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Sample records for cancer investigations r01

  1. Secondary Analysis and Integration of Existing Data to Elucidate the Genetic Architecture of Cancer Risk and Related Outcomes, R01 | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages applications that propose to conduct secondary data analysis and integration of existing datasets and database resources, with the ultimate aim to elucidate the genetic architecture of cancer risk and related outcomes. The goal of this initiative is to address key scientific questions relevant to cancer epidemiology by supporting the analysis of existing genetic or genomic datasets, possibly in combination with environmental, outcomes, behavioral, lifestyle, and molecular profiles data.

  2. Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgeons Achieve High Rates of K-Award Conversion Into R01 Funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narahari, Adishesh K; Mehaffey, J Hunter; Hawkins, Robert B; Baderdinni, Pranav K; Chandrabhatla, Anirudha S; Tribble, Curtis G; Kron, Irving L; Roeser, Mark E; Walters, Dustin M; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2018-03-14

    Obtaining National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 funding remains extremely difficult. The utility of career development grants (K awards) for achieving the goal of R01 funding remains debated, particularly for surgeon-scientists. We examined the success rate for cardiothoracic and vascular (CTV) surgeons compared to other specialties in converting K-level grants into R01 equivalents. All K (K08 and K23) grants awarded to surgeons by the NIH between 1992-2017 were identified through NIH RePORTER, an online database combining funding, publications, and patents. Only grants awarded to CTV surgeons were included. Grants active within the past year were excluded. Mann-Whitney U-tests and Chi-squared tests were used to compare groups. A total of 62 K grants awarded to CTV surgeons were identified during this period. Sixteen grants were still active within the last year and excluded from analysis. Twenty-two (48%) of the remaining K awardees successfully transitioned to an R01 or equivalent grant. Awardees with successful conversion published 9 publications per K grant compared to 4 publications for those who did not convert successfully (p=0.01). The median time for successful conversion to an R grant was 5.0 years after the K award start date. Importantly, the 10-year conversion rate to R01 was equal for CTV surgeons compared to other clinician-investigators (52.6% vs 42.5%). CTV surgeons have an equal 10-year conversion rate to first R01 award compared to other clinicians. These data suggest that NIH achieves a good return on investment when funding CTV surgeon-scientists with K-level funding. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cancer Investigation in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob Reinholdt; Møller, Henrik; Thomsen, Janus Laust

    2014-01-01

    Initiation of cancer investigations in general practice Background Close to 90% of all cancers are diagnosed because the patient presents symptoms and signs. Of these patients, 85% initiate the diagnostic pathway in general practice. Therefore, the initiation of a diagnostic pathway in general...... practice becomes extremely important. On average, a general practitioner (GP) is involved in 7500 consultations each year, and in the diagnostic process of 8-10 incident cancers. One half of cancer patients consult their GP with either general symptoms, which are not indicative of cancer, or vague and non......-specific symptoms. The other half present with what the GP assess as alarm symptoms. Three months prior to diagnosis, patients who are later diagnosed with cancer have twice as many GP consultations than a comparable reference population. Thus the complex diagnostic process in general practice requires the GP...

  4. Prior publication productivity, grant percentile ranking, and topic-normalized citation impact of NHLBI cardiovascular R01 grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltman, Jonathan R; Evans, Frank J; Danthi, Narasimhan S; Wu, Colin O; DiMichele, Donna M; Lauer, Michael S

    2014-09-12

    We previously demonstrated absence of association between peer-review-derived percentile ranking and raw citation impact in a large cohort of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute cardiovascular R01 grants, but we did not consider pregrant investigator publication productivity. We also did not normalize citation counts for scientific field, type of article, and year of publication. To determine whether measures of investigator prior productivity predict a grant's subsequent scientific impact as measured by normalized citation metrics. We identified 1492 investigator-initiated de novo National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute R01 grant applications funded between 2001 and 2008 and linked the publications from these grants to their InCites (Thompson Reuters) citation record. InCites provides a normalized citation count for each publication stratifying by year of publication, type of publication, and field of science. The coprimary end points for this analysis were the normalized citation impact per million dollars allocated and the number of publications per grant that has normalized citation rate in the top decile per million dollars allocated (top 10% articles). Prior productivity measures included the number of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-supported publications each principal investigator published in the 5 years before grant review and the corresponding prior normalized citation impact score. After accounting for potential confounders, there was no association between peer-review percentile ranking and bibliometric end points (all adjusted P>0.5). However, prior productivity was predictive (Pcitation counts, we confirmed a lack of association between peer-review grant percentile ranking and grant citation impact. However, prior investigator publication productivity was predictive of grant-specific citation impact. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Are Female Applicants Disadvantaged in National Institutes of Health Peer Review? Combining Algorithmic Text Mining and Qualitative Methods to Detect Evaluative Differences in R01 Reviewers' Critiques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magua, Wairimu; Zhu, Xiaojin; Bhattacharya, Anupama; Filut, Amarette; Potvien, Aaron; Leatherberry, Renee; Lee, You-Geon; Jens, Madeline; Malikireddy, Dastagiri; Carnes, Molly; Kaatz, Anna

    2017-05-01

    Women are less successful than men in renewing R01 grants from the National Institutes of Health. Continuing to probe text mining as a tool to identify gender bias in peer review, we used algorithmic text mining and qualitative analysis to examine a sample of critiques from men's and women's R01 renewal applications previously analyzed by counting and comparing word categories. We analyzed 241 critiques from 79 Summary Statements for 51 R01 renewals awarded to 45 investigators (64% male, 89% white, 80% PhD) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison between 2010 and 2014. We used latent Dirichlet allocation to discover evaluative "topics" (i.e., words that co-occur with high probability). We then qualitatively examined the context in which evaluative words occurred for male and female investigators. We also examined sex differences in assigned scores controlling for investigator productivity. Text analysis results showed that male investigators were described as "leaders" and "pioneers" in their "fields," with "highly innovative" and "highly significant research." By comparison, female investigators were characterized as having "expertise" and working in "excellent" environments. Applications from men received significantly better priority, approach, and significance scores, which could not be accounted for by differences in productivity. Results confirm our previous analyses suggesting that gender stereotypes operate in R01 grant peer review. Reviewers may more easily view male than female investigators as scientific leaders with significant and innovative research, and score their applications more competitively. Such implicit bias may contribute to sex differences in award rates for R01 renewals.

  6. Gender, Race/Ethnicity, and National Institutes of Health R01 Research Awards: Is There Evidence of a Double Bind for Women of Color?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginther, Donna K; Kahn, Shulamit; Schaffer, Walter T

    2016-08-01

    To analyze the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and the probability of being awarded an R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The authors used data from the NIH Information for Management, Planning, Analysis, and Coordination grants management database for the years 2000-2006 to examine gender differences and race/ethnicity-specific gender differences in the probability of receiving an R01 Type 1 award. The authors used descriptive statistics and probit models to determine the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, degree, investigator experience, and R01 award probability, controlling for a large set of observable characteristics. White women PhDs and MDs were as likely as white men to receive an R01 award. Compared with white women, Asian and black women PhDs and black women MDs were significantly less likely to receive funding. Women submitted fewer grant applications, and blacks and women who were new investigators were more likely to submit only one application between 2000 and 2006. Differences by race/ethnicity explain the NIH funding gap for women of color, as white women have a slight advantage over men in receiving Type 1 awards. Findings of a lower submission rate for women and an increased likelihood that they will submit only one proposal are consistent with research showing that women avoid competition. Policies designed to address the racial and ethnic diversity of the biomedical workforce have the potential to improve funding outcomes for women of color.

  7. Investigative procedures in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the main objectives of the procedures is to establish the likelihood of malignancy in the thyroid gland prior to surgery and detect metastases after surgery. Thyroid imaging is discussed in the context of (a) its role in the diagnosis of the primary disease (b) in the investigation of post-operative residual disease and (c) its role in the follow-up of patients after radioiodine therapy

  8. 75 FR 47602 - Clinical Studies of Safety and Effectiveness of Orphan Products Research Project Grant (R01)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ...] Clinical Studies of Safety and Effectiveness of Orphan Products Research Project Grant (R01) AGENCY: Food... (OPD) grant program. The goal of FDA's OPD grant program is to support the clinical development of... product will be superior to the existing therapy. FDA provides grants for clinical studies on safety and...

  9. 77 FR 46764 - Clinical Studies of Safety and Effectiveness of Orphan Products Research Project Grant (R01)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ...] Clinical Studies of Safety and Effectiveness of Orphan Products Research Project Grant (R01) AGENCY: Food... per year. B. Research Objectives The goal of FDA's OPD grant program is to support the clinical... (OPD) grant program. The goal of FDA's OPD grant program is to support the clinical development of...

  10. 75 FR 53701 - Clinical Studies of Safety and Effectiveness of Orphan Products Research Project Grant (R01...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0394] Clinical Studies of Safety and Effectiveness of Orphan Products Research Project Grant (R01); Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...

  11. Investigation of Breast Cancer Risk Factors in northern states of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common type of cancers and leading cause of death among women worldwide. In Sudan breast cancer is the most common type of cancer and its incidence has been rising for the past two decades. Objective: To investigate whether the breast risk factors of northern states (Northern ...

  12. Familial Investigations of Childhood Cancer Predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-03

    Acute Leukemia; Adenomatous Polyposis; Adrenocortical Carcinoma; AML; BAP1 Tumor Predisposition Syndrome; Carney Complex; Choroid Plexus Carcinoma; Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; DICER1 Syndrome; Dyskeratosis Congenita; Emberger Syndrome; Familial Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Fanconi Anemia; Familial Cancer; Familial Wilms Tumor; Familial Neuroblastoma; GIST; Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma-Pheochromocytoma Syndrome; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Juvenile Polyposis; Li-Fraumeni Syndrome; Lynch Syndrome; MDS; Melanoma Syndrome; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2; Neuroblastoma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1; Neurofibromatosis Type II; Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome; Non Hodgkin Lymphoma; Noonan Syndrome and Other Rasopathy; Overgrowth Syndromes; Pancreatic Cancer; Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome; Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma; PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome; Retinoblastoma; Rhabdoid Tumor Predisposition Syndrome; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome; Tuberous Sclerosis; Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

  13. Investigating the Mental Experience of Patients Suffering From Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Abdollahzadeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Despite the remarkable development of medical sciences, cancer has yet remained one of the most important diseases of the current century and the second cause of death following cardiovascular diseases. Although we witnessed considerable development in treating cancer and increased number of survivors, cancer is a unique disease that makes the patients deeply feel helplessness and fear. Methods A qualitative content analysis research was done. The present study investigated patients’ experience and behaviors after hearing about their cancer. Purposeful sampling was carried out and continued until data saturation. We used qualitative validation methods to verify the results. Results Study participants consisted of 14 patients. 10 main components emerged from the data including: 1 getting shocked, 2 fear, 3 anxiety and stress, 4 guilt, 5 hopelessness, 6 depression, 7 isolation, 8 lack of affection and dependency on family members, 9 getting prepared to die and, 10 reviving spiritual relationship with God. Conclusions There is a necessity to understand the mental feelings of cancer patients, and program suitable clinical interventions based on patients’ mental needs. As the number of cancer patients is increasing, the results of the present study can be useful for patients’ families and clinical personnel especially physicians and nurses in dealing with cancer patients.

  14. Investigation of Interleukin-1β Polymorphisms in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yencilek, Faruk; Yildirim, Asif; Yilmaz, Seda Gulec; Altinkilic, Emre Murat; Dalan, Altay Burak; Bastug, Yavuz; Isbir, Turgay

    2015-11-01

    Cytokine-mediated immune and inflammatory responses are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. The present study investigated certain interleukin-1β (IL1β) polymorphisms and their association with prostate cancer. Genotyping of the IL1B-31(rs 1143627 G>A) and IL1B-511(rs 16944 Ars16944) between prostate cancer patients and controls were statistically significantly different (p=0.001). The frequency of AG genotype for IL1B-511(rs16944) was 0.5-fold lower in patients with prostate cancer than in the controls (odds ratio=0.546; 95% confidence interval=0.377-0.791; p=0.001). Our data show that individuals carrying the IL1B-31(rs1143627) and IL1B-511(rs16944) AG genotypes had a decreased risk for developing prostate cancer. Out of all the possible combinations analyzed, IL1B-31(rs1143627) G with IL1B-511(rs16944) G combination had a protective association with prostate cancer. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation of the selenium metabolism in cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunøe, Kristoffer; Gabel-Jensen, Charlotte; Stürup, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare different selenium species for their ability to induce cell death in different cancer cell lines, while investigating the underlying chemistry by speciation analysis. A prostate cancer cell line (PC-3), a colon cancer cell line (HT-29) and a leukaemia cell line...... (Jurkat E6-1) were incubated with five selenium compounds representing inorganic as well as organic Se compounds in different oxidation states. Selenomethionine (SeMet), Se-methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys), methylseleninic acid (MeSeA), selenite and selenate in the concentration range 5-100 mu M were...... incubated with cells for 24 h and the induction of cell death was measured using flow cytometry. The amounts of total selenium in cell medium, cell lysate and the insoluble fractions was determined by ICP-MS. Speciation analysis of cellular fractions was performed by reversed phase, anion exchange and size...

  16. Investigation of cancer cell behavior on nanofibrous scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szot, Christopher S.; Buchanan, Cara F. [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Gatenholm, Paul [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Rylander, Marissa Nichole [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Freeman, Joseph W., E-mail: jwfreeman@vt.edu [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering and the use of nanofibrous biomaterial scaffolds offer a unique perspective for studying cancer development in vitro. Current in vitro models of tumorigenesis are limited by the use of static, two-dimensional (2D) cell culture monolayers that lack the structural architecture necessary for cell-cell interaction and three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds that are too simplistic for studying basic pathological mechanisms. In this study, two nanofibrous biomaterials that mimic the structure of the extracellular matrix, bacterial cellulose and electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL)/collagen I, were investigated as potential 3D scaffolds for an in vitro cancer model. Multiple cancer cell lines were cultured on each scaffold material and monitored for cell viability, proliferation, adhesion, infiltration, and morphology. Both bacterial cellulose and electrospun PCL/collagen I, which have nano-scale structures on the order of 100-500 nm, have been used in many diverse tissue engineering applications. Cancer cell adhesion and growth were limited on bacterial cellulose, while all cellular processes were enhanced on the electrospun scaffolds. This initial analysis has demonstrated the potential of electrospun PCL/collagen I scaffolds toward the development of an improved 3D in vitro cancer model.

  17. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athas, W.F.

    1996-04-01

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980's. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report

  18. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athas, W.F.

    1996-04-01

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980`s. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report.

  19. New trial evaluates investigational drug for endometrial and breast cancers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new clinical trial is testing ONC201, an investigational drug that in laboratory studies has been shown to kill breast and endometrial cancer cells most likely by destroying mitochondria within the tumor cells. Mitochondria are the “powerhouse” of the cell, and blocking its activity may kill tumor cells and shrink tumors in human patients.

  20. Nutrition, hormones and prostate cancer risk: results from the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional factors may influence the risk of developing prostate cancer, but understanding of this topic is poor. This chapter discusses research on this subject, mostly from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a cohort which includes 150,000 men recruited in the 1990s in eight European countries. So far the EPIC collaborators have published analyses of the relationship of prostate cancer risk with the intake of a range of foods and nutrients, and with blood-based markers of nutritional factors, on up to nearly 3,000 incident cases of prostate cancer. Most of the results of these analyses have been null, with no clear indication that the risk for prostate cancer is related to intakes of meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, fibre, fat or alcohol or with blood levels of fatty acids, carotenoids, tocopherols, B vitamins, vitamin D, or selenium. There is some evidence from EPIC that risk may be increased in men with a high intake of protein from dairy products, and analyses of hormone levels have shown that risk is higher in men with relatively high blood levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). More research is needed to better describe the relationships of prostate cancer risk with IGF-I and related hormones, and to better understand whether nutritional factors may influence risk through hormones or perhaps by other mechanisms.

  1. Mediterranean diet and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina-Montes, Esther; Sánchez, María José; Buckland, Genevieve; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Amiano, Pilar; Wark, Petra A.; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Huerta, José María; Ardanaz, Eva; Quirós, José Ramón; Affret, Aurélie; His, Mathilde; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Peeters, Petra H.; Ye, Weimin; Sund, Malin; Boeing, Heiner; Iqbal, Khalid; Ohlsson, Bodil; Sonestedt, Emily; Tjønneland, Anne; Petersen, Kristina EN; Travis, Ruth C.; Skeie, Guri; Agnoli, Claudia; Panico, Salvatore; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Freisling, Heinz; Huybrechts, Inge; Overvad, Kim; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Vasilopoulou, Effie; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay Tee; Cross, Amanda J.; Ward, Heather A.; Riboli, Elio; Duell, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Background:The Mediterranean diet (MD) has been proposed as a means for cancer prevention, but little evidence has been accrued regarding its potential to prevent pancreatic cancer. We investigated the association between the adherence to the MD and pancreatic cancer risk within the European

  2. Investigation of skin cancer treatment efficiency by raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. S.; Kim, D. W. [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    From the successful perform of the molecular structures of various kinds of human skin cancer. We can predict the types of cancer when a small abnormal change change occurs on skin by raman spectrum. When we applied the cancer causing chemicals, bezopyrene, to nude mouse, it did not develop to cancer. But we had radiated UV light after developed to skin cancer in a few days. We can deduce the development of human skin cancer from the result of nude mouse skin cancer, because the two skin are structurally very similar to each other. From the results of own research we could conform the UV light is essential for the development of skin cancer. The results of own research can be directly apply to early detection and proper treatment of skin cancer in hospital. 32 refs., 40 figs., 16 tabs. (Author)

  3. Investigational drugs for the treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Fabio; Lorusso, Domenica; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Ditto, Antonino; Bogani, Giorgio; Raspagliesi, Francesco; Ferrero, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is currently the fourth most common malignant disease of women worldwide. Although the incidence and the mortality rates have been decreasing with screening detection and new treatment strategies, a significant number of metastatic or recurrent disease is still diagnosed. For those patients not amenable to curative treatments, such as surgery and radiation, palliative chemotherapy remains the standard of care. As chemotherapy regimens have limited activity, research is focalized on investigating novel pharmacologic strategies. Areas covered: This paper aims to give a complete and updated overview on investigated therapies for the treatment of CC. The authors review the results of clinical studies and highlight the ongoing trials. Expert opinion: Agents targeting various molecular pathways including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), epigenetics and other biological mechanisms represent interesting investigational opportunities. Amongst such drugs, bevacizumab, an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody, was the first targeted drug recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of patients with metastatic, recurrent, or persistent CC. Another interesting experimental approach is represented by immunotherapy, which is leading to promising results with to the development of therapeutic vaccines and immune checkpoints inhibitors.

  4. Alcohol consumption and risk of urothelial cell bladder cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botteri, E; Ferrari, P; Roswall, N; Tjønneland, A; Hjartåker, A; Huerta, J M; Fortner, R T; Trichopoulou, A; Karakatsani, A; La Vecchia, C; Pala, V; Perez-Cornago, A; Sonestedt, E; Liedberg, F; Overvad, K; Sánchez, M J; Gram, I T; Stepien, M; Trijsburg, L; Börje, L; Johansson, M; Kühn, T; Panico, S; Tumino, R; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Weiderpass, E

    2017-01-01

    Findings on the association between alcohol consumption and bladder cancer are inconsistent. We investigated that association in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. We included 476,160 individuals mostly aged 35-70 years, enrolled in ten countries and followed

  5. Molecular Epidemiology Investigation of Obesity and Lethal Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    epigenetic link between obesity and prostate cancer survival which will be explored in future studies. The support of the award has provided many...histone modifications in prostate cancer . Epigenetic inhibitors that target HDACs have been tested in clinical trials and approved by the US Food and...Drug Administration for use in treating specific cancers . Thus, understanding the specific role of obesity-related epigenetic events in prostate

  6. An investigation into fatigue in cancer patients during radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Tech. In spite of the improvement in the delivery of anti-cancer treatments over the past decade, side effects from these treatments remain inevitable. A common, distressing side effect that all cancer patients experience is fatigue. However, cancer related fatigue (CRF) remains one that is under-reported and under-treated. CRF is a topic that has received very limited attention in the South African context. Regardless of the amount of literature available on CRF, many questions continue...

  7. Thermographic and radionuclide investigation in combined diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abushakhmanov, A.Kh.

    1986-01-01

    The results of examination of 157 women with breast diseases are given. Breast cancer was diagnosed in 94 patients, benign diseases in 63. The combined use of the thermographic and radionuclide methods was shown to raise the accuracy of breast cancer diagnosis

  8. Investigation of South African plants for anti cancer properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khorombi, TE

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A collaborative research programme between the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in South Africa and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the USA aimed at the screening of plant extracts and identification of potentially new...

  9. VITAL: Vanguard Investigations of Therapeutic Approaches to Lung Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun K; Lotan, Reuben; Stewart, David

    2006-01-01

    .... In addition, the clinical trials that will be conducted in the VITAL Research Program will demonstrate the true rate of lung cancer recurrence and second primary tumor incidence in patients at high...

  10. Investigation of lung cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Itoh, Chikako; Mitsuyama, Toyofumi; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1976-01-01

    Fourty two cases of lung cancer in A-bomb survivors experienced between 1971 and 1975 were compared to non-exposure cases with lung cancer, and discussed. The mean age of A-bomb survivors with lung cancer was 68.7 year old, and that of control cases was 60 year old. The incidence ratio of male to female in the group was 4 : 1, and that of control group was 5 : 1. Occupation was one of the predisposing causes, but patients who had engaged in the occupation which was considered to predispose lung cancer were three. Among 39 patients with lung cancer whose smoking histories were clarified, 20.5 per cent was nonsmoker, and 69.3 per cent was heavy smoker. Among 39 patients whose cancer histories were clarified, 28.2 per cent of the patients had family history of cancer. Subjective symptoms of this disease were cough, sputum, bloody sputum and chest pain, and some had no symptoms. Seventeen cases (40.5 per cent) were detected in the physical examination for the A-bomb survivors. For the early detection of lung cancer in A-bomb survivors, patients with high risk should be selected to have received clearly established diagnosis. Histologically, squamous cell carcinoma was seen in many cases, following adenoma, and undifferenciated large cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. Disturbances in pulmonary functions were obstructive ventilation, high rate of residual air, lowered diffusions ability. Therapy was operation in stage I, chemotherapy and radiation therapy in stage II and stage III. (Kanao, N.)

  11. Clinical investigation of TROP-2 as an independent biomarker and potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Yu, Hai-Zheng; Cai, Jian-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Colon cancer is associated with a severe demographic and economic burden worldwide. The pathogenesis of colon cancer is highly complex and involves sequential genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation, the pathogenesis of colon cancer remains to be elucidated. As the third most common type of cancer worldwide, the treatment options for colon cancer are currently limited. Human trophoblast cell‑surface marker (TROP‑2), is a cell‑surface transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by several types of epithelial carcinoma. In addition, TROP‑2 has been demonstrated to be associated with tumorigenesis and invasiveness in solid types of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein expression of TROP‑2 in colon cancer tissues, and further explore the association between the expression of TROP‑2 and clinicopathological features of patients with colon cancer. The expression and localization of the TROP‑2 protein was examined using western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. Finally, the expression of TROP‑2 expression was correlated to conventional clinicopathological features of colon cancer using a χ2 test. The results revealed that TROP‑2 protein was expressed at high levels in the colon cancer tissues, which was associated with the development and pathological process of colon cancer. Therefore, TROP‑2 may be used as a biomarker to determine the clinical prognosis, and as a potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  12. Investigating Esophageal Stent-Placement Outcomes in Patients with Inoperable Non-Cervical Esophageal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Forootan, Mojgan; Tabatabaeefar, Morteza; Mosaffa, Nariman; Ashkalak, Hormat Rahimzadeh; Darvishi, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Background: Esophageal stent insertion in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer is usually accompanied with relatively high adverse symptoms and even mortality. The current study aims at investigating the outcomes of esophageal stenting in patients with inoperable non-cervical esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: The current descriptive-analytical research evaluates 25 patients with esophageal cancer. The stent was placed in esophagus based upon endoscopy analysis with or without fl...

  13. Vital: Vanguard Investigations of Therapeutic Approaches to Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    immunohistochemistry (IHC) laboratory with manual and automated immunohistochemical techniques and in situ tissue-based methodologies, such as FISH and...Multiple-Drug Dose-Effect Analyzer and Manual uniform measures. Statistics in Medicine 22, 2091-2100. Cambridge, U.K.: Biosoft. Venables, W. N. and Ripley...Supplementary data for this article are available at Cancer Research Online tirsnsfection reagent (Roche Diagnos~tics Corp., Indianapolis, INI) following ( htp

  14. Variety in vegetable and fruit consumption and risk of bladder cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büchner, F.L.; Bueno de Mesquita, H.B.; Ros, M.M.; Kampman, E.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research does not show an association between fruit and vegetable consumption and bladder cancer risk. None of these studies investigated variety in fruit and vegetable consumption, which may capture different aspects of consumption. We investigated whether a varied consumption of vegetables

  15. VITAL (Vanguard Investigations of Therapeutic Approaches to Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    expression are important for driving tumorigenesis. k1 k2 k3 k3 -ab k4-ab k7 k8 k9 k10 k11 k12 k13 k14 k15 Figure 1...normal” area, except cases k3 and k4, which are from LIFE-abnormal while white-light normal area. Nevertheless, there is no obvious disparity among these... vitamin E and β caro- tene on the incidence of lung cancer and other can- cers in male smokers. N Engl J Med 1994;330: 1029–35. 6. Omenn GS, Goodman GE

  16. A Multidisciplinary Investigation of a Polycythemia Vera Cancer Cluster of Unknown Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Vincent; Dearwent, Steve M; Gable, Debra; Lewis, Brian; Metcalf, Susan; Orloff, Ken; Tierney, Bruce; Zhu, Jane; Logue, James; Marchetto, David; Ostroff, Stephen; Hoffman, Ronald; Xu, Mingjiang; Carey, David; Erlich, Porat; Gerhard, Glenn; Roda, Paul; Iannuzzo, Joseph; Lewis, Robert; Mellow, John; Mulvihill, Linda; Myles, Zachary; Wu, Manxia; Frank, Arthur; Gross-Davis, Carol Ann; Klotz, Judith; Lynch, Adam; Weissfeld, Joel; Weinberg, Rona; Cole, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Cancer cluster investigations rarely receive significant public health resource allocations due to numerous inherent challenges and the limited success of past efforts. In 2008, a cluster of polycythemia vera, a rare blood cancer with unknown etiology, was identified in northeast Pennsylvania. A multidisciplinary group of federal and state agencies, academic institutions, and local healthcare providers subsequently developed a multifaceted research portfolio designed to better understand the cause of the cluster. This research agenda represents a unique and important opportunity to demonstrate that cancer cluster investigations can produce desirable public health and scientific outcomes when necessary resources are available. PMID:20617023

  17. Ex vivo sentinel lymph node investigation in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Hilário Alves Freitas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Brazil, about 26,000 cases of colorectal cancer are diagnosed per year. Pa- tients considered at the early stage of disease (without lymph node evolve with tumor relapse or recurrence in up to a quarter of cases, probably due to understaging. Objective: Research on ex vivo sentinel lymph node in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods: We studied 37 patients who underwent curative surgical resection. The marker used to identify lymph nodes was patent blue dye injected into the peritu- moral submucosa of the open surgical specimen immediately after its removal from the abdominal cavity. Results: Ex vivo identification of sentinel lymph node with marker occurred in 13 (35.1% patients. The sensitivity was 40% and 60% false negative. The detailed histological examina- tion of sentinel lymph nodes with multilevel section and immunohistochemistry showed metastasis in one (4.3% individual, considered ultra-staging. Conclusion: The ex vivo identification of sentinel lymph node had questionable benefits, and worse results when include patients with rectal cancer. Restaging of one patient was possible after multilevel section and immunohistochemistry of the sentinel lymph node, but more research is needed to evaluate the role of micrometastases in patients with colorectal cancer. Resumo: Introdução: No Brasil, a cada ano são diagnosticados cerca de 26.000 casos de câncer colorre- tal. Pacientes com estadiamento considerado inicial, sem linfonodo metastático, evoluem com recorrência ou recidiva do tumor em até um quarto dos casos, por provável subesta- diamento. Objetivo: pesquisar sobre linfonodo-sentinela ex vivo em pacientes com adeno- carcinoma colorretal. Objetivo: Foram estudados 37 pacientes, submetidos à cirurgia oncológica com ressecção caráter curativo. O marcador de linfonodos utilizado foi o corante azul patente, injetado na submucosa peritumoral da peça cirúrgica aberta imediatamente

  18. Genetic variability of the mTOR pathway and prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Campa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin signal transduction pathway integrates various signals, regulating ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis as a function of available energy and amino acids, and assuring an appropriate coupling of cellular proliferation with increases in cell size. In addition, recent evidence has pointed to an interplay between the mTOR and p53 pathways. We investigated the genetic variability of 67 key genes in the mTOR pathway and in genes of the p53 pathway which interact with mTOR. We tested the association of 1,084 tagging SNPs with prostate cancer risk in a study of 815 prostate cancer cases and 1,266 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC. We chose the SNPs (n = 11 with the strongest association with risk (p<0.01 and sought to replicate their association in an additional series of 838 prostate cancer cases and 943 controls from EPIC. In the joint analysis of first and second phase two SNPs of the PRKCI gene showed an association with risk of prostate cancer (OR(allele = 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.94, p = 1.3 x 10⁻³ for rs546950 and OR(allele = 0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.93, p = 5.6 x 10⁻⁴ for rs4955720. We confirmed this in a meta-analysis using as replication set the data from the second phase of our study jointly with the first phase of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS project. In conclusion, we found an association with prostate cancer risk for two SNPs belonging to PRKCI, a gene which is frequently overexpressed in various neoplasms, including prostate cancer.

  19. Cross Cancer Genomic Investigation of Inflammation Pathway for Five Common Cancers: Lung, Ovary, Prostate, Breast, and Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Rayjean J; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Goode, Ellen L; Brhane, Yonathan; Muir, Kenneth; Chan, Andrew T; Marchand, Loic Le; Schildkraut, Joellen; Witte, John S; Eeles, Rosalind; Boffetta, Paolo; Spitz, Margaret R; Poirier, Julia G; Rider, David N; Fridley, Brooke L; Chen, Zhihua; Haiman, Christopher; Schumacher, Fredrick; Easton, Douglas F; Landi, Maria Teresa; Brennan, Paul; Houlston, Richard; Christiani, David C; Field, John K; Bickeböller, Heike; Risch, Angela; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Chanock, Stephen; Berndt, Sonja I; Kraft, Peter; Lindström, Sara; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Song, Honglin; Phelan, Catherine; Wentzensen, Nicholas; Peters, Ulrike; Slattery, Martha L; Sellers, Thomas A; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B; Hunter, David J; Amos, Christopher I; Henderson, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation has been hypothesized to increase the risk of cancer development as an initiator or promoter, yet no large-scale study of inherited variation across cancer sites has been conducted. We conducted a cross-cancer genomic analysis for the inflammation pathway based on 48 genome-wide association studies within the National Cancer Institute GAME-ON Network across five common cancer sites, with a total of 64 591 cancer patients and 74 467 control patients. Subset-based meta-analysis was used to account for possible disease heterogeneity, and hierarchical modeling was employed to estimate the effect of the subcomponents within the inflammation pathway. The network was visualized by enrichment map. All statistical tests were two-sided. We identified three pleiotropic loci within the inflammation pathway, including one novel locus in Ch12q24 encoding SH2B3 (rs3184504), which reached GWAS significance with a P value of 1.78 x 10(-8), and it showed an association with lung cancer (P = 2.01 x 10(-6)), colorectal cancer (GECCO P = 6.72x10(-6); CORECT P = 3.32x10(-5)), and breast cancer (P = .009). We also identified five key subpathway components with genetic variants that are relevant for the risk of these five cancer sites: inflammatory response for colorectal cancer (P = .006), inflammation related cell cycle gene for lung cancer (P = 1.35x10(-6)), and activation of immune response for ovarian cancer (P = .009). In addition, sequence variations in immune system development played a role in breast cancer etiology (P = .001) and innate immune response was involved in the risk of both colorectal (P = .022) and ovarian cancer (P = .003). Genetic variations in inflammation and its related subpathway components are keys to the development of lung, colorectal, ovary, and breast cancer, including SH2B3, which is associated with lung, colorectal, and breast cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  20. Investigation of treatment strategy for advanced cancer according to treatment of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Kecheng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of pancreatic cancer diagnoses are made at the advanced stage and when metastasis has already occurred, and the 1- and 5-year survival rates are extremely low. Cemcitabine remains the most frequently applied treatment option, yet the most effective chemotherapeutic agents and combinations with multiple agents and/or radiotherapy only marginally improve patient survival and may even establish an environment conducive to cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics. An alternative treatment modality, cryoablation, is available and has been applied at our institute to patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer since 2001. In this article, we present our collective experience with patient outcome using cryoablation, alone or combined with other treatment modalities such as brachytherapy (125iodine seed implantation. The overall outcomes have been encouraging, suggesting that comprehensive therapy including cryoablation may prolong the survival of patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, and we are achieving particular success with a novel combination of percutaneous cryoablation, cancer microvascular intervention with 125iodine seed implantation, and combined immunotherapy (3C applied using an individualized patient strategy (P. The 1- through 10-year survival rates of 145 patients treated with the so-called “3C+P model” are presented in support of this new strategy as a promising new treatment for advanced and metastatic cancer

  1. Fruits and vegetables consumption and the risk of histological subtypes of lung cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchner, F.L.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Linseisen, J.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Ros, M.M.; Overvad, K.; Hansen, L.; Tjonneland, A.; Raaschou-Nielsen, O.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Touillaud, M.; Kaaks, R.; Rohrmann, S.; Boeing, H.; Nothlings, U.; Trichopoulou, A.; Zylis, D.; Dilis, V.; Palli, D.; Sieri, S.; Vineis, P.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Gils, C.H. van; Lund, E.; Gram, I.T.; Braaten, T.; Martinez, C.; Agudo, A.; Arriola, L.; Ardanaz, E.; Navarro, C; Rodriguez, L.; Manjer, J.; Wirfalt, E.; Hallmans, G.; Rasmuson, T.; Key, T.J.; Roddam, A.W.; Bingham, S.; Khaw, K.T.; Slimani, N.; Bofetta, P.; Byrnes, G.; Norat, T.; Michaud, D.; Riboli, E.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of different histological subtypes of lung cancer among participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. METHODS: Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to

  2. The association of gastric cancer risk with plasma folate, cobalamin, and Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollset, Stein Emil; Igland, Jannicke; Jenab, Mazda; Fredriksen, Ase; Meyer, Klaus; Eussen, Simone; Gjessing, Hakon K.; Ueland, Per Magne; Pera, Guillem; Sala, Nuria; Agudo, Antonio; Capella, Gabriel; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Palli, Domenico; Boeing, Heiner; Weikert, Cornelia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Carneiro, Fatima; Pala, Valeria; Vineis, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Berglund, Goran; Manjer, Jonas; Stenling, Roger; Hallmans, Goran; Martinez, Carmen; Dorronsoro, Miren; Barricarte, Aurelio; Navarro, Carmen; Quiros, Jose R.; Allen, Naomi; Key, Timothy J.; Bingham, Sheila; Linseisen, Jakob; Kaaks, Rudolf; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Buchner, Frederike L.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Numans, Mattijs E.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lund, Eiliv; Slimani, Nadia; Ferrari, Pietro; Riboli, Elio; Gonzalez, Carlos A.

    Previous studies have shown inconsistent associations of folate intake and polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with gastric cancer risk. Our nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort is the first

  3. The association of gastric cancer risk with plasma folate, cobalamin, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollset, S.E.; Igland, J.; Jenab, M.; Fredriksen, A.; Meyer, K.; Eussen, S.; Gjessing, H.K.; Ueland, P.M.; Pera, G.; Sala, N.; Agudo, A.; Capella, G.; Giudice, G. Del; Palli, D.; Boeing, H.; Weikert, C.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Carneiro, F.; Pala, V.; Vineis, P.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Berglund, G.; Manjer, J.; Stenling, R.; Hallmans, G.; Martinez, C.; Dorronsoro, M.; Barricarte, A.; Navarro, C; Quiros, J.R.; Allen, N.; Key, T.J.; Bingham, S.; Linseisen, J.; Kaaks, R.; Overvad, K.; Tjonneland, A.; Buchner, F.L.; Peeters, P.H.; Numans, M.E.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Trichopoulou, A.; Lund, E.; Slimani, N.; Ferrari, P.; Riboli, E.; Gonzalez, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown inconsistent associations of folate intake and polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with gastric cancer risk. Our nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort is the first

  4. Main nutrient patterns and colorectal cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moskal, Aurélie; Freisling, Heinz; Byrnes, Graham; Assi, Nada; Fahey, Michael T.; Jenab, Mazda; Ferrari, Pietro; Tjønneland, Anne; Petersen, Kristina EN; Dahm, Christina C.; Hansen, Camilla Plambeck; Affret, Aurélie; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Cadeau, Claire; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Iqbal, Khalid; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Naska, Androniki; Masala, Giovanna; de Magistris, Maria Santucci; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Peeters, Petra H.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas H.; Engeset, Dagrun; Licaj, Idlir; Skeie, Guri; Ardanaz, Eva; Buckland, Genevieve; Castaño, José M Huerta; Quirós, José R.; Amiano, Pilar; Molina-Portillo, Elena; Winkvist, Anna; Myte, Robin; Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay Tee; Huybrechts, Inge; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Ward, Heather; Gunter, Marc J.; Slimani, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Background:Much of the current literature on diet–colorectal cancer (CRC) associations focused on studies of single foods/nutrients, whereas less is known about nutrient patterns. We investigated the association between major nutrient patterns and CRC risk in participants of the European Prospective

  5. Menopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer risk : impact of different treatments. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakken, Kjersti; Fournier, Agnes; Lund, Eiliv; Waaseth, Marit; Dumeaux, Vanessa; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Fabre, Alban; Hemon, Bertrand; Rinaldi, Sabina; Chajes, Veronique; Slimani, Nadia; Allen, Naomi E.; Reeves, Gillian K.; Bingham, Sheila; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Olsen, Anja; Tjonneland, Anne; Rodriguez, Laudina; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Amiano Etxezarreta, Pilar; Ardanaz, Eva; Tormo, Maria-Jose; Peeters, Petra H.; van Gils, Carla H.; Steffen, Annika; Schulz, Mandy; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Kaaks, Rudolf; Tumino, Rosario; Gallo, Valentina; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio; Panico, Salvatore; Masala, Giovanna; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Berrino, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is characterized by use of different constituents, regimens and routes of administration. We investigated the association between the use of different types of MHT and breast cancer risk in the EPIC cohort study. The analysis is based on data from 133,744

  6. Measured adiposity in relation to head and neck cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ward, Heather A.; Wark, Petra A.; Muller, David C.; Steffen, Annika; Johansson, Mattias; Norat, Teresa; Gunter, Marc J.; Overvad, Kim; Dahm, Christina C.; Halkjær, Jytte; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy; Mesrine, Sylvie; Brennan, Paul; Freisling, Heinz; Li, Kuanrong; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Panico, Salavatore; Grioni, Sara; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Palli, Domenico; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. Bas; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Agudo, Antonio; Quiros, Jose Ramon; Larranaga, Nerea; Ardanaz, Eva; Huerta, Jose María; Sanchez, María Jose; Laurell, Goran; Johansson, Ingegerd; Westin, Ulla; Wallstrom, Peter; Bradbury, Kathryn E.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Khaw, Kay Tee; Pearson, Clare; Boeing, Heiner; Riboli, Elio

    2017-01-01

    Background: Emerging evidence from cohort studies indicates that adiposity is associated with greater incidence of head and neck cancer. However, most studies have used self-reported anthropometry which is prone to error. Methods: Among 363,094 participants in the European Prospective Investigation

  7. Measured Adiposity in Relation to Head and Neck Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ward, Heather A; Wark, Petra A; Muller, David C; Steffen, Annika; Johansson, Mattias; Norat, Teresa; Gunter, Marc J; Overvad, Kim; Dahm, Christina C; Halkjær, Jytte; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy; Mesrine, Sylvie; Brennan, Paul; Freisling, Heinz; Li, Kuanrong; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Panico, Salavatore; Grioni, Sara; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Palli, Domenico; Peeters, Petra H M; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Agudo, Antonio; Quirós, Jose Ramón; Larrañaga, Nerea; Ardanaz, Eva; Huerta, José María; Sánchez, María-José; Laurell, Göran; Johansson, Ingegerd; Westin, Ulla; Wallström, Peter; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Pearson, Clare; Boeing, Heiner; Riboli, Elio

    Background: Emerging evidence from cohort studies indicates that adiposity is associated with greater incidence of head and neck cancer. However, most studies have used self-reported anthropometry which is prone to error.Methods: Among 363,094 participants in the European Prospective Investigation

  8. Variations in GPs' decisions to investigate suspected lung cancer: a factorial experiment using multimedia vignettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheringham, Jessica; Sequeira, Rachel; Myles, Jonathan; Hamilton, William; McDonnell, Joe; Offman, Judith; Duffy, Stephen; Raine, Rosalind

    2017-06-01

    Lung cancer survival is low and comparatively poor in the UK. Patients with symptoms suggestive of lung cancer commonly consult primary care, but it is unclear how general practitioners (GPs) distinguish which patients require further investigation. This study examined how patients' clinical and sociodemographic characteristics influence GPs' decisions to initiate lung cancer investigations. A factorial experiment was conducted among a national sample of 227 English GPs using vignettes presented as simulated consultations. A multimedia-interactive website simulated key features of consultations using actors ('patients'). GP participants made management decisions online for six 'patients', whose sociodemographic characteristics systematically varied across three levels of cancer risk. In low-risk vignettes, investigation (ie, chest X-ray ordered, computerised tomography scan or respiratory consultant referral) was not indicated; in medium-risk vignettes, investigation could be appropriate; in high-risk vignettes, investigation was definitely indicated. Each 'patient' had two lung cancer-related symptoms: one volunteered and another elicited if GPs asked. Variations in investigation likelihood were examined using multilevel logistic regression. GPs decided to investigate lung cancer in 74% (1000/1348) of vignettes. Investigation likelihood did not increase with cancer risk. Investigations were more likely when GPs requested information on symptoms that 'patients' had but did not volunteer (adjusted OR (AOR)=3.18; 95% CI 2.27 to 4.70). However, GPs omitted to seek this information in 42% (570/1348) of cases. GPs were less likely to investigate older than younger 'patients' (AOR=0.52; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.7) and black 'patients' than white (AOR=0.68; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.95). GPs were not more likely to investigate 'patients' with high-risk than low-risk cancer symptoms. Furthermore, they did not investigate everyone with the same symptoms equally. Insufficient data gathering

  9. An investigation of breast cancer risk factors in Cyprus: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadjisavvas Andreas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is the most common form of malignancy affecting women worldwide. It is also the leading cancer in females in Cyprus, with approximately 400 new cases diagnosed annually. It is well recognized that genetic variation as well as environmental factors modulate breast cancer risk. The main aim of this study was to assess the strength of associations between recognized risk factors and breast cancer among Cypriot women. This is the first epidemiological investigation on risk factors of breast cancer among the Cypriot female population. Methods We carried out a case-control study, involving 1,109 breast cancer patients and a group of 1,177 controls who were recruited while participating in the National screening programme for breast cancer. Information on demographic characteristics and potential risk factors were collected from both groups during a standardized interview. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the strength of the association between each risk factor and breast cancer risk, before and after adjusting for the possible confounding effect of other factors. Results In multivariable models, family history of breast cancer (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.23, 2.19 was the strongest predictor of breast cancer risk in the Cypriot population. Late menarche (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.45, 0.92 among women reaching menarche after the age of 15 vs. before the age of 12 and breastfeeding (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.59, 0.92 exhibited a strong protective effect. In the case of breastfeeding, the observed effect appeared stronger than the effect of pregnancy alone. Surprisingly, we also observed an inverse association between hormone replacement therapy (HRT although this may be a product of the retrospective nature of this study. Conclusion Overall the findings of our study corroborate with the results of previous investigations on descriptive epidemiology of risk factors for breast cancer. This investigation provides important background

  10. Chemical kinetic mechanistic models to investigate cancer biology and impact cancer medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stites, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Traditional experimental biology has provided a mechanistic understanding of cancer in which the malignancy develops through the acquisition of mutations that disrupt cellular processes. Several drugs developed to target such mutations have now demonstrated clinical value. These advances are unequivocal testaments to the value of traditional cellular and molecular biology. However, several features of cancer may limit the pace of progress that can be made with established experimental approaches alone. The mutated genes (and resultant mutant proteins) function within large biochemical networks. Biochemical networks typically have a large number of component molecules and are characterized by a large number of quantitative properties. Responses to a stimulus or perturbation are typically nonlinear and can display qualitative changes that depend upon the specific values of variable system properties. Features such as these can complicate the interpretation of experimental data and the formulation of logical hypotheses that drive further research. Mathematical models based upon the molecular reactions that define these networks combined with computational studies have the potential to deal with these obstacles and to enable currently available information to be more completely utilized. Many of the pressing problems in cancer biology and cancer medicine may benefit from a mathematical treatment. As work in this area advances, one can envision a future where such models may meaningfully contribute to the clinical management of cancer patients. (paper)

  11. A network-based biomarker approach for molecular investigation and diagnosis of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bor-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Many studies have investigated the carcinogenic process and identified the biomarkers for signature classification. However, based on the research dedicated to this field, there is no highly sensitive network-based method for carcinogenesis characterization and diagnosis from the systems perspective. Methods In this study, a systems biology approach integrating microarray gene expression profiles and protein-protein interaction information was proposed to develop a network-based biomarker for molecular investigation into the network mechanism of lung carcinogenesis and diagnosis of lung cancer. The network-based biomarker consists of two protein association networks constructed for cancer samples and non-cancer samples. Results Based on the network-based biomarker, a total of 40 significant proteins in lung carcinogenesis were identified with carcinogenesis relevance values (CRVs. In addition, the network-based biomarker, acting as the screening test, proved to be effective in diagnosing smokers with signs of lung cancer. Conclusions A network-based biomarker using constructed protein association networks is a useful tool to highlight the pathways and mechanisms of the lung carcinogenic process and, more importantly, provides potential therapeutic targets to combat cancer.

  12. Cancer research in need of a scientific revolution: Using 'paradigm shift' as a method of investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wion, Didier; Appaix, Florence; Burruss, Meriwether; Berger, Francois; van der Sanden, Boudewijn

    2015-09-01

    Despite important human and financial resources and considerable accumulation of scientific publications, patents, and clinical trials, cancer research has been slow in achieving a therapeutic revolution similar to the one that occurred in the last century for infectious diseases. It has been proposed that science proceeds not only by accumulating data but also through paradigm shifts. Here, we propose to use the concept of 'paradigm shift' as a method of investigation when dominant paradigms fail to achieve their promises. The first step in using the 'paradigm shift' method in cancer research requires identifying its founding paradigms. In this review, two of these founding paradigms will be discussed: (i) the reification of cancer as a tumour mass and (ii) the translation of the concepts issued from infectious disease in cancer research. We show how these founding paradigms can generate biases that lead to over-diagnosis and over-treatment and also hamper the development of curative cancer therapies. We apply the 'paradigm shift' method to produce perspective reversals consistent with current experimental evidence. The 'paradigm shift' method enlightens the existence of a tumour physiologic-prophylactic-pathologic continuum. It integrates the target/antitarget concept and that cancer is also an extracellular disease. The 'paradigm shift' method has immediate implications for cancer prevention and therapy. It could be a general method of investigation for other diseases awaiting therapy.

  13. Investigating the role of caveolin-2 in prostate cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yih Low

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a worldwide problem. While the role of caveolin-1 has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of caveolin-2 (CAV2 in prostate cancer. Up-regulation of CAV2 in androgen independent PC3 cells compared to normal prostate cell line and androgen dependent prostate cancer cell lines has been observed. Recent studies suggest that up-regulation of CAV2 plays an important role in androgen independent prostate cancer. This study investigates whether CAV2 is important in mediating the aggressive phenotypes seen in androgen independent prostate cancer cells. The androgen independent prostate cancer cell line, PC3 was used that has been shown to express CAV2, and CAV2 knock down was performed using siRNA system. Changes to cell number, migration and invasion were assessed after knocking down CAV2. Our results showed that down-regulating CAV2 resulted in reduced cell numbers, migration and invasion in PC3 cells. This preliminary study suggests that CAV2 may act to promote malignant behavior in an androgen independent prostate cancer cell line. Further studies are required to fully elucidate the role of CAV2 in androgen independent prostate cancer.

  14. Investigation of the roles of exosomes in colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Ding, Xiaoling; Nan, Lijuan; Wang, Yiting; Wang, Jing; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Jihong; Zhu, Wei; Ni, Bing; Dong, Suzhen; Yu, Lei

    2015-05-01

    The leading cause of death among cancer patients is tumor metastasis. Tumor-derived exosomes are emerging as mediators of metastasis. In the present study, we demonstrated that exosomes play a pivotal role in the metastatic progression of colorectal cancer. First, a nude mouse model of colorectal cancer liver metastasis was established and characterized. Then, we demonstrated that exosomes from a highly liver metastatic colorectal cancer cell line (HT-29) could significantly increase the metastatic tumor burden and distribution in the mouse liver of Caco-2 colorectal cancer cells, which ordinarily exhibit poor liver metastatic potential. We further investigated the mechanisms by which HT-29-derived-exosomes influence the liver metastasis of colorectal cancer and found that mice treated with HT-29-derived exosomes had a relatively higher level of CXCR4 in the metastatic microenvironment, indicating that exosomes may promote colorectal cancer metastasis by recruiting CXCR4-expressing stromal cells to develop a permissive metastatic microenvironment. Finally, the migration of Caco-2 cells was significantly increased following treatment with HT-29-derived exosomes in vitro, further supporting a role for exosomes in modulating colorectal tumor-derived liver metastasis. The data from the present study may facilitate further translational medicine research into the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

  15. Investigation of cAMP microdomains as a path to novel cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desman, Garrett; Waintraub, Caren; Zippin, Jonathan H

    2014-12-01

    Understanding of cAMP signaling has greatly improved over the past decade. The advent of live cell imaging techniques and more specific pharmacologic modulators has led to an improved understanding of the intricacies by which cAMP is able to modulate such a wide variety of cellular pathways. It is now appreciated that cAMP is able to activate multiple effector proteins at distinct areas in the cell leading to the activation of very different downstream targets. The investigation of signaling proteins in cancer is a common route to the development of diagnostic tools, prognostic tools, and/or therapeutic targets, and in this review we highlight how investigation of cAMP signaling microdomains driven by the soluble adenylyl cyclase in different cancers has led to the development of a novel cancer biomarker. Antibodies directed against the soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) are highly specific markers for melanoma especially for lentigo maligna melanoma and are being described as "second generation" cancer diagnostics, which are diagnostics that determine the 'state' of a cell and not just identify the cell type. Due to the wide presence of cAMP signaling pathways in cancer, we predict that further investigation of both sAC and other cAMP microdomains will lead to additional cancer biomarkers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The role of soluble adenylyl cyclase in health and disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Fruits and vegetables and prostate cancer: no association among 1104 cases in a prospective study of 130544 men in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Key, T.J.; Allen, N.; Appleby, P.N.; Overvad, K.; Tjonneland, A.; Miller, A.; Boeing, H.; Karalis, D.; Psaltopoulou, T.; Berrino, F.; Palli, D.; Panico, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Peeters, P.H.; Martinez, C.; Dorronsoro, M.; Gonzalez, C.A.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Quiros, J.R.; Ardanaz, E.; Berglund, G.; Egevad, L.; Hallmans, G.; Stattin, P; Bingham, S.; Day, N.; Gann, P.H.; Kaaks, R.; Ferrari, P.; Riboli, E.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the association between self-reported consumption of fruits and vegetables and prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Data on food consumption and complete follow-up for cancer incidence were available for 130544 men in 7

  17. Human Papillomavirus Antibodies and Future Risk of Anogenital Cancer : A Nested Case-Control Study in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreimer, Aimee R.; Brennan, Paul; Kuhs, Krystle A. Lang; Waterboer, Tim; Clifford, Gary; Franceschi, Silvia; Michel, Angelika; Willhauck-Fleckenstein, Martina; Riboli, Elio; Castellsague, Xavier; Hildesheim, Allan; Fortner, Renee Turzanski; Kaaks, Rudolf; Palli, Domenico; Ljuslinder, Ingrid; Panico, Salvatore; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Mesrine, Sylvie; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Peeters, Petra H.; Cross, Amanda J.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Vineis, Paolo; Larranaga, Nerea; Pala, Valeria; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Navarro, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Tumino, Rosario; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Boeing, Heiner; Steffen, Annika; Travis, Ruth C.; Ramon Quiros, J.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Pawlita, Michael; Johansson, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 (HPV16) causes cancer at several anatomic sites. In the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition study, HPV16 E6 seropositivity was present more than 10 years before oropharyngeal cancer diagnosis and was nearly absent in controls. The

  18. Investigation of the molecular relationship between breast cancer and obesity by candidate gene prioritization methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Garshasbi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer and obesity are two major public health concerns. More than 12 million cases of cancer are reported annually. Many reports confirmed obesity as a risk factor for cancer. The molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer has not been clear yet. The purpose of this study was to investigate priorities of effective genes in the molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer. Methods: In this study, computer simulation method was used for prioritizing the genes that involved in the molecular links between obesity and breast cancer in laboratory of systems biology and bioinformatics (LBB, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran, from March to July 2014. In this study, ENDEAVOUR software was used for prioritizing the genes and integrating multiple data sources was used for data analysis. Training genes were selected from effective genes in obesity and/or breast cancer. Two groups of candidate genes were selected. The first group was included the existential genes in 5 common region chromosomes (between obesity and breast cancer and the second group was included the results of genes microarray data analysis of research Creighton, et al (In 2012 on patients with breast cancer. The microarray data were analyzed with GER2 software (R online software on GEO website. Finally, both training and candidate genes were entered in ENDEAVOUR software package. Results: The candidate genes were prioritized to four style and five genes in ten of the first priorities were repeated twice. In other word, the outcome of prioritizing of 72 genes (Product of microarray data analysis and genes of 5 common chromosome regions (Between obesity and breast cancer showed, 5 genes (TNFRSF10B, F2, IGFALS, NTRK3 and HSP90B1 were the priorities in the molecular connection between obesity and breast cancer. Conclusion: There are some common genes between breast cancer and obesity. So, molecular relationship is confirmed. In this study the possible effect

  19. Preoperative Metabolic Syndrome Is Predictive of Significant Gastric Cancer Mortality after Gastrectomy: The Fujian Prospective Investigation of Cancer (FIESTA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Hu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. However, the impact of MetS on gastric cancer mortality remains largely unknown. Here, we prospectively examined the prediction of preoperative MetS for gastric cancer mortality by analyzing a subset of data from the ongoing Fujian prospective investigation of cancer (FIESTA study. This study was conducted among 3012 patients with gastric cancer who received radical gastrectomy between 2000 and 2010. The latest follow-up was completed in 2015. Blood/tissue specimens, demographic and clinicopathologic characteristics were collected at baseline. During 15-year follow-up, 1331 of 3012 patients died of gastric cancer. The median survival time (MST of patients with MetS was 31.3 months, which was significantly shorter than that of MetS-free patients (157.1 months. The coexistence of MetS before surgery was associated with a 2.3-fold increased risk for gastric cancer mortality (P < 0.001. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs were increased with invasion depth T1/T2 (HR = 2.78, P < 0.001, regional lymph node metastasis N0 (HR = 2.65, P < 0.001, positive distant metastasis (HR = 2.53, P < 0.001, TNM stage I/II (HR = 3.00, P < 0.001, intestinal type (HR = 2.96, P < 0.001, negative tumor embolus (HR = 2.34, P < 0.001, and tumor size ≤4.5 cm (HR = 2.49, P < 0.001. Further survival tree analysis confirmed the top splitting role of TNM stage, followed by MetS or hyperglycemia with remarkable discrimination ability. In this large cohort study, preoperative MetS, especially hyperglycemia, was predictive of significant gastric cancer mortality in patients with radical gastrectomy, especially for early stage of gastric cancer.

  20. Sweet-beverage consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva M; Wark, Petra A; Romaguera, Dora; Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Michaud, Dominique; Molina-Montes, Esther; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Fagherazzi, Guy; Katzke, Verena A; Kühn, Tilman; Steffen, Annika; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Klinaki, Eleni; Papatesta, Eleni-Maria; Masala, Giovanna; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Naccarati, Alessio; Mattiello, Amalia; Peeters, Petra H; Rylander, Charlotta; Parr, Christine L; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Quirós, J Ramón; Duell, Eric J; Dorronsoro, Miren; Huerta, José María; Ardanaz, Eva; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Tim; Stepien, Magdalena; Freisling, Heinz; Riboli, Elio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas

    2016-09-01

    The consumption of sweet beverages has been associated with greater risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity, which may be involved in the development of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that sweet beverages may increase pancreatic cancer risk as well. We examined the association between sweet-beverage consumption (including total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink and juice and nectar consumption) and pancreatic cancer risk. The study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. A total of 477,199 participants (70.2% women) with a mean age of 51 y at baseline were included, and 865 exocrine pancreatic cancers were diagnosed after a median follow-up of 11.60 y (IQR: 10.10-12.60 y). Sweet-beverage consumption was assessed with the use of validated dietary questionnaires at baseline. HRs and 95% CIs were obtained with the use of multivariable Cox regression models that were stratified by age, sex, and center and adjusted for educational level, physical activity, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Associations with total soft-drink consumption were adjusted for juice and nectar consumption and vice versa. Total soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.07), sugar-sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.02; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.08), and artificially sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.10) were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk (HR per 100 g/d: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99); this association remained statistically significant after adjustment for body size, type 2 diabetes, and energy intake. Soft-drink consumption does not seem to be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption might be associated with a modest decreased pancreatic cancer risk. Additional studies with specific information on juice and

  1. Residential cancer cluster investigation nearby a Superfund Study Area with trichloroethylene contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, David J; McKinley, Meg; Deapen, Dennis; Clarke, Christina A; Gomez, Scarlett Lin

    2016-05-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial solvent associated with liver cancer, kidney cancer, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). It is unclear whether an excess of TCE-associated cancers have occurred surrounding the Middlefield-Ellis-Whisman Superfund site in Mountain View, California. We conducted a population-based cancer cluster investigation comparing the incidence of NHL, liver, and kidney cancers in the neighborhood of interest to the incidence among residents in the surrounding four-county region. Case counts and address information were obtained using routinely collected data from the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry, part of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. Population denominators were obtained from the 1990, 2000, and 2010 US censuses. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with two-sided 99 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for time intervals surrounding the US Censuses. There were no statistically significant differences between the neighborhood of interest and the larger region for cancers of the liver or kidney. A statistically significant elevation was observed for NHL during one of the three time periods evaluated (1996-2005: SIR = 1.8, 99 % CI 1.1-2.8). No statistically significant NHL elevation existed in the earlier 1988-1995 (SIR = 1.3, 99 % CI 0.5-2.6) or later 2006-2011 (SIR = 1.3, 99 % CI 0.6-2.4) periods. There is no evidence of an increased incidence of liver or kidney cancer, and there is a lack of evidence of a consistent, sustained, or more recent elevation in NHL occurrence in this neighborhood. This evaluation included existing cancer registry data, which cannot speak to specific exposures incurred by past or current residents of this neighborhood.

  2. Consumption of dairy products and colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Murphy

    Full Text Available Prospective studies have consistently reported lower colorectal cancer risks associated with higher intakes of total dairy products, total milk and dietary calcium. However, less is known about whether the inverse associations vary for individual dairy products with differing fat contents.In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, we investigated the associations between intakes of total milk and milk subtypes (whole-fat, semi-skimmed and skimmed, yoghurt, cheese, and dietary calcium with colorectal cancer risk amongst 477,122 men and women. Dietary questionnaires were administered at baseline. Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for relevant confounding variables.During the mean 11 years of follow-up, 4,513 incident cases of colorectal cancer occurred. After multivariable adjustments, total milk consumption was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk (HR per 200 g/day 0.93, 95% CI: 0.89-0.98. Similar inverse associations were observed for whole-fat (HR per 200 g/day 0.90, 95% CI: 0.82-0.99 and skimmed milk (HR per 200 g/day 0.90, 95% CI: 0.79-1.02 in the multivariable models. Inverse associations were observed for cheese and yoghurt in the categorical models; although in the linear models, these associations were non-significant. Dietary calcium was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk (HR per 200 mg/day 0.95, 95% CI: 0.91-0.99; this association was limited to dairy sources of calcium only (HR per 200 mg/day 0.95, 95% CI: 0.91-0.99, with no association observed for non-dairy calcium sources (HR per 200 mg/day 1.00, 95% CI: 0.81-1.24.Our results strengthen the evidence for a possible protective role of dairy products on colorectal cancer risk. The inverse associations we observed did not differ by the fat content of the dairy products considered.

  3. Diversity of dietary patterns observed in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slimani, N.; Fahey, M.; Welch, A.A.; Wirfalt, E.; Stripp, C.; Bergstrom, E.; Linseisen, J.; Schulze, M.B.; Bamia, C.; Chloptsios, Y.; Veglia, F.; Panico, S.; Bueno de Mesquita, B.; Ocké, M.C.; Brustadt, M.; Lund, E.; Gonzalez, C.A.; Barcos, A.; Berglund, G.; Winkvist, A.; Mulligan, A.; Appleby, P.; Overvad, K.; Tjonneland, A.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Kesse, E.; Ferrari, P.; Staveren, van W.A.; Riboli, E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the diversity in dietary patterns existing across centres/regions participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Design and setting: Single 24-hour dietary recall measurements were obtained by means of standardised face-to-face

  4. Energy intake and sources of energy intake in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocke, M. C.; Larranaga, N.; Grioni, S.; van den Berg, S. W.; Ferrari, P.; Salvini, S.; Benetou, V.; Linseisen, J.; Wirfalt, E.; Rinaldi, S.; Jenab, M.; Halkjaer, J.; Jakobsen, M. U.; Niravong, M.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Kaaks, R.; Bergmann, M.; Moutsiou, E.; Trichopoulou, A.; Lauria, C.; Sacerdote, C.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Peeters, P. H. M.; Hjartaker, A.; Parr, C. L.; Tormo, M. J.; Sanchez, M. J.; Manjer, J.; Hellstrom, V.; Mulligan, A.; Spencer, E. A.; Riboli, E.; Bingham, S.; Slimani, N.

    Objectives: To describe energy intake and its macronutrient and food sources among 27 regions in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Methods: Between 1995 and 2000, 36 034 subjects aged 35-74 years were administered a

  5. Oesophageal cancer in the Transkei: multi-elemental investigation of plant material and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renan, M.J.; Drennan, B.D.; Keddy, R.J.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    1978-01-01

    A programme which investigates possible environmental factors which may have an effect on the demographic distribution of oesophageal cancer in the Transkei has been initiated. This report deals with the collection, handling and trace elemental analysis of maize leaves, rice, tomato leaves, spinach, pine needles and orchard leaves

  6. Estimation of enhanced cancer risk with 18FDG PET/CT investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Aruna; Mishra, Anil K.; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Dwarakanath, B.S.

