications for postoperative irradiation, present a videotape demonstration of a simulation technique for comprehensive chest wall/nodal irradiation, and discuss multimodality approaches to the difficult problem of locally advanced breast cancer. As part of an expanding role for the radiation oncologist in the treatment of all stages of breast cancer, recent data has inspired a reevaluation of chest wall and nodal irradiation following mastectomy. A decade ago, adjuvant irradiation was considered by many oncologists to be of no survival advantage or perhaps even harmful. Studies leading to this conclusion will be reviewed with special attention to the inadequacies and flawed constructs which biased these studies against adjuvant chest wall/nodal irradiation. The Fischer hypothesis or 'new paradigm' will be challenged. Can improvement in local control result in improved survival? If the goal of treatment is simply to reduce local-regional recurrence, a three-field technique covering the chest wall and supraclavicular nodes may suffice. But if the goal is an improvement in survival based on the treatment of all locoregional sites which may not be sterilized by chemotherapy and mastectomy, a more complex set of fields is required. Based on this premise, we designed a 5-field technique of comprehensive chest wall and nodal irradiation. Simulation of these fields will be demonstrated on videotape. Treatment strategies for both non-inflammatory and inflammatory non-metastatic breast cancer will be presented. Current recommendations include various combinations of chemohormonotherapy, radiation therapy, and mastectomy, but Controversies abound regarding the proper sequencing of these modalities, whether breast conservation therapy can be offered to patients who have a dramatic response to systemic therapy, and whether or not any one of these treatment modalities can be dropped under specific clinical scenarios

  16. Focal Therapy in the Management of Prostate Cancer: An Emerging Approach for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Nomura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A widespread screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA has led increased diagnosis of localized prostate cancer along with a reduction in the proportion of advanced-stage disease at diagnosis. Over the past decade, interest in focal therapy as a less morbid option for the treatment of localized low-risk prostate cancer has recently been renewed due to downward stage migration. Focal therapy stands midway between active surveillance and radical treatments, combining minimal morbidity with cancer control. Several techniques of focal therapy have potential for isolated ablation of a tumor focus with sparing of uninvolved surround tissue demonstrating excellent short-term cancer control and a favorable patient’s quality of life. However, to date, tissue ablation has mostly used for near-whole prostate gland ablation without taking advantage of accompanying the technological capabilities. The available ablative technologies include cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, and vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP. Despite the interest in focal therapy, this technology has not yet been a well-established procedure nor provided sufficient data, because of the lack of randomized trial comparing the efficacy and morbidity of the standard treatment options. In this paper we briefly summarize the recent data regarding focal therapy for prostate cancer and these new therapeutic modalities.

  17. Management of hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Neeraj; Hussain, Maha

    2013-12-01

    Targeting gonadal androgen synthesis (often in conjunction with blockade of androgen receptor) is the cornerstone of treatment of hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer (HSPC). Despite the failure of androgen deprivation therapy, most tumors maintain some dependence on androgen or androgen receptor signaling for proliferation. This article reviews the current standard of care for metastatic HSPC, mechanisms of treatment resistance, novel drugs targeting the androgen signaling pathway, biomarkers predicting response to treatment and survival, future directions, and ongoing clinical trials in HSPC. PMID:24188260

  18. Managing complications of radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients: Part I. Management of xerostomia

    OpenAIRE

    W. C. Ngeow; Chai, W. L.; Rahman, R.A.; Ramli, R

    2006-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is becoming a more recognizable pathology to the general population and dentists. The modes of treatment include surgery and/or radiation therapy. Where possible, pretreatment dental assessment shall be provided for these patients before they receive radiation therapy. There are occasions, however, whereby head and neck cancer patients are not prepared optimally for radiation therapy. Because of this, they succumb to complicated oral adverse effects after radiation therap...

  19. Ixabepilone: a new treatment option for the management of taxane-resistant metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Vallee Cobham

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Marta Vallee Cobham, Diana DonovanWeill Cornell Breast Center, Cornell University/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Ixabepilone (Ixempra®; Bristol-Myers Squibb is a novel microtubule stabilizing agent recently approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC. This article focuses on considerations for ixabepilone administration and adverse event (AE management, drawing from the biomedical literature indexed in PubMed, published abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings, and the manufacturer’s prescribing information for ixabepilone. Administered as monotherapy or in combination with capecitabine in clinical studies, ixabepilone demonstrated positive clinical response rates, prolonged progression-free survival, and a favorable safety profile in patients with MBC. Treatment-related AEs were predictable and manageable with dose modification, treatment interruption, and active management. As ixabepilone undergoes development in earlier lines of breast cancer therapy and in other solid tumors, oncology nurses will encounter more and more patients receiving ixabepilone therapy. If nurses are acquainted with the unique management strategies associated with ixabepilone treatment, as detailed herein, patients are more likely to receive the full benefit of therapy. Keywords: breast cancer, chemotherapy, microtubule-stabilizing agent, ixabepilone, adverse events, patient management 

  20. Targeting autophagy in cancer management – strategies and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process involving lysosomal degradation of intracellular components, damaged organelles, misfolded proteins, and toxic aggregates, reducing oxidative stress and protecting cells from damage. The process is also induced in response to various conditions, including nutrient deprivation, metabolic stress, hypoxia, anticancer therapeutics, and radiation therapy to adapt cellular conditions for survival. Autophagy can function as a tumor suppressor mechanism in normal cells and dysregulation of this process (ie, monoallelic Beclin-1 deletion) may lead to malignant transformation and carcinogenesis. In tumors, autophagy is thought to promote tumor growth and progression by helping cells to adapt and survive in metabolically-challenged and harsh tumor microenvironments (ie, hypoxia and acidity). Recent in vitro and in vivo studies in preclinical models suggested that modulation of autophagy can be used as a therapeutic modality to enhance the efficacy of conventional therapies, including chemo and radiation therapy. Currently, more than 30 clinical trials are investigating the effects of autophagy inhibition in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted agents in various cancers. In this review, we will discuss the role, molecular mechanism, and regulation of autophagy, while targeting this process as a novel therapeutic modality, in various cancers

  1. Pharmacogenetics in breast cancer: steps toward personalized medicine in breast cancer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Rofaiel

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarah Rofaiel1, Esther N Muo1, Shaker A Mousa1,21The Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, New York, USA; 2King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: There is wide individual variability in the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerance to anticancer drugs within the same ethnic group and even greater variability among different ethnicities. Pharmacogenomics (PG has the potential to provide personalized therapy based on individual genetic variability in an effort to maximize efficacy and reduce adverse effects. The benefits of PG include improved therapeutic index, improved dose regimen, and selection of optimal types of drug for an individual or set of individuals. Advanced or metastatic breast cancer is typically treated with single or multiple combinations of chemotherapy regimens including anthracyclines, taxanes, antimetabolites, alkylating agents, platinum drugs, vinca alkaloids, and others. In this review, the PG of breast cancer therapeutics, including tamoxifen, which is the most widely used therapeutic for the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer, is reviewed. The pharmacological activity of tamoxifen depends on its conversion by cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6 to its abundant active metabolite, endoxifen. Patients with reduced CYP2D6 activity, as a result of either their genotype or induction by the coadministration of other drugs that inhibit CYP2D6 function, produce little endoxifen and hence derive limited therapeutic benefit from tamoxifen; the same can be said about the different classes of therapeutics in breast cancer. PG studies of breast cancer therapeutics should provide patients with breast cancer with optimal and personalized therapy.Keywords: pharmacogenomics, genetic, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, personalized medicine, pharmacotherapy, anticancer drugs, efficacy, safety

  2. Advances in Diagnosis and Management of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenberg, S. Larry

    1990-01-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate accounts for 17% of malignancies in men. Great strides have been made in the understanding of the biology and natural history of this disease. It is clear that earlier diagnosis of the clinical carcinoma will improve overall disease-specific survival rates. The author reviews the diagnostic techniques and advances in management of localized and metastatic disease.

  3. Implementing Case Management in New York State’s Partnerships for Publicly Funded Breast Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia P. Lillquist, PhD, MSW

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThis research aimed to explore differences in the implementation of case management among local breast cancer screening partnerships in New York State after changes in federal public policy in 1998 and to achieve a better understanding of case management in a new and distinct practice setting. Capacity and willingness to implement change were theorized to explain local differences in implementation. Local breast cancer screening programs that received federal funding through the New York State Department of Health were invited to participate in the study.MethodsA mail survey was administered to the directors of New York’s 53 local breast cancer screening partnerships in 2003. The survey included questions about willingness and capacity to implement case management and a scale to assess case management program philosophy. Factor analysis and correlations were used to compare willingness and capacity with differences in implementation.ResultsTwo common factors — task focus and self-identity focus — were identified as factors that differentiated case management programs. Task-focus partnerships undertook a broader range of tasks but were less likely to report autonomy in making program changes. Self-identity partnerships were less likely to report difficulties with other agencies and scored highly on innovation, involvement in work, and interest in client service. Having a nurse as the case manager, being aware of the standards of case management, and providing health education were associated with both task focus and self-identity focus.ConclusionThe study identified distinct styles of implementation. These styles have implications for the breadth of services provided, such as whether client-level services only are offered. Interagency coordination was facilitated in partnerships with comprehensive case management.

  4. Cancer management: the difficulties of a target-driven healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Beverley

    2016-05-12

    This article gives a reflective overview on cancer management from a urological perspective. It is based on anecdotal evidence and observations of local practice, and highlights some of the inherent difficulties of delivering a robust service in a target-driven healthcare system. Cancer is a complex disease. It is crucial that stringent measures are used to ensure those affected by it receive care that is of the highest quality, delivered in a timely manner, and tailored to meet the individual's needs. In 2000, the Government's attempt to increase competition among healthcare providers in the delivery of care, and thereby healthcare quality and efficiency, resulted in a number of healthcare reforms being introduced in the UK. Central to these were the NHS Cancer Waiting Time standards, which were designed to fast-track care delivery in the management of cancer patients. The multidisciplinary teams play a pivotal role in this process and their contribution is imperative to achieving the desired outcomes. It is acknowledged that targets can be beneficial, but there are clear unintended consequences as well. Increases in urgent referrals result in significant screening demands and, consequently, newly diagnosed cancers. This, combined with factors such as patient choice and costs, put added pressure on NHS establishments and health professionals to deliver care within the target specifications. PMID:27172506

  5. Usefulness of 18FDG PET in the management of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical carcinoma is the second most common gynaecological cancer worldwide. Despite substantial advances in screening the pre-invasive forms, the management of women suffering from invasive cervical carcinomas remains problematic. In pre-treatment staging, the evaluation of the loco-regional and distant extent of the disease, according to the international federation of gynecology and obstetrics, has shown to be sub-optimal. After treatment, the routine surveillance protocol, based on a physical examination at the control visits and clinically oriented conventional imaging procedures, most often fails to accurately detect a recurrent disease. Its sensitivity is particularly low for asymptomatic women. On the other hand, the clinical value of positron emission tomography using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in the field of oncology is nowadays firmly established. In many tumour types, including the gynaecological cancers such as breast cancer and ovarian cancer, the metabolic imaging has proved to play a determinant role in both the pre-treatment and post-treatment evaluation. In the present review-article, we analyse in the light of the literature data and our experience, the potential contribution of positron emission tomography using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in the management of cervical cancer. (authors)

  6. Management of cancer pain with transdermal fentanyl: phase IV trial, University of Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maves, T J; Barcellos, W A

    1992-04-01

    A multicenter study was conducted to determine the patient and physician acceptability of transdermal fentanyl in the management of cancer-related pain. In this study, 10 cancer patients at the University of Iowa received transdermal fentanyl after discontinuing their prior opioid analgesic; 7 patients completed questionnaires before and at 2 and 4 wk following transdermal fentanyl application. There was no significant difference in visual analogue scale scores for pain or mood. Verbal pain descriptor scores improved at 2 wk (P less than .05). There was a nonsignificant tendency toward increased depression and nausea; however, patients spent less time thinking about their illness and felt their cancer was less disruptive to their closest friends/relatives. Constipation, appetite, drowsiness, and concentration were not statistically different. Patients reported improved sleep habits at 2 wk (P less than .05) and tended to require less help with eating, dressing, washing, and using the bathroom. All patients completing the study chose to continue transdermal fentanyl for their cancer pain management. In summary, these data demonstrate the analgesic efficacy of the transdermal fentanyl system and suggest that some patients with cancer-related pain could benefit from its use. PMID:1517636

  7. Cancer of the Uterus (Endometrial Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Cancer of the Uterus [Endometrial Cancer] Home For Patients Search FAQs Cancer of the ... Uterus [Endometrial Cancer] FAQ097, May 2011 PDF Format Cancer of the Uterus [Endometrial Cancer] Gynecologic Problems What ...

  8. Estimation and management of risk for lung cancer induced by radon progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation and management of risk for lung cancer induced by radon progeny. Radon is a radioactive gas released form soils and materials containing radium. Once inhaled in the respiratory tract, its decay products irradiate the tissues and provoke a risk of cancer. The estimation of this risk is carried out through an epidemiologic or a dosimetric approach. The former uses data on the mortality of miners who were exposed to radon. Then the results are extrapolated to the general population. More recently, some studies tried to estimate the risk directly on the general population. The latter approach tries to compute the rate of conversion between the radon concentration in the indoor environment and the dose absorbed by the respiratory tract. The risk of cancer is estimated through a coefficient which has been inferred from studies on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors. The risk management requires the definition of general principles and of a set of recommendations. In the past, the ICRP stated that risks provoked by natural sources of irradiation should not be taken into consideration. Since 1984, it has changed its mind and limits of acceptability concerning radon concentration in dwellings have been defined. We should stress that the cancer risk estimations are tainted by uncertainties. 'Experts judgements' play an important part. On the other hand, 'value judgements' are essential in the field of risk management. Obviously, it is a problem which has a trans-disciplinary character and which rises the question of the relationship between science and society. (authors)

  9. Recent insights in the therapeutic management of patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mestier, Louis; Lardière-Deguelte, Sophie; Volet, Julien; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bouché, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer remains frequent and one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. In this article, we aimed to comprehensively review recent insights in the therapeutic management of gastric cancer, with focus on the surgical and perioperative management of resectable forms, and the latest advances regarding advanced diseases. Surgical improvements comprise the use of laparoscopic surgery including staging laparoscopy, a better definition of nodal dissection, and the development of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. The best individualized perioperative management should be assessed before curative-intent surgery for all patients and can consists in perioperative chemotherapy, adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy or adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The optimal timing and sequence of chemotherapy and radiation therapy with respect to surgery should be further explored. Patients with advanced gastric cancer have a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, they can benefit from doublet or triplet chemotherapy combination, including trastuzumab in HER2-positive patients. Upon progression, second-line therapy can be considered in patients with good performance status. Although anti-HER2 (trastuzumab) and anti-VEGFR (ramucirumab) may yield survival benefit, anti-EGFR and anti-HGFR therapies have failed to improve outcomes. Nevertheless, combination regimens containing cytotoxic drugs and targeted therapies should be further evaluated; keeping in mind that gastric cancer biology is different between Asia and the Western countries. PMID:27156069

  10. State of the art management of metastatic gastroesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Adrian G; Lynch, David; Kelly, Ronan J

    2015-09-01

    The anatomical locations of upper gastrointestinal (GI) tumors have changed remarkably in the western world and reflect the increasing impact of obesity and gastroesophageal (GE) reflux rather than infectious etiologies. Incidence rates of GE tumors are rising rapidly and survival rates for patients with metastatic disease remain poor. Traditionally, cytotoxic chemotherapy has had some survival advantages but increasingly complex combination regimens are limited by toxicities. The advent of molecularly targeted therapy has provided additional options for patients with advanced disease including trastuzumab and ramucirumab. There has also been detailed molecular characterization of upper GI tumors which hopefully will result in improved tailoring of clinical trial design accounting for the heterogeneity inherent in GE tumors. While numerous targeted therapies are currently being studied in clinical trials, there is much excitement regarding the role of immunotherapy in GE cancers. Although further investigation is warranted, it represents a promising avenue for patients with advanced GE tumors. PMID:26539453

  11. Predictive Modeling: A New Paradigm for Managing Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendifallah, Sofiane; Daraï, Emile; Ballester, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    With the abundance of new options in diagnostic and treatment modalities, a shift in the medical decision process for endometrial cancer (EC) has been observed. The emergence of individualized medicine and the increasing complexity of available medical data has lead to the development of several prediction models. In EC, those clinical models (algorithms, nomograms, and risk scoring systems) have been reported, especially for stratifying and subgrouping patients, with various unanswered questions regarding such things as the optimal surgical staging for lymph node metastasis as well as the assessment of recurrence and survival outcomes. In this review, we highlight existing prognostic and predictive models in EC, with a specific focus on their clinical applicability. We also discuss the methodologic aspects of the development of such predictive models and the steps that are required to integrate these tools into clinical decision making. In the future, the emerging field of molecular or biochemical markers research may substantially improve predictive and treatment approaches. PMID:26577116

  12. Contemporary management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall’Era, Marc A; Cheng, Liang; Pan, Chong-Xian

    2012-01-01

    The current standard treatment for muscle-invasive nonmetastatic bladder cancer is neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy. However, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is not widely accepted even with level 1 evidence. Adjuvant chemotherapy should be discussed if patients have not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery and have high-risk pathologic features. Although not considered standard of care, bladder-sparing therapy can be considered for highly selected patients and for those medically unfit for surgery. Even though there are no level 1 data, the treatment outcomes for highly select patients given bladder-sparing therapy appear promising, with many patients retaining a functional bladder. Personalized chemotherapy is currently being actively pursued to target the underlying molecular changes and tailor to individual needs. PMID:22845409

  13. Postoperative axillary lymphoscintigraphy in the management of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, P.; Fruhling, J.; Henry, J.

    1983-01-01

    Postoperative axillary lymphoscintigrams have been performed according to a technique of two-staged injection in 313 patients who had undergone a radical mastectomy with axillary dissection for breast cancer. Total absence of visualization of residual nodes suggests that dissection could be said to be complete in only 35.8% of the investigated patients, or because of metastatic disease causing blockage. The visualized residual nodes in patients represent a risk of developing nodal relapse, especially with positive pathological demonstration of axillary node invasion and without nodal irradiation. On the other hand, when the investigation showed the interruption of the lymphatic pathways of the arm, patients developed upper limb edemas more frequently. It is concluded that this simple and non traumatic technique is of value in order to assess the immediate postoperative axillary nodal status, and that it may influence the treatment of the patients.

  14. Postoperative axillary lymphoscintigraphy in the management of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postoperative axillary lymphoscintigrams have been performed according to a technique of two-staged injection in 313 patients who had undergone a radical mastectomy with axillary dissection for breast cancer. Total absence of visualization of residual nodes suggests that dissection could be said to be complete in only 35.8% of the investigated patients, or because of metastatic disease causing blockage. The visualized residual nodes in patients represent a risk of developing nodal relapse, especially with positive pathological demonstration of axillary node invasion and without nodal irradiation. On the other hand, when the investigation showed the interruption of the lymphatic pathways of the arm, patients developed upper limb edemas more frequently. It is concluded that this simple and non traumatic technique is of value in order to assess the immediate postoperative axillary nodal status, and that it may influence the treatment of the patients

  15. Role of vandetanib in the management of medullary thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rondeau G

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Maryse Brassard1*, Geneviève Rondeau2* 1Endocrinology Service, Department of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Affilié (CHA, Laval University, Quebec, Canada; 2Endocrinology Service, Department of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada*Both authors contributed equally to this articleAbstract: Traditionally available treatments, like cytotoxic chemotherapy and external-beam radiation therapy, are limited and essentially ineffective for metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC. In the last decade, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI have been introduced in the field of thyroid cancer, after having been shown effective in a wide variety of other tumors. This review focuses on vandetanib (ZD6474, ZactimaTM; AstraZeneca and its role in the treatment of MTC. Vandetanib is an oral TKI that targets VEGF receptors 2 and 3, RET, and at higher concentrations, the epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor. This drug has been tested in two important phase II studies which demonstrated that both the 100 and 300 mg/day dosage of vandetanib have antitumor activity on advanced MTC. A phase III trial (ZETA trial evaluating vandetanib in 331 patients with locally advanced or metastatic MTC showed a significant prolongation of PFS for patients receiving vandetanib compared with placebo. Toxicity surveillance in all studies reported high rates of adverse effects with diarrhea, rash, fatigue and nausea being the most commonly experienced by patients. Vandetanib is currently approved in the United States for unresectable locally advanced or metastatic MTC and has become a new standard of care in this rare and indolent pathology.Keywords: vandetanib, medullary thyroid cancer, RET mutation, VEFGR

  16. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Symptom Management in Cancer Palliative Care: Systematic Review And Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Vincent C H; Wu, Xinyin; Lu, Ping; Hui, Edwin P; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Anthony L; Lau, Alexander Y L; Zhao, Junkai; Fan, Min; Ziea, Eric T C; Ng, Bacon F L; Wong, Samuel Y S; Wu, Justin C Y

    2016-02-01

    Use of Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) in symptom management for cancer palliative care is very common in Chinese populations but clinical evidence on their effectiveness is yet to be synthesized.To conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis to summarize results from CHM randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on symptoms that are undertreated in conventional cancer palliative care.Five international and 3 Chinese databases were searched. RCTs evaluating CHM, either in combination with conventional treatments or used alone, in managing cancer-related symptoms were considered eligible. Effectiveness was quantified by using weighted mean difference (WMD) using random effect model meta-analysis.Fourteen RCTs were included. Compared with conventional intervention alone, meta-analysis showed that combined CHM and conventional treatment significantly reduced pain (3 studies, pooled WMD: -0.90, 95% CI: -1.69 to -0.11). Six trials comparing CHM with conventional medications demonstrated similar effect in reducing constipation. One RCT showed significant positive effect of CHM plus chemotherapy for managing fatigue, but not in the remaining 3 RCTs. The additional use of CHM to chemotherapy does not improve anorexia when compared to chemotherapy alone, but the result was concluded from 2 small trials only. Adverse events were infrequent and mild.CHM may be considered as an add-on to conventional care in the management of pain in cancer patients. CHM could also be considered as an alternative to conventional care for reducing constipation. Evidence on the use of CHM for treating anorexia and fatigue in cancer patients is uncertain, warranting further research. PMID:26886628

  17. The total hospital and community UK costs of managing patients with relapsed breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R J; Williams, M; Marshall, C; Glen, J; Callam, M

    2009-02-24

    The complete hospital and community records of 77 women were randomly selected from 232 women who had relapsed breast cancer between 2000 and 2005. Scrutiny of all management activities revealed a total cost of 1,939,329 pound sterling (mean per patient of 25,186 pound sterling , 95% CI 13,705 pound sterling-33,821 pound sterling ). The median survival from time of relapse was 40.07 months and the median total cost per patient was 31 402.62 pound sterling . Including the community cost of a relapse provides a more realistic figure for future cost-effectiveness analysis of adjuvant breast cancer therapies. PMID:19223909

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Hospital-based Case Management in Cancer Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Christian N; Vedsted, Peter; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case management (CM) models based on experienced nurses are increasingly used to improve coordination and continuity of care for patients with complex health care needs. Anyway, little is known about the effects of hospital-based CM in cancer care.Aim.To analyse the effects of hospital......-based CM on (i) GPs' evaluation of information from the hospital and collaboration with the hospital staff and (ii) patients' contacts with GPs during daytime and out of hours. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial allocated 280 colorectal cancer patients 1:1 to either a control group or CM intervention...