    2014-01-01

    18 F-Fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 FDG) Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) investigation involves internal administration of 18 FDG and use of CT X-rays for the purpose of obtaining functional and anatomical information of a patient. However, the radiation exposure from undergoing PET/CT investigation may enhance the risk of cancer incidence as per the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model. The objective of the present study was to quantify the risk of cancer incidence associated with radiation exposure from 18 FDG PET/CT investigations. The organ doses from internally administered 18 FDG were estimated using OLINDA/EXM Code by performing dynamic PET scans in different regions of the body in a total of forty-nine patients. Organ doses from the CT component were calculated using the software CT-Expo. The associated cancer risk was calculated in terms of life time risk of cancer incidence resulting from a specified dose of ionizing radiation and was expressed in terms of Lifetime Attributable Risk (LAR). LAR values and the organ doses estimated for males and females were used to estimate the lifetime risk of cancer incidence from whole body 18 FDG PET/CT scan. Since from 18 FDG whole body PET/CT investigations, various tissues of the body receive substantially different doses, the site specific risk of cancer incidence was estimated and summed to obtain the total risk. This was compared with the baseline lifetime risk of cancer incidence in Indian population. LAR of cancer incidence was observed to be relatively higher in females as compared to males. The risk estimates ranged from 0.36% to 0.49% for a 20 year old male and 0.58% to 0.79% for a 20 year old female and were observed to be higher in younger ages and decreased with age. 18 FDG whole body PET/CT investigation was observed to be associated with non-negligible radiation risk as compared to the risks associated with other diagnostic modalities. (author)

  7. Endogenous versus exogenous exposure to N-nitroso compounds and gastric cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-EURGAST) study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakszyn, Paula; Bingham, Sheila A; Pera, Guillem; Agudo, Antonio; Luben, Robert; Welch, Ailsa; Boeing, Heiner; Giudice, Giuseppe del; Palli, Domenico; Saieva, Calogero; Krogh, Vittorio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Berglund, Göran; Simán, Henrik; Hallmans, Göran; Sanchez, María José; Larrañaga, Nerea; Barricarte, Aurelio; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Quirós, José Ramón; Key, Timothy J; Allen, Naomi E; Lund, Eiliv; Carneiro, Fátima; Linseisen, Jakob; Nagel, Gabriele; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Ocké, Marga C; Peeters, Petra H M; Numans, Mattijs E; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Fenger, Claus; Stenling, Roger; Ferrari, Pietro; Jenab, Mazda; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio; González, Carlos Alberto

    2006-01-01

    The risk of gastric cancer (GC) associated with dietary intake of nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and endogenous formation of nitroso compounds (NOCs) was investigated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The study included 521,457 individuals and 314 incident

  8. Endogenous versus exogenous exposure to N-Nitroso compounds and gastric cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-EURGAST) study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakszyn, P.; Bingham, S.; Pera, G.; Agudo, A.; Luben, R.; Welch, A.; Boeing, H.; Giudice, G. del; Palli, D.; Saieva, C.; Krogh, V.; Sacerdote, C.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Berglund, G.; Simán, H.; Hallmans, G.; Sanchez, M.J.; Larrañaga, N.; Barricarte, A.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Quirós, J.R.; Key, T.J.; Allen, N.; Lund, E.; Carneiro, F.; Linseisen, J.; Nagel, G.; Overvad, K.; Tjønneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Ocké, M.O.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Numans, M.E.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Trichopoulou, A.; Fenger, C.; Stenling, R.; Ferrari, P.; Jenab, M.; Norat, T.; Riboli, E.; Gonzalez, C.A.

    The risk of gastric cancer (GC) associated with dietary intake of Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and endogenous formation of Nitroso compounds (NOCs) was investigated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The study included 521,457 individuals and 314 incident

  9. Investigation of the possible increased incidence of cancer in West Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubery, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    The report of the Black Advisory Group on an investigation of the possible increased incidence of cancer in West Cumbria is briefly considered. The Advisory Group was unable to reach definite conclusions as to whether there is a link between discharges of radioactive material from BNFL Sellafield and the incidence of cancer due to uncertainties in the available epidemiological data and the radiation dose estimate data. The implementation of ten recommendations of the Black Advisory Group are briefly described covering epidemiological, radiation protection and organisational matters in an effort to clarify the situation and to enhance public safety. (U.K.)

  10. Utilizing Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy to investigate healthy and cancerous colon samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzegar, A.; Rezaei, H.; Malekfar, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, spontaneous Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering, Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy spectra have been investigated. The samples which were kept in the formalin solution selected from the human's healthy and cancerous colon tissues. The Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy spectra were collected by adding colloidal solution contained silver nanoparticles to the top of the samples. The recorded spectra were compared for the spontaneous Raman spectra of healthy and cancerous colon samples. The spontaneous and surface enhanced Raman scattering data were also collected and compared for both healthy and damaged samples.

  11. Concern as motivation for protection: an investigation of mothers' concern about daughters' breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, Lindsay; Silk, Kami J; Yun, Doshik; Bowman, Nicholas David; Anderson, Jennifer

    2011-11-01

    The present study surveyed mothers with daughters (N = 386) to investigate how mothers' concern about their daughters' breast cancer risk influenced intentions to engage in preventive behaviors. Using protection motivation theory as a framework, self-efficacy, response efficacy, and level of concern were posited to influence protective behavioral intention in distinct ways. Results from regression analyses indicate that self-efficacy, response efficacy, and mothers' concern are significant predictors of intentions to engage in preventive behaviors with daughters. In addition, a content analysis of mothers' open-ended reasons for their concern about their daughters' breast cancer risk yield a list of specific concerns and trends that vary by concern level and individual comment valence. The authors discuss implications for incorporating mothers' concerns into breast cancer prevention messages as a novel strategy for campaign designers.

  12. Concern as Motivation for Protection: An Investigation of Mothers’ Concern About Daughters’ Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEUBERGER, LINDSAY; SILK, KAMI J.; YUN, DOSHIK; BOWMAN, NICHOLAS DAVID; ANDERSON, JENNIFER

    2012-01-01

    The current study surveyed mothers with daughters (N=386) to investigate how mothers’ concern about their daughters’ breast cancer risk influenced intentions to engage in preventive behaviors. Using Protection Motivation Theory as a framework, self-efficacy, response efficacy and level of concern were posited to influence protective behavioral intention in distinct ways. Results from regression analyses indicate that self-efficacy, response efficacy, and mothers’ concern are significant predictors of intentions to engage in preventive behaviors with daughters. Additionally, a content analysis of mothers’ open-ended reasons for their concern about their daughters’ breast cancer risk yield a list of specific concerns as well as trends that vary by concern level and individual comment valence. Implications for incorporating mothers’ concerns into breast cancer prevention messages are discussed as a novel strategy for campaign designers. PMID:22070448

  13. N-glycosylation of colorectal cancer tissues: a liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry-based investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Crina I A; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Fung, Wesley L J; Koeleman, Carolien A; McDonnell, Liam A; Verhoeven, Aswin; Mesker, Wilma E; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Deelder, André M; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of ~1 million cases and an annual mortality rate of ~655,000 individuals. There is an urgent need for identifying novel targets to develop more sensitive, reliable, and specific tests for early stage detection of colon cancer. Post-translational modifications are known to play an important role in cancer progression and immune surveillance of tumors. In the present study, we compared the N-glycan profiles from 13 colorectal cancer tumor tissues and corresponding control colon tissues. The N-glycans were enzymatically released, purified, and labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid. Aliquots were profiled by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-HPLC) with fluorescence detection and by negative mode MALDI-TOF-MS. Using partial least squares discriminant analysis to investigate the N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer, an excellent separation and prediction ability were observed for both HILIC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS data. For structure elucidation, information from positive mode ESI-ion trap-MS/MS and negative mode MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was combined. Among the features with a high separation power, structures containing a bisecting GlcNAc were found to be decreased in the tumor, whereas sulfated glycans, paucimannosidic glycans, and glycans containing a sialylated Lewis type epitope were shown to be increased in tumor tissues. In addition, core-fucosylated high mannose N-glycans were detected in tumor samples. In conclusion, the combination of HILIC and MALDI-TOF-MS profiling of N-glycans with multivariate statistical analysis demonstrated its potential for identifying N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer tissues and provided new leads that might be used as candidate biomarkers.

  14. Staging Investigations in Breast Cancer: Collective Opinion of UK Breast Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Certain clinicopathological factors are associated with a higher likelihood of distant metastases in primary breast cancer. However, there remains inconsistency in which patients undergo formal staging for distant metastasis and the most appropriate investigation(s. Aims. To identify UK surgeon preferences and practice with regard to staging investigations for distant metastases. Methods. A survey was disseminated to members of the Association of Breast Surgery by e-mail regarding surgeon/breast unit demographics, use of staging investigations, and local policy on pre/postoperative staging investigations. Several patient scenarios were also presented. Results. 123 of 474 (25.9% recipients completed the survey. Investigations routinely employed for patients diagnosed with early breast cancer included serological/haematological tests (72% respondents, axillary ultrasound (67%, liver ultrasound (2%, chest radiograph (36%, and computed tomography (CT (1%. Three areas contributed to decisions to undertake staging by CT scan: tumour size, axillary nodal status, and plan for chemotherapy. There was widespread variation as to criteria for CT staging based on tumour size and nodal status, as well as the choice of staging investigation for the clinical scenarios presented. Conclusions. There remains variation in the use of staging investigations for distant disease in early breastcancer despite available guidelines.

  15. Clinical investigation of serum CEA in 120 patients with colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yusheng; Yang Liting; Yu Yunyun; Yu Suqing; Ma Shuqin

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between serum CEA and colorectal cancer, the pre-and postoperative serum CEA in 120 patients with colorectal cancer was measured by RIA, with other 24 cases of healthy donors as control. The results showed that serum CEA in control group and patient group were 9.84±2.44 ng/mL, 38, 85±19.21 ng/mL respectively, while colonic cancer group 37.43±18.58 ng/mL, rectal cancer group 39.72±20.67 ng/mL. There was significant difference between patient group and control group (P 0.05). Serum CEA of 37 among 44 cases with positive CEA findings decreased to 11.21±3.65 ng/mL during two months follow-up post-operation, whereas 50.63±24.38 ng/mL in 7/44 cases undergoing non-radical operation. The serum CEA of 41 recurrence cases was 43.12±17.15 ng/mL at six-year post-operation, with 87.80% of three-year recurrence rate. It suggested that the serum CEA test is a convenient method for colorectal cancer to preoperatively diagnose it, evaluate postoperative curative effect and detect tumor recurrence and metastasis

  16. Diabetes and onset of natural menopause: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J S; Onland-Moret, N C; Eijkemans, M J C; Tjønneland, A; Roswall, N; Overvad, K; Fagherazzi, G; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Dossus, L; Lukanova, A; Grote, V; Bergmann, M M; Boeing, H; Trichopoulou, A; Tzivoglou, M; Trichopoulos, D; Grioni, S; Mattiello, A; Masala, G; Tumino, R; Vineis, P; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Weiderpass, E; Redondo, M L; Sánchez, M J; Castaño, J M Huerta; Arriola, L; Ardanaz, E; Duell, E J; Rolandsson, O; Franks, P W; Butt, S; Nilsson, P; Khaw, K T; Wareham, N; Travis, R; Romieu, I; Gunter, M J; Riboli, E; van der Schouw, Y T

    2015-06-01

    Do women who have diabetes before menopause have their menopause at an earlier age compared with women without diabetes? Although there was no overall association between diabetes and age at menopause, our study suggests that early-onset diabetes may accelerate menopause. Today, more women of childbearing age are being diagnosed with diabetes, but little is known about the impact of diabetes on reproductive health. We investigated the impact of diabetes on age at natural menopause (ANM) in 258 898 women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), enrolled between 1992 and 2000. Determinant and outcome information was obtained through questionnaires. Time-dependent Cox regression analyses were used to estimate the associations of diabetes and age at diabetes diagnosis with ANM, stratified by center and adjusted for age, smoking, reproductive and diabetes risk factors and with age from birth to menopause or censoring as the underlying time scale. Overall, no association between diabetes and ANM was found (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.94; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-1.01). However, women with diabetes before the age of 20 years had an earlier menopause (10-20 years: HR = 1.43; 95% CI 1.02-2.01, France); German Cancer Aid, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMMF) (Germany); Ministry of Health and Social Solidarity, Stavros Niarchos Foundation and Hellenic Health Foundation (Greece); Italian Association for Research on Cancer (AIRC) and National Research Council (Italy); Dutch Ministry of Public Health, Welfare and Sports (VWS), Netherlands Cancer Registry (NKR), LK Research Funds, Dutch Prevention Funds, Dutch ZON (Zorg Onderzoek Nederland), World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), Statistics Netherlands (The Netherlands); ERC-2009-AdG 232997 and Nordforsk, Nordic Centre of Excellence programme on Food, Nutrition and Health (Norway); Health Research Fund (FIS), Regional Governments of Andaluc

  17. Main nutrient patterns and colorectal cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskal, Aurélie; Freisling, Heinz; Byrnes, Graham; Assi, Nada; Fahey, Michael T; Jenab, Mazda; Ferrari, Pietro; Tjønneland, Anne; Petersen, Kristina En; Dahm, Christina C; Hansen, Camilla Plambeck; Affret, Aurélie; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Cadeau, Claire; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Iqbal, Khalid; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Naska, Androniki; Masala, Giovanna; de Magistris, Maria Santucci; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas H; Engeset, Dagrun; Licaj, Idlir; Skeie, Guri; Ardanaz, Eva; Buckland, Genevieve; Castaño, José M Huerta; Quirós, José R; Amiano, Pilar; Molina-Portillo, Elena; Winkvist, Anna; Myte, Robin; Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Huybrechts, Inge; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Ward, Heather; Gunter, Marc J; Slimani, Nadia

    2016-11-22

    Much of the current literature on diet-colorectal cancer (CRC) associations focused on studies of single foods/nutrients, whereas less is known about nutrient patterns. We investigated the association between major nutrient patterns and CRC risk in participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Among 477 312 participants, intakes of 23 nutrients were estimated from validated dietary questionnaires. Using results from a previous principal component (PC) analysis, four major nutrient patterns were identified. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed for the association of each of the four patterns and CRC incidence using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for established CRC risk factors. During an average of 11 years of follow-up, 4517 incident cases of CRC were documented. A nutrient pattern characterised by high intakes of vitamins and minerals was inversely associated with CRC (HR per 1 s.d.=0.94, 95% CI: 0.92-0.98) as was a pattern characterised by total protein, riboflavin, phosphorus and calcium (HR (1 s.d.)=0.96, 95% CI: 0.93-0.99). The remaining two patterns were not significantly associated with CRC risk. Analysing nutrient patterns may improve our understanding of how groups of nutrients relate to CRC.

  18. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in childhood and incidence of cancer in adulthood in never smokers in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuang, Shu-Chun; Gallo, Valentina; Michaud, Dominique; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Romieu, Isabelle; Straif, Kurt; Palli, Domenico; Pala, Valeria; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Panico, Salvatore; Peeters, Petra H.; Lund, Eiliv; Gram, Inger Torhild; Manjer, Jonas; Borgquist, Signe; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo

    The association between childhood environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and adult cancer risk is controversial; we examined this relationship in never smokers within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Over an average of 10 years, 8,372 cases of

  19. Subtypes of fruit and vegetables, variety in consumption and risk of colon and rectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, Max; Siersema, Peter D; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bastide, Nadia; Fagherazzi, Guy; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Klinaki, Eleni; Masala, Giovanna; Grioni, Sara; De Magistris, Maria Santucci; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Peeters, Petra H M; Lund, Eiliv; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Quirós, J Ramón; Agudo, Antonio; Sánchez, María-José; Dorronsoro, Miren; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Ohlsson, Bodil; Jirström, Karin; Van Guelpen, Bethany; Wennberg, Maria; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Key, Timothy J; Romieu, Isabelle; Huybrechts, Inge; Cross, Amanda J; Murphy, Neil; Riboli, Elio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas

    2015-01-01

    Previously, a lower risk of colorectal cancer was observed with fruit and vegetable consumption in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition within a follow-up period of nine years which was not fully supported by a recent meta-analysis. Therefore, we were interested in the

  20. Pre-diagnostic metabolite concentrations and prostate cancer risk in 1077 cases and 1077 matched controls in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Julie A; Fensom, Georgina K; Rinaldi, Sabina; Scalbert, Augustin; Appleby, Paul N; Achaintre, David; Gicquiau, Audrey; Gunter, Marc J; Ferrari, Pietro; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kühn, Tilman; Floegel, Anna; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Anifantis, Eleutherios; Agnoli, Claudia; Palli, Domenico; Trevisan, Morena; Tumino, Rosario; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Agudo, Antonio; Larrañaga, Nerea; Redondo-Sánchez, Daniel; Barricarte, Aurelio; Huerta, José Maria; Quirós, J Ramón; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Johansson, Mattias; Cross, Amanda J; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Riboli, Elio; Key, Timothy J; Travis, Ruth C

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about how pre-diagnostic metabolites in blood relate to risk of prostate cancer. We aimed to investigate the prospective association between plasma metabolite concentrations and risk of prostate cancer overall, and by time to diagnosis and tumour characteristics, and risk of death

  1. [Investigations and review of literature relating to carcinogenesis. I. Communication: Cancer from asbestos, schistosomiasis, and cicatrization (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, G; Brand, I

    1980-06-01

    This review covers the following aspects: Cancer associated with asbestos and other fibers: Epidemiology. - Cancer types and location (mesothelioma; bronchogenic carcinoma; cancer of the upper respiratory tract; abdominal cancer). - Experimental asbestos cancer. - Other kinds of fibers and cancer (wool and cotton; glass; talc; others). - Cancer determining or influencing factors (individual predisposition; species susceptibility; type of material; shape and size of fibers; smoking). - Preneoplastic signs in man (fibrosis; ferruginous bodies; pleural plaques; milky spots). - Preneoplastic development in animals. - Fiber effects on cell cultures (macrophages; fibroblasts). Cancer associated with schistosomiasis: Epidemiology. - Patient age and cancer latency. - Pathology. - Foreign body reaction and preneoplastic development. Scar cancer. Foreign body cancer: In man. - Experimental (species differences in susceptibility; individual genetic differences in tumor incidence and latency; influence of sex, age, nutrition; tumor histopathology and ultrastructure; tumor growth, invasiveness, metastases, transplantability, immunology; search for tumor viruses). - Properties of foreign body materials in relation to tumorigenicity (chemical and physical properties; size and shape; surface properties; porosity). - Investigations and findings concerning the origin of foreign body sarcomas (the foreign body reaction; search for foci of tumor origin; an analytical method; monoclonal tumor origin; heterogenicity of carcinogenic events; surface dependency; identification of originator cells; time and location of the emergence of tumor originator cells; the carcinogenic initiation event; surface-independent and dependent preneoplastic maturation; the carcinogenic role of the foreign body). - Earlier hypotheses and theories in the light of new experimental findings. The results of experimental foreign body tumorigenesis in relation to foreign body-, asbestos-, schistosomiasis-, and

  2. Investigation of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in formalin-fixed and paraffin- embedded breast cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Ahmet; Ozdarendeli, Aykut; Bulut, Yasemin; Yekeler, Hayrettin; Cobanoglu, Bengu; Doymaz, Mehmet Z

    2005-01-01

    To investigate etiological role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in breast cancer. The presence of EBV DNA in 57 breast cancer tissues was investigated with a sensitive PCR assay. The breast cancer tissues were from invasive ductular (n=28), lobular (n=20) and other miscellaneous carcinomas (n=9). Tissues from normal breasts and patients with various benign breast diseases (n=55): fibrocystic disease (n=34), fibroadenoma (n=16), hyperplasia, and granulomatous mastitis (n=5), were used as control samples. EBV DNA was detected in 13 (23%) cancerous tissues (7 ductular, 4 lobular, 2 other carcinoma) and 19 (35%) in the control tissues. The difference between EBV presence in malignant and benign tissues was not statistically significant (p>0.05). The presence of EBV DNA was detected almost equally in both breast cancer and normal tissues, which indicates no etiological role for EBV in breast cancer. We suggest further etiological studies. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Investigations with FDG-PET Scanning in Prostate Cancer Show Limited Value for Clinical Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salminen, Eeva [Univ. of Turku (Finland). Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy; Hogg, Annette; Binns, David; Hicks, Rodney [The Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, East Melbourne, Vic (Australia). Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging; Frydenberg, Mark [Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Vic (Australia)

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate FDG-PET (fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Twenty-two patients were studied during different disease phases of prostate cancer, for staging or restaging to clarify specific clinical questions. FDG-PET was performed encompassing the thorax, abdomen and pelvis using the Penn PET 300H scanner. Scanning was begun 60 min after {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose marker. Patients were catheterized and administered diuretics to minimize urinary activity. Information obtained with FDG-PET was concordant with findings from other investigations in 7/22 (32%) patients, discordant in 15/22 (68%) patients and equivalent in one patient (4%). PET indicated progressive disease in five patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <4 ng/L. The impact on management of the patients was high in 46% of cases, low in 41% and for 14% there was no impact on management. The accuracy of FDG-PET was 72% (95% CI 50-89) as confirmed by invasive diagnostics/follow-up. FDG-PET can provide useful information and improve the clinician's decision on further management procedures in selected patients with low PSA and bone or lymph node changes. A negative PET scan in prostate cancer should be interpreted with caution.

  4. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) calibration study: rationale, design and population characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slimani, N.; Kaaks, R.; Ferrari, P.

    2002-01-01

    The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), which covers a large cohort of half a million men and women from 23 European centres in 10 Western European countries, was designed to study the relationship between diet and the risk of chronic diseases, particularly cancer......, a calibration approach was developed. This approach involved an additional dietary assessment common across study populations to re-express individual dietary intakes according to the same reference scale. A single 24-hour diet recall was therefore collected, as the EPIC reference calibration method, from...... in a large multi-centre European study. These studies showed that, despite certain inherent methodological and logistic constraints, a study design such as this one works relatively well in practice. The average response in the calibration study was 78.3% and ranged from 46.5% to 92.5%. The calibration...

  5. An investigation into between-meal food desires among hospitalised haematological cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, S. L.; Bredie, Wender; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt

    2016-01-01

    haematological cancer patients, screened for nutrition-related symptoms, participated. Univariate statistical models were used to investigate the influence of time-of-day and food texture on between-meal desires. Results: Fresh fruit, ice cream, cheese and mashed potatoes with bacon were the most desired food......Background & aims: Hospitalised haematological cancer patients often suffer from reduced appetite and food intake, which negatively influences the patients' well-being and nutritional status. The aim of this study was to identify specific between-meal food desires in a patient group, in order...... to increase food intake. The study was conducted using a picture-aided questionnaire, and relating the preferences to factors that could easily be implemented in the hospital menu, such as time of the day and texture. Moreover, the results of the questionnaire were verified by acceptance tests on six selected...

  6. Diagnostic and treatment pathways for men with prostate cancer in Queensland: investigating spatial and demographic inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baade Peter D

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patterns of diagnosis and management for men diagnosed with prostate cancer in Queensland, Australia, have not yet been systematically documented and so assumptions of equity are untested. This longitudinal study investigates the association between prostate cancer diagnostic and treatment outcomes and key area-level characteristics and individual-level demographic, clinical and psychosocial factors. Methods/Design A total of 1064 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between February 2005 and July 2007 were recruited through hospital-based urology outpatient clinics and private practices in the centres of Brisbane, Townsville and Mackay (82% of those referred. Additional clinical and diagnostic information for all 6609 men diagnosed with prostate cancer in Queensland during the study period was obtained via the population-based Queensland Cancer Registry. Respondent data are collected using telephone and self-administered questionnaires at pre-treatment and at 2 months, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months, 36 months, 48 months and 60 months post-treatment. Assessments include demographics, medical history, patterns of care, disease and treatment characteristics together with outcomes associated with prostate cancer, as well as information about quality of life and psychological adjustment. Complementary detailed treatment information is abstracted from participants' medical records held in hospitals and private treatment facilities and collated with health service utilisation data obtained from Medicare Australia. Information about the characteristics of geographical areas is being obtained from data custodians such as the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Geo-coding and spatial technology will be used to calculate road travel distances from patients' residences to treatment centres. Analyses will be conducted using standard statistical methods along with multilevel regression models including individual and area-level components

  7. Investigating the impact of audio instruction and audio-visual biofeedback for lung cancer radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Rohini

    function could be approximated to a normal distribution function. A statistical analysis was also performed to investigate if a patient's physical, tumor or general characteristics played a role in identifying whether he/she responded positively to the coaching type---signified by a reduction in the variability of respiratory motion. The analysis demonstrated that, although there were some characteristics like disease type and dose per fraction that were significant with respect to time-independent analysis, there were no significant time trends observed for the inter-session or intra-session analysis. Based on patient feedback with the existing audio-visual biofeedback system used for the study and research performed on other feedback systems, an improved audio-visual biofeedback system was designed. It is hoped the widespread clinical implementation of audio-visual biofeedback for radiotherapy will improve the accuracy of lung cancer radiotherapy.

  8. Macronutrient intake and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, N.E.; Appleby, P.N.; Key, T.J.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Ros, M.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Tjonneland, A.; Roswall, N.; Overvad, K.; Weikert, S.; Boeing, H.; Chang-Claude, J.; Teucher, B.; Panico, S.; Sacerdote, C.; Tumino, R.; Palli, D.; Sieri, S.; Peeters, P.; Quiros, J.R.; Jakszyn, P.; Molina-Montes, E.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Ardanaz, E.; Dorronsoro, M.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.; Ljungberg, B; Hallmans, G.; Ehrnstrom, R.; Ericson, U.; Gram, I.T.; Parr, C.L.; Trichopoulou, A.; Karapetyan, T.; Dilis, V.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Fagherrazzi, G.; Romieu, I.; Gunter, M.J.; Riboli, E.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that dietary factors may be important in the development of bladder cancer. We examined macronutrient intake in relation to risk of urothelial cell carcinoma among 469,339 men and women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Associations

  9. Investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L.; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A.; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R.; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine M.; Hallberg, Emily; Castelao, J. Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Torres, Maria; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Cross, Simon; Reed, Malcolm; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Arias Perez, José Ignacio; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Spurdle, Amanda; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; McLean, Catriona; Baglietto, Laura; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Brüning, Thomas; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Mannermaa, Arto; Swerdlow, Anthony; Giles, Graham G.; Brenner, Hermann; Fasching, Peter A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John; Benítez, Javier; Cox, Angela; Andrulis, Irene L.; Lambrechts, Diether; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Couch, Fergus; Czene, Kamila; Bojesen, Stig E.; Easton, Doug F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen

  10. The use of minimal preparation computed tomography for the primary investigation of colon cancer in frail or elderly patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Philip; Burnett, Hugh; Nicholson, David A

    2002-05-01

    AIM: To assess the place of computed tomography (CT) of the colon in frail or elderly patients with symptoms suggestive of colon cancer. METHOD: A total of 195 patients (median age 76 years) underwent CT of the abdomen and pelvis following the administration of positive oral contrast medium but no bowel preparation. All had symptoms suggestive of colon cancer. CT findings were classified as normal/diverticular disease (DD), possible colon cancer, definite colon cancer or extracolonic pathology. Accuracy of CT was assessed against patient outcome. Association between symptoms and colon cancer was assessed by chi-squared test. RESULTS: There were 47 deaths and median follow up for those alive was 16 months. Overall sensitivity of CT was 100% and specificity 87% for detection of colon cancer. One hundred and ten normal/DD CT examinations had no significant bowel lesion on follow up. Of 12 cases defined as 'definite cancers' on CT, there were nine colon cancers, two extracolonic cancers, and one normal. Of 23 'possible cancers' on CT, there were two colon cancers, three DD masses and 18 normal/DD. Fifty examinations had extracolonic findings including 33 (17%) cases of significant abdominal disease. CT findings led to a halt in investigations in 115 cases (59%), colonoscopy in 18 (9%) cases and surgery in 16 (8%) cases. None of the symptoms present showed a significant association with colon cancer (all P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Minimal preparation CT is a non-invasive and sensitive method for investigating colon cancer in frail or elderly patients. It has a 100% negative predictive value and also detects a large number of extracolonic lesions. Robinson, P. et al. (2002)

  11. The use of minimal preparation computed tomography for the primary investigation of colon cancer in frail or elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Philip; Burnett, Hugh; Nicholson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To assess the place of computed tomography (CT) of the colon in frail or elderly patients with symptoms suggestive of colon cancer. METHOD: A total of 195 patients (median age 76 years) underwent CT of the abdomen and pelvis following the administration of positive oral contrast medium but no bowel preparation. All had symptoms suggestive of colon cancer. CT findings were classified as normal/diverticular disease (DD), possible colon cancer, definite colon cancer or extracolonic pathology. Accuracy of CT was assessed against patient outcome. Association between symptoms and colon cancer was assessed by chi-squared test. RESULTS: There were 47 deaths and median follow up for those alive was 16 months. Overall sensitivity of CT was 100% and specificity 87% for detection of colon cancer. One hundred and ten normal/DD CT examinations had no significant bowel lesion on follow up. Of 12 cases defined as 'definite cancers' on CT, there were nine colon cancers, two extracolonic cancers, and one normal. Of 23 'possible cancers' on CT, there were two colon cancers, three DD masses and 18 normal/DD. Fifty examinations had extracolonic findings including 33 (17%) cases of significant abdominal disease. CT findings led to a halt in investigations in 115 cases (59%), colonoscopy in 18 (9%) cases and surgery in 16 (8%) cases. None of the symptoms present showed a significant association with colon cancer (all P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Minimal preparation CT is a non-invasive and sensitive method for investigating colon cancer in frail or elderly patients. It has a 100% negative predictive value and also detects a large number of extracolonic lesions. Robinson, P. et al. (2002)

  12. Investigation of relations between skin cancer lesions' images and their fluorescent spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, P.; Borisova, E.; Avramov, L.; Petkova, El.; Troyanova, P.

    2010-03-01

    This investigation is based on images obtained from healthy tissue and skin cancer lesions and their fluorescent spectra of cutaneous lesions derived after optical stimulation. Our analyses show that the lesions’ spectra of are different of those, obtained from normal tissue and the differences depend on the type of cancer. We use a comparison between these “healthy” and “unhealthy” spectra to define forms of variations and corresponding diseases. However, the value of the emitted light varies not only between the patients, but also depending on the position of the tested area inside of one lesion. These variations could be result from two reasons: different degree of damaging and different thickness of the suspicious lesion area. Regarded to the visible image of the lesion, it could be connected with the chroma of colour of the tested area and the lesion homogeneity that corresponds to particular disease. For our investigation, images and spectra of three non-melanoma cutanous malignant tumors are investigated, namely—basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and keratoacanthoma. The images were processed obtaining the chroma by elimination of the background—healthy tissue, and applying it as a basic signal for transformation from RGB to Lab colorimetric model. The chroma of the areas of emission is compared with the relative value of fluorescence spectra. Specific spectral features are used to develop hybrid diagnostic algorithm (including image and spectral features) for differentiation of these three kinds of malignant cutaneous pathologies.

  13. Investigation of a valuable biochemical indicator as objective measurement in radiation treated cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, M.; Rode, I.L.

    1978-01-01

    In the investigation of a valuable biochemical indicator in radiotherapy applied in the treatment of cancer patients, plasma hemoglobin, serum haptoglobin, total LDH enzyme and LDH isoenzyme distribution levels were measured. In immunological studies immunoproteins were determined quantitatively by immunodiffusion. Patients were irradiated generally by 2 Gy daily doses and measurements of the above factors were made weekly, during a radiation treatment for 4-6 weeks. In most of the cases examined, increase in hemoglobin and haptoglobin values were observed and the time-dependent curves of the changes showed a characteristic shape. The immunosuppressive effect of irradiation was found to be no universe phenomenon, as in some percentage of the cases an increase in the values of the immunoproteins was observed during radiation treatment, especially in grid-irradiation. Cancer patients treated by different type of radiation sources were compared. The effects of 200 kV X-ray, high-energy X-ray, electron and 60-Co-gamma radiation were evaluated and their effectivity compared. A trial was made to differentiate between type of radiation treatment in radiotherapy of cancer and to find the most promising method. (orig.) [de

  14. Flavonoid and lignan intake and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina-Montes, Esther; Sánchez, María José; Zamora-Ros, Raul; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Wark, Petra A.; Obon-Santacana, Mireia; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Travis, Ruth C.; Ye, Weimin; Sund, Malin; Naccarati, Alessio; Mattiello, Amalia; Krogh, Vittorio; Martorana, Caterina; Masala, Giovanna; Amiano, Pilar; Huerta, José María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Quirós, José Ramón; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Angell Åsli, Lene; Skeie, Guri; Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Peeters, Petra H.; Romieu, Isabelle; Scalbert, Augustin; Overvad, Kim; Clemens, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Peppa, Eleni; Vidalis, Pavlos; Khaw, Kay Tee; Wareham, Nick; Olsen, Anja; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutroun-Rualt, Marie Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cross, Amanda J.; Lu, Yunxia; Riboli, Elio; Duell, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the potential cancer preventive effects of flavonoids and lignans, their ability to reduce pancreatic cancer risk has not been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. Our aim was to examine the association between dietary intakes of flavonoids and lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the

  15. Mobile telecommunications and health: report of an investigation into an alleged cancer cluster in Sandwell, West Midlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Antony; Rao, Jammi N; Middleton, John D; Pearmain, Philippa; Evans, Tim

    2012-11-01

    Residents of one street expressed concern about the number of incident cancers, following the installation of a nearby mobile phone base station. The investigation explored whether the base station could be responsible for the cancers. Data were collected from residents' medical records. GPs and oncologists provided further information. Ward-level cancer incidence and mortality data were also obtained, over four three-year time periods. A total of 19 residents had developed cancer. The collection of cancers did not fulfil the criteria for a cancer cluster. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for all malignant neoplasms (excluding non-melanoma skin cancers) in females (1.38 (95% CI, 1.08-1.74)) and all persons (1.27 (CI, 1.06-1.51)) were significantly higher than in the West Midlands during 2001-3. There were no significant differences for colorectal, female breast and prostate cancers, for any time period. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for non-melanoma skin cancers in males and all persons was significantly lower than in the West Midlands during 1999-2001, and significantly lower in males, females and all persons during 2002-4. We cannot conclude that the base station was responsible for the cancers. It is unlikely that information around a single base station can either demonstrate or exclude causality.

  16. High-risk populations identified in Childhood Cancer Survivor Study investigations: implications for risk-based surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Melissa M; Mulrooney, Daniel A; Bowers, Daniel C; Sklar, Charles A; Green, Daniel M; Donaldson, Sarah S; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Neglia, Joseph P; Meadows, Anna T; Robison, Leslie L

    2009-05-10

    Childhood cancer survivors often experience complications related to cancer and its treatment that may adversely affect quality of life and increase the risk of premature death. The purpose of this manuscript is to review how data derived from Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) investigations have facilitated identification of childhood cancer survivor populations at high risk for specific organ toxicity and secondary carcinogenesis and how this has informed clinical screening practices. Articles previously published that used the resource of the CCSS to identify risk factors for specific organ toxicity and subsequent cancers were reviewed and results summarized. CCSS investigations have characterized specific groups to be at highest risk of morbidity related to endocrine and reproductive dysfunction, pulmonary toxicity, cerebrovascular injury, neurologic and neurosensory sequelae, and subsequent neoplasms. Factors influencing risk for specific outcomes related to the individual survivor (eg, sex, race/ethnicity, age at diagnosis, attained age), sociodemographic status (eg, education, household income, health insurance) and cancer history (eg, diagnosis, treatment, time from diagnosis) have been consistently identified. These CCSS investigations that clarify risk for treatment complications related to specific treatment modalities, cumulative dose exposures, and sociodemographic factors identify profiles of survivors at high risk for cancer-related morbidity who deserve heightened surveillance to optimize outcomes after treatment for childhood cancer.

  17. Investigation of Human Cancers for Retrovirus by Low-Stringency Target Enrichment and High-Throughput Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinner, Lasse; Mourier, Tobias; Friis-Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    -stringency in-solution hybridization method enables detection of discovery of hitherto unknown viral sequences by high-throughput sequencing. The sensitivity was sufficient to detect retroviral...... sequences in clinical samples. We used this method to conduct an investigation for novel retrovirus in samples from three cancer types. In accordance with recent studies our investigation revealed no retroviral infections in human B-cell lymphoma cells, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma or colorectal cancer...

  18. Inflammatory potential of the diet and risk of gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agudo, Antonio; Cayssials, Valerie; Bonet, Catalina

    2018-01-01

    Background: Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of the 2 major types of gastric cancer. Several foods, nutrients, and nonnutrient food components seem to be involved in the regulation of chronic inflammation. Objective: We assessed the association between the inflammatory...... potential of the diet and the risk of gastric carcinoma, overall and for the 2 major subsites: cardia cancers and noncardia cancers. Design: A total of 476,160 subjects (30% men, 70% women) from the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study were followed for 14 y, during which 913...... with the use of 28 dietary components and their corresponding inflammatory scores. The association between the ISD and gastric cancer risk was estimated by HRs and 95% CIs calculated by multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for confounders. Results: The inflammatory potential of the diet was associated...

  19. The value of auditing negative lower GI investigations preceding a final diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasekar, A; James, L; Stephenson, B M; Thompson, I W; Vellacott, K D; Allison, M C

    2009-09-01

    To review all preceding 'negative' large bowel investigations in patients with a final diagnosis of colorectal cancer, and to examine whether delayed diagnosis was associated with worse outcome. Details were gathered on all patients with a new diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma presenting over 4.5 years. For each patient the hospital's clinical workstation and radiology and endoscopy databases were interrogated for all flexible sigmoidoscopies, colonoscopies and barium enemas during the 5 years prior to diagnosis. Among the 570 patients, 28 (5%) had undergone colonoscopy and/or flexible sigmoidoscopy that had not shown colorectal cancer during the 5 years preceding final diagnosis, and a further 28 (5%) had undergone 'negative' barium enemas. Polyp surveillance might have missed four lesions destined to become malignant. Correspondingly there were three patients undergoing IBD surveillance found to have CRC, having had a negative complete colonoscopy within the preceding 5 years. Among patients undergoing de novo colonoscopy for diagnosis the true miss rate was only one patient per year. At August 2007, 29 (58%) of those with delayed diagnosis were still alive, compared with 216 (42%) of those diagnosed during initial investigation (chi2 = 5.04, P auditing the quality assurance of lower gastrointestinal diagnostic services. Despite the delay, late diagnosis was found to be associated with improved survival and a lower likelihood of metastatic disease.

  20. Impact of long-term antihypertensive and antidiabetic medications on the prognosis of post-surgical colorectal cancer: the Fujian prospective investigation of cancer (FIESTA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Feng; Hu, Dan; Lin, Xiandong; Liang, Binying; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Hejun; Xia, Yan; Lin, Jinxiu; Zheng, Xiongwei; Niu, Wenquan

    2018-05-24

    Hypertension and diabetes mellitus are common comorbidities of colorectal cancer. We designed a prospective cohort study aiming to investigate the impact of long-term antihypertensive and antidiabetic medications on colorectal cancer-specific survival and recurrence among 713 post-surgical patients. All participants received radical resection for colorectal cancer during 2000-08, and they were followed up until July 2017. Colorectal cancer patients without hypertension had better survival than those with hypertension (median survival time [MST]: 190.3 months versus 99.0 months, p colorectal cancer survival was statistically significant, that is, patients receiving antidiabetic medications had longer survival time than untreated diabetic patients (MST: 135.8 months versus 80.2 months, p : 0.007), whereas the prognosis was greatly improved in colorectal cancer patients without diabetes mellitus ( p colorectal cancer relative to those without medications, respectively. Our data indicate that long-term antidiabetic medications can significantly prolong the survival and improve the prognosis of post-surgical colorectal cancer.

  1. Consumption of predefined 'Nordic' dietary items in ten European countries - an investigation in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roswall, Nina; Olsen, Anja; Boll, Katja

    2014-01-01

    a broader preventive potential. The present study describes the intake of seven a priori defined healthy food items (apples/pears, berries, cabbages, dark bread, shellfish, fish and root vegetables) across ten countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC...

  2. Fruit and vegetable intake and overall cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffetta, Paolo; Couto, Elisabeth; Wichmann, Janine

    2010-01-01

    and lifestyle variables of the cohort was obtained. Cancer incidence and mortality data were ascertained, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable Cox regression models. Analyses were also conducted for cancers associated with tobacco and alcohol after...... stratification for tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. RESULTS: Of the initial 142 605 men and 335 873 women included in the study, 9604 men and 21 000 women were identified with cancer after a median follow-up of 8.7 years. The crude cancer incidence rates were 7.9 per 1000 person-years in men and 7.1 per.......97 to 0.99). Stratification by alcohol intake suggested a stronger reduction in risk in heavy drinkers and was confined to cancers caused by smoking and alcohol. CONCLUSIONS: A very small inverse association between intake of total fruits and vegetables and cancer risk was observed in this study. Given...

  3. Effects of temperature and cellular interactions on the mechanics and morphology of human cancer cells investigated by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Liu, LianQing; Xi, Ning; Wang, YueChao; Xiao, XiuBin; Zhang, WeiJing

    2015-09-01

    Cell mechanics plays an important role in cellular physiological activities. Recent studies have shown that cellular mechanical properties are novel biomarkers for indicating the cell states. In this article, temperature-controllable atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to quantitatively investigate the effects of temperature and cellular interactions on the mechanics and morphology of human cancer cells. First, AFM indenting experiments were performed on six types of human cells to investigate the changes of cellular Young's modulus at different temperatures and the results showed that the mechanical responses to the changes of temperature were variable for different types of cancer cells. Second, AFM imaging experiments were performed to observe the morphological changes in living cells at different temperatures and the results showed the significant changes of cell morphology caused by the alterations of temperature. Finally, by co-culturing human cancer cells with human immune cells, the mechanical and morphological changes in cancer cells were investigated. The results showed that the co-culture of cancer cells and immune cells could cause the distinct mechanical changes in cancer cells, but no significant morphological differences were observed. The experimental results improved our understanding of the effects of temperature and cellular interactions on the mechanics and morphology of cancer cells.

  4. Cancer communication science funding trends, 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, A Susana; Galica, Kasia; Blake, Kelly D; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Hesse, Bradford W

    2013-12-01

    Since 2000, the field of health communication has grown tremendously, owing largely to research funding by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). This study provides an overview of cancer communication science funding trends in the past decade. We conducted an analysis of communication-related grant applications submitted to the NCI in fiscal years 2000-2012. Using 103 keywords related to health communication, data were extracted from the Portfolio Management Application, a grants management application used at NCI. Automated coding described key grant characteristics such as mechanism and review study section. Manual coding determined funding across the cancer control continuum, by cancer site, and by cancer risk factors. A total of 3307 unique grant applications met initial inclusion criteria; 1013 of these were funded over the 12-year period. The top funded grant mechanisms were the R01, R21, and R03. Applications were largely investigator-initiated proposals as opposed to responses to particular funding opportunity announcements. Among funded communication research, the top risk factor being studied was tobacco, and across the cancer control continuum, cancer prevention was the most common stage investigated. NCI support of cancer communication research has been an important source of growth for health communication science over the last 12 years. The analysis' findings describe NCI's priorities in cancer communication science and suggest areas for future investments.

  5. Investigation of Prognostic Factors and Survival without Recurrence in Patients with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Abdollahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the major consequences of breast cancer is the recurrence of the disease. The objective of present study was to estimate the 7-year survival without recurrence as well as the effective prognostic factors in recurrence. Materials and Methods: This historical cohort survival analysis was conducted on 1329 patients diagnosed with breast cancer in Motahari Breast Clinic, Shiraz, Iran between 2004 and 2011. We estimated the rate of survival without recurrence through the Kaplan–Meier method and the difference between the survival curves was investigated using the log-rank test. Furthermore, Cox regression model was used to model the effective factors in local recurrence as well as metastasis. Results: The mean age of the patients was 54.8 ± 11.4 years. Estrogen receptor positive, progesterone receptor positive, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 positive were observed in 70.6%, 66.6%, and 34.4% of the cases, respectively. The mean of the follow-up period was 3.7 ± 1.8 years in all patients. The results of the Kaplan–Meier method revealed 1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-year rate of survival without recurrence as 96.4%, 78.4%, 66.3%, and 54.8%, respectively. There was a significant relationship between survival without recurrence and histology grade (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.66, P = 0.009, neural invasion (HR = 1.74, P = 0.006, and progesterone receptors (HR = 0.69, P = 0.031. Conclusion: In this study, the rate of survival without recurrence in breast cancer was 54.8%. Among factors, histology grade and neural involvement at the time of diagnosis increased the chance of recurrence and progesterone receptors caused a longer interval between diagnosis and recurrence.

  6. Healthy lifestyle and risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Fiona; Ferrari, Pietro; Freisling, Heinz; Chajès, Veronique; Rinaldi, Sabina; de Batlle, Jordi; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Baglietto, Laura; Dartois, Laureen; Dossus, Laure; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Krogh, Vittorio; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Rosso, Stefano; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; May, Anne; Peeters, Petra H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Buckland, Genevieve; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Andersson, Anne; Sund, Malin; Ericson, Ulrika; Wirfält, Elisabet; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Gunter, Marc; Riboli, Elio; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and prevention strategies are needed to reduce incidence worldwide. A healthy lifestyle index score (HLIS) was generated to investigate the joint effect of modifiable lifestyle factors on postmenopausal breast cancer risk. The study included 242,918 postmenopausal women from the multinational European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, with detailed information on diet and lifestyle assessed at baseline. The HLIS was constructed from five factors (diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and anthropometry) by assigning scores of 0-4 to categories of each component, for which higher values indicate healthier behaviours. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by Cox proportional regression models. During 10.9 years of median follow-up, 7,756 incident breast cancer cases were identified. There was a 3% lower risk of breast cancer per point increase of the HLIS. Breast cancer risk was inversely associated with a high HLIS when fourth versus second (reference) categories were compared [adjusted HR = 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.66-0.83]. The fourth versus the second category of the HLIS was associated with a lower risk for hormone receptor double positive (adjusted HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.67-0.98) and hormone receptor double negative breast cancer (adjusted HR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.40-0.90). Findings suggest having a high score on an index of combined healthy behaviours reduces the risk of developing breast cancer among postmenopausal women. Programmes which engage women in long term health behaviours should be supported. © 2014 UICC.

  7. Experimental investigation of the penetration of ultrasound nanobubbles in a gastric cancer xenograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaozhou; Wang, Luofu; Guo, Yanli; Tong, Haipeng; Li, Lang; Ding, Jun; Huang, Haiyun

    2013-08-01

    Nanobubbles as a type of ultrasound contrast agent have attracted much interest in recent years due to their many advantages, such as strong penetrating power and high stability. However, there is still insufficient morphological evidence concerning gas-filled nanobubbles in tumor tissue spaces and tumor angiogenesis. We used a gastric cancer xenograft as an example to study this question. Nanobubbles with a particle size of 435.2 ± 60.53 nm were prepared and compared with SonoVue® microbubbles in vitro and in vivo, and they exhibited a superior contrast imaging effect. After excluding the impact of the nanobubbles in blood vessels through saline flush, we used an ultrasound burst and frozen sectioning to investigate the distribution of nanobubbles in the gastric cancer xenografts and confirmed this by transmission electron microscopy. Preliminary results showed that the nanobubbles were able to pass through the gaps between the endothelial cells in the tumor vascular system to enter the tissue space. These findings could provide morphological evidence for extravascular ultrasound imaging of tumors and serve as a foundation for the application of nanobubbles in extravascular tumor-targeted ultrasonic diagnostics and therapy.

  8. A systematic analysis of UK cancer research funding by gender of primary investigator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Charlie D; Head, Michael G; Marshall, Dominic C; Gilbert, Barnabas J; El-Harasis, Majd A; Raine, Rosalind; O'Connor, Henrietta; Atun, Rifat; Maruthappu, Mahiben

    2018-04-30

    To categorically describe cancer research funding in the UK by gender of primary investigator (PIs). Systematic analysis of all open-access data. Data about public and philanthropic cancer research funding awarded to UK institutions between 2000 and 2013 were obtained from several sources. Fold differences were used to compare total investment, award number, mean and median award value between male and female PIs. Mann-Whitney U tests were performed to determine statistically significant associations between PI gender and median grant value. Of the studies included in our analysis, 2890 (69%) grants with a total value of £1.82 billion (78%) were awarded to male PIs compared with 1296 (31%) grants with a total value of £512 million (22%) awarded to female PIs. Male PIs received 1.3 times the median award value of their female counterparts (Pfunding than their male counterparts in terms of total investment, the number of funded awards, mean funding awarded and median funding awarded. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Experimental investigation of the penetration of ultrasound nanobubbles in a gastric cancer xenograft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiaozhou; Guo Yanli; Tong Haipeng; Li Lang; Ding Jun; Huang Haiyun; Wang Luofu

    2013-01-01

    Nanobubbles as a type of ultrasound contrast agent have attracted much interest in recent years due to their many advantages, such as strong penetrating power and high stability. However, there is still insufficient morphological evidence concerning gas-filled nanobubbles in tumor tissue spaces and tumor angiogenesis. We used a gastric cancer xenograft as an example to study this question. Nanobubbles with a particle size of 435.2 ± 60.53 nm were prepared and compared with SonoVue ® microbubbles in vitro and in vivo, and they exhibited a superior contrast imaging effect. After excluding the impact of the nanobubbles in blood vessels through saline flush, we used an ultrasound burst and frozen sectioning to investigate the distribution of nanobubbles in the gastric cancer xenografts and confirmed this by transmission electron microscopy. Preliminary results showed that the nanobubbles were able to pass through the gaps between the endothelial cells in the tumor vascular system to enter the tissue space. These findings could provide morphological evidence for extravascular ultrasound imaging of tumors and serve as a foundation for the application of nanobubbles in extravascular tumor-targeted ultrasonic diagnostics and therapy. (paper)

  10. Investigating the Feasibility of Rapid MRI for Image-Guided Motion Management in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sawant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner. A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter, tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter, tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  11. Investigating the feasibility of rapid MRI for image-guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Amit; Keall, Paul; Pauly, Kim Butts; Alley, Marcus; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Loo, Billy W; Hinkle, Jacob; Joshi, Sarang

    2014-01-01

    Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner). A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP) sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D) images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter), tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter), tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  12. Results from the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition link vitamin B6 catabolism and lung cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuo, Hui; Ueland, Per Magne; Midttun, Øivind; Vollset, Stein Emil; Tell, Grethe S.; Theofylaktopoulou, Despoina; Travis, Ruth C.; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Fournier, Agnès; Severi, Gianluca; Kvaskoff, Marina; Boeing, Heiner; Bergmann, Manuela M.; Turzanski-Fortner, Renée; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Lagiou, Pagona; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. Bas; Peeters, Petra H.; Grankvist, Kjell; Johansson, Mikael; Agudo, Antonio; Garcia, Jose Ramon Quiros; Larranaga, Nerea; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Chuang, Shu Chun; Gallo, Valentina; Brennan, Paul; Johansson, Mattias; Ulvik, Arve

    2018-01-01

    Circulating pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP) has been linked to lung cancer risk. The PAr index, defined as the ratio 4-pyridoxic acid/(pyridoxal + PLP), reflects increased vitamin B6 catabolism during inflammation. PAr has been defined as a marker of lung cancer risk in a prospective cohort study, but

  13. Results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Link Vitamin B6 Catabolism and Lung Cancer Risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuo, Hui; Ueland, Per M; Midttun, Øivind; Vollset, Stein E; Tell, Grethe S; Theofylaktopoulou, Despoina; Travis, Ruth C; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fournier, Agnès; Severi, Gianluca; Kvaskoff, Marina; Boeing, Heiner; Bergmann, Manuela M; Fortner, Renée T; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Lagiou, Pagona; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H; Grankvist, Kjell; Johansson, Mikael; Agudo, Antonio; Garcia, Jose Ramon Quiros; Larranaga, Nerea; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Chirlaque, Maria Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Gallo, Valentina; Brennan, Paul; Johansson, Mattias; Ulvik, Arve

    2018-01-01

    Circulating pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) has been linked to lung cancer risk. The PAr index, defined as the ratio 4-pyridoxic acid/(pyridoxal + PLP), reflects increased vitamin B6 catabolism during inflammation. PAr has been defined as a marker of lung cancer risk in a prospective cohort study, but

  14. Adiposity, mediating biomarkers and risk of colon cancer in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrova, K.; Drogan, D.; Boeing, H.; Jenab, M.; Bueno de Mesquita, H.B.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Adiposity is a risk factor for colon cancer, but underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We evaluated the extent to which 11 biomarkers with inflammatory and metabolic actions mediate the association of adiposity measures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI), with colon cancer

  15. Utilizing nonlinear optical microscopy to investigate the development of early cancer in nude mice in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lo, Wen; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    In this investigation, we used in vivo nonlinear optical microscopy to image normal and carcinogen DMBA treated skin tissues of nude mice. We acquired two-photon autofluroescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) images of the skin tissue, and applied the ASI (Autofluorescence versus SHG Index) to the resulting image. This allows us to visualize and quantify the interaction between mouse skin cells and the surrounding connective tissue. We found that as the imaging depth increases, ASI has a different distribution in the normal and the treated skin tissues. Since the DMBA treated skin eventually became squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), our results show that the physiological changes to mouse skin en route to become cancer can be effectively tracked by multiphoton microscopy. We envision this approach to be effective in studying tumor biology and tumor treatment procedures.

  16. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake and breast cancer risk according to menopause and hormone receptor status in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Ferrari, Pietro; González, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence on the association between dietary flavonoids and lignans and breast cancer (BC) risk is inconclusive, with the possible exception of isoflavones in Asian countries. Therefore, we investigated prospectively dietary total and subclasses of flavonoid and lignan intake and BC risk according...... to menopause and hormonal receptor status in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The study included 334,850 women, mostly aged between 35 and 70 years from ten European countries. At baseline, country-specific validated dietary questionnaires were used. A flavonoid...

  17. Magnetic resonance colonography versus colonoscopy as a diagnostic investigation for colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purkayastha, S.; Tekkis, P.P.; Athanasiou, T.; Aziz, O.; Negus, R.; Gedroyc, W.; Darzi, A.W.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: Magnetic resonance colonography (MRC) is emerging as a potential complementary investigation for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) and also for benign pathology such as diverticular disease. A meta-analysis reporting the use of MRC is yet to be performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MRC compared with the gold-standard investigation, conventional colonoscopy (CC). METHODS: A literature search was carried out to identify studies containing comparative data between MRC findings and CC findings. Quantitative meta-analysis for diagnostic tests was performed, which included the calculation of independent sensitivities, specificities, diagnostic odds ratios, the construction of summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves, pooled analysis and sensitivity analysis. The study heterogeneity was evaluated by the Q-test using a random-effect model to accommodate the cluster of outcomes between individual studies. RESULTS: In all, 8 comparative studies were identified, involving 563 patients. The calculated pooled sensitivity for all lesions was 75% (95% CI: 47% to 91%), the specificity was 96% (95% CI: 86% to 98%) and the area under the ROC curve was 90% (weighted). On sensitivity analysis, MRC had a better diagnostic accuracy for CRC than for polyps, with a sensitivity of 91% (95% CI: 97% to 91%), a specificity of 98% (95% CI: 66% to 99%) and an area under the ROC curve of 92%. There was no significant heterogeneity between the studies with regard to the diagnostic accuracy of MRC for CRC. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis suggests that MRC is an imaging technique with high discrimination for cases presenting with colorectal cancer. The exact diagnostic role of MRC needs to be clarified (e.g. suitable for an elderly person with suspected CRC). Further evaluation is necessary to refine its applicability and diagnostic accuracy in comparison with other imaging methods such as computed tomography colonography

  18. Investigating the Ketogenic Diet As Treatment for Primary Aggressive Brain Cancer: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Schwartz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Survival of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM with the current recommended treatment is poor. Reported median survivals are approximately 8–15 months. Based on recent publications from animal models, combining cancer drugs, radiation, and diet-metabolic treatments may be a new route to better survivals. To investigate this possibility, we have begun a clinical trial that has enrolled 15 subjects using a ketogenic diet (KD as an addition to current standard treatments that include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Of the 15 enrolled, 10 completed the protocol. This perspective describes the challenges and lessons learned during this clinical trial and discusses the critical elements that are essential for investigating treatment with a KD. We also reviewed and compared various types of KDs. We believe that the diet selected should be standardized within individual clinical trials, and more importantly, the patients’ blood should be monitored for glucose and ketones twice daily so that the supervising dietitian can work with the patient and their caregivers to make appropriate changes in the diet. Compliance with the diet is best in highly motivated patients who have excellent home support from a family member or a friend who can help to overcome administrative, physical, and cognition deficiencies associated with the disease. Treatment of GBM using a KD represents a reasonable investigative approach. This perspective summarizes the challenges and lessons learned implementing and continuing KD therapy while the patients are concurrently being treated with radiation and chemotherapy.

  19. Prospect-EPIC Utrecht: study design and characteristics of the cohort population. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boker, L K; van Noord, P A; van der Schouw, Y T; Koot, N V; Bueno de Mesquita, H B; Riboli, E; Grobbee, D E; Peeters, P H

    2001-01-01

    The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), which has been established in order to investigate the relations between nutrition and cancer, was initiated in 1990 and involves 10 European countries with heterogeneous dietary patterns and differing cancer incidence rates. This manuscript presents the design, recruitment and baseline characteristics of the Prospect-EPIC cohort co-ordinated in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The cohort is based on volunteers recruited among women participating in a regional breast cancer screening program. It comprises of 17,357 subjects aged 50-69 years at enrolment from Utrecht and vicinity, who have consented to participate in the study and its follow-up. Each participant filled out a general questionnaire and a food frequency questionnaire. Participants were also physically examined and have donated a blood sample. Participation rate was 34.5%. Blood samples were donated by most participants (97.5%) and detailed informed consents were obtained from 87.4% of participants. Mean age at enrolment was 57 years. Anthropometric, lifestyle and morbidity characteristics of the cohort population did not differ largely from those of similar study populations in The Netherlands. Based on the Prospect-EPIC population, we intend to conduct prospective total cohort, nested case-control or case-cohort studies, in order to investigate relations between consumption of certain food groups or nutrients and chronic diseases, including hormone dependant cancers such as breast, colon, endometrial and ovary cancers.

  20. Investigation of SNARE-Mediated Membrane Trafficking in Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Xin

    2003-01-01

    In order to better understand how polarized membrane trafficking pathways change during the loss of epithelial cell polarity during cancer progression we have studied syntaxins 3 and 4 in prostate cancer...

  1. Investigating Genomic Mechanisms of Treatment Resistance in Castration ResistantProstate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    bladder cancer which has been a time intensive but fruitful process. Additionally I have taken on a number of extramural responsibilities including...advancement. Led ASCO 2017 Annual Meeting Prostate Program Committee, served on ASCO 2017 Educational Committee, NCCN panel member ( bladder cancer ...pancreatic cancer . Cancer Lett. 2016 Sep 28; 380(1):144-52. PMID: 27343980 4. Anantharaman A, Friedlander TW. Targeting the androgen receptor in metastatic

  2. Dietary Flavonoid Intake and Esophageal Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Esther; Zamora-Ros, Raul; Duell, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    flavonoid intake was inversely associated with esophageal cancer risk (hazard ratio (HR) (log2) = 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.78, 0.98) but not in multivariable models (HR (log2) = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.86, 1.10). After covariate adjustment, no statistically significant association was found between any...... flavonoid subclass and esophageal cancer, EAC, or ESCC. However, among current smokers, flavonols were statistically significantly associated with a reduced esophageal cancer risk (HR (log2) = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.94), whereas total flavonoids, flavanols, and flavan-3-ol monomers tended to be inversely...

  3. Subtypes of fruit and vegetables, variety in consumption and risk of colon and rectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Max; Siersema, Peter D; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bastide, Nadia; Fagherazzi, Guy; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Klinaki, Eleni; Masala, Giovanna; Grioni, Sara; Santucci De Magistris, Maria; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Peeters, Petra H M; Lund, Eiliv; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Quirós, J Ramón; Agudo, Antonio; Sánchez, María-José; Dorronsoro, Miren; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Ohlsson, Bodil; Jirström, Karin; Van Guelpen, Bethany; Wennberg, Maria; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Key, Timothy J; Romieu, Isabelle; Huybrechts, Inge; Cross, Amanda J; Murphy, Neil; Riboli, Elio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas

    2015-12-01

    Previously, a lower risk of colorectal cancer was observed with fruit and vegetable consumption in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition within a follow-up period of 9 years which was not fully supported by a recent meta-analysis. Therefore, we were interested in the relation with extended follow-up, also focusing on single subtypes and a variety of intake of fruit and vegetables. Fruit and vegetable consumption was assessed at baseline. After an average of 13 years of follow-up, 3,370 participants were diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer. Diet diversity scores were constructed to quantify variety in fruit and vegetable consumption. A lower risk of colon cancer was observed with higher self-reported consumption of fruit and vegetable combined (HR Q4 vs. Q1 0.87, 95% CI 0.75-1.01, p for trend 0.02), but no consistent association was observed for separate consumption of fruits and vegetables. No associations with risk of rectal cancer were observed. The few observed associations for some fruit and vegetable subtypes with colon cancer risk may have been due to chance. Variety in consumption of fruits and vegetables was not associated with a lower risk of colon or rectal cancer. Although a lower risk of colon cancer is suggested with high consumption of fruit and vegetables, this study does not support a clear inverse association between fruit and vegetable consumption and colon or rectal cancer beyond a follow-up of more than 10 years. Attenuation of the risk estimates from dietary changes over time cannot be excluded, but appears unlikely. © 2015 UICC.

  4. Evaluation of a Bladder Cancer Cluster in a Population of Criminal Investigators with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives—Part 1: The Cancer Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan R. Davis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated a bladder cancer cluster in a cohort of employees, predominately criminal investigators, participating in a medical surveillance program with the United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF between 1995 and 2007. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs were used to compare cancer incidences in the ATF population and the US reference population. Seven cases of bladder cancer (five cases verified by pathology report at time of analysis were identified among a total employee population of 3,768 individuals. All cases were white males and criminal investigators. Six of seven cases were in the 30 to 49 age range at the time of diagnosis. The SIRs for white male criminal investigators undergoing examinations were 7.63 (95% confidence interval = 3.70–15.75 for reported cases and 5.45 (2.33–12.76 for verified cases. White male criminal investigators in the ATF population are at statistically significant increased risk for bladder cancer.

  5. Reanalysis of Epidemiological Investigation of Cancer Risk among People Residing near Nuclear Power Plants in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Kim, Myoung-Hee; Ju, Young-Su; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Ha, Mina; Kim, Bong-Kyu; Zoh, Kyung Ehi; Paek, Domyung

    2018-03-09

    Background : A 20-year follow-up study on cancer incidence among people living near nuclear power plants in South Korea ended in 2011 with a finding of significantly, but inconsistently, elevated thyroid cancer risk for females. Reanalysis of the original study was carried out to examine the dose-response relationship further, and to investigate any evidence of detection bias. Methods : In addition to replicating the original Cox proportional hazards models, nested case-control analysis was carried out for all subjects and for four different birth cohorts to examine the effects of excluding participants with pre-existing cancer history at enrollment. The potential for detection bias was investigated using the records of medical utilization and voluntary health checks of comparison groups. Results : The overall risk profile of the total sample was similar to that of the original study. However, in the stratified analysis of four birth cohorts, the cancer risk among people living near nuclear power plants became higher in younger birth cohorts. This was especially true for thyroid cancers of females (hazard ratio (HR) 3.38) and males (HR 1.74), female breast cancers (HR 2.24), and radiation-related cancers (HR 1.59 for males, HR 1.77 for females), but not for radiation-insensitive cancers (HR 0.59 for males, HR 0.98 for females). Based on medical records and health check reports, we found no differences between comparison groups that could have led to detection bias. Conclusions : The overall results suggest elevated risk of radiation-related cancers among residents living near nuclear power plants, controlling for the selective survival effect. This is further supported by the lack of evidence of detection bias and by records of environmental exposure from radiation waste discharge.

  6. Reanalysis of Epidemiological Investigation of Cancer Risk among People Residing near Nuclear Power Plants in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Min Kim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A 20-year follow-up study on cancer incidence among people living near nuclear power plants in South Korea ended in 2011 with a finding of significantly, but inconsistently, elevated thyroid cancer risk for females. Reanalysis of the original study was carried out to examine the dose–response relationship further, and to investigate any evidence of detection bias. Methods: In addition to replicating the original Cox proportional hazards models, nested case-control analysis was carried out for all subjects and for four different birth cohorts to examine the effects of excluding participants with pre-existing cancer history at enrollment. The potential for detection bias was investigated using the records of medical utilization and voluntary health checks of comparison groups. Results: The overall risk profile of the total sample was similar to that of the original study. However, in the stratified analysis of four birth cohorts, the cancer risk among people living near nuclear power plants became higher in younger birth cohorts. This was especially true for thyroid cancers of females (hazard ratio (HR 3.38 and males (HR 1.74, female breast cancers (HR 2.24, and radiation-related cancers (HR 1.59 for males, HR 1.77 for females, but not for radiation-insensitive cancers (HR 0.59 for males, HR 0.98 for females. Based on medical records and health check reports, we found no differences between comparison groups that could have led to detection bias. Conclusions: The overall results suggest elevated risk of radiation-related cancers among residents living near nuclear power plants, controlling for the selective survival effect. This is further supported by the lack of evidence of detection bias and by records of environmental exposure from radiation waste discharge.

  7. Investigation of Three Approaches to Address Fear of Recurrence Among Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-16

    Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Breast Carcinoma; Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Cancer of Breast; Mammary Neoplasm, Human; Human Mammary Carcinoma; Malignant Tumor of Breast; Mammary Cancer; Mammary Carcinoma; Anxiety; Fear; Neoplasm Remission, Spontaneous; Spontaneous Neoplasm Regression; Regression, Spontaneous Neoplasm; Remission, Spontaneous Neoplasm; Spontaneous Neoplasm Remission

  8. Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    cells and in transformed ovarian cells affected by obesity that lead to ovarian cancer initiation and progression. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Obesity, Ovarian...5 7. Participants & Other Collaborating Organizations...that lead to ovarian cancer initiation and progression. We also aim to identify secreted factors from adipose tissue that promote ovarian cancer

  9. Fatty Acid Synthesis Gene Variants and Breast Cancer Risk: A Study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaaks, Rudolf J

    2005-01-01

    A western lifestyle, characterized by low rates of energy expenditure and a high-energy diet rich in saturated fats and refined carbohydrates, is associated with high incidence of breast cancer in women...

  10. Differentiation of Lung Cancer, Empyema, and Abscess Through the Investigation of a Dry Cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, Brittany; Michaels, Scott

    2016-11-24

    An acute dry cough results commonly from bronchitis or pneumonia. When a patient presents with signs of infection, respiratory crackles, and a positive chest radiograph, the diagnosis of pneumonia is more common. Antibiotic failure in a patient being treated for community-acquired pneumonia requires further investigation through chest computed tomography. If a lung mass is found on chest computed tomography, lung empyema, abscess, and cancer need to be included on the differential and managed aggressively. This report describes a 55-year-old Caucasian male, with a history of obesity, recovered alcoholism, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension, presenting with an acute dry cough in the primary care setting. The patient developed signs of infection and was found to have a lung mass on chest computed tomography. Treatment with piperacillin-tazobactam and chest tube placement did not resolve the mass, so treatment with thoracotomy and lobectomy was required. It was determined through surgical investigation that the patient, despite having no risk factors, developed a lung abscess. Lung abscesses rarely form in healthy middle-aged individuals making it an unlikely cause of the patient's presenting symptom, dry cough. The patient cleared his infection with proper management and only suffered minor complications of mild pneumoperitoneum and pneumothorax during his hospitalization.

  11. Clinician-Reported Barriers to Implementing Breast Cancer Chemoprevention in the UK: A Qualitative Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel G; Side, Lucy; Meisel, Susanne F; Horne, Rob; Cuzick, Jack; Wardle, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The use of tamoxifen and raloxifene as preventive therapy for women at increased risk of breast cancer was approved by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in 2013. We undertook a qualitative investigation to investigate the factors affecting the implementation of preventive therapy within the UK. We recruited general practitioners (GPs) (n = 10) and clinicians working in family history or clinical genetics settings (FHCG clinicians) (n = 15) to participate in semi-structured interviews. Data were coded thematically within the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. FHCG clinicians focussed on the perceived lack of benefit of preventive therapy and difficulties interpreting the NICE guidelines. FHCG clinicians felt poorly informed about preventive therapy, and this discouraged patient discussions on the topic. GPs were unfamiliar with the concept of preventive therapy, and were not aware that they may be asked to prescribe it for high-risk women. GPs were reluctant to initiate therapy because it is not licensed, but were willing to continue a prescription if it had been started in secondary or tertiary care. Barriers to implementing preventive therapy within routine clinical practice are common and could be addressed by engaging all stakeholders during the development of policy documents. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Proteomic investigation into betulinic acid-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  13. The malignant pleural effusion as a model to investigate intratumoral heterogeneity in lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K Basak

    Full Text Available Malignant Pleural Effusions (MPE may be useful as a model to study hierarchical progression of cancer and/or intratumoral heterogeneity. To strengthen the rationale for developing the MPE-model for these purposes, we set out to find evidence for the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC in MPE and demonstrate an ability to sustain intratumoral heterogeneity in MPE-primary cultures. Our studies show that candidate lung CSC-expression signatures (PTEN, OCT4, hTERT, Bmi1, EZH2 and SUZ12 are evident in cell pellets isolated from MPE, and MPE-cytopathology also labels candidate-CSC (CD44, cMET, MDR-1, ALDH subpopulations. Moreover, in primary cultures that use MPE as the source of both tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME, candidate CSC are maintained over time. This allows us to live-sort candidate CSC-fractions from the MPE-tumor mix on the basis of surface markers (CD44, c-MET, uPAR, MDR-1 or differences in xenobiotic metabolism (ALDH. Thus, MPE-primary cultures provide an avenue to extract candidate CSC populations from individual (isogenic MPE-tumors. This will allow us to test whether these cells can be discriminated in functional bioassays. Tumor heterogeneity in MPE-primary cultures is evidenced by variable immunolabeling, differences in colony-morphology, and differences in proliferation rates of cell subpopulations. Collectively, these data justify the ongoing development of the MPE-model for the investigation of intratumoral heterogeneity, tumor-TME interactions, and phenotypic validation of candidate lung CSC, in addition to providing direction for the pre-clinical development of rational therapeutics.

  14. Variety in vegetable and fruit consumption and the risk of gastric and esophageal cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurnink, S.M.; Büchner, F.L.; Bueno-de Mesquita, H.B.; Siersema, P.D.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Numans, M.E.; Dahm, C.C.; Overvad, K.; Tjonneland, A.; Roswall, N.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Morois, S.; Kaaks, R.; Teucher, B.; Boeing, H.; Buijsse, B.; Trichopoulou, A.; Benetou, V.; Zylis, D.; Palli, D.; Sieri, S.; Vineis, P.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Ocké, M.C.; Peeters, P.H.; Skeie, G.; Brustad, M.; Lund, E.; Sanchez-Cantalejo, E.; Navarro, C.; Amiano, P.; Ardanaz, E.; Ramón Quirós, J.; Hallmans, G.; Johansson, I.; Lindkvist, B.; Regnér, S.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.; Key, T.J.; Slimani, N.; Norat, T.; Vergnaud, A.C.; Romaguera, D.; Gonzalez, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Diets high in vegetables and fruits have been suggested to be inversely associated with risk of gastric cancer. However, the evidence of the effect of variety of consumption is limited. We therefore investigated whether consumption of a variety of vegetables and fruit is associated with gastric and

  15. Investigating the possible causal role of coffee consumption with prostate cancer risk and progression using Mendelian randomization analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Amy E; Martin, Richard M; Geybels, Milan S

    2017-01-01

    Coffee consumption has been shown in some studies to be associated with lower risk of prostate cancer. However, it is unclear if this association is causal or due to confounding or reverse causality. We conducted a Mendelian randomisation analysis to investigate the causal effects of coffee...... consumption on prostate cancer risk and progression. We used two genetic variants robustly associated with caffeine intake (rs4410790 and rs2472297) as proxies for coffee consumption in a sample of 46,687 men of European ancestry from 25 studies in the PRACTICAL consortium. Associations between genetic...... variants and prostate cancer case status, stage and grade were assessed by logistic regression and with all-cause and prostate cancer-specific mortality using Cox proportional hazards regression. There was no clear evidence that a genetic risk score combining rs4410790 and rs2472297 was associated...

  16. Adherence to the Dutch Guidelines for a Healthy Diet and cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands (EPIC-NL) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijk, Ellen A; May, Anne M; Beulens, Joline W J; Fransen, Heidi P; de Wit, G Ardine; Boer, Jolanda M A; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Hoekstra, Jeljer; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M

    2014-11-01

    To examine the association between adherence to the Dutch Guidelines for a Healthy Diet created by the Dutch Health Council in 2006 and overall and smoking-related cancer incidence. Prospective cohort study. Adherence to the guidelines, which includes one recommendation on physical activity and nine on diet, was measured using an adapted version of the Dutch Healthy Diet (DHD) index. The score ranged from 0 to 90 with a higher score indicating greater adherence to the guidelines. We estimated the hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals for the association between the DHD index (in tertiles and per 20-point increment) at baseline and cancer incidence at follow-up. We studied 35 608 men and women aged 20-70 years recruited into the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands (EPIC-NL) study during 1993-1997. After an average follow-up of 12·7 years, 3027 cancer cases were documented. We found no significant association between the DHD index (tertile 3 v. tertile 1) and overall (HR = 0·97; 95 % CI 0·88, 1·07) and smoking-related cancer incidence (HR = 0·89; 95 % CI 0·76, 1·06) after adjustment for relevant confounders. Excluding the components physical activity or alcohol from the score did not change the results. None of the individual components of the DHD index was significantly associated with cancer incidence. In the present study, participants with a high adherence to the Dutch Guidelines for a Healthy Diet were not at lower risk of overall or smoking-related cancer. This does not exclude that other components not included in the DHD index may be associated with overall cancer risk.

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection, chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: A nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiaqi; Zagai, Ulrika; Hallmans, Göran; Nyrén, Olof; Engstrand, Lars; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Duell, Eric J; Overvad, Kim; Katzke, Verena A; Kaaks, Rudolf; Jenab, Mazda; Park, Jin Young; Murillo, Raul; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Riboli, Elio; Aune, Dagfinn; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Capellá, Gabriel; Agudo, Antonio; Krogh, Vittorio; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Martínez, Begoña; Redondo-Sanchez, Daniel; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Hm Peeters, Petra; Regnér, Sara; Lindkvist, Björn; Naccarati, Alessio; Ardanaz, Eva; Larrañaga, Nerea; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Rebours, Vinciane; Barré, Amélie; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Ye, Weimin

    2017-04-15

    The association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk remains controversial. We conducted a nested case-control study with 448 pancreatic cancer cases and their individually matched control subjects, based on the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, to determine whether there was an altered pancreatic cancer risk associated with H. pylori infection and chronic corpus atrophic gastritis. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for matching factors and other potential confounders. Our results showed that pancreatic cancer risk was neither associated with H. pylori seropositivity (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.70, 1.31) nor CagA seropositivity (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.48). We also did not find any excess risk among individuals seropositive for H. pylori but seronegative for CagA, compared with the group seronegative for both antibodies (OR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.38). However, we found that chronic corpus atrophic gastritis was non-significantly associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 0.77, 2.37), and although based on small numbers, the excess risk was particularly marked among individuals seronegative for both H. pylori and CagA (OR = 5.66; 95% CI: 1.59, 20.19, p value for interaction cancer risk in western European populations. However, the suggested association between chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk warrants independent verification in future studies, and, if confirmed, further studies on the underlying mechanisms. © 2016 UICC.

  18. Investigating the cognitive precursors of emotional response to cancer stress: re-testing Lazarus's transactional model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert-Williams, N J; Morrison, V; Wilkinson, C; Neal, R D

    2013-02-01

    Lazarus's Transactional Model of stress and coping underwent significant theoretical development through the 1990s to better incorporate emotional reactions to stress with their appraisal components. Few studies have robustly explored the full model. This study aimed to do so within the context of a major life event: cancer diagnosis. A repeated measures design was used whereby data were collected using self-report questionnaire at baseline (soon after diagnosis), and 3- and 6-month follow-up. A total of 160 recently diagnosed cancer patients were recruited (mean time since diagnosis = 46 days). Their mean age was 64.2 years. Data on appraisals, core-relational themes, and emotions were collected. Data were analysed using both Spearman's correlation tests and multivariate regression modelling. Longitudinal analysis demonstrated weak correlation between change scores of theoretically associated components and some emotions correlated more strongly with cognitions contradicting theoretical expectations. Cross-sectional multivariate testing of the ability of cognitions to explain variance in emotion was largely theory inconsistent. Although data support the generic structure of the Transactional Model, they question the model specifics. Larger scale research is needed encompassing a wider range of emotions and using more complex statistical testing. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ON THIS SUBJECT?: • Stress processes are transactional and coping outcome is informed by both cognitive appraisal of the stressor and the individual's emotional response (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984). • Lazarus (1999) made specific hypotheses about which particular stress appraisals would determine which emotional response, but only a small number of these relationships have been robustly investigated. • Previous empirical testing of this theory has been limited by design and statistical limitations. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: • This study empirically investigates the cognitive precedents of a

  19. Variation in Direct Access to Tests to Investigate Cancer: A Survey of English General Practitioners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D Nicholson

    Full Text Available The 2015 NICE guidelines for suspected cancer recommend that English General Practitioners have direct access to diagnostic tests to investigate symptoms of cancer that do not meet the criteria for urgent referral. We aimed to identify the proportion of GPs in England with direct access to these tests.We recruited 533 English GPs through a national clinical research network to complete an online survey about direct access to laboratory, radiology, and endoscopy tests in the three months leading up to the release of the 2015 NICE guidance. If they had direct access to a diagnostic test, GPs were asked about the time necessary to arrange a test and receive a report. Results are reported by NHS sub-region and, adjusting for sampling, for England as a whole.Almost all GPs reported direct access to x-ray and laboratory investigations except faecal occult blood testing (54%, 95% CI 49-59% and urine protein electrophoresis (89%, 95% CI 84-92%. Fewer GPs had direct access to CT scans (54%, 95% CI 49-59% or endoscopy (colonoscopy 32%, 95% CI 28-37%; gastroscopy 72%, 95% CI 67-77%. There was significant variation in direct access between NHS regions for the majority of imaging tests-for example, from 20 to 85% to MRI. Apart from x-ray, very few GPs (1-22% could access radiology and endoscopy within the timescales recommended by NICE. The modal request to test time was 2-4 weeks for routine radiology and 4-6 weeks for routine endoscopy with results taking another 1-2 weeks.At the time that the 2015 NICE guideline was released, local investment was required to not only provide direct access but also reduce the interval between request and test and speed up reporting. Further research using our data as a benchmark is now required to identify whether local improvements in direct access have been achieved in response to the NICE targets. If alternative approaches to test access are to be proposed they must be piloted comprehensively and underpinned by robust

  20. Variation in Direct Access to Tests to Investigate Cancer: A Survey of English General Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Brian D.; Oke, Jason L.; Rose, Peter W.; Mant, David

    2016-01-01

    Background The 2015 NICE guidelines for suspected cancer recommend that English General Practitioners have direct access to diagnostic tests to investigate symptoms of cancer that do not meet the criteria for urgent referral. We aimed to identify the proportion of GPs in England with direct access to these tests. Methods We recruited 533 English GPs through a national clinical research network to complete an online survey about direct access to laboratory, radiology, and endoscopy tests in the three months leading up to the release of the 2015 NICE guidance. If they had direct access to a diagnostic test, GPs were asked about the time necessary to arrange a test and receive a report. Results are reported by NHS sub-region and, adjusting for sampling, for England as a whole. Results Almost all GPs reported direct access to x-ray and laboratory investigations except faecal occult blood testing (54%, 95% CI 49–59%) and urine protein electrophoresis (89%, 95% CI 84–92%). Fewer GPs had direct access to CT scans (54%, 95% CI 49–59%) or endoscopy (colonoscopy 32%, 95% CI 28–37%; gastroscopy 72%, 95% CI 67–77%). There was significant variation in direct access between NHS regions for the majority of imaging tests—for example, from 20 to 85% to MRI. Apart from x-ray, very few GPs (1–22%) could access radiology and endoscopy within the timescales recommended by NICE. The modal request to test time was 2–4 weeks for routine radiology and 4–6 weeks for routine endoscopy with results taking another 1–2 weeks. Conclusion At the time that the 2015 NICE guideline was released, local investment was required to not only provide direct access but also reduce the interval between request and test and speed up reporting. Further research using our data as a benchmark is now required to identify whether local improvements in direct access have been achieved in response to the NICE targets. If alternative approaches to test access are to be proposed they must be

  1. Investigation into the controversial association of Streptococcus gallolyticus with colorectal cancer and adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulamir, Ahmed S; Hafidh, Rand R; Mahdi, Layla K; Al-jeboori, Tarik; Abubaker, Fatimah

    2009-01-01

    The seroprevalence of IgG antibodies of Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus, CIP 105428, was evaluated to investigate the controversial association of S. gallolyticus with colorectal carcinoma and adenoma in attempt to investigate the nature of such association if any, by exploring the mRNA expression of NF-κB and IL-8. Moreover, the serological behavior of S. gallolyticus IgG antibodies was compared to that of an indicator bacterium of bowel, Bacteroides fragilis. ELISA was used to measure IgG antibodies of S. gallolyticus and B. fragilis in sera of 50 colorectal cancer, 14 colorectal adenoma patients, 30 age- and sex- matched apparently healthy volunteers (HV) and 30 age- and sex- matched colonoscopically-proven tumor-free control subjects. NF-κB and IL-8 mRNA expression was evaluated in tumorous and non-tumorous tissue sections of carcinoma and adenoma patients in comparison with that of control subjects by using in situ hybridization assay. Colorectal cancer and adenoma patients were associated with higher levels of serum S. gallolyticus IgG antibodies in comparison with HV and control subjects (P < 0.05) while no similar association was found with serum IgG antibodies of B. fragilis (P > 0.05). ELISA cutoff value for the seropositivity of S. gallolyticus IgG was calculated from tumor-free control group. The expression of NF-κB mRNA was higher in tumorous than non-tumorous tissue sections of adenoma and carcinoma, higher in carcinoma/adenoma sections than in control subjects, higher in tumorous sections of carcinoma than in adenoma patients, and higher in S. gallolyticus IgG seropositive than in seronegative groups in both tumorous and non-tumorous sections (P < 0.05). IL-8 mRNA expression in tumorous sections of adenoma and carcinoma was higher than in non-tumorous sections, higher in carcinoma/adenoma than in control subjects, and higher in S. gallolyticus IgG seropositive than in seronegative groups in tumorous rather than non

  2. Physical activity and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Nina Føns; Tjønneland, Anne; Thomsen, Birthe L R

    2009-01-01

    incidence rate and occupational activity and leisure time activity in terms of participation in sports, cycling, walking and gardening; a metabolic equivalent (MET) score based on weekly time spent on the 4 activities; and a physical activity index. MET hours per week of leisure time activity, higher score......The evidence concerning the possible association between physical activity and the risk of prostate cancer is inconsistent and additional data are needed. We examined the association between risk of prostate cancer and physical activity at work and in leisure time in the European Prospective...... in the physical activity index, participation in any of the 4 leisure time activities, and the number of leisure time activities in which the participants were active were not associated with prostate cancer incidence. However, higher level of occupational physical activity was associated with lower risk...

  3. In two minds about screening: an investigation of cervical cancer prevention among Irish women

    OpenAIRE

    Kotzur, Marie-Christin

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common female cancer worldwide. Cervical screening programmes can reduce the incidence of cervical cancer by up to 80 percent if the invited women participate. Previous Irish research has associated screening attendance with subjective norms, anticipated regret, higher socio-economic status and education. Greater perceived screening barriers and lacking knowledge were associated with avoidance. These findings support a variety of expectancy-value theories of...

  4. Quantitative food intake in the EPIC-Germany cohorts. European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, M B; Brandstetter, B R; Kroke, A; Wahrendorf, J; Boeing, H

    1999-01-01

    The EPIC-Heidelberg and the EPIC-Potsdam studies with about 53,000 study participants represent the German contribution to the EPIC (European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) cohort study. Within the EPIC study, standardized 24-hour dietary recalls were applied as a quantitative calibration method in order to estimate the amount of scaling bias introduced by the varying center-specific dietary assessment methods. This article presents intake of food items and food groups in the two German cohorts estimated by 24-hour quantitative dietary recalls. Recalls from 1,013 men and 1,078 women in Heidelberg and 1,032 men and 898 women in Potsdam were included in the analysis. The intake of recorded food items or recipe ingredients as well as fat used for cooking was summarized into 16 main food groups and a variety of different subgroups stratified by sex and weighted for the day of the week and age. In more than 90% of the recalls, consumption of dairy products, cereals and cereal products, bread, fat, and non-alcoholic beverages, particularly coffee/tea, was reported. Inter-cohort evaluations revealed that bread, potatoes, fruit and fat were consumed in higher amounts in the Potsdam cohort while the opposite was found for pasta/rice, non-alcoholic, and alcoholic beverages. It was concluded that the exposure variation was increased by having two instead of one EPIC study centers in Germany. Copyright 1999 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Investigating the effect of cell substrate on cancer cell stiffness by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad Sulaiman; Coceano, Giovanna; Bonin, Serena; Niemela, Joseph; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2017-07-26

    The mechanical properties of cells are influenced by their microenvironment. Here we report cell stiffness alteration by changing the cell substrate stiffness for isolated cells and cells in contact with other cells. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is used to prepare soft substrates with three different stiffness values (173, 88 and 17kPa respectively). Breast cancer cells lines, namely HBL-100, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 with different level of aggressiveness are cultured on these substrates and their local elasticity is investigated by vertical indentation of the cell membrane. Our preliminary results show an unforeseen behavior of the MDA-MB-231 cells. When cultured on glass substrate as isolated cells, they are less stiff than the other two types of cells, in agreement with the general statement that more aggressive and metastatic cells are softer. However, when connected to other cells the stiffness of MDA-MB-231 cells becomes similar to the other two cell lines. Moreover, the stiffness of MDA-MB-231 cells cultured on soft PDMS substrates is significantly higher than the stiffness of the other cell types, demonstrating thus the strong influence of the environmental conditions on the mechanical properties of the cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. In Vivo Investigation of Breast Cancer Progression by Use of an Internal Control1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, John; Haller, Jodi; Shih, Helen; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2009-01-01

    Optical imaging of breast cancer has been considered for detecting functional and molecular characteristics of diseases in clinical and preclinical settings. Applied to laboratory research, photonic investigations offer a highly versatile tool for preclinical imaging and drug discovery. A particular advantage of the optical method is the availability of multiple spectral bands for performing imaging. Herein, we capitalize on this feature to demonstrate how it is possible to use different wavelengths to offer internal controls and significantly improve the observation accuracy in molecular imaging applications. In particular, we show the independent in vivo detection of cysteine proteases along with tumor permeability and interstitial volume measurements using a dual-wavelength approach. To generate results with a view toward clinically geared studies, a transgenic Her2/neu mouse model that spontaneously developed mammary tumors was used. In vivo findings were validated against conventional ex vivo tests such as histology and Western blot analyses. By correcting for biodistribution parameters, the dual-wavelength method increases the accuracy of molecular observations by separating true molecular target from probe biodistribution. As such, the method is highly appropriate for molecular imaging studies where often probe delivery and target presence are not independently assessed. On the basis of these findings, we propose the dual-wavelength/normalization approach as an essential method for drug discovery and preclinical imaging studies. PMID:19242603

  7. Circulating Metabolites Associated with Alcohol Intake in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline H. van Roekel

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the metabolites associated with alcohol consumption may provide insights into the metabolic pathways through which alcohol may affect human health. We studied associations of alcohol consumption with circulating concentrations of 123 metabolites among 2974 healthy participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC study. Alcohol consumption at recruitment was self-reported through dietary questionnaires. Metabolite concentrations were measured by tandem mass spectrometry (BIOCRATES AbsoluteIDQTM p180 kit. Data were randomly divided into discovery (2/3 and replication (1/3 sets. Multivariable linear regression models were used to evaluate confounder-adjusted associations of alcohol consumption with metabolite concentrations. Metabolites significantly related to alcohol intake in the discovery set (FDR q-value < 0.05 were further tested in the replication set (Bonferroni-corrected p-value < 0.05. Of the 72 metabolites significantly related to alcohol intake in the discovery set, 34 were also significant in the replication analysis, including three acylcarnitines, the amino acid citrulline, four lysophosphatidylcholines, 13 diacylphosphatidylcholines, seven acyl-alkylphosphatidylcholines, and six sphingomyelins. Our results confirmed earlier findings that alcohol consumption was associated with several lipid metabolites, and possibly also with specific acylcarnitines and amino acids. This provides further leads for future research studies aiming at elucidating the mechanisms underlying the effects of alcohol in relation to morbid conditions.

  8. Investigation of star polymer nanoshells for use in diagnostic imaging and photothermal cancer therapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Lizabeth

    Gold nanoshells can be designed to possess high light scattering and strong absorption of near-infrared light. Thus, they have the potential to be used in biological applications as contrast agents for diagnostic imaging as well as for thermal ablation of tumor cells in future cancer treatments. In this study, gold nanoshells with dye-loaded star polymer cores were investigated. Uniform near-infrared gold nanoshells with 100 nm diameters were successfully generated using different batches of star polymer templates and were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The star polymers used were block copolymer structures with a hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) core and a hydrophilic poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethylmethracrylate) (DMAEMA) outer shell. Within this work, a general procedure was established in order to achieve a desired gold nanoshell size regardless of the star polymer batch used, since the synthesis process conditions can cause star polymers to vary in size as well in the number and length of amino-functionalized arms. Control of the gold nanoshell diameter was optimized after an in-depth analysis of the synthesis parameters that affected the formation and final size of the dye-loaded star polymer gold nanoshells. The main parameters examined were pH of the gold seeds used to nucleate the templates and the ratio of star polymer to gold hydroxide used during the growth of the outer gold shell.

  9. Total dietary carbohydrate, sugar, starch and fibre intakes in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cust, A. E.; Skilton, M. R.; van Bakel, M. M. E.; Halkjaer, J.; Olsen, A.; Agnoli, C.; Psaltopoulou, T.; Buurma, E.; Sonestedt, E.; Chirlaque, M. D.; Rinaldi, S.; Tjonneland, A.; Jensen, M. K.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M. C.; Kaaks, R.; Noethlings, U.; Chloptsios, Y.; Zylis, D.; Mattiello, A.; Caini, S.; Ocke, M. C.; van der Schouw, Y. T.; Skeie, G.; Parr, C. L.; Molina-Montes, E.; Manjer, J.; Johansson, I.; McTaggart, A.; Key, T. J.; Bingham, S.; Riboli, E.; Slimani, N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe dietary carbohydrate intakes and their food sources among 27 centres in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Methods: Between 1995 and 2000, 36 034 subjects, aged between 35-74 years, were administered a

  10. Meat and fish consumption and the risk of renal cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohrmann, Sabine; Linseisen, Jakob; Overvad, Kim; Wurtz, Anne Mette Lund; Roswall, Nina; Tjonneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Racine, Antoine; Bastide, Nadia; Palli, Domenico; Agnoli, Claudia; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Weikert, Steffen; Steffen, Annika; Kuehn, Tilman; Li, Kuanrong; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Bradbury, Kathryn E.; Peppa, Eleni; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Hjartaker, Anette; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Jakszyn, Paula; Dorronsoro, Miren; Barricarte, Aurelio; Santiuste de Pablos, Carmen; Molina-Montes, Esther; Alonso de la Torre, Ramon; Ericson, Ulrika; Sonestedt, Emily; Johansson, Mattias; Ljungberg, Borje; Freisling, Heinz; Romieu, Isabelle; Cross, Amanda J.; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Riboli, Elio; Boeing, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) incidence varies worldwide with a higher incidence in developed countries and lifestyle is likely to contribute to the development of this disease. We examined whether meat and fish consumption were related to the risk of RCC in the European Prospective Investigation into

  11. Investigating a case of possible field cancerization in oral squamous cell carcinoma by the use of next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Larsen, Martin J.; Larsen, Stine R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Local recurrence and the development of second primary tumors (SPT) are important factors that can influence the survival rate of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. We investigate the concept of field cancerization which proposes that normal tissue adjacent to the primary...

  12. An investigation into the psychometric properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in patients with breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jacqui; Martin, Colin R; Morse, Rachel C; Kendell, Kate; Verrill, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Background To determine the psychometric properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in patients with breast cancer and determine the suitability of the instrument for use with this clinical group. Methods A cross-sectional design was used. The study used a pooled data set from three breast cancer clinical groups. The dependent variables were HADS anxiety and depression sub-scale scores. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted on the HADS to determine its psychometric properties in 110 patients with breast cancer. Seven models were tested to determine model fit to the data. Results Both factor analysis methods indicated that three-factor models provided a better fit to the data compared to two-factor (anxiety and depression) models for breast cancer patients. Clark and Watson's three factor tripartite and three factor hierarchical models provided the best fit. Conclusion The underlying factor structure of the HADS in breast cancer patients comprises three distinct, but correlated factors, negative affectivity, autonomic anxiety and anhedonic depression. The clinical utility of the HADS in screening for anxiety and depression in breast cancer patients may be enhanced by using a modified scoring procedure based on a three-factor model of psychological distress. This proposed alternate scoring method involving regressing autonomic anxiety and anhedonic depression factors onto the third factor (negative affectivity) requires further investigation in order to establish its efficacy. PMID:16018801

  13. An investigation into the psychometric properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendell Kate

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the psychometric properties of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS in patients with breast cancer and determine the suitability of the instrument for use with this clinical group. Methods A cross-sectional design was used. The study used a pooled data set from three breast cancer clinical groups. The dependent variables were HADS anxiety and depression sub-scale scores. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted on the HADS to determine its psychometric properties in 110 patients with breast cancer. Seven models were tested to determine model fit to the data. Results Both factor analysis methods indicated that three-factor models provided a better fit to the data compared to two-factor (anxiety and depression models for breast cancer patients. Clark and Watson's three factor tripartite and three factor hierarchical models provided the best fit. Conclusion The underlying factor structure of the HADS in breast cancer patients comprises three distinct, but correlated factors, negative affectivity, autonomic anxiety and anhedonic depression. The clinical utility of the HADS in screening for anxiety and depression in breast cancer patients may be enhanced by using a modified scoring procedure based on a three-factor model of psychological distress. This proposed alternate scoring method involving regressing autonomic anxiety and anhedonic depression factors onto the third factor (negative affectivity requires further investigation in order to establish its efficacy.

  14. Lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naudin, Sabine; Li, Kuanrong; Jaouen, Tristan; Assi, Nada; Kyrø, Cecilie; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Rebours, Vinciane; Védié, Anne-Laure; Boeing, Heiner; Kaaks, Rudolf; Katzke, Verena; Bamia, Christina; Naska, Androniki; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Berrino, Franco; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Weiderpass Vainio, Elisabete; Gram, Inger Torhild; Skeie, Guri; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Barricarte, Aurelio; Quirós, Jose Ramón; Dorronsoro, Miren; Johansson, Ingegerd; Sund, Malin; Sternby, Hanna; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Wareham, Nick; Riboli, Elio; Gunter, Marc; Brennan, Paul; Duell, Eric J; Ferrari, Pietro

    2018-01-01

    Recent evidence suggested a weak relationship between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer (PC) risk. In this study, the association between lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and the risk of PC was evaluated, including the type of alcoholic beverages and potential interaction with smoking.

  15. Coffee, tea and melanoma risk: findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caini, Saverio; Masala, Giovanna; Saieva, Calogero; Kvaskoff, Marina; Savoye, Isabelle; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Hemmingsson, Oskar; Hammer Bech, Bodil; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Petersen, Kristina E N; Mancini, Francesca Romana; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Cervenka, Iris; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Floegel, Anna; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Valanou, Elisavet; Kritikou, Maria; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Peeters, Petra H; Veierød, Marit B; Ghiasvand, Reza; Lukic, Marko; Quirós, José Ramón; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Salamanca Fernández, Elena; Larrañaga, Nerea; Zamora-Ros, Raul; Maria Nilsson, Lena; Ljuslinder, Ingrid; Jirström, Karin; Sonestedt, Emily; Key, Timothy J; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc; Huybrechts, Inge; Murphy, Neil; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Palli, Domenico

    2017-05-15

    In vitro and animal studies suggest that bioactive constituents of coffee and tea may have anticarcinogenic effects against cutaneous melanoma; however, epidemiological evidence is limited to date. We examined the relationships between coffee (total, caffeinated or decaffeinated) and tea consumption and risk of melanoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). EPIC is a multicentre prospective study that enrolled over 500,000 participants aged 25-70 years from ten European countries in 1992-2000. Information on coffee and tea drinking was collected at baseline using validated country-specific dietary questionnaires. We used adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations between coffee and tea consumption and melanoma risk. Overall, 2,712 melanoma cases were identified during a median follow-up of 14.9 years among 476,160 study participants. Consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with melanoma risk among men (HR for highest quartile of consumption vs. non-consumers 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.69) but not among women (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.62-1.47). There were no statistically significant associations between consumption of decaffeinated coffee or tea and the risk of melanoma among both men and women. The consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with melanoma risk among men in this large cohort study. Further investigations are warranted to confirm our findings and clarify the possible role of caffeine and other coffee compounds in reducing the risk of melanoma. © 2017 UICC.

  16. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33: combined results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kirchhoff

    Full Text Available Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341 was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC. In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA. Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.06, p = 0.023. There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I(2 = 49.3%; p = <0.004. In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80-1.00, p = 0.048, indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk.

  17. Breast Cancer Risk and 6q22.33: Combined Results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Braaf, Linde M.; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I.; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; kConFab; Group, AOCS Study; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; SWE-BRCA; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; HEBON; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gille, Hans J.P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; EMBRACE; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00–1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I2 = 49.3%; p = <0.004). In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80–1.00, p = 0.048), indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk. PMID:22768030

  18. Investigating the genetic relationship between Alzheimer’s disease and cancer using GWAS summary statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Yen Chen Anne; Cho, Kelly; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Cormack, Jean; Blalock, Kendra; Campbell, Peter T.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Figueiredo, Jane; James Gauderman, W.; Gong, Jian; Green, Roger C.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Harju, John F.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Jacobs, Eric J; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Li, Li; Lin, Yi; Manion, Frank J.; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Peters, Ulrike; Raskin, Leon; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Severi, Gianluca; Stenzel, Stephanie L.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Hunter, David J.; Lindström, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Ahsan, Habib; Whittemore, Alice S.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Crisponi, Laura; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Easton, Douglas F.; Turnbull, Clare A.; Rahman, Nazneen; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher; Schumacher, Fred; Travis, Ruth C.; Riboli, Elio; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Han, Younghun; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Hung, Rayjean J.; Brhane, Yonathan; McLaughlin, John; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.; Bickeböller, Heike; Rosenberger, Albert; Houlston, Richard S.; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa; Heinrich, Joachim; Risch, Angela; Wu, Xifeng; Ye, Yuanqing; Christiani, David C.; Amos, Christopher I; Liang, Liming; Driver, Jane A.; IGAP Consortium, Colorectal Transdisciplinary Study (CORECT); Discovery, Biology, and Risk of Inherited Variants in Breast Cancer (DRIVE)

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence from both epidemiology and basic science suggest an inverse association between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cancer. We examined the genetic relationship between AD and various cancer types using GWAS summary statistics from the IGAP and GAME-ON consortia. Sample size ranged from

  19. Phytochemical investigation and the anti-cancer properties of pengularia daemia and phylica paniculata

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khorombi, TE

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) implemented an in-house anti-cancer screen aimed at testing several plant extracts. This was done in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the USA and involved training...

  20. Gene by Environment Investigation of Incident Lung Cancer Risk in African-Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P. David

    2016-02-01

    Interpretation: These results suggest that chromosome 15q25.1 variants are robustly associated with CPD and lung cancer in African-Americans and that the allelic dose effect of these polymorphisms on lung cancer risk is most pronounced in lighter smokers.

  1. A Preliminary Investigation into the Incidence of Cancer of the Cervix

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    considered by some to have a protective effect in carcino- genesis of the ... PATIENTS AND METHODS ... Then we compared the histologically confirmed cancers from the ... comparison of histologically confirmed cancers of females in the 4 .... Unspecified. Contraceptive loop. Depo-Provera. Erosion of cervix. Cervicitis.

  2. Investigation of study items for the patterns of care study in the radiotherapy of laryngeal cancer: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Woong Ki; Ahn, Sung Ja; Kim, Il Han

    2003-01-01

    the use of combined modality treatments between glottic and supraglottic cancers (p=0.20). In all patients, 6 MV X-ray was used with conventional fractionation. The fraction size was 2 Gy in 80% of glottic cancer patients compared with 1.8 Gy in 59% of the patients with supraglottic cancers. The mean total dose delivered to primary lesions were 65.98 Gy and 70.15 Gy in glottic and supraglottic patients treated, respectively with radiation alone. Based on the collected data, 12 modules with 90 items were developed for the study of the patterns of care in laryngeal cancer. The study items for laryngeal cancer were developed. In the near future, a web system will be established based on the items investigated, and then a nation-wide analysis on laryngeal cancer will be processed for the standardization and optimization of radiotherapy

  3. Yttrium-90 used to treat colon cancer: Awaiting investigational new drug approval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    A new radiation treatment takes just 14 to 21 days to shrink colorectal tumors in laboratory mice, is under review for clinical trials with human cancer patients. The treatment has succeeded in reducing the size of tumors by up to 95%. Colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the US, is extremely difficult to treat unless it is detected early enough for surgical procedures. In laboratory tests over the last 5 years, a team of researchers has developed the treatment using yttrium-90. The yttrium-90 is transported to the tumors by attaching it to monoclonal antibodies that seek out the cancer cells. Once the radioisotope has been targeted to the tumor, the radiation destroys many of the cells, dramatically reducing the size of the tumor. Since this treatment usually does not completely eliminate all the cancer cells, it cannot be called a cure, but it does seem to be an effective method of shrinking colorectal tumors

  4. Analysis of data (1987-1995) from investigation of cancer mortality in high background radiation area of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Zufan; Akiba, S.; Zha Yongru

    1999-01-01

    Objective: This investigation is a special project of High Background Radiation Research Group. The objective of the cancer mortality study in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang, China, which was started in 1972, was to estimate cancer risk associated with the low level radiation exposure of average annual effective dose of 6.4 mSv in HBRA. Since 1991, the study has been conducted collaboratively by Chinese and Japanese scientists with the purpose of accumulating further person years (Pyr) of observation for improving the statistical precision and seeing the reproducibility of the previous results. Methods: The cancer mortality data of 1987-1995 covered in the current cooperative study were collected by a retrospective and/or prospective survey from a fixed cohort. The mortality investigation on the spot consisted of two steps, i.e. the follow-up of members in the cohort and the ascertainment of the death causes. Based on the hamlet-specific average annual external dose, the members of the cohort in HBRA were classified into three groups: high, medial and low dose groups. Risk comparisons between each of the three dose groups with the control group from control area (CA) were conducted by means of relative risk (RR). The RR and the excess relative risk coefficient (ERR per sievert) and their y 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using AMFIT program in Epicure. Results: During the period 1987-1995, there were 5161 total deaths and 557 cancer deaths among 926238 Pyr at risk in the cohort of 106517 subjects. The RR (95% CI) adjusted for sex and age group for all cancers of whole HBRA was 0.96 (0.80-1.15). As for the site-specific cancer of whole HBRA, the RRs for leukemia, cancers of nasopharynx, esophagus and intestine were larger than one, while the RRs for cancers of stomach, liver, lungs, female breast, thyroid and lymphoma were less than one. However, all of them were not statistically different from one (P>0.05 for all). The

  5. Functional Genomic investigation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARG mediated transcription response in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan Selvarasu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a complex and progressive multi-step disorder that results from the transformation of normal cells to malignant derivatives. Several oncogenic signaling pathways are involved in this transformation. PPARG (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma mediated transcription and signaling is involved in few cancers. We have investigated the PPARG in gastric tumors. The objective of the present study was to investigate the PPARG mediated transcriptional response in gastric tumors. Gene-set based and pathway focused gene-set enrichment analysis of available PPARG signatures in gastric tumor mRNA profiles shows that PPARG mediated transcription is highly activated in intestinal sub-type of gastric tumors. Further, we have derived the PPARG associated genes in gastric cancer and their expression was identified for the association with the better survival of the patients. Analysis of the PPARG associated genes reveals their involvement in mitotic cell cycle process, chromosome organization and nuclear division. Towards identifying the association with other oncogenic signaling process, E2F regulated genes were found associated with PPARG mediated transcription. The current results reveal the possible stratification of gastric tumors based on the PPARG gene expression and the possible development of PPARG targeted gastric cancer therapeutics. The identified PPARG regulated genes were identified to be targetable by pioglitazone and rosiglitazone. The identification of PPARG genes also in the normal stomach tissues reveal the possible involvement of these genes in the normal physiology of stomach and needs to be investigated.

  6. Lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naudin, Sabine; Li, Kuanrong; Jaouen, Tristan

    2018-01-01

    Recent evidence suggested a weak relationship between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer (PC) risk. In this study, the association between lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and the risk of PC was evaluated, including the type of alcoholic beverages and potential interaction with smoking...... alcohol intakes were positively associated with PC risk, with more apparent risk estimates for beer and spirits/liquors than wine intake. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  7. Molecular epigenetics in the management of ovarian cancer: Are we investigating a rational clinical promise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha eNguyen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics is essentially a phenotypical change in gene expression without any alteration of the DNA sequence; the emergence of epigenetics in cancer research and mainstream oncology is fueling new hope. However, it is not yet known whether this knowledge will translate to improved clinical management of ovarian cancer. In this malignancy, women are still undergoing chemotherapy similar to what was approved in 1978, which to this day represents one of the biggest breakthroughs for treating ovarian cancer. While liquid tumors are benefitting from epigenetically-related therapies, solid tumors like ovarian cancer are not (yet?. Herein we will review the science of molecular epigenetics, especially DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNA, but also include transcription factors since they, too, are important in ovarian cancer. Preclinical and clinical research on the role of epigenetic modifications is summarized as well. Sadly, ovarian cancer remains an idiopathic disease, for the most part, and there are many areas of patient management which could benefit from improved technology. This review will also highlight the evidence suggesting that epigenetics may have preclinical utility in pharmacology and clinical applications for prognosis and diagnosis. Lastly, drugs currently in clinical trials (i.e. histone deacetylase inhibitors are discussed along with the promise for epigenetics in the exploitation of chemoresistance. Whether epigenetics will ultimately be the answer to better management in ovarian cancer is currently unknown; what we have now is hope.

  8. The Breast Cancer to Bone (B2B) Metastases Research Program: a multi-disciplinary investigation of bone metastases from breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockton, Nigel T.; Gill, Stephanie J.; Laborge, Stephanie L.; Paterson, Alexander H. G.; Cook, Linda S.; Vogel, Hans J.; Shemanko, Carrie S.; Hanley, David A.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Friedenreich, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is the most common site of breast cancer distant metastasis, affecting 50–70 % of patients who develop metastatic disease. Despite decades of informative research, the effective prevention, prediction and treatment of these lesions remains elusive. The Breast Cancer to Bone (B2B) Metastases Research Program consists of a prospective cohort of incident breast cancer patients and four sub-projects that are investigating priority areas in breast cancer bone metastases. These include the impact of lifestyle factors and inflammation on risk of bone metastases, the gene expression features of the primary tumour, the potential role for metabolomics in early detection of bone metastatic disease and the signalling pathways that drive the metastatic lesions in the bone. The B2B Research Program is enrolling a prospective cohort of 600 newly diagnosed, incident, stage I-IIIc breast cancer survivors in Alberta, Canada over a five year period. At baseline, pre-treatment/surgery blood samples are collected and detailed epidemiologic data is collected by in-person interview and self-administered questionnaires. Additional self-administered questionnaires and blood samples are completed at specified follow-up intervals (24, 48 and 72 months). Vital status is obtained prior to each follow-up through record linkages with the Alberta Cancer Registry. Recurrences are identified through medical chart abstractions. Each of the four projects applies specific methods and analyses to assess the impact of serum vitamin D and cytokine concentrations, tumour transcript and protein expression, serum metabolomic profiles and in vitro cell signalling on breast cancer bone metastases. The B2B Research Program will address key issues in breast cancer bone metastases including the association between lifestyle factors (particularly a comprehensive assessment of vitamin D status) inflammation and bone metastases, the significance or primary tumour gene expression in tissue tropism, the

  9. The Breast Cancer to Bone (B2B) Metastases Research Program: a multi-disciplinary investigation of bone metastases from breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockton, Nigel T; Gill, Stephanie J; Laborge, Stephanie L; Paterson, Alexander H G; Cook, Linda S; Vogel, Hans J; Shemanko, Carrie S; Hanley, David A; Magliocco, Anthony M; Friedenreich, Christine M

    2015-07-10

    Bone is the most common site of breast cancer distant metastasis, affecting 50-70 % of patients who develop metastatic disease. Despite decades of informative research, the effective prevention, prediction and treatment of these lesions remains elusive. The Breast Cancer to Bone (B2B) Metastases Research Program consists of a prospective cohort of incident breast cancer patients and four sub-projects that are investigating priority areas in breast cancer bone metastases. These include the impact of lifestyle factors and inflammation on risk of bone metastases, the gene expression features of the primary tumour, the potential role for metabolomics in early detection of bone metastatic disease and the signalling pathways that drive the metastatic lesions in the bone. The B2B Research Program is enrolling a prospective cohort of 600 newly diagnosed, incident, stage I-IIIc breast cancer survivors in Alberta, Canada over a five year period. At baseline, pre-treatment/surgery blood samples are collected and detailed epidemiologic data is collected by in-person interview and self-administered questionnaires. Additional self-administered questionnaires and blood samples are completed at specified follow-up intervals (24, 48 and 72 months). Vital status is obtained prior to each follow-up through record linkages with the Alberta Cancer Registry. Recurrences are identified through medical chart abstractions. Each of the four projects applies specific methods and analyses to assess the impact of serum vitamin D and cytokine concentrations, tumour transcript and protein expression, serum metabolomic profiles and in vitro cell signalling on breast cancer bone metastases. The B2B Research Program will address key issues in breast cancer bone metastases including the association between lifestyle factors (particularly a comprehensive assessment of vitamin D status) inflammation and bone metastases, the significance or primary tumour gene expression in tissue tropism, the

  10. Investigation of mammographic breast density as a risk factor for ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernli, Karen J; O'Meara, Ellen S; Kerlikowske, Karla; Miglioretti, Diana L; Muller, Carolyn Y; Onega, Tracy; Sprague, Brian L; Henderson, Louise M; Buist, Diana S M

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones and growth factors that increase mammographic breast density could increase ovarian cancer risk. We examined whether high breast density is associated with ovarian cancer risk. We conducted a cohort study of 724,603 women aged 40 to 79 years with 2,506,732 mammograms participating in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium from 1995 to 2009. Incident epithelial ovarian cancer was diagnosed in 1373 women. We used partly conditional Cox regression to estimate the association between breast density and 5-year risk of incident epithelial ovarian cancer overall and stratified by 10-year age group. All statistical tests were two-sided. Compared with women with scattered fibroglandular densities, women with heterogeneously dense and extremely dense breast tissue had 20% and 18% increased 5-year risk of incident epithelial ovarian cancer (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06 to 1.36; HR = 1.18, 95% CI = 0.93 to 1.50, respectively; P(trend) = .01). Among women aged 50 to 59 years, we observed a trend in elevated risk associated with increased breast density (P(trend) = .02); women with heterogeneously and extremely dense breast tissue had 30% (HR = 1.30; 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.64) and 65% (HR = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.12 to 2.44) increased risk, respectively, compared with women with scattered fibroglandular densities. The pattern was similar but not statistically significant at age 40 to 49 years. There were no consistent patterns of breast density and ovarian cancer risk at age 60 to 79 years. Dense breast tissue was associated with a modest increase in 5-year ovarian cancer risk in women aged 50 to 59 years but was not associated with ovarian cancer at ages 40 to 49 or 60 to 79 years.

  11. Investigation and analysis of oncologists' knowledge of morphine usage in cancer pain treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Weiran Liu,1,* Shumin Xie,2,* Lin Yue,3,* Jiahao Liu,2 Stephanie Mu-Lian Woo,4 Weilin Liu,2 Adam R Miller,5 Jing Zhang,6 Lijun Huang,7 Lei Zhang8,*1Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Department of Anesthesia, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2The Xiangya Medical School of Central-South University, Changsha, People's Republic of China; 3Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Outpatient Service, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 4Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA; 5Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 6Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 7Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital, Department of Lymphoma and Hematology, Changsha, People's Republic of China; 8Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin Lung Cancer Center, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tianjin, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this paperPurpose: To examine oncologists' knowledge of cancer pain and morphine's clinical application in the People's Republic of China. In addition, this study analyzes and discusses the negative factors that currently affect the clinical application of morphine.Patients and methods: A questionnaire survey was given to a random sample of 150 oncologists from Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital. The statistical results were analyzed and processed using SPSS version 21.0 and Matlab version 2012a statistical software. Single-factor analysis of variance, Kruskal–Wallis nonparametric test, and independent samples t-test were adopted to analyze the difference in knowledge scores of morphine usage. The study

  12. Olive oil intake and CHD in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Spanish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Genevieve; Travier, Noemie; Barricarte, Aurelio; Ardanaz, Eva; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi; Sánchez, María-José; Molina-Montes, Esther; Chirlaque, María Dolores; Huerta, José María; Navarro, Carmen; Redondo, Maria Luisa; Amiano, Pilar; Dorronsoro, Miren; Larrañaga, Nerea; Gonzalez, Carlos A

    2012-12-14

    Olive oil is well known for its cardioprotective properties; however, epidemiological data showing that olive oil consumption reduces incident CHD events are still limited. Therefore, we studied the association between olive oil and CHD in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Spanish cohort study. The analysis included 40 142 participants (38 % male), free of CHD events at baseline, recruited from five EPIC-Spain centres from 1992 to 1996 and followed up until 2004. Baseline dietary and lifestyle information was collected using interview-administered questionnaires. Cox proportional regression models were used to assess the relationship between validated incident CHD events and olive oil intake (energy-adjusted quartiles and each 10 g/d per 8368 kJ (2000 kcal) increment), while adjusting for potential confounders. During a 10·4-year follow-up, 587 (79 % male) CHD events were recorded. Olive oil intake was negatively associated with CHD risk after excluding dietary mis-reporters (hazard ratio (HR) 0·93; 95 % CI 0·87, 1·00 for each 10 g/d per 8368 kJ (2000 kcal) and HR 0·78; 95 % CI 0·59, 1·03 for upper v. lower quartile). The inverse association between olive oil intake (per 10 g/d per 8368 kJ (2000 kcal)) and CHD was more pronounced in never smokers (11 % reduced CHD risk (P = 0·048)), in never/low alcohol drinkers (25 % reduced CHD risk (P culinary use of olive oil within the Mediterranean diet to reduce the CHD burden.

  13. Investigating the role of SPECT/CT in dynamic sentinel lymph node biopsy for penile cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Ziauddin Zia; Bomanji, Jamshed [University College Hospitals London, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); UCLH NHS Foundation Trust, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, 5th Floor, London (United Kingdom); Omorphos, Savvas; Malone, Peter; Nigam, Raj; Muneer, Asif [University College Hospitals London, Department of Urology, London (United Kingdom); Michopoulou, Sofia; Gacinovic, Svetislav [University College Hospitals London, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-15

    Currently, most centres use 2-D planar lymphoscintigraphy when performing dynamic sentinel lymph node biopsy in penile cancer patients with clinically impalpable inguinal nodes. This study aimed to investigate the role of SPECT/CT following 2-D planar lymphoscintigraphy (dynamic and static) in the detection and localization of sentinel lymph nodes in the groin. A qualitative (visual) review was performed on planar followed by SPECT/CT lymphoscintigraphy in 115 consecutive patients (age 28-86 years) who underwent injection of {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid followed by immediate acquisition of dynamic (20 min) and early static scans (5 min) initially and further delayed static (5 min) images at 120 min followed by SPECT/CT imaging. The lymph nodes detected in each groin on planar lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT were compared. A total of 440 and 467 nodes were identified on planar scintigraphy and SPECT/CT, respectively. Overall, SPECT/CT confirmed the findings of planar imaging in 28/115 cases (24%). In the remaining 87 cases (76%), gross discrepancies were observed between planar and SPECT/CT images. SPECT/CT identified 17 instances of skin contamination (16 patients, 13%) and 36 instances of in-transit lymphatic tract activity (24 patients, 20%) that had been interpreted as tracer-avid lymph nodes on planar imaging. In addition, SPECT/CT identified 53 tracer-avid nodes in 48 patients (42%) that were not visualized on planar imaging and led to reclassification of the drainage basins (pelvic/inguinal) of 27 tracer-avid nodes. The addition of SPECT/CT improved the rate of detection of true tracer-avid lymph nodes and delineated their precise (3-D) anatomic localization in drainage basins. (orig.)

  14. Energy intake and sources of energy intake in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocké, M C; Larrañaga, N; Grioni, S; van den Berg, S W; Ferrari, P; Salvini, S; Benetou, V; Linseisen, J; Wirfält, E; Rinaldi, S; Jenab, M; Halkjaer, J; Jakobsen, M U; Niravong, M; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Kaaks, R; Bergmann, M; Moutsiou, E; Trichopoulou, A; Lauria, C; Sacerdote, C; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Peeters, P H M; Hjartåker, A; Parr, C L; Tormo, M J; Sanchez, M J; Manjer, J; Hellstrom, V; Mulligan, A; Spencer, E A; Riboli, E; Bingham, S; Slimani, N

    2009-11-01

    To describe energy intake and its macronutrient and food sources among 27 regions in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Between 1995 and 2000, 36 034 subjects aged 35-74 years were administered a standardized 24-h dietary recall. Intakes of macronutrients (g/day) and energy (kcal/day) were estimated using standardized national nutrient databases. Mean intakes were weighted by season and day of the week and were adjusted for age, height and weight, after stratification by gender. Extreme low- and high-energy reporters were identified using Goldberg's cutoff points (ratio of energy intake and estimated basal metabolic rate 2.72), and their effects on macronutrient and energy intakes were studied. Low-energy reporting was more prevalent in women than in men. The exclusion of extreme-energy reporters substantially lowered the EPIC-wide range in mean energy intake from 2196-2877 to 2309-2866 kcal among men. For women, these ranges were 1659-2070 and 1873-2108 kcal. There was no north-south gradient in energy intake or in the prevalence of low-energy reporting. In most centres, cereals and cereal products were the largest contributors to energy intake. The food groups meat, dairy products and fats and oils were also important energy sources. In many centres, the highest mean energy intakes were observed on Saturdays. These data highlight and quantify the variations and similarities in energy intake and sources of energy intake among 10 European countries. The prevalence of low-energy reporting indicates that the study of energy intake is hampered by the problem of underreporting.

  15. A Prospective Investigation of Body Size, Body Fat Composition and Colorectal Cancer Risk in the UK Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Luisa Saldana; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Cross, Amanda J; Morris, Jessica S; Gunter, Marc J; Murphy, Neil

    2017-12-19

    Obesity has been consistently associated with a greater colorectal cancer risk, but this relationship is weaker among women. In the UK Biobank, we investigated the associations between body size (body mass index [BMI], height, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio) and body fat composition (total body fat percentage and trunk fat percentage) measurements with colorectal cancer risk among 472,526 men and women followed for 5.6 years on average. Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for developing colorectal cancer (2,636 incident cases) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Among men, when the highest and lowest fifths were compared, BMI (HR = 1.35, 95%CI: 1.13-1.61; P trend  body fat percentage (HR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.06-1.53; P trend  = 0.002), and trunk fat percentage (HR = 1.31, 95%CI: 1.09-1.58; P trend  = 0.002) were associated with greater colorectal cancer risk. For women, only waist-to-hip ratio (HR for highest versus lowest fifth = 1.33, 95%CI: 1.08-1.65; P trend  = 0.005) was positively associated with colorectal cancer risk. Greater body size (overall and abdominal adiposity) was positively associated with colorectal cancer development in men. For women, abdominal adiposity, rather than overall body size, was associated with a greater colorectal cancer risk.

  16. A visualized investigation at the atomic scale of the antitumor effect of magnetic nanomedicine on gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaokang; Deng, Xia; Li, Xinghua; Xue, Desheng; Zhang, Haoli; Liu, Tao; Liu, Qingfang; Mellors, Nigel J; Li, Yumin; Peng, Yong

    2014-07-01

    Discovering which anticancer drugs attack which organelle(s) of cancer cells is essential and significant, not only for understanding their therapeutic and adverse effects, but also to enable the development of new-generation therapeutics. Here, we show that novel Fe3O4-carboxymethyl cellulose-5-fluorouracil (Fe3O4-CMC-5FU) nanomedicine can apparently enhance the antitumor effect on gastric cancer cells, and its mechanism of killing the SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells can be directly observed at the atomic scale. The novel nanomedicine was prepared using the traditional antitumor drug 5FU to chemically bond onto the functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4-CMC-5FU nanomedicine), and then was fed into SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. The inorganic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were used to track the distribution and antitumor effect of the nanomedicine within individual SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. Atomic-level observation and tracking the elemental distribution inside individual cells proved that the magnetic nanomedicine killed the gastric cells mainly by attacking their mitochondria. The enhanced therapeutic efficacy derives from the localized high concentration and poor mobility of the aggregated Fe3O4-CMC-5FU nanomedicine in the cytoplasm. A brand new mechanism of Fe3O4-CMC-5FU nanomedicine killing SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells by attacking their mitochondria was discovered, which is different from the classical mechanism utilized by traditional medicine 5FU, which kills gastric cancer cells by damaging their DNA. Our work might provide a partial solution in nanomedicines or even modern anticancer medicine for the visualized investigation of their antitumor effect.

  17. Investigation of the Candidate Tumor Suppressor Gene prk in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dai, Wei

    2002-01-01

    .... We have proposed to characterize the genetic and epigenetic basis of aberrant PLK3 transcripts detected in prostate cancer, their prevalence and possible clinical relevance, to test the functional...

  18. Investigating the effects of Pentoxifylline on human breast cancer cells using Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush N. Goel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in a global scenario. In the present study, biochemical changes exerted upon Pentoxifylline (PTX treatment had been appraised in human breast cancer cells using Raman spectroscopy. There are no clinically approved methods to monitor such therapeutic responses available. The spectral profiling is suggestive of changes in DNA, protein and lipid contents showing a linear relationship with drug dosage. Further, multivariate analysis using principal-component based linear-discriminant-analysis (PC-LDA was employed for classifying the control and the PTX treated groups. These findings support the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy as an alternate/adjunct label-free, objective method for monitoring drug-induced modifications against breast cancer cells.

  19. Pre-Clinical and Clinical Investigation of the Impact of Obesity on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    clinical cancer drug discovery , including 10 years as a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery at Duke University Medical Center...cancer therapy. Nature chemical biology . 2015;11(1):9-15. Epub 2014/12/18. doi: 10.1038/nchembio.1712. PubMed PMID: 25517383; PubMed Central PMCID...Assistant Professor of Nutrition, a member of the Nutrition Obesity Research Center, Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, McCallister Heart

  20. Commentary: Utilizing Community-Engaged Approaches to Investigate and Address Hmong Women’s Cancer Disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M.A. Sparks

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a growing concern for women in the Hmong community. Hmong women experience poor health outcomes for both cervical and breast cancer, largely due to low rates of screening and resultant late-stage at diagnosis. Both breast and cervical cancer screening are complicated by a multitude of social, cultural and environmental factors which influence health care decision-making and can otherwise serve to restrict access. We argue that community-engaged research, an orientation which prioritizes collaborative, equitable partnerships and community voice in identifying both problems and solutions, can be a valuable approach to helping address cancer health disparities for Hmong women. Using the Milwaukee-based “Healthy Hmong Women” project as a case example, we detail how the community-engaged approach implemented by the project partners was critical in identifying factors contributing to Hmong cancer disparities and appropriate interventions, as well as the overall acceptance and success of the project. Specifically, we discuss how this approach: (1 promoted community investment and ownership in the project; (2 facilitated the integration of local perspectives and experiences; (3 built capacity to address cancer screening disparities; (4 facilitated the creation of interventions targeting multiple ecological levels; and (5 framed the community as the foundation and driver of positive change.

  1. Clinico-pathological investigation of resectable gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takashi; Saeki, Toshiaki; Hirai, Toshihiro; Toge, Tetuya; Niimoto, Minoru; Hattori, Takao; Ootaki, Megu; Munaka, Masaki

    1989-01-01

    This is a review of 1074 patients with resectable gastric cancer who have satisfied the following criteria: primary cancer, histological confirmation, the description of exposed or non-exposed patients, and certification of atomic bomb survivor's health handbook in exposed patients. There were 250 men and 162 women in the exposed group, and 460 men and 203 women in the non-exposed group. Gastric cancer was detected in 29.6% for the exposed group and 7.4% for the non-exposed group, although the patients had not complained of any symptoms. These figures tended to increase annually, probably benefiting from health examination. The difference between the exposed and non-exposed patients tended to be smaller when preoperative stages and the percentage of macroscopic early cancer were adjusted by age and the presence of complaints. The difference in histology between the groups also tended to be smaller. In the exposed group, however, men and women tended to have well differentiated cancer and poorly differentiated cancer, respectively. Since A-bomb survivors consist of radiation exposed population and are managed under intensive medical care, adjustment of some factors is necessary in comparing A-bomb survivors with general population. (Namekawa, K)

  2. The relationship between fermented food intake and mortality risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praagman, J.; Dalmeijer, G.W.; Schouw, van der Y.T.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Bueno-de Mesquita, H.B.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Beulens, J.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between total and subtypes of bacterial fermented food intake (dairy products, cheese, vegetables and meat) and mortality due to all causes, total cancer and CVD. From the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and

  3. Understanding cancer and its treatment in Thai traditional medicine: An ethnopharmacological-anthropological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumlerdkij, Natchagorn; Tantiwongse, Jaturapat; Booranasubkajorn, Suksalin; Boonrak, Ranida; Akarasereenont, Pravit; Laohapand, Tawee; Heinrich, Michael

    2018-04-24

    Thai traditional medicine (TTM) is widely practiced in Thailand and continues to gain importance in cancer management, but little is known about the TTM practitioners' emic concepts and practice. With this study we firstly aim to document the practice of cancer treatment and prevention by TTM practitioners and, secondly, to evaluate how such traditional concepts and practices are correlated with biomedical ones. This in turn can form the basis for developing novel strategies for designing pharmacological experiments and longer term strategies to develop TTM practice. Semi-structured interviews with 33 TTM practitioners were performed in five provinces in different regions of Thailand. The following information were recorded; basic information of informants, descriptions of cancer (mareng in Thai), causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Plants used in the treatment and prevention of mareng were also collected. Using an in depth ethnographic approach four representative case studies to assist in a better understanding of the characteristics of mareng, its diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are reported here. Five characteristics of mareng - waste accumulation (khong sia), chronic illnesses (krasai), inflammation (kan aksep), bad blood (luead) and lymph (namlueang), and the imbalance of four basic elements (dhātu si) - have been identified. Explanatory models of cancer in TTM were linked with biomedical concepts and relevant pharmacological actions. Traditional uses and available scientific evidence of medicinal plants mentioned in the case studies for the treatment or prevention of mareng are presented and discussed. Here for the first time five main characteristics of cancer based on Thai traditional medical concepts are analysed. Our findings are relevant not only for the planning of clinical studies or pharmacological experiment in the search for novel compounds for cancer treatment and prevention, but also for the integration of Thai traditional

  4. Critical analysis of the literature investigating urogenital function preservation following robotic rectal cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sofoklis; Panteleimonitis; Jamil; Ahmed; Mick; Harper; Amjad; Parvaiz

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyses the current literature regarding the urogenital functional outcomes of patients receiving robotic rectal cancer surgery. METHODS A comprehensive literature search of electronic databases was performed in October 2015. The following search terms were applied: 'rectal cancer' or 'colorectal cancer' and robot* or 'da Vinci' and sexual or urolog* or urinary or erect* or ejaculat* or impot* or incontinence. All original studies examining the urological and/or sexual outcomes of male and/or female patients receiving robotic rectal cancer surgery were included. Reference lists of all retrieved articles were manually searched for further relevant articles. Abstracts were independently searched by two authors. RESULTS Fifteen original studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A total of 1338 patients were included; 818 received robotic, 498 laparoscopic and 22 open rectal cancer surgery. Only 726(54%) patients had their urogenital function assessed via means of validated functional questionnaires. From the included studies, three found that robotic rectal cancer surgery leads to quicker recovery of male urological function and five of male sexual function as compared to laparoscopic surgery. It is unclear whether robotic surgery offers favourable urogenital outcomes in the long run for males. In female patients only two studies assessed urological and threesexual function independently to that of males. In these studies there was no difference identified between patients receiving robotic and laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. However, in females the presented evidence was very limited making it impossible to draw any substantial conclusions. CONCLUSION There seems to be a trend towards earlier recovery of male urogenital function following robotic surgery. To evaluate this further, larger well designed studies are required.