  19. Application of biomarkers in cancer risk management: evaluation from stochastic clonal evolutionary and dynamic system optimization points of view.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Li

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aside from primary prevention, early detection remains the most effective way to decrease mortality associated with the majority of solid cancers. Previous cancer screening models are largely based on classification of at-risk populations into three conceptually defined groups (normal, cancer without symptoms, and cancer with symptoms. Unfortunately, this approach has achieved limited successes in reducing cancer mortality. With advances in molecular biology and genomic technologies, many candidate somatic genetic and epigenetic "biomarkers" have been identified as potential predictors of cancer risk. However, none have yet been validated as robust predictors of progression to cancer or shown to reduce cancer mortality. In this Perspective, we first define the necessary and sufficient conditions for precise prediction of future cancer development and early cancer detection within a simple physical model framework. We then evaluate cancer risk prediction and early detection from a dynamic clonal evolution point of view, examining the implications of dynamic clonal evolution of biomarkers and the application of clonal evolution for cancer risk management in clinical practice. Finally, we propose a framework to guide future collaborative research between mathematical modelers and biomarker researchers to design studies to investigate and model dynamic clonal evolution. This approach will allow optimization of available resources for cancer control and intervention timing based on molecular biomarkers in predicting cancer among various risk subsets that dynamically evolve over time.

  20. Comparative study of laparoscopic vs open gastrectomy in gastric cancer management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe S Sica; Edoardo Iaculli; Livia Biancone; Sara Di Carlo; Rosa Scaramuzzo; Cristina Fiorani; Paolo Gentileschi; Achille L Gaspari

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To compare long-term results of gastric cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic and open gastrectomy in a single unit.METHODS: From February 2000 to September 2004, all patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were assessed to entry in this longitudinal prospective non-randomized trial. Primary endpoint was cancer-related survival and secondary endpoints were overall survival, evaluation of surgical complications and mortality.RESULTS: Fifty-eight patients were enrolled. Forty-seven patients were followed-up (range 11-103, median 38 mo). Four patients were lost at follow up. Twenty-two patients underwent a laparoscopic gastric surgery (LGS) and 25 had a standard open procedure (OGS). No statistical difference was found between the two groups in terms of 5 years cancer-related mortality rate (50% vs 52%, P = 1), and 5 years overall mortality rate (54.5% vs 56%, P = 1). Accordingly, cancer-related and overall survival probability by Kaplan-Meier method showed comparable results (P = 0.81 and P = 0.83, respectively). We found no differences in surgical complications in the 2 groups. There was no conversion to open surgery in this series.CONCLUSION: LGS is as effective as OGS in the management of advanced gastric cancer. However LGS cannot be recommended routinely over OGS for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer.

  1. Guide to clinical PET in oncology: Improving clinical management of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    information on clinical PET in oncology for nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists and clinical practitioners. Possible ideas for cost effectiveness of clinical PET in oncology are mentioned. The information is also intended to be useful in decision making to improve clinical management of cancer patients when allocating resources dedicated to the health care system. This is a critical issue that is important for the development of both clinical oncology and nuclear medicine in IAEA member states. The IAEA can be instrumental in the advancement of programmes which focus on the IAEA's coordinated research projects and technical cooperation project

  2. Economic evaluation of monoclonal antibody in the management of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezat SW

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to determine the cost of colorectal cancer (CRC management and compare the cost effectiveness of cetuximab and bevacizumab in the management of CRC. Method: This economic evaluation study from a societal perspective involves collecting resource utilization data based on the clinical pathway of colorectal cancer management. The cost calculated includes drugs, human resources, administrative, investigations as well as capital cost. Patient’s cost was also calculated based on an interview with colorectal cancer patients. Effectiveness estimates for monoclonal antibody (cetuximab and bevacizumab treatment were modeled from study respondents based on references from other studies. Results: Cost of treating a case of colorectal cancer in stage I is RM13,623 (RM12,467-RM14,777, stage II RM19,753 (RM16,734-RM23,520, stage III RM24,972 (RM20,291-RM29,654 and stage IV RM27, 163 (RM23, 192-RM31,133. Cost of CRC management increase with the increasing stage of the disease (Kruskal Wallis, X2=106, p<0.001. Based on estimates of 2671 new cases of CRC, the incremental cost of cetuximab is RM20, 556 480 and bevacizumab is RM7,557,953 at 50% stage III and IV as compared to the conventional chemotherapy. The incremental cost per quality adjusted life years gained for cetuximab is RM38,869 and RM14,290 for bevacizumab. Although both types of monoclonal antibody are considered cost effective (based on WHO guidelines of less than three times of GDP, bevacizumab is considered more cost effective than cetuximab. Cost effectiveness was sensitive to the percentage of late stages of CRC. Conclusions: Cost of treating late stage of CRC is high and bevacizumab are more cost effective compared to cetuximab in the management of the late stage of CRC.

  3. Current trends in initial management of laryngeal cancer: the declining use of open surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Carl E; Beitler, Jonathan J; Shaha, Ashok R; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2009-09-01

    The role of open surgery for management of laryngeal cancer has been greatly diminished during the past decade. The development of transoral endoscopic laser microsurgery (TLS), improvements in delivery of radiation therapy (RT) and the advent of multimodality protocols, particularly concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) have supplanted the previously standard techniques of open partial laryngectomy for early cancer and total laryngectomy followed by adjuvant RT for advanced cancer. A review of the recent literature revealed virtually no new reports of conventional conservation surgery as initial treatment for early stage glottic and supraglottic cancer. TLS and RT, with or without laser surgery or CCRT, have become the standard initial treatments for T1, T2 and selected T3 laryngeal cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) may have an emerging role in the treatment of early laryngeal cancer. Anterior commissure involvement presents particular difficulties in application of TLS, although no definitive conclusions have been reached with regard to optimal treatment of these lesions. Results of TLS are equivalent to those obtained by conventional conservation surgery, with considerably less morbidity, less hospital time and better postoperative function. Oncologic results of TLS and RT are equivalent for glottic cancer, but with better voice results for RT in patients who require more extensive cordectomy. The preferred treatment for early supraglottic cancer, particularly for bulkier or T3 lesions is TLS, with or without postoperative RT. The Veterans Administration Study published in 1991 established the fact that the response to neoadjuvant CT predicts the response of a tumor to RT. Patients with advanced tumors that responded either partially or completely to CT were treated with RT, and total laryngectomy was reserved for non-responders. This resulted in the ability to preserve the larynx in a significant number of patients with locally advanced laryngeal cancer, while

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance Directives ... Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance Directives ...

  5. Morphine and oxycodone in the management of cancer pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphine and oxycodone were administered to ten patients suffering from severe cancer pain in a double-blind cross-over study. The patients titrated themselves pain-free, first intravenously, using a patient-controlled analgesia device, and then orally. Each titration phase lasted for 48 hours. Blood samples were drawn after 36 hr of each administration phase. The plasma levels of morphine, morphine-6- and morphine-3 glucuronides were determined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), whereas the oxycodone samples were assayed with gas chromatography (GC). Twin samples were analyzed for plasma opioid activity with a radioreceptor assay (RRA) using 3H-dihydromorphien and 3H-naloxone as radioligands. Adequate analgesia was achieved with both morphine and oxycodone. About 30% more oxycodone was needed intravenously, whereas 25% less oxycodone than morphine was consumed orally. There was a good linear correlation between the morphine concentrations measured with HPLC and RRA. The mean morphine-6-glucuronide to morphine concentration ratio was 2.3 after intravenous and 4.6 after oral administration. Results from RRA indicate that oxycodone in vivo is a potent μ-agonist and that a least part of its analgesic action is mediated by active metabolites. In vitro morphine glucuronides enhanced morphine in displacing radioligands from the opioid receptors, thus suggesting their complex interactions in vivo. (author)

  6. Radiotherapy in the management of cervical cancer in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred and fourteen elderly patients (median 75.5 years, range 70.0-85.9) consecutively referred for curative radiotherapy in the period 1987-1996 were prospectively followed with regard to tumour control and complications. The importance of age, stage (FIGO), tumour size, histology, tumour fixation, haemoglobin, concurrent disease, performance status (WHO) and type of radiotherapy were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Treatment was completed as planned in 68%, delayed in 29% and stopped prematurely in 3%. The frequency of grade 3 late complications was 11% and the actuarial probability at 5 years was 20%. Overall 5-year survival according to FIGO was 61% (I), 34% (II) and 25% (III). Cox multivariate analysis identified tumour size as independent prognostic factor for tumour control, disease-free survival and overall survival. FIGO stage was predictive for late grade 2 complications. We were unable to identify significant factors with respect to grade 3 complications. Age was not a significant parameter for any of the investigated endpoints. Elderly patients in good performance status with advanced cancer of the uterine may tolerate radical radiotherapy with acceptable morbidity and reasonable survival. Radiotherapy may also be a good alternative in early stage disease for surgically unfit elderly patients. (author)

  7. Emerging intravesical therapies for management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Tomaszewski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey J Tomaszewski, Marc C SmaldoneDepartment of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is the second most common urologic malignancy, and 70% of patients present with superficial or nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG is the most effective agent for preventing disease recurrence, and the only therapy able to inhibit disease progression. However, recurrence rates as high as 30% and significant local and systemic toxicity have led to increased interest in alternative intravesical therapies. In patients refractory or intolerant to BCG, BCG-interferon α2b, gemcitabine, and anthracyclines (doxorubicin, epirubicin, valrubicin have demonstrated durable clinical responses. Phase I trials investigating alternative cytotoxic agents, such as apaziquone, taxanes (docetaxel, paclitaxel, and suramin are reporting promising data. Novel immunomodulating agents have demonstrated promise as efficacious alternatives in patients refractory to BCG. Optimization of existing chemotherapeutic regimens using hyperthermia, photodynamic therapy, magnetically-targeted carriers, and liposomes remains an area of active investigation. Despite enthusiasm for new intravesical agents, radical cystectomy remains the treatment of choice for patients with NMIBC who have failed intravesical therapy and selected patients with naïve T1 tumors and aggressive features. This report provides a comprehensive review of contemporary intravesical therapy for NMIBC and refractory NMIBC, with an emphasis on emerging agents and novel treatment modalities.Keywords: transitional cell carcinoma, nonmuscle, invasive, intravesical therapy, BCG

  8. Locoregional Treatment Outcomes After Multimodality Management of Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine outcomes for patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) treated with multimodality therapy, to identify factors associated with locoregional recurrence, and to determine which patients may benefit from radiation dose escalation. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 256 consecutive patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated at our institution between 1977 and 2004. Results: The 192 patients who were able to complete the planned course of chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation had significantly better outcomes than the 64 patients who did not. The respective 5-year outcome rates were: locoregional control (84% vs. 51%), distant metastasis-free survival (47% vs. 20%), and overall survival (51% vs. 24%) (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Univariate factors significantly associated with locoregional control in the patients who completed plan treatment were response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgical margin status, number of involved lymph nodes, and use of taxanes. Increasing the total chest-wall dose of postmastectomy radiation from 60 Gy to 66 Gy significantly improved locoregional control for patients who experienced less than a partial response to chemotherapy, patients with positive, close, or unknown margins, and patients <45 years of age. Conclusions: Patients with IBC who are able to complete treatment with chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation have a high probability of locoregional control. Escalation of postmastectomy radiation dose to 66 Gy appears to benefit patients with disease that responds poorly to chemotherapy, those with positive, close, or unknown margin status, and those <45 years of age

  9. Management of Inflammatory Breast Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the benefit of breast surgery for inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). Methods and Materials: This retrospective series was based on 232 patients treated for IBC. All patients received primary chemotherapy followed by either exclusive radiotherapy (118 patients; 51%) or surgery with or without radiotherapy (114 patients; 49%). The median follow-up was 11 years. Results: The two groups were comparable apart from fewer tumors <70 mm (43% vs. 33%, p = 0.003), a higher rate of clinical stage N2 (15% vs. 5%, p = 0.04), and fewer histopathologic Grade 3 tumors (46% vs. 61%, p <0.05) in the no-surgery group. The addition of surgery was associated with a significant improvement in locoregional disease control (p = 0.04) at 10 years locoregional free interval 78% vs. 59% but with no significant difference in overall survival rates or disease-free intervals. Late toxicities were not significantly different between the two treatment groups except for a higher rate of fibrosis in the no-surgery group (p <0.0001) and more lymphedema in the surgery group (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Our data suggest an improvement in locoregional control in patients treated by surgery, in conjunction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, for IBC. Efforts must be made to improve overall survival.

  10. Vulvar cancer: initial management and systematic review of literature on currently applied treatment approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznurkowski, Jacek Jan

    2016-07-01

    This review provides guidelines and aims to estimate utilisation rates of treatment modalities applied in vulvar cancer. Current standards of treatment are as follows: wide local excision instead of radical vulvectomy in the case of small tumour (T cancer', 'treatment' identified seven full-text manuscripts, including data on 1114 patients. Utilisation rates of neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy, chemotherapy alone, surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy and adjuvant radiochemotherapy were 5.9%, 0.3%, 89.3%, 22.6% and 0.2% respectively. An evidence-based estimation of appropriate rates of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy for vulvar cancer is needed to compare management reflecting guidelines with presented here real frequency of applied modalities. PMID:26880231

  11. Mullerian duct anomalies and their effect on the radiotherapeutic management of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Gupta

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy plays a major role in the treatment of cervical cancer. A successful radiotherapy program integrates both external beam and brachytherapy components. The principles of radiotherapy are strongly based on the anatomy of the organ and patterns of local and nodal spread. However, in patients with distorted anatomy, several practical issues arise in the delivery of optimal radiotherapy, especially with brachytherapy. Mullerian duct anomalies result in congenital malformations of the female genital tract. Though being very commonly studied for their deleterious effects on fertility and pregnancy, they have not been recognized for their potential to interfere with the delivery of radiotherapy among patients with cervical cancer. Here, we discuss the management of cervical cancer among patients with Mullerian duct anomalies and review the very sparse amount of published literature on this topic.

  12. Hypnosis for the management of chronic and cancer procedure-related pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé-Pires, Catarina; Miró, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review published controlled trials of hypnotic treatments for chronic and cancer procedure-related pain in children. Trials were included if participants were 18 years of age or below, were randomized and had populations with chronic pain or cancer procedure-related pain. After the studies were assessed, 12 were selected for review. Although the evidence is limited, the findings indicate that hypnosis is an effective pain-control technique when used with children suffering from cancer procedure-related pain or chronic pain. Further research into the use of hypnosis to manage chronic pain in children should be a priority so that empirically based conclusions can be drawn about the effects of hypnosis on children. PMID:22917107

  13. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin: appraisal of its current role in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markman M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Maurie MarkmanCancer Treatment Centers of America, Eastern Regional Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD has become a major component in the routine management of epithelial ovarian cancer. The drug is frequently employed as a single agent in the platinum-resistant setting, and recently reported data reveal the superiority of the combination of PLD plus carboplatin, compared with the platinum drug plus paclitaxel, in delaying the time to disease progression in women with recurrent (potentially platinum-sensitive disease. Current research efforts involving PLD in ovarian cancer are focusing on adding novel targeted drugs to this cytotoxic agent. The utility of such approaches in the platinum-resistant population, compared with the sequential administration of single agents active in this setting, remains to be determined.Keywords: PLD, carboplatin, paclitaxel, platinum-sensitive, platinum-resistant

  14. Müllerian duct anomalies and their effect on the radiotherapeutic management of cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madhup Rastogi; Swaroop Revannasiddaiah; Pragyat Thakur; Priyanka Thakur; Manish Gupta; Manoj K Gupta; Rajeev K Seam

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays a major role in the treatment of cervical cancer.A successful radiotherapy program integrates both external beam and brachytherapy components.The principles of radiotherapy are strongly based on the anatomy of the organ and patterns of local and nodal spread.However,in patients with distorted anatomy,several practical issues arise in the delivery of optimal radiotherapy,especially with brachytherapy.Müllerian duct anomalies result in congenital malformations of the female genital tract.Though being very commonly studied for their deleterious effects on fertility and pregnancy,they have not been recognized for their potential to interfere with the delivery of radiotherapy among patients with cervical cancer.Here,we discuss the management of cervical cancer among patients with Müllerian duct anomalies and review the very sparse amount of published literature on this topic.

  15. The prevention, detection and management of cancer treatment-induced cardiotoxicity: a meta-review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The benefits associated with some cancer treatments do not come without risk. A serious side effect of some common cancer treatments is cardiotoxicity. Increased recognition of the public health implications of cancer treatment-induced cardiotoxicity has resulted in a proliferation of systematic reviews in this field to guide practice. Quality appraisal of these reviews is likely to limit the influence of biased conclusions from systematic reviews that have used poor methodology related to clinical decision-making. The aim of this meta-review is to appraise and synthesise evidence from only high quality systematic reviews focused on the prevention, detection or management of cancer treatment-induced cardiotoxicity. Using Cochrane methodology, we searched databases, citations and hand-searched bibliographies. Two reviewers independently appraised reviews and extracted findings. A total of 18 high quality systematic reviews were subsequently analysed, 67 % (n = 12) of these comprised meta-analyses. One systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence regarding the utility of cardiac biomarkers for the detection of cardiotoxicity. The following strategies might reduce the risk of cardiotoxicity: 1) The concomitant administration of dexrazoxane with anthracylines; 2) The avoidance of anthracyclines where possible; 3) The continuous administration of anthracyclines (>6 h) rather than bolus dosing; and 4) The administration of anthracycline derivatives such as epirubicin or liposomal-encapsulated doxorubicin instead of doxorubicin. In terms of management, one review focused on medical interventions for treating anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity during or after treatment of childhood cancer. Neither intervention (enalapril and phosphocreatine) was associated with statistically significant improvement in ejection fraction or mortality. This review highlights the lack of high level evidence to guide clinical decision-making with respect to the detection

  16. Estrogens and Prostate Cancer: Etiology, Mediators, Prevention, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shuk-Mei; Lee, Ming-tsung; Lam, Hung-Ming; Leung, Yuet-Kin

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between hormones and the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (PCa) has been studied extensively. All the mainstay targets for hormonal PCa therapies are based on negating androgen action. Recent epidemiologic and experimental data have clearly pinpointed the key roles of estrogens in PCa development and progression. Racial and geographical differences, as well as age-associated changes, in estrogen synthesis and metabolism contribute significantly to the etiology by increasing the ratio of circulating estrogen to androgen, sex hormone binding globulin synthesis, and aromatase activity and reducing androgen glucuronidation and tissue bioactivation. Promotion of aberrant cell growth, evasion of apoptosis, increased oxidative stress and inflammation, and gains in adiposity and bioactivation to genotoxic carcinogens during adulthood are probable mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenicity, while “estrogen imprinting” via epigenetics in early-life also determines PCa risk. Although the effects of estrogens are known to be mediated by genomic actions of the two estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes (ERα and ERβ), other non-canonical mediators, including the different ERβ isoforms, membrane and mitochondrial ERs, and G protein-coupled receptor 30, may have major actions diverging from classical ER actions. These new discoveries have led to renewed interest among the public and the medicinal field in estrogens and antiestrogens as singular and adjuvant PCa treatment and prevention regimens. This review summarizes current knowledge on how different estrogens/antiestrogens/estrogen mimics contribute to prostate carcinogenesis, the roles of the different mediators of estrogen in the process, and the potentials of new estrogenic/antiestrogenic compounds as targeted therapies for prevention and treatment of PCa. PMID:21889723

  17. Radiotherapy in the management of non-metastatic prostate cancer: Current standards and future opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: The intent of this course is to review issues involved in the management of non-metastatic prostate cancer and to clarify the role of external beam radiotherapy, the use of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormonal therapy in conjunction with the radiation, the management of patients with regional metastases and recurrent disease following surgery and radiation. At the end of this course, participants should be able to fluently discuss management issues and strategies across the entire spectrum of non-metastatic prostate cancer. - Pre-treatment prognostic factors including clinical stage, grade, and pre-treatment PSA, will be presented and their relative value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. Strategies to be discussed include standard dose radiation, escalated dose radiation, particle radiation and the use of adjuvant and neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy. - The process of simulation and field design will be presented, the value of CT-based treatment planning, beams-eye view design and the relative value of three-dimensional treatment planning will be discussed. - The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with this will also be presented so that what constitutes an adequate simulation and margin of treatment can be clarified. - The management of newly diagnosed patients, covering the range of low stage/low grade to locally advanced prostate cancer will be discussed. - The relative value of increasing dose, the relative value of using neo-adjuvant and/or adjuvant hormone therapy and the indications for escalated dose will be presented. - Strategies for managing post-prostatectomy patients will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant and therapeutic irradiation for biochemical failure will be presented and a strategy for management will be discussed. - How to deal with patients with residual disease post radiation will be discussed and the relative value of cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy or hormonal therapy will

  18. Pain management in head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy: Clinical practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabile, A; Airoldi, M; Ripamonti, C; Bolner, A; Murphy, B; Russi, E; Numico, G; Licitra, L; Bossi, P

    2016-03-01

    Pain in head and neck cancer represents a major issue, before, during and after the oncological treatments. The most frequent cause of pain is chemo/radiation related oral mucositis, which involves 80% of the patients and worsens their quality of life inhibiting speaking, eating, drinking or swallowing and sometimes reducing the treatment compliance, the maximum dose intensity and thus the potential efficacy of treatment. Nevertheless pain is still often under estimated and undertreated. An Italian multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists met with the aim of reaching a consensus on pain management in this setting. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for the consensus. External expert reviewers evaluated the final statements. The paper contains 30 consensus-reached statements about pain management in HNC patients and offers a review of recent literature in these topics. PMID:26712589

  19. Pain management of opioid-treated cancer patients in hospital settings in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorff, L.; Peuckmann, V.; Sjøgren, Per

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance and quality of cancer pain management in hospital settings. METHODS: Anaesthesiologists specialised in pain and palliative medicine studied pain management in departments of oncology and surgery. Study days were randomly chosen and patients treated with oral opioids...... were included. Information regarding pain aetiology and mechanisms, pain medications and opioid side effects were registered from the medical records and by examining patients. Pain intensity was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. RESULTS: In total, 59 cancer patients were included. In 49 (83...... according to the duration of action. In 88% of the patients supplemental short-acting oral opioids were given on demand and the median supplemental oral dose was 16.5% of the daily dose. Seven patients with neuropathic pain received adjuvant drugs, whereas six patients with non-neuropathic pain received...