  5. A prospective investigation of fish, meat and cooking-related carcinogens with endometrial cancer incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arem, H; Gunter, M J; Cross, A J; Hollenbeck, A R; Sinha, R

    2013-08-06

    There are limited prospective studies of fish and meat intakes with risk of endometrial cancer and findings are inconsistent. We studied associations between fish and meat intakes and endometrial cancer incidence in the large, prospective National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. Intakes of meat mutagens 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) were also calculated. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We observed no associations with endometrial cancer risk comparing the highest to lowest intake quintiles of red (HR=0.91, 95% CI 0.77-1.08), white (0.98, 0.83-1.17), processed meats (1.02, 0.86-1.21) and fish (1.10, 95% CI 0.93-1.29). We also found no associations between meat mutagen intakes and endometrial cancer. Our findings do not support an association between meat or fish intakes or meat mutagens and endometrial cancer.

  6. Is knowledge translation adequate? A quality assurance study of staging investigations in early stage breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dolly; Hogeveen, Sophie; Sweet Goldstein, Miriam; George, Ralph; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Hoch, Jeffrey; Haq, Rashida; Simmons, Christine E

    2012-02-01

    After primary surgery, patients diagnosed with early stage breast cancer undergo radiological investigations based on pathologic stage of disease to rule out distant metastases. Published guidelines can aid clinicians in determining which tests are appropriate based on stage of disease. We wished to assess the consistency of radiological staging in an academic community oncology setting with standard guidelines and to determine the overall impact of non-adherence to these guidelines. A retrospective cohort study was conducted for new breast cancer patients seen at a single institution between January 2009 and April 2010. Patients were included if initial diagnosis and primary surgery was at this institution. Pathologic stage and radiological tests completed were recorded. A literature review was performed and the results were compared with those from this study to determine overall adherence rates. Subsequently, a cost analysis was performed to determine the financial impact at this centre. 231 patients met eligibility criteria for inclusion in this study. A large proportion of patients were over-staged with 129 patients (55%) undergoing unnecessary investigations according to guidelines. Specifically, 59% of stage I patients and 58% of stage II patients were over-investigated. Distant metastases at the time of diagnosis were found in three patients, all of whom had stage III disease (1.3%). The literature reviewed revealed similar non-adherence rates in other centres. The estimated cost of such non-adherence is in the range of $78 (CDN) per new early stage breast cancer patient seen at this centre. This oncology centre has a low adherence to practice guidelines for staging investigations in breast cancer patients, with 55% of patients undergoing unnecessary tests. Very few patients had metastases at diagnosis, and all had pathological stage III disease. Efforts may need to focus on improving knowledge translation across clinical oncology settings to increase

  7. Investigation of breast cancer screening among the women of Khorramabad (west of Iran: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatereh Anbari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Breast cancer is the most common women's cancer that more than 90% of the patients can be treated or even cured through early diagnosis. So we intend to investigate the status of breast cancer screening in Khorramabad, a city in the west of Iran. In the present cross-sectional study, the study population included 457 number of 20 to 65 year old women referring to the health centers of Khorramabad during the second half of 2015 to receive health care services. The sampling method was multistage random-cluster. A multi-part questionnaire were used. Fisher exact test, chi-square and independent t tests were used to analyze the data.  The regular self-breast exam (SBE had been carried out by 12.3% of the women, visiting doctors for regular clinical breast exam (CBE had been done by 6% of the respondents and regular mammography every one to two years had been performed by 2.4% of the women. A statistically significant relationship was seen between occupation (P = 0.001, regular consumption of contraceptive pills (P = 0.032, history of breastfeeding, history of breast cancer in the first degree relatives (P = 0.001, and a history of cancer in the second degree (P = 0.005 relatives, and the regular SBE. Planning to enhance the women's awareness about breast cancer and the methods of early diagnosis and designing educational programs can be an important step to reduce deaths and disabilities caused by this disease among the women in such deprived cities.

  8. Investigating the Association Between Sociodemographic Factors and Lung Cancer Risk Using Cyber Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hong-Jun; Tourassi, Georgia

    2016-02-01

    Openly available online sources can be very valuable for executing in silico case-control epidemiological studies. Adjustment of confounding factors to isolate the association between an observing factor and disease is essential for such studies. However, such information is not always readily available online. This paper suggests natural language processing methods for extracting socio-demographic information from content openly available online. Feasibility of the suggested method is demonstrated by performing a case-control study focusing on the association between age, gender, and income level and lung cancer risk. The study shows stronger association between older age and lower socioeconomic status and higher lung cancer risk, which is consistent with the findings reported in traditional cancer epidemiology studies.

  9. Prevention of nausea and vomiting in cancer patients undergoing chemo and radiotherapy: an investigational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonse, Mohammed Raees; Ravi, Rithin; Pais, Saira; Jayachander, Dipika; Hasib, A.G.; Vidyasagar, M.S.; Baliga, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting remains both a feared side effect of cancer treatment and a primary focus of many supportive care initiatives/guidelines. It is associated with severe morbidity and causes significant deterioration in quality of life of the cancer patients. The emetogenic potential of the chemotherapeutic agents, repeated chemotherapy cycles, the radiation dose, the site of tumor, and patient risk factors like female gender, younger age, alcohol consumption and history of motion sickness are the major risk factors. A combination of dexamethasone, serotonin receptor antagonists and H2 blockers has been used with success in the prevention of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting from both moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. The present study addresses the experience of our hospital in the reduction of chemotherapy and radiotherapy induced nausea and vomiting among cancer patients. (author)

  10. A Prospective Investigation of Coffee Drinking and Bladder Cancer Incidence in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftfield, Erikka; Freedman, Neal D; Inoue-Choi, Maki; Graubard, Barry I; Sinha, Rashmi

    2017-09-01

    In 1991, coffee was classified as a group 2B carcinogen, possibly carcinogenic to humans, based on limited epidemiologic evidence of a positive association with bladder cancer. In 2016, the International Agency for Research on Cancer downgraded this classification due to lack of evidence from prospective studies particularly for never smokers. Baseline coffee drinking was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire in the NIH-AARP prospective cohort study. Among 469,047 US adults, who were cancer free at baseline, 6,012 bladder cancer cases (5,088 men and 924 women) were identified during >6.3 million person-years of follow-up. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), with non-coffee drinkers as the reference group. Coffee drinking was positively associated with bladder cancer in models adjusted for age and sex (HR for ≥4 cups/d relative to coffee nondrinkers = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.70, 2.14; P trend coffee nondrinkers = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.33; P trend = 0.0007). Associations were further attenuated after additional adjustment for lifetime smoking patterns among the majority of the cohort with this available data (P trend = 0.16). There was no evidence of an association among never smokers (P trend = 0.84). Positive associations between coffee drinking and bladder cancer among ever smokers but not never smokers suggest that residual confounding from imperfect measurement of smoking or unmeasured risk factors may be an explanation for our positive findings.

  11. Investigation of eating disorders in cancer patients and its relevance with body image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Abbas Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eating disorder is one of the most common health problems with clinical and psychological consequences, which can affect body image in cancer patients. Similar studies in this area for checking the status of this disorder and its relevance with body image in patients with cancer are limited. Therefore, this study was designed with the aim of determination of eating disorders in patients with cancer and their relevance with body image. Materials and Methods: The research was a cross-correlation study. It was carried out in Sayed-Al-Shohada Hospital affiliated to the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Two hundred and ten patients with cancer were selected and were asked tocomplete the demographic and disease characteristics questionnaire, the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ, and eating disorders questionnaire. SPSS statistical software, version 14 was used for statistical analysis′-Test, analysis of variance (ANOVA, and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for analyzing the obtained data. Results: The mean values of age, body mass index (BMI, and duration of illness were 48.2 ± 13.20 years, 24.6 ± 4.6kg/m 2 , and 25.64 ± 21.24months, respectively. Most patients were married (87%, without university education (96%, unemployed (67%, and with incomes below their requirement (52%. Most patients were diagnosed with breast cancer (36.5%. They received chemotherapy as the main treatment (56.2%. In addition, mean ± SD of eating disorders and body image were 12.84 ± 4.7 and184.40 ± 43.68, respectively. Also, 49.7% of patients with cancer had an eating disorder. Among these, 29% had experiences of anorexia and 20.7% had bulimia. There was a significant negative correlation between the score of body image and eating disorders (r = −0.47, P = 0.01. Conclusions: Findings of this study showed that most patients with cancer had experienced symptoms of eating disorders. This may lead to a negative

  12. Young Cancer Survivor Connections: A Mixed Methods Investigation of Online Communications, Social Support, and Unmet Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-08

    help me if I really need it," and "There is a trustworthy person I could turn to for advice if I were having problems." Each item is rated on a 4...Writing a cancer-related status update (e.g., celebrating an anniversary, announcing a clear scan, discussing cancer) 8 Kept 94 • Posting pictures...one who shares my interests and concerns. _____ 15. There is no one who really relies on me for their well-being. _____ 16. There is a trustworthy

  13. A prospective investigation of predictive and modifiable risk factors for breast cancer in unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinan, Emer M; Hussey, Juliette; McGarrigle, Sarah A; Healy, Laura A; O’Sullivan, Jacintha N; Bennett, Kathleen; Connolly, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide. The lifetime risk of a woman being diagnosed with breast cancer is approximately 12.5%. For women who carry the deleterious mutation in either of the BRCA genes, BRCA1 or BRCA2, the risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer is significantly increased. In recent years there has been increased penetrance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 associated breast cancer, prompting investigation into the role of modifiable risk factors in this group. Previous investigations into this topic have relied on participants recalling lifetime weight changes and subjective methods of recording physical activity. The influence of obesity-related biomarkers, which may explain the link between obesity, physical activity and breast cancer risk, has not been investigated prospectively in this group. This paper describes the design of a prospective cohort study investigating the role of predictive and modifiable risk factors for breast cancer in unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers. Participants will be recruited from breast cancer family risk clinics and genetics clinics. Lifestyle risk factors that will be investigated will include body composition, metabolic syndrome and its components, physical activity and dietary intake. PBMC telomere length will be measured as a potential predictor of breast cancer occurrence. Measurements will be completed on entry to the study and repeated at two years and five years. Participants will also be followed annually by questionnaire to track changes in risk factor status and to record cancer occurrence. Data will be analysed using multiple regression models. The study has an accrual target of 352 participants. The results from this study will provide valuable information regarding the role of modifiable lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer in women with a deleterious mutation in the BRCA gene. Additionally, the study will attempt to identify potential blood biomarkers which may be predictive

  14. Smoking and lymphoma risk in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohrmann, Sabine; Becker, Nikolaus; Linseisen, Jakob; Ruediger, Thomas; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Allen, Naomi E.; Travis, Ruth C.; Bingham, Sheila; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Ardanaz, Eva; Redondo, M. L.; Basterrechea, Mikel; Martinez, Carmen; Tormo, Maria-Jose; Rosso, Stefano; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Masala, Giovanna; Mattiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Boeing, Heiner; Bergmann, Manuela; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Peeters, Petra H.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Ferrari, Pietro; Neasham, David; Lund, Eiliv; Berglund, Goeran; Manjer, Jonas; Hallmans, Goeran; Johansson, Ingegerd; Vineis, Paolo; Riboli, Elio

    2008-01-01

    Lymphomas are one of the few cancers that have been increasing in incidence over the past decades. So far, only a few established risk factors have been identified, including immunosuppression and viral infections. Recent evidence suggests etiologic heterogeneity of different lymphoma subtypes.

  15. Investigation of anticancer potential of hypophyllanthin and phyllanthin against breast cancer by in vitro and in vivo methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukiran Parvathaneni

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities of hypophyllanthin and phyllanthin isolated from Phyllanthus amarus Schum & Thonn against breast cancer. Methods: In vitro anticancer activity was evaluated against two cell lines (MCF-7 and MDAMB-231 using MTT assay. In vivo anticancer activity was tested using Sprague-Dawley rats with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea induced mammary cancer. Results: In vitro studies demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell growth with IC50 values of (35.18依1.48 µg/mL (hypophyllanthin and (32.51依0.95 µg/mL (phyllanthin for MCF-7; (38.74 依1.24 (hypophyllanthin and (32.2依1.17 (phyllanthin for MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Tumor weights per group at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg/day for hypophyllanthin (12.82 and 12.06 g and phyllanthin (11.95 and 8.87 g treated groups were significantly (P<0.001 lower than untreated N-methyl-N-nitrosourea group (35.85. Conclusions: Results of the present research work indicated that the isolated lignan compounds, hypophyllanthin and phyllanthin showed significant anticancer activities against breast cancer, in vitro and in vivo.

  16. A Nested Case-Control Study of Metabolically Defined Body Size Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Murphy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is positively associated with colorectal cancer. Recently, body size subtypes categorised by the prevalence of hyperinsulinaemia have been defined, and metabolically healthy overweight/obese individuals (without hyperinsulinaemia have been suggested to be at lower risk of cardiovascular disease than their metabolically unhealthy (hyperinsulinaemic overweight/obese counterparts. Whether similarly variable relationships exist for metabolically defined body size phenotypes and colorectal cancer risk is unknown.The association of metabolically defined body size phenotypes with colorectal cancer was investigated in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC study. Metabolic health/body size phenotypes were defined according to hyperinsulinaemia status using serum concentrations of C-peptide, a marker of insulin secretion. A total of 737 incident colorectal cancer cases and 737 matched controls were divided into tertiles based on the distribution of C-peptide concentration amongst the control population, and participants were classified as metabolically healthy if below the first tertile of C-peptide and metabolically unhealthy if above the first tertile. These metabolic health definitions were then combined with body mass index (BMI measurements to create four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories: (1 metabolically healthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2, (2 metabolically healthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, (3 metabolically unhealthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2, and (4 metabolically unhealthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Additionally, in separate models, waist circumference measurements (using the International Diabetes Federation cut-points [≥80 cm for women and ≥94 cm for men] were used (instead of BMI to create the four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories. Statistical tests used in the analysis were all two-sided, and a p-value of <0.05 was

  17. Critical analysis of the literature investigating urogenital function preservation following robotic rectal cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sofoklis; Panteleimonitis[1,2; Jamil; Ahmed[1; Mick; Harper[2; Amjad; Parvaiz[1,2

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyses the current literature regarding the urogenital functional outcomes of patients receiving robotic rectal cancer surgery.METHODS A comprehensive literature search of electronic databases was performed in October 2015. The following search terms were applied: “rectal cancer” or “colorectal cancer” and robot* or “da Vinci” and sexual or urolog* or urinary or erect* or ejaculat* or impot* or incontinence.All original studies examining the urological and/or sexual outcomes of male and/or female patients receiving robotic rectal cancer surgery were included. Reference lists of all retrieved articles were manually searched for further relevant articles. Abstracts were independently searched by two authors.RESULTS Fifteen original studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria.A total of 1338 patients were included; 818 received robotic, 498 laparoscopic and 22 open rectal cancer surgery. Only 726 (54%) patients had their urogenital function assessed via means of validated functional questionnaires. From the included studies, three found that robotic rectal cancer surgery leads to quicker recovery of male urological function and five of male sexual function as compared to laparoscopic surgery.It is unclear whether robotic surgery offers favourable urogenital outcomes in the long run for males. In female patients only two studies assessed urological and three sexual function independently to that of males. In these studies there was no difference identified between patients receiving robotic and laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. However, in females the presented evidence was very limited making it impossible to draw any substantial conclusions.CONCLUSION There seems to be a trend towards earlier recovery of male urogenital function following robotic surgery. To evaluate this further, larger well designed studies are required.

  18. Investigation of non-thermal plasma effects on lung cancer cells within 3D collagen matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Surya B.; Thapa Gupta, Tripti; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M.; Ayan, Halim

    2017-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in plasma medicine have identified a potential application for the non-thermal plasma in cancer therapy. Most studies on the effects of non-thermal plasma on cancer cells have used traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture. However, very few studies are conducted employing non-thermal plasma in animal models. Two dimensional models do not fully mimic the three-dimensional (3D) tumor microenvironment and animal models are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, we used 3D collagen matrices that closely resemble the native geometry of cancer tissues and provide more physiologically relevant results than 2D models, while providing a more cost effective and efficient precursor to animal studies. We previously demonstrated a role for non-thermal plasma application in promoting apoptotic cell death and reducing the viability of A549 lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells cultured upon 2D matrices. In this study, we wished to determine the efficacy of non-thermal plasma application in driving apoptotic cell death of A549 lung cancer cells encapsulated within a 3D collagen matrix. The percentage of apoptosis increased as treatment time increased and was time dependent. In addition, the anti-viability effect of plasma was demonstrated. Twenty-four hours post-plasma treatment, 38% and 99% of cell death occurred with shortest (15 s) and longest treatment time (120 s) respectively at the plasma-treated region. We found that plasma has a greater effect on the viability of A549 lung cancer cells on the superficial surface of 3D matrices and has diminishing effects as it penetrates the 3D matrix. We also identified the nitrogen and oxygen species generated by plasma and characterized their penetration in vertical and lateral directions within the 3D matrix from the center of the plasma-treated region. Therefore, the utility of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in driving apoptosis and reducing the viability of lung cancer cells

  19. Investigation of non-thermal plasma effects on lung cancer cells within 3D collagen matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karki, Surya B; Gupta, Tripti Thapa; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Ayan, Halim; Eisenmann, Kathryn M

    2017-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in plasma medicine have identified a potential application for the non-thermal plasma in cancer therapy. Most studies on the effects of non-thermal plasma on cancer cells have used traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture. However, very few studies are conducted employing non-thermal plasma in animal models. Two dimensional models do not fully mimic the three-dimensional (3D) tumor microenvironment and animal models are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, we used 3D collagen matrices that closely resemble the native geometry of cancer tissues and provide more physiologically relevant results than 2D models, while providing a more cost effective and efficient precursor to animal studies. We previously demonstrated a role for non-thermal plasma application in promoting apoptotic cell death and reducing the viability of A549 lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells cultured upon 2D matrices. In this study, we wished to determine the efficacy of non-thermal plasma application in driving apoptotic cell death of A549 lung cancer cells encapsulated within a 3D collagen matrix. The percentage of apoptosis increased as treatment time increased and was time dependent. In addition, the anti-viability effect of plasma was demonstrated. Twenty-four hours post-plasma treatment, 38% and 99% of cell death occurred with shortest (15 s) and longest treatment time (120 s) respectively at the plasma-treated region. We found that plasma has a greater effect on the viability of A549 lung cancer cells on the superficial surface of 3D matrices and has diminishing effects as it penetrates the 3D matrix. We also identified the nitrogen and oxygen species generated by plasma and characterized their penetration in vertical and lateral directions within the 3D matrix from the center of the plasma-treated region. Therefore, the utility of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in driving apoptosis and reducing the viability of lung cancer cells

  20. Plasma carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols levels and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition: a nested case-control study: plasma micronutrients and pancreatic cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeurnink, Suzanne M; Ros, Martine M; Leenders, Max; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J B; Siersema, Peter D; Jansen, Eugene H J M; van Gils, Carla H; Bakker, Marije F; Overvad, Kim; Roswall, Nina; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Racine, Antoine; Cadeau, Claire; Grote, Verena; Kaaks, Rudolf; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Benetou, Vasiliki; Valanou, Elisavet; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Vineis, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Mattiello, Amalia; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Castaño, José María Huerta; Duell, Eric J; Barricarte, Aurelio; Molina-Montes, Esther; Argüelles, Marcial; Dorronsoro, Mire; Johansen, Dorthe; Lindkvist, Björn; Sund, Malin; Crowe, Francesca L; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Jenab, Mazda; Fedirko, Veronika; Riboli, E; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B

    2015-03-15

    Evidence of a protective effect of several antioxidants and other nutrients on pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association for prediagnostic plasma levels of carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols with risk of pancreatic cancer in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 446 incident exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were matched to 446 controls by age at blood collection, study center, sex, date and time of blood collection, fasting status and hormone use. Plasma carotenoids (α- and β-carotene, lycopene, β-cryptoxanthin, canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein), α- and γ-tocopherol and retinol were measured by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography and plasma vitamin C by a colorimetric assay. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for pancreatic cancer risk were estimated using a conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for smoking status, smoking duration and intensity, waist circumference, cotinine levels and diabetes status. Inverse associations with pancreatic cancer risk were found for plasma β-carotene (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.52, 95%CI 0.31-0.88, p for trend = 0.02), zeaxanthin (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.53, 95%CI 0.30-0.94, p for trend = 0.06) and α-tocopherol (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.62, 95%CI 0.39-0.99, p for trend = 0.08. For α- and β-carotene, lutein, sum of carotenoids and γ-tocopherol, heterogeneity between geographical regions was observed. In conclusion, our results show that higher plasma concentrations of β-carotene, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol may be inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, but further studies are warranted. © 2014 UICC.

  1. Investigating a multigene prognostic assay based on significant pathways for Luminal A breast cancer through gene expression profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haiyan; Yang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2018-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate potential recurrence-risk biomarkers based on significant pathways for Luminal A breast cancer through gene expression profile analysis. Initially, the gene expression profiles of Luminal A breast cancer patients were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using a Limma package and the hierarchical clustering analysis was conducted for the DEGs. In addition, the functional pathways were screened using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analyses and rank ratio calculation. The multigene prognostic assay was exploited based on the statistically significant pathways and its prognostic function was tested using train set and verified using the gene expression data and survival data of Luminal A breast cancer patients downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus. A total of 300 DEGs were identified between good and poor outcome groups, including 176 upregulated genes and 124 downregulated genes. The DEGs may be used to effectively distinguish Luminal A samples with different prognoses verified by hierarchical clustering analysis. There were 9 pathways screened as significant pathways and a total of 18 DEGs involved in these 9 pathways were identified as prognostic biomarkers. According to the survival analysis and receiver operating characteristic curve, the obtained 18-gene prognostic assay exhibited good prognostic function with high sensitivity and specificity to both the train and test samples. In conclusion the 18-gene prognostic assay including the key genes, transcription factor 7-like 2, anterior parietal cortex and lymphocyte enhancer factor-1 may provide a new method for predicting outcomes and may be conducive to the promotion of precision medicine for Luminal A breast cancer.

  2. Does culture matter?: a cross-national investigation of women's responses to cancer prevention campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyoo-Hoon; Jo, Samsup

    2012-01-01

    We examined how culture influences the persuasive effects of health campaigns that promote early screening for cancers that occur in women. Two message dimensions were included: individualistic vs. collectivistic appeal and gain vs. loss frame. A total of 955 females from three countries-the United States, South Korea, and Japan-participated in the experiment. From the results, we found that message framing alone did not significantly influence the effectiveness of public campaigns for women's cancer prevention; and this tendency was similar across the three countries. Gain-framed messages are likely to be more persuasive when combined with a collectivistic appeal, however, whereas loss-framed messages tend to be more effective when combined with an individualistic appeal in both the United States and South Korea; but this result was not the case for Japan. Based on the findings, we suggested theoretical and managerial implications as well as several directions for future research.

  3. Investigation of the proinflammatory activity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in lung cancer and inflammatory diseases of respiratory organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Makarova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The proinflammatory activity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF was investigated using the biological test system (donor blood in 71 patients with lung cancer and inflammatory disease of respiratory organs (lung abscess, infiltrative tuberculosis, tuberculoma, fibrocavernous tuberculosis. The supernatant of BALF was purified by filtration through millipores and added to blood, and a nitroblue tetrazolium recovery test (HBT was carried out. Hank’s balanced salt solution was used in the control. The proinflammatory effect of BALF was defined as a diformazan-positive neutrophil count ratio in the experimental and control samples (stimulation index. The inflammatory process developing in lung cancer was active, as suggested by the accumulation of neutrophils in the lung and by the high proinflammatory activity of BALF, which were comparable with the similar indicators in lung abscess and fibrocavernous tuberculosis.

  4. Investigation of therapeutic efficiency of phenytoin (PHT) labeled with radioactive 131I in the cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cansu Uzaras; Ugur Avcibasi; Hasan Demiroglu; Emin Ilker Medine; Ayfer Yurt KiIcar; Fazilet Zuemruet Biber Mueftueler; Perihan Uenak

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the incorporations of PHT radiolabeled with 131 I ( 131 I-PHT) on U-87 MG, Daoy and A549 cancerous cell lines. For this, cold and radio-labeling studies were carried out. The radiolabeling yield of 131 I-PHT was obtained about 95 %. Subsequently, cell culture studies were carried out and radio-labeling yields of 131 I, 131 I-PHT on U-87 MG, Daoy and A549 cancerous cells were investigated. Cell culture studies demonstrated that the incorporation values of 131 IPHT on the three cell lines decreased with increasing radioactivity. Consequently, 131 I-PHT may be a good radiopharmaceutical for targeting radionuclide therapy of Central Nervous System Tumors. (author)

  5. The investigation of lactalbumin as a possible marker for human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, K.L.; Cove, D.H.; Morrison, J.M.; Heath, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    Measurable amounts of the whey protein lactalbumin have been found in the cytosol of over a third of 89 primary breast cancers using a specific radioimmunoassay. With a modification of the method which prevents interference from endogenous antibodies, serum levels of lactalbumin have been measured in 83 subjects with breast cancer, 45 subjects with benign mammary dysplasic and 63 controls. In earlier studies of normal women, we found that circulating lactalbumin was not found in subjects aged over 45 yr but was commonly present below that age since the patients with benign dysplasia had a mean age of 35.0 yr and the breast carcinoma patients a mean age of 60.4 yr, separate control groups were necessary for the two patient groups. Circulating lactalbumin was found in 12% of patients with operable breast cancer, 24% of patients with metastatic disease and in none of the age-matched controls circulating lactalbumin was detected no more often in the patients with benign dysplasia than in corresponding controls. It appears that a sizeable minority of human breast carcinomas are able to synthesise lactalbumin in sufficient quantity to produce a measurable level in the blood. (author)

  6. Coffee consumption and risk of chronic disease in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Germany study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floegel, Anna; Pischon, Tobias; Bergmann, Manuela M; Teucher, Birgit; Kaaks, Rudolf; Boeing, Heiner

    2012-04-01

    Early studies suggested that coffee consumption may increase the risk of chronic disease. We investigated prospectively the association between coffee consumption and the risk of chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes (T2D), myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and cancer. We used data from 42,659 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Germany study. Coffee consumption was assessed by self-administered food-frequency questionnaire at baseline, and data on medically verified incident chronic diseases were collected by active and passive follow-up procedures. HRs and 95% CIs were calculated with multivariate Cox regression models and compared by competing risk analysis. During 8.9 y of follow-up, we observed 1432 cases of T2D, 394 of MI, 310 of stroke, and 1801 of cancer as first qualifying events. Caffeinated (HR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.84, 1.05) or decaffeinated (HR: 1.05; 95% CI: 0.84, 1.31) coffee consumption (≥4 cups/d compared with disease. A lower risk of T2D was associated with caffeinated (HR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.94; P-trend 0.009) and decaffeinated (HR: 0.70; 95% CI: 0.46, 1.06; P-trend: 0.043) coffee consumption (≥4 cups/d compared with disease and cancer risk were not. The competing risk analysis showed no significant differences between the risk associations of individual diseases. Our findings suggest that coffee consumption does not increase the risk of chronic disease, but it may be linked to a lower risk of T2D.

  7. CCR investigators use liquid biopsies to uncover cancer in the blood of lymphoma patients | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCR investigators are using circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) as a type of noninvasive liquid biopsy for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. are using circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) as a type of noninvasive liquid biopsy for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of non-Hodgkin

  8. Investigating a role for p63 in prostate stem cells, cancer and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Di Giacomo, Valeria, 1983-

    2014-01-01

    P63 is a transcription factor of the p53 family with key roles in embryonic development, stem cells and cancer. P63-deficient mice fail to form stratified and glandular epithelia, including the prostate, demonstrating a critical function for this protein in prostate development. The P63 gene encodes two different isoform groups, TA and N, which can act as tumor suppressors or oncogenes respectively in different tumors. In the prostate gland, Np63 is the main isoform expressed specifically ...

  9. Comparative assessment of the spreading of central lung cancer by the results of tomography and bronchological investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovyagin, E.V.; Moerman, B.A.; Tereshchenko, O.I.

    1987-01-01

    The results of tomographic and bronchological investigations were compared in 100 patients with central lung cancer. Bronchofibroscopy (BFS) was shown to play a leading role in the assessment of tumor involvement of the proximal parts of the bronchial tree. In 38% of the cases additional information on the bronchial status permitted a more precise definition of the disease stage (T factor). Tomography was superior with respect to the assessment of the intrathoratic lymph nodes giving a preliminary idea of the bronchial state. Tomography potentialities could be expanded by using an equalizer network for better differentiation of the mediastinal structures including small increases in the lymph nodes

  10. Dietary fat intake and subsequent weight change in adults: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forouhi, Nita G; Sharp, Stephen J; Du, Huaidong

    2009-01-01

    weight divided by duration of follow-up). DESIGN: We analyzed data from 89,432 men and women from 6 cohorts of the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) study. Using country-specific food-frequency questionnaires, we examined the association between baseline fat intake......). CONCLUSIONS: We found no significant association between the amount or type of dietary fat and subsequent weight change in this large prospective study. These findings do not support the use of low-fat diets to prevent weight gain....

  11. Blood pressure and risk of renal cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weikert, Steffen; Boeing, Heiner; Pischon, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Blood pressure was measured in 296,638 women and men, recruited in eight European countries during 1992-1998, 254,935 of whom provided information on antihypertensive medication. During a mean follow-up of 6.2 years, 250 cases of RCC were...... interval: 1.54, 3.55). Risk estimates did not significantly differ according to sex or use of antihypertensive medication. Individuals taking antihypertensive drugs were not at a significantly increased risk unless blood pressure was poorly controlled. These results support the hypothesis that hypertension...

  12. Overweight, obesity and fat distribution in 50- to 64-year-old participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haftenberger, M; Lahmann, P.H.; Panico, S; Gonzalez-Martinez, A.C.; Seidell, J. C.; Boeing, H; Giurdanella, M C; Krogh, V.; Bueno De Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M; Skeie, G.; Hjartåker, A; Rodriguez, M.; Quirós, J. R.; Berglund, G.; Janlert, U; Khaw, K.T.; Spencer, E.A.; Overvad, K.; Tjønneland, A; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Tehard, B; Miller, A.B.; Klipstein-Grobusch, K; Benetou, V.; Kiriazi, G; Riboli, E.; Slimani, N.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe anthropometric characteristics of participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Design: A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data of a European prospective cohort study. Subjects: This analysis includes study populations from 25

  13. Association of sleep duration with chronic diseases in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Potsdam study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne von Ruesten

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In view of the reduced number of hours devoted to sleep in modern western societies the question arises what effects might result from sleep duration on occurrence of chronic diseases. METHODS: Data from 23 620 middle-aged participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Potsdam study, that were recruited between 1994-1998, were analyzed by using Cox proportional hazard regression to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration at baseline and incidence of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, myocardial infarction, stroke, and cancer. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up period of 7.8 years 841 incident cases of type 2 diabetes, 197 cases of myocardial infarction, 169 incident strokes, and 846 tumor cases were observed. Compared to persons sleeping 7-<8 h/day, participants with sleep duration of <6 h had a significantly increased risk of stroke (Hazard Ratio (HR = 2.06, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.18-3.59, cancer (HR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.09-1.87, and overall chronic diseases (HR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.10-1.55 in multivariable adjusted models. Self-reported daytime sleep at baseline was not associated with incident chronic diseases in the overall study sample. However, there had been an effect modification of daytime sleep by hypertension showing that daytime sleep was inversely related to chronic disease risk among non-hypertensive participants but directly related to chronic diseases among hypertensives. CONCLUSION: Sleep duration of less than 6 h is a risky behavior for the development of chronic diseases, particularly stroke and cancer, and should be therefore addressed in public health campaigns.

  14. Association of sleep duration with chronic diseases in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ruesten, Anne; Weikert, Cornelia; Fietze, Ingo; Boeing, Heiner

    2012-01-01

    In view of the reduced number of hours devoted to sleep in modern western societies the question arises what effects might result from sleep duration on occurrence of chronic diseases. Data from 23 620 middle-aged participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam study, that were recruited between 1994-1998, were analyzed by using Cox proportional hazard regression to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration at baseline and incidence of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, myocardial infarction, stroke, and cancer. During a mean follow-up period of 7.8 years 841 incident cases of type 2 diabetes, 197 cases of myocardial infarction, 169 incident strokes, and 846 tumor cases were observed. Compared to persons sleeping 7-day, participants with sleep duration of <6 h had a significantly increased risk of stroke (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 2.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18-3.59), cancer (HR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.09-1.87), and overall chronic diseases (HR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.10-1.55) in multivariable adjusted models. Self-reported daytime sleep at baseline was not associated with incident chronic diseases in the overall study sample. However, there had been an effect modification of daytime sleep by hypertension showing that daytime sleep was inversely related to chronic disease risk among non-hypertensive participants but directly related to chronic diseases among hypertensives. Sleep duration of less than 6 h is a risky behavior for the development of chronic diseases, particularly stroke and cancer, and should be therefore addressed in public health campaigns.

  15. Impact of investigations in general practice on timeliness of referral for patients subsequently diagnosed with cancer: analysis of national primary care audit data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, G P; Saunders, C L; Abel, G A; McPhail, S; Lyratzopoulos, G; Neal, R D

    2015-02-17

    For patients with symptoms of possible cancer who do not fulfil the criteria for urgent referral, initial investigation in primary care has been advocated in the United Kingdom and supported by additional resources. The consequence of this strategy for the timeliness of diagnosis is unknown. We analysed data from the English National Audit of Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care on patients with lung (1494), colorectal (2111), stomach (246), oesophagus (513), pancreas (327), and ovarian (345) cancer relating to the ordering of investigations by the General Practitioner and their nature. Presenting symptoms were categorised according to National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance on referral for suspected cancer. We used linear regression to estimate the mean difference in primary-care interval by cancer, after adjustment for age, gender, and the symptomatic presentation category. Primary-care investigations were undertaken in 3198/5036 (64%) of cases. The median primary-care interval was 16 days (IQR 5-45) for patients undergoing investigation and 0 days (IQR 0-10) for those not investigated. Among patients whose symptoms mandated urgent referral to secondary care according to NICE guidelines, between 37% (oesophagus) and 75% (pancreas) were first investigated in primary care. In multivariable linear regression analyses stratified by cancer site, adjustment for age, sex, and NICE referral category explained little of the observed prolongation associated with investigation. For six specified cancers, investigation in primary care was associated with later referral for specialist assessment. This effect was independent of the nature of symptoms. Some patients for whom urgent referral is mandated by NICE guidance are nevertheless investigated before referral. Reducing the intervals between test order, test performance, and reporting can help reduce the prolongation of primary-care intervals associated with investigation use. Alternative models of

  16. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  17. HSE investigation of leukaemia and other cancers in the children of male workers at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report presents two findings of the U.K. Health and Safety Executive study group responsible for examining the conclusions of the Gardner Report that ''the raised incidence of leukaemia particularly, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, among children near Sellafield was associated with paternal employment and recorded external dose of whole body penetrating radiation during work at the plant before conception''. The HSE report is divided into three:- the Case-only study and the Radiation Dose study, concerned with the 11 case fathers who had worked at Sellafield. The third part, the Case-control study, is an epidemiological study which seeks to identify all cancer cases diagnosed before the age of 25, where the children concerned had been born in West Cumbria to fathers who were Sellafield employees. The search included the whole country from January 1980 to September 1989. (UK)

  18. Preliminary investigation of stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jindong; Lu Changxing; Wang Jiaming; Liu Jun; Li Hongxuan; Wang Changlu; Gao Lanting; Zhao Lei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and treatment-related toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: SBRT was applied to 30 patients, including clinically staged T 1 , T 2 (≤5 cm) or T 3 (chest wall primary tumors only), N 0 , M 0 ,biopsy-confirmed NSCLC. All patients were precluded from lobotomy because of physical condition or comorbidity. No patients developed tumors of any T-stage in the proximal zone. SBRT was performed with the total dose of 50 Gy to 70 Gy in 10 - 11 fractions during 12 - 15 days. prescription line was set onthe edge of the PTV. Results: The follow-up rate was 100%. The number of patients who completed the 1-, and 2-year follow-up were 15, and 10, respectively. All 30 patients completed therapy as planned. The complete response (CR), partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) rates were 37%, 53% and 3%, respectively. With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 4-36 months), Kaplan-Meier local control at 2 years was 94%. The 2-year overall survival was 84% and the 2-year cancer specific survival was 90%. Seven patients(23%) developed Grade 2 pneumonitis, no grade > 2 acute or late lung toxicity was observed. No one developed chest wall pain. Conclusions: It is feasible to deliver 50 Gy to 70 Gy of SBRT in 10 - 11 fractions for medically inoperable patients with stage I / II NSCLC. It was associated with low incidence of toxicities and provided sustained local tumor control.The preliminary investigation indicated the cancer specific survival probability of SBRT was high. It is necessary to perform similar investigation in a larger number of patients with long-term follow-up. (authors)

  19. Investigating the Experiences of Childhood Cancer Patients and Parents Participating in Optional Nontherapeutic Clinical Research Studies in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errington, Julie; Malik, Ghada; Evans, Julie; Baston, Jenny; Parry, Annie; Price, Lisa; Johnstone, Hina; Peters, Selena; Oram, Victoria; Howe, Karen; Whiteley, Emma; Tunnacliffe, Jane; Veal, Gareth J

    2016-07-01

    While the majority of childhood cancer clinical trials are treatment related, additional optional research investigations may be carried out that do not directly impact on treatment. It is essential that these studies are conducted ethically and that the experiences of families participating in these studies are as positive as possible. A questionnaire study was carried out to investigate the key factors that influence why families choose to participate in optional nontherapeutic research studies, the level of understanding of the trials involved, and the experiences of participation. A total of 100 participants from six UK centers were studied; 77 parents, 10 patients >16 years, and 13 patients aged 8-15 years. Ninety-seven percent of parents and 90% of patients felt that information provided prior to study consent was of the right length, with 52% of parents and 65% of patients fully understanding the information provided. Seventy-four percent of parents participated in research studies in order to "do something important", while 74% of patients participated "to help medical staff". Encouragingly, <5% of participants felt that their clinical care would be negatively affected if they did not participate. Positive aspects of participation included a perception of increased attention from medical staff. Negative aspects included spending longer periods in hospital and the requirement for additional blood samples. Ninety-six percent of parents and 87% of patients would participate in future studies. The study provides an insight into the views of childhood cancer patients and their parents participating in nontherapeutic clinical research studies. Overwhelmingly, the findings suggest that participation is seen as a positive experience. © 2016 The Authors. Pediatric Blood & Cancer, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Clinical investigation on the feature of immunological parameters following radiotherapy in patients with primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyohira, Ken

    1984-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate five systemic immunological parameters; the number of peripheral blood lymphocytes (number of lymphocytes), percentage of cytotoxicity of peripheral blood lymphocytes against allogeneic target cells of bronchogenic carcinoma (percentage of cytotoxicity), stimulation index of lymphocyte blastoid transformation with phytohemagglutinin (stimulation index with PHA) and reactivities of PPD skin test and PHA skin test in 174 patients with primary lung cancer receiving radiotherapy alone. Percentage of cytotoxicity showed a significant increase and the other four parameters showed a significant decrease when compared with values before radiotherapy. The number of lymphocytes, percentage of cytotoxicity and stimulation index with PHA appeared to have no relation with histologic types of pulmonary cancer. The number of lymphocytes showed a significant decrease through radiotherapy in both groups with and without irradiation for mediastinal region. A decrease in stimulation index with PHA and reactivity of PPD skin test and an increase in percentage of cytotoxicity were significant after radiotherapy in the group with mediastinal irradiation. Significant differences in percentage of cytotoxicity, stimulation index with PHA and reactivity of PPD skin test were observed between the groups receiving 2 Gy/day and 1.5 Gy/day. Stimulation index with PHA, reactivity of PPD skin test and percentage of cytotoxicity appeared to be correlated with tumor regression following radiotherapy. The reactivity of PPD skin test measured after irradiation was correlated with prognosis as a single parameter. Survival time was well correlated with grades using the combination of three parameters (the number of lymphocytes, and reactivities of PPD skin test and PHA skin test). (J.P.N.)

  1. Up-to-date opportunities of cervical lymph nodes ultrasound investigation in patients, suffering from oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Alymov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Incidence of oral cancer in Russia is 4.52 and mortality – 2.44. Head and neck cancer is characterized by the high risk of development of metastases in regional lymph nodes. Lymph nodes status exerts influence on the treatment plan and appears to be the major predictive factor. Regional metastases result into two-fold decrease of five-year survival. Therefore, evaluation and treatment of metastatic lymph nodes is of prime importance. Objective. The aim of this manuscript was to illustrate and summarize publications devoted to modern methods of ultrasound evaluation of cervical lymph node status in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Results. Numerous studies have demonstrated, that standard ultrasound investigation (in B-mode is characterized by high sensitivity and specificity (specificity varies from 71.0 to 96.4 %, and specificity – from 46.6 to 91.0 %, according to different studies. In addition, ultrasound efficiency exceeds that of CT. Accuracy of ultrasound as the method of cervical lymph node investigation has increased after implementation of such methods, as elastography and elastometry (this techniques allow to achieve sensitivity of 98.1 % and specificity of 100 %. 

  2. Experimental investigation of the cytotoxicity of medium-borne signals in human prostate cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjostedt, Svetlana; Bezak, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Evidence exists that exposure of non-irradiated cells to Irradiated Cell Conditioned Medium (ICCM) can cause effects similar to those resulting from direct radiation damage. This study attempts to validate the stochastic model, relating absorbed dose to the emission and processing of cell death signals by non-irradiated cells, in vitro in PC3 human prostate cancer cell line. Methods. The recipient cell survival was measured after exposure of cells to ICMM derived from donor cells: a) exposed to radiation doses from 2 Gy to 8 Gy and b) of concentrations varying from 2 x 10 2 to 6 x 10 6 irradiated with 2 Gy. Results. Exposure to ICCM, irradiated with doses between 2-8 Gy, resulted in a significant (p 2 cells was significantly higher (p < 0.5) compared to the rest of donor cell concentrations, indicating that the toxicity of ICCM depends on the cellular concentration of donor cells. Non-linear regression data fitting provided reasonable agreement with the microdosimetric model for the induction of cell killing through medium-borne signals. Conclusion. For the given cell line and given experimental conditions, significant decreases in cell survival were observed in non-irradiated cells exposed to ICCM derived from donor cells of various concentrations and irradiated with different doses

  3. THE NECESSITY OF ADVANCED RAS-MUTATIONS INVESTIGATION FOR COLORECTAL CANCER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Gorbunova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Retrospective analysis of 3 randomized clinical trials of WT-KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer patients (PRIME, PEAK, FIRE-3 is presented. The PRIME study demonstrated increase in median overall survival (OS in group receiving panitumumab in addition to FOLFOX4 chemotherapy – 26.0 vs 20.2 months (р = 0.04. The РЕАК trial compared FOLFOX4 + panitumumab and FOLFOX4 + bevacizumab in the same patient group in first-line treatment, a significant increase in median PFS (13.1 vs 9.5 months, p = 0.03 and non-significant increase in median OS (41.3 vs 28.9 months, p = 0.058 was achieved. The FIRE trial demonstrated FOLFIRI + cetuximab superiority when compared to FOLFIRI + bevacizumab in median OS 33.1 vs 25.6 months (р = 0.011. All trials retrospectively analyzed additional RAS mutations, allowing to select a subgroup of patients, who benefit most from EGFR inhibition.

  4. Clinical investigation: Regional nodal failure patterns in breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy without radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, Eric A.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Katz, Angela; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Perkins, George H.; Jhingran, Anuja; Theriault, Richard; Singletary, Eva; Sahin, Aysegul; McNeese, Marsha D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe regional nodal failure patterns in patients who had undergone mastectomy with axillary dissection to define subgroups of patients who might benefit from supplemental regional nodal radiation to the axilla or supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex. Methods and Materials: The cohort consisted of 1031 patients treated with mastectomy (including a level I-II axillary dissection) and doxorubicin-based systemic therapy without radiation on five clinical trials at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Patient records, including pathology reports, were retrospectively reviewed. All regional recurrences (with or without distant metastasis) were recorded. Median follow-up was 116 months (range, 6-262 months). Results: Twenty-one patients recurred within the low-mid axilla (10-year actuarial rate 3%). Of these, 16 were isolated regional failures (no chest wall failure). The risk of failure in the low-mid axilla was not significantly higher for patients with increasing numbers of involved nodes, increasing percentage of involved nodes, larger nodal size or gross extranodal extension. Only 3 of 100 patients with 20% involved axillary nodes, and the presence of gross extranodal extension (10-year actuarial rates 15%, 14%, and 19%, respectively, p 20% involved axillary nodes, or gross extranodal extension are at increased risk of failure in the supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex and should receive radiation to undissected regions in addition to the chest wall

  5. Bayesian versus frequentist statistical inference for investigating a one-off cancer cluster reported to a health department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wills Rachael A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The problem of silent multiple comparisons is one of the most difficult statistical problems faced by scientists. It is a particular problem for investigating a one-off cancer cluster reported to a health department because any one of hundreds, or possibly thousands, of neighbourhoods, schools, or workplaces could have reported a cluster, which could have been for any one of several types of cancer or any one of several time periods. Methods This paper contrasts the frequentist approach with a Bayesian approach for dealing with silent multiple comparisons in the context of a one-off cluster reported to a health department. Two published cluster investigations were re-analysed using the Dunn-Sidak method to adjust frequentist p-values and confidence intervals for silent multiple comparisons. Bayesian methods were based on the Gamma distribution. Results Bayesian analysis with non-informative priors produced results similar to the frequentist analysis, and suggested that both clusters represented a statistical excess. In the frequentist framework, the statistical significance of both clusters was extremely sensitive to the number of silent multiple comparisons, which can only ever be a subjective "guesstimate". The Bayesian approach is also subjective: whether there is an apparent statistical excess depends on the specified prior. Conclusion In cluster investigations, the frequentist approach is just as subjective as the Bayesian approach, but the Bayesian approach is less ambitious in that it treats the analysis as a synthesis of data and personal judgements (possibly poor ones, rather than objective reality. Bayesian analysis is (arguably a useful tool to support complicated decision-making, because it makes the uncertainty associated with silent multiple comparisons explicit.

  6. Investigation of in vivo potential of scorpion venom against skin tumorigenesis in mice via targeting markers associated with cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Asmari AK

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdulrahman K Al Asmari, Abdul Quaiyoom Khan Research Centre, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world in spite of the advances made in its management. In this study, we investigated the in vivo antitumorigenic potential of the venom obtained from a medically important scorpion species Leiurus quinquestriatus on chemically induced skin cancer in mice. Animals were divided into five groups, with 13 animals in each group. All the treatments were given topically on the shaved dorsal surface of the skin. Animals in Group 1 received vehicle only (0.2 mL acetone. Moreover, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 400 nmol per mouse was applied to all the animals in the remaining four groups. After 1 week, different concentrations of venom (17.5 µg, 35 µg, and 52.5 µg per animal were applied to each animal in the Groups III–V. Thirty minutes after the application of venom, croton oil was applied on the same position where venom was administered to the animals of Groups III–V. Animals in Group II were treated as the positive control (without venom and received croton oil as in Groups III–V. The findings of this study revealed that venom extract of L. quinquestriatus inhibits DMBA + croton oil-induced mouse skin tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity. Venom treatment also decreased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry results showed a downregulation of the expression of molecular markers such as Ki-67, nuclear factor kappa-B, cyclooxygenase-2, B-cell lymphoma-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in venom-treated animals. Our findings suggest that the venom of L. quinquestriatus possesses in vivo anticancer potential and may be used in the development of anticancer molecules. Keywords: Leiurus quinquestriatus, skin cancer, apoptosis, immunosuppression

  7. Investigating the Relationship between Self-efficacy and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Chemical Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Moradi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regarding to the importance of self-efficacy and its impact on health-related behaviors, chronic disease management and quality of life, and limited studies in this field, present study tried to investigated the relationship between self-efficacy and quality of life in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy in the Seyed-o-shohda hospital (Isfahan/ Iran. Methods: This descriptive- correlational study was done in Isfahan Seyed-o-shohada hospital in 2014. Statistical population included all women who had received chemical therapy because of their breast cancer (N=130. 100 participants were selected through Cochran formula and systematic sampling. Data gathering instruments included Sherer's standard questionnaire of self-efficacy and W.H.O questionnaire of quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF. The data were analyzed with use of the descriptive statistics and Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, one-way ANOVA and Pearson Correlation in SPSS 18. Results: The average and Standard Deviation of both self-efficacy (11.00 ± 55.78 and quality of life (15.28 ± 75.91 were estimated on the average level. There was a direct meaningful relation between self-efficacy and quality of life efficiency. The results also showed that there is meaningful relation between self-efficacy and quality of life’s dimensions including physical health, mental health, social relations and satisfaction with the environment. Conclusion: Based on the significant positive relation found between self-efficacy and quality of life it’s recommended to hold some training courses for these patients, have a physiologist in chemotherapy department, and prepare more palliative care to raise the breast cancer patients’ self-efficacy which finally leads to a better quality of life.

  8. Using a mixed methods research design to investigate complementary alternative medicine (CAM) use among women with breast cancer in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Patricia; Butler, Michelle; Coughlan, Barbara; Murray, Mary; Boland, Noreen; Hanan, Terry; Murphy, Hilary; Forrester, Pauline; O' Brien, Marie; O' Sullivan, Nollaig

    2013-08-01

    To investigate complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among women with breast cancer in Ireland using a mixed methods modified sequential explanatory design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with oncology professionals (n = 20) and CAM practitioners (n = 20) and this was followed by a survey of 406 women with breast cancer using the 'Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapies Survey' questionnaire (UCATS) (Lengacher et al., 2003). Follow up interviews were subsequently undertaken with a subset of this survey sample (n = 31). Over half of those surveyed (55.7%, n = 226) used some form of CAM since diagnosis. The most frequently used therapies were massage, herbal supplements (including herbs with oestrogenic properties), antioxidants, relaxation, counselling, health supplements, reflexology, reiki and support groups. Dietary interventions were used primarily to reduce symptoms and/or side effects while reduction of psychological stress was the primary reason for use of stress-reducing therapies. Most respondents reported that the CAM therapies they had used were helpful. The qualitative data elaborated on and provided clarification of the survey results. Similar to international studies, CAM is popular among women with breast cancer in Ireland. As such, the challenge for Irish oncology professionals is to identify low risk CAM therapies that are likely to benefit patients while educating patients and themselves on therapies which may be of concern. This study clearly illustrates the benefits of using a mixed methods approach to enhance our understanding of a complex clinical issue and thus we recommend that this method should be the method of choice when planning health services research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical investigation of twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy for T2 laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, K.; Kaneyasu, Y.; Fukuhara, N.; Kita-Okawa, M.; Okawa, T.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/objective: To improve the local control rate while minimizing the complication rate in the treatment of T2 laryngeal cancer, we conducted a Phase II trial of twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy (TDFR) and compared the results with those of historical control treated by conventional radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between 1966 and 1995, 126 cases with T2 laryngeal cancer were treated by radiotherapy in our department by Cobalt equipment. Median field sige was 42cm 2 . Since 1986, we started TDFR. Fifty-eight cases were treated by TDFR, among them there were 6 cases of supraglottic lesion, 49 cases of glottic, and 3 cases of subglottic. Their age ranged from 47 to 82 (mean 64), and all but 1 cases were male. They were irradiated with a fraction dose of 1.5 Gy twice a day at least 6 hours apart, 10 times a week to a total dosage of 66 - 78 Gy (mean 69Gy) in 30 to 53 days (median 43 days). Fifty-four (93 %) of the cases needed a split during radiotherapy for acute mucosal reaction. The other 68 cases were treated by conventional radiotherapy (control group). There were 8 cases of supraglottic lesion, 57 of glottic, and 3 of subglottic. Their age ranged from 33 to 86 (mean 62), and 62 cases (91 %) were male. They were irradiated with a fraction dose of 1.8 Gy (38 cases) or 2 Gy (30 cases) to a total dosage of 59 - 72Gy (mean 66 Gy) in 43 - 69 days (median 51 days). Thirteen (19 %) of the cases needed a split during radiotherapy. Acute and late reactions were graded into 4 grades and compared. Results: Five year actuarial local control rate was 79.0 % in the TDFR group and 75.6 % in the control group (n.s.). Five year actuarial survival rate was 79.7 % in the TDFR group and 77.7 % in the control group (n.s.). Five year actuarial cause-specific survival rate was 96.4 % in the TDFR group and 95.2 % in the control group (n.s.). Five year actuarial local control rate of glottic cases was 78.6 % in the TDFR group and 78.8 % in the control group (n.s.). As for

  10. Novel Platinum (Pt)-Vandetanib Hybrid Compounds: Design, Synthesis and Investigation of Anti-cancer Activity and Mechanism of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Rong

    Purpose: Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 80-85% of lung cancers. 70% of individuals with NSCLC harboring somatic mutations in exons of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that encode tyrosine kinase domain. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are promising molecular targeted therapy for NSCLC with sensitizing EGFR mutations. However, secondary mutation of EGFR after treatment of TKIs develops resistance. Vandetanib is introduced to overcome erlotinib resistance as a multi-targeted TKI. However, its anticancer effect is still compromised by EGFR T790M mutation. Therefore, new molecular anticancer strategies are necessarily needed. In this study, vandetanib is incorporated with Pt-based anticancer agents as hybrid compounds, aiming to circumvent TKI resistance. Furthermore, hybrid compounds are investigated in cisplatin resistant problem to expect to overcome resistance by introduction of vandetanib. Methods: Three novel Pt-vandetanib hybrid compounds were synthesized and its physicochemical properties were characterized. Anticancer activity and cytotoxicity were evaluated by sulforhodamine B assay and lactate dehydrogenase release. Docking simulation was performed to investigate the interaction of compounds with EGFR harboring different mutations. Inhibition efficacy of hybrids to kinases was evaluated by kinase inhibition profiling service and cell-free kinase inhibition assay. Mechanistic studies on cytotoxicity activity of the hybrid compounds were carried out. DNA damage response of hybrid compounds was further investigated in KB cells. The cytotoxicity of hybrids was tested in cisplatin resistant KB CP20 cells. Mechanistic of anticancer activity was studied to test inhibition on oncoprotein CIP2Aand DNA damage. Results: Platinum-vandetanib hybrid compounds were synthesized and test to be stable under extracellular condition. Hybrids reacted with 5'-GMP2- and glutathione, and both

  11. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tho, Lye Mun; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V 5 , V 1 , etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p 5 and V 15 . Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further investigation

  12. THE INVESTIGATION OF EFFECT OF FLURBIPROFEN AXETIL ON THE TISSUE GROWTH AND THE CONTENT OF PGE2 IN CERVICAL CANCER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Shenggang; Chen, Guiying; Sun, Xiaofeng; Li, Kezhong

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether flurbiprofen axetil can inhibit the tissue growth and the content of PGE2 in cervical cancer or not. Fifty female BALB/c nude mice were randomly divided into control group (C), tumor + saline group (T), tumor + flurbiprofen axetil 10 mg/kg (Cfl0) group, tumor + flurbiprofen axetil 25 mg/kg (Cf25) group, tumor + flurbiprofen axetil tumor 50 mg/kg (Cf50), so that each group had 10 animals. Then, the animal model of human cervical carcinoma was established, and the relative tumor volume (RTV), relative tumor proliferation rate (T/C) and tumor inhibition rate were measured. The content of PGE2 in tumor tissue was determined by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There was no tumor formation in group C, and the time of tumor growth in other groups was non-statistically different. The RVT in Cf50 group was lower than in other groups. It was evident from the curve of tumor growth that the tumor weight in T group was evidently higher than that of administration groups (p Flurbiprofen axetil can inhibit the growth of cervical cancer transplanted tumor in nude mice and this inhibitory effect was maximal in Cf50 group. Flurbiprofen axetil can inhibit the production of PGE2 in tumor tissue of cervical carcinoma in nude mice.

  13. Investigating the prediction value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T in response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minarikova, Lenka; Bogner, Wolfgang; Zaric, Olgica; Trattnig, Siegfried; Gruber, Stephan; Pinker, Katja; Valkovic, Ladislav; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Bartsch, Rupert; Helbich, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    To explore the predictive value of parameters derived from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI at different time-points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in breast cancer. Institutional review board approval and written, informed consent from 42 breast cancer patients were obtained. The patients were investigated before and at three different time-points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) using tumour diameter and volume from CE-MRI and ADC values obtained from drawn 2D and segmented 3D regions of interest. Prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic analysis. There was no significant difference between pathologic complete response and non-pCR in baseline size measures (p > 0.39). Diameter change was significantly different in pCR (p < 0.02) before the mid-therapy point. The best predictor was lesion diameter change observed before mid-therapy (AUC = 0.93). Segmented volume was not able to differentiate between pCR and non-pCR at any time-point. The ADC values from 3D-ROI were not significantly different from 2D data (p = 0.06). The best AUC (0.79) for pCR prediction using DWI was median ADC measured before mid-therapy of NACT. The results of this study should be considered in NACT monitoring planning, especially in MRI protocol designing and time point selection. (orig.)

  14. Investigating the prediction value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T in response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minarikova, Lenka; Bogner, Wolfgang; Zaric, Olgica; Trattnig, Siegfried; Gruber, Stephan [Medical University of Vienna, High-field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Pinker, Katja [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, New York, NY (United States); Valkovic, Ladislav [Medical University of Vienna, High-field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research, Oxford (United Kingdom); Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pathology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Bartsch, Rupert [Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Helbich, Thomas H. [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    To explore the predictive value of parameters derived from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI at different time-points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in breast cancer. Institutional review board approval and written, informed consent from 42 breast cancer patients were obtained. The patients were investigated before and at three different time-points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) using tumour diameter and volume from CE-MRI and ADC values obtained from drawn 2D and segmented 3D regions of interest. Prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic analysis. There was no significant difference between pathologic complete response and non-pCR in baseline size measures (p > 0.39). Diameter change was significantly different in pCR (p < 0.02) before the mid-therapy point. The best predictor was lesion diameter change observed before mid-therapy (AUC = 0.93). Segmented volume was not able to differentiate between pCR and non-pCR at any time-point. The ADC values from 3D-ROI were not significantly different from 2D data (p = 0.06). The best AUC (0.79) for pCR prediction using DWI was median ADC measured before mid-therapy of NACT. The results of this study should be considered in NACT monitoring planning, especially in MRI protocol designing and time point selection. (orig.)

  15. Tumor Microenvironment In Experimental Models Of Human Cancer: Morphological Investigational Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Minoli

    2017-05-01

    Discussion and conclusions. Due to the microenvironmental heterogeneity which influence tumor development and biological behavior, a sole quantification is unreliable for characterizing the TME. Considering that, morphological techniques proved to be a valuable approach, allowing the evaluation of the spatial distribution and mutual interaction between the different elements. Additional studies are needed for further investigate the biological significance of spatial distribution of the components of the TME.

  16. Preliminary Investigation of Myo-Inositol Phosphates Produced by ASUIA279 Phytase on MCF-7 Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mohd. Yusoff

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytate or myo-inositol hexakisphosphates (IP6 is widely distributed in plants like rice brans. The production of myo-inositol phosphate intermediates has received much attention due to the remarkable potential health benefits offered by the compounds. In this study, the cytotoxicity of the partially purified myo-inositol phosphate fractions and commercial IP1 and IP6 were investigated against MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. The study showed that the commercial standard IP1 and IP6 showed good inhibition towards the MCF-7 cell line. The MCF-7 cells growth was inhibited in minimum concentration of myo-inositol phosphates (<1000 µg/ml. However, no inhibition observed on the MCF-7 cell line by the myo-inositol phosphates fractions partially purified from rice bran at concentration <1000 ?g/ml. The inhibition of MCF-7 was only observed at concentration more than 30 mg/ml with more than 40% cells were inhibited. This indicates that the partially purified rice bran myo-inositol phosphates degraded by ASUIA279 phytase on MCF-7 breast cancer cells exhibit positive results towards the inhibition of cancer cells growth at relatively high concentration..KEYWORDS: myo-inositol phosphates, phytase, MCF-7,  cancerABSTRAK: Fitat atau myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6 dikenali umum teragih di dalam tumbuhan seperti dedak padi. Penghasilan perantaraan fosfat myo-inositol mendapat perhatian memandangkan ia berpotensi tinggi dalam kesihatan. Dalam kajian ini, kesitotoksikan sebahagian daripada fosfat myo-inositol separa tulen, IP1 komersil dan IP6 komersil dikaji terhadap produk yang berupa sel kekal (cell lines kanser payu dara MCF-7. Tumbesaran sel MCF-7 direncatkan dalam pekatan minima fosfat myo-inositol (<1000 μg/ml. Tetapi, tidak ada perencatan dilihat terhadap sel kekal MCF-7 oleh sebahagian fosfat myo-inositol separa tulen daripada dedak padi pada kepekatan <1000 mg/ml. Perencatan MCF-7 hanya dilihat pada kepekatan lebih daripada 30 mg/ml dengan lebih

  17. Gene expression profile analysis of colorectal cancer to investigate potential mechanisms using bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kou YB

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Yubin Kou,1,2* Suya Zhang,3* Xiaoping Chen,2 Sanyuan Hu1 1Department of General Surgery, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of General Surgery, 3Department of Neurology, Shuguang Hospital Baoshan Branch, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: This study aimed to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer (CRC using bioinformatics analysis. Using GSE4107 datasets downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs were screened by comparing the RNA expression from the colonic mucosa between 12 CRC patients and ten healthy controls using a paired t-test. The Gene Ontology (GO functional and pathway enrichment analyses of DEGs were performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID software followed by the construction of a protein–protein interaction (PPI network. In addition, hub gene identification and GO functional and pathway enrichment analyses of the modules were performed. A total of 612 up- and 639 downregulated genes were identified. The upregulated DEGs were mainly involved in the regulation of cell growth, migration, and the MAPK signaling pathway. The downregulated DEGs were significantly associated with oxidative phosphorylation, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. Moreover, FOS, FN1, PPP1CC, and CYP2B6 were selected as hub genes in the PPI networks. Two modules (up-A and up-B in the upregulated PPI network and three modules (d-A, d-B, and d-C in the downregulated PPI were identified with the threshold of Molecular Complex Detection (MCODE Molecular Complex Detection (MCODE score ≥4 and nodes ≥6. The genes in module up-A were significantly enriched in neuroactive ligand–receptor interactions and the calcium signaling pathway. The genes in module d-A were enriched in four pathways, including oxidative

  18. Variability of fish consumption within the 10 European countries participating in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, A.A.; Lund, E.; Amiano, P.

    2002-01-01

    was in the coastal areas of northern Europe (Denmark, Sweden and Norway) and in Germany. Consumption of fish products was greater in northern than in southern Europe, with white fish products predominating in centres in France, Italy, Spain, The Netherlands and Norway. Intake of roe and roe products was low......OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare the consumption of total fish (marine foods) and the fish sub-groups - white fish, fatty fish, very fatty fish, fish products and crustacea, in participants from the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis...... study. SUBJECTS: In total, 35 955 subjects (13 031 men and 22 924 women), aged 35-74 years, selected from the main EPIC cohort. RESULTS: A six- to sevenfold variation in total fish consumption exists in women and men, between the lowest consumption in Germany and the highest in Spain. Overall, white...

  19. Variability of fish consumption within the 10 European countries participating in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, A.A.; Lund, E.; Amiano, P.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare the consumption of total fish (marine foods) and the fish sub-groups - white fish, fatty fish, very fatty fish, fish products and crustacea, in participants from the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis...... of dietary intake using a computerised standardised 24-hour recall interview. Crude means, means and standard errors adjusted by age, season and day of the week were calculated, stratified by centre and gender. SETTING: Twenty-seven redefined centres in the 10 European countries participating in the EPIC...... study. SUBJECTS: In total, 35 955 subjects (13 031 men and 22 924 women), aged 35-74 years, selected from the main EPIC cohort. RESULTS: A six- to sevenfold variation in total fish consumption exists in women and men, between the lowest consumption in Germany and the highest in Spain. Overall, white...

  20. Former smokers with non-small-cell lung cancers: a comprehensive investigation of clinicopathologic characteristics, oncogenic drivers, and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shanbo; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Yang; Pan, Yunjian; Cheng, Chao; Zheng, Difan; Sun, Yihua; Chen, Haiquan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this present investigation was to evaluate the clinicopathologic characteristics, oncogenic drivers, and prognosis of former smokers with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and to compare them with those of the current and never smokers. This investigation was a single-institution retrospective study of 2289 NSCLC patients, who were classified as former, current, or never smokers. A collection was made of the clinicopathological characteristics, spectra of well-identified driver genes and survival rates. The survival rates were compared using log-rank test, and independent prognostic factors, identified using Cox regression analysis. Of 2289 NSCLC patients, 257 (11.2%) were former smokers; 868 (37.9%), current smokers; and 1164 (50.9%), never smokers. Compared with the current, the former were characterized by older age at diagnosis (64.3y vs. 59.9y; P vs. 39.5%; P = 0.017), fewer solid predominance in adenocarcinomas (16.2% vs. 29.5%; P = 0.005), and more EGFR mutation (33.2% vs. 20.7%; P vs. 11.9%, P = 0.041). No statistically significant survival differences were observed between the former and current. However, the light former smokers presented favorable overall survival when compared with the light current and heavy former or current (the light former vs. the heavy former, P = 0.028; the light former vs. the light current, P = 0.048; and the light former vs. the heavy current, P = 0.048). Our findings suggest that the former smokers with NSCLCs can have distinctive clinicopathologic characteristics, oncogenic drivers, and prognosis, and they, especially the light former, can benefit from smoking cessation. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Use of FDG PET/CT for investigation of febrile neutropenia: evaluation in high-risk cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, Stephen D.; Tramontana, Adrian R. [Western Health, Department of Infectious Diseases, Private Bag, Footscray, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Worth, Leon J.; Thursky, Karin A.; Slavin, Monica A. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Infectious Diseases, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Lau, Eddie; Hicks, Rodney J. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Seymour, John F. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Haematology, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2012-08-15

    Febrile neutropenia (FNP) is a frequent complication of cancer care and evaluation often fails to identify a cause. [{sup 18} F]FDG PET/CT has the potential to identify inflammatory and infectious foci, but its potential role as an investigation for persistent FNP has not previously been explored. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in patients with cancer and severe neutropenia and five or more days of persistent fever despite antibiotic therapy. Adult patients with a diagnosis of an underlying malignancy and persistent FNP (temperature {>=}38 C and neutrophil count <500 cells/{mu}l for 5 days) underwent FDG PET/CT as an adjunct to conventional evaluation and management. The study group comprised 20 patients with FNP who fulfilled the eligibility criteria and underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to conventional evaluation. The median neutrophil count on the day of the FDG PET/CT scan was 30 cells/{mu}l (range 0-730 cells/{mu}l). Conventional evaluation identified 14 distinct sites of infection, 13 (93 %) of which were also identified by FDG PET/CT, including all deep tissue infections. FDG PET/CT identified 9 additional likely infection sites, 8 of which were subsequently confirmed as ''true positives'' by further investigations. FDG PET/CT was deemed to be of 'high' clinical impact in 15 of the 20 patients (75 %). This study supports the utility of FDG PET/CT scanning in severely neutropenic patients with five or more days of fever. Further evaluation of the contribution of FDG PET/CT in the management of FNP across a range of underlying malignancies is required. (orig.)

  2. Use of FDG PET/CT for investigation of febrile neutropenia: evaluation in high-risk cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, Stephen D.; Tramontana, Adrian R.; Worth, Leon J.; Thursky, Karin A.; Slavin, Monica A.; Lau, Eddie; Hicks, Rodney J.; Seymour, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FNP) is a frequent complication of cancer care and evaluation often fails to identify a cause. [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT has the potential to identify inflammatory and infectious foci, but its potential role as an investigation for persistent FNP has not previously been explored. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in patients with cancer and severe neutropenia and five or more days of persistent fever despite antibiotic therapy. Adult patients with a diagnosis of an underlying malignancy and persistent FNP (temperature ≥38 C and neutrophil count <500 cells/μl for 5 days) underwent FDG PET/CT as an adjunct to conventional evaluation and management. The study group comprised 20 patients with FNP who fulfilled the eligibility criteria and underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to conventional evaluation. The median neutrophil count on the day of the FDG PET/CT scan was 30 cells/μl (range 0-730 cells/μl). Conventional evaluation identified 14 distinct sites of infection, 13 (93 %) of which were also identified by FDG PET/CT, including all deep tissue infections. FDG PET/CT identified 9 additional likely infection sites, 8 of which were subsequently confirmed as ''true positives'' by further investigations. FDG PET/CT was deemed to be of 'high' clinical impact in 15 of the 20 patients (75 %). This study supports the utility of FDG PET/CT scanning in severely neutropenic patients with five or more days of fever. Further evaluation of the contribution of FDG PET/CT in the management of FNP across a range of underlying malignancies is required. (orig.)

  3. Semisynthesis of SY-1 for investigation of breast cancer stem cell selectivity of C-ring-modified salinomycin analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoli; Borgström, Björn; Månsson, Linda; Persson, Lo; Oredsson, Stina; Hegardt, Cecilia; Strand, Daniel

    2014-07-18

    Salinomycin, a naturally occurring polyether ionophore was recently found to selectively reduce the proportion of CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells, a phenotype associated with breast cancer stem cells. Subsequent studies from our group showed that chemical modification of the allylic C20 hydroxyl of salinomycin, located at the C-ring, can enhance the activity of derivatives against breast cancer cells over 5-fold compared to the native structure. Access to C-ring-modified salinomycin analogues is thus of interest from both a mechanistic and a synthetic perspective. Here, we report efficient strategies for gram scale synthesis of the natural product SY-1 (20-deoxy salinomycin), and a saturated analogue, 18,19-dihydro SY-1, for a comparative in vitro investigation of the biological profiles of these compounds with that of salinomycin. Across several assays, the deoxygenated structures required higher concentrations to elicit similar cellular responses to that of salinomycin. Similarly to salinomycin, SY-1 or 18,19-dihydro SY-1 treatment was found to reduce the proportion of CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells with essentially complete selectivity up to ∼IC25. Importantly, the proportion of CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells showed a pronounced U-shaped dose response curve for salinomycin and its derivatives, but not for paclitaxel. The concentration for maximum response in this assay followed differences in IC50 for salinomycin and its analogues, which emphasizes the importance of taking concentration dependence into account when comparing effects on the CD44(+)/CD24(-) phenotype. Small differences in the global conformation within the triad of compounds investigated together with differences in activity across assays emphasize the importance of substitution at C20 for the activity of salinomycin and its derivatives.

  4. Investigating Changes in Weight and Body Composition Among Women in Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Birgith; Delmar, Charlotte; Lörincz, Tamás

    2018-01-01

    for attention on younger premenopausal women given chemotherapy. Weight need to be monitored for at least 2 years as short-term changes may be caused by increased body water, whereas long-term changes seem to be related with increased fat mass essential for risking recurrence and early death. IMPLICATIONS...... as free text, 19 articles were selected for further investigation. RESULTS: The scoping review illustrates how findings in weight and body composition changes fluctuate over time as illustrated in 4 measure points: short term, 1 year, 18 months/2 years, and long term. The studies displayed differences...

  5. Grantee Spotlight: Marvella Ford, Ph.D. - Reducing Barriers to Surgical Cancer Care among African Am

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drs. Marvella E. Ford and Nestor F. Esnaola were awarded a five-year NIH/NIMHD R01 grant to evaluate a patient navigation intervention to reduce barriers to surgical cancer care and improving surgical resection rates in African Americans with lung cancer.

  6. Investigation of rectal complication after RALS-therapy for uterine cervix cancer using multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Takaichiro

    1983-01-01

    Rectal injury is one of the major side effects after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. According to our previous reports, the cases of rectal complication were mainly related to the measured rectal dose in half of patients, and the other causes were related to the following factors; such as diabetes mellitus, hemorrhagic tendency, syphilis and so on. Concerning to rectal complication, these factors were investigated by means of the discriminant analysis, one of the multivariate analyses, in this paper. Twenty-eight factors as to radiation dose, laboratory tests and physical condition of patients were analyzed. From August 1978 through January 1980, 52 cases of previously untreated carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated using RALS, remotely controlled high dose rate intracavitary radiotherapy, at our department. The data from 49 out of 52 cases were available for the discriminant analysis. By m eans of this analysis, it was found that these factors, such as the dose of whole pelvic irradiation, Point A dose of RALS, measured rectal dose by RALS, WGC-Z and TPHA were important factors for occurence of rectal complication. According to the discriminant score, 46 out of 49 cases (94 %) could be correctly discriminated. There were two cases of false positive and one false negative. Form February 1980 through July 1980, 27 cases of previously untreated carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated at our department. The obtained discriminant function was applied to these 27 cases, and 24 out of 27 cases (89 %) were correctly predicted. There were two cases of false positive, and one of false negative. Discriminant analysis is useful for the prediction of rectal complication after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. (J.P.N.)

  7. Investigation of selective induction of breast cancer cells to death with treatment of plasma-activated medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Kano, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    The applications of plasma in medicine have much attention. We previously showed that plasma-activated medium (PAM) induced glioblastoma cells to apoptosis. However, it has not been elucidated the selectivity of PAM in detail. In this study, we investigated the selective effect of PAM on the death of human breast normal and cancer cells, MCF10A and MCF7, respectively, and observed the selective death with fluorescent microscopy. For the investigation of cell viability with PAM treatment, we prepared various PAMs according to the strengths, and treated each of cells with PAMs. Week PAM treatment only decreased the viability of MCF7 cells, while strong PAM treatment significantly affected both viabilities of MCF7 and MCF10A cells. For the fluorescent observation, we prepared the mixture of MCF7 and fluorescent-probed MCF10A cells, and seeded them. After the treatment of PAMs, the images showed that only MCF7 cells damaged in the mixture with week PAM treatment. These results suggested that a specific range existed with the selective effect in the strength of PAM. This work was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' Grant No. 24108002 and 24108008 from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  8. Investigation of six-degree-of-freedom image registration between planning and cone beam computed tomography in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiancheng; Pan Jianji; Hu Cairong; Wang Xiaoliang; Cheng Wenfang; Zhao Yunhui

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore six-degree-of-freedom (6-DF) registration methods between planning and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) during image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) in esophageal cancer. Methods: Thirty pairs of CBCT images acquired before radiation and the corresponding planning computed tomography (CT) images of esophageal cancer were selected for further investigation. Registration markers for 6-DF image registration were determined and contoured in those images. The results of registration as well as time cost were compared among different registration methods of bone match, gray value match, manual match, and bone plus manual match. Results: Contouring bone and spinal canal posterior to the target volume of esophageal carcinoma as registration marker could make 6-DF registration quick and precise. Compared with manual match, set-up errors of v rotation in bone plus manual match (-0.55 degree vs.-0.88 degree, t=2.55, P=0.020), of x-axis and v rotation in bone match (0.12 mm vs.-2.33 mm, t=5.75, P=0.000; -0.35 degree vs. -0.88 degree, t=3.00, P=0.007), and of x-axis and w rotation in gray value match (7.20 mm vs. -2.33 mm, t=3.10, P=0.006; -0.10 degree vs. -0.59 degree, t=2.81, P =0.011) were significantly different. Compared with manual match, the coincidence rate of bone plus manual match was the highest (85.55%), followed by bone match and gray value match (74.45% and 74.45%). The time cost of each registration method from longest to shortest was: 6.00 -10.00 minutes for manual match, 1.00 - 5.00 minutes for bone plus manual match, 0.75 - 1.50 minutes for gray value match, and 0.50 - 0.83 minutes for bone match. Conclusions: Registration marker is useful for image registration of CBCT and planning CT in patients with esophageal cancer. Bone plus manual match may be the best registration method considering both registration time and accuracy. (authors)

  9. Non-invasive label-free investigation and typing of head and neck cancers by multimodal nonlinear microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tobias; Vogler, Nadine; Dietzek, Benjamin; Akimov, Denis; Inhestern, Johanna; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    Early detection and typing of tumors is pressing matter in clinical research with important impacts for prognosis and successful treatment. Currently, staining is the golden standard in histopathology but requires surgical removal of tissue. In order to avoid resection of non-diseased tissue a non-invasive real-time imaging method is required which can be applied ideally intrasurgically. In this proceeding a combination of second harmonic generation (SHG), two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) imaging has been employed to investigate tissue sections of head and neck carcinomas focussing on laryngeal carcinoma. Primary laryngeal and other head and neck carcinomas consist to 99% of squamous cell carcinoma. By fusing the various imaging methods it is possible to measure the thickness of the epithelial cell layer as a marker for dysplastic or cancerous tissue degradation and to differentiate keratinizing and nonkeratininzing squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). As nonkeratinizing SCCs of the oropharynx correlate with a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as a subentity of head and neck cancer, and HPV related tumors are associated with a better clinical prognosis, the differentiation between keratinizing and non-keratinizing forms of SCCs is of high diagnostic value. TPEF is capable of displaying cell nuclei, therefore, morphologic information as cell density, cell to cytoplasm ratio, size and shape of cell nuclei can be obtained. SHG - on the other hand - selectively reveals the collagen matrix of the connective tissue, which is useful for determination of tumor-islets boundaries within epithelial tissue - a prerequisite for precise resection. Finally CARS in the CH-stretching region visualizes the lipid content of the tissue, which can be correlated with the dysplastic grade of the tissue.

  10. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake and gastric adenocarcinoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study123

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Agudo, Antonio; Luján-Barroso, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Background: Several experimental studies have suggested potential anticarcinogenic effects of flavonoids, although epidemiologic evidence for the impact of dietary flavonoids on risk of gastric cancer (GC) is limited.Objective: We investigated the association between intake of dietary flavonoids...... and lignans and incident GC.Design: The study followed 477,312 subjects (29.8% men) aged 35–70 y from 10 European countries who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Validated dietary questionnaires and lifestyle information were collected at baseline...

  11. An investigation of routes to cancer diagnosis in 10 international jurisdictions, as part of the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership: survey development and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, David; Vedsted, Peter; Anandan, Chantelle; Zalounina, Alina; Fourkala, Evangelia Ourania; Desai, Rakshit; Liston, William; Jensen, Henry; Barisic, Andriana; Gavin, Anna; Grunfeld, Eva; Lambe, Mats; Law, Rebecca-Jane; Malmberg, Martin; Neal, Richard D; Kalsi, Jatinderpal; Turner, Donna; White, Victoria; Bomb, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes the methods used in the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership Module 4 Survey (ICBPM4) which examines time intervals and routes to cancer diagnosis in 10 jurisdictions. We present the study design with defining and measuring time intervals, identifying patients with cancer, questionnaire development, data management and analyses. Design and setting Recruitment of participants to the ICBPM4 survey is based on cancer registries in each jurisdiction. Questionnaires draw on previous instruments and have been through a process of cognitive testing and piloting in three jurisdictions followed by standardised translation and adaptation. Data analysis focuses on comparing differences in time intervals and routes to diagnosis in the jurisdictions. Participants Our target is 200 patients with symptomatic breast, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer in each jurisdiction. Patients are approached directly or via their primary care physician (PCP). Patients’ PCPs and cancer treatment specialists (CTSs) are surveyed, and ‘data rules’ are applied to combine and reconcile conflicting information. Where CTS information is unavailable, audit information is sought from treatment records and databases. Main outcomes Reliability testing of the patient questionnaire showed that agreement was complete (κ=1) in four items and substantial (κ=0.8, 95% CI 0.333 to 1) in one item. The identification of eligible patients is sufficient to meet the targets for breast, lung and colorectal cancer. Initial patient and PCP survey response rates from the UK and Sweden are comparable with similar published surveys. Data collection was completed in early 2016 for all cancer types. Conclusion An international questionnaire-based survey of patients with cancer, PCPs and CTSs has been developed and launched in 10 jurisdictions. ICBPM4 will help to further understand international differences in cancer survival by comparing time intervals and routes to cancer

  12. Plasma and dietary carotenoids and vitamins A, C and e and risk of colon and rectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, Max; Leufkens, Anke M.; Siersema, Peter D.; Van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; Vrieling, Alina; Hulshof, Paul J M; Van Gils, Carla H.; Overvad, Kim; Roswall, Nina; Kyrø, Cecilie; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Fagerhazzi, Guy; Cadeau, Claire; Kühn, Tilman; Johnson, Theron; Boeing, Heiner; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Klinaki, Eleni; Androulidaki, Anna; Palli, Domenico; Grioni, Sara; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Bakker, Marije F.; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Jakszyn, Paula; Barricarte, Aurelio; Huerta, José María; Molina-Montes, Esther; Argüelles, Marcial; Johansson, Ingegerd; Ljuslinder, Ingrid; Key, Timothy J.; Bradbury, Kathryn E.; Khaw, Kay Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Ferrari, Pietro; Duarte-Salles, Talita; Jenab, Mazda; Gunter, Marc J.; Vergnaud, Anne Claire; Wark, Petra A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E are possibly associated with a reduced colorectal cancer (CRC) risk through antioxidative properties. The association of prediagnostic plasma concentrations and dietary consumption of carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E with the risk of colon and rectal cancer was

  13. Plasma and dietary carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E and risk of colon and rectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, M.; Leufkens, A.M.; Siersema, P.D.; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Vrieling, A.; Hulshof, P.J.; Gils, C.H. van; Overvad, K.; Roswall, N.; Kyro, C.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Fagerhazzi, G.; Cadeau, C.; Kuhn, T.; Johnson, T.; Boeing, H.; Aleksandrova, K.; Trichopoulou, A.; Klinaki, E.; Androulidaki, A.; Palli, D.; Grioni, S.; Sacerdote, C.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Bakker, M.F.; Skeie, G.; Weiderpass, E.; Jakszyn, P.; Barricarte, A.; Huerta, J. Maria; Molina-Montes, E.; Arguelles, M.; Johansson, I.; Ljuslinder, I.; Key, T.J.; Bradbury, K.E.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.J.; Ferrari, P.; Duarte-Salles, T.; Jenab, M.; Gunter, M.J.; Vergnaud, A.C.; Wark, P.A.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E are possibly associated with a reduced colorectal cancer (CRC) risk through antioxidative properties. The association of prediagnostic plasma concentrations and dietary consumption of carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E with the risk of colon and rectal cancer was

  14. Circulating concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 in relation to prostate cancer risk: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johansson, M.; Appleby, P.N.; Allen, N.E.; Travis, R.C.; Roddam, A.W.; Egevad, L.; Jenab, M.; Rinaldi, S.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Vollset, S.E.; Ueland, P.M.; Sanchez, M.J.; Quiros, J.R.; Gonzalez, C.A.; Larrañaga, N.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Ardanaz, E.; Sieri, S.; Palli, D.; Vineis, P.; Tumino, R.; Linseisen, J.; Kaaks, R.; Boeing, H.; Pischon, T.; Psaltopoulou, T.; Trichopoulou, A.; Trichopoulos, D.; Khaw, K.T.; Bingham, S.; Hallmans, G.; Riboli, E.; Stattin, P; Key, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Determinants of one-carbon metabolism, such as folate and vitamin B(12), have been implicated in cancer development. Previous studies have not provided conclusive evidence for the importance of circulating concentrations of folate and vitamin B(12) in prostate cancer etiology. The aim of

  15. Dietary fibre intake and risks of cancers of the colon and rectum in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Murphy

    Full Text Available Earlier analyses within the EPIC study showed that dietary fibre intake was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, but results from some large cohort studies do not support this finding. We explored whether the association remained after longer follow-up with a near threefold increase in colorectal cancer cases, and if the association varied by gender and tumour location.After a mean follow-up of 11.0 years, 4,517 incident cases of colorectal cancer were documented. Total, cereal, fruit, and vegetable fibre intakes were estimated from dietary questionnaires at baseline. Hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and centre, and adjusted for total energy intake, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, education, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptive use, and intakes of alcohol, folate, red and processed meats, and calcium. After multivariable adjustments, total dietary fibre was inversely associated with colorectal cancer (HR per 10 g/day increase in fibre 0.87, 95% CI: 0.79-0.96. Similar linear associations were observed for colon and rectal cancers. The association between total dietary fibre and risk of colorectal cancer risk did not differ by age, sex, or anthropometric, lifestyle, and dietary variables. Fibre from cereals and fibre from fruit and vegetables were similarly associated with colon cancer; but for rectal cancer, the inverse association was only evident for fibre from cereals.Our results strengthen the evidence for the role of high dietary fibre intake in colorectal cancer prevention.

  16. Television watching and incident diabetes: Findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Earl S; Schulze, Matthias B; Kröger, Janine; Pischon, Tobias; Bergmann, Manuela M; Boeing, Heiner

    2010-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether the amount of time spent watching television is a potential risk factor for incident diabetes and to what extent this association may be explained by obesity. We used data for 23,855 men and women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam Study. During an average of 7.8 years of follow-up, 927 participants developed diabetes. Incident diabetes was identified on the basis of self-report and was verified by contacting the patient's attending physician. The amount of time spent watching television was self-reported. The mean time that the participants who developed diabetes watched television was 2.4 h/week, compared with 2.0 h/week for those who did not develop diabetes (Pday of television compared with those who watched day was 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17-2.27]. After additional adjustment for waist circumference and body mass index, the hazard ratio was reduced to 1.14 (95% CI: 0.81-1.61). In the present study, the amount of time spent watching television was an independent predictor of incident diabetes only in models that adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle behaviors, and systolic blood pressure. The attenuation of the association after adjusting for anthropometric measures may represent an explanatory mechanism for our findings. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Intake of total, animal and plant proteins, and their food sources in 10 countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halkjaer, J.; Olsen, A.; Bjerregaard, L. J.; Deharveng, G.; Tjonneland, A.; Welch, A. A.; Crowe, F. L.; Wirfalt, E.; Hellstrom, V.; Niravong, M.; Touvier, M.; Linseisen, J.; Steffen, A.; Ocke, M. C.; Peeters, P. H. M.; Chirlaque, M. D.; Larranaga, N.; Ferrari, P.; Contiero, P.; Frasca, G.; Engeset, D.; Lund, E.; Misirli, G.; Kosti, M.; Riboli, E.; Slimani, N.; Bingham, S.

    Objective: To describe dietary protein intakes and their food sources among 27 redefined centres in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods: Between 1995 and 2000, 36 034 persons, aged between 35 and 74 years, were administered a

  18. Does a better adherence to dietary guidelines reduce mortality risk and environmental impact in the Dutch sub-cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesbroek, Sander; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Kamp, van de Mirjam E.; Schouw, Van Der Yvonne T.; Geelen, Anouk; Looman, Moniek; Temme, Elisabeth H.M.

    2017-01-01

    Guidelines for a healthy diet aim to decrease the risk of chronic diseases. It is unclear as to what extent a healthy diet is also an environmentally friendly diet. In the Dutch sub-cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, the diet was assessed with a 178-item FFQ

  19. Does a better adherence to dietary guidelines reduce mortality risk and environmental impact in the Dutch sub-cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesbroek, Sander; Verschuren, W M Monique; Boer, Jolanda M A; van de Kamp, Mirjam E; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Geelen, Anouk; Looman, Moniek; Temme, Elisabeth H M

    Guidelines for a healthy diet aim to decrease the risk of chronic diseases. It is unclear as to what extent a healthy diet is also an environmentally friendly diet. In the Dutch sub-cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, the diet was assessed with a 178-item FFQ

  20. An investigation of the apparent breast cancer epidemic in France: screening and incidence trends in birth cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Jørn

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Official descriptive data from France showed a strong increase in breast-cancer incidence between 1980 to 2005 without a corresponding change in breast-cancer mortality. This study quantifies the part of incidence increase due to secular changes in risk factor exposure and in overdiagnosis due to organised or opportunistic screening. Overdiagnosis was defined as non progressive tumours diagnosed as cancer at histology or progressive cancer that would remain asymptomatic until time of death for another cause. Methods Comparison between age-matched cohorts from 1980 to 2005. All women residing in France and born 1911-1915, 1926-1930 and 1941-1945 are included. Sources are official data sets and published French reports on screening by mammography, age and time specific breast-cancer incidence and mortality, hormone replacement therapy, alcohol and obesity. Outcome measures include breast-cancer incidence differences adjusted for changes in risk factor distributions between pairs of age-matched cohorts who had experienced different levels of screening intensity. Results There was an 8-fold increase in the number of mammography machines operating in France between 1980 and 2000. Opportunistic and organised screening increased over time. In comparison to age-matched cohorts born 15 years earlier, recent cohorts had adjusted incidence proportion over 11 years that were 76% higher [95% confidence limits (CL 67%, 85%] for women aged 50 to 64 years and 23% higher [95% CL 15%, 31%] for women aged 65 to 79 years. Given that mortality did not change correspondingly, this increase in adjusted 11 year incidence proportion was considered as an estimate of overdiagnosis. Conclusions Breast cancer may be overdiagnosed because screening increases diagnosis of slowly progressing non-life threatening cancer and increases misdiagnosis among women without progressive cancer. We suggest that these effects could largely explain the reported

  1. An investigation of the apparent breast cancer epidemic in France: screening and incidence trends in birth cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, Bernard; Zahl, Per-Henrik; Kaplan, Robert M; Olsen, Jørn; Greenland, Sander

    2011-09-21

    Official descriptive data from France showed a strong increase in breast-cancer incidence between 1980 to 2005 without a corresponding change in breast-cancer mortality. This study quantifies the part of incidence increase due to secular changes in risk factor exposure and in overdiagnosis due to organised or opportunistic screening. Overdiagnosis was defined as non progressive tumours diagnosed as cancer at histology or progressive cancer that would remain asymptomatic until time of death for another cause. Comparison between age-matched cohorts from 1980 to 2005. All women residing in France and born 1911-1915, 1926-1930 and 1941-1945 are included. Sources are official data sets and published French reports on screening by mammography, age and time specific breast-cancer incidence and mortality, hormone replacement therapy, alcohol and obesity. Outcome measures include breast-cancer incidence differences adjusted for changes in risk factor distributions between pairs of age-matched cohorts who had experienced different levels of screening intensity. There was an 8-fold increase in the number of mammography machines operating in France between 1980 and 2000. Opportunistic and organised screening increased over time. In comparison to age-matched cohorts born 15 years earlier, recent cohorts had adjusted incidence proportion over 11 years that were 76% higher [95% confidence limits (CL) 67%, 85%] for women aged 50 to 64 years and 23% higher [95% CL 15%, 31%] for women aged 65 to 79 years. Given that mortality did not change correspondingly, this increase in adjusted 11 year incidence proportion was considered as an estimate of overdiagnosis. Breast cancer may be overdiagnosed because screening increases diagnosis of slowly progressing non-life threatening cancer and increases misdiagnosis among women without progressive cancer. We suggest that these effects could largely explain the reported "epidemic" of breast cancer in France. Better predictive classification of

  2. Diet and risk of kidney stones in the Oxford cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Benjamin W; Appleby, Paul N; Reynard, John M; Noble, Jeremy G; Key, Timothy J; Allen, Naomi E

    2014-05-01

    The lifetime prevalence of kidney stones is around 10 % and incidence rates are increasing. Diet may be an important determinant of kidney stone development. Our objective was to investigate the association between diet and kidney stone risk in a population with a wide range of diets. This association was examined among 51,336 participants in the Oxford arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition using data from Hospital Episode Statistics in England and Scottish Morbidity Records. In the cohort, 303 participants attended hospital with a new kidney stone episode. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and their 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI). Compared to those with high intake of meat (>100 g/day), the HR estimates for moderate meat-eaters (50-99 g/day), low meat-eaters (<50 g/day), fish-eaters and vegetarians were 0.80 (95 % CI 0.57-1.11), 0.52 (95 % CI 0.35-0.8), 0.73 (95 % CI 0.48-1.11) and 0.69 (95 % CI 0.48-0.98), respectively. High intakes of fresh fruit, fibre from wholegrain cereals and magnesium were also associated with a lower risk of kidney stone formation. A high intake of zinc was associated with a higher risk. In conclusion, vegetarians have a lower risk of developing kidney stones compared with those who eat a high meat diet. This information may be important to advise the public about prevention of kidney stone formation.

  3. Inflammatory potential of the diet and risk of gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agudo, Antonio; Cayssials, Valerie; Bonet, Catalina; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Affret, Aurélie; Fagherazzi, Guy; Katzke, Verena; Schübel, Ruth; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Karakatsani, Anna; La Vecchia, Carlo; Palli, Domenico; Grioni, Sara; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Peeters, Petra H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Nøst, Theresa H; Lasheras, Cristina; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Amiano, Pilar; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Ohlsson, Bodil; Dias, Joana A; Nilsson, Lena M; Myte, Robin; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Gunter, Marc; Huybrechts, Inge; Cross, Amanda J; Tsilidis, Kostas; Riboli, Elio; Jakszyn, Paula

    2018-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of the 2 major types of gastric cancer. Several foods, nutrients, and nonnutrient food components seem to be involved in the regulation of chronic inflammation.

  4. Breast Cancer Risk in Relation to Serum IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and their Genetic Determinants: A Study Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaaks, Rudolf

    2002-01-01

    Purpose and scope: we are conducting a large case-control study, nested within a prospective cohort, to estimate relative risks of breast cancer by levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3, and to examine associations of IGF...

  5. A U-shaped relationship between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuang, Shu-Chun; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Ueland, Per Magne; Vollset, Stein Emil; Midttun, Oivind; Olsen, Anja; Tjonneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Morois, Sophie; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Teucher, Birgit; Kaaks, Rudolf; Weikert, Cornelia; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Naska, Androniki; Jenab, Mazda; Slimani, Nadia; Romieu, Isabelle; Michaud, Dominique S.; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Panico, Salvatore; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Tumino, Rosario; Skeie, Guri; Duell, Eric J.; Rodriguez, Laudina; Molina-Montes, Esther; Maria Huerta, Jose; Larranaga, Nerea; Barricarte Gurrea, Aurelio; Johansen, Dorthe; Manjer, Jonas; Ye, Weimin; Sund, Malin; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Jeurnink, Suzanne; Wareham, Nicholas; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Crowe, Francesca; Riboli, Elio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Vineis, Paolo

    Folate intake has shown an inverse association with pancreatic cancer; nevertheless, results from plasma measurements were inconsistent. The aim of this study is to examine the association between plasma total homocysteine, methionine, folate, cobalamin, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, riboflavin, flavin

  6. Dietary intake of total polyphenol and polyphenol classes and the risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Cayssials, Valerie; Jenab, Mazda

    2018-01-01

    Polyphenols may play a chemopreventive role in colorectal cancer (CRC); however, epidemiological evidence supporting a role for intake of individual polyphenol classes, other than flavonoids is insufficient. We evaluated the association between dietary intakes of total and individual classes and ...

  7. Use of general practice, diagnostic investigations and hospital services before and after cancer diagnosis - a population-based nationwide registry study of 127,000 incident adult cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Karina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of patterns in cancer patients’ health care utilisation around the time of diagnosis may guide health care resource allocation and provide important insights into this groups’ demand for health care services. The health care need of patients with comorbid conditions far exceeds the oncology capacity and it is therefore important to elucidate the role of both primary and secondary care. The aim of this paper is to describe the use of health care services amongst incident cancer patients in Denmark one year before and one year after cancer diagnosis. Methods The present study is a national population-based case–control (1:10 registry study. All incident cancer patients (n = 127,210 diagnosed between 2001 and 2006 aged 40 years or older were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry. Data from national health registries were provided for all cancer patients and for 1,272,100 controls. Monthly consultation frequencies, monthly proportions of persons receiving health services and three-month incidence rate ratios for one year before and one year after the cancer diagnosis were calculated. Data were analysed separately for women and men. Results Three months before their diagnosis, cancer patients had twice as many general practitioner (GP consultations, ten to eleven times more diagnostic investigations and five times more hospital contacts than the reference population. The demand for GP services peaked one month before diagnosis, the demand for diagnostic investigations one month after diagnosis and the number of hospital contacts three months after diagnosis. The proportion of cancer patients receiving each of these three types of health services remained more than 10% above that of the reference population from two months before diagnosis until the end of the study period. Conclusions Cancer patients’ health service utilisation rose dramatically three months before their diagnosis. This increase applied to

  8. Simulating an Investigative Study of Clinical Cancer Samples: Use of Tissue Slides and PCR-based Promoter-Hypermethylation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Yuan Yuan; Chin, Cheen Fei; Yeong, Foong May

    2015-01-01

    Topics on the molecular basis underlying cancer are quite popular among students. Also, excellent textbooks abound that provide interesting materials for discussion during lectures and tutorials about major events leading to cancer formation and progression. However, much less is available for students to conduct experiments for the analysis of…

  9. Investigation of HOXA9 promoter methylation as a biomarker to distinguish oral cancer patients at low risk of neck metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Kenichiro; Veeramachaneni, Ratna; Huey, Bing; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Schmidt, Brian L; Albertson, Donna G

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis to the cervical (neck) lymph nodes is one of the most significant clinical factors responsible for death from oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Therefore, the lymph nodes are frequently removed when the tumor is excised (neck dissection), even though the majority of patients will not benefit from the extra surgery. Two subtypes of oral SCC distinguished by the presence of tumor genomic aberrations +3q, -8p, +8q and/or +20 differ in risk for metastasis – high for the 3q8pq20 subtype, harboring one or more of the aberrations and low for the non-3q8pq20 subtype, lacking these alterations. A prior analysis of the literature suggested genes differentially methylated in the two subtypes. Therefore, the goal of this study was to further investigate the methylation status of candidate biomarkers of the non-3q8pq20 subtype, and evaluate their utility for identifying patients at low risk for metastasis. Methylation status of genes in a cohort of 52 oral SCC patients with at least five year follow up was determined by pyrosequencing. Gene expression levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Growth following re-expression of HOXA9 in cultured oral SCC cells was assessed by proliferation and colony formation assays. A pilot study evaluating methylation levels of HOXA9, MT1A and HOXA11 promoters in DNA from 12 tumors (six each of the 3q8pq20 and non-3q8pq20 subtypes) revealed that only HOXA9 was differentially methylated. Significant differences in methylation levels of HOXA9 were observed amongst the 52 oral SCCs with respect to genomic subtype and nodal status (p = 0.014, and p = 0.024, respectively, Wilcoxon rank sum test). High levels of HOXA9 methylation and low levels of expression in oral SCC cell lines were observed compared to HaCaT, a non-tumorigenic keratinocyte cell line. Re-expression of HOXA9 in the SCC4 oral cancer cell line resulted in diminished proliferation and colony formation. HOXA9 methylation is frequent in oral cancers and levels are

  10. An investigation of the dose distribution effect related with collimator angle in volumetric arc therapy of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Tas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV and organ at risks (OARs in eleven prostate cancer patients planned with single and double arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT when varying collimator angle. Single and double arc VMAT treatment plans were created using Monaco5.0® with collimator angle set to 0°. All plans were normalized 7600 cGy dose to the 95% of clinical target volume (CTV volume. The single arc VMAT plans were reoptimized with different collimator angles (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90°, and for double arc VMAT plans (0–0°, 15°–345, 30–330°, 45–315°, 60–300°, 75–285°, 90–270° using the same optimization parameters. For the comparison the parameters of heterogeneity index (HI, dose-volume histogram and minimum dose to the 95% of PTV volume (D95 PTV calculated and analyzed. The best plans were verified using 2 dimensional ion chamber array IBA Matrixx® and three-dimensional IBA Compass® program. The comparison between calculation and measurement were made by the γ-index (3%/3 mm analysis. A higher D95 (PTV were found for single arc VMAT with 15° collimator angle. For double arc, VMAT with 60–300° and 75–285° collimator angles. However, lower rectum doses obtained for 75–285° collimator angles. There was no significant dose difference, based on other OARs which are bladder and femur head. When we compared single and double arc VMAT's D95 (PTV, we determined 2.44% high coverage and lower HI with double arc VMAT. All plans passed the γ-index (3%/3 mm analysis with more than 97% of the points and we had an average γ-index for CTV 0.36, for PTV 0.32 with double arc VMAT. These results were significant by Wilcoxon signed rank test statistically. The results show that dose coverage of target and OAR's doses also depend significantly on the collimator angles due to the geometry of target and OARs. Based on the results we have decided to plan prostate

  11. Grantee Spotlight: Manuel L. Penichet, M.D., Ph.D. - Reprogramming the Immune System to Kill Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Manuel L. Penichet, former CURE K01 trainee and NCI R01 grantee, aims to genetically engineer antibodies that can be used to directly target and eliminate cancer cells and also stimulate the body’s immune system to fight and destroy cancer.

  12. Identification of a dietary pattern characterized by high-fat food choices associated with increased risk of breast cancer: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Mandy; Hoffmann, Kurt; Weikert, Cornelia; Nöthlings, Ute; Schulze, Matthias B; Boeing, Heiner

    2008-11-01

    Epidemiological studies conducted thus far have mainly used a single-nutrient approach which may not be sufficient in detecting diet-cancer relationships. The aim of the study was to examine the association of a food pattern based on explained variations in fatty acid intake by means of reduced rank regression with breast cancer risk. Study participants were female subjects (n 15,351) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study free of cancer at baseline and with complete dietary and outcome information followed for an average of 6.0 years. Among those, 137 incident cases of invasive breast cancer were identified. We identified a food pattern characterized by low consumption of bread, and fruit juices, and high consumption of processed meat, fish, butter and other animal fats, and margarine explaining >42 % of total variation in fatty acid intake (SFA, MUFA, n-3 PUFA, n-6 PUFA). Intake of all four fatty acid fractions was positively associated with the pattern score. Adherence to this food pattern adjusted for covariates was associated with a two-fold risk (hazard ratio 2.00; 95 % CI 1.30, 3.09) of breast cancer comparing extreme tertiles of the pattern score. There was no evidence of effect modification by menopausal status, overweight status and use of hormone replacement therapy, respectively. In conclusion, a food pattern characterized by high-fat food choices was significantly associated with increased risk of breast cancer. Given that the food pattern was high in all fatty acid fractions, we found evidence for total dietary fat rather than for specific fatty acids to be associated with breast cancer risk.

  13. Preliminary analysis of data (1987-1990) from investigation of cancer mortality in high background radiation area of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Zufan; Sun Quanfu; Zhang Shouzhi

    1997-01-01

    Objective: The cancer mortality study conducted in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang, China, was started in 1972. The major objective of the study was to estimate cancer risk associated with the low level radiation exposure in HBRA. Since 1991, the cancer mortality data were collected from a fixed cohort instead of a dynamic one as in the previous stage. The purpose of the study in the current stage was to accumulate further person-years (Pyr) of observation for improving the statistical power of test in the estimates of cancer risk associated with the natural radiation exposure and to see the reproducibility of the previous results. Methods: The collection of cancer mortality data consisted of two phases, the survey of demography and the ascertainment of death causes. The estimates of relative risk (RR) were calculated by AMFIT in Epicure (Hirosoft International Corp., 1988-1992). Results: During the period of 1987-1990 there were 231 cancer deaths among 421640 Pyr at risk in the cohort of 106517 subjects, which were classified into four groups based on the hamlet-specific average annual gamma ray absorbed doses: three groups (high , medial and low doses) from HBRA and control group from CA. The RRs adjusted for sex and age for each dose group in HBRA compared with the control group for overall cancers and for all cancers except leukemia were less than 1 except for the low dose group, and there seemed to be a trend of RR decrease with the increase of exposure dose from natural radiation, though there was no statistically significant difference. As for the site-specific cancer studied, the cancers of lungs, liver, stomach, nasopharynx and leukemia, the RRs were also less than 1 except for nasopharynx cancer and for leukemia in the high dose group. The analysis of combined data ( 1979-1990) showed similar results. Conclusion: Although the sample size was not large enough to make definite conclusion statistically, the observation of current

  14. Investigation of the international comparability of population-based routine hospital data set derived comorbidity scores for patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Morris, Eva J A; Tataru, Daniela; Coupland, Victoria H; Smith, Andrew; Milne, Roger L; Te Marvelde, Luc; Baker, Deborah; Young, Jane; Turner, Donna; Nishri, Diane; Earle, Craig; Shack, Lorraine; Gavin, Anna; Fitzpatrick, Deirdre; Donnelly, Conan; Lin, Yulan; Møller, Bjørn; Brewster, David H; Deas, Andrew; Huws, Dyfed W; White, Ceri; Warlow, Janet; Rashbass, Jem; Peake, Michael D

    2018-04-01

    The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP) identified significant international differences in lung cancer survival. Differing levels of comorbid disease across ICBP countries has been suggested as a potential explanation of this variation but, to date, no studies have quantified its impact. This study investigated whether comparable, robust comorbidity scores can be derived from the different routine population-based cancer data sets available in the ICBP jurisdictions and, if so, use them to quantify international variation in comorbidity and determine its influence on outcome. Linked population-based lung cancer registry and hospital discharge data sets were acquired from nine ICBP jurisdictions in Australia, Canada, Norway and the UK providing a study population of 233 981 individuals. For each person in this cohort Charlson, Elixhauser and inpatient bed day Comorbidity Scores were derived relating to the 4-36 months prior to their lung cancer diagnosis. The scores were then compared to assess their validity and feasibility of use in international survival comparisons. It was feasible to generate the three comorbidity scores for each jurisdiction, which were found to have good content, face and concurrent validity. Predictive validity was limited and there was evidence that the reliability was questionable. The results presented here indicate that interjurisdictional comparability of recorded comorbidity was limited due to probable differences in coding and hospital admission practices in each area. Before the contribution of comorbidity on international differences in cancer survival can be investigated an internationally harmonised comorbidity index is required. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Isolation of Melittin from Iranian Honey Bee Venom and Investigation of Its Effect on Proliferation of Cervical Cancer- HeLa Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Pooshang Bagheri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cervical cancer is the second prevalent cancer in developing countries and the sixth prevalent cancer in USA. Since conventional treatment methods are associated with detrimental side effects, searching for new drugs using natural ingredients is very important. Previous studies have shown that melittin (main component of honey bee venom has anticancer properties along with the effect on cell membrane and activation of apoptosis. In this study, inhibitory effects of melittin on the viability and proliferation of cervical cancer cell line (HeLa was investigated. Methods: Melittin was purified from honeybee venom using reversed-phase HPLC method. Then, biological activity of melittin was examined by hemolytic activity analysis on the red blood cells. In order to investigate whether melittin inhibits proliferation of HeLa cell, MTT assay was performed. HeLa cells were plated in a 96-well plate and treated with serially diluted concentrations of melittin for 12 and 24 hours. The viability of the cells was measured via MTT assay at 540nm. Results: Melittin showed a strong hemolytic activity (HD50=0.5 µg/ml which can be reduced by FBS(HD50=2 µg/ml. Results of MTT assay indicated that melittin shows cytotoxic effect on cervical cancer cells with IC50 = 1.2 ug/ml at 12h incubation period. Conclusion: In this study, biological activity of melittin and inhibitory effect of FBS on hemolysis were determined via hemolytic activity analysis. MTT assay indicated that melittin induced cytotoxic effects in a dose dependent manner on cervical cancer cells and it also revealed dependence on incubation time as well.

  16. Preliminary Investigation of the Role of Cellular Immunity in Estrous Cycle Modulation of Post-Resection Breast Cancer Spread

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hrushesky, William

    2002-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the short term objectives of doing this proposal are to better understand which sex steroids and which cellular immune functions control post resection metastatic cancer spread...

  17. An investigation into why two-view mammography is better than one-view in breast cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackshaw, A.K.; Wald, N.J.; Michell, M.J.; Field, S.; Wilson, A.R.M.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To determine why two-view mammography in screening for breast cancer is more effective than using a single medio-lateral oblique view. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the United Kingdom Coordinating Committee on Cancer Research randomized trial of one- vs two-view mammography in breast cancer screening the oblique view was assessed by one radiologist and two views (oblique and cranio-caudal) assessed by another. For the present study the mammographic films were retrieved from the screening centres and assessed by three consultant radiologists. Mammographic films were available from 110 women; 87 had their breast cancer detected by both one and two views and in 23 it was missed by one view but detected using two views. Outcome measures were breast size, location and size of the cancer, mammographic features, presence of microcalcification and overall radiological assessment. RESULTS: Although 23 cancers were missed in the original trial when one view was used, only two were not visible on the oblique view. Cancers missed using a single oblique view (and only detected if the cranio-caudal view was available with the oblique) tended to be smaller by about 4 mm (P = 0.05), centrally located in the breast (P = 0.16), not spiculated or round, (P ≤ 0.001) and lacked microcalcification (P = 0.15). Breast size and breast radiographic density were not significantly associated with breast cancer detection. CONCLUSIONS: The results provide the basis for the observation that two-view mammographic screening is more effective than one-view mammographic screening. Hackshaw, A. (2000). Clinical Radiology 55, 454-458

  18. Preclinical investigations towards the first spacer gel application in prostate cancer treatment during particle therapy at HIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruciński, Antoni; Parodi, Katia; Jäkel, Oliver; Haberer, Thomas; Bauer, Julia; Campbell, Patrick; Brons, Stephan; Unholtz, Daniel; Habl, Gregor; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Bert, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The application of spacer gel represents a promising approach to reliably spare the rectal frontal wall during particle therapy (IJROBP 76:1251-1258, 2010). In order to qualify the spacer gel for the clinical use in particle therapy, a variety of measurements were performed in order to ensure the biological compatibility of the gel, its physical stability during and after the irradiation, and a proper definition of the gel in terms of the Hounsfield Unit (HU) values for the treatment planning system. The potential for the use of the spacer gel for particle therapy monitoring with off-line Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was also investigated. The spacer gel implanted to the prostate patient in direct neighbourhood to the clinical target volume does not interfere with the particle therapy treatment planning procedure applied at Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Centre (HIT). The performed measurements show that Bragg-peak position of the particles can be properly predicted on the basis of computed tomography imaging with the treatment planning system used at HIT (measured water equivalent path length of 1.011 ±0.011 (2σ), measured Hounsfield Unit of 28.9 ±6.1 (2σ)). The spacer gel samples remain physically unchanged after irradiation with a dose exceeding the therapeutic dose level. The independently measured Bragg-Peak position does not change within the time interval of 10 weeks. As a result of the presented experiments, the first clinical application of spacer gel implant during prostate cancer treatment with carbon ions and protons was possible at HIT in 2012. The reported pre-clinical investigations demonstrate that use of spacer gel is safe in particle therapy in presence of therapy target motion and patient positioning induced particle range variations. The spacer gel injected between prostate and rectum enlarge the distance between both organs, which is expected to clinically significantly decrease the undesirable exposure of the most critical organ at risk

  19. Dietary fibre in food and protection against colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bingham, SA; Day, NE; Luben, R; Ferrari, P; Slimani, N; Norat, T; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Kesse, E; Boeing, H; Tjonneland, A; Overvad, K; Martinez, C; Dorronsoro, M; Gonzalez, CA; Key, TJ; Trichopoulou, A; Naska, A; Vineis, P; Tumino, R; Krogh, [No Value; Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB; Peeters, PHM; Berglund, G; Hallmans, G; Lund, E; Skeie, G; Kaaks, R; Riboli, E

    2003-01-01

    Background Dietary fibre is thought to protect against colorectal cancer but this view has been challenged by recent prospective and intervention studies that showed no protective effect. Methods We prospectively examined the association between dietary fibre intake and incidence of colorectal

  20. Pre-diagnostic meat and fibre intakes in relation to colorectal cancer survival in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ward, Heather A.; Norat, Teresa; Overvad, Kim; Dahm, Christina C.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Jenab, Mazda; Fedirko, Veronika; Duijnhoven, Van Fränzel J.B.; Skeie, Guri; Romaguera-Bosch, Dora; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck; Affret, Aurélie; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Aleksandrova, Krassimira; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Naccarati, Alessio; Mattiello, Amalia; Peeters, Petra H.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Åsli, Lene Angell; Jakszyn, Paula; Ramón Quirós, J.; Sánchez, María José; Dorronsoro, Miren; Huerta, José María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Jirström, Karin; Ericson, Ulrika; Johansson, Ingegerd; Gylling, Björn; Bradbury, Kathryn E.; Khaw, Kay Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Stepien, Magdalena; Freisling, Heinz; Murphy, Neil; Cross, Amanda J.; Riboli, Elio

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in colorectal cancer (CRC) detection and treatment have led to greater numbers of CRC survivors, for whom there is limited evidence on which to provide dietary guidelines to improve survival outcomes. Higher intake of red and processed meat and lower intake of fibre are associated with

  1. Metabolic Mediators of the Association Between Adult Weight Gain and Colorectal Cancer: Data From the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Cohort.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Fedirko, Veronika; Jenab, Mazda; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Freisling, Heinz; Romieu, Isabelle; Pischon, Tobias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Gunter, Marc J; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Rostgaard-Hansen, Agnetha Linn; Tjønneland, Anne; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Lagiou, Pagona; Agnoli, Claudia; Mattiello, Amalia; Bradbury, Kathryn; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Riboli, Elio; Boeing, Heiner

    2017-01-01

    Evidence indicates that gaining weight in adult life is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal cancer; however, biological mechanisms that may explain this association remain unclear. We evaluated the mediation effect of 20 different biomarkers on the relationship between adult weight gain

  2. Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase gene polymorphisms, alcohol intake and the risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, P.; McKay, J. D.; Jenab, M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Heavy alcohol drinking is a risk factor of colorectal cancer (CRC), but little is known on the effect of polymorphisms in the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) on the alcohol-related risk of CRC in Caucasian populati...

  3. Breast Cancer Risk and 6q22.33: Combined Results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; van 't Veer, Laura J.; Braaf, Linde M.; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I.; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gille, Hans J. P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Justenhoven, Christina; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate; Harth, Volker; Rabstein, Sylvia; Bowtell, D.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; deFazio, A.; Gertig, D.; Green, A.; Webb, P.; Parsons, P.; Hayward, N.; Whiteman, D.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Webb, P. M.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Arver, Brita; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Verhoef, Senno; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Tollenaar, Rob A.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A.; Gille, Johan J. P.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna B.; van Roozendaal, Cees E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Mourits, Marian J.; Vasen, Hans F.; Gregory, Helen; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Boyes, Laura; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, M. John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Izatt, Louise; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Side, Lucy; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durrell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Robinson, Anne; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Traficante, N.; Moore, S.; Hung, J.; Fereday, S.; Harrap, K.; Sadkowsky, T.; Pandeya, N.; Malt, M.; Mellon, A.; Robertson, R.; Vanden Bergh, T.; Jones, M.; Mackenzie, P.; Maidens, J.; Nattress, K.; Chiew, Y. E.; Stenlake, A.; Sullivan, H.; Alexander, B.; Ashover, P.; Brown, S.; Corrish, T.; Green, L.; Jackman, L.; Ferguson, K.; Martin, K.; Martyn, A.; Ranieri, B.; White, J.; Jayde, V.; Bowes, L.; Mamers, P.; Galletta, L.; Giles, D.; Hendley, J.; Alsop, K.; Schmidt, T.; Shirley, H.; Ball, C.; Young, C.; Viduka, S.; Tran, Hoa; Bilic, Sanela; Glavinas, Lydia; Brooks, Julia; Stuart-Harris, R.; Kirsten, F.; Rutovitz, J.; Clingan, P.; Glasgow, A.; Proietto, A.; Braye, S.; Otton, G.; Shannon, J.; Bonaventura, T.; Stewart, J.; Begbie, S.; Friedlander, M.; Bell, D.; Baron-Hay, S.; Ferrier, A.; Gard, G.; Nevell, D.; Pavlakis, N.; Valmadre, S.; Young, B.; Camaris, C.; Crouch, R.; Edwards, L.; Hacker, N.; Marsden, D.; Robertson, G.; Beale, P.; Beith, J.; Carter, J.; Dalrymple, C.; Houghton, R.; Russell, P.; Anderson, L.; Links, M.; Grygiel, J.; Hill, J.; Brand, A.; Byth, K.; Jaworski, R.; Harnett, P.; Sharma, R.; Wain, G.; Ward, B.; Papadimos, D.; Crandon, A.; Cummings, M.; Horwood, K.; Obermair, A.; Perrin, L.; Wyld, D.; Nicklin, J.; Davy, M.; Oehler, M. K.; Hall, C.; Dodd, T.; Healy, T.; Pittman, K.; Henderson, D.; Miller, J.; Pierdes, J.; Achan, A.; Blomfield, P.; Challis, D.; McIntosh, R.; Parker, A.; Brown, B.; Rome, R.; Allen, D.; Grant, P.; Hyde, S.; Laurie, R.; Robbie, M.; Healy, D.; Jobling, T.; Manolitsas, T.; McNealage, J.; Rogers, P.; Susil, B.; Sumithran, E.; Simpson, I.; Phillips, K.; Rischin, D.; Fox, S.; Johnson, D.; Waring, P.; Lade, S.; Loughrey, M.; O'Callaghan, N.; Murray, W.; Mileshkin, L.; Allan, P.; Billson, V.; Pyman, J.; Neesham, D.; Quinn, M.; Hamilton, A.; Underhill, C.; Bell, R.; Ng, L. F.; Blum, R.; Ganju, V.; Hammond, I.; Leung, Y.; McCartney, A.; Stewart, C.; Buck, M.; Haviv, I.; Purdie, D.; Zeps, N.; Gurry, P.; Hankinson, S.; Meltzer, P.; Murray, B.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication

  4. Endogenous androgens and risk of epithelial invasive ovarian cancer by tumor characteristics in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ose, Jennifer; Fortner, Renée T.; Rinaldi, Sabina; Schock, Helena; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Dossus, Laure; Fournier, Agnes; Baglietto, Laura; Romieu, Isabelle; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Palli, Domenico; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; Ramon Quiros, Jose; Obõn-Santacana, Mireia; Larrañaga, Nerea; Chirlaque, María Dolores; Sánchez, María José; Barricarte, Aurelio; Peeters, Petra H.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. B.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Brändstedt, Jenny; Lundin, Eva; Idahl, Annika; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger T.; Lund, Eiliv; Kaw, Kay Tee; Travis, Ruth C.; Merritt, Melissa A.; Gunther, Marc J.; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    The role of endogenous androgens and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in ovarian carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Epithelial invasive ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous disease and there are no prospective data on endogenous androgens and EOC risk by tumor characteristics (histology,

  5. Three-dimensional ultrashort echo time MRI and Short T2 images generated from subtraction for determination of tumor burden in lung cancer: Preclinical investigation in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Jagoda, Philippe; Fries, Peter; Gräber, Stefan; Bals, Robert; Buecker, Arno; Jungnickel, Christopher; Beisswenger, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the potential of 3D ultrashort echo time MRI and short T 2 images generated by subtraction for determination of total tumor burden in lung cancer. As an animal model of spontaneously developing non-small cell lung cancer, the K-rasLA1 transgenic mouse was used. Three-dimensional MR imaging was performed with radial k-space acquisition and echo times of 20 µs and 1 ms. For investigation of the short T 2 component in the recorded signal, subtraction images were generated from these data sets and used for consensus identification of tumors. Next, manual segmentation was performed on all MR images by two independent investigators. MRI data were compared with the results from histologic investigations and among the investigators. Tumor number and total tumor burden from imaging experiments correlated strongly with the results of histologic investigations. Intra- and interuser comparison showed highest correlations between the individual measurements for ultra-short TE MRI. Three-dimensional MRI protocols facilitate accurate tumor identification in mice harboring lung tumors. Ultrashort TE MRI is the superior imaging strategy when investigating lung tumors of miscellaneous size with 3D MR imaging strategies. Magn Reson Med 79:1052-1060, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. An Investigation into the Association between DNA Damage and Dietary Fatty Acid in Men with Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Bishop

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a growing problem in New Zealand and worldwide, as populations adopt a Western style dietary pattern. In particular, dietary fat is believed to be associated with oxidative stress, which in turn may be associated with cancer risk and development. In addition, DNA damage is associated with the risk of various cancers, and is regarded as an ideal biomarker for the assessment of the influence of foods on cancer. In the study presented here, 20 men with prostate cancer adhered to a modified Mediterranean style diet for three months. Dietary records, blood fatty acid levels, prostate specific antigen, C-reactive protein and DNA damage were assessed pre- and post-intervention. DNA damage was inversely correlated with dietary adherence (p = 0.013 and whole blood monounsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.009 and oleic acid (p = 0.020. DNA damage was positively correlated with the intake of dairy products (p = 0.043, red meat (p = 0.007 and whole blood omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.015. Both the source and type of dietary fat changed significantly over the course of the dietary intervention. Levels of DNA damage were correlated with various dietary fat sources and types of dietary fat.

  7. Investigation of the Change of Quality of Life and Depression in Lung Cancer Patients before and after Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancun CAO

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Quality of life (QoL is an important end point in cancer patients, and depressive symptoms are significantly more frequent in lung cancer patients. The aim of this study is to observe the impact of chemotherapy on quality of life and emotion among lung cancer patients. Methods Fourty lung cancer patients were assessed with clinical outcomes, the EORTC QLQ-C30, SDS questionnaires before chemotherapy, one week after 2 cycles of chemotherapy, one week after 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Results Before chemotherapy, the scores of functioning scales were high, the rate of depression was 65%. After 2 cycles of chemotherapy, effective rate was 42.5%, the scores of cognitive function increase, the scores of role, emotional, social function decrease, the scores of dyspnoea decrease, the scores of pain, appetite loss, insomnia, constipation, diarrhea increase, the scores of Global quality of life decrease; the rate of depression was 70%. After 4 cycles of chemotherapy, effective rate was 23%, the scores of physical, role, emotional, social function decrease, the scores of symptom scales increase, the scores of dyspnoea, nausea and vomiting, appetite loss, financial impact increase, the scores of global quality of life decrease, the rate of depression was 87.5%. Conclusion Some patients have symptoms relieved, but during the chemotherapy, the patients have significant depression, the quality of life decrease. We should evaluate the quality of life and emotions of lung cancer patients, and give positive psychological intervention to improve the quality of life.

  8. An epidemiologic investigation of cancers among medical diagnostic X-ray workers of 1950-1996 in Jiangsu province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Ningle; Wang Jin; Xu Cuizhen; Hu Lianzhi; Hou Bijun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To research the phenomenon and characteristic of radiation oncogenesis among medical diagnostic X-ray workers. Methods: The cancer incidence data of the fixed cohort from the beginning of 1950 to the end of 1996 were collected. The estimates of relative risk (RR) were calculated by AMFIT in Epicure (Hirosoft International Corp, 1988-1992). Results: During the period of 1950-1996 there were 312 cancers among 215 355 person-years at risk in a cohort of 7701 subjects, including, medical diagnostic X-ray workers and workers of other departments in the same hospitals. The RR adjusted for sex and age for overall cancers was more than 1. The incidence of female breast cancer increased significantly (RR = 3.3, 95%, CI = 1.39 - 8.07), and the relative risks for solid cancer and leukemia were 1.2 and 2.6, respectively. The average age of occurrence of malignant tumors was moved up from 55.0 years in the controls to 51.3 years in the X-ray workers. Conclusions: There is a positive effect of radiation oncogenesis on medical diagnostic X-ray workers, although the sample size is not large enough to make a definite overall conclusion statistically. Further follow-up is needed

  9. Dietary flavonoid, lignan and antioxidant capacity and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Fedirko, Veronika; Trichopoulou, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    Limited epidemiological evidence suggests a protective role for plant foods rich in flavonoids and antioxidants in hepatocellular cancer (HCC) etiology. Our aim was to prospectively investigate the association between dietary intake of flavonoids, lignans and nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity (NEAC......) and HCC risk. Data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort including 477,206 subjects (29.8% male) recruited from ten Western European countries, was analyzed. Flavonoid, lignan and NEAC intakes were calculated using a compilation of existing food composition......, 191 incident HCC cases (66.5% men) were identified. Using Cox regression, multivariable adjusted models showed a borderline nonsignificant association of HCC with total flavonoid intake (highest versus lowest tertile, HR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.40-1.04; ptrend  = 0.065), but not with lignans. Among...

  10. Evaluation of a Modified Italian European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Food Frequency Questionnaire for Individuals with Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, Teresa; Roncoroni, Leda; Lombardo, Vincenza; Tomba, Carolina; Elli, Luca; Sieri, Sabina; Grioni, Sara; Bardella, Maria T; Agostoni, Carlo; Doneda, Luisa; Brighenti, Furio; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2016-11-01

    To date, it is unclear whether individuals with celiac disease following a gluten-free (GF) diet for several years have adequate intake of all recommended nutrients. Lack of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for individuals with celiac disease could be partly responsible for this still-debated issue. The aim of the study is to evaluate the performance of a modified European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) FFQ in estimating nutrient and food intake in a celiac population. In a cross-sectional study, the dietary habits of individuals with celiac disease were reported using a modified Italian EPIC FFQ and were compared to a 7-day weighed food record as a reference method. A total of 200 individuals with histologically confirmed celiac disease were enrolled in the study between October 2012 and August 2014 at the Center for Prevention and Diagnosis of Celiac Disease (Milan, Italy). Nutrient and food category intake were calculated by 7-day weighed food record using an Italian food database integrated with the nutrient composition of 60 GF foods and the modified EPIC FFQ, in which 24 foods were substituted with GF foods comparable for energy and carbohydrate content. An evaluation of the modified FFQ compared to 7-day weighed food record in assessing the reported intake of nutrient and food groups was conducted using Spearman's correlation coefficients and weighted κ. One hundred individuals completed the study. The Spearman's correlation coefficients of FFQ and 7-day weighed food record ranged from .13 to .73 for nutrients and from .23 to .75 for food groups. A moderate agreement, which was defined as a weighted κ value of .40 to .60, was obtained for 30% of the analyzed nutrients, and 40% of the nutrients showed values between .30 and .40. The weighted κ exceeded .40 for 60% of the 15 analyzed food groups. The modified EPIC FFQ demonstrated moderate congruence with a weighed food record in ranking individuals by dietary intakes

  11. Investigations on the influence of radiotherapy on the extent of DNA-repair in peripheral lymphocytes and tumor cells of patients with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, W.; Koren, H.; Alth, G.; Klein, H.

    1977-02-01

    The influence of radiotherapy on DNA excision repair after setting UV-lesions in peripheral lymphocytes and tumor cells of 11 patients with different forms of cancer was investigated. The effect of short term radiotherapy was compared with that after irradiation over a longer period. Radiotherapy provoked inhibition of DNA repair in tumor cells in every case, whereas changes in lymphocytes were dependent on irradiation schedule. (author)

  12. A Cross-sectional Investigation on Risk Factors of Lung Cancer for Residents over 40 Years Old in Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojiang CHEN

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective In the previous studies, we have designed the Self-evaluation Scoring Questionnaire for High-risk Individuals of Lung Cancer. In order to make a better understanding of the status of risk factors of lung cancer for residents in Chengdu, we carried out the investigation from June 2009 to December 2009. Methods With the stratified random sampling method, eligible residents were included and their risk factors of lung cancer were collected with the Self-evaluation Scoring Questionnaire for High-risk Individuals of Lung Cancer. Results According to the criteria of the questionnaire, 21.34% of the population were at high risk of lung cancer. The smoking rate for male was 48.58%, higher than that of 2.65% for female. About 5.39% of male smokers began smoking before 15 years old. The average daily tobacco consumption in the most population was less than 20 pieces, with a duration between 20 to 40 years. However, there were 11.34% of all women suffered from passive smoking, and another 15.30% and 5.86% of residents were exposed to cooking fumes, minerals or asbestos. As for the previous illness history, 0.77%-18.08% of individuals have connective tissue diseases, pulmonary tuberculosis, emphysema and others. Finally, 4.91% of residents endured the long-term mental depression, and 7.24% had a positive family history of tumors. Conclusion The status of risk factors for lung cancer among residents in Chengdu was not optimistic. It should be paid more attention to tobacco control and environmental improvement to improve people's health.