  20. The importance of perceived stress management skills for patients with prostate cancer in active surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanez, Betina; Bustillo, Natalie E; Antoni, Michael H; Lechner, Suzanne C; Dahn, Jason; Kava, Bruce; Penedo, Frank J

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about whether and how stress management skills may improve adjustment for men diagnosed with prostate cancer who opt for active surveillance. This study examined whether two types of perceived stress management skills, specifically the ability to relax and confidence in coping, moderated the relationship between prostate cancer (PC) concerns and psychological distress. Participants were 71 ethnically diverse men in active surveillance. Coping confidence moderated the relationship between PC concerns and intrusive thoughts (p intrusive thoughts, β = .95, p .05. Coping confidence also moderated the relationship between PC treatment concerns (a subscale of PC concerns) and intrusive thoughts. At low levels of coping confidence, PC treatment concerns was positively associated with intrusive thoughts, β = .73, p .05. Findings underscore the importance of interventions aimed at improving coping in men undergoing active surveillance. PMID:25234859

  1. Patient-related barriers to cancer pain management: a systematic exploratory review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring; Sjøgren, Per

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this review was to systemically explore the current evidence regarding patient-related barriers to cancer pain management to find new areas that might be important for better understanding of patient barriers' phenomenon. The method used in this study was a computerised literature search...... analgesic regimen were included and analysed. The dominant part of articles studied cognitive patient-related barriers to cancer pain management, while affective, sensory barriers, as well as pain communication and pain medication adherence were studied in much less extend. However, the findings from...... different studies regarding relationships between cognitive barriers and pain intensity were not consistent. On the contrary, the quality of pain communication was consistently found to be not satisfactory in some key areas. The associations between more expressed attitudinal as well as sensory barriers and...

  2. Psychological and behavioural predictors of pain management outcomes in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    analyse the impact of patient-related barriers on cancer pain management outcomes following this model. Thirty-three patients responded to the Brief Pain Inventory Pain scale, the Danish Barriers Questionnaire II (DBQ-II), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), the Danish version of Patient...... Perceived Involvement in Care Scale measuring the quality of patient-physician pain communication, and the Danish version of Medication Adherence Report Scale (DMARS-4). Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 16.00. The results of the multivariable linear regression analyses showed that pain intensity...... was explained by patients' emotional distress (symptoms of anxiety and depression) and that pain relief was explained by cognitive barriers. In conclusion, interventions in emotional distress and patients' concerns may supposedly result in better cancer pain management outcomes....

  3. Quo Vadis Radiotherapy? Technological Advances and the Rising Problems in Cancer Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J. Allen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Despite the latest technological advances in radiotherapy, cancer control is still challenging for several tumour sites. The survival rates for the most deadly cancers, such as ovarian and pancreatic, have not changed over the last decades. The solution to the problem lies in the change of focus: from local treatment to systemic therapy. The aim of this paper is to present the current status as well as the gaps in radiotherapy and, at the same time, to look into potential solutions to improve cancer control and survival. Methods. The currently available advanced radiotherapy treatment techniques have been analysed and their cost-effectiveness discussed. The problem of systemic disease management was specifically targeted. Results. Clinical studies show limited benefit in cancer control from hadron therapy. However, targeted therapies together with molecular imaging could improve treatment outcome for several tumour sites while controlling the systemic disease. Conclusion. The advances in photon therapy continue to be competitive with the much more expensive hadron therapy. To justify the cost effectiveness of proton/heavy ion therapy, there is a need for phase III randomised clinical trials. Furthermore, the success of systemic disease management lies in the fusion between radiation oncology technology and microbiology.

  4. Chemotherapy and its evolving role in the management of advanced prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael T Schweizer; Emmanuel S Antonarakis

    2014-01-01

    prostate cancer has been recognized as being responsive to androgen deprivation since the 1940s when Charles Huggins ifrst described the role of surgical castration in managing these patients. However, androgen deprivation only results in transient disease control for the vast majority of men, with those progressing in spite of castrate testosterone levels labeled as having castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Until 2004, the therapeutic arena for these patients had remained stagnant, with no agent having shown a survival gain in the CRPC setting. Two landmark publications changed the prostate cancer treatment landscape by providing‘level-1 evidence’ that docetaxel-based chemotherapy led to prolongation in overall survival (OS). This was followed by the approval of cabazitaxel in 2010 on the basis of Phase III data demonstrating its efifcacy in patients pretreated with docetaxel. More recently, a number of next-generation androgen-directed agents (e.g. abiraterone and enzalutamide) have also been shown to lead to a survival beneift in men with CRPC. With so many new treatment options available, a number of questions remain. These include:how to best sequence chemotherapy with these newer hormonal agents, the clinical implication of cross-resistance between taxanes and androgen-directed agents and which subsets of patients may beneift most from early use of chemotherapy. This review will provide an overview of the evolving role of chemotherapy in the management of advanced prostate cancer in the current era.

  5. Surveillance recommendations in reducing risk of and optimally managing breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostby, Pamela L; Armer, Jane M; Dale, Paul S; Van Loo, Margaret J; Wilbanks, Cassie L; Stewart, Bob R

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, and disfiguring condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management of symptoms. It has been reported that over 40% of the 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States may meet the criteria for BCRL during their lifetimes. Ongoing surveillance, beginning with pre-operative assessment, has been effective in identifying subclinical lymphedema (LE). A prospective model for surveillance is necessary in order to detect BCRL at an early stage when there is the best chance to reduce risk or slow progression. Physical methods for monitoring and assessment, such as circumferential arm measures, perometry, bioimpedance; exercise programs; prophylactic and early-intervention compression garments; and referral for complete decongestive therapy are all interventions to consider in the development of a BCRL surveillance program. In addition, supportive-educative programs and interactive engagement for symptom self-management should also be implemented. The importance of interdisciplinary collaboration is integral to the success of an effective personalized medicine program in breast cancer-related lymphedema surveillance. PMID:25563360

  6. Surveillance Recommendations in Reducing Risk of and Optimally Managing Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela L. Ostby

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL, a chronic, debilitating, and disfiguring condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management of symptoms. It has been reported that over 40% of the 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States may meet the criteria for BCRL during their lifetimes. Ongoing surveillance, beginning with pre-operative assessment, has been effective in identifying subclinical lymphedema (LE. A prospective model for surveillance is necessary in order to detect BCRL at an early stage when there is the best chance to reduce risk or slow progression. Physical methods for monitoring and assessment, such as circumferential arm measures, perometry, bioimpedance; exercise programs; prophylactic and early-intervention compression garments; and referral for complete decongestive therapy are all interventions to consider in the development of a BCRL surveillance program. In addition, supportive-educative programs and interactive engagement for symptom self-management should also be implemented. The importance of interdisciplinary collaboration is integral to the success of an effective personalized medicine program in breast cancer-related lymphedema surveillance.

  7. Pharmacological strategies for the management of cancer pain in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omoti AE

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Pain associated with cancer is often under treated especially in the developing countries where there are problems of poor economy, poor purchasing power of the citizens, absence of effective national health insurance schemes, poor manpower, fake adulterated and expired drugs, poor drug storage conditions; adverse temperature conditions combined with poor power supply which may affect drug efficacy. There is also poor understanding of the physiopharmacology of cancer pain management by health care providers. Assessment of the severity of the pain by location, oncological type, as well as psychosocial, emotional and environmental factors are necessary. The pain often occurs from malignancy, from procedures done to diagnose, stage and treat the malignancy, and from the toxicities of therapy used in treating the cancer. The first priority of treatment is to control pain rapidly and completely, as judged by the patient. The second priority is to prevent recurrence of pain. Analgesic drugs are given ‘by the ladder,’ ‘by the clock’ and ‘by the appropriate route’ using the analgesic ladder guideline proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO. The pharmacological aspects of various drugs used in the management of cancer pain are discussed.

  8. Pharmacological strategies for the management of cancer pain in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoti, Afekhide E; Omoti, Caroline E

    2007-07-01

    Pain associated with cancer is often under treated especially in the developing countries where there are problems of poor economy, poor purchasing power of the citizens, absence of effective national health insurance schemes, poor manpower, fake adulterated and expired drugs, poor drug storage conditions; adverse temperature conditions combined with poor power supply which may affect drug efficacy. There is also poor understanding of the physiopharmacology of cancer pain management by health care providers. Assessment of the severity of the pain by location, oncological type, as well as psychosocial, emotional and environmental factors are necessary. The pain often occurs from malignancy, from procedures done to diagnose, stage and treat the malignancy, and from the toxicities of therapy used in treating the cancer. The first priority of treatment is to control pain rapidly and completely, as judged by the patient. The second priority is to prevent recurrence of pain. Analgesic drugs are given 'by the ladder,' 'by the clock' and 'by the appropriate route' using the analgesic ladder guideline proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO). The pharmacological aspects of various drugs used in the management of cancer pain are discussed. PMID:25247009

  9. Presentation and management of docetaxel-related adverse effects in patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The taxane chemotherapeutic agent docetaxel has been utilized in the management of breast cancer in the adjuvant, neoadjuvant and metastatic setting. Although well tolerated by the majority of patients, docetaxel toxicity may limit the dose which can be administered. Adverse events include infusion reactions, febrile neutropenia, fatigue, fluid retention, pneumonitis, cutaneous and nail toxicity, epiphora and lacrimal duct stenosis, gastrointestinal complications, and neuropathies. In this review, we explore these complications and how they can be effectively managed to improve patient quality of life during and following docetaxel therapy

  10. Present and future roles of FDG-PET/CT imaging in the management of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Doi, Hiroshi; Kanda, Tomonori; Yamane, Tomohiko; Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Kaida, Hayato; Tamaki, Yukihisa; Kuribayashi, Kozo

    2016-06-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) has emerged as a powerful tool for combined metabolic and anatomic evaluation in clinical oncologic imaging. This review discusses the utility of (18)F-FDG PET/CT as a tool for managing patients with lung cancer. We discuss different patient management stages, including diagnosis, initial staging, therapy planning, early treatment response assessment, re-staging, and prognosis. PMID:27121156

  11. Proactive strategies for regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer: implications for optimal patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan G

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gazala Khan,1 Rebecca A Moss,2 Fadi Braiteh,3,4 Marc Saltzman5 1Department of Hematology and Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USA; 2Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USA; 3US Oncology Research, Las Vegas, NV, USA; 4Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA; 5Innovative Medical Research of South Florida, Inc, Aventura, FL, USA Abstract: Regorafenib is a broad-spectrum oral multikinase inhibitor that targets several angiogenic, oncogenic, and stromal receptor tyrosine kinases that support the tumor microenvironment. Results from the pivotal Phase III Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated with Regorafenib or Placebo After Failure of Standard Therapy (CORRECT trial showed that the addition of regorafenib to best supportive care resulted in a significant improvement in median overall survival and progression-free survival compared with placebo plus best supportive care in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC following all available approved therapies. Thus, regorafenib is the first oral multikinase inhibitor indicated for mCRC; it currently has approval in the USA, EU, Japan, Canada, and Singapore for the treatment of mCRC patients who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, and, if the tumor is KRAS wild-type, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. In this review, we highlight regorafenib's mechanism of action, present key efficacy data from the CORRECT trial, and discuss how to proactively manage common adverse events (eg, hand-foot skin reaction, hypertension, oral mucositis, diarrhea, and fatigue experienced by patients receiving regorafenib. Increased awareness of potential adverse events associated with regorafenib and the implementation of proactive strategies to prevent, monitor, and manage these

  12. Covered Bronchial Stent Insertion to Manage Airway Obstruction with Hemoptysis Caused by Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sae Ah; Kim, Do Hyeong [Dankook University College of Medicine, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Jen, Gyeong Sik [Bundang CHA General Hospital, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Malignant airway obstruction and hemoptysis are common in lung cancer patients. Recently, airway stent is commonly used to preserve airway in malignant airway obstruction. Hemoptysis can be managed through various methods including conservative treatment, endobronchial tamponade, bronchoscopic intervention, embolization and surgery. In our case studies, we sought to investigate the effectiveness of airway stents for re-opening the airway as well as tamponade effects in four patients with malignant airway obstruction and bleeding caused by tumors or lymph node invasions.

  13. Surgical Management of Early Endometrial Cancer: An Update and Proposal of a Therapeutic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Falcone, Francesca; Balbi, Giancarlo; Di Martino, Luca; Grauso, Flavio; Salzillo, Maria Elena; Messalli, Enrico Michelino

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years technical improvements have produced a dramatic shift from traditional open surgery towards a minimally invasive approach for the management of early endometrial cancer. Advancement in minimally invasive surgical approaches has allowed extensive staging procedures to be performed with significantly reduced patient morbidity. Debate is ongoing regarding the choice of a minimally invasive approach that has the most effective benefit for the patients, the surgeon, and the h...

  14. Management of Ontario children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia by the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute protocols.

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, S J; Barr, R D; Andrew, M.; deVeber, L L; Pai, M K

    1989-01-01

    There is ample evidence of the value of intensive therapeutic strategies in the management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the commonest form of malignant disease in children. Such a program, devised at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), Boston, and incorporating high-dose L-asparaginase, was adopted in 1984 by the Children's Hospital at Chedoke-McMaster, Hamilton, Ont., and the Children's Hospital of Western Ontario, London. We describe the experience of these institutions in th...

  15. Bowel symptom experiences and management following sphincter saving surgery for rectal cancer: A qualitative perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Landers, Margaret; McCarthy, Geraldine; Savage, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to explore participants’ qualitative perspectives on bowel symptom experiences and management strategies following sphincter saving surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and sample The data presented in this paper were gleaned from a semi-structured question that formed part of a larger multi-site quantitative correlational study. From a sample of 143 participants, a total of 77 (62.6%) males and 46 (37.3%) females provided qualitative comments. Participants were age...

  16. Electronic patient self-assessment and management (SAM: a novel framework for cancer survivorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tighe Foss

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We propose a novel framework for management of cancer survivorship: electronic patient Self-Assessment and Management (SAM. SAM is a framework for transfer of information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice. Methods Patients who participate in the SAM system are contacted by email at regular intervals and asked to complete validated questionnaires online. Patient responses on these questionnaires are then analyzed in order to provide patients with real-time, online information about their progress and to provide them with tailored and standardized medical advice. Patient-level data from the questionnaires are ported in real time to the patient's health care provider to be uploaded to clinic notes. An initial version of SAM has been developed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF for aiding the clinical management of patients after surgery for prostate cancer. Results Pilot testing at MSKCC and UCSF suggests that implementation of SAM systems are feasible, with no major problems with compliance (> 70% response rate or security. Conclusion SAM is a conceptually simple framework for passing information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice.

  17. Current status of radiation therapy. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) of radiation therapy. Current management of patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The best management for small mucosal esophageal cancer is generally endoscopic mucosal resection. However, for submucosal cancer and extensive mucosal caner, either radical surgery or radiation seems to be an equally efficacious option. Radiation therapy concurrent with chemotherapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone for patients with unresectable esophageal cancer. The key drugs are cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. However, for patients with poor performance status or for aged patients, radiation therapy alone is still a choice of treatment. Surgery has generally been indicated for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. However, outcomes of concurrent chemoradiation therapy may be comparable with those of surgery. Therefore, a prospective randomized study should be performed to determine the best management for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. The usefulness of intra-cavitary irradiation for esophageal cancer has not been clarified. A prospective randomized trial with a large number of patients is necessary to determine the effectiveness of intra-cavitary irradiation. The best management for patients with loco-regionally recurrent esophageal cancer after surgery has not been determined. Intensive therapy should be considered if the site of recurrence is limited and the time interval from surgery to recurrence is long. Chemotherapy is essential in the management of patients with small cell esophageal cancer. However, the best local therapy has not been determined. (author)

  18. Targeted therapies with companion diagnostics in the management of breast cancer: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers MB

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meagan B Myers Division of Genetic and Molecular Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR, USA Abstract: Breast cancer is a multifaceted disease exhibiting both intertumoral and intratumoral heterogeneity as well as variable disease course. Over 2 decades of research has advanced the understanding of the molecular substructure of breast cancer, directing the development of new therapeutic strategies against these actionable targets. In vitro diagnostics, and specifically companion diagnostics, have been integral in the successful development and implementation of these targeted therapies, such as those directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Lately, there has been a surge in the development, commercialization, and marketing of diagnostic assays to assist in breast cancer patient care. More recently, multigene signature assays, such as Oncotype DX, MammaPrint, and Prosigna, have been integrated in the clinical setting in order to tailor decisions on adjuvant endocrine and chemotherapy treatment. This review provides an overview of the current state of breast cancer management and the use of companion diagnostics to direct personalized approaches in the treatment of breast cancer. Keywords: HER2, precision medicine, in vitro diagnostics, estrogen receptor, multigene assay

  19. A risk management model for familial breast cancer: A new application using Fuzzy Cognitive Map method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Elpiniki I; Jayashree Subramanian; Karmegam, Akila; Papandrianos, Nikolaos

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most deadly disease affecting women and thus it is natural for women aged 40-49 years (who have a family history of breast cancer or other related cancers) to assess their personal risk for developing familial breast cancer (FBC). Besides, as each individual woman possesses different levels of risk of developing breast cancer depending on their family history, genetic predispositions and personal medical history, individualized care setting mechanism needs to be identified so that appropriate risk assessment, counseling, screening, and prevention options can be determined by the health care professionals. The presented work aims at developing a soft computing based medical decision support system using Fuzzy Cognitive Map (FCM) that assists health care professionals in deciding the individualized care setting mechanisms based on the FBC risk level of the given women. The FCM based FBC risk management system uses NHL to learn causal weights from 40 patient records and achieves a 95% diagnostic accuracy. The results obtained from the proposed model are in concurrence with the comprehensive risk evaluation tool based on Tyrer-Cuzick model for 38/40 patient cases (95%). Besides, the proposed model identifies high risk women by calculating higher accuracy of prediction than the standard Gail and NSAPB models. The testing accuracy of the proposed model using 10-fold cross validation technique outperforms other standard machine learning based inference engines as well as previous FCM-based risk prediction methods for BC. PMID:26220142

  20. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy in the management of ovarian cancer: focus on carboplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurie Markman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Maurie MarkmanUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAAbstract: Both pre-clinical studies and phase 1–2 clinical trials have provided strong support for the potential role of regional drug delivery in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer, a disease process whose major manifestations remain largely localized to the peritoneal cavity in the majority of individuals with this malignancy. The results of 3 phase 3 randomized trials have revealed the favorable impact of primary cisplatin-based intraperitoneal chemotherapy in women who initiate drug treatment with small-volume residual ovarian cancer following an attempt at optimal surgical cytoreduction. Concerns have been raised regarding the toxicity of regional treatment, particularly the side-effect profile associated with cisplatin. One rational approach to improving the tolerability of intraperitoneal chemotherapy is to substitute carboplatin for cisplatin. This review discusses the rationale for and data supporting regional treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer, and highlights the potential role for intraperitoneal carboplatin in this clinical setting.Keywords: ovarian cancer, intraperitoneal chemotherapy, cisplatin, carboplatin

  1. Critical appraisal of the use of regorafenib in the management of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of valid clinical management options for patients affected by metastatic colorectal cancer, which has progressed after all approved standard treatments, has lead to research into new active molecules. Regorafenib is an oral small-molecule multi kinase inhibitor, binding to several intracellular kinases, with powerful inhibitory activity against vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR-1,VEGFR-2, and VEGFR-3), platelet-derived growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, Raf, TIE-2, and the kinases KIT, RET, and BRAF. The antitumor activity of regorafenib has been tested in vitro and in vivo, and inhibition of tumor growth has been observed in several cancer models, particularly colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The most frequent adverse events of grade 3 or higher related to regorafenib were hand-foot skin reaction, fatigue, diarrhea, hypertension, and rash or desquamation. Only a few Phase I–II trials, and most recently a Phase III trial in pretreated colorectal cancer, have been carried out to date. Several ongoing trials are testing the efficacy of regorafenib in combination with chemotherapy. At this point in time, regorafenib is the first small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor to gain approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for pretreated metastatic colorectal cancer patients

  2. Women’s Views on Handling and Managing Their Breast Cancer in Pakistan: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najma Naz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examine and analyze the experiences of women and their perceptions on handling and managing their breast cancer. Seven women from Peshawar, Pakistan who had breast cancer and have been cured, were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis of their life stories was performed using a computerized software Atlas.ti. In the coding process, 128 codes were initially developed. These codes were then grouped into 12 categories, which were then further refined into 8 theoretically grounded categories: awareness and education about breast cancer, cultural barriers, early detection, quality of care and treatment, support, side effects, courage and learned to face challenges. The early views of participant’s feelings about breast cancer are mostly similar to the general population in Pakistan. Before starting treatment, all participant were unaware of the treatment process and had fear in their mind. They were hesitant in starting their treatment and were worried. However, when they were cured, their attitudes toward breast cancer and even to their whole lives were changed. Comprehensive awareness programs in a culturally acceptable language and facilities for routine breast examinations should be easily accessible to all women in Pakistan in order to promote early detection. In order to eradicate cultural barriers, female staff who are trained to perform routine breast examinations, should be available in all facilities and treatment centers.

  3. Acupuncture and Related Therapies for Symptom Management in Palliative Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Charlotte H. Y.; Wu, Xinyin; Chung, Vincent C. H.; Liu, Xin; Hui, Edwin P.; Cramer, Holger; Lauche, Romy; Wong, Samuel Y. S.; Lau, Alexander Y. L.; Sit, Regina S. T.; Ziea, Eric T. C.; Ng, Bacon F. L.; Wu, Justin C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Available systematic reviews showed uncertainty on the effectiveness of using acupuncture and related therapies for palliative cancer care. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to summarize current best evidence on acupuncture and related therapies for palliative cancer care. Five international and 3 Chinese databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture and related therapies with conventional or sham treatments were considered. Primary outcomes included fatigue, paresthesia and dysesthesias, chronic pain, anorexia, insomnia, limb edema, constipation, and health-related quality of life, of which effective conventional interventions are limited. Thirteen RCTs were included. Compared with conventional interventions, meta-analysis demonstrated that acupuncture and related therapies significantly reduced pain (2 studies, n = 175, pooled weighted mean difference: −0.76, 95% confidence interval: −0.14 to −0.39) among patients with liver or gastric cancer. Combined use of acupuncture and related therapies and Chinese herbal medicine improved quality of life in patients with gastrointestinal cancer (2 studies, n = 111, pooled standard mean difference: 0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.36–1.13). Acupressure showed significant efficacy in reducing fatigue in lung cancer patients when compared with sham acupressure. Adverse events for acupuncture and related therapies were infrequent and mild. Acupuncture and related therapies are effective in reducing pain, fatigue, and in improving quality of life when compared with conventional intervention alone among cancer patients. Limitations on current evidence body imply that they should be used as a complement, rather than an alternative, to conventional care. Effectiveness of acupuncture and related therapies for managing anorexia, reducing constipation, paresthesia and dysesthesia, insomnia, and limb edema in cancer patients is uncertain, warranting

  4. The case for focal brachytherapy for the management of low grade prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radical therapy of low to intermediate prostate cancer patients can cause substantial adverse events relating to genitourinary and rectal toxicity. Yet there is little evidence that such treatment results in increased life expectancy. On the other hand, watchful waiting is associated with active surveillance and the patient must accept that the cancer remains untreated and has a risk of progression. Focal therapy of low grade prostate cancer provides an intermediate approach to the management of this cancer. The approach is to treat only those positive segments on biopsy and so reduce the likelihood of adverse events. However, continued surveillance is required because of the increased risk of disease progression. Focal therapy needs to be evaluated using available ablative therapies. Recent studies of focal HIFU for 20 patients showed PSA reduced from 7.3 to 1.5 ng/mL at 12 months. 1/20 patients had inadequate erections and 2120 required pads. 17/19 had no histological evidence of cancer and none had evidence of high volume or Gleason = 7 cancer in the treated lobe. Seed brachytherapy is commonly used for radical prostate treatment of low volume disease. As the same template can be used for seed therapy as is used for biopsy, the technique is ideally suited for focal brachytherapy. As any treatment involving less than the entire gland involves the risk of leaving viable cancer cells outside the treatment zone, a phase 3 randomised clinical trial between radical and focal brachytherapy is advocated to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of the latter relative to radical therapy.