  13. Comparative Investigation of Postoperative Complications in Patients With Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer Treated With Preoperative Chemotherapy or Surgery Alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Jensen, L.B.; Larsson, H.

    2016-01-01

    complications of patients with cancer at the gastroesophageal junction treated with either neoadjuvant chemotherapy or surgery alone in patients from "The Danish Clinical Registry of Carcinomas of the Esophagus, the Gastro-Esophageal Junction and the Stomach." MATERIALS AND METHODS: A historical follow-up study......BACKGROUND AND AIM: Gastroesophageal junction cancer is one of the leading causes to cancer-related death and the prognosis is poor. However, progress has been made over the last couple of decades with the introduction of multimodality treatment and optimized surgery. Three-year survival rates have...... of Carcinomas of the Esophagus, the Gastro-Esophageal Junction and the Stomach. No difference was found in demographics between the two groups, except for alcohol consumption and a lower T and N stage in the surgery-only group, and no difference in complication rates was found. Furthermore, no variable...

  14. The relationship between fermented food intake and mortality risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praagman, Jaike; Dalmeijer, Geertje W; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S; Monique Verschuren, W M; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Beulens, Joline W J

    2015-02-14

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between total and subtypes of bacterial fermented food intake (dairy products, cheese, vegetables and meat) and mortality due to all causes, total cancer and CVD. From the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands cohort, 34 409 Dutch men and women, aged 20-70 years who were free from CVD or cancer at baseline, were included. Baseline intakes of total and subtypes of fermented foods were measured with a validated FFQ. Data on the incidence and causes of death were obtained from the national mortality register. Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyse mortality in relation to the quartiles of fermented food intake. After a mean follow-up of 15 (sd 2·5) years, 2436 deaths occurred (1216 from cancer and 727 from CVD). After adjustment for age, sex, total energy intake, physical activity, education level, hypertension, smoking habit, BMI, and intakes of fruit, vegetables and alcohol, total fermented food intake was not found to be associated with mortality due to all causes (hazard ratio upper v. lowest quartile (HR(Q4 v. Q1)) 1·00, 95% CI 0·88, 1·13), cancer (HR(Q4 v. Q1) 1·02, 95% CI 0·86, 1·21) or CVD (HR(Q4 v. Q1) 1·04, 95 % CI 0·83, 1·30). Bacterial fermented foods mainly consisted of fermented dairy foods (78 %) and cheese (16%). None of the subtypes of fermented foods was consistently related to mortality, except for cheese which was moderately inversely associated with CVD mortality, and particularly stroke mortality (HR(Q4 v. Q1) 0·59, 95% CI 0·38, 0·92, P trend= 0·046). In conclusion, the present study provides no strong evidence that intake of fermented foods, particularly fermented dairy foods, is associated with mortality.

  15. Patient-Derived Xenografts of Non Small Cell Lung Cancer: Resurgence of an Old Model for Investigation of Modern Concepts of Tailored Therapy and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Moro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current chemotherapy regimens have unsatisfactory results in most advanced solid tumors. It is therefore imperative to devise novel therapeutic strategies and to optimize selection of patients, identifying early those who could benefit from available treatments. Mouse models are the most valuable tool for preclinical evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies in cancer and, among them, patient-derived xenografts models (PDX have made a recent comeback in popularity. These models, obtained by direct implants of tissue fragments in immunocompromised mice, have great potential in drug development studies because they faithfully reproduce the patient’s original tumor for both immunohistochemical markers and genetic alterations as well as in terms of response to common therapeutics They also maintain the original tumor heterogeneity, allowing studies of specific cellular subpopulations, including their modulation after drug treatment. Moreover PDXs maintain at least some aspects of the human microenvironment for weeks with the complete substitution with murine stroma occurring only after 2-3 passages in mouse and represent therefore a promising model for studies of tumor-microenvironment interaction. This review summarizes our present knowledge on mouse preclinical cancer models, with a particular attention on patient-derived xenografts of non small cell lung cancer and their relevance for preclinical and biological studies.

  16. Investigating multiple candidate genes and nutrients in the folate metabolism pathway to detect genetic and nutritional risk factors for lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Swartz

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Folate metabolism, with its importance to DNA repair, provides a promising region for genetic investigation of lung cancer risk. This project investigates genes (MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, CBS, SHMT1, TYMS, folate metabolism related nutrients (B vitamins, methionine, choline, and betaine and their gene-nutrient interactions. METHODS: We analyzed 115 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 15 nutrients from 1239 and 1692 non-Hispanic white, histologically-confirmed lung cancer cases and controls, respectively, using stochastic search variable selection (a Bayesian model averaging approach. Analyses were stratified by current, former, and never smoking status. RESULTS: Rs6893114 in MTRR (odds ratio [OR] = 2.10; 95% credible interval [CI]: 1.20-3.48 and alcohol (drinkers vs. non-drinkers, OR = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.26-0.84 were associated with lung cancer risk in current smokers. Rs13170530 in MTRR (OR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.10-2.87 and two SNP*nutrient interactions [betaine*rs2658161 (OR = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.19-0.88 and betaine*rs16948305 (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30-0.91] were associated with lung cancer risk in former smokers. SNPs in MTRR (rs13162612; OR = 0.25; 95% CI: 0.11-0.58; rs10512948; OR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.41-0.90; rs2924471; OR = 3.31; 95% CI: 1.66-6.59, and MTHFR (rs9651118; OR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.43-0.95 and three SNP*nutrient interactions (choline*rs10475407; OR = 1.62; 95% CI: 1.11-2.42; choline*rs11134290; OR = 0.51; 95% CI: 0.27-0.92; and riboflavin*rs8767412; OR = 0.40; 95% CI: 0.15-0.95 were associated with lung cancer risk in never smokers. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified possible nutrient and genetic factors related to folate metabolism associated with lung cancer risk, which could potentially lead to nutritional interventions tailored by smoking status to reduce lung cancer risk.

  17. Age-Related Patterns in Cancer Pain and Its Psychosocial Impact: Investigating the Role of Variability in Physical and Mental Health Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Lynn R; Dworkin, Robert H; Warr, David; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca; Macpherson, Alison K; Rodin, Gary; Zimmermann, Camilla; Lawrence Librach, S; Moore, Malcolm; Shepherd, Frances A; Gagliese, Lucia

    2017-03-03

    Age-related patterns in cancer pain remain equivocal. Most studies ignore heterogeneity across multiple domains of well-being, and the potential role of physical (PH) and mental health (MH) quality of life (QOL) in these age-related patterns is unknown. We investigated the relationships between age and cancer pain intensity, qualities, and interference, and physical and psychosocial adaptation and the interaction between age and PH and MH QOL on pain and adaptation to cancer pain. In this cross-sectional study, 244 patients with advanced cancer and pain completed measures of pain, QOL, physical function, and psychosocial well-being. Pearson's correlations and ANOVAs assessed relationships between age and demographic and clinical factors, pain, and physical and psychosocial measures. Regression models tested the role of age and its interaction with PH and MH QOL on pain and physical and psychosocial adaptation. Older age was associated with a lower likelihood of receiving an opioid prescription, greater likelihood of having comorbidities, and worse functional status. When we did not account for these factors, age was not associated with pain and most adaptation indices. When we did account for these factors and PH QOL, older age was associated with lower non-neuropathic and neuropathic pain and several indices of psychosocial adaptation. Most interestingly, older age was associated with lower non-neuropathic pain among those with high, but not low, MH QOL. This study addresses knowledge gaps about factors underlying age-related patterns in cancer pain. Impaired MH QOL may be a proxy for age-related patterns in cancer pain. This study investigated age-related patterns in the experience of cancer pain and the role of quality of life in resilience and vulnerability to pain and adaptation to pain. Older age is associated with lower non-neuropathic pain among those with high, but not low, mental health quality of life, suggesting that impaired mental health quality of

  18. Sporadic colorectal cancer and individual susceptibility: A review of the association studies investigating the role of DNA repair genetic polymorphisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Naccarati, Alessio; Pardini, B.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 635, 2-3(2007), s.118-145 ISSN 1383-5742 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8563; GA ČR GA310/05/2626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Sporadic colorectal cancer * Individual susceptibility * DNA repair Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.353, year: 2007

  19. An investigation of the relationship between social support and coping with stress in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Deniz; Arslan, Fatma Tas

    2018-06-15

    Social support may play a role in effective stress management and make a positive contribution to the health of women with breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the ways of coping with stress and levels of perceived social support of women with breast cancer, as well as the associated factors. The descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted with 100 women with breast cancer at a training and research hospital in Turkey. Data were collected using an information form including sociodemographic and disease characteristics, the Scale of Ways of Coping with Stress, and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Effective ways of coping with stress were found to be significantly lower in women who were primary school graduates and who did not undergo surgery (psocial support from family and total score of perceived social support increased, so did the levels of effective coping with stress (psocial support and age significantly predicted effective stress management (pSocial support given to women with breast cancer is a key reference point in effective stress mamangement, and increased age also has an important effect on women's ability to cope with stress. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. A gene-wide investigation on polymorphisms in the ABCG2/BRCP transporter and susceptibility to colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Campa, D.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Novotný, J.; Försti, A.; Hemminki, K.; Barale, R.; Vodička, Pavel; Canzian, F.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 645, 1-2 (2008), s. 56-60 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/1430 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : ABCG2 * Transporter * Colorectal cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2008

  1. The first investigation of Wilms' tumour atomic structure-nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition as a novel biomarker for the most individual approach in cancer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Katarzyna; Frączek, Tomasz; Sikora-Szubert, Anita; Sitkiewicz, Anna; Młynarski, Wojciech; Kobos, Józef; Paneth, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a novel approach to investigating Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma) biology at the atomic level. Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) was used to directly assess the isotope ratios of nitrogen and carbon in 84 Wilms' tumour tissue samples from 28 cases representing the histological spectrum of nephroblastoma. Marked differences in nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios were found between nephroblastoma histological types and along the course of cancer disease, with a breakout in isotope ratio of the examined elements in tumour tissue found between stages 2 and 3. Different isotopic compositions with regard to nitrogen and carbon content were observed in blastemal Wilms' tumour, with and without focal anaplasia, and in poorly- and well-differentiated epithelial nephroblastoma. This first assessment of nitrogen and carbon isotope ratio reveals the previously unknown part of Wilms' tumour biology and represents a potential novel biomarker, allowing for a highly individual approach to treating cancer. Furthermore, this method of estimating isotopic composition appears to be the most sensitive tool yet for cancer tissue evaluation, and a valuable complement to established cancer study methods with prospective clinical impact. PMID:27732932

  2. Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α on Morphology and Mechanical Properties of HCT116 Human Colon Cancer Cells Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiqing; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Hongda; Du, Jun; Tang, Jilin

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammation orchestrates the tumor microenvironment and is strongly associated with cancer. Tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF α ) is involved in tumor invasion and metastasis by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). This process is defined by the loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal traits. The mechanisms of TNF α -induced EMT in cancer cells have been well studied. However, mechanical properties have not yet been probed. In this work, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to investigate the morphology and mechanical properties of EMT in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. A remarkable morphological change from cobblestone shape to spindle-like morphology was observed. In parallel, AFM images showed that the cellular cytoskeleton was rearranged from a cortical to a stress-fiber pattern. Moreover, cell stiffness measurements indicated that Young's modulus of cells gradually reduced from 1 to 3 days with TNF α -treatment, but it has an apparent increase after 4 days of treatment compared with that for 3 days. Additionally, Young's modulus of the cells treated with TNF α for 4 days is slightly larger than that for 1 or 2 days, but still less than that of the untreated cells. Our work contributes to a better understanding of colorectal cancer metastasis induced by inflammation.

  3. Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α on Morphology and Mechanical Properties of HCT116 Human Colon Cancer Cells Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqing Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation orchestrates the tumor microenvironment and is strongly associated with cancer. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα is involved in tumor invasion and metastasis by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. This process is defined by the loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal traits. The mechanisms of TNFα-induced EMT in cancer cells have been well studied. However, mechanical properties have not yet been probed. In this work, atomic force microscopy (AFM was applied to investigate the morphology and mechanical properties of EMT in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. A remarkable morphological change from cobblestone shape to spindle-like morphology was observed. In parallel, AFM images showed that the cellular cytoskeleton was rearranged from a cortical to a stress-fiber pattern. Moreover, cell stiffness measurements indicated that Young’s modulus of cells gradually reduced from 1 to 3 days with TNFα-treatment, but it has an apparent increase after 4 days of treatment compared with that for 3 days. Additionally, Young’s modulus of the cells treated with TNFα for 4 days is slightly larger than that for 1 or 2 days, but still less than that of the untreated cells. Our work contributes to a better understanding of colorectal cancer metastasis induced by inflammation.

  4. An investigation on the efficacy of the present procedure in the diagnosis of lung cancer complicated pneumoconiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kiyonobu; Nakano, Ikuo; Ohtsuka, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    We examined the efficiency of screening pneumoconiotics for lung cancer by newly introduced helical CT and sputum cytology from 2002 to 2008. A total of 21 cases were diagnosed as lung cancer when they took medical examination under the pneumoconiosis law. Clinical stages and tumor size were compared between two groups; chest X-ray group vs. helical CT and sputum cytology group. The motives of diagnosis of lung cancer were as follows; 16 cases (76%) by chest X-ray, 3 cases (14%) by CT, 2 cases (10%) by sputum cytology. The clinical stages of diagnosed lung cancer were, 6 cases (28%) in IA, 5 cases (24%) in IB, 1 case (5%) in IIA, 4 cases (19%) in IIIA, 2 cases (10%) in IIIB, 3 cases (14%) in IV. In 16 cases diagnosed by chest X-ray, the number of operable cases (from IA to IIB) was 10 (63%), inoperable cases (from IIIA to IV) were 6 (38%), respectively. On the other hand, in 5 cases diagnosed by helical CT and sputum cytology, the numbers of operable cases were 2 (40%), inoperable cases were 3 (60%). There were no differences in the clinical stage of lung cancer between the two motive groups. The average diameter of all the tumors were 27.7±13.1 mm (mean±standard deviation (SD), median 27.5 mm). There was no difference between the two motive groups; 27.0±12.9 mm vs. 30.0±15.6 mm. There was no significant trend in the diameter of tumor among the pneumoconiotic backgrounds; 28.9±11.4 mm in PR1, 21.7±11.9 mm in PR2 and PR3, 33.3±15.4 mm in PR4A and PR4B. In 5 cases, it was possible to trace back the presence of tumors in one year previous helical CT. These results suggest that in the pneumoconiotics it might be difficult to diagnose early stage lung cancer even if helical CT and sputum cytology were added to the screening of lung cancer. (author)

  5. Investigation of nuclear nano-morphology marker as a biomarker for cancer risk assessment using a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Rajan K.; Uttam, Shikhar; Hartman, Douglas J.; Qiu, Wei; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Lin; Brand, Randall E.; Liu, Yang

    2012-06-01

    The development of accurate and clinically applicable tools to assess cancer risk is essential to define candidates to undergo screening for early-stage cancers at a curable stage or provide a novel method to monitor chemoprevention treatments. With the use of our recently developed optical technology--spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy (SL-QPM), we have derived a novel optical biomarker characterized by structure-derived optical path length (OPL) properties from the cell nucleus on the standard histology and cytology specimens, which quantifies the nano-structural alterations within the cell nucleus at the nanoscale sensitivity, referred to as nano-morphology marker. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of the nuclear nano-morphology marker from histologically normal cells, extracted directly from the standard histology specimens, to detect early-stage carcinogenesis, assess cancer risk, and monitor the effect of chemopreventive treatment. We used a well-established mouse model of spontaneous carcinogenesis--ApcMin mice, which develop multiple intestinal adenomas (Min) due to a germline mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene. We found that the nuclear nano-morphology marker quantified by OPL detects the development of carcinogenesis from histologically normal intestinal epithelial cells, even at an early pre-adenomatous stage (six weeks). It also exhibits a good temporal correlation with the small intestine that parallels the development of carcinogenesis and cancer risk. To further assess its ability to monitor the efficacy of chemopreventive agents, we used an established chemopreventive agent, sulindac. The nuclear nano-morphology marker is reversed toward normal after a prolonged treatment. Therefore, our proof-of-concept study establishes the feasibility of the SL-QPM derived nuclear nano-morphology marker OPL as a promising, simple and clinically applicable biomarker for cancer risk assessment and

  6. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP2-02: Audiovisual Biofeedback Guided Respiratory-Gated MRI: An Investigation of Tumor Definition and Scan Time for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [Virginia Commonwealth University, Glen Allen, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Breathing consistency variations can cause respiratory-related motion blurring and artifacts and increase in MRI scan time due to inadequate respiratory-gating and discarding of breathing cycles. In a previous study the concept of audiovisual biofeedback (AV) guided respiratory-gated MRI was tested with healthy volunteers and it demonstrated image quality improvement on anatomical structures and scan time reduction. This study tests the applicability of AV-guided respiratorygated MRI for lung cancer in a prospective patient study. Methods: Image quality and scan time were investigated in thirteen lung cancer patients who underwent two 3T MRI sessions. In the first MRI session (pre-treatment), respiratory-gated MR images with free breathing (FB) and AV were acquired at inhalation and exhalation. An RF navigator placed on the liver dome was employed for the respiratory-gated MRI. This was repeated in the second MRI session (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were delineated on each dataset. FB and AV were compared in terms of (1) tumor definition assessed by lung tumor contours and (2) intra-patient scan time variation using the total image acquisition time of inhalation and exhalation datasets from the first and second MRI sessions across 13 lung cancer patients. Results: Compared to FB AV-guided respiratory-gated MRI improved image quality for contouring tumors with sharper boundaries and less blurring resulted in the improvement of tumor definition. Compared to FB the variation of intra-patient scan time with AV was reduced by 48% (p<0.001) from 54 s to 28 s. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that AV-guided respiratorygated MRI improved the quality of tumor images and fixed tumor definition for lung cancer. These results suggest that audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance has the potential to control breathing for adequate respiratory-gating for lung cancer imaging and radiotherapy.

  7. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP2-02: Audiovisual Biofeedback Guided Respiratory-Gated MRI: An Investigation of Tumor Definition and Scan Time for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J; Kim, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Breathing consistency variations can cause respiratory-related motion blurring and artifacts and increase in MRI scan time due to inadequate respiratory-gating and discarding of breathing cycles. In a previous study the concept of audiovisual biofeedback (AV) guided respiratory-gated MRI was tested with healthy volunteers and it demonstrated image quality improvement on anatomical structures and scan time reduction. This study tests the applicability of AV-guided respiratorygated MRI for lung cancer in a prospective patient study. Methods: Image quality and scan time were investigated in thirteen lung cancer patients who underwent two 3T MRI sessions. In the first MRI session (pre-treatment), respiratory-gated MR images with free breathing (FB) and AV were acquired at inhalation and exhalation. An RF navigator placed on the liver dome was employed for the respiratory-gated MRI. This was repeated in the second MRI session (mid-treatment). Lung tumors were delineated on each dataset. FB and AV were compared in terms of (1) tumor definition assessed by lung tumor contours and (2) intra-patient scan time variation using the total image acquisition time of inhalation and exhalation datasets from the first and second MRI sessions across 13 lung cancer patients. Results: Compared to FB AV-guided respiratory-gated MRI improved image quality for contouring tumors with sharper boundaries and less blurring resulted in the improvement of tumor definition. Compared to FB the variation of intra-patient scan time with AV was reduced by 48% (p<0.001) from 54 s to 28 s. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that AV-guided respiratorygated MRI improved the quality of tumor images and fixed tumor definition for lung cancer. These results suggest that audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance has the potential to control breathing for adequate respiratory-gating for lung cancer imaging and radiotherapy.

  8. Investigation of CD28 gene polymorphisms in patients with sporadic breast cancer in a Chinese Han population in Northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD28 is one of a number of costimulatory molecules that play crucial roles in immune regulation and homeostasis. Accumulating evidence indicates that immune factors influence breast carcinogenesis. To clarify the relationships between polymorphisms in the CD28 gene and breast carcinogenesis, a case-control study was conducted in women from Heilongjiang Province in northeast of China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our research subjects consisted of 565 female patients with sporadic breast cancer and 605 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. In total, 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CD28 gene were successfully determined using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method. The relationship between the CD28 variants and clinical features, including histological grade, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (C-erbB2, estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and tumor protein 53 (P53 status were analyzed. A statistically significant association was observed between rs3116496 and breast cancer risk under different genetic models (additive P = 0.0164, dominant P = 0.0042. Different distributions of the rs3116496 'T' allele were found in patients and controls, which remained significant after correcting the P value for multiple testing using Haploview with 10,000 permutations (corrected P = 0.0384. In addition, significant associations were observed between rs3116487/rs3116494 (D' = 1, r(2 = 0.99 and clinicopathological features such as C-erbB2 and ER status, in breast cancer patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that CD28 gene polymorphisms contribute to sporadic breast cancer risk and have a significant association with clinicopathological features in a northeast Chinese Han population.

  9. Does implementation matter if comprehension is lacking? A qualitative investigation into perceptions of advance care planning in people with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Anna; O'Callaghan, Clare; Byard, Clem; Brean, Samantha; MacKay, Jenelle; Boltong, Anna; Davoren, Sondra; Lawson, Deborah; Parente, Phillip; Michael, Natasha; Livingston, Patricia

    2018-05-11

    While advance care planning holds promise, uptake is variable and it is unclear how well people engage with or comprehend advance care planning. The objective of this study was to explore how people with cancer comprehended advance care plans and examine how accurately advance care planning documentation represented patient wishes. This study used a qualitative descriptive design. Data collection comprised interviews and an examination of participants' existing advance care planning documentation. Participants included those who had any diagnosis of cancer with an advance care plan recorded: Refusal of Treatment Certificate, Statement of Choices, and/or Enduring Power of Attorney (Medical Treatment) at one cancer treatment centre. Fourteen participants were involved in the study. Twelve participants were female (86%). The mean age was 77 (range: 61-91), and participants had completed their advance care planning documentation between 8 and 72 weeks prior to the interview (mean 33 weeks). Three themes were evident from the data: incomplete advance care planning understanding and confidence, limited congruence for attitude and documentation, advance care planning can enable peace of mind. Complete advance care planning understanding was unusual; most participants demonstrated partial comprehension of their own advance care plan, and some indicated very limited understanding. Participants' attitudes and their written document congruence were limited, but advance care planning was seen as helpful. This study highlighted advance care planning was not a completely accurate representation of patient wishes. There is opportunity to improve how patients comprehend their own advance care planning documentation.

  10. An Investigation into the Cytotoxic Effects of 13-Acetoxysarcocrassolide from the Soft Coral Sarcophyton crassocaule on Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Wu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Active compounds from natural products have been widely studied. The anti-tumor effects of 13-acetoxysarcocrassolide isolated from Formosan soft coral Sarcophyton crassocaule on bladder cancer cells were examined in this study. An MTT assay showed that 13-acetoxysarcocrassolide was cytotoxic to bladder female transitional cancer (BFTC cells. We determined that the BFTC cells underwent cell death through apoptosis by flow cytometry. Due to the highly-migratory nature of the BFTC cells, the ability of 13-acetoxysarcocrassolide to stop their migration was assessed by a wound healing assay. To determine which proteins were affected in the BFTC cells upon treatment, a comparative proteomic analysis was performed. By LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified that 19 proteins were up-regulated and eight were down-regulated. Seven of the proteins were confirmed by western blotting analysis. This study reveals clues to the potential mechanism of the cytotoxic effects of 13-acetoxysarcocrassolide on BFTC cells. Moreover, it suggests that PPT1 and hnRNP F could be new biomarkers for bladder cancer. The results of this study are also helpful for the diagnosis, progression monitoring and therapeutic strategies of transitional cell tumors.

  11. Modulation of butyrate anticancer activity by solid lipid nanoparticle delivery: an in vitro investigation on human breast cancer and leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglietta, Federica; Serpe, Loredana; Canaparo, Roberto; Vivenza, Nicoletta; Riccio, Giovanna; Imbalzano, Erica; Gasco, Paolo; Zara, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Histone modification has emerged as a promising approach to cancer therapy. The short-chain fatty acid, butyric acid, a histone deacetylase (HD) inhibitor, has shown anticancer activity. Butyrate transcriptional activation is indeed able to withdraw cancer cells from the cell cycle, leading to programmed cell death. Since butyrate's clinical use is hampered by unfavorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, delivery systems, such as solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), have been developed to overcome these constraints. In order to outline the influence of butyrate delivery on its anticancer activity, the effects of butyrate as a free (sodium butyrate, NB) or nanoparticle (cholesteryl butyrate solid lipid nanoparticles, CBSLN) formulation on the growth of different human cancer cell lines, such as the promyelocytic leukemia, HL-60, and the breast cancer, MCF-7 was investigated. A detailed investigation into the mechanism of the induced cytotoxicity was also carried out, with a special focus on the modulation of HD and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) mRNA gene expression by real time PCR analysis. In HL-60 cells, CBSLN induced a higher and prolonged expression level of the butyrate target genes at lower concentrations than NB. This led to a significant decrease in cell proliferation, along with considerable apoptosis, cell cycle block in the G0/G1 phase, significant inhibition of total HD activity and overexpression of the p21 protein. Conversely, in MCF-7 cells, CBSLN did not enhance the level of expression of the butyrate target genes, leading to the same anticancer activity as that of NB. Solid lipid nanoparticles were able to improve butyrate anticancer activity in HL-60, but not in MCF-7 cells. This is consistent with difference in properties of the cells under study, such as expression of the TP53 tumor suppressor, or the transporter for short-chain fatty acids, SLC5A8.

  12. An in vitro based investigation of the cytotoxic effect of water extracts of the Chinese herbal remedy LD on cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Lucy A

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long Dan Xie Gan Wan (LD, a Chinese herbal remedy formulation, is traditionally used to treat a range of conditions, including gall bladder diseases, hepatitis, hyperthyroidism, migraines but it is not used for the management or treatment of cancer. However some of its herbal constituents, specifically Radix bupleuri, Radix scutellariae and Rhizoma alismatis have been shown to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. Thus, the aim of the study was to investigate the impact of LD on cancer cells in vitro. Methods HL60 and HT29 cancer cell lines were exposed to water extracts of LD (1:10, 1:50, 1:100 and/or 1:1000 prepared from a 3 mg/30 ml stock and for both cell lines growth, apoptotic induction, alterations in cell cycle characteristics and genotoxicity were investigated. The specificity of the action of LD on these cancer cell lines was also investigated by determining its effect on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Preliminary chemical analysis was carried out to identify cytotoxic constituents of LD using HPLC and LCMS. Results LD was significantly cytotoxic to, and induced apoptosis in, both cell lines. Apoptotic induction appeared to be cell cycle independent at all concentrations of LD used (1:10, 1:50 and 1:100 for the HL60 cell lines and at 1:10 for the HT29 cell line. At 1:50 and 1:100 apoptotic induction by LD appeared to be cell cycle dependent. LD caused significant genotoxic damage to both cell lines compared to their respective controls. The specificity study showed that LD exerted a moderate cytotoxic action against non-proliferating and proliferating blood lymphocytes but not apoptosis. Chemical analysis showed that a number of fractions were found to exert a significant growth inhibitory effect. However, the molecular weights of compounds within these fractions did not correspond to those from the herbal constituents of LD. Conclusion It is possible that LD may have some chemotherapeutic potential. However

  13. Radionuclide investigations of the hormonal reflection of warm stress in cancer patients under whole body guided hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhorova, V.I.; Zhavrid, Eh.A.; Fradkin, S.Z.; Tsyrus', T.P.; Shitikov, B.D.; Kosheleva, M.I.

    1991-01-01

    The results of the radioimmunoassay of ACTH, ST, hydrocortisone, glucagon, C-peptide, insulin and cyclic nucleotides in 180 patients with advanced and metastatic melanomas, soft tissue sarcomas, lung cancers and renal cell carcinomas testify to the development of the syndrome of endocrine hyperfunction in patients under whole-body guided hyperthermia and artificial hyperglycemia as well as of functional pancreas insufficiency. The data presented form a biochemical basis for working out measures to optimally carry out whole-body hyperthermia and artificial hyperglycemia treatment, aimed at increasing the range of indications for its use in clinical oncology

  14. Investigating Steroid Receptor Coactivator 3 (SRC3) as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Treating Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    different kinases including MAPK, IKK, GSK3a , GSK3b , and CK1d. SRC-3 is also a target of ABL tyrosine kinase which can be activated by estrogen and...differentiated as evidenced by higher levels of Fkbp5, an AR-responsive gene that inhibits Akt signaling. These tumors also had lower levels of some...34 castrationCresistant" prostate" cancer,"we" found" that" although" androgen" deprivation" shrunk" the" size" of" the"tumor,"the"reduced" level "of"testosterone

  15. Investigation of conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques to determine the absorbed fetal dose in pregnant patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öğretici, Akın, E-mail: akinogretici@gmail.com; Akbaş, Uğur; Köksal, Canan; Bilge, Hatice

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the fetal doses of pregnant patients undergoing conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for breast cancers. An Alderson Rando phantom was chosen to simulate a pregnant patient with breast cancer who is receiving radiation therapy. This phantom was irradiated using the Varian Clinac DBX 600 system (Varian Medical System, Palo Alto, CA) linear accelerator, according to the standard treatment plans of both three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) and IMRT techniques. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure the irradiated phantom's virtually designated uterus area. Thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements (in the phantom) revealed that the mean cumulative fetal dose for 3-D CRT is 1.39 cGy and for IMRT it is 8.48 cGy, for a pregnant breast cancer woman who received radiation treatment of 50 Gy. The fetal dose was confirmed to increase by 70% for 3-D CRT and 40% for IMRT, if it is closer to the irradiated field by 5 cm. The mean fetal dose from 3-D CRT is 1.39 cGy and IMRT is 8.48 cGy, consistent with theoretic calculations. The IMRT technique causes the fetal dose to be 5 times more than that of 3-D CRT. Theoretic knowledge concerning the increase in the peripheral doses as the measurements approached the beam was also practically proven.

  16. Evidence-based investigation of the influence of computer-aided detection of polyps on screening of colon cancer with CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC), also known as virtual colonoscopy, is a CT examination of the colon for colorectal neoplasms. Recent large-scale clinical trials have demonstrated that CTC yields sensitivity comparable to optical colonoscopy in the detection of clinically significant polyps in a screening population, making CTC a promising technique for screening of colon cancer. For CTC to be a clinically practical means of screening, it must reliably and consistently detect polyps with high accuracy. However, high-level expertise is required to interpret the resulting CT images to find polyps, resulting in variable diagnostic accuracy among radiologists in the detection of polyps. A key technology to overcome this problem and to bring CTC to prime time for screening of colorectal cancer is computer-aided detection (CAD) of polyps. CAD automatically detects the locations of suspicious polyps in CTC images and presents them to radiologists. CAD has the potential to increase diagnostic performance in the detection of polyps as well as to reduce variability of the diagnostic accuracy among radiologists. This paper presents an evidence-based investigation of the influence of CAD on screening of colon cancer with CTC by describing the benefits of using CAD in the diagnosis of CTC, the fundamental CAD scheme for the detection of polyps in CTC, its detection performance, the effect on the improvement of detection performance, as well as the current and future challenges in CAD. (author)

  17. The association between adult attained height and sitting height with mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norie Sawada

    Full Text Available Adult height and sitting height may reflect genetic and environmental factors, including early life nutrition, physical and social environments. Previous studies have reported divergent associations for height and chronic disease mortality, with positive associations observed for cancer mortality but inverse associations for circulatory disease mortality. Sitting height might be more strongly associated with insulin resistance; however, data on sitting height and mortality is sparse. Using the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, a prospective cohort of 409,748 individuals, we examined adult height and sitting height in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Height was measured in the majority of participants; sitting height was measured in ~253,000 participants. During an average of 12.5 years of follow-up, 29,810 deaths (11,931 from cancer and 7,346 from circulatory disease were identified. Hazard ratios (HR with 95% confidence intervals (CI for death were calculated using multivariable Cox regression within quintiles of height. Height was positively associated with cancer mortality (men: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 1.11, 95%CI = 1.00-1.24; women: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 1.17, 95%CI = 1.07-1.28. In contrast, height was inversely associated with circulatory disease mortality (men: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 0.63, 95%CI = 0.56-0.71; women: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 0.81, 95%CI = 0.70-0.93. Although sitting height was not associated with cancer mortality, it was inversely associated with circulatory disease (men: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 0.64, 95%CI = 0.55-0.75; women: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 0.60, 95%CI = 0.49-0.74 and respiratory disease mortality (men: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 0.45, 95%CI = 0.28-0.71; women: HRQ5 vs. Q1 = 0.60, 95%CI = 0.40-0.89. We observed opposing effects of height on cancer and circulatory disease mortality. Sitting height was inversely associated with circulatory disease and respiratory disease mortality.

  18. Investigation of mental health and its influence on Chinese cancer patients using a multidisciplinary screening flow:an epidemiological survey in the west of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Huan; LI Jin; LU You; DENG Lei; SUN Xue-li

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite psycho-oncological concerns and studies having thrived these past decades,sparse reports illustrate to what extent Chinese cancer patients are involved and influenced by comorbid mental health problems.To investigate the mental health condition of cancer patient,as well as its possible impacts on prognosis,the first large-scale survey was performed in the west of China.Methods For standardizing and facilitating the assessment of mental illness in inpatients with cancer,a multidisciplinary rating flow was designed and established.On the basis of this system,between May 1st and 31st 2009,2279 cancer inpatients from nine medical centers received preliminarily screening executed by oncologists using screening scales Mental Health Screening Questionnaire (MHSQ),Zung self-rating depression scales (SDS),Zung self-rating anxiety scale (SAS),and posttraumatic stress disorder checklist-civilian version (PCL-C).Further analyses of the ones screened positively were conducted by psychiatrists applying corresponding symptom-rating scales (HAMA/HAMD/BPRS).We summarized the overall proportion of patients with impaired mental health based on the data acquired from preliminary screening,and then calculated occurrence rates of each clinical syndrome of mental disorder according to symptom conclusions.The impact of comorbid mental illness was evaluated through the follow-up scheduled 1 year later,by comparing the survival rate,progression of disease,and quality of life (QoL) between subgroup patients with or without clinical syndrome of mental disorder.Results In preliminary screenings,26.1% (595/2279) yielded positive results.Further symptom conclusions confirmed 15.8% (359/2279) with clinical syndrome of mental disorder.Regarding specific type of syndrome,the occurrence rates of depression,anxiety,psychotic symptoms,and stress-related disorders were 13.3%,10.2%,2.8%,and 1.4%,respectively.Follow-up assessments were successfully performed in 1918

  19. The Investigate Factors on Screening of the Breast Cancer Based on PEN-3 Model in Iranian Northern Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Abolhassan Naghibi

    2015-09-01

    Materials and Methods: The present study was cross-sectional. The samples studied were women above 20 years and the sample size was 1416 people. The method of sampling was a random cluster. The tools of data collection questionnaire with 70 questions which approved its content validity and reliability. Data were analyzed by using software of SPSS Ver. 20. Results: The average age of samples was 35.71±6.1. Only 14.3% of samples are regularly conducted to the self-examination. Also, 38.5% of women had a history of the clinical examination. The difference of observed in performance the breast self-examination and clinical breast examination were the statistical significant by variables of rural or urban (P= 0.005, the marital status (P = 0.013 and a background of having breast cancer (P <0.001. The results of the study based on PEN-3 model were showed that there were a statistical significant relationship between the structure of perceptual factors and reinforcing factors (P=0.002 and between the perceptual factors and enabling factors (P=0.006. Conclusion: According to the results of presented, the women`s performance in using the screening was low. Also, the components status of the PEN-3 Model (factors of perceptual, enabling, and reinforcing for the breast cancer screening in women studied were not suitable.

  20. Investigating the benefits of molecular profiling of advanced non-small cell lung cancer tumors to guide treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alifrangis, Costi; Carter, Philip; Cereser, Biancastella; Chandrasinghe, Pramodh; Belluz, Lisa Del Bel; Lim, Eric; Moderau, Nina; Poyia, Fotini; Tabassum, Neha; Zhang, Hua; Krell, Jonathan; Stebbing, Justin

    2018-02-27

    In this study we utilized data on patient responses to guided treatments, and we evaluated their benefit for a non-small cell lung cancer cohort. The recommended therapies used were predicted using tumor molecular profiles that involved a range of biomarkers but primarily used immunohistochemistry markers. A dataset describing 91 lung non-small cell lung cancer patients was retrospectively split into two. The first group's drugs were consistent with a treatment plan whereby all drugs received agreed with their tumor's molecular profile. The second group each received one or more drug that was expected to lack benefit. We found that there was no significant difference in overall survival or mortality between the two groups. Patients whose treatments were predicted to be of benefit survived for an average of 402 days, compared to 382 days for those that did not ( P = 0.7934). In the matched treatment group, 48% of patients were deceased by the time monitoring had finished compared to 53% in the unmatched group ( P = 0.6094). The immunohistochemistry biomarker for the ERCC1 receptor was found to be a marker that could be used to predict future survival; ERCC1 loss was found to be predictive of poor survival.

  1. Investigating the effect of pixel size of high spatial resolution FTIR imaging for detection of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, G. R.; Nallala, J.; Stone, N.

    2016-03-01

    FTIR is a well-established technique and there is significant interest in applying this technique to medical diagnostics e.g. to detect cancer. The introduction of focal plane array (FPA) detectors means that FTIR is particularly suited to rapid imaging of biopsy sections as an adjunct to digital pathology. Until recently however each pixel in the image has been limited to a minimum of 5.5 µm which results in a comparatively low magnification image or histology applications and potentially the loss of important diagnostic information. The recent introduction of higher magnification optics gives image pixels that cover approx. 1.1 µm. This reduction in image pixel size gives images of higher magnification and improved spatial detail can be observed. However, the effect of increasing the magnification on spectral quality and the ability to discriminate between disease states is not well studied. In this work we test the discriminatory performance of FTIR imaging using both standard (5.5 µm) and high (1.1 µm) magnification for the detection of colorectal cancer and explore the effect of binning to degrade high resolution images to determine whether similar diagnostic information and performance can be obtained using both magnifications. Results indicate that diagnostic performance using high magnification may be reduced as compared to standard magnification when using existing multivariate approaches. Reduction of the high magnification data to standard magnification via binning can potentially recover some of the lost performance.

  2. Kinase Expression and Chromosomal Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Tissues: Investigations at the Molecular and Microscopic Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Kwan, Johnson; Lu, Chun-Mei; Ito, Yuko; Wang, Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Hayward, Simon W.; Weier, Jingly F.; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.

    2009-01-01

    Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, ret or the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- or interchromosomal rearrangements have been suggested as a cause of the disease. The 1986 accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl, USSR, led to the uncontrolled release of high levels of radioisotopes. Ten years later, the incidence of childhood papillary thyroid cancer (chPTC) near Chernobyl had risen by two orders of magnitude. Tumors removed from some of these patients showed aberrant expression of the ret RTK gene due to a ret/PTC1 or ret/PTC3 rearrangement involving chromosome 10. However, many cultured chPTC cells show a normal G-banded karyotype and no ret rearrangement. We hypothesize that the 'ret-negative' tumors inappropriately express a different oncogene or have lost function of a tumor suppressor as a result of chromosomal rearrangements, and decided to apply molecular and cytogenetic methods to search for potentially oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements in Chernobyl chPTC cases. Knowledge of the kind of genetic alterations may facilitate the early detection and staging of chPTC as well as provide guidance for therapeutic intervention.

  3. Kinase Expression and Chromosomal Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Tissues: Investigations at the Molecular and Microscopic Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Kwan, Johnson; Lu, Chun-Mei; Ito, Yuko; Wang, Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Hayward, Simon W.; Weier, Jingly F.; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.

    2009-07-07

    Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, ret or the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- or interchromosomal rearrangements have been suggested as a cause of the disease. The 1986 accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl, USSR, led to the uncontrolled release of high levels of radioisotopes. Ten years later, the incidence of childhood papillary thyroid cancer (chPTC) near Chernobyl had risen by two orders of magnitude. Tumors removed from some of these patients showed aberrant expression of the ret RTK gene due to a ret/PTC1 or ret/PTC3 rearrangement involving chromosome 10. However, many cultured chPTC cells show a normal G-banded karyotype and no ret rearrangement. We hypothesize that the 'ret-negative' tumors inappropriately express a different oncogene or have lost function of a tumor suppressor as a result of chromosomal rearrangements, and decided to apply molecular and cytogenetic methods to search for potentially oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements in Chernobyl chPTC cases. Knowledge of the kind of genetic alterations may facilitate the early detection and staging of chPTC as well as provide guidance for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Consumption of fruits, vegetables and fruit juices and differentiated thyroid carcinoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Béraud, Virginie; Franceschi, Silvia; Cayssials, Valerie; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Eriksen, Anne K; Bonnet, Fabrice; Affret, Aurélie; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Valanou, Elisavet; Karakatsani, Anna; Masala, Giovanna; Grioni, Sara; Santucci de Magistris, Maria; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Skeie, Guri; Parr, Christine L; Merino, Susana; Salamanca-Fernández, Elena; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Amiano, Pilar; Almquist, Martin; Drake, Isabel; Hennings, Joakim; Sandström, Maria; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Thee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Schmidt, Julie A; Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Aune, Dagfinn; Riboli, Elio; Slimani, Nadia; Scalbert, Augustin; Romieu, Isabelle; Agudo, Antonio; Rinaldi, Sabina

    2018-02-01

    Fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake is considered as probably protective against overall cancer risk, but results in previous studies are not consistent for thyroid cancer (TC). The purpose of this study is to examine the association between the consumption of fruits, vegetables, fruit juices and differentiated thyroid cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. The EPIC study is a cohort including over half a million participants, recruited between 1991 and 2000. During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 748 incident first primary differentiated TC cases were identified. F&V and fruit juice intakes were assessed through validated country-specific dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox regression models adjusted for potential confounding factors. Comparing the highest versus lowest quartile of intake, differentiated TC risk was not associated with intakes of total F&V (HR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.68-1.15; p-trend = 0.44), vegetables (HR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.69-1.14; p-trend = 0.56), or fruit (HR: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.79-1.26; p-trend = 0.64). No significant association was observed with any individual type of vegetable or fruit. However, there was a positive borderline trend with fruit juice intake (HR: 1.23; 95% CI: 0.98-1.53; p-trend = 0.06). This study did not find any significant association between F&V intakes and differentiated TC risk; however a positive trend with fruit juice intake was observed, possibly related to its high sugar content. © 2017 UICC.

  5. Investigating the role of the IGF axis as a predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer patients post-surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Kieran J; O'Neill, Amanda; Murphy, Lisa; Fan, Yue; Boyce, Susie; Fitzgerald, Noel; Dorris, Emma; Brady, Lauren; Finn, Stephen P; Hayes, Brian D; Treacy, Ann; Barrett, Ciara; Aziz, Mardiana Abdul; Kay, Elaine W; Fitzpatrick, John M; Watson, R William G

    2017-09-01

    Between 20% and 35% of prostate cancer (PCa) patients who undergo treatment with curative intent (ie, surgery or radiation therapy) for localized disease will experience biochemical recurrence (BCR). Alterations in the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis and PTEN expression have been implicated in the development and progression of several human tumors including PCa. We examined the expression of the insulin receptor (INSR), IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), PTEN, and AKT in radical prostatectomy tissue of patients who developed BCR post-surgery. Tissue microarrays (TMA) of 130 patients post-radical prostatectomy (65 = BCR, 65 = non-BCR) were stained by immunohistochemistry for INSR, IGF-1R, PTEN, and AKT using optimized antibody protocols. INSR, IGF1-R, PTEN, and AKT expression between benign and cancerous tissue, and different Gleason grades was assessed. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to examine the relationship between proteins expression and BCR. INSR (P IGF-1R (P IGF-1R, or AKT expression in the cancerous tissue of non-BCR versus BCR patients (P = 0.149, P = 0.990, P = 0.399, respectively). There was a significant decrease in PTEN expression in the malignant tissue of BCR versus non-BCR patients (P = 0.011). Combinational analysis of the tissue proteins identified a combination of decreased PTEN and increased AKT or increased INSR was associated with worst outcome. We found that in each case, our hypothesized worst group was most likely to experience BCR and this was significant for combinations of PTEN+INSR and PTEN+AKT but not PTEN+IGF-1R (P = 0.023, P = 0.028, P = 0.078, respectively). Low PTEN is associated with BCR and this association is strongly modified by high INSR and high AKT expression. Measurement of these proteins could help inform appropriate patient selection for postoperative adjuvant therapy and prevent BCR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Clinical Investigation of the Effects of Filgrastim BS1 on Neutropenia Following Oral Cancer Chemotherapy (TPF Therapy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Kimio; Yamada, Manabu; Tamate, Shusuke; Iwasaki, Konomi; Mitomo, Keisuke; Nakayama, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    The time for the neutrophil count to recover after subcutaneous injection of filgrastim BS1 or lenograstim was studied in patients suffering from neutropenia following preoperative combined chemotherapy using docetaxel, nedaplatin, or cisplatin (in divided doses for 5 days)and 5-fluorouracil for oral cancer. 1. There was no significant difference in the minimum leukocyte and neutrophil counts after chemotherapy. 2. There was no significant difference in the maximum leukocyte and neutrophil counts after chemotherapy. 3. Time for leukocytes to recover from their minimum count(>4,000/mm3)or for neutrophils to recover from their minimum count(>2,000/mm3)and the number of days on which treatment was administered tended to be shorter in the filgrastim BS1 group. Thus, it was concluded that filgrastim BS1 is just as effective as other prior G-CSF agents in treating patients suffering from neutropenia following chemotherapy(TPF therapy).

  7. Cooking of meat and fish in Europe--results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, S; Linseisen, J; Becker, N; Norat, T; Sinha, R; Skeie, G; Lund, E; Martínez, C; Barricarte, A; Mattisson, I; Berglund, G; Welch, A; Davey, G; Overvad, K; Tjønneland, A; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Kesse, E; Lotze, G; Klipstein-Grobusch, K; Vasilopoulou, E; Polychronopoulos, E; Pala, V; Celentano, E; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H B; Peeters, P H M; Riboli, E; Slimani, N

    2002-12-01

    There is epidemiologic evidence that the consumption of fried, grilled or barbecued meat and fish that are well-done or browned may be associated with an increased cancer risk. These high-temperature cooking methods are thought to be surrogates for mutagens and carcinogens produced in meat and fish, eg heterocyclic amines or polycyclic hydrocarbons. Since data on food cooking methods are scarce, the aim of this study was to describe the variation in meat and fish cooking methods in different parts of Europe. Using a standardized 24 h recall from a sub-sample of the EPIC cohort (35 644 persons, 35-75 y old), mean daily intake of meat and fish prepared by different cooking methods and the relative contribution of the cooking methods to the overall cooking of meat and fish was calculated. Whereas frying was more often noted in northern Europe, roasting and stir frying were more often used in the south. Concerning high-temperature cooking methods, their frequency of application varies between 15% in the EPIC cohort of North-Italy and 49% in the cohort of The Netherlands. Average consumption of fried, grilled and barbecued meat and fish ranges from a low of 12 g/day in the centres in southern Spain to a high of 91 g/day in northern Spain. High variation in both the kind of meat/fish consumed as well as its cooking methods is observed within EPIC. In order to use this variation for the evaluation of the impact of cooking methods on cancer risk, a questionnaire on meat and fish cooking methods is being developed and could be applied in the whole EPIC cohort.

  8. Hanging drop cultures of human testis and testis cancer samples: a model used to investigate activin treatment effects in a preserved niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, A; Young, J; Nielsen, J E; Joensen, U N; Toft, B G; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Loveland, K L

    2014-05-13

    Testicular germ cell tumours of young adults, seminoma or non-seminomas, are preceded by a pre-invasive precursor, carcinoma in situ (CIS), understood to arise through differentiation arrest of embryonic germ cells. Knowledge about the malignant transformation of germ cells is currently limited by the lack of experimental models. The aim of this study was to establish an experimental tissue culture model to maintain normal and malignant germ cells within their niche and allow investigation of treatment effects. Human testis and testis cancer specimens from orchidectomies were cultured in 'hanging drops' and effects of activin A and follistatin treatment were investigated in seminoma cultures. Testis fragments with normal spermatogenesis or CIS cells were cultured for 14 days with sustained proliferation of germ cells and CIS cells and without increased apoptosis. Seminoma cultures survived 7 days, with proliferating cells detectable during the first 5 days. Activin A treatment significantly reduced KIT transcript and protein levels in seminoma cultures, thereby demonstrating a specific treatment response. Hanging drop cultures of human testis and testis cancer samples can be employed to delineate mechanisms governing growth of normal, CIS and tumorigenic germ cells retained within their niche.

  9. First Clinical Investigation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Deformable Registration for Adaptive Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, Catarina [Proton and Advanced RadioTherapy Group, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Janssens, Guillaume [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Teng, Ching-Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Baudier, Thomas; Hotoiu, Lucian [iMagX Project, ICTEAM Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); McClelland, Jamie R. [Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Royle, Gary [Proton and Advanced RadioTherapy Group, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Lin, Liyong; Yin, Lingshu; Metz, James; Solberg, Timothy D.; Tochner, Zelig; Simone, Charles B.; McDonough, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kevin Teo, Boon-Keng, E-mail: teok@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: An adaptive proton therapy workflow using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is proposed. It consists of an online evaluation of a fast range-corrected dose distribution based on a virtual CT (vCT) scan. This can be followed by more accurate offline dose recalculation on the vCT scan, which can trigger a rescan CT (rCT) for replanning. Methods and Materials: The workflow was tested retrospectively for 20 consecutive lung cancer patients. A diffeomorphic Morphon algorithm was used to generate the lung vCT by deforming the average planning CT onto the CBCT scan. An additional correction step was applied to account for anatomic modifications that cannot be modeled by deformation alone. A set of clinical indicators for replanning were generated according to the water equivalent thickness (WET) and dose statistics and compared with those obtained on the rCT scan. The fast dose approximation consisted of warping the initial planned dose onto the vCT scan according to the changes in WET. The potential under- and over-ranges were assessed as a variation in WET at the target's distal surface. Results: The range-corrected dose from the vCT scan reproduced clinical indicators similar to those of the rCT scan. The workflow performed well under different clinical scenarios, including atelectasis, lung reinflation, and different types of tumor response. Between the vCT and rCT scans, we found a difference in the measured 95% percentile of the over-range distribution of 3.4 ± 2.7 mm. The limitations of the technique consisted of inherent uncertainties in deformable registration and the drawbacks of CBCT imaging. The correction step was adequate when gross errors occurred but could not recover subtle anatomic or density changes in tumors with complex topology. Conclusions: A proton therapy workflow based on CBCT provided clinical indicators similar to those using rCT for patients with lung cancer with considerable anatomic changes.

  10. Direct-access to abdominal ultrasonic investigation from general practice-the role in earlier cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeman, Mads Lind; Ormstrup, Tina E; Vedsted, Peter

    2015-01-01

    at diagnosticere kræft i bughulen, fordi de første tegn tit er uspecifikke og svage. Formålet med dette studie var at beskrive de praktiserende læges brug af muligheden for direkte adgang til ultralydsscanning af bughulen og at undersøge udbredelsen af kræft hos de henviste patienter. De deltagende læger havde...... mulighed for enten at henvise patienterne direkte til ultralydsskanning eller via en normal venteliste. Knap 60 % af patienterne blev henvist via den direkte adgang, og 2,7 % af alle henviste patienter fik konstateret kræft i løbet af de første seks måneder efter skanningen. Skanningen gav direkte mistanke...... om kræft hos 57,9 % af kræftpatienterne, og 90 % af disse cancere blev fundet hos patienter, som blev henvist via den direkte adgang. Resultaterne var ikke signifikante, men de tyder dog på, at de praktiserende læger generelt vælger at henvise patienter med en større kræftrisiko til den direkte...

  11. Magnetic fields and childhood cancer: an epidemiological investigation of the effects of high-voltage underground cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, K J; Vincent, T J; Murphy, M F G; Swanson, J

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence of increased risks for childhood leukaemia from magnetic fields has implicated, as one source of such fields, high-voltage overhead lines. Magnetic fields are not the only factor that varies in their vicinity, complicating interpretation of any associations. Underground cables (UGCs), however, produce magnetic fields but have no other discernible effects in their vicinity. We report here the largest ever epidemiological study of high voltage UGCs, based on 52 525 cases occurring from 1962–2008, with matched birth controls. We calculated the distance of the mother’s address at child’s birth to the closest 275 or 400 kV ac or high-voltage dc UGC in England and Wales and the resulting magnetic fields. Few people are exposed to magnetic fields from UGCs limiting the statistical power. We found no indications of an association of risk with distance or of trend in risk with increasing magnetic field for leukaemia, and no convincing pattern of risks for any other cancer. Trend estimates for leukaemia as shown by the odds ratio (and 95% confidence interval) per unit increase in exposure were: reciprocal of distance 0.99 (0.95–1.03), magnetic field 1.01 (0.76–1.33). The absence of risk detected in relation to UGCs tends to add to the argument that any risks from overhead lines may not be caused by magnetic fields. (paper)

  12. [Surgery for colorectal cancer since the introduction of the Netherlands national screening programmeInvestigations into changes in number of resections and waiting times for surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Neree Tot Babberich, M P M; van der Willik, E M; van Groningen, J T; Ledeboer, M; Wiggers, T; Wouters, M W J M

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the impact of the Netherlands national colorectal cancer screening programme on the number of surgical resections for colorectal carcinoma and on waiting times for surgery. Descriptive study. Data were extracted from the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit. Patients with primary colorectal cancer surgery between 2011-2015 were included. The volume and median waiting times for the years 2011-2015 are described. Waiting times from first tumor positive biopsy until the operation (biopsy-operation) and first preoperative visit to the surgeon until the operation (visit-operation) are analyzed with a univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis. Separate analysis was done for visit-operation for academic and non-academic hospitals and for screening compared to non-screening patients. In 2014 there was an increase of 1469 (15%) patients compared to 2013. In 2015 this increase consisted of 1168 (11%) patients compared to 2014. In 2014 and 2015, 1359 (12%) and 3111 (26%) patients were referred to the surgeon through screening, respectively. The median waiting time of biopsy-operation significantly decreased (ß: 0.94, 95%BI) over the years 2014-2015 compared to 2011-2013. In non-academic hospitals, the waiting time visit-operation also decreased significantly (ß: 0.89, 95%BI 0.87-0.90) over the years 2014-2015 compared to 2011-2013. No difference was found in waiting times between patients referred to the surgeon through screening compared to non-screening. There is a clear increase in volume since the introduction of the colorectal cancer screening programme without an increase in waiting time until surgery.

  13. The association of pattern of lifetime alcohol use and cause of death in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Manuela M; Rehm, Jürgen; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Boeing, Heiner; Schütze, Madlen; Drogan, Dagmar; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Halkjær, Jytte; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Teucher, Birgit; Kaaks, Rudolph; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Palli, Domenico; Pala, Valeria; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Beulens, Joline WJ; Redondo, Maria Luisa; Duell, Eric J; Molina-Montes, Esther; Navarro, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Arriola, Larraitz; Allen, Naomi E; Crowe, Francesca L; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Romaguera, Dora; Wark, Petra A; Romieu, Isabelle; Nunes, Luciana; Riboli, Elio; Ferrari, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence for an association between the pattern of lifetime alcohol use and cause-specific risk of death. Methods Multivariable hazard ratios were estimated for different causes of death according to patterns of lifetime alcohol consumption using a competing risks approach: 111 953 men and 268 442 women from eight countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study were included. Self-reported alcohol consumption at ages 20, 30, 40 or 50 years and at enrolment were used for the analysis; 26 411 deaths were observed during an average of 12.6 years of follow-up. Results The association between lifetime alcohol use and death from cardiovascular diseases was different from the association seen for alcohol-related cancers, digestive, respiratory, external and other causes. Heavy users (>5 drinks/day for men and >2.5 drinks/day for women), regardless of time of cessation, had a 2- to 5-times higher risk of dying due to alcohol-related cancers, compared with subjects with lifetime light use (≤1 and ≤0.5 drink/week for men and women, respectively). Compared with lifetime light users, men who used <5 drinks/day throughout their lifetime had a 24% lower cardiovascular disease mortality (95% confidence interval 2-41). The risk of death from coronary heart disease was also found to be 34–46% lower among women who were moderate to occasionally heavy alcohol users compared with light users. However, this relationship was only evident among men and women who had no chronic disease at enrolment. Conclusions Limiting alcohol use throughout life is associated with a lower risk of death, largely due to cardiovascular disease but also other causes. However, the potential health benefits of alcohol use are difficult to establish due to the possibility of selection bias and competing risks related to diseases occurring later in life. PMID:24415611

  14. Comparison of investigator-delineated gross tumor volumes and quality assurance in pancreatic cancer: Analysis of the pretrial benchmark case for the SCALOP trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Clifford, Charlotte; Spezi, Emiliano; Joseph, George; Branagan, Jennifer; Hurt, Chris; Nixon, Lisette; Abrams, Ross; Staffurth, John; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the variation in investigator-delineated volumes and assess plans from the radiotherapy trial quality assurance (RTTQA) program of SCALOP, a phase II trial in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Participating investigators (n=25) outlined a pre-trial benchmark case as per RT protocol, and the accuracy of investigators' GTV (iGTV) and PTV (iPTV) was evaluated, against the trials team-defined gold standard GTV (gsGTV) and PTV (gsPTV), using both qualitative and geometric analyses. The median Jaccard Conformity Index (JCI) and Geographical Miss Index (GMI) were calculated. Participating RT centers also submitted a radiotherapy plan for this benchmark case, which was centrally reviewed against protocol-defined constraints. Twenty-five investigator-defined contours were evaluated. The median JCI and GMI of iGTVs were 0.57 (IQR: 0.51-0.65) and 0.26 (IQR: 0.15-0.40). For iPTVs, these were 0.75 (IQR: 0.71-0.79) and 0.14 (IQR: 0.11-0.22) respectively. Qualitative analysis showed largest variation at the tumor edges and failure to recognize a peri-pancreatic lymph node. There were no major protocol deviations in RT planning, but three minor PTV coverage deviations were identified. . SCALOP demonstrated considerable variation in iGTV delineation. RTTQA workshops and real-time central review of delineations are needed in future trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation of Pitch and Jaw Width to Decrease Delivery Time of Helical Tomotherapy Treatments for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldovan, Monica; Fontenot, Jonas D.; Gibbons, John P.; Lee, Tae Kyu; Rosen, Isaac I.; Fields, Robert S.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy plans using a combination of pitch and jaw width settings were developed for 3 patients previously treated for head and neck cancer. Three jaw widths (5, 2.5, and 1 cm) and 4 pitches (0.86, 0.43, 0.287, and 0.215) were used with a (maximum) modulation factor setting of 4. Twelve plans were generated for each patient using an identical optimization procedure (e.g., number of iterations, objective weights, and penalties, etc.), based on recommendations from TomoTherapy (Madison, WI). The plans were compared using isodose plots, dose volume histograms, dose homogeneity indexes, conformity indexes, radiobiological models, and treatment times. Smaller pitches and jaw widths showed better target dose homogeneity and sparing of normal tissue, as expected. However, the treatment time increased inversely proportional to the jaw width, resulting in delivery times of 24 ± 1.9 min for the 1-cm jaw width. Although treatment plans produced with the 2.5-cm jaw were dosimetrically superior to plans produced with the 5-cm jaw, subsequent calculations of tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities suggest that these differences may not be radiobiologically meaningful. Because treatment plans produced with the 5-cm jaw can be delivered in approximately half the time of plans produced with the 2.5-cm jaw (5.1 ± 0.6 min vs. 9.5 ± 1.1 min), use of the 5-cm jaw in routine treatment planning may be a viable approach to decreasing treatment delivery times from helical tomotherapy units.

  16. An investigation of the effects of therapeutic touch plan on acute chemotherapy-induced nausea in women with breast cancer in Isfahan, Iran, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matourypour, Pegah; Zare, Zahra; Mehrzad, Valiolah; Musarezaie, Amir; Dehghan, Mojtaba; Vanaki, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Nausea is the worst and most prevalent chemotherapy-induced complication experienced by 70-80% of patients despite mediation therapy. Reduction of nausea is one of the most important roles of oncologist nurses. Today, complementary therapies in addition to classic medicine, because of their lower costs, receive much attention. Nonetheless, their safety and effectiveness are not yet proven. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of therapeutic touch plan as a complementary therapy on acute nausea in women with breast cancer in 2012-2013 in Isfahan, Iran. A quasi-experimental, single-blind, randomized control trial with three groups (control, placebo and intervention) was performed at the Isfahan Seyedolshohada (AS) Teaching Hospital, Isfahan, in 2012-2013. The intervention was therapeutic touch plan on women with breast cancer, with the three groups receiving the same medicine regimen. Information was recorded by a checklist after infusion of chemotherapy drugs. Data analysis was performed by SPSS, ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The ANOVA test showed that the therapeutic touch plan was significantly effective in reducing the duration of nausea compared with the control and placebo groups (P touch plan was significantly effective in delaying the onset of nausea compared with the control and placebo groups (P touch plan is effective in reducing acute chemotherapy-induced nausea; thus, education and implementation of the therapeutic touch plan is proposed for clinical nurses.

  17. An investigation of the effects of therapeutic touch plan on acute chemotherapy-induced nausea in women with breast cancer in Isfahan, Iran, 2012–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matourypour, Pegah; Zare, Zahra; Mehrzad, Valiolah; Musarezaie, Amir; Dehghan, Mojtaba; Vanaki, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nausea is the worst and most prevalent chemotherapy-induced complication experienced by 70–80% of patients despite mediation therapy. Reduction of nausea is one of the most important roles of oncologist nurses. Today, complementary therapies in addition to classic medicine, because of their lower costs, receive much attention. Nonetheless, their safety and effectiveness are not yet proven. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of therapeutic touch plan as a complementary therapy on acute nausea in women with breast cancer in 2012–2013 in Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: A quasi-experimental, single-blind, randomized control trial with three groups (control, placebo and intervention) was performed at the Isfahan Seyedolshohada (AS) Teaching Hospital, Isfahan, in 2012–2013. The intervention was therapeutic touch plan on women with breast cancer, with the three groups receiving the same medicine regimen. Information was recorded by a checklist after infusion of chemotherapy drugs. Data analysis was performed by SPSS, ANOVA and Kruskal–Wallis tests. Results: The ANOVA test showed that the therapeutic touch plan was significantly effective in reducing the duration of nausea compared with the control and placebo groups (P touch plan was significantly effective in delaying the onset of nausea compared with the control and placebo groups (P touch plan is effective in reducing acute chemotherapy-induced nausea; thus, education and implementation of the therapeutic touch plan is proposed for clinical nurses. PMID:26430688

  18. Options for investigative postsurgical therapy for gastric cancer, and case report of using the option for combined immunotherapy and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, P

    2001-02-01

    The investigative therapy for a senior patient after radical subtotal gastroesophagectomy for regional lymph node and proximal esophagus metastasized adenocarcinoma (stage IIIA, T3, N 1 M0) of the cardioesophageal junction is reported. The case has several unusual features: (1) the patient is the author and is not a physician; (2) in the absence of codified postsurgical treatment, he used his academic biomedical background, commercial associations, and international contacts to find and prioritize six clinically tested options for investigative postsurgical therapy; (3) after unsuccessful efforts to append ongoing clinical trials of new immunotherapies for breast adenocarcinoma (the first two therapy options), an innovative protocol was designed and gained allowance by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for his use of combined nonspecific immunotherapy and chemotherapy based on extensive trials in South Korea that showed the synergistic effect of the two postsurgical therapies used together. A potent, new, nonspecific immunostimulant (DetoxPC) was injected subcutaneously in 10 diminishing doses during 105 weeks. Two standard chemotherapeutic drugs (5-fluorouracil and mitomycin-C) were injected intravenously in six equal doses during three weeks. Five years after the surgery, the patient enjoys good health without signs or symptoms of recurrence or metastasis. He discusses his perspectives on future clinical trials and on a patient actively pursuing investigative postsurgical therapy for a malignancy when otherwise poor survival is indicated.

  19. An investigation of compositions and effects of local herbal Glycyrrhiza glabra and Mentha pulegium extracts on Helicobacter pylori and cell Line of stomach cancer (AGS by MTT assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Salmani Jamaat1

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim:According to globally development of stomach cancer especially in Ardabil, Iran, as the second major cause of mortality throughout the world, increased drug-resistant bacteria including Helicobacter pylori as the most important risk factors for stomach cancer, and side effects of antibiotics and chemical drugs normally used to treat. Experimental: The current research was conducted to investigate the anticancer and antimicrobial effects of native herbs of liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra and pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium extractions for finding a solution with the lowest complications in control or treatment of stomach cancer.The extractions were firstly obtained using Soxhlet and methanol solvent and then their compounds were determined by GC/MS. Antimicrobial activity, MIC and MBC of the extractions were assessed respectively using agar diffusion and broth dilution test and the anticancer effect on stomach cancer (cell line AGS was assessed by MTT assay. H. pylori ATCC 26695 was respectively revived and purified on Brucella broth containing 7% citrated horse serum and Columbia agar. Results: The analysis showed that liquorice extract contains 15 compositions, mainly consists of 26.48% Nonane, 23.38% Ethylcyclohexan, 8.29% 3-Bromodecane, 10.31% trans-2-Heptenal, 8.93% 9-Octadecenamide and 4.68% β-pregna and pennyroyal extract contains 17 compositions, mainly including 3.36% Camphor, 22.79% Pulegone, 4.92% Paramenth-3-n8-l, 8.06% Menthoforan, 7.54% Cis-Isopulegon and 24.58% α-Selinene. The bacteria were resistant or semi-sensitive to common antibiotics, whereas had considerable sensitivity to herbal extracts and liquorice showed almost three times more antibacterial effect. Pennyroyal extract had no cytotoxic effects, but the anticancer effect was observed in liquorice extract with optimal concentration of 25 μg/ml after 48 hours. Recommended applications/industries: In conclusion, liquorice extract due to the significant health

  20. [Investigation of Helicobacter pylori iceA1 and iceA2 genes in patients with chronic gastritis and gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, Ihsan Hakkı; Uslan, Ihsan; Dilek, Fatma Hüsniye; Aşık, Gülşah; Ozgür, Mihrican Aydın; Dilek, Osman Nuri

    2011-04-01

    Several virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori play crucial role in the pathogenesis of the infections.H.pylori iceA gene which is induced by the contact with epithelium during the attachment of bacterium to the gastric mucosa, possess two variants (iceA1 and iceA2). Although there are some data indicating the relationship between H.pylori iceA1 and peptic ulcer, this concept is still controversial. The aims of this study were to investigate the presence and prevalence of H.pylori iceA1 and iceA2 gene regions in the tissue samples of patients diagnosed as chronic gastritis and gastric cancer, and to evaluate whether any correlation existed between these genotypes and clinical manifestations. A total of 109 tissue samples obtained from chronic gastritis (n= 55) and gastric cancer (n= 54) patients whose H.pylori infections have been confirmed by histopathologic examination of biopsy samples, were included in the study. The presence of H.pylori in the samples were also confirmed by amplification of the ureA gene region by inhouse polymerase chain reaction (PCR). H.pylori iceA1 and iceA2 genes were directly genotyped with the use of specific primers in the gastric biopsy specimens by PCR. The total positivity rates of iceA1 and ice- A2 genotypes in patients were found as 58% (63/109) and 24% (26/109), respectively. With the special attention to chronic gastritis and gastric cancer patients, the frequencies of iceA1 gene were 51% (28/55) and 65% (35/54), while the frequencies of iceA2 gene were 20% (11/55) and 28% (15/54), respectively. The difference of positivity rates of iceA1 and iceA2 genotypes between the patient groups were not statistically significant (p> 0.05). There was also no statistically significant correlation between the genotypes and clinical manifestation (r> 0.01). As a result, H.pylori iceA1 genotype was predominant (58%) in chronic gastritis and gastric cancer patients in our region, however the prevalence of iceA2 genotype was lower (24

  1. Perspectives on barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment for clinical trials among cancer center leaders, investigators, research staff, and referring clinicians: enhancing minority participation in clinical trials (EMPaCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Raegan W; Wenzel, Jennifer A; Scarinci, Isabel C; Paterniti, Debora A; Fouad, Mona N; Hurd, Thelma C; Martin, Michelle Y

    2014-04-01

    The study of disparities in minority recruitment to cancer clinical trials has focused primarily on inquiries among minority populations. Yet very little is known about the perceptions of individuals actively involved in minority recruitment to clinical trials within cancer centers. Therefore, the authors assessed the perspectives of cancer center clinical and research personnel on barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment. In total, 91 qualitative interviews were conducted at 5 US cancer centers among 4 stakeholder groups: cancer center leaders, principal investigators, research staff, and referring clinicians. All interviews were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative analyses of response data was focused on identifying prominent themes related to barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment. The perspectives of the 4 stakeholder groups were largely overlapping with some variations based on their unique roles in minority recruitment. Four prominent themes were identified: 1) racial and ethnic minorities are influenced by varying degrees of skepticism related to trial participation, 2) potential minority participants often face multilevel barriers that preclude them from being offered an opportunity to participate in a clinical trial, 3) facilitators at both the institutional and participant level potentially encourage minority recruitment, and 4) variation between internal and external trial referral procedures may limit clinical trial opportunities for racial and ethnic minorities. Multilevel approaches are needed to address barriers and optimize facilitators within cancer centers to enhance minority recruitment for cancer clinical trials. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  2. Effect of dietary fatty acid intake on prospective weight change in the Heidelberg cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Berg-Beckhoff, Gabi; Linseisen, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between fatty acid (alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), EPA, DHA, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and arachidonic acids) intake and prospective weight change in the Heidelberg cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. DESIGN....... RESULTS: Stearic acid intake was linearly associated with weight gain (P acid intake, significantly so in women. In multinomial models, women in the highest tertile of ALA and stearic acid intake showed increased OR (95 % CI......) and categorised into four groups (weight loss, or =2.5 to or =7.5%/5 years). Energy-adjusted dietary fatty acid intake data were estimated from the FFQ completed at baseline. Multivariate linear regression models as well as multinomial logistic regression analyses (carbohydrate replacement models) were conducted...

  3. Investigation of the Causes of Breast Cancer at the Cellular Level: Isolation of In Vivo Binding Sites of the Human Origin Recognition Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mendez, Juan

    2000-01-01

    ... of cellular life tipically lost in cancer. In order to unravel the molecular mechanisms of human DNA replication in normal and cancer cells, we have started a search for human DNA sequences that serve as replicators", this is, binding sites...

  4. Investigation of the dosimetric accuracy of the isocenter shifting method in prostate cancer patients with and without hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Andrew B.; Kinsey, Erica; Xia Ping

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The use of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) enables compensation for prostate movement by shifting the treatment isocenter to track the prostate on a daily basis. Although shifting the isocenter can alter the source to skin distances (SSDs) and the effective depth of the target volume, it is commonly assumed that these changes have a negligible dosimetric effect, and therefore, the number of monitor units delivered is usually not adjusted. However, it is unknown whether or not this assumption is valid for patient with hip prostheses, which frequently contain high density materials. Methods: The authors conducted a retrospective study to investigate dosimetric effect of the isocenter shifting method for prostate patients with and without hip prostheses. For each patient, copies of the prostate volume were shifted by up to 1.5 cm from the original position to simulate prostate movement in 0.5 cm increments. Subsequently, 12 plans were created for each patient by creating a copy of the original plan for each prostate position with the isocenter shifted to track the position of the shifted prostate. The dose to the prostate was then recalculated for each plan. For patients with hip prostheses, plans were created both with and without lateral beam angles entering through the prostheses. Results: Without isocenter shifting to compensate for prostate motion of 1.5 cm, the dose to the 95% of the prostate (D-95%) changed by an average of 30% and by up to 64%. This was reduced to less than 3% with the isocenter shifting method. It was found that for patients with hip prostheses, this technique worked best for treatment plans that avoided beam angles passing through the prostheses. Conclusions: The results demonstrated that the isocenter shifting method can accurately deliver dose to the prostate even in patients with hip prostheses.

  5. Weather, day length and physical activity in older adults: Cross-sectional results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC Norfolk Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tzu Wu

    Full Text Available A wide range of environmental factors have been related to active ageing, but few studies have explored the impact of weather and day length on physical activity in older adults. We investigate the cross-sectional association between weather conditions, day length and activity in older adults using a population-based cohort in England, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC Norfolk study.Physical activity was measured objectively over 7 days using an accelerometer and this was used to calculate daily total physical activity (counts per minute, daily minutes of sedentary behaviour and light, moderate and vigorous physical activity (LMVPA. Day length and two types of weather conditions, precipitation and temperature, were obtained from a local weather station. The association between these variables and physical activity was examined by multilevel first-order autoregressive modelling.After adjusting for individual factors, short day length and poor weather conditions, including high precipitation and low temperatures, were associated with up to 10% lower average physical activity (p<0.01 and 8 minutes less time spent in LMVPA but 15 minutes more sedentary time, compared to the best conditions.Day length and weather conditions appear to be an important factor related to active ageing. Future work should focus on developing potential interventions to reduce their impact on physical activity behaviours in older adults.

  6. In vitro investigation of the effect of matrix molecules on the behavior of colon cancer cells under the effect of geldanamycin derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Kamil; Kosova, Funda; Kurt, Feyzan Özdal; Tuğlu, İbrahim

    2017-10-01

    The chaperone-binding drug, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, has recently come into clinical use. It is a derivative of geldanamycin, an ansamycin benzoquinone antibiotic with anti-carcinogenic effect. Understanding the effect of this drug on the cancer cells and their niche is important for treatment. We applied 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin to colon cancer cell line (Colo 205) on matrix molecules to investigate the relationship of apoptosis with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling immunocytochemistry and related gene expression. We used laminin and collagen I for matrix molecules and vascular endothelial growth factor for angiogenic structure. We also examined apoptosis-related signaling pathway including mitochondrial proteins, cytochrome c, Bcl-2, caspase-9, Apaf-1 expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction. There was clear effect of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin that killed more cells on tissue culture plastic compared to matrix molecules. The IC 50 value was 0.58 µg/mL for tissue culture plastic compared with 0.64 µg/mL for laminin and 0.75 µg/mL for collagen I. The analyses showed that more cells on matrix molecules underwent apoptosis compared to that on tissue culture plastic. Apoptosis-related gene expression was similar in which Bcl-2 expression decreased and proapoptotic gene expression of the cells on matrix molecules increased compared to that on tissue culture plastic. However, the application of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin was more effective for the cells on collagen I compared to the cells on laminin. There was also a decrease in angiogenesis as shown by the vascular endothelial growth factor staining. This was more pronounced by coating of the tissue culture plastic with matrix molecules. Our results supported the anti-cancer effect of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, and this effect depended on matrix molecules. This effect occurs through apoptosis, and related

  7. Self-administered versus provider-directed sampling in the Anishinaabek Cervical Cancer Screening Study (ACCSS): a qualitative investigation with Canadian First Nations women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehbe, Ingeborg; Wakewich, Pamela; King, Amy-Dee; Morrisseau, Kyla; Tuck, Candace

    2017-09-01

    While (Pap)anicolaou screening has helped to decrease cervical cancer incidence in Canada, First Nations women continue to have a higher burden and mortality relative to mainstream populations. Many First Nations women may feel uncomfortable with the invasiveness of this test, contributing to this statistic. Implemented from 2009 to 2015 in 10 Northwest Ontario First Nations communities, the Anishinaabek Cervical Cancer Screening Study (ACCSS) uniquely addressed this Indigenous health inequity through a mixed methods approach. Our goal was to offer an alternative test which the women could do themselves: human papillomavirus (HPV) testing based on self-sampling. We investigated whether First Nations women preferred HPV self-sampling over healthcare provider (HCP)-administered Pap screening. Participatory action researchinformed by the ethical space concept has guided all stages of the ACCSS. We conducted qualitative interviews with 16 HCPs and 8 focus group discussions with 69 female community members followed by a cluster-randomised controlled trial (RCT). Here, we draw on the qualitative field data and an end-of-study community update gathering to disseminate and contextualise research findings. Informant data were evaluated using thematic analysis. We discuss factors influencing participants' strong preference for HPV self-sampling over physician-conducted Pap screening. Key arguments included enhanced accessibility and more personal control, less physical and emotional discomfort and fewer concerns regarding privacy of test results. For future implementation of HPV self-sampling, study participants emphasised the need for more culturally sensitive education addressed to community members of all genders, starting at school, clarifying that HPV causes cervical cancer. Further, HPV infection should be de-stigmatised by accentuating that it affects men and women alike. Here we show that self-sampling in conjunction with community engagement and culturally sensitive

  8. Couples' communication before the wife's death to cancer and the widower's feelings of guilt or regret after the loss - a population-based investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, Junmei Miao; Hauksdóttir, Arna; Nemes, Szilard; Surkan, Pamela J; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Onelöv, Erik; Steineck, Gunnar

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the association between couples' communication before the wife's death to cancer and the widower's feelings of guilt and regret after the loss, in a population-based data. Men (n=907) younger than 80 years and living in Sweden, who had lost their wives due to cancer, were asked 4-5 years after their loss to answer an anonymous postal questionnaire it included questions about the couple's end-of-life communication during the last 3 months of life and the widower's feelings of guilt or regret during the first 6 months after the wife's death. During the last 3 months of their wives' lives, men who had not talked about the impending death with their wives had a higher risk of experiencing feelings of guilt than men who did talk (relative risk (RR) 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-3.4). Men who were not able to spend as much time as they wished with their wives had an increase in the risk of having feelings of guilt twice that of men who spent time (RR 2.0 95% CI 1.5-2.7). Men who did not talk with their wives about how they could cope practically or emotionally after the death had elevated risks of guilt feelings compared with men who talked (RR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.0; RR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-2.9, respectively). Men who realised it was too late to discuss the impending death had an increased risk of guilt feelings (RR 4.3, 95% CI 2.9-6.6). Men who thought that not everything had been brought to closure before their wives' deaths had 3.3 times increased risk of guilt feeling (RR 3.3, 95% CI 1.7-6.4). A man who does not have end-of-life discussions with his wife during the last 3 months before her death from cancer may be subject to a significantly greater risk of experiencing feelings of guilt or regret in widowhood than men who did engage in such discussions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis and biodistribution of novel magnetic-poly(HEMA-APH) nanopolymer radiolabeled with iodine-131 and investigation its fate in vivo for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcıbaşı, Uğur; Avcıbaşı, Nesibe; Akalın, Hilmi Arkut; Ediz, Melis; Demiroğlu, Hasan; Gümüşer, Fikriye Gül; Özçalışkan, Emir; Türkcan, Ceren; Uygun, Deniz Aktaş; Akgöl, Sinan

    2013-10-01

    Herein, we investigated the biological uptake, distribution, and radiopharmaceutical potential of a novel molecule based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and anilinephtalein (APH) in the metabolism of Albino Wistar rats. In order to achieve this, we synthesized APH using organic synthesis methods and copolymerized APH with HEMA using a common polymerization method, surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. In the presence of Fe3O4 particles, we obtained a new generation magnetic-nano-scale polymer, magnetic-poly(HEMA-APH). This new molecule was chemically identified and approved by several characterization methods using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron spin resonance, atomic force microscope, and Zeta particle-size analysis. To evaluate the biological activity in live metabolism and anti-cancer potential of mag-poly(HEMA-APH), molecule was radioiodinated by a widely used labeling technique, iodogen method, with a gamma diffuser radionuclide, 131I. Thin-layer radiochromatography experiments demonstrated that 131I binded to nanopolymer with the labeling yield of 90 %. Lipophilicity and stability experiments were conducted to determine the condition of cold and labeled mag-poly(HEMA-APH) in rat blood and lipid medium. Results demonstrated that radioiodinated molecule stayed as an intact complex in rat metabolism for 24 h and experimental lipophilicity was determined as 0.12 ± 0.02. In vivo results obtained by imaging and biological distribution experiments indicated that mag-poly(HEMA-APH) labeled with 131I [131I-mag-poly(HEMA-APH)] highly incorporated into tissues of the uterus, the ovarian, the prostate, and the lungs in rat metabolism. Based on these results, it may be evaluated that novel mag-poly(HEMA-APH) molecule labeled with 131I is a compound which has a significant potential for being used as an anti-cancer agent. Certain results can only be obtained whether this

  10. Consumption of added fats and oils in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) centres across 10 European countries as assessed by 24-hour dietary recalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linseisen, J; Bergström, E; Gafá, L; González, C A; Thiébaut, A; Trichopoulou, A; Tumino, R; Navarro Sánchez, C; Martínez Garcia, C; Mattisson, I; Nilsson, S; Welch, A; Spencer, E A; Overvad, K; Tjønneland, A; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Kesse, E; Miller, A B; Schulz, M; Botsi, K; Naska, A; Sieri, S; Sacerdote, C; Ocké, M C; Peeters, P H M; Skeie, G; Engeset, D; Charrondière, U R; Slimani, N

    2002-12-01

    To evaluate the consumption of added fats and oils across the European centres and countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 24-Hour dietary recalls were collected by means of standardised computer-guided interviews in 27 redefined EPIC centres across 10 European countries. From an initial number of 36 900 subjects, single dietary recalls from 22 924 women and 13 031 men in the age range of 35-74 years were included. Mean daily intake of added fats and oils varied between 16.2 g (Varese, Italy) and 41.1 g (Malmö, Sweden) in women and between 24.7 g (Ragusa, Italy) and 66.0 g (Potsdam, Germany) in men. Total mean lipid intake by consumption of added fats and oils, including those used for sauce preparation, ranged between 18.3 (Norway) and 37.2 g day-1 (Greece) in women and 28.4 (Heidelberg, Germany) and 51.2 g day-1 (Greece) in men. The Mediterranean EPIC centres with high olive oil consumption combined with low animal fat intake contrasted with the central and northern European centres where fewer vegetable oils, more animal fats and a high proportion of margarine were consumed. The consumption of added fats and oils of animal origin was highest in the German EPIC centres, followed by the French. The contribution of added fats and oils to total energy intake ranged from 8% in Norway to 22% in Greece. The results demonstrate a high variation in dietary intake of added fats and oils in EPIC, providing a good opportunity to elucidate the role of dietary fats in cancer aetiology.

  11. Investigating the Effects of Regular Resistance Training and Prostatic Massage on Proinflammatory Markers and Serum Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels in Males with Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathollahi Shoorabeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Some studies support that chronic inflammation of prostate tissue plays a role in the development of PC. A variety of growth factors and cytokines may lead to proinflammatory processes within the prostate. Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of eight weeks of regular resistance training and prostatic massage on proinflammatory markers CRP, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels in males with PC. Patients and Methods Forty-five patients with PC were selected for this study. They were randomized into either the resistance training intervention group (n = 15, the massage intervention group (n = 15, or the control group (n = 15. Resistance-training patients participated in resistance training for eight weeks, and massage was performed for six weeks on the massage group. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to analyze the data (P ≤ 0.05. Results In the resistance training group, IL-10 levels significantly increased after four (P = 0.055 and eight weeks (P = 0.000. Four and eight weeks of resistance training showed a significant reduction in PSA, CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α levels (P < 0.05. Patients of massage intervention showed an increase in IL-10 after four (P = 0.045 and six weeks (P = 0.005. In addition, four and six weeks of massage intervention showed a significant reduction in PSA, CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α levels (P < 0.05. Conclusions Regular resistance training and prostatic massage can improve proinflammatory markers and PSA levels in men with PC.

  12. The Patient-Reported Information Multidimensional Exploration (PRIME) Framework for Investigating Emotions and Other Factors of Prostate Cancer Patients with Low Intermediate Risk Based on Online Cancer Support Group Discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaragoda, Tharindu; Ranasinghe, Weranja; Adikari, Achini; de Silva, Daswin; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Alahakoon, Damminda; Persad, Raj; Bolton, Damien

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed to use the Patient Reported Information Multidimensional Exploration (PRIME) framework, a novel ensemble of machine-learning and deep-learning algorithms, to extract, analyze, and correlate self-reported information from Online Cancer Support Groups (OCSG) by patients (and partners of patients) with low intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP), external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and active surveillance (AS), and to investigate its efficacy in quality-of-life (QoL) and emotion measures. From patient-reported information on 10 OCSG, the PRIME framework automatically filtered and extracted conversations on low intermediate-risk PCa with active user participation. Side effects as well as emotional and QoL outcomes for 6084 patients were analyzed. Side-effect profiles differed between the methods analyzed, with men after RP having more urinary and sexual side effects and men after EBRT having more bowel symptoms. Key findings from the analysis of emotional expressions showed that PCa patients younger than 40 years expressed significantly high positive and negative emotions compared with other age groups, that partners of patients expressed more negative emotions than the patients, and that selected cohorts ( 70 years, partners of patients) have frequently used the same terms to express their emotions, which is indicative of QoL issues specific to those cohorts. Despite recent advances in patient-centerd care, patient emotions are largely overlooked, especially in younger men with a diagnosis of PCa and their partners. The authors present a novel approach, the PRIME framework, to extract, analyze, and correlate key patient factors. This framework improves understanding of QoL and identifies low intermediate-risk PCa patients who require additional support.

  13. Investigation of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18), lactoferrin and CD163 as potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Ratana; Lappas, Martha; Riley, Clyde

    2013-01-01

    controls, including 28 women with benign pelvic masses; 91 cancer, including 21 women with borderline tumours). Localisation of each antigen within the ovary was assessed by immunohistochemistry and serum concentrations determined by ELISA assays. RESULTS: Immunoreactive (ir) hCAP-18 and lactoferrin were......BACKGROUND: Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of gynaecological cancer morbidity and mortality in women. Early stage ovarian cancer is usually asymptomatic, therefore, is often first diagnosed when it is widely disseminated. Currently available diagnostics lack the requisite...... and plasma concentrations of three putative ovarian cancer biomarkers: human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18); lactoferrin; and CD163 in normal healthy women and women with ovarian cancer. METHODS: In this case-control cohort study, ovarian tissue and blood samples were obtained from 164 women (73...

  14. Esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Ways of metastatic spreading of esophagus cancer, depending on segmental division of esophagus are considered. Classification of esophagus cancer according to morphological structure, domestic clinical classification according to stages and international classification according to TNM system are presented. Diagnosis of esophagus cancer should be complex and based on results of clinical examination of patients, radiological, endoscopic and morphological investigations. Radiological, surgical and combined (preoperative radiotherapy with successive operation) methods of treatment are used in the case of esophagus cancer. Versions of preoperative radiotherapy are given. Favourable results of applying combined surgical treatment with preoperative radiotherapy are shown

  15. Laboratory investigations in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, M.G.R.

    1999-01-01

    The usefulness of in vitro tests for diagnosis of primary thyroid tumor is negligible. However, monitoring the adequacy of thyroxin replacement and assess the functional aspects of metastatic disease is necessary using the routinely available hormonal tests. Serum thyroglobulin as a tumor marker for monitoring metastatic disease is a well-established and indispensable procedure in all thyroid clinics worldwide

  16. Investigating the effect of therapeutic touch on the intensity of acute chemotherapy-induced vomiting in breast cancer women under chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matourypour, Pegah; Vanaki, Zohreh; Zare, Zahra; Mehrzad, Valiolah; Dehghan, Mojtaba; Ranjbaran, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are the worst and the most prevalent complications experienced by 70-80% of patients. Complementary treatments including therapeutic touch are cost-effective and low-risk, independent nursing interventions. Present research aims at investigating the effect of therapeutic touch on the intensity of acute chemotherapy-induced vomiting in these patients. As a single-blind, randomized clinical trial, the present research was carried out on women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy in Isfahan, Iran. The subjects were divided into three groups of control, placebo, and intervention. The intervention was applied to each patient once for 20 min on the aura (human energy field) focusing on solar chakra. Data gathering instruments included demographic questionnaire and acute vomiting intensity scale. There was a significant difference among the three groups (and also after the intervention) (P touch was effective in reducing vomiting in the intervention group. However, the patients experienced lower-intensity vomiting which may be because of presence of a therapist and probably the reduced anxiety related to an additional intervention. So, further research is recommended considering the placebo group and employing another person in addition to the therapist, who is not skilled for this technique.

  17. Investigation of ‘Head-to-Tail’-Connected Oligoaryl N,O-Ligands as Recognition Motifs for Cancer-Relevant G-Quadruplexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Rizeq

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Oligomeric compounds, constituted of consecutive N,O-heteroaromatic rings, introduce useful and tunable properties as alternative ligands for biomolecular recognition. In this study, we have explored a synthetic scheme relying on Van Leusen oxazole formation, in conjunction with C–H activation of the formed oxazoles and their subsequent C–C cross-coupling to 2-bromopyridines in order to assemble a library of variable-length, ‘head-to-tail’-connected, pyridyl-oxazole ligands. Through investigation of the interaction of the three longer ligands (5-mer, 6-mer, 7-mer with cancer-relevant G-quadruplex structures (human telomeric/22AG and c-Myc oncogene promoter/Myc2345-Pu22, the asymmetric pyridyl-oxazole motif has been demonstrated to be a prominent recognition element for G-quadruplexes. Fluorescence titrations reveal excellent binding affinities of the 7-mer and 6-mer for a Na+-induced antiparallel 22AG G-quadruplex (KD = 0.6 × 10−7 M−1 and 0.8 × 10−7 M−1, respectively, and satisfactory (albeit lower affinities for the 22AG/K+ and Myc2345-Pu22/K+ G-quadruplexes. All ligands tested exhibit substantial selectivity for G-quadruplex versus duplex (ds26 DNA, as evidenced by competitive Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET melting assays. Additionally, the 7-mer and 6-mer are capable of promoting a sharp morphology transition of 22AG/K+ G-quadruplex.

  18. Comparison of investigator-delineated gross tumour volumes and quality assurance in pancreatic cancer: Analysis of the on-trial cases for the SCALOP trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Spezi, Emiliano; Patel, Neel; Hurt, Chris; Nixon, Lisette; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Staffurth, John; Abrams, Ross; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2016-08-01

    We performed a retrospective central review of tumour outlines in patients undergoing radiotherapy in the SCALOP trial. The planning CT scans were reviewed retrospectively by a central review team, and the accuracy of investigators' GTV (iGTV) and PTV (iPTV) was compared to the trials team-defined gold standard (gsGTV and gsPTV) using the Jaccard Conformity Index (JCI) and Geographical Miss Index (GMI). The prognostic value of JCI and GMI was also assessed. The RT plans were also reviewed against protocol-defined constraints. 60 patients with diagnostic-quality planning scans were included. The median whole volume JCI for GTV was 0.64 (IQR: 0.43-0.82), and the median GMI was 0.11 (IQR: 0.05-0.22). For PTVs, the median JCI and GMI were 0.80 (IQR: 0.71-0.88) and 0.04 (IQR: 0.02-0.12) respectively. Tumour was completely missed in 1 patient, and⩾50% of the tumour was missed in 3. Patients with JCI for GTV⩾0.7 had 7.12 (95% CIs: 1.83-27.67, p=0.005) higher odds of progressing by 9months in multivariate analysis. Major deviations in RT planning were noted in 4.5% of cases. Radiotherapy workshops and real-time central review of contours are required in RT trials of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro investigation of the potential immunomodulatory and anti-cancer activities of black pepper (Piper nigrum) and cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdalawieh, Amin F; Carr, Ronald I

    2010-04-01

    Although the immunomodulatory effects of many herbs have been extensively studied, research related to possible immunomodulatory effects of various spices is relatively scarce. Here, the potential immunomodulatory effects of black pepper and cardamom are investigated. Our data show that black pepper and cardamom aqueous extracts significantly enhance splenocyte proliferation in a dose-dependent, synergistic fashion. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay experiments reveal that black pepper and cardamom significantly enhance and suppress, respectively, T helper (Th)1 cytokine release by splenocytes. Conversely, Th2 cytokine release by splenocytes is significantly suppressed and enhanced by black pepper and cardamom, respectively. Experimental evidence suggests that black pepper and cardamom extracts exert pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory roles, respectively. Consistently, nitric oxide production by macrophages is significantly augmented and reduced by black pepper and cardamom, respectively. Remarkably, it is evident that black pepper and cardamom extracts significantly enhance the cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells, indicating their potential anti-cancer effects. Our findings strongly suggest that black pepper and cardamom exert immunomodulatory roles and antitumor activities, and hence they manifest themselves as natural agents that can promote the maintenance of a healthy immune system. We anticipate that black pepper and cardamom constituents can be used as potential therapeutic tools to regulate inflammatory responses and prevent/attenuate carcinogenesis.

  20. Eating out of home: energy, macro- and micronutrient intakes in 10 European countries. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, P; Naska, A; Trichopoulou, A; Grioni, S; Boer, J M A; van Bakel, M M E; Ericson, U; Rohrmann, S; Boeing, H; Rodríguez, L; Ardanaz, E; Sacerdote, C; Giurdanella, M C; Niekerk, E M; Peeters, P H M; Manjer, J; van Guelpen, B; Deharveng, G; Skeie, G; Engeset, D; Halkjaer, J; Jensen, A M; McTaggart, A; Crowe, F; Stratigakou, V; Oikonomou, E; Touvier, M; Niravong, M; Riboli, E; Bingham, S; Slimani, N

    2009-11-01

    To assess the contribution of out-of-home (OH) energy and nutrient intake to total dietary intake, and to compare out- versus in-home nutrient patterns among 27 centres in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Between 1995 and 2000, 36,034 participants aged between 35-74 years completed a standardized 24-h dietary recall using a software programme (EPIC-Soft) that recorded the place of food/drink consumption. Eating OH was defined as the consumption of foods and beverages anywhere other than in household premises, irrespective of the place of purchase/preparation. Nutrient intakes were estimated using a standardized nutrient database. Mean intakes were adjusted for age and weighted by season and day of recall. Among women, OH eating contributed more to total fat intake than to intakes of protein and carbohydrates. Among both genders, and particularly in southern Europe, OH eating contributed more to sugar and starch intakes and less to total fibre intake. The contribution of OH eating was also lower for calcium and vitamin C intakes. The composition of diet at home was different from that consumed out of home in southern countries, but was relatively similar in the north. In northern Europe, OH and in-home eating are homogeneous, whereas southern Europeans consider OH eating as a distinctive occasion. In most centres, women selected more fat-rich items when eating out.

  1. Trends in cigarette smoking in the German centers of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC): the influence of the educational level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, Sabine; Becker, Nikolaus; Kroke, Anja; Boeing, Heiner

    2003-04-01

    Several studies in Germany and other European countries have already shown smoking prevalence to be related to education. This study was aimed to investigate time trends in smoking habits in the German cohorts Heidelberg and Potsdam of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) according to sex, birth cohort, and level of education. Within EPIC, 25,546 and 27,548 participants were recruited in Heidelberg and Potsdam, respectively. Data on smoking were collected by means of a computer-guided interview during the baseline examination between 1994 and 1998. For each birth cohort smoking prevalence and mean number of cigarettes smoked per day at different ages were calculated. Odds ratios and 95% confidence interval for associations between smoking prevalence and educational level were computed by using logistic regression. Smoking prevalence was higher among men than among women, with a smaller difference in younger birth cohorts. Between 1950 and 1960, smoking prevalence among women in the Heidelberg cohort rose sharply (from 12.8% to 51.8% in the least educated group). This strong increase was delayed by 10 years in the Potsdam cohort. Men and women in Heidelberg smoked more cigarettes per day than their counterparts in Potsdam, but in both study centers less educated subjects smoked more than subjects with a higher education. Smoking patterns in the Potsdam and Heidelberg cohorts are quite similar with respect to prevalence and years of lifetime smoking. Since an increasing difference between smoking prevalence of less and high educated individuals is observable, programs on smoking cessation should especially concentrate on persons of lower educational level.

  2. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B [Cancer Care Centers of South Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters.

  3. WE-E-BRE-09: Investigation of the Association Between Radiation-Induced Pain and Radiation Dose in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, H; Dyk, P; Mullen, D; Eschen, L; Fergus, S; Chin, R; Thorstad, W; Oh, J; Apte, A; Deasy, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer who undergo radiotherapy often experience several undesirable side-effects, including xerostomia, trismus, and pain in the head and neck area, but little is know about the dose-volume predictors of such pain. We investigated the association between radiation dose and both throat and esophagus pain during radiotherapy. Methods: We analyzed 124 head and neck patients who received radiotherapy at the Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. For these patients, weekly PROs were recorded, including 16 pain and anatomical location questions. In addition, 17 observational symptoms were recorded. Patients were asked to describe their pain at each site according to a four-level scale: none (0), mild (1), moderate (2), and severe (3). We explored the association between throat pain and the mean dose received in oral cavity and between esophageal pain and the mean dose received in the esophagus. The severity of pain was determined by the difference between the baseline (week 1) pain score and the maximum pain score during treatment. The baseline pain score was defined as the first available pain score before receiving 10 Gy because radiotherapy pain originates later during treatment. Dose-volume metrics were extracted from treatment plans using CERR. To evaluate the correlation between pain and radiation dose, Spearman's correlation coefficient (Rs) was used. Results: The associations between throat pain and the mean dose to the oral cavity, and between esophagus pain and the mean dose to the esophagus, were both statistically significant, with Rs=0.320 (p=0.003) and Rs=0.424 (p<0.0001), respectively. Mean dose, for each structure, was a better predictor of pain than total integral dose. Conclusion: We demonstrated that pain during radiotherapy in head and neck patients highly correlates with the dose delivered. We will further investigate the association between other pain locations and relevant normal tissue

  4. Nuclear survivin and its relationship to DNA damage repair genes in non-small cell lung cancer investigated using tissue array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songliu Hu

    Full Text Available To investigate the predictive role and association of nuclear survivin and the DNA double-strand breaks repair genes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC: DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs, Ku heterodimeric regulatory complex 70-KD subunit (Ku70 and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM.The protein expression of nuclear survivin, DNA-PKcs, Ku70 and ATM were investigated using immunohistochemistry in tumors from 256 patients with surgically resected NSCLC. Furthermore, we analyzed the correlation between the expression of nuclear survivin, DNA-PKcs, Ku70 and ATM. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the prognostic factors that inuenced the overall survival and disease-free survival of NSCLC.The expression of nuclear survivin, DNA-PKcs, Ku70 and ATM was significantly higher in tumor tissues than in normal tissues. By dichotomizing the specimens as expressing low or high levels of nuclear survivin, nuclear survivin correlated significantly with the pathologic stage (P = 0.009 and lymph node status (P = 0.004. The nuclear survivin levels were an independent prognostic factor for both the overall survival and the disease-free survival in univariate and multivariate analyses. Patients with low Ku70 and DNA-PKcs expression had a greater benefit from radiotherapy than patients with high expression of Ku70 (P = 0.012 and DNA-PKcs (P = 0.02. Nuclear survivin expression positively correlated with DNA-PKcs (P<0.001 and Ku70 expression (P<0.001.Nuclear survivin may be a prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with resected stage I-IIIA NSCLC. DNA-PKcs and Ku70 could predict the effect of radiotherapy in patients with NSCLC. Nuclear survivin may also stimulates DNA double-strand breaks repair by its interaction with DNA-PKcs and Ku70.

  5. WE-E-BRE-09: Investigation of the Association Between Radiation-Induced Pain and Radiation Dose in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, H; Dyk, P; Mullen, D; Eschen, L; Fergus, S; Chin, R; Thorstad, W [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Oh, J; Apte, A; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer who undergo radiotherapy often experience several undesirable side-effects, including xerostomia, trismus, and pain in the head and neck area, but little is know about the dose-volume predictors of such pain. We investigated the association between radiation dose and both throat and esophagus pain during radiotherapy. Methods: We analyzed 124 head and neck patients who received radiotherapy at the Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. For these patients, weekly PROs were recorded, including 16 pain and anatomical location questions. In addition, 17 observational symptoms were recorded. Patients were asked to describe their pain at each site according to a four-level scale: none (0), mild (1), moderate (2), and severe (3). We explored the association between throat pain and the mean dose received in oral cavity and between esophageal pain and the mean dose received in the esophagus. The severity of pain was determined by the difference between the baseline (week 1) pain score and the maximum pain score during treatment. The baseline pain score was defined as the first available pain score before receiving 10 Gy because radiotherapy pain originates later during treatment. Dose-volume metrics were extracted from treatment plans using CERR. To evaluate the correlation between pain and radiation dose, Spearman's correlation coefficient (Rs) was used. Results: The associations between throat pain and the mean dose to the oral cavity, and between esophagus pain and the mean dose to the esophagus, were both statistically significant, with Rs=0.320 (p=0.003) and Rs=0.424 (p<0.0001), respectively. Mean dose, for each structure, was a better predictor of pain than total integral dose. Conclusion: We demonstrated that pain during radiotherapy in head and neck patients highly correlates with the dose delivered. We will further investigate the association between other pain locations and relevant normal tissue

  6. Does a better adherence to dietary guidelines reduce mortality risk and environmental impact in the Dutch sub-cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesbroek, Sander; Verschuren, W M Monique; Boer, Jolanda M A; van de Kamp, Mirjam E; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Geelen, Anouk; Looman, Moniek; Temme, Elisabeth H M

    2017-07-01

    Guidelines for a healthy diet aim to decrease the risk of chronic diseases. It is unclear as to what extent a healthy diet is also an environmentally friendly diet. In the Dutch sub-cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, the diet was assessed with a 178-item FFQ of 40 011 participants aged 20-70 years between 1993 and 1997. The WHO's Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI), the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score and the Dutch Healthy Diet index 2015 (DHD15-index) were investigated in relation to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, land use and all-cause mortality risk. GHG emissions were associated with HDI scores (-3·7 % per sd increase (95 % CI -3·4, -4·0) for men and -1·9 % (95 % CI -0·4, -3·4) for women), with DASH scores in women only (1·1 % per sd increase, 95 % CI 0·9, 1·3) and with DHD15-index scores (-2·5 % per sd increase (95 % CI -2·2, -2·8) for men and -2·0 % (95 % CI -1·9, -2·2) for women). For all indices, higher scores were associated with less land use (ranging from -1·3 to -3·1 %). Mortality risk decreased with increasing scores for all indices. Per sd increase of the indices, hazard ratios for mortality ranged from 0·88 (95 % CI 0·82, 0·95) to 0·96 (95 % CI 0·92, 0·99). Our results showed that adhering to the WHO and Dutch dietary guidelines will lower the risk of all-cause mortality and moderately lower the environmental impact. The DASH diet was associated with lower mortality and land use, but because of high dairy product consumption in the Netherlands it was also associated with higher GHG emissions.

  7. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters

  8. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Logager, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data.......To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data....

  9. Peralta Cancer Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The investigators in the cell biology program at PCRI have pioneered in the development of techniques for culturing human epithelial cells. The cancer diagnosis program has been concerned with researching new techniques for early diagnosis of breast cancer in women. The cancer treatment program has been concerned with applying cell biology and biochemistry advances to improve cancer management

  10. Consumption of fruits, vegetables and fruit juices and differentiated thyroid carcinoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Béraud, Virginie; Franceschi, Silvia; Cayssials, Valerie; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Eriksen, Anne K; Bonnet, Fabrice; Affret, Aurélie; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Valanou, Elisavet; Karakatsani, Anna; Masala, Giovanna; Grioni, Sara; Santucci de Magistris, Maria; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Skeie, Guri; Parr, Christine L; Merino, Susana; Salamanca-Fernández, Elena; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Amiano, Pilar; Almquist, Martin; Drake, Isabel; Hennings, Joakim; Sandström, Maria; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Thee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Schmidt, Julie A; Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Aune, Dagfinn; Riboli, Elio; Slimani, Nadia; Scalbert, Augustin; Romieu, Isabelle; Agudo, Antonio; Rinaldi, Sabina

    2018-01-01

    Fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake is considered as probably protective against overall cancer risk, but results in previous studies are not consistent for thyroid cancer (TC). The purpose of this study is to examine the association between the consumption of fruits, vegetables, fruit juices and

  11. SU-F-T-197: Investigating Optimal Oblique-Beam Arrangement for Bilateral Metallic Prosthesis Prostate Cancer in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, S; Tesfamicael, B; Park, S [McLaren Proton Therapy Center, Karmanos Cancer Institute at McLaren-Flint, Flint, MI (United States); Zheng, Y; Singh, H; Twyford, T [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Cheng, C [Vantage Oncology, West Hills, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to investigate the optimum oblique-beam arrangement for bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer treatment in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. Methods: A computed tomography dataset of bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer case was selected for this retrospective study. A total of four beams (rightanterior- oblique [RAO], left-anterior-oblique [LAO], left-posterior-oblique [LPO], and right-posterior-oblique [RPO]) were selected for treatment planning. PBS plans were generated using multi-field-optimization technique for a total dose of 79.2 Gy[RBE] to be delivered in 44 fractions. Specifically, five different PBS plans were generated based on 2.5% ± 2 mm range uncertainty using five different beam arrangements (i)LAO+RAO+LPO+RPO, (ii)LAO+RAO, (iii)LPO+RPO, (iv)RAO+LPO, and (v)LAO+RPO. Each PBS plan was optimized by applying identical dose-volume constraints to the PTV, rectum, and bladder. Treatment plans were then compared based on the dose-volume histograms results. Results: The PTV coverage was found to be greater than 99% in all five plans. The homogeneity index (HI) was found to be almost identical (range, 0.03–0.04). The PTV mean dose was found to be comparable (range, 81.0–81.1 Gy[RBE]). For the rectum, the lowest mean dose (8.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (31.1 Gy[RBE]) were found in RAO+LAO plan and LPO+RPO plan, respectively. LAO+RAO plan produced the most favorable dosimetric results of the rectum in the medium-dose region (V50) and high-dose region (V70). For the bladder, the lowest (5.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (10.3 Gy[RBE]) were found in LPO+RPO plan and RAO+LAO plan, respectively. Other dosimetric results (V50 and V70) of the bladder were slightly better in LPO+RPO plan than in other plans. Conclusion: Dosimetric findings from this study suggest that two anterior-oblique proton beams arrangement (LAO+RAO) is a more favorable option with the possibility of reducing rectal

  12. Synthesis and biodistribution of novel magnetic-poly(HEMA-APH) nanopolymer radiolabeled with iodine-131 and investigation its fate in vivo for cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Ugur, E-mail: uguravcibasi@yahoo.com [Celal Bayar University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science (Turkey); Avc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Nesibe [Ege University, Ege Higher Vocational School (Turkey); Akal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I n, Hilmi Arkut; Ediz, Melis; Demiroglu, Hasan [Celal Bayar University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science (Turkey); Guemueser, Fikriye Guel [Celal Bayar University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine (Turkey); Oezcal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Emir; Tuerkcan, Ceren [Ege University, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey); Uygun, Deniz Aktas [Adnan Menderes University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science (Turkey); Akgoel, Sinan [Ege University, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey)

    2013-10-15

    Herein, we investigated the biological uptake, distribution, and radiopharmaceutical potential of a novel molecule based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and anilinephtalein (APH) in the metabolism of Albino Wistar rats. In order to achieve this, we synthesized APH using organic synthesis methods and copolymerized APH with HEMA using a common polymerization method, surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. In the presence of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles, we obtained a new generation magnetic-nano-scale polymer, magnetic-poly(HEMA-APH). This new molecule was chemically identified and approved by several characterization methods using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron spin resonance, atomic force microscope, and Zeta particle-size analysis. To evaluate the biological activity in live metabolism and anti-cancer potential of mag-poly(HEMA-APH), molecule was radioiodinated by a widely used labeling technique, iodogen method, with a gamma diffuser radionuclide, {sup 131}I. Thin-layer radiochromatography experiments demonstrated that {sup 131}I binded to nanopolymer with the labeling yield of 90 %. Lipophilicity and stability experiments were conducted to determine the condition of cold and labeled mag-poly(HEMA-APH) in rat blood and lipid medium. Results demonstrated that radioiodinated molecule stayed as an intact complex in rat metabolism for 24 h and experimental lipophilicity was determined as 0.12 {+-} 0.02. In vivo results obtained by imaging and biological distribution experiments indicated that mag-poly(HEMA-APH) labeled with {sup 131}I [{sup 131}I-mag-poly(HEMA-APH)] highly incorporated into tissues of the uterus, the ovarian, the prostate, and the lungs in rat metabolism. Based on these results, it may be evaluated that novel mag-poly(HEMA-APH) molecule labeled with {sup 131}I is a compound which has a significant potential for being used as an anti-cancer agent. Certain

  13. SU-E-T-523: Investigation of Various MR-Compatible Shielding Materials for Direction Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, U of T, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, U of T, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Meigooni, A Soleimani [Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Scanderbeg, D [UCSD Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate various shielding materials such as Gold (Au), Osmium (Os), Tantalum (Ta), and Tungsten (W) based alloys for use with a novel intensity modulation capable direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator for image guided cervical cancer HDR brachytherapy. Methods: The novel MRI-compatible DMBT tandem, made from nonmagnetic tungsten-alloy rod with diameter of 5.4 mm, has 6 symmetric peripheral holes of 1.3 mm diameter with 2.05 mm distance from the center for a high degree intensity modulation capacity. The 0.3 mm thickness of bio-compatible plastic tubing wraps the tandem. MCNPX was used for Monte Carlo simulations of the shields and the mHDR Ir-192 V2 source. MC-generated 3D dose matrices of different shielding materials of Au, Os, Ta, and W with 1 mm3 resolution were imported into an in-house-coded inverse optimization planning system to evaluate 19 clinical patient plans. Prescription dose was 15Gy. All plans were normalized to receive the same HRCTV D90. Results: In general, the plan qualities for various shielding materials were similar. The OAR D2cc for bladder was very similar for Au, Os, and Ta with 11.64±2.30Gy. For W, it was very close 11.65±2.30Gy. The sigmoid D2cc was 9.82±2.46Gy for Au and Os while it was 9.84±2.48Gy for Ta and W. The rectum D2cc was 7.44±3.06Gy for Au, 7.43±3.07Gy for Os, 7.48±3.05Gy for Ta, and 7.47±3.05Gy for W. The HRCTV D98 and V100 were very close with 16.37±1.87 Gy and 97.37±1.93 Gy, on average, respectively. Conclusion: Various MRI-compatible shielding alloys were investigated for the DMBT tandem applicator. The clinical plan qualities were not significantly different among these various alloys, however. Therefore, the candidate metals (or in combination) can be used to select best alloys for MRI image guided cervical cancer brachytherapy using the novel DMBT applicator that is capable of unprecedented level of intensity modulation.

  14. SU-E-T-523: Investigation of Various MR-Compatible Shielding Materials for Direction Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Song, W; Han, D; Meigooni, A Soleimani; Scanderbeg, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate various shielding materials such as Gold (Au), Osmium (Os), Tantalum (Ta), and Tungsten (W) based alloys for use with a novel intensity modulation capable direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator for image guided cervical cancer HDR brachytherapy. Methods: The novel MRI-compatible DMBT tandem, made from nonmagnetic tungsten-alloy rod with diameter of 5.4 mm, has 6 symmetric peripheral holes of 1.3 mm diameter with 2.05 mm distance from the center for a high degree intensity modulation capacity. The 0.3 mm thickness of bio-compatible plastic tubing wraps the tandem. MCNPX was used for Monte Carlo simulations of the shields and the mHDR Ir-192 V2 source. MC-generated 3D dose matrices of different shielding materials of Au, Os, Ta, and W with 1 mm3 resolution were imported into an in-house-coded inverse optimization planning system to evaluate 19 clinical patient plans. Prescription dose was 15Gy. All plans were normalized to receive the same HRCTV D90. Results: In general, the plan qualities for various shielding materials were similar. The OAR D2cc for bladder was very similar for Au, Os, and Ta with 11.64±2.30Gy. For W, it was very close 11.65±2.30Gy. The sigmoid D2cc was 9.82±2.46Gy for Au and Os while it was 9.84±2.48Gy for Ta and W. The rectum D2cc was 7.44±3.06Gy for Au, 7.43±3.07Gy for Os, 7.48±3.05Gy for Ta, and 7.47±3.05Gy for W. The HRCTV D98 and V100 were very close with 16.37±1.87 Gy and 97.37±1.93 Gy, on average, respectively. Conclusion: Various MRI-compatible shielding alloys were investigated for the DMBT tandem applicator. The clinical plan qualities were not significantly different among these various alloys, however. Therefore, the candidate metals (or in combination) can be used to select best alloys for MRI image guided cervical cancer brachytherapy using the novel DMBT applicator that is capable of unprecedented level of intensity modulation

  15. SU-F-J-145: MRI-Guided Interventional Boost Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Investigating the Feasibility of Adapting the Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleijnen, J J E; Couwenberg, A M; Asselen, B van; Lagendijk, J J W; Intven, M; Raaymakers, B W [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The recent development of an MRI-linac allows adaptation of treatments to the anatomy of the moment. This anatomy, in turn, could be altered into a more favorable situation for radiotherapy purposes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential dosimetric benefits of manipulating rectal anatomy in MRI-guided interventional external-beam radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods: For this retrospective analysis, four patients (1M/3F) diagnosed with rectal cancer were included. These underwent MR-imaging using sonography transmission gel as endorectal contrast at time of diagnosis and standard, non-contrast, MR-imaging prior to radiotherapy planning. In the contrast scan, the rectum is inflated by the inserted contrast gel, thereby potentially increasing the distance between tumor and the organs-at-risk (OAR). Both anatomies were delineated and 7- beam IMRT-plans were calculated for both situations (RT-standard and RT-inflated), using in-house developed treatment planning software. Each plan was aimed to deliver 15Gy to the planning target volume (PTV; tumor+3mm margin) with a D99>95% and Dmax<120% of the planned dose. The D2cc dose to the OAR were then compared for both situations. Results: At equal (or better) target coverage, we found a mean reduction in D2cc of 4.1Gy/237% [range 2.6Gy–6.3Gy/70%–621%] for the bladder and of 2.0Gy/145% [range −0.7Gy–7.9Gy/−73%–442%] for the small-bowel, for the RT-inflated compared to the RT-standard plans. For the three female patients, a reduction in D2cc of 5.2Gy/191% [range 3.2Gy–9.2Gy/44%–475%] for the gynecological organs was found. We found all D2cc doses to be better for the RT-inflated plans, except for one patient for whom the bladder D2cc dose was slightly increased. Conclusion: Reduction of OAR dose by manipulation of anatomy is feasible. Inflation of the rectum results in more distance between OAR and PTV. This leads to a substantial reduction in dose to OAR at equal or better target

  16. Neoadjuvant letrozole in postmenopausal estrogen and/or progesterone receptor positive breast cancer: A phase IIb/III trial to investigate optimal duration of preoperative endocrine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krainick-Strobel, Ute E; Lichtenegger, Werner; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Tulusan, Augustinus H; Jänicke, Fritz; Bastert, Gunther; Kiesel, Ludwig; Wackwitz, Birgit; Paepke, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, preoperative volume reduction of locally advanced breast cancers, resulting in higher rates of breast-conserving surgery (BCS), has become increasingly important also in postmenopausal women. Clinical interest has come to center on the third-generation nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors (AIs), including letrozole, for such neoadjuvant endocrine treatment. This usually lasts 3–4 months and has been extended to up to 12 months, but optimal treatment duration has not been fully established. This study was designed as a multicenter, open-label, single-arm, exploratory phase IIb/III clinical trial of letrozole 2.5 mg, one tablet daily, for 4–8 months. The primary objective was to investigate the effect of neoadjuvant treatment duration on tumor regression and BCS eligibility to identify optimal treatment duration. Tumor regression (by clinical examination, mammography, and ultrasound), shift towards BCS eligibility, and safety assessments were the main outcome measures. Standard parametric and nonparametric descriptive statistics were performed. Letrozole treatment was received by 32 of the enrolled 33 postmenopausal women (median (range): 67.0 (56–85) years) with unilateral, initially BCS-ineligible primary breast cancer (clinical stage ≥ T2, N0, M0). Letrozole treatment duration in the modified intent-to-treat (ITT; required 4 months' letrozole treatment) analysis population (29 patients) was 4 months in 14 patients and > 4 months in 15 patients. The respective per-protocol (PP) subgroup sizes were 14 and 11. The majority of partial or complete responses were observed at 4 months, though some beneficial responses occurred during prolonged letrozole treatment. Compared with baseline, median tumor size in the ITT population was reduced by 62.5% at Month 4 and by 70.0% at final study visit (Individual End). Similarly, in the PP population, respective reductions were 64.0% and 67.0%. Whereas initially all patients were mastectomy candidates

  17. Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Liu, Helen; Wei Xiong; Swisher, Stephen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also received irinotecan-based induction chemotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based and in 97 cases included taxanes. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 41.4-50.4 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a three-dimensional conformal technique. Surgery (three-field, Ivor-Lewis, or transhiatal esophagectomy) was performed 27-123 days (median, 45 days) after completion of radiotherapy. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for total lung: lung volume, mean dose to lung, relative and absolute volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose (relative V dose and absolute V dose ), and absolute volume of lung receiving less than a threshold dose (volume spared, or VS dose ). Occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications, defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 30 days after surgery, was the endpoint for all analyses. Fisher's exact test was used to investigate the relationship between categorical factors and incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Logistic analysis was used to analyze the relationship between continuous factors (e.g., V dose or VS dose ) and complication rate. Logistic regression with forward stepwise inclusion of factors was used to perform multivariate analysis of those factors having univariate significance (p < 0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare length of hospital stay in patients with and without lung complications and to compare lung volumes, VS5

  18. Dietary intake of different types and characteristics of processed meat which might be associated with cancer risk--results from the 24-hour diet recalls in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linseisen, Jakob; Rohrmann, Sabine; Norat, Teresa; González, Carlos Alberto; Dorronsoro Iraeta, Miren; Morote Gómez, Patrocinio; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Pozo, Basilio G; Ardanaz, Eva; Mattisson, Irene; Pettersson, Ulrika; Palmqvist, Richard; Guelpen, Bethany van; Bingham, Sheila A; McTaggart, Alison; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Stripp, Connie; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kesse, Emmanuelle; Boeing, Heiner; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Vasilopoulou, Effie; Bellos, George; Pala, Valeria; Masala, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Pezzo, Mariarosaria Del; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Ocké, Marga C; Peeters, Petra H M; Engeset, Dagrun; Skeie, Guri; Slimani, Nadia; Riboli, Elio

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is increasing evidence for a significant effect of processed meat (PM) intake on cancer risk. However, refined knowledge on how components of this heterogeneous food group are associated with cancer risk is still missing. Here, actual data on the intake of PM subcategories is given;

  19. Outbreaks and Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who Gets Fungal Infections? People living with HIV/AIDS Organ Transplant Patients Cancer Patients Hospitalized Patients Stem Cell Transplant Patients Medications that Weaken Your Immune System Outbreaks Rhizopus Investigation CDC at Work Global Fungal Diseases Cryptococcal Meningitis ...

  20. Intake of total, animal and plant proteins, and their food sources in 10 countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkjaer, J; Olsen, A; Bjerregaard, L J; Deharveng, G; Tjønneland, A; Welch, A A; Crowe, F L; Wirfält, E; Hellstrom, V; Niravong, M; Touvier, M; Linseisen, J; Steffen, A; Ocké, M C; Peeters, P H M; Chirlaque, M D; Larrañaga, N; Ferrari, P; Contiero, P; Frasca, G; Engeset, D; Lund, E; Misirli, G; Kosti, M; Riboli, E; Slimani, N; Bingham, S

    2009-11-01

    To describe dietary protein intakes and their food sources among 27 redefined centres in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Between 1995 and 2000, 36 034 persons, aged between 35 and 74 years, were administered a standardized 24-h dietary recall (24-HDR) using a computerized interview software programme (EPIC-SOFT). Intakes (g/day) of total, animal and plant proteins were estimated using the standardized EPIC Nutrient Database (ENDB). Mean intakes were adjusted for age, and weighted by season and day of recall. Mean total and animal protein intakes were highest in the Spanish centres among men, and in the Spanish and French centres among women; the lowest mean intakes were observed in the UK health-conscious group, in Greek men and women, and in women in Potsdam. Intake of plant protein was highest among the UK health-conscious group, followed by some of the Italian centres and Murcia, whereas Sweden and Potsdam had the lowest intake. Cereals contributed to the highest proportion of plant protein in all centres. The combined intake of legumes, vegetables and fruit contributed to a greater proportion of plant protein in the southern than in the northern centres. Total meat intake (with some heterogeneity across subtypes of meat) was, with few exceptions, the most important contributor to animal protein in all centres, followed by dairy and fish products. This study shows that intake of protein, especially of animal origin, differs across the 10 European countries, and also shows some differences in food sources of protein across Europe.

  1. Investigation of the Relationship Between Gross Tumor Volume Location and Pneumonitis Rates Using a Large Clinical Database of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non–small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior–inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman–Kutcher–Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Results: Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose–volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Conclusions: Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant

  2. A randomized controlled trial to investigate the influence of low dose radiotherapy on immune stimulatory effects in liver metastases of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reissfelder, Christoph; Büchler, Markus W; Beckhove, Philipp; Huber, Peter E; Weitz, Jürgen; Timke, Carmen; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus; Rahbari, Nuh N; Koch, Moritz; Klug, Felix; Roeder, Falk; Edler, Lutz; Debus, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Insufficient migration and activation of tumor specific effector T cells in the tumor is one of the main reasons for inadequate host anti-tumor immune response. External radiation seems to induce inflammation and activate the immune response. This phase I/II clinical trial aims to evaluate whether low dose single fraction radiotherapy can improve T cell associated antitumor immune response in patients with colorectal liver metastases. This is an investigator-initiated, prospective randomised, 4-armed, controlled Phase I/II trial. Patients undergoing elective hepatic resection due to colorectal cancer liver metastasis will be enrolled in the study. Patients will receive 0 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 2 Gy or 5 Gy radiation targeted to their liver metastasis. Radiation will be applied by external beam radiotherapy using a 6 MV linear accelerator (Linac) with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique two days prior to surgical resection. All patients admitted to the Department of General-, Visceral-, and Transplantion Surgery, University of Heidelberg for elective hepatic resection are consecutively screened for eligibility into this trial, and written informed consent is obtained before inclusion. The primary objective is to assess the effect of active local external beam radiation dose on, tumor infiltrating T cells as a surrogate parameter for antitumor activity. Secondary objectives include radiogenic treatment toxicity, postoperative morbidity and mortality, local tumor control and recurrence patterns, survival and quality of life. Furthermore, frequencies of systemic tumor reactive T cells in blood and bone marrow will be correlated with clinical outcome. This is a randomized controlled patient blinded trial to assess the safety and efficiency of low dose radiotherapy on metastasis infiltrating T cells and thus potentially enhance the antitumor immune response. ClinicalTrials.gov: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01191632

  3. Phase 1 study of the investigational Aurora A kinase inhibitor alisertib (MLN8237) in East Asian cancer patients: pharmacokinetics and recommended phase 2 dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, Karthik; Kim, Tae Min; Lin, Chia-Chi; Thye, Lim Soon; Chng, Wee Joo; Ma, Brigette; Chen, Ming Huang; Zhou, Xiaofei; Liu, Hua; Kelly, Virginia; Kim, Won Seog

    2015-08-01

    This phase 1 study assessed the pharmacokinetics (PK), maximum tolerated dose (MTD)/recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), safety, and preliminary efficacy of the investigational Aurora A kinase inhibitor, alisertib, in East Asian patients with advanced solid tumors or lymphomas. Patients received alisertib twice-daily (BID) for 7 days in 21-day cycles. Doses were escalated (3 + 3) from 30 mg BID based on cycle 1 dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) until the MTD, followed by expansion for PK/safety characterization. Thirty-six patients (61 % Chinese, 36 % Korean, 3 % Malay) received alisertib (30 mg BID, n = 30; 40 mg BID, n = 6; median, 2.5 cycles). Alisertib exposures increased approximately dose proportionally, and mean half-life was 16 h. Geometric mean apparent oral clearance (2.65 L/h) was 40 % lower than previous estimates in Western patients, resulting in approximately 70 % higher mean dose-normalized, steady-state exposures (735 nM*h/mg) in East Asian patients. Two patients experienced DLTs at 40 mg BID (grade 3 stomatitis; grade 4 neutropenia); the MTD/RP2D was 30 mg BID. Common toxicities (grade ≥3 at RP2D) were neutropenia (50 %), diarrhea (13 %), and stomatitis (10 %). One patient with extranodal T-/NK-cell lymphoma (nasal type) achieved a partial response and 18 (51 %) had stable disease. The MTD/RP2D of alisertib in East Asian patients (30 mg BID) was lower than in Western patients (50 mg BID), consistent with higher systemic exposures in the East Asian population. Alisertib was generally well tolerated and showed signs of antitumor activity in East Asian cancer patients.

  4. Investigation of the relationship between gross tumor volume location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L; Liao, Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K

    2012-04-01

    Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior-inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose-volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant improvement in the fit of the pneumonitis model. Copyright

  5. The association between adult attained height and sitting height with mortality in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawada, Norie; Wark, Petra A.; Merritt, Melissa A.; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Ward, Heather A.; Rinaldi, Sabina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Dartois, Laureen; His, Mathilde; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Turzanski-Fortner, Renée; Kaaks, Rudolf; Overvad, Kim; Redondo, María Luisa; Travier, Noemie; Molina-Portillo, Elena; Dorronsoro, Miren; Cirera, Lluis; Ardanaz, Eva; Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Valanou, Elissavet; Masala, Giovanna; Pala, Valeria; Peeters, Petra H M; Van Der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Melander, Olle; Manjer, Jonas; Silva, Marisa Da; Skeie, Guri; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Gunter, Marc J.; Riboli, Elio; Cross, Amanda J.

    2017-01-01

    Adult height and sitting height may reflect genetic and environmental factors, including early life nutrition, physical and social environments. Previous studies have reported divergent associations for height and chronic disease mortality, with positive associations observed for cancer mortality

  6. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Pita, G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. METHODS: We have...... genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. RESULTS: We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk...... for BRCA1 (per-allele HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.04, P = 0.5) or BRCA2 (per-allele HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06, P = 0.5) mutation carriers. CONCLUSION: This SNP is not a significant modifier of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers, though weak associations cannot be ruled out Udgivelsesdato: 2009/12/15...