  5. Optimal management of prostate cancer with lethal biology - state-of-the-art local therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian F Chapin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Defining prostate cancer with lethal biology based upon clinical criteria is challenging. Locally advanced/High-Grade prostate cancer can be downstaged or even downgraded with cure in up to 60% of patients with primary therapy. [1] ,[2] ,[3] ,[4] ,[5] However, what is known is that high-grade prostate cancers have a greater potential for recurrence and progression to metastatic disease, which can ultimately result in a patient′s death. Patients with clinical features of "high-risk" prostate cancer (cT2c, PSA >20, ≥ Gl 8 on biopsy are more likely to harbor more aggressive pathologic findings. The optimal management of high-risk prostate cancer is not known as there are not prospective studies comparing surgery to radiation therapy (RT. Retrospective and population-based studies are subject to many biases and attempts to compare surgery and radiation have demonstrated mixed results. Some show equivalent survival outcomes [6] while others showing an advantage of surgery over RT. [7] ,[8] ,[9] ,[10] ,[11] Local therapy for high-risk disease does appear to be beneficial. Improved outcomes realized with local therapy have been clearly demonstrated by several prospective studies evaluating androgen deprivation therapy (ADT alone versus ADT plus RT. The combination of local with systemic treatment showed improved disease-specific and overall survival outcomes. [12], [13], [14] Unfortunately, primary ADT for N0M0 prostate cancer is still inappropriately applied in general practice. [11] While the surgical literature is largely retrospective, it too demonstrates that surgery in the setting of high-risk prostate cancer is effective in providing durable disease-specific and overall survivals. [2] ,[3] ,[15

  6. Optimal management of prostate cancer with lethal biology--state-of-the-art local therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Brian F

    2015-01-01

    Defining prostate cancer with lethal biology based upon clinical criteria is challenging. Locally advanced/High-Grade prostate cancer can be downstaged or even downgraded with cure in up to 60% of patients with primary therapy. However, what is known is that high-grade prostate cancers have a greater potential for recurrence and progression to metastatic disease, which can ultimately result in a patient's death. Patients with clinical features of "high-risk" prostate cancer (cT2c, PSA >20, ≥ Gl 8 on biopsy) are more likely to harbor more aggressive pathologic findings. The optimal management of high-risk prostate cancer is not known as there are not prospective studies comparing surgery to radiation therapy (RT). Retrospective and population-based studies are subject to many biases and attempts to compare surgery and radiation have demonstrated mixed results. Some show equivalent survival outcomes while others showing an advantage of surgery over RT. Local therapy for high-risk disease does appear to be beneficial. Improved outcomes realized with local therapy have been clearly demonstrated by several prospective studies evaluating androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) alone versus ADT plus RT. The combination of local with systemic treatment showed improved disease-specific and overall survival outcomes. Unfortunately, primary ADT for N0M0 prostate cancer is still inappropriately applied in general practice. While the surgical literature is largely retrospective, it too demonstrates that surgery in the setting of high-risk prostate cancer is effective in providing durable disease-specific and overall survivals. [ PMID:26178396

  7. End-of-life management in pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelman, Claudia L

    2012-04-01

    Pediatric palliative care at the end-of-life is focused on ensuring the best possible quality of life for patients with life-threatening illness and their families. To achieve this goal, important needs include: engaging with patients and families; improving communication and relationships; relieving pain and other symptoms, whether physical, psychosocial, or spiritual; establishing continuity and consistency of care across different settings; considering patients and families in the decision-making process about services and treatment choices to the fullest possible and desired degree; being sensitive to culturally diverse beliefs and values about death and dying; and responding to suffering, bereavement, and providing staff support. Any effort to improve quality of palliative and end-of-life care in pediatric oncology must be accompanied by an educational strategy to enhance the level of competence among health care professionals with regard to palliative care and end-of-life management skills as well as understanding of individualized care planning and coordination processes. PMID:22350329

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance Directives Using Trusted Resources What Is Cancer Cancer Statistics Causes & Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship For Family & Friends Questions to Ask About Cancer Advanced Cancer Choices For Care Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer ...

  10. Impact of multidisciplinary team working on the management of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Ying-jiang; G. J. Poston; WANG Shan; SHEN Zhan-long; SUN Xian-tao; WANG Zhi-feng; SHEN Dan-hua; LIU Hui-jun; ZHANG Wan-lei; CHEN Ya-lin; ZHOU Jing

    2012-01-01

    Background The continual and rapid development of techniques which are used for diagnosis and treatment makes management of colorectal cancer more difficult depending on single discipline.Colorectal cancer multidisciplinary team (MDT) working model is recommended by UK and other countries,but there is little information on the impact of MDT working on management of colorectal cancer in China.The aim of this study was to assess the effect on management of colorectal cancer after the inception of an MDT.Methods A total of 595 consecutive colorectal cancer patients were referred to the Department of Gastroenterological Surgery,the pre-MDT cohort include 297 patients,recruited from January 1999 to November 2002,and the MDT cohort had 298 patients enrolled from December 2002 to September 2006.Information recorded included:TNM stage from histological reports,degree of differentiation,the number of examined lymph nodes and CT TNM staging performed or not,and its accuracy,including local and distant recurrence.Results The number of examined lymph nodes and the accuracy of TNM staging by CT in the MDT group were significantly more than those in pre-MDT group.CT TNM staging was more accurate in the MDT group compared to the pre-MDT group (P=-0.044).The rate of tumor recurrence in the MDT group was lower than pre-MDT group (log-rank test,P <0.001).Multivariate analysis revealed that age (P=0.001),management after inception of the MDT (P=0.002),degree of differentiation (P=0.003),number of examined lymph nodes (P=0.002),and TNM stage (P=0.000) were important factors that independently influence overall survival.Conclusions The inception of MDT working improved the diagnostic accuracy and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients.MDT working promoted communication and cooperation between disciplines and ensured high-quality diagnosis,evidence-based decision making,and optimal treatment planning.

  11. Malignant bowel obstruction in advanced cancer patients: epidemiology, management, and factors influencing spontaneous resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuca A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Albert Tuca1, Ernest Guell2, Emilio Martinez-Losada3, Nuria Codorniu41Cancer and Hematological Diseases Institute, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Palliative Care Unit, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain; 3Palliative Care Unit, Institut Català Oncologia Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; 4Medical Oncology Department, Institut Català Oncologia L'Hospitalet, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Malignant bowel obstruction (MBO is a frequent complication in advanced cancer patients, especially in those with abdominal tumors. Clinical management of MBO requires a specific and individualized approach that is based on disease prognosis and the objectives of care. The global prevalence of MBO is estimated to be 3% to 15% of cancer patients. Surgery should always be considered for patients in the initial stages of the disease with a preserved general status and a single level of occlusion. Less invasive approaches such as duodenal or colonic stenting should be considered when surgery is contraindicated in obstructions at the single level. The priority of care for inoperable and consolidated MBO is to control symptoms and promote the maximum level of comfort possible. The spontaneous resolution of an inoperable obstructive process is observed in more than one third of patients. The mean survival is of no longer than 4–5 weeks in patients with consolidated MBO. Polymodal medical treatment based on a combination of glucocorticoids, strong opioids, antiemetics, and antisecretory drugs achieves very high symptomatic control. This review focuses on the epidemiological aspects, diagnosis, surgical criteria, medical management, and factors influencing the spontaneous resolution of MBO in advanced cancer patients.Keywords: malignant bowel obstruction, cancer, intestinal obstruction, bowel occlusion

  12. The acute oncologist’s role in managing patients with cancer and other comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Shankland

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: An Acute Oncology Service (AOS is paramount to providing timely and improved pathways of care for patients who are admitted to hospital with cancer-related problems or suspected cancer. Objective: To establish an AOS pilot study to decide how best to implement such a service locally. Methods: The AOS, which included collaboration between the oncology and palliative care teams at the Northern General Hospital in Sheffield, UK, ensured that the majority of oncology patients in the region received timely assessment by an oncologist if they became acutely unwell as a result of their cancer or its treatment. The AOS consisted of a thrice-weekly ward round, and daily telephone advice service. Results: We report on patient data during the first 12 months of the pilot study. Delivery of the AOS enhanced communication between the services and provided inter-professional education and support, resulting in earlier oncological team involvement in the management of patients with cancer admitted under other teams, as well as provision of advice to patients and their caregivers and families. Provision of the AOS shortened the mean length of hospital stay by 6 days. Two case studies are presented to illustrate the typical challenges faced when managing these patients. Conclusions: Establishment of the AOS enabled effective collaboration between the oncology and other clinical teams to provide a rapid and streamlined referral pathway of patients to the AOS. Locally, this process has been supported by the development of acute oncology protocols, which are now in use across the local cancer network.

  13. Symptom management in patients with cancer of the female reproductive system receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phianmongkhol, Yupin; Suwan, Natthawan

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the feelings, symptom management, and needs of patients with gynecological cancer receiving chemotherapy at Chiang Mai University Hospital, Chiang Mai, Thailand. During the period July 2006 and June 2007, 286 patients were recruited. The most common chemotherapeutic regimen was paclitaxel and carboplatin followed by single carboplatin and weekly cisplatin. Five severe and frequent complications were as follows: alopecia, anorexia, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. Some 41.9% could well tolerate with such complications but 50.3% had various feelings including irritability, boredom, dejection, fear, stress, and anxiety. Anorexia was the symptom that the majority of them could best manage, 17.4% by eating as much as they can and 32.6% by selecting different foods from normal, such as fruit, sweetmeats, noodles, milk. For nausea and vomiting, 31.3% managed by eating fruit, drinking sour juice, and holding sour fruit in mouth, and 16.0% used the breathing method, eating something cold, such as ice-cream, or hot food like noodles. For health needs, 41.0% needed encouragement, care, health education, and information from doctors and nurses, and 5.0% needed care and encouragement from their family, and sympathy from neighbors and colleagues. In conclusion, gynecological cancer patients receiving chemotherapy experience a variety of feelings, symptom management. and health needs. Nurses need to explain the pathology of the occurring symptoms so that the patients can understand and accept the symptoms to lessen their negative impact. PMID:19256770

  14. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being shipped, and will otherwise maintain it as nearly as possible in its original condition.The recommendations provided are short-term solutions to the problems of shipping evidence, and have considered only currently commercially available containers. These containers may not be appropriate for all cases. Design, testing, and certification of new transportation containers would be necessary to provide a container appropriate for all cases.Table 1 provides a summary of the recommendations for each class of hazardous material.Table 1: Summary of RecommendationsContainerCost1-quart paint can with ArmlockTM seal ringLabelMaster(r)%242.90 eachHazard Class 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9 Small ContainersTC Hazardous Material Transport ContainerCurrently in Use4 DraftDraftDraftTable 1: Summary of Recommendations (continued)ContainerCost55-gallon open or closed-head steel drumsAll-Pak, Inc.%2458.28 - %2473.62 eachHazard Class 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9 Large Containers95-gallon poly overpack LabelMaster(r)%24194.50 each1-liter glass container with plastic coatingLabelMaster(r)%243.35 - %243.70 eachHazard Class 6 Division 6.1 Poisonous by Inhalation (PIH) Small ContainersTC Hazardous Material Transport ContainerCurrently in Use20 to 55-gallon PIH overpacksLabelMaster(r)%24142.50 - %24170.50 eachHazard Class 6 Division 6.1 Poisonous by Inhalation (PIH) Large Containers65 to 95-gallon poly overpacksLabelMaster(r)%24163.30 - %24194.50 each1-liter transparent containerCurrently in UseHazard Class 6 Division 6.2 Infectious Material Small ContainersInfectious Substance ShipperSource Packaging of NE, Inc.%24336.00 eachNone Commercially AvailableN/AHazard Class 6 Division 6.2 Infectious Material Large ContainersNone Commercially Available N/A5

  15. Contemporary management of prostate cancer: a practice survey of Ontario genitourinary radiation oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To survey radiation oncology practice in the utilization of hormonal and radiation therapy in the primary, adjuvant and salvage treatment of localized prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Genitourinary radiation oncologists practicing in Ontario were invited to participate in a practice survey examining staging, hormonal and radiation management, and radiation technique for a variety of common clinical scenarios. Background demographic information was collected on all respondents. The survey consisted of three cases relating to the hormonal/radiation management of low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer as well as two adjuvant and one salvage post-prostatectomy scenarios. The survey response rate was 70% (26/37). Results: Clinicians were more likely to utilize laboratory and imaging studies for staging as the risk categorization increased. Low-risk disease was managed with radiation alone in 26/26 (70 Gy in 65%, 74-79.8 Gy in 35%). Intermediate-risk disease was managed with radiation (70 Gy in 46%, 74-79.8 Gy in 54%) with neoadjuvant hormones in 58%. All respondents managed high-risk disease with adjuvant hormones in addition to radiation therapy (70-71 Gy in 85%, and 76 Gy in 15%). In the pT3a, margin negative (PSA undetectable) scenario, most individuals would not recommend adjuvant radiation (73%). If margins were positive, 30% would still not recommend adjuvant radiation. In the salvage scenario (slowly rising PSA 4 years post-prostatectomy for pT2a close margin disease), all respondents would manage with radiation therapy. Hormones were not routinely recommended in the initial management of the adjuvant and salvage scenarios. Radiation doses utilized for both adjuvant and salvage treatment ranged from 60-70 Gy (median 66 Gy). Conclusions: General agreement exists for the management of low- and high-risk disease and in the post-prostatectomy salvage setting. Use of dose-escalation and neoadjuvant hormones in the intermediate

  16. Critical appraisal of the use of regorafenib in the management of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Festino L

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lucia Festino*, Alessio Fabozzi*, Anna Manzo, Valentina Gambardella, Erika Martinelli, Teresa Troiani, Ferdinando De Vita, Michele Orditura, Fortunato Ciardiello, Floriana Morgillo Division of Medical Oncology, Department of clinical and experimental medicine and surgery "F. Magrassi e A. Lanzara", Second University of Naples, Napoli, Italy*These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The lack of valid clinical management options for patients affected by metastatic colorectal cancer, which has progressed after all approved standard treatments, has lead to research into new active molecules. Regorafenib is an oral small-molecule multi kinase inhibitor, binding to several intracellular kinases, with powerful inhibitory activity against vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR-1,VEGFR-2, and VEGFR-3, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, Raf, TIE-2, and the kinases KIT, RET, and BRAF. The antitumor activity of regorafenib has been tested in vitro and in vivo, and inhibition of tumor growth has been observed in several cancer models, particularly colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The most frequent adverse events of grade 3 or higher related to regorafenib were hand-foot skin reaction, fatigue, diarrhea, hypertension, and rash or desquamation. Only a few Phase I–II trials, and most recently a Phase III trial in pretreated colorectal cancer, have been carried out to date. Several ongoing trials are testing the efficacy of regorafenib in combination with chemotherapy. At this point in time, regorafenib is the first small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor to gain approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for pretreated metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Keywords: colorectal cancer, angiogenesis, regorafenib

  17. Management of Cervical Cancer: Strategies for Limited-Resource Centres - A Guide for Radiation Oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical cancer remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among women globally, even though it is the cancer with the greatest demonstrated potential for secondary prevention. In some regions of the world the incidence is alarmingly high, such as in sub-Saharan Africa, some countries in Latin America, India and South-East Asia. This disease is highly preventable and curable at a relatively low risk and low cost when screening of asymptomatic women is available, together with appropriate diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. In developing clinical guidelines, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has selected forms of cancer or clinical situations that are very common in low and middle income Member States and for which radiation oncologists consistently express a need for guidance. Clinical guidelines for the management of cervical cancer do exist in the published literature. However, these guidelines have usually been developed in and for affluent environments where all modern diagnosis and treatment modalities are available for the practitioner. In limited resource environments, the radiation oncologist is faced with the question, what would be the minimally acceptable line of action with the limited resources available? Clinical guidelines focusing on low and middle income countries provide a practical tool to these practitioners. This publication is aimed at the radiation oncologist working in centres with limited resources and treating a large number of patients with cervical cancer on a daily basis. The approach and techniques are intended to be simple, feasible and resource sparing to the extent that this is possible when dealing with a complex treatment modality. The Division of Human Health is placing special emphasis on the subject of cervical cancer, which is addressed not only in this guide but also in regional training courses and coordinated research projects on the subject

  18. Pharmacologic management of bone-related complications and bone metastases in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Denise A

    2016-01-01

    There is a high risk for bone loss and skeletal-related events, including bone metastases, in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Both the disease itself and its therapeutic treatments can negatively impact bone, resulting in decreases in bone mineral density and increases in bone loss. These negative effects on the bone can significantly impact morbidity and mortality. Effective management and minimization of bone-related complications in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer remain essential. This review discusses the current understanding of molecular and biological mechanisms involved in bone turnover and metastases, increased risk for bone-related complications from breast cancer and breast cancer therapy, and current and emerging treatment strategies for managing bone metastases and bone turnover in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

  19. The diagnosis and management of rectal cancer: expert discussion and recommendations derived from the 9th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, Barcelona, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cutsem, E; Dicato, M; Haustermans, K; Arber, N; Bosset, J-F; Cunningham, D; De Gramont, A; Diaz-Rubio, E; Ducreux, M; Goldberg, R; Glynne-Jones, R; Haller, D; Kang, Y-K; Kerr, D; Labianca, R; Minsky, B D; Moore, M; Nordlinger, B; Rougier, P; Scheithauer, W; Schmoll, H-J; Sobrero, A; Tabernero, J; Tempero, M; Van de Velde, C; Zalcberg, J

    2008-06-01

    Knowledge of the biology and management of rectal cancer continues to improve. A multidisciplinary approach to a patient with rectal cancer by an experienced expert team is mandatory, to assure optimal diagnosis and staging, surgery, selection of the appropriate neo-adjuvant and adjuvant strategy and chemotherapeutic management. Moreover, optimal symptom management also requires a dedicated team of health care professionals. The introduction of total mesorectal excision has been associated with a decrease in the rate of local failure after surgery. High quality surgery and the achievement of pathological measures of quality are a prerequisite to adequate locoregional control. There are now randomized data in favour of chemoradiotherapy or short course radiotherapy in the preoperative setting. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is more beneficial and has less toxicity for patients with resectable rectal cancer than postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Furthermore chemoradiotherapy leads also to downsizing of locally advanced rectal cancer. New strategies that decrease the likelihood of distant metastases after initial treatment need be developed with high priority. Those involved in the care for patients with rectal cancer should be encouraged to participate in well-designed clinical trials, to increase the evidence-based knowledge and to make further progress. Health care workers involved in the care of rectal cancer patients should be encouraged to adopt quality control processes leading to increased expertise. PMID:18539618

  20. Cancer pain: A critical review of mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of pain is essential to effectively manage painful symptoms in patients attending palliative care. The objective of this review is to provide a detailed review of mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of patients with cancer pain. Cancer pain can be classified based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Classification based upon mechanisms not only addresses the underlying pathophysiology but also provides us with an understanding behind patient′s symptoms and treatment responses. Existing evidence suggests that the five mechanisms - central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, sympathetically maintained pain, nociceptive and cognitive-affective - operate in patients with cancer pain. Summary of studies showing evidence for physical therapy treatment methods for cancer pain follows with suggested therapeutic implications. Effective palliative physical therapy care using a mechanism-based classification model should be tailored to suit each patient′s findings, using a biopsychosocial model of pain.

  1. Benefit risk assessment and update on the use of docetaxel in the management of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alken S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Scheryll Alken, Catherine M KellyDepartment of Medical Oncology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, IrelandAbstract: The objective of this paper is to review the data supporting the use of docetaxel in the treatment of breast cancer, focusing on pharmacokinetics, efficacy in adjuvant and metastatic trials alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic and targeted agents, and the toxicity of docetaxel in comparison to paclitaxel. Docetaxel is a semisynthetic product derived from the European yew tree Taxus baccata L. It promotes the assembly of microtubules, stabilizes them, and thereby prevents their depolymerization. Docetaxel has been incorporated into neo-adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, both with and without anthracyclines. The inclusion of taxanes such as docetaxel in polychemotherapy regimens in early breast cancer is associated with a statistically significant reduction in mortality. As a single agent, docetaxel is highly active in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. In first-line treatment of metastatic breast cancer, the combination of docetaxel and capecitabine was associated with an improvement in overall survival; however, toxicity was higher. The toxicity profile of docetaxel has been well documented and is predictable; the most frequent adverse effects are neutropenia and febrile neutropenia. Taxane-specific adverse effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, are also expected but are manageable with appropriate dosing and scheduling.Keywords: taxanes, docetaxel, clinical trial, adverse effects, peripheral neuropathy, neutropenia

  2. [Advances in thyroglobulin assays and their impact on the management of differentiated thyroid cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Herbomez, Michèle; Lion, Georges; Béron, Amandine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis; DoCao, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a high molecular weight glycoprotein located mainly in thyroid follicles, where thyroid hormones are synthesized and stored. In patients with differentiated thyroid cancer of follicular origin, serum Tg levels become undetectable following total thyroidectomy and iodine-131 remnant ablation. It is a key biomarker to follow-up patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, in combination with neck ultrasound monitoring. The measurement of Tg in the wash-out of the needle used for fine needle aspiration biopsy is a valuable aid to the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis. The presence of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies affects reliability of Tg results measured in serum or plasma. Systematic investigation of such antibodies is required to validate any Tg assay. Elevated or rising levels of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies can in turn be used as a surrogate tumor marker of thyroid cancer. The development of second-generation Tg assay (automated, highly sensitive) has enabled significant advances in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer: early detection of persistent or recurrent disease and follow-up care simplified in low-risk patients. Testing of serum Tg can also be useful in evaluating other clinical situations such as congenital hypothyroidism, endemic goiter and thyrotoxicosis factitia. PMID:26711165

  3. Assessing the impact of FDG-PET in the management of anal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the utility of FDG-PET in anal cancer for staging and impact on radiotherapy planning (RTP), response and detection of recurrent disease. Methods and materials: Fifty histopathological anal cancer patients were reviewed between 1996 and 2006. The median age was 58 years (range 36-85) with 19 males:31females. Clinical assessment with CT was compared to PET. Impact on management, disease response, recurrence and metastases was evaluated. Results: The non-PET staging was Stage I(8), Stage II(18), Stage III(22), and Stage IV(2)s. The primary was strongly FDG avid in 98% with non-excised tumors compared to CT (58%). PET upstaged 17% with unsuspected pelvic/inguinal nodal disease. Pre-treatment PET identified 11 additional by involved nodal groups in 48 patients causing RTP amendments in 19%. Post-treatment PETs at median 17 weeks (range 9-28) showed complete responses in 20 (80%) and 5 (20%) partial responses (PR). PRs were biopsy positive in 2 and negative in 3. Fifteen had follow-up scans of which all nine PETs detected recurrences were pathologically confirmed. Conclusions: Anal cancer is FDG-PET avid. PET upstages 17% and changes the RTP in 19%. PET can aid in anal cancer staging and identification of residual disease, recurrent/metastatic disease but warrants further prospective studies

  4. Benefit risk assessment and update on the use of docetaxel in the management of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to review the data supporting the use of docetaxel in the treatment of breast cancer, focusing on pharmacokinetics, efficacy in adjuvant and metastatic trials alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic and targeted agents, and the toxicity of docetaxel in comparison to paclitaxel. Docetaxel is a semisynthetic product derived from the European yew tree Taxus baccata L. It promotes the assembly of microtubules, stabilizes them, and thereby prevents their depolymerization. Docetaxel has been incorporated into neo-adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, both with and without anthracyclines. The inclusion of taxanes such as docetaxel in polychemotherapy regimens in early breast cancer is associated with a statistically significant reduction in mortality. As a single agent, docetaxel is highly active in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. In first-line treatment of metastatic breast cancer, the combination of docetaxel and capecitabine was associated with an improvement in overall survival; however, toxicity was higher. The toxicity profile of docetaxel has been well documented and is predictable; the most frequent adverse effects are neutropenia and febrile neutropenia. Taxane-specific adverse effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, are also expected but are manageable with appropriate dosing and scheduling

  5. Usability testing of an online self-management program for adolescents with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Jennifer; Gupta, Abha; Dupuis, France; Dick, Bruce; Laverdière, Caroline; LeMay, Sylvie; Sung, Lillian; Dettmer, Elizabeth; Gomer, Stephanie; Lober, Janie; Chan, Carol Y

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the usability of a bilingual (English and French) Internet-based self-management program for adolescents with cancer and their parents and refine the Internet program. A qualitative study design with semistructured, audio-taped interviews and observation was undertaken with 4 iterative cycles. A purposive sample of English-speaking and French-speaking adolescents with cancer and one of their parents/caregivers was recruited. Adolescents and parents provided similar feedback on how to improve the usability of the Internet program. Most changes to the website were completed after the initial cycles of English and French testing. Both groups also found information presented on the website to be appropriate, credible, and relevant to their experiences of going through cancer. Participants reported the program would have been extremely helpful when they were first diagnosed with cancer. Usability testing uncovered some issues that affected the usability of the website that led to refinements in the online program. PMID:25037173

  6. A systematic review of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies: management strategies and economic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S.B.; Pedersen, A.M.L.; Vissink, A.;

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to assess the literature for management strategies and economic impact of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies and to determine the quality of evidence-based management recommendations. The electronic databases of MEDLINE/PubMed and E...