  7. Final Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Trial Investigating the Addition of Cetuximab to Induction Chemotherapy and Accelerated or Hyperfractionated Chemoradiation for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiwert, Tanguy Y., E-mail: tseiwert@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu [Departments of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Melotek, James M. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Blair, Elizabeth A. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Stenson, Kerstin M. [Department of Otolaryngology, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Witt, Mary Ellyn [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Brisson, Ryan J.; Chawla, Apoorva; Dekker, Allison [Departments of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Lingen, Mark W. [Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kocherginsky, Masha [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Villaflor, Victoria M. [Departments of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Cohen, Ezra E.W. [Moores Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, California (United States); Haraf, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [Departments of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The role of cetuximab in the treatment of locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer (LA-HNSCC) remains poorly defined. In this phase 2 randomized study, we investigated the addition of cetuximab to both induction chemotherapy (IC) and hyperfractionated or accelerated chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LA-HNSCC were randomized to receive 2 cycles of weekly IC (cetuximab, paclitaxel, carboplatin) and either Cetux-FHX (concurrent cetuximab, 5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea, and 1.5 Gy twice-daily radiation therapy every other week to 75 Gy) or Cetux-PX (cetuximab, cisplatin, and accelerated radiation therapy with delayed concomitant boost to 72 Gy in 42 fractions). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), with superiority compared with historical control achieved if either arm had 2-year PFS ≥70%. Results: 110 patients were randomly assigned to either Cetux-FHX (n=57) or Cetux-PX (n=53). The overall response rate to IC was 91%. Severe toxicity on IC was limited to rash (23% grade ≥3) and myelosuppression (38% grade ≥3 neutropenia). The 2-year rates of PFS for both Cetux-FHX (82.5%) and Cetux-PX (84.9%) were significantly higher than for historical control (P<.001). The 2-year overall survival (OS) was 91.2% for Cetux-FHX and 94.3% for Cetux-PX. With a median follow-up time of 72 months, there were no significant differences in PFS (P=.35) or OS (P=.15) between the treatment arms. The late outcomes for the entire cohort included 5-year PFS, OS, locoregional failure, and distant metastasis rates of 74.1%, 80.3%, 15.7%, and 7.4%, respectively. The 5-year PFS and OS were 84.4% and 91.3%, respectively, among human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive patients and 65.9% and 72.5%, respectively, among HPV-negative patients. Conclusions: The addition of cetuximab to IC and chemoradiation was tolerable and produced long-term control of LA-HNSCC, particularly among poor-prognosis HPV-negative patients. Further

  8. Final Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Trial Investigating the Addition of Cetuximab to Induction Chemotherapy and Accelerated or Hyperfractionated Chemoradiation for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Melotek, James M.; Blair, Elizabeth A.; Stenson, Kerstin M.; Salama, Joseph K.; Witt, Mary Ellyn; Brisson, Ryan J.; Chawla, Apoorva; Dekker, Allison; Lingen, Mark W.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Villaflor, Victoria M.; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Vokes, Everett E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The role of cetuximab in the treatment of locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer (LA-HNSCC) remains poorly defined. In this phase 2 randomized study, we investigated the addition of cetuximab to both induction chemotherapy (IC) and hyperfractionated or accelerated chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LA-HNSCC were randomized to receive 2 cycles of weekly IC (cetuximab, paclitaxel, carboplatin) and either Cetux-FHX (concurrent cetuximab, 5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea, and 1.5 Gy twice-daily radiation therapy every other week to 75 Gy) or Cetux-PX (cetuximab, cisplatin, and accelerated radiation therapy with delayed concomitant boost to 72 Gy in 42 fractions). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), with superiority compared with historical control achieved if either arm had 2-year PFS ≥70%. Results: 110 patients were randomly assigned to either Cetux-FHX (n=57) or Cetux-PX (n=53). The overall response rate to IC was 91%. Severe toxicity on IC was limited to rash (23% grade ≥3) and myelosuppression (38% grade ≥3 neutropenia). The 2-year rates of PFS for both Cetux-FHX (82.5%) and Cetux-PX (84.9%) were significantly higher than for historical control (P<.001). The 2-year overall survival (OS) was 91.2% for Cetux-FHX and 94.3% for Cetux-PX. With a median follow-up time of 72 months, there were no significant differences in PFS (P=.35) or OS (P=.15) between the treatment arms. The late outcomes for the entire cohort included 5-year PFS, OS, locoregional failure, and distant metastasis rates of 74.1%, 80.3%, 15.7%, and 7.4%, respectively. The 5-year PFS and OS were 84.4% and 91.3%, respectively, among human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive patients and 65.9% and 72.5%, respectively, among HPV-negative patients. Conclusions: The addition of cetuximab to IC and chemoradiation was tolerable and produced long-term control of LA-HNSCC, particularly among poor-prognosis HPV-negative patients. Further

  9. Health service utilisation and investigations before diagnosis of cancer of unknown primary (CUP): A population-based nested case-control study in Australian Government Department of Veterans' Affairs clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajdic, Claire M; Schaffer, Andrea L; Dobbins, Timothy A; Ward, Robyn L; Er, Chuang C; Pearson, Sallie-Anne

    2015-08-01

    Population-based data on the use of health services and diagnostic investigations for patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is scarce. It is uncertain whether the pathways to diagnosis are different for CUP compared to other cancers. We performed a population-based nested matched case-control study using linked routinely collected records for Australian Government Department of Veterans' Affairs clients, 2004-2007. We compared health care consultations, hospitalisations, emergency department visits, and diagnostic procedures in the three months prior and the month of diagnosis for 281 clients registered with a diagnosis of CUP (C809) and 1102 controls randomly selected from clients registered with a first diagnosis of metastatic cancer of known primary. Overall, the median age at cancer diagnosis was 83 years. CUP patients were slightly older and had significantly more comorbidities prior to diagnosis than those with known primary. Compared to known primary, a diagnosis of CUP was significantly more likely after an emergency department visit, less specialist input, fewer invasive diagnostic procedures such as resection or endoscopy, and more non-invasive procedures such as magnetic resonance imaging. There were no differences in primary care or allied health consultations and hospitalisations. This health care pathway suggests delayed recognition of cancer and scope for improvement in the medical management of high-risk individuals presenting to primary care. The pattern of diagnostic investigations reveals under-investigation in some CUP patients but this is likely to reflect recognition of limited treatment options and poor prognosis and is consistent with clinical guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Commonwealth of Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) routines and rituals in men with cancer and their significant others (SOs): a qualitative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klafke, Nadja; Eliott, Jaklin A; Olver, Ian N; Wittert, Gary A

    2014-05-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is frequently used in cancer patients, often with contribution of the significant others (SOs), but without consultation of healthcare professionals. This research explored how cancer patients integrate and maintain CAM use in their everyday life, and how SOs are involved in it. In this qualitative study, male participants were selected from a preceding Australian survey on CAM use in men with cancer (94 % response rate and 86 % consent rate for follow-up interview). Semistructured interviews were conducted with 26 men and 24 SOs until data saturation was reached. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed thematically, thereby paying close attention to participants' language in use. A major theme associated with high CAM use was "CAM routines and rituals," as it was identified that men with cancer practiced CAM as (1) functional routines, (2) meaningful rituals, and (3) mental/spiritual routines or/and rituals. Regular CAM use was associated with intrapersonal and interpersonal benefits: CAM routines provided men with certainty and control, and CAM rituals functioned for cancer patients and their SOs as a means to create meaning, thereby working to counter fear and uncertainty consequent upon a diagnosis of cancer. SOs contributed most to men's uptake and maintenance of dietary-based CAM in ritualistic form resulting in interpersonal bonding and enhanced closeness. CAM routines and rituals constitute key elements in cancer patients' regular and satisfied CAM use, and they promote familial strengthening. Clinicians and physicians can convey these benefits to patient consultations, further promoting the safe and effective use of CAM.

  11. Investigation on the association between breast cancer and consumption patterns of combined oral contraceptive pills in the women of Isfahan in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsanpour, Soheila; Nejad, Fahime Seyed Ahmadi; Rajabi, Fariborz Mokarian; Taleghani, Fariba

    2013-05-01

    Oral contraceptive pills are among the most popular contraceptive methods, but the fear of cancer and cardiovascular disease overshadows its continuous use among women. This study aimed to define the association between consumption patterns of combined oral contraceptives among women with breast cancer. This is an analytical case-control study conducted on 175 women with breast cancer, referring to Seyed al Shohada Medical Center and private clinics in Isfahan to be treated and followed up in 2011, as well as 350 healthy women who were identical with the subjects in the study group regarding age and residential location. The data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire. Content validity and Cronbach's alpha were employed to confirm validity and scientific reliability of the questionnaire, respectively. The data were analyzed by descriptive and analytical statistical methods through SPSS. The findings showed that there was a significant association between history of contraceptive pills' consumption and incidence of breast cancer (P pills' consumption compared to those with no history of that. It was also shown that pills' consumption for 36-72 months increased the risk of breast cancer by 2.18-fold, the age of the first use being less than 20 years increased the risk by 3.28-fold, and time since the last use of less than 25 years increased the risk by 2.63-fold. There was no significant association between duration of use, age of the first and last use, and time since the first and last use in the study and control groups. The results showed that history of pills' consumption is associated with incidence of breast cancer regardless of the consumption pattern. Use of oral contraceptives pills at any age and for any duration can increase the risk of breast cancer.

  12. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... National Cancer Institute. PDQ lip and oral cavity cancer ... September 25, 2015. www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/hp/lip- ...

  13. Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Is Cancer? Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Cancer Statistics Cancer has a major impact on society in ... success of efforts to control and manage cancer. Statistics at a Glance: The Burden of Cancer in ...

  14. SU-F-R-01: Preclinical Radioimmunogenomics Study to Design Personalized Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, H [Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Radiogenomics is an active area of research to find clinical correlation between genomics and radiotherapy outcomes. In this era, many different biological issues should be taken into account. In this study we aimed to introduce “Radioimmunogenomics” as a new approach to study immunogetics issue regard to radiotherapy induced clinical manifestations. Methods: We studied different immunological pathways and signaling molecules which underling radiation response of normal and malignant tissues. In the other hand, we found many genes and proteins are responsible to radiation effects on biological tissues. We defined a theoretical framework to correlate these genes with radiotherapy outcomes as TCP and NTCP biological dose tools. Results: Our theoretical results showed, high-throughput immunogenomics biomarkers can be correlated with radiotherapy outcomes. Genes regarding to inflammation, apoptosis, repair molecules and many other immunological markers can be defined as radioimmune markers to predict radiotherapy response. Conclusion: Radioimmunogenomics can be used as a new personalized radiotherapy research area to enhance treatment outcome as well as quality of life.

  15. Investigations of (99m)Tc-labeled glucarate as a SPECT radiotracer for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and potential tumor uptake mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lanfang; Xiu, Yan; Li, Yanli; Xu, Xiaobo; Li, Shanqun; Li, Xiao; Pak, Koon Y; Shi, Hongcheng; Cheng, Dengfeng

    2015-07-01

    This study attempted to evaluate the feasibility of (99m)Tc-labeled glucarate ((99m)Tc-GLA) imaging in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the potential tumor uptake mechanism. Cell lysates from two NSCLC cell lines, H292 and H1975, were immunoblotted with anti-glucose transporter 5 (GLUT5) antibody for Western blotting. Thereafter, the two cell lines were used to examine cellular uptake of (99m)Tc-GLA with or without fructose. SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed on small animals bearing H292 and H1975 tumors. Biodistribution studies were also conducted to achieve accurate tissue uptake of this tracer in two tumor models. Hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) staining and GLUT5, Ki67 and cytokeratin-7 (CK-7) immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis were further investigated on tumor tissues. In Western blotting, H292 cells showed higher levels of GLUT5 compared to the H1975 cells. Meanwhile, the in vitro cell assays indicated GLUT5-dependent uptake of (99m)Tc-GLA in H292 and H1975 cells. The fructose competition assays showed a significant decrease in (99m)Tc-GLA uptake by H292 and H1975 cells when fructose was added. The (99m)Tc-GLA accumulation was as much as two-fold higher in H292 implanted tumors than in H1975 implanted tumors. (99m)Tc-GLA exhibited rapid clearance pharmacokinetics and reasonable uptake in human NSCLC H292 (1.69±0.37 ID%/g) and H1975 (0.89±0.06 ID%/g) implanted tumors at 30min post injection. Finally, the expression of GLUT5, Ki67 and CK-7 on tumor tissues also exhibited positive correlation with the in vitro cell test results and in vivo SPECT/CT imaging results in xenograft tumors. Both in vitro and ex vivo studies demonstrated that the uptake of (99m)Tc-GLA in NSCLC is highly related to GLUT5 expression. Imaging and further IHC results support that (99m)Tc-GLA could be a promising SPECT imaging agent for NSCLC diagnosis and prognosis evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Standardization of the 24-hour diet recall calibration method used in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC): general concepts and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, N; Ferrari, P; Ocké, M; Welch, A; Boeing, H; Liere, M; Pala, V; Amiano, P; Lagiou, A; Mattisson, I; Stripp, C; Engeset, D; Charrondière, R; Buzzard, M; Staveren, W; Riboli, E

    2000-12-01

    Despite increasing interest in the concept of calibration in dietary surveys, there is still little experience in the use and standardization of a common reference dietary method, especially in international studies. In this paper, we present the general theoretical framework and the approaches developed to standardize the computer-assisted 24 h diet recall method (EPIC-SOFT) used to collect about 37 000 24-h dietary recall measurements (24-HDR) from the 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). In addition, an analysis of variance was performed to examine the level of standardization of EPIC-SOFT across the 90 interviewers involved in the study. The analysis of variance used a random effects model in which mean energy intake per interviewer was used as the dependent variable, while age, body mass index (BMI), energy requirement, week day, season, special diet, special day, physical activity and the EPIC-SOFT version were used as independent variables. The analysis was performed separately for men and women. The results show no statistical difference between interviewers in all countries for men and five out of eight countries for women, after adjustment for physical activity and the EPIC-SOFT program version used, and the exclusion of one interviewer in Germany (for men), and one in Denmark (for women). These results showed an interviewer effect in certain countries and a significant difference between gender, suggesting an underlying respondent's effect due to the higher under-reporting among women that was consistently observed in EPIC. However, the actual difference between interviewer and country mean energy intakes is about 10%. Furthermore, no statistical differences in mean energy intakes were observed across centres from the same country, except in Italy and Germany for men, and France and Spain for women, where the populations were recruited from areas scattered throughout the countries. Despite

  17. 177Lu-labeled HPMA copolymers utilizing cathepsin B and S cleavable linkers: Synthesis, characterization and preliminary in vivo investigation in a pancreatic cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbomo, Sunny M.; Shi, Wen; Wagh, Nilesh K.; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Brusnahan, Susan K.; Garrison, Jered C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: A major barrier to the advancement of therapeutic nanomedicines has been the non-target toxicity caused by the accumulation of the drug delivery systems in organs associated with the reticuloendothelial system, particularly the liver and spleen. Herein, we report the development of peptide based metabolically active linkers (MALs) that are enzymatically cleaved by cysteine cathepsin B and S, two proteases highly expressed in the liver and spleen. The overall goal of this approach is to utilize the MALs to lower the non-target retention and toxicity of radiolabeled drug delivery systems, thus resulting in higher diagnostic and radiotherapeutic efficacy. Methods: In this study three MALs (MAL0, MAL1 and MAL2) were investigated. MAL1 and MAL2 are composed of known substrates of cathepsin B and S, respectively, while MAL0 is a non-cleavable control. Both MAL1 and MAL2 were shown to undergo enzymatic cleavage with the appropriate cathepsin protease. Subsequent to conjugation to the HPMA copolymer and radiolabeling with 177 Lu, the peptide–polymer conjugates were renamed 177 Lu-metabolically active copolymers ( 177 Lu-MACs) with the corresponding designations: 177 Lu-MAC0, 177 Lu-MAC1 and 177 Lu-MAC2. Results: In vivo evaluation of the 177 Lu-MACs was performed in an HPAC human pancreatic cancer xenograft mouse model. 177 Lu-MAC1 and 177 Lu-MAC2 demonstrated 3.1 and 2.1 fold lower liver retention, respectively, compared to control ( 177 Lu-MAC0) at 72 h post-injection. With regard to spleen retention, 177 Lu-MAC1 and 177 Lu-MAC2 each exhibited a nearly fourfold lower retention, relative to control, at the 72 h time point. However, the tumor accumulation of the 177 Lu-MAC0 was two to three times greater than 177 Lu-MAC1 and 177 Lu-MAC2 at the same time point. The MAL approach demonstrated the capability of substantially reducing the non-target retention of the 177 Lu-labeled HPMA copolymers. Conclusions: While further studies are needed to optimize the

  18. Overview of the trastuzumab (Herceptin) anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody clinical program in HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer. Herceptin Multinational Investigator Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, S

    1999-08-01

    The recombinant humanized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin; Genentech, San Francisco, CA) was evaluated in human clinical trials for treatment of women with metastatic breast cancer who have tumors that overexpress HER2. The trastuzumab clinical program consisted of a series of phase I, phase II, and phase III clinical trials. Clinical experience with this novel biologic has been obtained in more than 1,000 women with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer. Two pivotal trials were performed to evaluate trastuzumab efficacy and safety: (1) trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy as first-line therapy and (2) trastuzumab as a single agent in second- and third-line chemotherapy. Preliminary results of the pivotal clinical trials that have been presented at national meetings are summarized below. The data suggest that trastuzumab will be an important new treatment option for women with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer.

  19. Polymorphisms of genes coding for ghrelin and its receptor in relation to anthropometry, circulating levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3, and breast cancer risk: a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossus, Laure; McKay, James D; Canzian, Federico; Wilkening, Stefan; Rinaldi, Sabina; Biessy, Carine; Olsen, Anja; Tjønneland, Anne; Jakobsen, Marianne U; Overvad, Kim; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fournier, Agnes; Linseisen, Jakob; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Boeing, Heiner; Fisher, Eva; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Georgila, Christina; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Quirós, José Ramon; Sala, Núria; Martínez-García, Carmen; Dorronsoro, Miren; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Barricarte, Aurelio; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; van Gils, Carla H; Peeters, Petra H M; Hallmans, Göran; Lenner, Per; Bingham, Sheila; Khaw, Kay Tee; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Ferrari, Pietro; Jenab, Mazda; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2008-07-01

    Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, has two major functions: the stimulation of the growth hormone production and the stimulation of food intake. Accumulating evidence also suggests a role of ghrelin in cancer development. We conducted a case-control study on 1359 breast cancer cases and 2389 matched controls, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, to examine the association of common genetic variants in the genes coding for ghrelin (GHRL) and its receptor (GHSR) with anthropometric measures, circulating insulin growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 and breast cancer risk. Pair-wise tagging was used to select the 15 polymorphisms that represent the majority of common genetic variants across the GHRL and GHSR genes. A significant increase in breast cancer risk was observed in carriers of the GHRL rs171407-G allele (odds ratio: 1.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.0-1.4; P = 0.02). The GHRL single-nucleotide polymorphism rs375577 was associated with a 5% increase in IGF-I levels (P = 0.01). A number of GHRL and GHSR polymorphisms were associated with body mass index (BMI) and height (P between GHRL variations are associated with BMI. Furthermore, we have observed evidence for association of GHRL polymorphisms with circulating IGF-I levels and with breast cancer risk. These associations, however, might also be due to chance findings and further large studies are needed to confirm our results.

  20. To Investigate the Association of Thr241Met Polymorphisms of the XRCC3 Gene with the Risk of Breast Cancer in Women in Markazi Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hamta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Biological and epidemiological data suggest that damage induced by endogenous and exogenous factors affects the integrity and stability of DNA and associated with susceptibility to breast cancer. The XRCC3 protein participates in DNA double-strand breaks and recombination repair. The aim of the present study was to evaluate associations between the risk of breast cancer and Thr241Met polymorphism in the XRCC3 gene. Materials and Methods: In this study, the effects of Thr241Met polymorphism of the XRCC3 gene and the risk of breast cancer in a population-based case-control study inclusive 80 patients and 80 healthy individuals of women in Markazi province were evaluated. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples using the kit procedure. The genotypes of samples were determined by PCR-RFLP technique. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software (estimation of χ2 and p-value and the final results were determined. Results: Statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups of patients and controls for three genotypes of the site rs861539 (p= 0.000. Genotype CT (p= 0.000, OR=2.352, CI= 95%; 2.431 - 39.948 and TT (p = 0.003, OR= 2.352, CI=95%; 0.611 - 9.049 significant associations were showed with risk of breast cancer. Instead, the genotype CC (p= 0.000 showed a protective role against susceptibility to breast cancer. Conclusion: This study identified that there is significant association between Thr241Met polymorphisms of the XRCC3 and the risk of susceptibility to breast cancer, which is in accordance to some of researchers' studies.

  1. An open-label extension study to investigate the long-term safety and tolerability of THC/CBD oromucosal spray and oromucosal THC spray in patients with terminal cancer-related pain refractory to strong opioid analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremy R; Lossignol, Dominique; Burnell-Nugent, Mary; Fallon, Marie T

    2013-08-01

    Chronic pain in patients with advanced cancer poses a serious clinical challenge. The Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/cannabidiol (CBD) oromucosal spray (U.S. Adopted Name, nabiximols; Sativex(®)) is a novel cannabinoid formulation currently undergoing investigation as an adjuvant therapy for this treatment group. This follow-up study investigated the long-term safety and tolerability of THC/CBD spray and THC spray in relieving pain in patients with advanced cancer. In total, 43 patients with cancer-related pain experiencing inadequate analgesia despite chronic opioid dosing, who had participated in a previous three-arm (THC/CBD spray, THC spray, or placebo), two-week parent randomized controlled trial, entered this open-label, multicenter, follow-up study. Patients self-titrated THC/CBD spray (n=39) or THC spray (n=4) to symptom relief or maximum dose and were regularly reviewed for safety, tolerability, and evidence of clinical benefit. The efficacy end point of change from baseline in mean Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form scores for "pain severity" and "worst pain" domains showed a decrease (i.e., improvement) at each visit in the THC/CBD spray patients. Similarly, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30 scores showed a decrease (i.e., improvement) from baseline in the domains of insomnia, pain, and fatigue. No new safety concerns associated with the extended use of THC/CBD spray arose from this study. This study showed that the long-term use of THC/CBD spray was generally well tolerated, with no evidence of a loss of effect for the relief of cancer-related pain with long-term use. Furthermore, patients who kept using the study medication did not seek to increase their dose of this or other pain-relieving medication over time, suggesting that the adjuvant use of cannabinoids in cancer-related pain could provide useful benefit. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc

  2. Prediagnostic circulating concentrations of plasma insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of lymphoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Appleby, Paul N.; Tipper, Sarah; Key, Timothy J.; Allen, Naomi E.; Nieters, Alexandra; Vermeulen, Roel; Roulland, Sandrine; Casabonne, Delphine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renee T.; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Klinaki, Eleni; Hansen, Louise; Tjønneland, Anne; Bonnet, Fabrice; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Pala, Valeria; Masala, Giovanna; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Peeters, Petra H.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, J. Ramón; Barricarte, Aurelio; Gavrila, Diana; Agudo, Antonio; Borgquist, Signe; Rosendahl, Ann H.; Melin, Beatrice; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay Tee; Gunter, Marc; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Travis, Ruth C.

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I has cancer promoting activities. However, the hypothesis that circulating IGF-I concentration is related to risk of lymphoma overall or its subtypes has not been examined prospectively. IGF-I concentration was measured in pre-diagnostic plasma samples from a nested

  3. Investigating relationships between ancestry, lifestyle behaviors and perceptions of heart disease and breast cancer among Canadian women with British and with South Asian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Kimberley D; Berry, Tanya R; Courneya, Kerry S; McGannon, Kerry R; Norris, Colleen M; Rodgers, Wendy M; Spence, John C

    2018-04-01

    Ethnic minority groups including Asians in Canada have different knowledge and perceptions of heart disease and breast cancer compared with the ethnic majority group. Examine relationships between perceptions of heart disease and breast cancer, and lifestyle behaviors for Canadian women with British and with South Asian ancestry. Women with South Asian ( n = 170) and with British ( n = 373) ancestry ( M age = 33.01, SD = 12.86) reported leisure time physical activity, intended fruit and vegetable consumption, disease perceptions (ability to reduce risk, control over getting the diseases, and influence of family history), and demographic information. Mann-Whitney tests and multiple hierarchical linear regressions were used to examine the relationships between lifestyle behaviors and disease perceptions, with ancestry explored as a possible moderator. Participants with South Asian ancestry believed they had greater ability to reduce their risk and have control over getting breast cancer than participants with British ancestry. Family history influences on getting either disease was perceived as higher for women with British ancestry. Age was positively related to all three perceptions in both diseases. Intended fruit and vegetable consumption was positively related to perceptions of ability to reduce risk and control of both diseases, but was stronger for women with South Asian ancestry regarding perceptions of breast cancer. Leisure time physical activity was positively related to perceptions of control over getting heart disease for women with British ancestry. Women's disease perceptions can vary by ancestry and lifestyle behaviors. Accurate representation of diseases is essential in promoting effective preventative behaviors.

  4. Delivery of disulfiram into breast cancer cells using folate-receptor-targeted PLGA-PEG nanoparticles: in vitro and in vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasehee, Hamidreza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Esfandyari-Manesh, Mehdi; Moradian, Hanieh; Faghihi, Shahab; Ghaffari, Seyed Hamidollah

    2016-04-21

    A folate-receptor-targeted poly (lactide-co-Glycolide) (PLGA)-Polyethylene glycol (PEG) nanoparticle is developed for encapsulation and delivery of disulfiram into breast cancer cells. After a comprehensive characterization of nanoparticles, cell cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, cellular uptake and intracellular level of reactive oxygen species are analyzed. In vivo acute and chronic toxicity of nanoparticles and their efficacy on inhibition of breast cancer tumor growth is studied. The folate-receptor-targeted nanoparticles are internalized into the cells, induce reactive oxygen species formation, induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation more efficiently compared to the untargeted nanoparticles. The acute and toxicity test show the maximum dose of disulfiram equivalent of nanoparticles for intra-venous injection is 6 mg/kg while show significant decrease in the breast cancer tumor growth rate. It is believed that the developed formulation could be used as a potential vehicle for successful delivery of disulfiram, an old and inexpensive drug, into breast cancer cells and other solid tumors.

  5. A gene-wide investigation on polymorphisms in the taste receptor 2R14 (TAS2R14) and susceptibility to colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Campa, D.; Vodička, Pavel; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Carrai, M.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Novotný, J.; Hemminki, K.; Försti, A.; Barale, R.; Canzian, F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2010), s. 88-93 ISSN 1471-2350 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/05/2626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : colorectal cancer * TAS2R14 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.439, year: 2010

  6. Linking CHHiP prostate cancer RCT with GP records: A study proposal to investigate the effect of co-morbidities and medications on long-term symptoms and radiotherapy-related toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Lemanska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients receiving cancer treatment often have one or more co-morbid conditions that are treated pharmacologically. Co-morbidities are recorded in clinical trials usually only at baseline. However, co-morbidities evolve and new ones emerge during cancer treatment. The interaction between multi-morbidity and cancer recovery is significant but poorly understood. Purpose: To investigate the effect of co-morbidities (e.g. cardiovascular and diabetes and medications (e.g. statins, antihypertensives, metformin on radiotherapy-related toxicity and long-term symptoms in order to identify potential risk factors. The possible protective effect of medications such as statins or antihypertensives in reducing radiotherapy-related toxicity will also be explored. Methods: Two datasets will be linked. (1 CHHiP (Conventional or Hypofractionated High Dose Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer randomised control trial. CHHiP contains pelvic symptoms and radiation-related toxicity reported by patients and clinicians. (2 GP (General Practice data from RCGP RSC (Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre. The GP records of CHHiP patients will be extracted, including cardiovascular co-morbidities, diabetes and prescription medications. Statistical analysis of the combined dataset will be performed in order to investigate the effect. Conclusions: Linking two sources of healthcare data is an exciting area of big healthcare data research. With limited data in clinical trials (not all clinical trials collect information on co-morbidities or medications and limited lengths of follow-up, linking different sources of information is increasingly needed to investigate long-term outcomes. With increasing pressures to collect detailed information in clinical trials (e.g. co-morbidities, medications, linkage to routinely collected data offers the potential to support efficient conduct of clinical trials. Keywords: Data

  7. A Qualitative Investigation of Health Care Professionals', Patients' and Partners' Views on Psychosocial Issues and Related Interventions for Couples Coping with Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Regan

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that cancer affects couples as an interdependent system and that couple-based psychosocial interventions are efficacious in reducing distress and improving coping skills. However, adoption of a couples-focused approach into cancer care is limited. Previous research has shown that patients and partners hold differing views from health care professionals (HCPs regarding their psychosocial needs, and HCPs from different disciplines also hold divergent views regarding couples' psychosocial needs. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of HCPs and couples on the provision of couple-focused psychosocial care in routine cancer services.A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken with 20 HCPs (medical oncologists, nurses, psycho-oncology professionals and 20 couples where one member had been diagnosed with cancer (breast, prostate, head/neck, bowel, multiple myeloma. Interviews were analysed using the framework approach.Three core themes were identified: "How Do Couples Cope with Cancer?" emphasised the positive and negative coping strategies used by couples, and highlighted that partners perceived a lack of engagement by HCPs. "What Is Couple-focused Psychosocial Care for People with Cancer?" described varying perspectives regarding the value of couple-focused psychosocial care and variation in the types of support couples need among HCPs and couples. Whereas most couples did not perceive a need for specialist couple-focused support and interventions, most HCPs felt couple-focused psychosocial care was necessary. "How Can Couple-Focused Psychosocial Care be Improved?" described couples' view of a need for better provision of information, and the importance of their relationship with oncology clinicians. HCPs identified a lack of confidence in responding to the emotional needs of couples, and barriers to providing psychosocial care, including challenges identifying distress (through screening and

  8. Colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma; Colon carcinoma ... eat may play a role in getting colon cancer. Colon cancer may be linked to a high-fat, ...

  9. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  10. Multiple Primary Cancer Monograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    To identify groups of cancer survivors that are at increased risk for multiple primary cancers, investigators led an effort to provide the first comprehensive population-based analysis of the risk of subsequent cancer in the U.S., resulting in a monograph.

  11. A prospective, multicenter pilot study to investigate the feasibility and safety of a 1-year controlled exercise training after adjuvant chemotherapy in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piringer, Gudrun; Fridrik, Michael; Fridrik, Alfred; Leiherer, Andreas; Zabernigg, August; Greil, Richard; Eisterer, Wolfgang; Tschmelitsch, Jörg; Lang, Alois; Frantal, Sophie; Burgstaller, Sonja; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef

    2018-04-01

    Despite advances in adjuvant chemotherapy, 20-30% of patients in stages II-III colorectal cancer will eventually relapse. Observational studies showed a reduction in relapse rate, colon cancer-specific mortality, and overall mortality by physical activity. Results from prospective randomized interventional studies to confirm these observational data are lacking. The aims of this prospective single-arm multicenter pilot study are to evaluate feasibility and safety of exercise training after adjuvant chemotherapy in colorectal cancer patients. The training was performed three times per week for 1 year and was increased gradually in three phases until reaching 18 metabolic equivalent task hours per week. Overall, 30 patients were included. The planned training intensity could be achieved in all three phases. Patients experienced a performance increase of median 35.5 watt, a weight-loss of a median of 3.0 kg, and a reduction in body fat content of median 1.0% during this exercise training. The analysis showed early study termination due to non-compliance in 10/30 patients (33.3%), disease progression in 4 patients (13.3%), and serious adverse events in 2 patients (6.7%). About half of patients (46.7%) completed the pilot study as planned. Biomarker analysis from 20 patients showed a non-significant reduction in insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGF-BP3) levels, significant increases in adiponectin and leptin levels, and a non-significant increase in C-peptide levels. Exercise training is feasible in patients with colorectal cancer after completion of adjuvant chemotherapy. The main problem encountered during the study was compliance. To improve compliance of exercise training, several measures were adapted for the upcoming prospective randomized ABCSG C08 Exercise II study.

  12. Lifetime alcohol use and overall and cause-specific mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, Pietro; Licaj, Idlir; Muller, David C

    2014-01-01

    .39 to 1.68) in men. Strong associations were observed for ARC mortality, in men particularly, and for violent deaths and injuries, in men only. No associations were observed for CVD/CHD mortality among drinkers, whereby HRs were higher in never compared to moderate drinkers. Overall mortality seemed...... men and women, free of cancer, diabetes, heart attack or stroke at enrolment, followed up for 12.6 years on average. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: 20 453 fatal events, of which 2053 alcohol-related cancers (ARC, including cancers of upper aerodigestive tract, liver, colorectal and female breast), 4187...... cardiovascular diseases/coronary heart disease (CVD/CHD), 856 violent deaths and injuries. Lifetime alcohol use was assessed at recruitment. RESULTS: HRs comparing extreme drinkers (≥30 g/day in women and ≥60 g/day in men) to moderate drinkers (0.1-4.9 g/day) were 1.27 (95% CI 1.13 to 1.43) in women and 1.53 (1...

  13. Effective delivery of hydrophobic drugs to breast (MCF-7) and Liver (HepG2) cancer cells: A detailed investigation using Cytotoxicity assays, fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manatunga, Danushika C; de Silva, Rohini M; Nalin de Silva, K M; Neelika Malavige, Gathsaurie; Wijeratne, Dulharie T; Williams, Gareth R; Jayasinghe, Chanika D; Udagama, Preethi V

    2018-04-03

    This study aimed to develop a drug carrier system consisting of a polymer containing hydroxyapatite (HAp) shell and a magnetic core of iron oxide nanoparticles. Doxorubicin and/or curcumin were loaded into the carrier via a simple diffusion deposition approach, with encapsulation efficiencies (EE) for curcumin and doxorubicin of 93.03 ± 0.3% and 97.37 ± 0.12% respectively. The co-loading of curcumin and doxorubicin led to a total EE of 76.02 ± 0.48%. Release studies were carried out at pH 7.4 and 5.3, and revealed higher release was at pH 5.3 expressing the potential application in tumor microenvironments. Cytotoxicity assays, fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry showed the formulations could effectively inhibit the growth of MCF-7 and HEpG2 cancer cells, being more potent than the free drug molecules both in dose and time dependent manner. Additionally, hemolysis tests and cytotoxicity evaluations determined the drug-loaded carriers to be non-toxic towards non-cancerous cells. These formulations thus have great potential in the development of new cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Ki67 levels as predictive and prognostic parameters in pretherapeutic breast cancer core biopsies: a translational investigation in the neoadjuvant GeparTrio trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkert, C; Loibl, S; Müller, B M; Eidtmann, H; Schmitt, W D; Eiermann, W; Gerber, B; Tesch, H; Hilfrich, J; Huober, J; Fehm, T; Barinoff, J; Jackisch, C; Prinzler, J; Rüdiger, T; Erbstösser, E; Blohmer, J U; Budczies, J; Mehta, K M; von Minckwitz, G

    2013-11-01

    The proliferation marker Ki67 has been suggested as a promising cancer biomarker. As Ki67 needs an exact quantification, this marker is a prototype of a new generation of tissue-based biomarkers. In this study, we have systematically evaluated different cut points for Ki67 using three different clinical end points in a large neoadjuvant study cohort. We have evaluated pretherapeutic Ki67 levels by immunohistochemistry in 1166 breast cancer core biopsies from the neoadjuvant GeparTrio trial. We used the standardized cutoff-finder algorithm for three end points [response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (pCR), disease-free (DFS) and overall-survival (OS)]. The analyses were stratified for hormone receptor (HR) and HER2 status by molecular subtype radar diagrams (MSRDs). A wide range of Ki67 cut points between 3%-94% (for pCR), 6%-46% (for DFS) and 4%-58% (for OS) were significant. The three groups of Ki67 ≤ 15% versus 15.1%-35% versus >35% had pCR-rates of 4.2%, 12.8%, and 29.0% (P strength of this marker. MSRDs are an easy new approach for visualization of biomarker effects on outcome across molecular subtypes in breast cancer. The experience with Ki67 could provide important information regarding the development and implementation of other quantitative biomarkers.

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Research Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... Genomics Research Research on Causes of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer ...

  16. Cancer section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is presented of the program at ORNL which is concerned with the study of cancer. The studies range from those at the molecular level and the control of gene expression to those concerning cell interactions and the role of immune responses. Since the agents capable of inducing cancer are multiple, the approaches must encompass the specific characteristics of chemical carcinogens, ionizing radiation, ultraviolet radiation and viruses. The approach of the molecular biological studies is centered on the role of activation of transposable gene elements. One investigation is concerned with the study of radiation-induced myelogenous leukemia. The other radiation carcinogenesis studies fall into two major groups. First, there are investigations of various facets of the mechanisms of cancer induction. The molecular and chromosomal studies fall into this category. The second group of studies includes those that are concerned with risk estimates

  17. Use of general practice, diagnostic investigations and hospital services before and after cancer diagnosis - a population-based nationwide registry study of 127,000 incident adult cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karina Garnier; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Flarup, Kaare Rud

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of patterns in cancer patients' health care utilisation around the time of diagnosis may guide health care resource allocation and provide important insights into this groups' demand for health care services. The health care need of patients with comorbid conditions far...... demand for GP services one year after their diagnosis highlights the importance of close coordination and communication between the primary and the secondary healthcare sector....

  18. FRAGMATIC: A randomised phase III clinical trial investigating the effect of fragmin® added to standard therapy in patients with lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macbeth Fergus R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE occurs when blood clots in the leg, pelvic or other deep vein (deep vein thrombosis with or without transport of the thrombus into the pulmonary arterial circulation (pulmonary embolus. VTE is common in patients with cancer and is increased by surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and disease progression. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH is routinely used to treat VTE and some evidence suggests that LMWH may also have an anticancer effect, by reduction in the incidence of metastases. The FRAGMATIC trial will assess the effect of adding dalteparin (FRAGMIN, a type of LMWH, to standard treatment for patients with lung cancer. Methods/Design The study design is a randomised multicentre phase III trial comparing standard treatment and standard treatment plus daily LMWH for 24 weeks in patients with lung cancer. Patients eligible for this study must have histopathological or cytological diagnosis of primary bronchial carcinoma (small cell or non-small cell within 6 weeks of randomisation, be 18 or older, and must be willing and able to self-administer 5000 IU dalteparin by daily subcutaneous injection or have it administered to themselves or by a carer for 24 weeks. A total of 2200 patients will be recruited from all over the UK over a 3 year period and followed up for a minimum of 1 year after randomisation. Patients will be randomised to one of the two treatment groups in a 1:1 ratio, standard treatment or standard treatment plus dalteparin. The primary outcome measure of the trial is overall survival. The secondary outcome measures include venous thrombotic event (VTE free survival, serious adverse events (SAEs, metastasis-free survival, toxicity, quality of life (QoL, levels of breathlessness, anxiety and depression, cost effectiveness and cost utility. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80812769

  19. FRAGMATIC: A randomised phase III clinical trial investigating the effect of fragmin® added to standard therapy in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, Gareth O; Burns, Sarah; Noble, Simon I; Macbeth, Fergus R; Cohen, David; Maughan, Timothy S

    2009-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs when blood clots in the leg, pelvic or other deep vein (deep vein thrombosis) with or without transport of the thrombus into the pulmonary arterial circulation (pulmonary embolus). VTE is common in patients with cancer and is increased by surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and disease progression. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is routinely used to treat VTE and some evidence suggests that LMWH may also have an anticancer effect, by reduction in the incidence of metastases. The FRAGMATIC trial will assess the effect of adding dalteparin (FRAGMIN), a type of LMWH, to standard treatment for patients with lung cancer. The study design is a randomised multicentre phase III trial comparing standard treatment and standard treatment plus daily LMWH for 24 weeks in patients with lung cancer. Patients eligible for this study must have histopathological or cytological diagnosis of primary bronchial carcinoma (small cell or non-small cell) within 6 weeks of randomisation, be 18 or older, and must be willing and able to self-administer 5000 IU dalteparin by daily subcutaneous injection or have it administered to themselves or by a carer for 24 weeks. A total of 2200 patients will be recruited from all over the UK over a 3 year period and followed up for a minimum of 1 year after randomisation. Patients will be randomised to one of the two treatment groups in a 1:1 ratio, standard treatment or standard treatment plus dalteparin. The primary outcome measure of the trial is overall survival. The secondary outcome measures include venous thrombotic event (VTE) free survival, serious adverse events (SAEs), metastasis-free survival, toxicity, quality of life (QoL), levels of breathlessness, anxiety and depression, cost effectiveness and cost utility. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80812769

  20. An initial investigation on developing a new method to predict short-term breast cancer risk based on deep learning technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Wang, Yunzhi; Yan, Shiju; Tan, Maxine; Cheng, Samuel; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    In order to establish a new personalized breast cancer screening paradigm, it is critically important to accurately predict the short-term risk of a woman having image-detectable cancer after a negative mammographic screening. In this study, we developed and tested a novel short-term risk assessment model based on deep learning method. During the experiment, a number of 270 "prior" negative screening cases was assembled. In the next sequential ("current") screening mammography, 135 cases were positive and 135 cases remained negative. These cases were randomly divided into a training set with 200 cases and a testing set with 70 cases. A deep learning based computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme was then developed for the risk assessment, which consists of two modules: adaptive feature identification module and risk prediction module. The adaptive feature identification module is composed of three pairs of convolution-max-pooling layers, which contains 20, 10, and 5 feature maps respectively. The risk prediction module is implemented by a multiple layer perception (MLP) classifier, which produces a risk score to predict the likelihood of the woman developing short-term mammography-detectable cancer. The result shows that the new CAD-based risk model yielded a positive predictive value of 69.2% and a negative predictive value of 74.2%, with a total prediction accuracy of 71.4%. This study demonstrated that applying a new deep learning technology may have significant potential to develop a new short-term risk predicting scheme with improved performance in detecting early abnormal symptom from the negative mammograms.

  1. Long-term results of breast-conserving treatment for early-stage breast cancer in Japanese women from multicenter investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsumi, Shozo; Takashima, Shigemitsu; Sakamoto Goi

    2003-01-01

    Although many clinical data regarding breast-conserving treatment have already been reported from European and North American countries, few clinical data with long-term follow-up have been reported from Japan. We collected information on therapeutic and possible or developed prognostic factors and follow-up data for Japanese women who had received breast-conserving treatment consisting of wide excision of the primary tumor, axillary dissection and radiotherapy for unilateral breast cancer considered suitable for breast-conserving treatment from 18 Japanese major breast cancer treating hospitals; 1561 patients were registered. The median follow-up period was 77 months. Five-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 89.4 and 95.9%, respectively. The 5-year local recurrence-free rate was 96.3%. The patients with histologically positive margins (P<0.0001) or estrogen receptor negative tumor (P=0.0340) or younger than 40 years old (P<0.0001) developed statistically significantly more local recurrences. Adjuvant endocrine therapy was essential for the estrogen receptor positive patients to have a lower local recurrence rate. Endocrine therapy did not change the local recurrence rate among estrogen receptor negative patients at all. Multivariate analysis showed histological margin status and the combination of estrogen receptor status and endocrine therapy were independent prognostic factors for local recurrence. The 5-year local recurrence rate of Japanese breast cancer patients who were treated with breast-conserving treatment using radiotherapy was 3.7%. Independent prognostic factors for local recurrence were histological margin status and the combination of estrogen receptor status and adjuvant endocrine therapy. (author)

  2. Investigation of the effect of the rebamipide mouthwash on the crisis of the stomatitis induced by the cancer chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Keishi; Hanawa, Takehisa; Hanawa, Kazumi

    2001-01-01

    Stomatitis is well-known as one of the undesirable side effects induced by high and/or multiple dosing of cytotoxic drugs such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Stomatitis causes pain in the oral cavity, impaired swallowing or loss of appetite, and finally, lowering of the quality of life (QOL) of patients. In this study, we attempted to apply a new mouthwash containing rebamipide (REB) which is known as the anti-activated oxygen agent. Rebamipide mouthwash (REB-M) showed the effectiveness to the crisis of the stomatitis during the cancer chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Pathology of breast and ovarian cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Engel, Christoph; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; O’Malley, Frances; John, Esther M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Hansen, Thomas v O; Nielsen, Finn C.; Osorio, Ana; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Benítez, Javier; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Volorio, Sara; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Putignano, Anna Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Brewer, Carole; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Houghton, Catherine; Weaver, JoEllen; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Doroteha; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Barjhoux, Laure; Isaacs, Claudine; Peshkin, Beth N.; Caldes, Trinidad; de al Hoya, Miguel; Cañadas, Carmen; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; D’Andrea, Emma; Yan, Max; Fox, Stephen; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Rubinstein, Wendy; Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia M.; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Rappaport, Christine; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Sokolenko, Anna; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Sweet, Kevin; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben; Caligo, Maria; Aretini, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeld, Anna; Henriksson, Karin; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nussbaum, Bob; Beattie, Mary; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara; Gayther, Simon A; Nathanson, Kate; Gross, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous small studies found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization. Methods We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze the pathology of invasive breast, ovarian and contralateral breast cancers. Results There was strong evidence that the proportion of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors decreased with age at diagnosis among BRCA1 (p-trend=1.2×10−5) but increased with age at diagnosis among BRCA2 carriers (p-trend=6.8×10−6). The proportion of triple negative tumors decreased with age at diagnosis in BRCA1 carriers but increased with age at diagnosis of BRCA2 carriers. In both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, ER-negative tumors were of higher histological grade than ER-positive tumors (Grade 3 vs. Grade 1, p=1.2×10−13 for BRCA1 and p=0.001 for BRCA2). ER and progesterone receptor (PR) expression were independently associated with mutation carrier status (ER-positive odds ratio (OR) for BRCA2=9.4, 95%CI:7.0-12.6 and PR-positive OR=1.7, 95%CI:1.3-2.3, under joint analysis). Lobular tumors were more likely to be BRCA2-related (OR for BRCA2=3.3, 95%CI:2.4-4.4, p=4.4×10−14), and medullary tumors BRCA1-related (OR for BRCA2=0.25, 95%CI:0.18-0.35, p=2.3×10−15). ER-status of the first breast cancer was predictive of ER-status of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (p=0.0004 for BRCA1; p=0.002 for BRCA2). There were no significant differences in ovarian cancer morphology between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers (serous:67%; mucinous:1%; endometriod:12%; clear-cell:2%). Conclusions/Impact Pathology characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumors may be useful for improving risk prediction algorithms and informing clinical strategies for screening and prophylaxis. PMID:22144499

  4. Early Detection Of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V B Bhatnagar

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available Farly detection of cancer is based upon three fundamental assumptions, firstly that the trea'ment of benign and precancerous lesions reduces the incidence of cancer, secondly, that the treatment of in situ cancers is conducive to total cure and thirdly that early diagnosis and management of invasive cancer ensures be.ter survival. When patient seeks medical advice for vague symptoms, which could however be due to a possible malignant tumour at a particular site, the alert clinician should investigate the patient immediately to exclude cancer. At this stage cancer is usually not significantly advanced. Currently the U. I. C. C. (International Union for Cancer Control} is studying the epidemiology of cancers in various countries The importance of this is two folds : Firstly by focussing attention on a section of population vulnerable to a particular cancer an early detection is facilitated Secondly by changing the causative factors responsible to a particular cancer, the incidence of that cancer can be reduced e. g. reduction in lung cancer following campaigns against ciguette smoking and reductioi in breast cancer after campaigns for advocating breast feeding of infants, lowering fat consumption and encouraging self palpation of breast regularly. Indeed early diagnosis of cancer implies diagnosis of cancer in almost a symptomatic stage It involves motiva’ion of the population towards acquisitio : of knowledge, attitude and practice.. Epidemiologies and clinicians should be able to recognise high risk cases exposed to particular neoplasia and knowledge of alarming symptoms should be pro- pogated for wide publicity through common available media and means. Probable cases should have regular clhrcal examination periodically and relevant investigations including radiological, imaging techniques and Bio-Chemical examination should be undertaken as and when desired Suspicious lesions should be investigated by specific tests including smear cytology

  5. Phorbol esters in seed oil of Jatropha curcas L. (saboodam in Thai) and their association with cancer prevention: from the initial investigation to the present topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Hirota; Suttajit, Maitree; Rawangkan, Anchalee; Iida, Keisuke; Limtrakul, Pornngarm; Umsumarng, Sonthaya; Suganuma, Masami

    2017-08-01

    In 1988, we first reported the complete chemical structure of a new type of phorbol ester, abbreviated to DHPB, found in seed oil of Jatropha curcas L. (Saboodam in Thai) and its tumor-promoting activity on mouse skin. Although this seed oil contains toxic phorbol ester, it was planned to use it as a feasible renewable oil and the extracted seed cake as fertilizer. This utilization value opened a new science of Jatropha curcas. The main experimental results are cited from our publications, and the relevant literature screened from journals and PubMed. This paper begins with our original work on the structural elucidation of a new phorbol ester, 12-deoxy-16-hydroxyphorbol (DHPB): its tumor-promoting activity was compared with that of TPA. We think that it is timely to review the following research advances with Jatropha curcas, so numerous topics are classified as follows: (1) historical development of phorbol esters in seed oil; (2) toxicity of phorbol ester based on various bioassays; (3) degradation of phorbol ester; (4) a new pharmaceutical compound in seed; and (5) tumor promotion and progression with endogeneous tumor promoters in human carcinogenesis. The discovery of phorbol ester in seed oil raised awareness of the danger of public use of seed oil and seed cake in Thailand, and also indicated the necessity of discussing the concept of primary and tertiary cancer preventions. It is worthwhile to study the future benefits and cancer risks of globally distributed Jatropha curcas L.

  6. Investigating core genetic-and-epigenetic cell cycle networks for stemness and carcinogenic mechanisms, and cancer drug design using big database mining and genome-wide next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cell cycle plays a central role in development and carcinogenesis. Thus, the use of big databases and genome-wide high-throughput data to unravel the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying cell cycle progression in stem cells and cancer cells is a matter of considerable interest. Real genetic-and-epigenetic cell cycle networks (GECNs) of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and HeLa cancer cells were constructed by applying system modeling, system identification, and big database mining to genome-wide next-generation sequencing data. Real GECNs were then reduced to core GECNs of HeLa cells and ESCs by applying principal genome-wide network projection. In this study, we investigated potential carcinogenic and stemness mechanisms for systems cancer drug design by identifying common core and specific GECNs between HeLa cells and ESCs. Integrating drug database information with the specific GECNs of HeLa cells could lead to identification of multiple drugs for cervical cancer treatment with minimal side-effects on the genes in the common core. We found that dysregulation of miR-29C, miR-34A, miR-98, and miR-215; and methylation of ANKRD1, ARID5B, CDCA2, PIF1, STAMBPL1, TROAP, ZNF165, and HIST1H2AJ in HeLa cells could result in cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis through NFκB, TGF-β, and PI3K pathways. We also identified 3 drugs, methotrexate, quercetin, and mimosine, which repressed the activated cell cycle genes, ARID5B, STK17B, and CCL2, in HeLa cells with minimal side-effects.

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver ... on Causes of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver ... of Cancer Cancer Diagnosis Research Cancer Prevention Research Screening & Early Detection Cancer Treatment Research Cancer & Public Health ...

  9. Eyelid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  10. Anal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  11. Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  12. Appendix Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  13. Study protocol of the B-CAST study: a multicenter, prospective cohort study investigating the tumor biomarkers in adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Megumi; Mori, Masaki; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Kanazawa, Akiyoshi; Kobayashi, Michiya; Okajima, Masazumi; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Miyakoda, Keiko; Sugihara, Kenichi; Kotake, Kenjiro; Nishimura, Genichi; Tomita, Naohiro; Ichikawa, Wataru; Takahashi, Keiichi; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Kondo, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer is internationally accepted as standard treatment with established efficacy. Several oral fluorouracil (5-FU) derivatives with different properties are available in Japan, but which drug is the most appropriate for each patient has not been established. Although efficacy prediction of 5-FU derivatives using expression of 5-FU activation/metabolism enzymes in tumors has been studied, it has not been clinically applied. The B-CAST study is a multicenter, prospective cohort study aimed to identify the patients who benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with each 5-FU regimen, through evaluating the relationship between tumor biomarker expression and treatment outcome. The frozen tumor specimens of patients with stage III colon cancer who receives postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy are examined. Protein expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). mRNA expression of TP, DPD, thymidylate synthase (TS) and orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT) are evaluated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The patients’ clinical data reviewed are as follow: demographic and pathological characteristics, regimen, drug doses and treatment duration of adjuvant therapy, types and severity of adverse events, disease free survival, relapse free survival and overall survival. Then, relationships among the protein/mRNA expression, clinicopathological characteristics and the treatment outcomes are analyzed for each 5-FU derivative. A total of 2,128 patients from the 217 institutions were enrolled between April 2009 and March 2012. The B-CAST study demonstrated that large-scale, multicenter translational research using frozen samples was feasible when the sample shipment and Web-based data collection were well organized. The results

  14. TU-CD-BRB-12: Radiogenomics of MRI-Guided Prostate Cancer Biopsy Habitats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyanova, R; Lynne, C; Abraham, S; Patel, M; Jorda, M; Kryvenko, O; Ishkanian, A; Abramowitz, M; Pollack, A [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Tachar, M; Erho, N; Buerki, C; Lam, L; Davicioni, E [GenomeDx Biosciences Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diagnostic prostate biopsies are subject to sampling bias. We hypothesize that quantitative imaging with multiparametric (MP)-MRI can more accurately direct targeted biopsies to index lesions associated with highest risk clinical and genomic features. Methods: Regionally distinct prostate habitats were delineated on MP-MRI (T2-weighted, perfusion and diffusion imaging). Directed biopsies were performed on 17 habitats from 6 patients using MRI-ultrasound fusion. Biopsy location was characterized with 52 radiographic features. Transcriptome-wide analysis of 1.4 million RNA probes was performed on RNA from each habitat. Genomics features with insignificant expression values (<0.25) and interquartile range <0.5 were filtered, leaving total of 212 genes. Correlation between imaging features, genes and a 22 feature genomic classifier (GC), developed as a prognostic assay for metastasis after radical prostatectomy was investigated. Results: High quality genomic data was derived from 17 (100%) biopsies. Using the 212 ‘unbiased’ genes, the samples clustered by patient origin in unsupervised analysis. When only prostate cancer related genomic features were used, hierarchical clustering revealed samples clustered by needle-biopsy Gleason score (GS). Similarly, principal component analysis of the imaging features, found the primary source of variance segregated the samples into high (≥7) and low (6) GS. Pearson’s correlation analysis of genes with significant expression showed two main patterns of gene expression clustering prostate peripheral and transitional zone MRI features. Two-way hierarchical clustering of GC with radiomics features resulted in the expected groupings of high and low expressed genes in this metastasis signature. Conclusions: MP-MRI-targeted diagnostic biopsies can potentially improve risk stratification by directing pathological and genomic analysis to clinically significant index lesions. As determinant lesions are more reliably

  15. Testicular cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer; Testicular neoplasm ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 86. National Cancer Institute. PDQ testicular cancer treatment. Updated February 17, 2016. www.cancer. ...

  16. Preliminary Clinical and Pharmacologic Investigation of Photodynamic Therapy with the Silicon Phthalocyanine Photosensitizer Pc 4 for Primary or Metastatic Cutaneous Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, Timothy James; Baron, Elma D.; Colussi, Valdir C.; Cooper, Kevin D.; Hoppel, Charles L.; Ingalls, Stephen T.; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Li, Xiaolin; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Stevens, Seth R.; Remick, Scot C.

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cutaneous malignancies has been found to be an effective treatment with a range of photosensitizers. The phthalocyanine Pc 4 was developed initially for PDT of primary or metastatic cancers in the skin. A Phase I trial was initiated to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetic profiles of systemically administered Pc 4 followed by red light (Pc 4-PDT) in cutaneous malignancies. A dose-escalation study of Pc 4 (starting dose 0.135 mg/m 2 ) at a fixed light fluence (135 J/cm 2 of 675-nm light) was initiated in patients with primary or metastatic cutaneous malignancies with the aim of establishing the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Blood samples were taken at intervals over the first 60 h post-PDT for pharmacokinetic analysis, and patients were evaluated for toxicity and tumor response. A total of three patients (two females with breast cancer and one male with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma) were enrolled and treated over the dose range of 0.135 mg/m 2 (first dose level) to 0.54 mg/m 2 (third dose level). Grade 3 erythema within the photoirradiated area was induced in patient 2, and transient tumor regression in patient 3, in spite of the low photosensitizer doses. Pharmacokinetic observations fit a three-compartment exponential elimination model with an initial rapid distribution phase (∼0.2 h) and relatively long terminal elimination phase (∼28 h), Because of restrictive exclusion criteria and resultant poor accrual, the trial was closed before MTD could be reached. While the limited accrual to this initial Phase I study did not establish the MTD nor establish a complete pharmacokinetic and safety profile of intravenous Pc 4-PDT, these preliminary data support further Phase I testing of this new photosensitizer.

  17. Preliminary clinical and pharmacologic investigation of photodynamic therapy with the silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4 for primary or metastatic cutaneous cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy James Kinsella

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT for cutaneous malignancies has been found to be an effective treatment with a range of photosensitizers. The phthalocyanine Pc 4 was developed initially for PDT of primary or metastatic cancers in the skin. A Phase I trial was initiated to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetic profiles of systemically administered Pc 4 followed by red light (Pc 4-PDT in cutaneous malignancies. A dose-escalation study of Pc 4 (starting dose 0.135 mg/m2 at a fixed light fluence (135 J/cm2 of 675-nm light was initiated in patients with primary or metastatic cutaneous malignancies with the aim of establishing the maximum tolerated dose (MTD. Blood samples were taken at intervals over the first 60 hours post-PDT for pharmacokinetic analysis, and patients were evaluated for toxicity and tumor response. A total of 3 patients (2 females with breast cancer and 1 male with cutaneous lymphoma were enrolled and treated over the dose range of 0.135 mg/m2 (first dose level to 0.54 mg/m2 (third dose level. Grade 3 erythema within the photoirradiated area was induced in patient 2, and transient tumor regression in patient 3, in spite of the low photosensitizer doses. Pharmacokinetic observations fit a 3-compartment exponential elimination model with an initial rapid distribution phase (~0.2 hrs and relatively long terminal elimination phase (~28 hrs, Because of restrictive exclusion criteria and resultant poor accrual, the trial was closed before MTD could be reached. While the limited accrual to this initial Phase I study did not establish the MTD nor establish a complete pharmacokinetic and safety profile of intravenous Pc 4-PDT, these preliminary data support further Phase I testing of this new photosensitizer.

  18. The investigation of minoxidil-induced [Ca2+]i rises and non-Ca2+-triggered cell death in PC3 human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Shu; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Liu, Yuan-Yuarn; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Liang, Wei-Zhe; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Chen, Fu-An; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2017-02-01

    Minoxidil is clinically used to prevent hair loss. However, its effect on Ca 2+ homeostasis in prostate cancer cells is unclear. This study explored the effect of minoxidil on cytosolic-free Ca 2+ levels ([Ca 2+ ] i ) and cell viability in PC3 human prostate cancer cells. Minoxidil at concentrations between 200 and 800 μM evoked [Ca 2+ ] i rises in a concentration-dependent manner. This Ca 2+ signal was inhibited by 60% by removal of extracellular Ca 2+ . Minoxidil-induced Ca 2+ influx was confirmed by Mn 2+ -induced quench of fura-2 fluorescence. Pre-treatment with the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X, PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA), nifedipine and SKF96365 inhibited minoxidil-induced Ca 2+ signal in Ca 2+ containing medium by 60%. Treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ pump inhibitor 2,5-ditert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) in Ca 2+ -free medium abolished minoxidil-induced [Ca 2+ ] i rises. Conversely, treatment with minoxidil abolished BHQ-induced [Ca 2+ ] i rises. Inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) with U73122 abolished minoxidil-evoked [Ca 2+ ] i rises. Overnight treatment with minoxidil killed cells at concentrations of 200-600 μM in a concentration-dependent fashion. Chelation of cytosolic Ca 2+ with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid/AM (BAPTA/AM) did not prevent minoxidil's cytotoxicity. Together, in PC3 cells, minoxidil induced [Ca 2+ ] i rises that involved Ca 2+ entry through PKC-regulated store-operated Ca 2+ channels and PLC-dependent Ca 2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Minoxidil-induced cytotoxicity in a Ca 2+ -independent manner.

  19. A Large Cross-Sectional Survey Investigating the Knowledge of Cervical Cancer Risk Aetiology and the Predictors of the Adherence to Cervical Cancer Screening Related to Mass Media Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado De Vito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aims of this study were to compare the characteristics of women who got a Pap-test during the mass media campaign, carried out in an Italian region by broadcasts advertising, and two years later and to identify the determinants of knowledge of cervical cancer etiology and of the adherence to the mass media campaign. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was carried out through a self-administered questionnaire. Results. A total of 8570 randomly selected women were surveyed, 823 of these had a Pap-test during the mass media campaign period and 7747 two years later. Higher educational level, being not married, and living in urban areas were the main independent characteristics associated with a higher level of knowledge of cervical cancer etiology, although a previous treatment following a Pap smear abnormality was the strongest predictor (OR = 2.88; 95% CI: 2.43–3.41. During the campaign period women had the Pap-test more frequently as a consequence of the mass media campaign (OR = 8.28; 95% CI; 5.51–12.45. Conclusions. Mass media campaign is a useful tool to foster cervical screening compliance; however, its short-term effect suggests repeating it regularly.

  20. Targeting Quiescence in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0413 TITLE: Targeting Quiescence in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Buttitta CONTRACTING...Quiescence in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting uiescence in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0413 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT A major problem in prostate cancer is finding and eliminating the non-proliferating or “quiescent” cancer cells. This is because early

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  2. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer ...

  3. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  4. Nanomedicine and cancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Sebastian, Mathew; Ninan, Neethu

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to radically change the way cancer is diagnosed, imaged, and treated. The holistic approach to cancer involves noninvasive procedures that emphasize restoring the health of human energy fields. Presenting a wealth of information and research about the most potent cancer healing therapies, this forward-thinking book explores how nanomedicine, holistic medicine, and other cancer therapies play important roles in treatment of this disease. Topics include nanobiotechnology for antibacterial therapy and diagnosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and cancer, antioxidants and combinatorial therapies, and optical and mechanical investigations of nanostructures for biomolecular detection.

  5. Gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Takashi; Katsumata, Noriyuki

    2008-01-01

    Surgery and radiation therapy have been the main types of treatment for gynecologic cancer. However, chemotherapy in gynecologic oncology has recently made dramatic progress and presently is becoming the most widespread treatment. After the discovery of cisplatin in the field of chemotherapy for epithelial ovarian cancer, it has now become the leading treatment modality. According to the result of several important phase III randomized control trials (RCTs), the platinum-taxane combined therapy has now become the standard treatment regimen. Regarding endometrial cancer, Cisplatin-Adriamycin-Cyclophosphamide (CAP) therapy has been used as an effective adjuvant chemotherapy in Japan. The adjuvant chemotherapy (Adriamycin-Cisplatin therapy) for the endometrial cancer has now been recognized worldwide as the standard therapy based on the findings of a phase III RCT. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer has also been recommended as the standard therapy in Japan since 1999 based on the successful results of numerous RCTs which proved its efficacy. The chemotherapy for gynecologic cancers has been investigated and standardized based on the results of numerous clinical trials. These trials have been conducted by many clinical trial groups, such as the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG), and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) throughout the world, in addition to the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) and the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group (JGOG) in Japan. The valuable contributions of these clinical trials are helping in the development of new drug therapies, thus leading to such treatment regimens playing increasingly important and wider roles in the field of gynecologic oncology treatment in the future. (author)

  6. Investigation of quality of life in the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent oropharyngeal cancer: State-of the-art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sikorsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postsurgical survival is considered to be indicators of treatment efficiency in most cases. However, the sociomedical rehabilitation of patients in this group is no less important; not only life expectancy, but also functional rehabilitation and quality of life are in the lead in patients with Stage III–IVA due to their low 2-year and much lower 5-year survival. The main efficiency criterion is patients, quality of life as compared to antitumor treatment programs in the absence of differences in survival.As the only chance of cure or life prolongation in most cases, multicomponent surgery for locally advanced and recurrent oropharyngeal cancer may be refused by a patient for fear of being lost to society. Identification of surgical treatment-induced changes in quality of life in patients may be used as a criterion for assessing the performed operations.The body's changes in a patient with otopharyngeal cancer are associated with impairment of basic physiological functions (deglutition, mastication, and breathing, sensitivity (taste, olfaction, and hearing, and individual characteristics of a human being (for example, appearance and voice. The quality of life is integral characteristics of the physical, psychological, emotional, and social functioning of a patient, which is based on his subjective perception. The methods for studying the quality of life include first of all questionnaires that are classified as general and special ones.The general questionnaires are intended to assess the quality of life of both healthy individuals and patients regardless of their disease; the special questionnaires are used to study that in certain categories and groups of patients. The general questionnaires allow the comparison of patients with a population of healthy people. Account must be also taken of the fact that the quality of life varies with age and comorbidities. A great deal of procedures for measuring the quality of life in different groups of

  7. [HPV primary test in the cervical cancer screening: reproducibility assessment and investigation on cytological outcome of Hybrid Capture 2 borderline samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroni, Elena; Sani, Cristina; Bisanzi, Simonetta; Ocello, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate the reproducibility of the High-Risk Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2-HR, Qiagen) test within the frame of cervical cancer screening with HPV, for samples with values very close to the cut-off (borderline), that is 0.80≤RLU/CO≤0.99 (RLU/CO: relative light units/cut-off) and to assess any possible presence of high grade lesions. all borderline samples collected from January 2014 to August 2015 were repeated with HR-HC2 test within two weeks from the first test. For HPV-positive samples, cytology and colposcopy results (if present) were analysed. national and international directions recommend the use of HPV testing as a primary test for cervical cancer screening for women aged 30/34-64 years. In Tuscany Region (Central Italy) the primary screening with HPV test was introduced in 2013 and the HPV test currently used, HR-HC2, has a positive cut-off≥1 RLU/CO. proportion of HPV-positive tests at repetition, then stratified by type of material (ThinPrep, STM) and for the following subc