  7. A systematic review of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies : management strategies and economic impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, S. B.; Pedersen, A. M. L.; Vissink, A.; Andersen, E.; Brown, C. G.; Davies, A. N.; Dutilh, J.; Fulton, J. S.; Jankovic, L.; Lopes, N. N. F.; Mello, A. L. S.; Muniz, L. V.; Murdoch-Kinch, C. A.; Nair, R. G.; Napenas, J. J.; Nogueira-Rodrigues, A.; Saunders, D.; Stirling, B.; von Bueltzingsloewen, I.; Weikel, D. S.; Spijkervet, F. K. L.; Brennan, M. T.; Elting, L.

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to assess the literature for management strategies and economic impact of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies and to determine the quality of evidence-based management recommendations. The electronic databases of MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBA

  8. A systematic review of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies: management strategies and economic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Vissink, Arjan;

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to assess the literature for management strategies and economic impact of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia induced by cancer therapies and to determine the quality of evidence-based management recommendations. The electronic databases of MEDLINE/PubMed and...

  9. Development testing of mobile health interventions for cancer patient self-management: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, Susan; Wen, Kuang-Yi

    2016-09-01

    As the vision of mobile health (mHealth) is beginning to be realized, rigorous intervention development protocols are needed in order to draw optimal efficacy and effectiveness to support patient-centered oncology care. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a review of published articles that describe the development process of mHealth interventions for patients' cancer care self-management. The review search yielded 11 interventions, reported by 14 manuscripts. The following trends emerged: importance of stakeholder engagement during the development process, addressing the unique needs and experiences of cancer patients and care providers, ensuring user satisfaction with the system, and identifying perceived benefits and limitations of the system. This review provides practical suggestions for mHealth intervention development. Assessments of user perceptions should be both qualitative and quantitative, and researchers should follow an established framework when developing a randomized controlled trial employing mHealth. PMID:25916831

  10. Image guided surgery in the management of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Hassan; Pan, Quintin

    2016-06-01

    Complete resection of head and neck tumors relies on palpation and visual inspection. Achieving a negative margin in remote locations in the head and neck region, especially in close proximity to critical structures, is often difficult to achieve. Positive resection margins in head and neck cancer are at high risk to develop recurrent disease and associated with poor prognosis. Near-infrared fluorescence-guided optical imaging is an emerging technology with the potential to move the surgical field forward and facilitate surgeons to visualize tumors in real-time intra-operatively. In this review, our focus is to discuss the recent advances and the potential application of near infrared (NIR) fluorescent-guided surgery in the management of head and neck cancer. PMID:27208842

  11. Chemotherapy principles of managing stage IV breast cancer in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Aya, Leonel F; Ma, Cynthia X

    2016-06-01

    The therapeutic landscape for metastatic breast cancer (MBC) has expanded greatly over the last three decades with an increasing availability of targeted therapies for specific breast cancer subtypes. However, cytotoxic chemotherapy remains an essential component for the management of endocrine refractory or triple negative MBC. Multiple chemotherapy agents have demonstrated activity in MBC as single agents and in combination. While taxanes are frequently recommended as the initial treatment of metastatic disease, capecitabine is a convenient oral therapy with well received toxicity profile. Eribulin is the only agent that demonstrated overall survival (OS) benefit in a phase III clinical trial when compared to treatment of physician choice in heavily pre-treated patients. Ixabepilone, gemcitabine, vinorelbine and platinum agents have demonstrated activity and, therefore, constitute additional therapeutic options. In this review, we will discuss the data supporting the use of different cytotoxic agents and the general principles in guiding the use of chemotherapy. PMID:27164855

  12. Ovarian cancer: contribution of radiation therapy to patient management: Erskine Memorial Lecture, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovarian cancer may be treated with radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, or a combination. To evaluate the contribution of radiation therapy to patient management the cure rate must be estimated; data are presented suggesting that the 5-year survival rate provides a reasonable estimate of the cure rate. A study of patients treated since 1971 showed that stage and postoperative residuum could be used to divide patients into two subgroups, a poor prognosis group and a good prognosis group; a multifactorial grouping of patients in the good prognosis group who were treated postoperatively with radiation therapy only was further able to divide patients into low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups. Studies of radiation therapy for different subgroups are discussed; abdominopelvic irradiation has been shown to improve survival for approximately one-third of patients with cancer of the ovary

  13. Proactive strategies for regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer: implications for optimal patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regorafenib is a broad-spectrum oral multikinase inhibitor that targets several angiogenic, oncogenic, and stromal receptor tyrosine kinases that support the tumor microenvironment. Results from the pivotal Phase III Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated with Regorafenib or Placebo After Failure of Standard Therapy (CORRECT) trial showed that the addition of regorafenib to best supportive care resulted in a significant improvement in median overall survival and progression-free survival compared with placebo plus best supportive care in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) following all available approved therapies. Thus, regorafenib is the first oral multikinase inhibitor indicated for mCRC; it currently has approval in the USA, EU, Japan, Canada, and Singapore for the treatment of mCRC patients who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, and, if the tumor is KRAS wild-type, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. In this review, we highlight regorafenib’s mechanism of action, present key efficacy data from the CORRECT trial, and discuss how to proactively manage common adverse events (eg, hand-foot skin reaction, hypertension, oral mucositis, diarrhea, and fatigue) experienced by patients receiving regorafenib. Increased awareness of potential adverse events associated with regorafenib and the implementation of proactive strategies to prevent, monitor, and manage these events early in the course of treatment will be instrumental in ensuring optimal patient management and continuation of regorafenib therapy

  14. Management of Biochemical Recurrence after Primary Localized Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oussama M. eDarwish

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinically localized prostate cancer is typically managed by well established therapies like radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy. While many patients can be cured with definitive local therapy, some will have biochemical recurrence (BCR of disease detected by a rising serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA. Management of these patients is nuanced and controversial. The natural history indicates that a majority of patients with BCR will not die from prostate cancer but from other causes. Despite this, a vast majority of patients with BCR are empirically treated with non-curable systemic androgen deprivation therapy, with its myriad of real and potential side effects. In this review article, we examined the very definition of BCR after definitive local therapy, the current status of imaging studies in its evaluation, the need for additional therapies and the factors involved in the decision making in the choice of additional therapies. This review aims to help clinicians with the management of patients with BCR. The assessment of prognostic factors including absolute PSA level, time to recurrence, PSA kinetics, multivariable nomograms, imaging, and biopsy of the prostatic bed may help stratify the patients into localized or systemic recurrence. Patients with low risk of systemic disease may be cured by a salvage local therapy, while those with higher risk of systemic disease may be offered the option of androgen deprivation therapy or a clinical trial. An algorithm incorporating these factors is presented.

  15. Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Management of Breast-Cancer-Related Lymphedema

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    Solmaz Fakhari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast-cancer-related lymphedema is a significant morbidity mostly observed following primary treatments for breast cancer (surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy (1. Multiple complications might accompany lymphedema including cosmetic deformity, psychological disorders, consistent pain, and consequently decreased quality of life. Treatment  mostly focuses on reducing edema and its subsequent pain; however, no definite treatment has been hitherto introduced (2. Surgical approaches in the management of lymphedema are efficient including physiologic methods (e.g. flap interposition, lymph transfer, and lymphatic bypass and reductive techniques (e.g. liposuction (3. While the former mostly targets at reducing lymphedema through restoring lymphatic drainage, the latter aims at removing fibrofatty tissues which contribute to lymph stasis. Microsurgical variation of lymphatic bypass has gained popularity, in which the accumulated lymph in the lymphedematous limb is redirected. Non-surgical approaches are also practiced in most cases. Comprehensive decongestive therapy, consisting of skin care, exercise, special bandaging and massage, is the most frequently used non-surgical approach efficacy of which could be enhanced in combination with self-management strategies (4. Recently newer techniques have been introduced to tackle lymphedema and its associated pain. Manual lymph drainage, stellate ganglion block, acupuncture, deep oscillation, and pneumatic compression have been efficiently used in several studies. Moreover, significant short-term progress has been reported following other modalities such as low-level laser therapy (5. The complexity of breast-cancer-related lymphedema and its complications necessitates a multidisciplinary approach with the primary goal of easing the burden of the disease on the breast cancer patients. In addition, developing special guidelines encompassing these multidisciplinary approaches and providing educational and

  16. Conservative management of breast cancer in the elderly in a developing country

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    de V Odendaal Jacobus

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cost effective treatment of cancer in developing countries remains challenging. In the elderly with possible limited life expectancy, the health expenditure associated with standard treatment regimes should be carefully considered. We present the results of conservative management of breast cancer in the aged in a resource-limited environment. Methods Patients aged 70 or older with early breast cancer were treated with tumour excision or simple mastectomy and adjuvant tamoxifen. The records of patients presenting to the Breast Unit between January 1990 and December 2004 were retrieved and demographic, clinical, pathological and oncological data were reviewed. Survival statistics were calculated using the life table method. Results A total of 483 patients above 70 years of age were identified. One hundred and eighty eight patients were managed according to the conservative protocol. Forty-one had a simple mastectomy and 147 tumour excision. Their mean age was 77.3 years. The mean follow-up is 62 months. Thirty-one patients (16.4% were not compliant with tamoxifen use. TNM staging was 0 in 4 patients, I in 42 patients, II in 116 patients and III in 26 patients. There was no 30-day mortality. The cumulative incidence of local recurrence was 3.3% at 5 and 10 years. The cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 3.3% at 5 years and 4.5% at 10 years. The cumulative incidence of distant recurrence was 6.2% at 5 years and 12.2% at 10 years. The cumulative overall, disease specific and disease free survival at 10 years was 59%, 88% and 81% respectively. Conclusion Limited surgery and tamoxifen provide excellent control of breast cancer in the elderly in a resource restricted environment. Radiotherapy and axillary dissection and can be safely omitted thereby reducing health care resource utilization.

  17. A Pilot Study of Self-Management-based Nutrition and Physical Activity Intervention in Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michelle; Zrim, Stephanie; Lawn, Sharon; Woodman, Richard; Leggett, Stephanie; Jones, Lynnette; Karapetis, Christos; Kichenadasse, Ganessan; Sukumaran, Shawgi; Roy, Amitesh C; Koczwara, Bogda

    2016-07-01

    Exercise and a healthy diet are beneficial after cancer, but are not uniformly adopted by cancer survivors. This study reports on the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of a self-management-based nutrition and exercise intervention for Australian cancer survivors. Adult survivors (n  =  25) during curative chemotherapy (stratum 1[S1]; n  =  11) or post-treatment (stratum 2 [S2]; n  =  14) were recruited prospectively from a single center. The Flinders Living Well Self-Management Program™ (FLW Program) was utilized to establish patient-led nutrition and exercise goals and develop a tailored 12-wk intervention plan. Fortnightly reviews occurred with assessments at baseline, 6 and 12 wk. A recruitment and retention rate of 38% and 84% were observed. Both strata maintained total skeletal muscle mass. Small reductions in body mass index, hip circumference, and percentage body fat, and small increases in hand grip strength and exercise capacity among subjects in both strata were observed. No significant differences were observed between strata; however, significant increases in exercise capacity and global health status for S2 were observed from baseline to 12 wk. FLW Program is a feasible mode of delivering nutrition and exercise intervention to cancer survivors and it appears that there are no barriers to implementing this program early during chemotherapy. Hence, the additive effect of gains achieved over a longer duration is promising and this should be explored in randomized controlled trials adequately powered to observe clinically and statistically significant improvements in relevant outcomes. PMID:27176450

  18. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Jeremy G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.Stock@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ≥grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ≥grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following

  19. Managing symptoms during cancer treatments: evaluating the implementation of evidence-informed remote support protocols

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    Stacey Dawn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of cancer treatment-related symptoms is an important safety issue given that symptoms can become life-threatening and often occur when patients are at home. With funding from the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, a pan-Canadian steering committee was established with representation from eight provinces to develop symptom protocols using a rigorous methodology (CAN-IMPLEMENT©. Each protocol is based on a systematic review of the literature to identify relevant clinical practice guidelines. Protocols were validated by cancer nurses from across Canada. The aim of this study is to build an effective and sustainable approach for implementing evidence-informed protocols for nurses to use when providing remote symptom assessment, triage, and guidance in self-management for patients experiencing symptoms while undergoing cancer treatments. Methods A prospective mixed-methods study design will be used. Guided by the Knowledge to Action Framework, the study will involve (a establishing an advisory knowledge user team in each of three targeted settings; (b assessing factors influencing nurses’ use of protocols using interviews/focus groups and a standardized survey instrument; (c adapting protocols for local use, ensuring fidelity of the content; (d selecting intervention strategies to overcome known barriers and implementing the protocols; (e conducting think-aloud usability testing; (f evaluating protocol use and outcomes by conducting an audit of 100 randomly selected charts at each of the three settings; and (g assessing satisfaction with remote support using symptom protocols and change in nurses’ barriers to use using survey instruments. The primary outcome is sustained use of the protocols, defined as use in 75% of the calls. Descriptive analysis will be conducted for the barriers, use of protocols, and chart audit outcomes. Content analysis will be conducted on interviews/focus groups and usability testing

  20. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2-65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  1. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of tongue cancer

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    Anil K D′Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The document is based on consensus among the experts and best available evidence pertaining to Indian population and is meant for practice in India. Early diagnosis is imperative in improving outcomes and preserving quality of life. High index of suspicion is to be maintained for leukoplakia (high risk site. Evaluation of a patient with newly diagnosed tongue cancer should include essential tests: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is investigative modality of choice when indicated. Computed tomography (CT scan is an option when MRI is unavailable. In early lesions when imaging is not warranted ultrasound may help guide management of the neck. Early stage cancers (stage I & II require single modality treatment - either surgery or radiotherapy. Surgery is preferred. Adjuvant radiotherapy is indicated for T3/T4 cancers, presence of high risk features [lymphovascular emboli (LVE, perineural invasion (PNI, poorly differentiated, node +,close margins. Adjuvant chemoradiation (CTRT is indicated for positive margins and extranodal disease. Locally advanced operable cancers (stage III & IVA require combined multimodality treatment - surgery + adjuvant treatment. Adjuvant treatment is indicated in all and in the presence of high risk features as described above. Locally advanced inoperable cancers (stage IVB are treated with palliative chemo-radiotherapy, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or symptomatic treatment depending upon the performance status. Select cases may be considered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical salvage. Metastatic disease (stage IVC should be treated with a goal for palliation. Chemotherapy may be offered to patients with good performance status. Local treatment in the form of radiotherapy may be added for palliation of symptoms. Intense follow-up every 3 months is required for initial 2 years as most recurrences occur in the first 24 months. After 2 nd year follow up is done at 4-6 months interval. At each follow up screening

  2. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational interventions may

  3. Effects of yoga on symptom management in breast cancer patients: A randomized controlled trial

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    Hosakote Vadiraja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study compares the effects of an integrated yoga program with brief supportive therapy on distressful symptoms in breast cancer outpatients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight stage II and III breast cancer outpatients were randomly assigned to receive yoga (n = 44 or brief supportive therapy (n = 44 prior to their radiotherapy treatment. Intervention consisted of yoga sessions lasting 60 min daily while the control group was imparted supportive therapy once in 10 days during the course of their adjuvant radiotherapy. Assessments included Rotterdam Symptom Check List and European Organization for Research in the Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life (EORTC QoL C30 symptom scale. Assessments were done at baseline and after 6 weeks of radiotherapy treatment. Results: A GLM repeated-measures ANOVA showed a significant decrease in psychological distress (P = 0.01, fatigue (P = 0.007, insomnia (P = 0.001, and appetite loss (P = 0.002 over time in the yoga group as compared to controls. There was significant improvement in the activity level (P = 0.02 in the yoga group as compared to controls. There was a significant positive correlation between physical and psychological distress and fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, dyspnea, insomnia, appetite loss, and constipation. There was a significant negative correlation between the activity level and fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, dyspnea, insomnia, and appetite loss. Conclusion: The results suggest beneficial effects with yoga intervention in managing cancer- and treatment-related symptoms in breast cancer patients.

  4. Contemporary Management of Penile Cancer: Greater than 15-Year MSKCC Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Kelvin A.; Winer, Andrew; Sfakianos, John P.; Poon, Stephen A.; Kent, Matthew; Bernstein, Melanie; Russo, Paul; Dalbagni, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Penile cancer is a rare malignancy, and few guidelines are available to define treatment paradigms. For greater understanding of the natural history of surgically treated penile cancer, we analyzed experience at our institution. Materials and Methods Using an institutional database, we identified 127 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the penis from 1995 – 2011. Cancer-specific survival (CSS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Survival data were compared using the log-rank test. The difference in risk of cancer-specific death by lymph node status and histological grade was determined by univariate Cox regression analysis. Results Five-year CSS for pTis, pT1, pT2, and pT3/4 was 100%, 84% (95% CI 58%-95%), 54% (95% CI 33%-71%), and 54% (95% CI 25%-76%), respectively (P ≤ .005). Three-year CSS for patients with N0, N+, and Nx disease was 90% (95% CI 47%-99%), 65% (95% CI 47%-79%), and 86% (95% CI 73%-93%), respectively (P = .03). The receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy did not change per 5 year period over the 16 years of our study. Median follow-up was 2.8 years. Conclusions Penile cancer patients with advanced disease had poor survival. Tumor stage and nodal status were significant predictors of CSS. Penis-sparing approaches may be considered for most patients; however, pathological stage and grade dictate the management and ultimate outcome. Further studies are necessary to clarify the benefits of chemotherapy in this disease. PMID:24775572

  5. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Janz, Nancy K. [Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sabel, Michael S. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational

  6. BRCA-Associated Ovarian Cancer: From Molecular Genetics to Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Girolimetti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer (OC mostly arises sporadically, but a fraction of cases are associated with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The presence of a BRCA mutation in OC patients has been suggested as a prognostic and predictive factor. In addition, the identification of asymptomatic carriers of such mutations offers an unprecedented opportunity for OC prevention. This review is aimed at exploring the current knowledge on epidemiological and molecular aspects of BRCA-associated OC predisposition, on pathology and clinical behavior of OC occurring in BRCA mutation carriers, and on the available options for managing asymptomatic carriers.

  7. The Cost of Lung Cancer Management in France from the Payor's Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Alain Vergnenegre; Laurent Molinier; Christophe Combescure; Jean-Pierre Daures; Bruno Housset; Christos Chouaid

    2006-01-01

    Background: We assessed the average management cost per case of lung cancer in France according to the histological type and stage at diagnosis, together with the cost of each component of different treatment strategies. Methods: The sample was drawn from public and private hospitals that were treating large numbers of patients. The study covered the period from 1 July 1998 to 30 June 1999 and was based on medical chart review. A Markov model with six decision trees (two for small cell lung c...

  8. Established, emerging and future roles of PET/CT in the management of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is rapidly being integrated into the imaging pathways of several different tumour types, most frequently using the glucose analogue 2- [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). Integrated FDG-PET/CT combines functional and anatomical imaging to improve sensitivity and specificity of tumour detection. The aim of this article is to review the established, emerging, and future roles of FDG-PET/CT in the management of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC)

  9. mHealth self-care interventions: managing symptoms following breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mei R.; Axelrod, Deborah; Guth, Amber A.; Rampertaap, Kavita; El-Shammaa, Nardin; Hiotis, Karen; Scagliola, Joan; Yu, Gary; Wang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Background Many women suffer from daily distressing symptoms related to lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. Lymphedema, an abnormal accumulation of lymph fluid in the ipsilateral body area or upper limb, remains an ongoing major health problem affecting more than 40% of 3.1 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. Patient-centered care related to lymphedema symptom management is often inadequately addressed in clinical research and practice. mHealth plays a significant role in improving self-care, patient-clinician communication, and access to health information. The-Optimal-Lymph-Flow health IT system (TOLF) is a patient-centered, web-and-mobile-based educational and behavioral mHealth interventions focusing on safe, innovative, and pragmatic electronic assessment and self-care strategies for lymphedema symptom management. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and test of TOLF system. Methods The development of TOLF was guided by the Model of Self-Care for Lymphedema Symptom Management and designed based on principles fostering accessibility, convenience, and efficiency of mHealth system to enhance training and motivating assessment of and self-care for lymphedema symptoms. Test of TOLF was accomplished by conducting a psychometric study to evaluate reliability, validity, and efficiency of the electronic version of Breast Cancer and Lymphedema Symptom Experience Index (BCLE-SEI), a usability testing and a pilot feasibility testing of mHealth self-care interventions. Results Findings from the psychometric study with 355 breast cancer survivors demonstrated high internal consistency of the electronic version of the instrument: a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.959 for the total scale, 0.919 for symptom occurrence, and 0.946 for symptom distress. Discriminant validity of the instrument was supported by a significant difference in symptom occurrence (z=−6.938, Psignificantly positive effects on less pain (P=0.031), less

  10. [Management of complications after residual tumor resection for metastatic testicular cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusch, A; Zaum, M; Winter, C; Albers, P

    2014-07-01

    Residual tumor resection (RTR) in patients with metastatic testicular cancer plays a pivotal role in a multimodal treatment. It can be performed unilaterally or as an extended bilateral RTR. Additional surgical procedures might be necessary, such as nephrectomy, splenectomy, partial colectomy, or vascular interventions with possible caval resection, cavotomy, or aortic resection with aortic grafting. Consequently, several complications can be seen in the intra- and postoperative course, most common of which are superficial wound infections, intestinal paralysis, lymphocele, and chylous ascites. We sought to describe complication management and how to prevent complications before they arise. PMID:25023235

  11. Optimizing the management of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a personal view

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    The management of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (a-nsclc) is currently undergoing one of its rare paradigm shifts. Just as the nihilism of the 1970s gave way to the empiricism of the 1980s and 1990s, so the current decade has seen the first truly rational therapies based on informed design. In addition, molecular markers and traditional parameters can now be combined to provide a framework of knowledge that will guide the application of not just the new therapies, but also the older one...

  12. Advancements in the Management of Pancreatic Cancer Highlights from the "2009 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium". San Francisco, CA, USA. January 15-17, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Management of pancreatic cancer remains the most challenging work in oncology. Though pancreatic cancer represents only 2-3% of all cancers, it is the most fatal one accounting for the 6% of all cancer death. It remains the 4th cause of death by cancer since 1970s in the U.S.. Gemcitabine remains the only standard of care for this disease. More and more combination therapies containing gemcitabine have been tested or undergoing investigation. The interest in treating pancreatic cancer is apparently global. Over 75 abstracts were presented in the 2009 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium at San Francisco in the field of pancreatic cancer. In this highlights article, authors summarize the critical studies in the management of pancreatic cancer. A large retrospective study evaluated the role of post-operative adjuvant radiation (Abstract #181 and correlated the receipt of radiation with survival benefit. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer remains an area that requires multi-disciplinary approach. Neo-adjuvant therapy very likely plays a role to downstage to a resectable state in these subgroup patients (Abstracts #197 and #248. In advanced or metastatic setting, studies aiming at the gemcitabine-based triplet or doublet combinations are still the mainstream. FFCD 0301 trial (Abstract #180, the only large phase III trial presented in the first-line setting, failed to demonstrate any survival advantage of either 5-FU and leucovorin plus cisplatin followed by gemcitabine or vice versa. Biologic agents containing regimens were also presented. Of note, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab achieved a high response rate of 39% (Abstract #182 while gemcitabine with dual monoclonal antibody regimen was disappointing (Abstract #183. The clear benefit of all other combinations over gemcitabine alone remains questionable given most studies are small. Newer agents, especially S-1 (Abstracts #213 and #251, are very promising, and further studies

  13. Prognostic value of breast cancer subtypes on breast cancer specific survival, distant metastases and local relapse rates in conservatively managed early stage breast cancer: a retrospective clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Sanpaolo, Pietro; Barbieri, Viviana; Genovesi, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    International audience To ascertain if breast cancer subtypes had prognostic effect on breast cancer specific survival, distant metastases and local relapse rates in women affected by early stage breast cancer.

  14. Characteristics and prognostic factors for pain management in 152 patients with lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi L

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Lei Shi,1,* Yumei Liu,2,* Hua He,1 Cong Wang,1 Hongwei Li,1 Nanya Wang1 1Cancer Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 2Department of Hematology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the pain characteristics and factors influencing the outcome of pain control in patients with lung cancer having pain. Methods: Pain characteristics, the effectiveness, and prognostic factors for pain control were analyzed in 152 patients with lung cancer having moderate or severe chronic pain admitted to Cancer Center of The First Hospital of Jilin University, People’s Republic of China, between January 2012 and May 2013. Information about sex, age, pathological type, TNM stage, presence/absence of bone metastases, characteristics of pain, methods, and effectiveness of pain management was recorded. Results: Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and small-cell carcinoma accounted for 132/152 (86.8% and 20/152 (13.2% cases, respectively. Among them, moderate (72.4% or severe pain (27.6% was reported in 73.7% of the cases at stage IV, chest or back pain was reported in 76.3% of the cases, and pain in other locations in the rest of the cases. Bone metastases were apparent in 44.1% of the patients. Neuropathic pain was noted in 46.7% of the patients, and frequent breakthrough pain was noted in 25.7% of the patients. High pain intensity was associated with frequent breakthrough pain. Pain was adequately controlled in 81.6% of the patients prescribed 3 days of analgesics. More patients reported a KPS higher than or equal to 80 after 3 days of analgesic treatment (P<0.001. Severe pain, frequent breakthrough pain, and presence of bone metastases were independent risk factors for poor pain control. Severe pain, frequent breakthrough pain, or neuropathic pain in the patients using opioids required higher

  15. Therapeutic Education in Improving Cancer Pain Management: A Synthesis of Available Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Virginie; Delorme, Claire; Grach, Marie-Christine; Chvetzoff, Gisèle; Hureau, Magalie

    2016-07-01

    This literature review aims to synthesize available studies and to update findings in order to obtain a current, comprehensive estimate of the benefits of pain education. Forty-four original articles obtained from the PubMed database were analyzed to investigate which protocols could be most effective in improving pain management. Recent studies indicate a growing interest in evaluating patients' skills and attitudes; these include satisfaction with cancer pain treatment, patient-reported improvement, and patient participation-all of which could be dependable benchmarks for evaluating the effectiveness of educational programs. Besides pain measurement, recent studies advance support for the importance of assessing newly developed outcome criteria. In this sense, patients' active participation and decision making in their pain management are probably the most relevant goals of pain education. PMID:25991567

  16. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer

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    Ashraf Abusamra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi oncology society and Saudi urological association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate to.

  17. Dental and nutritional management of the head and neck cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This course will examine the expected acute and late normal tissue toxicities associated with the delivery of high dose radiation therapy to the head and neck region. The purpose of this course will be to identify strategies to reduce radiotherapy-related toxicity without compromising adequate tumor treatment. A multidisciplinary approach will be emphasized and the following topics will be addressed: 1) Appropriate dental evaluation prior to the institution of treatment, oral care during radiation therapy and management of dental complications following completion of treatment. 2) Treatment techniques that accurately localize the target tissue, displace normal tissues from high dose volume and reduce the volume of normal tissue included in the radiation portals. 3) The investigative use of radioprotective agents. 4) The nutritional management of head and neck cancer patients including enteral and parenteral nutrition. 5) The use of medications to reduce the severity of acute symptomatology before, during and after radiation therapy

  18. On the advent and necessity of molecular biology in the clinical management of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbek Sørensen, H; Olsson, L

    1986-12-01

    The very rapidly expanding knowledge and technologies of molecular biology are reviewed with special reference to problems in the clinical management of lung cancer. Genetic events, tumor-associated antigens, production of murine and human monoclonal antibodies, culture of cell lines, intratumoral phenotypic diversity and squamous-lung-cancer-associated antigens are discussed and related to possible therapeutical approaches. A monoclonal antibody with high specificity for squamous cell lung cancer reacted positively in blood samples and tissue extracts in about 80%. Its use as a marker during follow-up after surgical treatment is demonstrated by examples. It is concluded that there will be limiting factors in the therapeutic use of monoclonal antibodies, such as intratumoral phenotypic diversity. Genetic analysis might be a method for selecting a high risk group of individuals in whom exposure to carcinogenic factors, such as cigarette smoking, would be fatal. Murine monoclonal antibodies can be used in vitro for screening, for histological examination and for prognostic studies. Human monoclonal antibodies should be used for in vivo purposes as well as for the screening of primary tumor and metastases for the therapy. To achieve usable results, the monoclonal antibodies should be raised against the cell membranes that, in particular, are expressed on the stem cells of the neoplastic cell population. PMID:2433792

  19. The role of sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer management: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional lymph nodes surgical management is an integral part of breast cancer therapy. One of the most important therapeutic problems is the risk of surgical treatment which is too wide or inadequate due to the lack of correct presurgical information on the conditions of regional lymph nodes. For melanoma the problem was solved combining surgical accuracy with the slightest surgical resection, using sentinel node biopsy. In breast cancer the removal of axillary nodes proved to be unnecessary in more than 50% of cases. The first international studies on the use of sentinel node biopsy in breast carcinoma for the identification of patients who do not need axillary clearance suggest the high accuracy of the technique. Some practical problems still exist, however, and the optimisation of the method is not yet complete. The use of sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer treatment might be able to provide distinctive clinical information, which can improve our knowledge about the disease's biological behaviour and about its treatment. (author)

  20. [Anesthetic Management of Cesarean Section in a Pregnant Woman with Advanced Tongue Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Mikiko; Yoshie, Kazuka; Shimazaki, Azusa; Ohtsuka, Naoki; Otake, Hiroshi; Koide, Keiko; Sato, Youko

    2016-06-01

    It is very difficult to decide the best time to deliver the baby for a pregnant woman with advanced cancer. We experienced the perioperative and perinatal management of a 39-year-old pregnant woman with advanced tongue cancer. The cancer had already metastasized to the lung and lymph nodes. Furthermore a recurrent thumb-sized tumor was found in her mouth. She had firmly desired to discontinue all anticancer treatment for protecting the fetus. On the other hand, her family could not accept her determination yet. Therefore the medical team was organized with doctors and co-medicals from multiple departments such as gynecology, pediatrics, radiology, oncology, midwife, psychotherapy and anesthesiology. After several conferences including herself and family, finally cesarean section was scheduled for the 30th gestational week. Prepared for unexpected emergency delivery, airway stenosis was ruled out by fiberoptic laryngoscopy and the consent for emergency tracheostomy was obtained. The operation was performed successfully under spinal anesthesia without any severe troubles. Medical care as a team from early phase enabled elaborate observation and preparation through the perioperative and perinatal period. Furthermore, it was efficient to provide satisfaction to the patient and her family as well. PMID:27483663

  1. Prevalence and Treatment Management of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Cancer Patients: Results of the French Candidoscope Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this pharmaco-epidemiological study was to evaluate the prevalence of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Signs and symptoms of OPC were noted for all patients. Antifungal therapeutic management was recorded in OPC patients. Patients receiving local antifungal treatments were monitored until the end of treatment. Results: Enrolled in the study were 2,042 patients with solid tumor and/or lymphoma treated with chemotherapy and/or another systemic cancer treatment and/or radiotherapy. The overall prevalence of OPC was 9.6% (95% confidence interval, 8.4%-11.0%] in this population. It was most frequent in patients treated with combined chemoradiotherapy (22.0%) or with more than two cytotoxic agents (16.9%). Local antifungal treatments were prescribed in 75.0% of OPC patients as recommended by guidelines. The compliance to treatment was higher in patients receiving once-daily miconazole mucoadhesive buccal tablet (MBT; 88.2%) than in those treated with several daily mouthwashes of amphotericin B (40%) or nystatin (18.8%). Conclusion: OPC prevalence in treated cancer patients was high. Local treatments were usually prescribed as per guidelines. Compliance to local treatments was better with once-daily drugs.

  2. Clinical Application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Management of Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon-Hor Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC, also termed primary, induction, or preoperative chemotherapy, is traditionally used to downstage inoperable breast cancer. In recent years it has been increasingly used for patients who have operable cancers in order to facilitate breast-conserving surgery, achieve better cosmetic outcome, and improve prognosis by reaching pathologic complete response (pCR. Many studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can assess residual tumor size after NAC, and that provides critical information for planning of the optimal surgery. NAC also allows for timely adjustment of administered drugs based on response, so ineffective regimens could be terminated early to spare patients from unnecessary toxicity while allowing other effective regimens to work sooner. This review article summarizes the clinical application of MRI during NAC. The use of different MR imaging methods, including dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, proton MR spectroscopy, and diffusion-weighted MRI, to monitor and evaluate the NAC response, as well as how changes of parameters measured at an early time after initiation of a drug regimen can predict final treatment outcome, are reviewed. MRI has been proven a valuable tool and will continue to provide important information facilitating individualized image-guided treatment and personalized management for breast cancer patients undergoing NAC.

  3. Comparison of diabetes management status between cancer survivors and the general population: results from a Korean population-based survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yeon Shin

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine and compare the prevalences of diabetes awareness, treatment, and adequate glycemic control among cancer survivors in a Korean population and two non-cancer control groups, comprising individuals without a history of cancer but with other chronic diseases (non-cancer, chronic disease controls and individuals without a history of cancer or any other chronic disease (non-cancer, non-chronic disease controls.We analyzed data from 2,660 subjects with prevalent diabetes (aged ≥30 years, who had participated in the 2007-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Awareness was defined as a subject having been diagnosed with diabetes by a clinician. Treatment was defined as a subject who was taking anti-diabetic medicine. Adequate glycemic control was defined as a hemoglobin A1c level of <7%. Multivariable logistic regression and predictive margins were used to evaluate whether awareness, treatment, or adequate glycemic control differed among cancer survivors and the two non-cancer control groups.Cancer survivors had greater awareness compared with the non-cancer, chronic disease and non-cancer, non-chronic disease control groups (85.1%, 80.4%, and 60.4%, respectively. Although the prevalences of treatment and adequate glycemic control were higher for survivors compared with the non-cancer, non-chronic disease controls, they were lower compared with the non-cancer, chronic disease controls. The prevalence of diabetes treatment was 67.5% for cancer survivors, 69.5% for non-cancer, chronic disease controls, and 46.7% for non-cancer, non-chronic disease controls; the prevalences of adequate glycemic control in these three groups were 31.7%, 34.6%, and 17.8%, respectively.Cancer survivors were less likely than the non-cancer chronic disease subjects to receive diabetes management and to achieve adequate glycemic targets. Special attention and education are required to ensure that this population receives

  4. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak I

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Iwona Zaporowska-Stachowiak,1,2 Grzegorz Kowalski,3 Jacek Łuczak,2 Katarzyna Kosicka,4 Aleksandra Kotlinska-Lemieszek,3 Maciej Sopata,3 Franciszek Główka4 1Chair and Department of Pharmacology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Palliative Medicine In-patient Unit, University Hospital of Lord's Transfiguration, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 3Palliative Medicine Chair and Department, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 4Department of Physical Pharmacy and Pharmacokinetics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland Background: Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III "pain ladder" drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient's refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective: Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures, and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal on the bupivacaine plasma concentration.Cases: We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours. The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 m

  5. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan-positive recurrent papillary thyroid cancer and the prognosis and implications for surgical management

    OpenAIRE

    Schreinemakers Jennifer MJ; Vriens Menno R; Munoz-Perez Nuria; Guerrero Marlon A; Suh Insoo; Rinkes Inne HM; Gosnell Jessica; Shen Wen T; Clark Orlo H; Duh Quan-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background To compare outcomes for patients with recurrent or persistent papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) who had metastatic tumors that were fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) positive or negative, and to determine whether the FDG-PET scan findings changed the outcome of medical and surgical management. Methods From a prospective thyroid cancer database, we retrospectively identified patients with recurrent or persistent PTC and reviewed data on demographics, in...

  6. How can we help family carers manage pain medicines for patients with advanced cancer? A systematic review of intervention studies

    OpenAIRE

    Latter, Susan; Hopkinson, Jane; Richardson, Alison; Hughes, James; Lowson, Elizabeth; Edwards, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Family carers play a significant role in managing pain and associated medicines for people with advanced cancer. Research indicates that carers often feel inadequately prepared for the tasks involved, which may impact on carer and patient emotional state as well as the achievement of optimal pain control. However, little is known about effective methods of supporting family carers with cancer pain medicines. Aims: To systematically identify and review studies of interventions...

  7. A rare case of ovarian cancer in pregnancy complicated by pulmonary embolus and myocardial infarction: management dilemmas

    OpenAIRE

    Nasser, Sara; von Heymann, Christian; Feldheiser, Aarne; Schäfer-Graf, Ute; Klempert, Iris; Pöllinger, Alexander; Krackhardt, Florian; Henrich, Wolfgang; Sehouli, Jalid; Pietzner, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Malignant ovarian neoplasms diagnosed during pregnancy at advanced stages are very rare. The clinical course and prognosis of pregnant patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer is similar to that of non-pregnant patients. We describe our management of a woman diagnosed with FIGO IIIc ovarian cancer at Caesarean section. Immediately after surgery she suffered a pulmonary embolus and a myocardial infarction. She showed signs of a severe pulmonary hypertension (59 mmHg). Four weeks later...

  8. Strategies for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer: A Guide for Radiation Oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is a serious health issue, especially considering the recent epidemiological trend and its corresponding socioeconomic impact. Challenges encountered by treating physicians include the long natural history of the disease, the fact that it is more prevalent in the elderly and the difficulty in performing a complete critical review of medical evidence due to the plethora of available information. In addition, the difficulty in deciding if and when therapeutic intervention should be initiated is an important issue pertaining to this type of malignancy. However, there is one area where there is a uniform consensus: the applicability of the multidisciplinary approach in the management of prostate cancer. Clinical guidelines are systematically developed statements designed to help practitioners, managers and patients make decisions about appropriate health care for specific circumstances. Clinicians need simple, patient specific, user friendly guidelines. The main purposes of clinical guidelines are to: (a) provide recommendations for the treatment of individual patients by practitioners; (b) help develop standards to assess the individual practice of health professionals; (c) be used in the education and training of health professionals; (d) assist patients in making informed decisions; and (e) improve communication between patients and health professionals. Clinical guidelines for the management of prostate cancer exist in the published literature. However, these guidelines have usually been developed in and for affluent health care environments where all modern diagnostic and treatment modalities are available. In limited resource environments, the radiation oncologist is faced with the question of what the minimum acceptable (evidence based) line of action would be, considering the limited resources available. Clinical guidelines focusing on low to middle income countries aim to provide these practitioners with a practical tool. This publication is

  9. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about rectal cancer clinical management: The radiation oncologist’s expert review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: Although rectal and colon cancer management has progressed greatly in the last few decades clinical outcomes still need to be optimized. Furthermore, consensus is required on several issues as some of the main international guidelines provide different recommendations. The European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA) drew up documents to standardize management and care in Europe and aid in decision-making. Material and Methods: In the present section the panel of experts reviews and discusses data from the literature on rectal cancer, focusing on recommendations for selecting between short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and long-course radio-chemotherapy (LCRTCT) as preoperative treatment as well as on the controversies about adjuvant treatment in patients who had received a pre-operative treatment. Results: The starting-point of the present EURECCA document is that adding SCRT or LCRTCT to TME improved loco-regional control but did not increase overall survival in any single trial which, in any case, had improved with the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) into clinical practice. Moderate consensus was achieved for cT3 anyNM0 disease. In this frame, agreement was reached on either SCRT followed by immediate surgery or LCRTCT with delayed surgery for mesorectal fascia (MRF) negative tumors at presentation. LCRTCT was recommended for tumor shrinkage in MRF+ at presentations but if patients were not candidates for chemotherapy, SCRT with delayed surgery is an option/alternative. LCRTCT was recommended for cT4 anycNM0. SCRT offers the advantages of less acute toxicity and lower costs, and LCRTCT tumor shrinkage and down-staging, with 13–36% pathological complete response (pCR) rates. To improve the efficacy of preoperative treatment both SCRT and LCRTCT have been, or are being, associated with diverse schedules of chemotherapy and even new targeted therapies but without any definitive evidence of benefit. Nowadays, standard

  10. Supportive Management of Mucositis and Metabolic Derangements in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Marcelo; Batt, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is among the most undesirable, painful, and expensive toxicities of cytotoxic cancer therapy, and is disheartening for patients and frustrating for caregivers. Accurate assessment of the incidence of OM has been elusive, but accumulating data suggests that reported OM frequency is significantly less than its actual occurrence. It has been suggested that over 90% of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent cisplatin experience severe OM with symptoms of extreme pain, mucosal ulceration and consequent limitations in swallowing and achieving adequate nutritional intake. This panoply of symptoms inevitably impacts a patients' quality of life and their willingness to continue treatment. In spite of all the advances made in understanding the pathophysiology of OM, there is still no prophylactic therapy with proven efficacy. Strategies to limit the extent of OM and to manage its symptomatology include basic oral care, supportive medications, nutritional support and targeting aggressive treatments to high-risk patients. This review focuses on OM recognition, preventive measurements, and symptom-management strategies. PMID:26404378

  11. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Clavo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n=12 previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83% patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119. Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p<0.001 and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p=0.032. Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14 g/dL to 13 (10–15 g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p=0.008. Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation.

  12. Supportive Management of Mucositis and Metabolic Derangements in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonomi, Marcelo, E-mail: mbonomi@wakehealth.edu; Batt, Katharine [Section of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2015-09-03

    Oral mucositis (OM) is among the most undesirable, painful, and expensive toxicities of cytotoxic cancer therapy, and is disheartening for patients and frustrating for caregivers. Accurate assessment of the incidence of OM has been elusive, but accumulating data suggests that reported OM frequency is significantly less than its actual occurrence. It has been suggested that over 90% of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent cisplatin experience severe OM with symptoms of extreme pain, mucosal ulceration and consequent limitations in swallowing and achieving adequate nutritional intake. This panoply of symptoms inevitably impacts a patients’ quality of life and their willingness to continue treatment. In spite of all the advances made in understanding the pathophysiology of OM, there is still no prophylactic therapy with proven efficacy. Strategies to limit the extent of OM and to manage its symptomatology include basic oral care, supportive medications, nutritional support and targeting aggressive treatments to high-risk patients. This review focuses on OM recognition, preventive measurements, and symptom-management strategies.

  13. Supportive Management of Mucositis and Metabolic Derangements in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral mucositis (OM) is among the most undesirable, painful, and expensive toxicities of cytotoxic cancer therapy, and is disheartening for patients and frustrating for caregivers. Accurate assessment of the incidence of OM has been elusive, but accumulating data suggests that reported OM frequency is significantly less than its actual occurrence. It has been suggested that over 90% of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent cisplatin experience severe OM with symptoms of extreme pain, mucosal ulceration and consequent limitations in swallowing and achieving adequate nutritional intake. This panoply of symptoms inevitably impacts a patients’ quality of life and their willingness to continue treatment. In spite of all the advances made in understanding the pathophysiology of OM, there is still no prophylactic therapy with proven efficacy. Strategies to limit the extent of OM and to manage its symptomatology include basic oral care, supportive medications, nutritional support and targeting aggressive treatments to high-risk patients. This review focuses on OM recognition, preventive measurements, and symptom-management strategies

  14. Supportive Management of Mucositis and Metabolic Derangements in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Bonomi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis (OM is among the most undesirable, painful, and expensive toxicities of cytotoxic cancer therapy, and is disheartening for patients and frustrating for caregivers. Accurate assessment of the incidence of OM has been elusive, but accumulating data suggests that reported OM frequency is significantly less than its actual occurrence. It has been suggested that over 90% of head and neck cancer (HNC patients receiving radiotherapy (RT with concurrent cisplatin experience severe OM with symptoms of extreme pain, mucosal ulceration and consequent limitations in swallowing and achieving adequate nutritional intake. This panoply of symptoms inevitably impacts a patients’ quality of life and their willingness to continue treatment. In spite of all the advances made in understanding the pathophysiology of OM, there is still no prophylactic therapy with proven efficacy. Strategies to limit the extent of OM and to manage its symptomatology include basic oral care, supportive medications, nutritional support and targeting aggressive treatments to high-risk patients. This review focuses on OM recognition, preventive measurements, and symptom-management strategies.

  15. Municipal return to work management in cancer survivors undergoing cancer treatment: a protocol on a controlled intervention study

    OpenAIRE

    Stapelfeldt, Christina M; Labriola, Merete; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Momsen, Anne-Mette H.; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer survivors are often left on their own to deal with the challenges of resuming work during or after cancer treatment, mainly due to unclear agreements between stakeholders responsible for occupational rehabilitation. Social inequality exists in cancer risk, survival probability and continues with regard to the chance of being able to return to work. The aim is to apply an early, individually tailored occupational rehabilitation intervention to cancer survivors in two municipa...

  16. The pitfalls of FDG-PET for managing the patients with primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently positron emission tomography (PET)/CT systems have become popular and been introduced at many institutions throughout Japan and the clinical importance should increase for managing many kinds of malignant diseases including lung cancers. A 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has been the most important tracer in clinical usage and seems to play a major role during these several years. Since March 2004 we began operating the first PET/CT scanner in Japan with a 4-slice multi-detector CT (MDCT) and we have now introduced a second PET/CT scanner with 8-slice MDCT and have been performing 25 to 30 PET studies per day. Although some problems have been reported based on extensive experience, the ability of FDG-PET for staging lung cancers is still indispensable, like other conventional modalities such as CT, MRI and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). It is usually hard to differentiate malignant from benign lesions except for lesions with markedly elevated FDG accumulation. FDG accumulation in macrophages and sarcoid reaction may lead to false positive results. It is essential to interpret FDG-PET findings with the morphological characteristics of CT and/or MRI. FDG-PET has been considered superior to CT for evaluating N factor. However recent studies mention that FDG-PET might show considerable both false-positive and false-negative results particularly in patients with small primary nodules. FDG-PET is useful for integrating and simplifying many kinds of examination methods to determine the existence of distant metastases. Physiological FDG accumulation in brown fat and skeletal muscles, misregistration artifacts between CT and PET and metal devices such as pace-makers might cause incorrect results. In this paper we demonstrate the pitfalls of FDG-PET in managing patients with lung cancer. (author)

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask About Cancer Research Advanced Cancer Choices for Care Talking about Advanced Cancer Coping with Your Feelings ... to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance Directives Using Trusted ...

  18. Ovarian Cancer FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Ovarian Cancer Home For Patients Search FAQs Ovarian Cancer ... Spanish Ovarian Cancer FAQ096, April 2015 PDF Format Ovarian Cancer Gynecologic Problems What is cancer? What is ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Family & Friends Survivorship Questions to Ask About Cancer Research Advanced Cancer Choices for Care Talking about Advanced ... Cancer and Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Advance ...

  20. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the management of locally advanced cervix cancer: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Osman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced cervix cancer has comparable benefits to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT, but with fewer side effects. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the benefits of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for the management of locally advanced cervix cancer from stage IB2 (tumor >4.0 cm to IIIB (tumor extending to the pelvic wall and/or hydronephrosis. Our primary objective was to assess benefits in terms of survival. The data source included the USA national library of medicine, Medline search, and the National Cancer Institute PDQ Clinical Protocols. Inclusion criteria for consideration in the current systematic review included studies published between January 1997 and December 2012. In terms of histology, they had to be focused on squamous cell carcinoma, adenosquamous carcinoma, and/or adenocarcinoma. Patients should be either chemotherapy naïve or cervix cancer chemotherapy naïve, and have a performance status ≤2. The search in the above-mentioned scientific websites led to identify 49 publications, 19 of which were excluded, as they did not meet the inclusion criteria of this systematic review. Therefore only 30 studies were deemed eligible. Data was collected from 1760 patients enrolled in the current systematic review study. The mean age was 45.2 years. The mean tumor size was 4.7 cm. The most commonly used chemotherapies were cisplatin doublets. Paclitaxel was the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent in the doublets. The mean chemotherapy cycles were 2.7. After chemotherapy, patients underwent surgery after a mean time of 2.5 weeks. The standard operation was radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy. Chemotherapy achieved an objective response rate of 84%. The 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 61.9% and 72.8% respectively. The treatment protocol was associated

  1. Integrating Chemotherapy in the Management of Cervical Cancer: A Critical Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lalit; Gupta, Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    The management of locally advanced cervix cancer has undergone a paradigm shift during the last decade. Concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) (with cisplatin alone or in combination) is currently the standard treatment approach. CCRT results in a 5-year overall survival rate of 66% and a disease-free survival of 58%. About 30-40% of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer fail to achieve complete response to CCRT; alternative approaches are needed to improve the outcome for such patients. Weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin for 4-6 weeks as dose-dense chemotherapy prior to CCRT could be one such potential approach. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy after CCRT in patients with positive lymph nodes, larger tumor volume and stage III-IVA disease needs further exploration. Adjuvant chemotherapy is also being investigated for early-stage (stages IA2, IB1 or IIA) cervical cancer with presence of risk factors such as lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular space invasion and invasion depth of more than 10 mm, microscopic parametrial invasion, non-squamous histology and positive surgical margins. For patients with early-stage disease (IA2-IIA), short-course chemotherapy prior to surgery is associated with an improved outcome in many studies. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by fertility preservation surgery is feasible in carefully selected young patients with bulky stage IB1 disease. Recently, a number of molecular pathways have been identified as potential therapeutic targets. Bevacizumab - an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor - is associated with improved survival in patients with recurrent/metastatic cervical cancer. Whether bevacizumab and other similar novel agents targeting molecular pathways could be used in front-line treatment along with cytotoxic chemotherapy is likely to be an area of research in future studies. PMID:27464068

  2. Radiation-sparing managements for cervical cancer: a developing countries perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Garza Jaime

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cervical cancer is the seventh most frequent cancer worldwide but more than 80% of cases occur in developing countries. Till date, radiation therapy with external beam and brachytherapy remains as the core treatment for most stages of cervical cancer. However, radiation treatment protocols and equipment modelled on the best developed countries can be seldom applied directly to developing countries owing to financial constraints and lack of qualified personnel, thus, a substantial proportion of patients do not have access to even palliative radiation therapy. Treatment options when the standard therapy is either not available or difficult to reproduce in particular settings is highly desirable with the potential to save lives that otherwise could be lost by the lack of adequate treatment. These options of treatment ideally had to have show, 1 that these are not inferior to the "standard" in terms of either survival or quality of life; 2 that these can be delivered in settings were the "standard" is not available or if available its quality is poor; and 3 that the treatment option be accepted by the population to be treated. Based on these considerations, it is obvious that cervical cancer patients, particularly those who live in countries with limited resources and therefore may not have sufficient radiation therapy resources are in need of newer therapeutical options. There is now a considerable amount of information emanating from clinical studies where surgery has a major role in treating this disease. These forms of "radiation-sparing" treatments include total mesometrial resection that could make unnecessary the use of adjuvant radiation; neoadjuvant chemotherapy that could avoid the use of adjuvant radiation in around 85% of patients and preoperative chemoradiation that could make brachytherapy dispensable. The feasibility and therapeutical value of these potential forms of management need to be prospectively evaluated.

  3. What is new in the surgical management and prevention of breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Australian women. As most women now survive breast cancer, improving quality-of-life outcomes is increasingly important and major changes are occurring in breast surgery to meet this challenge. Use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy results in lower mastectomy rates, broader surgical options and less surgical morbidity. Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS) facilitates less frequent need for mastectomy, better aesthetic outcomes and improved quality of life. Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) improves quality of life and can be considered in a large proportion of women requiring mastectomy; however, Australia's rate of IBR is low compared with similar countries. Breast cancer risk reduction can be achieved with lifestyle modifications and, in women at high risk, chemoprevention with selective oestrogen receptor modulators or aromatase inhibitors. Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy is an option for BRCA gene mutation carriers or those women otherwise established to have a high level of risk. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) is increasingly performed at the time of initial breast cancer management, largely driven by patient preference. However, CPM does not improve survival and has similar rates of complications as therapeutic mastectomy. It should be cautiously considered, with full discussion of risks and benefits. Breast Surgeons of Australia and New Zealand (BreastSurgANZ) coordinates training of most new breast surgeons and is fostering a broader range of multidisciplinary oncology, OBS and IBR skills in its members. The BreastSurgANZ Quality Audit monitors the quality of care provided by members. Training breast surgeons now have access to a Graduate Certificate in Surgery (Breast Surgery) to broaden their knowledge base. PMID:27125805

  4. Managing Patients with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: Old Disease, New Ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Uno Malmström

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prof Per-Uno Malmström opened this symposium on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC by describing the medical and economic burden caused by the increasing incidence of bladder cancer and the lack of new therapeutic options available to address the challenges of the management of NMIBC. Prof Marko Babjuk followed with a presentation that demonstrated that risk stratification using European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and Spanish Urological Club for Oncological Treatment (CUETO risk scores remains a useful tool for determining the best individual treatment options for patients. The next presentation, given by Dr Carsten Ohlmann, described the use of mitomycin C (MMC for low and intermediate-risk patients as per the European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines. However, despite a favourable safety profile, single case reports of severe adverse events following treatment with MMC should not be dismissed. MMC should therefore be given with care, with an emphasis on performing high quality transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB. Prof Bernard Malavaud then presented details of newer diagnostic methods, such as photodynamic diagnosis (PDD and narrow band imaging (NBI, which offer better optical tumour recognition for the surgeon than the old standard of white light cystoscopy. The uptake of PDD and NBI in the future will facilitate an increase in the quality of TURB. Finally, Prof Ashish Kamat explained that recurrence of bladder cancer after bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG treatment (‘BCG failure’ needs to be more clearly defined and stratified. He stated that optimal recognition of timing with relation to BCG immunotherapy is critical to determine the next steps. For example, in the past, patients with late recurrence who may have benefitted from challenge with BCG may have been overlooked.

  5. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grant Management Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ...

  6. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer–related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2–65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  7. Management of Early Breast Cancer with Breast Conservative Surgery. An Egyptian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Breast conservative surgery (BCS) has been an established method for treatment of early breast cancer. The volume of the procedure varies from a wide local excision to partial mastectomy and ipsilateral axillary lymphadenectomy. The nipple and areola complex sparing, depends on their proximity to the tumour. Radiotherapy, chemotherapy and or hormonal treatment play an integral role in the treatment of early breast cancer. Aim of the Study: In the present study we present our experience at National Cancer Institute, Cairo University with breast conservative surgery in treatment of female patients with early (T1-T2) breast cancer. The aim is to examine the evidence based management of those cases and the outcome of treatment in terms of loco regional recurrence and/or distant metastasis. Patients and Methods: The study includes 200 with early breast cancer patients who presented to the department of surgery, National Cancer Institute between May 2002 and February 2007. The average age was 46±6.5 years and the range was (26-72 years). Bilateral mammography, chest X-ray and full blood count were done routinely in the entire patients' group. The inclusion criteria included all patients presented with a breast tumor up to 4 cm in greatest dimension (T1-2N0). Results: Sixty Eight percent of patients underwent wide local excision, 20% underwent quadrantectomies, and 12% underwent partial mastectomy with or without nipple and areola preservation. All patients who underwent quadrantectomy or partial mastectomy required an augmentation mammoplasty to restore the breast volume. A latissmus dorsi myocutaneous flap was used in the majority of cases (70%), the rest were reconstructed with either a prosthetic implant or transverse rectus abdominis flap. The complications involved a total flap loss in 2 patients, partial flap loss in 2, nipple and areola sloughing in 4, wound infection in 5, haematoma in 4, seroma in 60, and donor site morbidity in 12 patients. Ninety

  8. Randomized controlled trial of a collaborative care intervention to manage cancer-related symptoms: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Jennifer; Geller, David A; Tsung, Allan; Marsh, J Wallis; Dew, Mary Amanda; Spring, Michael; Grady, Jonathan; Likumahuwa, Sonja; Dunlavy, Andrea; Youssef, Michael; Antoni, Michael; Butterfield, Lisa H; Schulz, Richard; Day, Richard; Helgeson, Vicki; Kim, Kevin H; Gamblin, T Clark

    2012-01-01

    Background Collaborative care interventions to treat depression have begun to be tested in settings outside of primary care. However, few studies have expanded the collaborative care model to other settings and targeted comorbid physical symptoms of depression. Purpose The aims of this report were to: (1) describe the design and methods of a trial testing the efficacy of a stepped collaborative care intervention designed to manage cancer-related symptoms and improve overall quality of life in patients diagnosed with hepatobiliary carcinoma; and (2) share the lessons learned during the design, implementation, and evaluation of the trial. Methods The trial was a phase III randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of a stepped collaborative care intervention to reduce depression, pain, and fatigue in patients diagnosed with advanced cancer. The intervention was compared to an enhanced usual care arm. The primary outcomes included the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT)-Fatigue, and the FACT-Hepatobiliary. Sociodemographic and disease-specific characteristics were recorded from the medical record; Natural Killer cells and cytokines that are associated with these symptoms and with disease progression were assayed from serum. Results and Discussion The issues addressed include: (1) development of collaborative care in the context of oncology (e.g., timing of the intervention, tailoring of the intervention, ethical issues regarding randomization of patients, and changes in medical treatment over the course of the study); (2) use of a website by chronically ill populations (e.g., design and access to the website, development of the website and intervention, ethical issues associated with website development, website usage, and unanticipated costs associated with website development); (3) evaluation of the efficacy of intervention (e.g., patient preferences, proxy raters

  9. Pericardial effusion in patients with cancer: outcome with contemporary management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laham, R. J.; Cohen, D. J.; Kuntz, R. E.; Baim, D. S.; Lorell, B. H.; Simons, M.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the clinical presentation and current management strategies of pericardial effusion in patients with malignancy. DESIGN--Retrospective single centre, consecutive observational study. SETTING--University hospital. PATIENTS--93 consecutive patients with a past or present diagnosis of cancer and a pericardial effusion, including 50 with a pericardial effusion > 1 cm. RESULTS--Of the 50 patients with pericardial effusions > 1 cm, most had stage 4 cancer (64%), were symptomatic at the time of presentation (74%), and had right atrial collapse (74%). Twenty patients were treated conservatively (without pericardiocentesis) and were less symptomatic (55% v 87%, P = 0.012), had smaller pericardial effusions (1.5 (0.4) v 1.8 (0.5), P = 0.02), and less frequent clinical (10% v 40%, P = 0.02) and echocardiographic evidence of tamponade (40% v 97%, P < 0.001) than the 30 patients treated invasively with initial pericardiocentesis (n = 29) or pericardial window placement (n = 1). Pericardial tamponade requiring repeat pericardiocentesis occurred in 18 (62%) of 29 patients after a median of 7 days. In contrast, only four (20%) of 20 patients in the conservative group progressed to frank clinical tamponade and required pericardiocentesis (P = 0.005 v invasive group). The overall median survival was 2 months with a survival rate at 48 months of 26%. Survival, duration of hospital stay, and hospital charges were similar with both strategies. By multivariable analysis, the absence of symptoms was the only independent predictor of long-term survival (relative hazards ratio = 3.2, P = 0.05). Survival was similar in the 43 patients with cancer and pericardial effusions of < or = 1 cm. CONCLUSION--Asymptomatic patients with cancer and pericardial effusion can be managed conservatively with close follow up. In patients with symptoms or clinical cardiac tamponade, pericardiocentesis provides relief of symptoms but does not improve survival and has a high recurrence

  10. 18F-FDG PET in the management of endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few studies have investigated the clinical impact of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in endometrial cancer. We aimed to assess the value of integrating FDG-PET into the management of endometrial cancer in comparison with conventional imaging alone. All patients with histologically confirmed primary advanced (stage III/IV) or suspicious/documented recurrent endometrial cancer, with poor prognostic features (serum CA-125 >35 U/ml or unfavourable cell types), or surveillance after salvage therapy were eligible. Before FDG-PET scanning, each patient had received magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography (MRI-CT). The receiver operating characteristic curve method with calculation of the area under the curve (AUC) was used to compare the diagnostic efficacy. Clinical impacts were determined on a scan basis. Forty-nine eligible patients were accrued and 60 studies were performed (27 primary staging, 33 post-therapy surveillance or restaging on relapse). The clinical impact was positive in 29 (48.3%) of the 60 scans. Mean standardised uptake values (SUVs) of true-positive lesions were 13.2 (range 5.7-37.4) for central pelvic lesions and 11.1 (range 1.5-37.4) for metastases. The sensitivity of FDG-PET alone (P<0.0001) or FDG-PET plus MRI-CT (P<0.0001) was significantly higher than that of MRI-CT alone in overall lesion detection. FDG-PET plus MRI-CT was significantly superior to MRI-CT alone in overall lesion detection (AUC 0.949 vs 0.872; P=0.004), detection of pelvic nodal/soft tissue metastases (P=0.048) and detection of extrapelvic metastases (P=0.010), while FDG-PET alone was only marginally superior by AUC (P=0.063). Whole-body FDG-PET coupled with MRI-CT facilitated optimal management of endometrial cancer in well-selected cases. (orig.)

  11. Adverse event management strategies: optimizing treatment with regorafenib in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jessica; Khoukaz, Taline; McNeal, Deborah; Brent, Lori

    2014-04-01

    Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) frequently experience treatment-related adverse events (AEs), which may lead to nonadherence or discontinuation from their treatment regimen. In the phase 3 CORRECT study, the addition of regorafenib to best supportive care (BSC) significantly increased overall survival and progression-free survival compared with placebo plus BSC in patients with mCRC who had progressed on all approved standard care therapies. Although regorafenib showed an acceptable safety profile, patients experienced treatment-related AEs such as hand-foot skin reaction, hypertension, oral mucositis, diarrhea, fatigue, and liver abnormalities. The goal of this article is to help oncology nurses implement a strategic, proactive approach to AE management in patients mCRC treated with regorafenib. The article reviews the most common AEs associated with regorafenib in patients who participated in the CORRECT study and provides a strategy and practical measures that nurses can apply to AE management. In addition, the article provides direction and guidance for educating patients and their caregivers on recognizing and managing potential side effects of regorafenib. PMID:24675266

  12. [Current status and prospect of perioperative thrombus management in gastrointestinal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, X Y

    2016-03-01

    Thanks to the progress of surgical theory and skills, as well as the application of modern medical devices in general surgery, both the occurrence of perioperative complications and mortality of gastrointestinal surgery have significantly reduced recently. However, it is still far from optimal in terms of the perioperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) management in gastrointestinal cancer, and what is responsible for that? This paper aims at finding out the reasons contributing to the current status, giving suggestions for how to make improvement at both disease level and hospital management level. At the same time, while paying attention for the prophylaxis of VTE, there have been more and more patients receiving antithrombotic treatment require elective or emergent surgery in clinical practice, due to aging and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease year by year. How to balance the bleeding and thrombosis risk for these patients during perioperative periods is also a question we are going to discuss. In conclusion, as to the issue of the management of perioperative thrombosis, there will be a long way for Chinese doctors to go. Our peers should pay more attention to this problem and take more efforts, so that the thrombotic complications in surgical patients can be reduced. PMID:26932880

  13. Ethmoid sinus cancer: Twenty-nine cases managed with primary radiation therapys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the outcome of patients with carcinoma of the ethmoid sinus managed with a policy of primary radiation therapy with surgery for salvage of persistent or progressive disease. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was undertaken of 29 patients with the diagnosis of carcinoma of the ethmoid complex who underwent treatment in the period between January 1976 and December 1994 at the Princess Margaret Hospital. Analysis was confined to those patients with epithelial invasive histology (squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, or undifferentiated carcinoma) managed with curative intent with primary radiation therapy. The median patient age was 62, with a median follow-up time of 4 years. Staging was assigned according to a modification of the UICC 1997 system with 19 (66%) of patients presenting with T4 category tumors. The most common radiation dose regimes were 60 Gy in 30 daily fractions over 6 weeks, or 50 Gy in 20 daily fractions over 4 weeks. Outcome was analyzed with respect to overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local progression-free survival. The influence of a variety of clinical and therapeutic factors on outcome is discussed, the patterns of disease failure are described, and the rationale for this treatment approach is outlined. Results: The 5-year rates of overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local progression-free survival were 39%, 58%, and 41%, respectively. A total of 18 of 29 patients died during the period of review. Of these, 12 deaths were due to ethmoid cancer, one was due to a second primary lung cancer, and five were attributed to nononcologic causes. No patients died due to treatment-related toxicity. Increasing T category predicted for worse outcome on univariate analysis. Local progression was the major cause of treatment failure and was documented in 15 of 29 patients treated (52%). Six patients were offered salvage surgery for local progression, of whom two remained disease free at 15 and 17

  14. Effects of Cancer Comorbidity on Disease Management: Making the Case for Diabetes Education (A Report from the SOAR Program)

    OpenAIRE

    Irizarry, Lauren; Li, Qijuan E.; Duncan, Ian; Thurston, Andrew L.; Fitzner, Karen A.; Edwards, Beatrice J.; McKoy-Bent, Judith M.; Tulas, Katrina M.; McKoy, June M.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with type II diabetes have an increased risk of cancer diagnosis (relative risk [RR]=1.12–2.50) and mortality (RR=1.4) compared to normoglycemic individuals. Biologic mechanisms, including mitogenic effects of insulin, hyperglycemia, and increased oxidative stress, as well as behavioral factors (eg, difficulty managing the comorbidity) may explain the elevated risk. To investigate the effects of the comorbidity on disease management, the authors compared diabetes education utiliza...

  15. A qualitative investigation of the roles and perspectives of older patients with advanced cancer and their family caregivers in managing pain in the home

    OpenAIRE

    McPherson, Christine J; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Devereaux, Alana; Lobchuk, Michelle M

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain in advanced cancer is complex and multifaceted. In older patients comorbidities and age-related functional decline add to the difficulties in managing cancer pain. The current emphasis on care in the community, and preference by patients with life-limiting disease to receive care in the home, has meant that patients and their family caregivers have become increasingly responsible for the day-to-day management of cancer pain. An appreciation of patients’ and caregivers’ roles a...

  16. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood tests (which look for chemicals such as tumor markers) Bone marrow biopsy (for lymphoma or leukemia) Chest ... the case with skin cancers , as well as cancers of the lung, breast, and colon. If the tumor has spread ...

  17. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  18. Lipegfilgrastim in the management of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guariglia R

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Guariglia,1 Maria Carmen Martorelli,1 Rosa Lerose,2 Donatella Telesca,2 Maria Rita Milella,2 Pellegrino Musto3 1Unit of Hematology and Stem Cell Transplantation, 2Pharmacy Service, 3Scientific Direction, IRCCS, Referral Cancer Center of Basilicata, Rionero in Vulture, Potenza, Italy Abstract: Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia (FN are frequent and potentially fatal toxicities of myelosuppressive anticancer treatments. The introduction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs in clinical practice has remarkably reduced the duration and severity of neutropenia, as well as the incidence of FN, thus allowing the administration of chemotherapeutic agents at the optimal dose and time with lower risk. The current scenario of G-CSFs in Europe includes filgrastim, lenograstim, some G-CSF biosimilars, and pegfilgrastim. Recently, a novel long-acting G-CSF, lipegfilgrastim, became available. Lipegfilgrastim is a glycopegylated G-CSF, alternative to pegfilgrastim, and has shown in randomized trials, to be equivalent to pegfilgrastim in reducing the incidence of severe neutropenia and FN in patients with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy, with a similar safety profile. Furthermore, lipegfilgrastim was more effective than the placebo in reducing the incidence of severe neutropenia, its duration, and time to absolute neutrophil count recovery, in patients with non-small cell lung cancer receiving myelosuppressive therapy. Although the number of studies currently published is still limited, lipegfilgrastim seems to be a promising drug in the management of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Keywords: neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, granulocyte colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF, pegfilgrastim, lipegfilgrastim

  19. Management of recurrent rectal cancer: A population based study in greater Amsterdam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roel Bakx; Otto Visser; Judith Josso; Sybren Meijer; J Frederik M Slors; J Jan B van Lanschot

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze, retrospectively in a population-based study, the management and survival of patients with recurrent rectal cancer initially treated with a macroscopically radical resection obtained with total mesorectal excision (TME).METHODS: All rectal carcinomas diagnosed during 1998 to 2000 and initially treated with a macroscopically radical resection (632 patients) were selected from the Amsterdam Cancer Registry. For patients with recurrent disease, information on treatment of the recurrence was collected from the medical records.RESULTS: Local recurrence with or without clinically apparent distant dissemination occurred in 62 patients (10%). Thirty-two patients had an isolated local recurrence. Ten of these 32 patients (31%) underwent radical re-resection and experienced the highest survival (three quarters survived for at least 3 years). Eight patients (25%) underwent non-radical surgery (median survival 24 too), seven patients (22%) were treated with radio- and/or chemotherapy without surgery (median survival 15 mo) and seven patients (22%) only received best supportive care (median survival 5 mo). Distant dissemination occurred in 124 patients (20%) of whom 30 patients also had a local recurrence. The majority (54%) of these patients were treated with radio- and/or chemotherapy without surgery (median survival 15 mo). Twenty-seven percent of these patients only received best supportive care (median survival 6 mo), while 16% underwent surgery for their recurrence. Survival was best in the latter group (median survival 32 mo).CONCLUSION: Although treatment options and survival are limited in case of recurrent rectal cancer after radical local resection obtained with TME, patients can benefit from additional treatment, especially if a radical resection is feasible.

  20. Role of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in the management of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Taiki; Chiyo, Masako; Iyoda, Akira; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Suzuki, Makoto; Sekine, Yasuo; Shibuya, Kiyoshi; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2008-06-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is a promising new modality first introduced during the early 1990s. The radial probe EBUS was initially developed seeking for high-resolution imaging of processes in the airway wall and outside the airways. The structure of special importance was lymph nodes, walls of the central airways, and the mediastinum. After the development of miniaturized radial probes with flexible catheters having a balloon at the tip, it has been applied to aid bronchoscopists during biopsy of patients with respiratory diseases. In particular, the role of EBUS in transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) has been established. Radial probe EBUS-guided TBNA has increased the yield of TBNA of mediastinal lymph nodes, although it was still not a real-time procedure with target visualization. New convex probe EBUS (CP-EBUS) with the ability to perform real-time EBUS-guided TBNA (EBUS-TBNA) has emerged to overcome these problems. Indications for EBUS-TBNA are (1) lymph node staging in lung cancer patients; (2) diagnosis of intrapulmonary tumors; (3) diagnosis of unknown hilar and/or mediastinal lymphadenopathy; and (4) diagnosis of mediastinal tumors. Case series using EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging in lung cancer have reported a high yield, ranging from 89% to 98% (average 94.5%). To date, there are no reports of major complications related to EBUS-TBNA. EBUS-TBNA is a novel approach with a high diagnostic yield that is safe. The aim of this article was to review the current role of EBUS-TBNA for the management of lung cancer patients. PMID:18563521

  1. Impact of Port-A-Cath device management in cancer patients with candidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Y-C; Huang, L-J; Chen, T-L; Yang, Y-W; Hsiao, L-T; Teng, H-W; Fung, C-P; Chiou, T-J; Tzeng, C-H; Liu, C-Y

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the impact of management of a totally implantable central venous access port device, Port-A-Cath (Smith Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA), on the outcome of 98 cancer patients with candidaemia. Port-A-Cath retention was found to be significantly associated with poorer outcome, independent of other significant adverse factors [breakthrough candidaemia, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score ≥ 21, and worse Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score (3-4)]. However, retention of Port-A-Cath devices could be considered in patients who do not have definite catheter-related candidaemia, are not using total parenteral nutrition, do not have poor ECOG performance scores or APACHE II scores, and do not have septic shock. PMID:23084483

  2. Assessing and managing breast cancer risk: clinicians' current practice and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ian M; Steel, Emma; Mann, G Bruce; Emery, Jon D; Bickerstaffe, Adrian; Trainer, Alison; Butow, Phyllis; Pirotta, Marie; Antoniou, Antonis C; Cuzick, Jack; Hopper, John; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Keogh, Louise A

    2014-10-01

    Decision support tools for the assessment and management of breast cancer risk may improve uptake of prevention strategies. End-user input in the design of such tools is critical to increase clinical use. Before developing such a computerized tool, we examined clinicians' practice and future needs. Twelve breast surgeons, 12 primary care physicians and 5 practice nurses participated in 4 focus groups. These were recorded, coded, and analyzed to identify key themes. Participants identified difficulties assessing risk, including a lack of available tools to standardize practice. Most expressed confidence identifying women at potentially high risk, but not moderate risk. Participants felt a tool could especially reassure young women at average risk. Desirable features included: evidence-based, accessible (e.g. web-based), and displaying absolute (not relative) risks in multiple formats. The potential to create anxiety was a concern. Development of future tools should address these issues to optimize translation of knowledge into clinical practice. PMID:24998452

  3. The surgical management of male breast cancer: Time for an easy access national reporting database?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M.T. Staruch

    2016-08-01

    Discussion: We report a series of seven cases of male breast cancer encountered over three years, evaluating patient demographics as well as treatment and outcomes. In our series patients were managed with mastectomy. New evidence is questioning the role of mastectomy against breast conserving surgery in male patients. Furthermore there is a lack of reporting infrastructure for national data capture of the benefits of surgical modalities. Literature review highlights the varied clinical experience between units that remains reported as podium presentation but not published. The establishment of an online international reporting registry would allow for efficient analysis of surgical outcomes to improve patient care from smaller single centres. This would facilitate large scale meta analysis by larger academic surgical centres.

  4. Bridging Gaps in Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Care: Nursing Coordination and Case Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with advanced head and neck cancer face not only a life-threatening malignancy, but also a remarkably complex treatment regimen that can affect their cosmetic appearance and ability to speak, breathe, and swallow. These patients benefit from the coordinated interaction of a multidisciplinary team of specialists and a comprehensive plan of care to address their physical and psychosocial concerns, manage treatment-related toxicities, and prevent or limit long-term morbidities affecting health-related quality of life. Although little has been published on patient-provider communication with a multidisciplinary team, evidence has suggested that gaps often occur in communication between patients and providers, as well as between specialists. These communication gaps can hinder the multidisciplinary group from working toward common patient-centered goals in a coordinated 'interdisciplinary' manner. We discuss the role of a head-and-neck oncology nurse coordinator at a single institution in bridging gaps across the continuum of care, promoting an interdisciplinary team approach, and enhancing the overall quality of patient-centered head-and-neck cancer care

  5. Core biopsy as a tool in planning the management of invasive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garud Trivikram

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Core biopsy is a method of choice for the triple assessment of breast disease as it can reliably distinguish between benign and malignant tumours, between in-situ and invasive cancers and can be useful to assess oestrogen receptor status. This study was carried out to assess the reliability of core biopsy in predicting the grade and type of cancer accurately as obtaining this information can influence initial therapeutic decisions. Patients and methods A total of 105 patients who had invasive breast carcinoma diagnosed by core biopsy in year 2001 and who subsequently underwent surgical management were included. The core biopsy results were compared with final histology with the help of kappa statastics. Results A moderate level of agreement between the predicted grades and final grades was noted (kappa = 0.585. The agreement was good between predicted and final type of tumour (kappa = 0.639. Conclusions Core biopsy as a predictor of grade and type has limited use at present. We suggest that initial clinical decisions should not be based on the results of core biopsy.

  6. Cytotoxic chemotherapy in the contemporary management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonpavde, Guru; Wang, Christopher G; Galsky, Matthew D; Oh, William K; Armstrong, Andrew J

    2015-07-01

    For several years, docetaxel was the only treatment shown to improve survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). There are now several novel agents available, although chemotherapy with docetaxel and cabazitaxel continues to play an important role. However, the increasing number of available agents will inevitably affect the timing of chemotherapy and therefore it may be important to offer this approach before declining performance status renders patients ineligible for chemotherapy. Patient selection is also important to optimise treatment benefit. The role of predictive biomarkers has assumed greater importance due to the development of multiple agents and resistance to available agents. In addition, the optimal sequence of treatments remains undefined and requires further study in order to maximize long-term outcomes. We provide an overview of the clinical data supporting the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of mCRPC and the emerging role in metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer. We review the key issues in the management of patients including selection of patients for chemotherapy, when to start chemotherapy, and how best to sequence treatments to maximise outcomes. In addition, we briefly summarise the promising new chemotherapeutic agents in development in the context of emerging therapies. PMID:25046451

  7. Usefulness of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate in the management of cancer-related cachexia-anorexia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, A; Gebbia, V; Borsellino, N; Valenza, R; Cannata, G; Tirrito, M; Verderame, F; Armata, M; Valerio, M; Gebbia, N

    1996-05-01

    A study on the activity and tolerability of high-dose medroxyprogesterone acetate in the treatment of ACS in neoplastic patients was carried out in a series of 103 patients with advanced cancer beyond cure with standard chemotherapeutic or radiotherapeutic treatments. The treatment plan was: medroxyprogesterone acetate (MAP) 1,000 mg/day as liquid suspension orally at a single dose, for at least one month. If there was no improvement in body weight, SSA, performance status therapy was interrupted. An increase in body weight greater than or equal to 5%, in SSA score greater than or equal to 2 points, in performance status and then in quality of life were recorded as positive MAP-related events. Therapy-related toxicity was evaluated according to the WHO criteria. A mean body weight increased from 63 kg recorded before therapy to 67 kg recorded after 30 days of MAP. This difference was statistically significant (pacetate in the management of anorexia-cachexia syndrome in patients with advanced cancer resistant to systemic chemotherapy. PMID:21594399

  8. Multi-centre European study of breakthrough cancer pain: pain characteristics and patient perceptions of current and potential management strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Andrew; Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Andersen, Steen;

    2011-01-01

    This study involved 320 cancer patients from four Northern European countries. Patients with breakthrough pain were questioned about the characteristics of their pain, the current management of their pain, and the acceptability/utility of alternative routes of administration. The median number...

  9. Barriers to cancer pain management in danish and lithuanian patients treated in pain and palliative care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Samsanaviciene, Jurgita; Liubarskiene, Zita;

    2014-01-01

    -related barriers to cancer pain management in patient samples from Denmark and Lithuania. Thirty-three Danish and 30 Lithuanian patients responded to, respectively, Danish and Lithuanian versions of the Brief Pain Inventory pain scale, the Barriers Questionnaire II, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the...... poor adherence to pain medication and poor pain relief appear to be more country-specific problems....

  10. Challenges in the Management of Childhood Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Experience in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in children is a challenge because of its unique nature of presentation, biological behavior and prognosis. Treatment pattern varies and there is no uniform management strategy. Objective: The aim of the present paper is to summarize the experience gained in the treatment of children with DTC in Bangladesh and to propose a work plan for optimal management of childhood DTC which is yet to be determined. Results: In a review of mixed population of patients with DTC treated for over 20 years at a referral center in Dhaka, 8.7 % were children aged between 9 to 15 years. The sex distribution shows that DTC is more common in girls than boys and this difference became greater as children reached puberty. Papillary thyroid cancer was the most common histological subtype (89% cases). At the time of diagnosis, 61% children had disease confined to the neck, 34% had metastasis to the cervical nodes and 5% had pulmonary metastasis. Treatment strategy consisted of near total thyroidectomy with or without lymph node dissection followed by radioiodine treatment and TSH suppression therapy (THST) with levothyroxine. Follow-up examinations included the estimations of thyroglobulin (Tg) levels and interval whole body survey after withdrawal of thyroxine. Follow up showed a high recurrence rate of the disease in children with lymph node and pulmonary involvement. Even after multiple doses of radioiodine therapy, 20% of these patients showed evidence of persistent disease. In patients who initially presented with disease confined to the neck, persistent disease was found in 8% cases. The survival rate at 5 and 15 years was higher in children without metastasis (92%) compared to 82% in children with lymph node involvement and 67% in those who presented with pulmonary metastasis. There were no cause specific deaths. Conclusion: Our experience suggests that management of childhood DTC is best, when done with the consensus of a

  11. Radioiodine (I-131) application in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) remains one of the curable of all cancers. All literature reviews and clinical experiences regarding I131 use in DTC conclude the beneficial effects, better prognosis, longer survival time and an assurance for cure. The Overall prognosis of patients with DTC is excellent if treat scientifically, adequately and timely. The management of thyroid cancer depends on the resources available in different institutions. Nuclear Medicine unit (NMU), Faculty of Medicine Peradeniya, Sri Lanka is in the process of uplifting the services for thyroid cancer management. Clinical audit was carried out in NMU on patients who utilized the Nuclear Medicine facilities in the management of DTC. It is important to identify deficiencies in current practice to improve our services. During January 2004 to March 2005, 126 DTC patients were referred for radioiodine Whole body scan (WBS) and therapy. Their age, sex, histology, extent of surgery, adequacy of thyroxine suppression treatment, monitoring with serum thyroglobulin levels (Tg), WBS results and radioiodine therapy were analyzed. There were 104(82.5%) females and 22(17.5%) males giving sex ratio of 4.7: 1. The Mean age was 35.5 years (range 9-58 years). The commonest histological types were papillary carcinoma 55.5% (n=70), follicular carcinoma 35% (n=44) and follicular variant of papillary carcinoma 9.5% (n=12). Seventy five percent (n=95) had total thyroidectomy (TT), 17 %(n=21) had near total thyroidectomy (NTT) and 8%(n=10) had subtotal thyroidectomy (STT). Sixty-nine patients (54.8%) were on thyroid suppression therapy. Thirty-six patients (28.6%) were referred to the WBS soon after surgery without initiation of thyroxine treatment. Another twenty-one patients (16.6%) were not on thyroxine therapy since surgery. Serum thyroglobulin was assessed on 20.6% (n=26). WBS done using 3-4 mCi liquid radioiodine showed residual functioning thyroid tissues in 41% (n=52). Lymph nodes or bone

  12. Efficacy and safety of fentanyl buccal for cancer pain management by administration through a soluble film: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than half of patients receiving prescription medicine for cancer pain have been reported to experience inadequate pain relief or breakthrough pain. Buccal administration can deliver lipophilic opioids rapidly to the systemic circulation through the buccal mucosa, limiting gastrointestinal motility and first-pass metabolism. This review updates the safety and efficacy of fentanyl buccal soluble film (FBSF) in patients with cancer pain. Literature was identified through searches of Medline (PubMed). Search terms included combinations of the following: cancer pain, fentanyl, fentanyl buccal soluble film, pharmacology, kinetics, safety, efficacy and toxicity. FBSF is an oral transmucosal form of fentanyl citrate developed as a treatment of breakthrough pain in opioid-tolerant patients with cancer. Studies have shown that it is well tolerated in the oral cavity, with adequate bioavailability and safety in cancer patients. Further studies are warranted to evaluate, in comparison with other short-acting opioids, its efficacy in the management of breakthrough cancer pain, its addictive potential and its economic impact in cancer patients

  13. Correct Pre-Operative Diagnosis of Breast Cancer by Tru-cut Biopsy: Key Point in Breast Cancer Management and a Part of Patient Right

    OpenAIRE

    A. Joulaee; M Kalantari; M. Salamati

    2009-01-01

    The new revolutionary concept in breast cancer diagnosis and management during the last 3 decades significantly decreases invasion against patients while maximizing the accuracy of diagnosis and the effectiveness of treatment."n"n In this new concept team work multidisciplinary approach is the key. The presence of an interventional breast radiologist in this new approach is absolutely necessary. The role of an interventional and a non interventional breast radiologist in this team w...

  14. Axillary radiotherapy: an alternative treatment option for adjuvant axillary management of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Axillary lymph node dissection is standard management of axilla in invasive breast cancer. Radiotherapy also is important in local treatment. It is controversial as to whether axillary radiotherapy can displace axillary lymph node dissection. We performed a meta-analysis comparing axillary radiotherapy with axillary dissection. No significant difference was observed for disease free survival and overall survival between the radiation group and the dissection group. There was also no significant difference in either the axillary recurrence or the local recurrence between the two groups. But the axillary relapse rate in the radiation group was higher than in the surgery group at five-year follow-up while the local recurrence rate in the surgery group was higher than in the radiation group. A subgroup analysis showed that the difference in the axillary recurrence rate (RR = 0.20, P = 0.01) and local recurrence rate (RR = 4.7, P = 0.01) mainly appeared in the clinical node-positive subgroup. The edema rate in the surgery group was higher than in the radiation group (RR = 2.08, 95%: 1.71–2.54, P < 0.0001). We concluded that radiotherapy may be an alternative treatment option for adjuvant management of the axilla in selected sub-groups of patients. PMID:27212421

  15. Assessment and management of cancer risks from radiological and chemical hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Joint Working Group was established in April 1995 by the President of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) and the Assistant Deputy Minister of the Health Protection Branch of Health Canada to examine the similarities, disparities and inconsistencies between the levels of risk considered acceptable for regulating ionizing radiation and those considered acceptable for regulating chemical and microbiological hazards. During the process of collecting, analysing and interpreting information, the Joint Working Group realized that its terms of reference as written presented a major difficulty because of the lack of consensus on acceptable levels of risk. Consequently it decided that the most reasonable way to proceed was to compare the risk assessment and management processes used to protect the public from radiation, chemicals and microbiological hazards. This report concentrates on the assessment and management of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals (which both cause cancer by damaging the DNA in cells) and pays less attention to non-genotoxic effects and microbiological hazards. The report also examines public more than occupational exposures and exposures from man-made rather than naturally occurring agents. (author)

  16. Impact of inadequate respiratory motion management in SBRT for oligometastatic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in oligometastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) resulted in a disappointing 1-year local control rate of 54% in our experience. We aimed to determine the root cause(s). Methods: 47 oligometastatic CRC patients were treated with SBRT by helical tomotherapy to a dose of 40 or 50 Gy in 10 fractions, without specific respiratory motion management and PTV-margins of 10–10–12 mm in all patients. The local recurrences (LRs) were delineated on diagnostic PET–CT scans and co-registered with initial planning CTs. LRs were classified as in-field or marginal with respect to the initial dose distribution, and predictors for LR were determined. Results: Out of 105 irradiated metastases, LR modeling yielded 15 in-field and 15 marginal failures. Metastases in moving organs (liver and lung) exhibited a local control of 53% at 1-year (95% confidence interval (CI): 38–67%), compared to 79% for lymph nodes (95% CI: 32–95%). The first group exhibited a sixfold increased risk compared to the latter on multivariate analysis (p = 0.01). Conclusions: The nature and locations of LR indicated that dose prescription and methodology were both inadequate for liver and lung metastases. This study demonstrates the need for individual respiratory motion management and a biological effective dose of >75 Gy

  17. European and North American lung cancer screening experience and implications for pulmonary nodule management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for low dose computed tomography (LDCT) to act as an effective tool in screening for lung cancer is currently the subject of several randomised control trials. It has recently been given prominence by interim results released by the North American National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). Several other trials assessing LDCT as a screening tool are currently underway in Europe, and are due to report their final results in the next few years. These include the NELSON, DLSCT, DANTE, ITALUNG, MILD and LUSI trials. Although slow to instigate a trial of its own, the UK Lung Screen (UKLS) trial will shortly commence. The knowledge gained from the newer trials has mostly reinforced and refined previous concepts that have formed the basis of existing nodule management guidelines. This article takes the opportunity to summarise the main aspects and initial results of the trials presently underway, assess the status of current collaborative efforts and the scope for future collaboration, and analyse observations from these studies that may usefully inform the management of the indeterminate pulmonary nodule. (orig.)

  18. Dental and nutritional management of the head and neck cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This course will examine the expected acute and late normal tissue toxicities associated with the delivery of high dose radiation therapy to the head and neck region. The purpose of this course will be to identify strategies to reduce radiotherapy-related toxicity without compromising adequate tumor treatment. A multidisciplinary approach will be emphasized and the following topics will be addressed: 1) Appropriate dental evaluation prior to the institution of treatment, oral care during radiation therapy and management of dental complications following completion of treatment. 2) Treatment techniques that accurately localize the target tissue, displace normal tissues from high dose volume and reduce the volume of normal tissue included in the radiation portals. 3) The investigative use of radioprotective agents. 4) Optimal integration of radiotherapy with surgery and/or chemotherapy. 5) The nutritional management of head and neck cancer patients including enteral and parenteral nutrition. 6) The use of medications to reduce the severity of acute symptomatology before, during and after radiation therapy

  19. A phase II trial of Reiki for the management of pain in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Karin; Hanson, John; Michaud, Mary

    2003-11-01

    This trial compared pain, quality of life, and analgesic use in a sample of patients with cancer pain (n=24) who received either standard opioid management plus rest (Arm A) or standard opioid management plus Reiki (Arm B). Participants either rested for 1.5 hr on Days 1 and 4 or received two Reiki treatments (Days 1 and 4) one hour after their first afternoon analgesic dose. Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain ratings, blood pressure, heart rate, and respirations were obtained before and after each treatment/rest period. Analgesic use and VAS pain scores were reported for 7 days. Quality of life was assessed on Days 1 and 7. Participants in Arm B experienced improved pain control on Days 1 and 4 following treatment, compared to Arm A, and improved quality of life, but no overall reduction in opioid use. Future research will determine the extent to which the benefits attributed to Reiki in this study may have been due to touch. PMID:14585550

  20. Role of transurethral resection of the prostate in the management of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Szollosi Attila; Martha Orsolya; Denes Lorand; Vida Arpad Oliver; Maier Adrian; Pavai Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate cancer is the second most diagnosed cancer in men, after lung cancer. The gold standard procedure in prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis is the ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) used in solving the bladder outlet obstruction, can have a role in detection of PCa. The aim of this retrospective study is to examine the role of transurethral resection of the prostate in the diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer.