WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer institute center

  1. Report of chronic myeloid leukemia from Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Regional Cancer Center, 2002-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Pritanjali

    2013-07-01

    Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Regional Cancer Center was established in 1993. It's one of the main Health-Care Institution in the state of Bihar. The data of 205 patients was presented in the ICON meeting and 98% of patients were diagnosed in chronic phase. Complete hematological response was seen in 91% of patients in 3 months. A total of 197 (96%) patients were alive at the time of analysis of which 179 (87%) were still in chronic phase with hematological remission.

  2. Creating a “culture of research” in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Background The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. Methods To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. Limitations The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important

  3. Children's cancer centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  4. Quality Improvement in the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program: The Quality Oncology Practice Initiative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert D.; Castro, Kathleen M.; Eisenstein, Jana; Stallings, Holley; Hegedus, Patricia D.; Bryant, Donna M.; Kadlubek, Pam J.; Clauser, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) began in 2007; it is a network of community-based hospitals funded by the NCI. Quality of care is an NCCCP priority, with participation in the American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) playing a fundamental role in quality assessment and quality improvement (QI) projects. Using QOPI methodology, performance on quality measures was analyzed two times per year over a 3-year period to enhance our implementation of quality standards at NCCCP hospitals. Methods: A data-sharing agreement allowed individual-practice QOPI data to be electronically sent to the NCI. Aggregated data with the other NCCCP QOPI participants were presented to the network via Webinars. The NCCCP Quality of Care Subcommittee selected areas in which to focus subsequent QI efforts, and high-performing practices shared voluntarily their QI best practices with the network. Results: QOPI results were compiled semiannually between fall 2010 and fall 2013. The network concentrated on measures with a quality score of ≤ 0.75 and planned voluntary group-wide QI interventions. We identified 13 measures in which the NCCCP fell at or below the designated quality score in fall 2010. After implementing a variety of QI initiatives, the network registered improvements in all parameters except one (use of treatment summaries). Conclusion: Using the NCCCP as a paradigm, QOPI metrics provide a useful platform for group-wide measurement of quality performance. In addition, these measurements can be used to assess the effectiveness of QI initiatives. PMID:25538082

  5. CPRIT/Johnson Space Center, September, 2011 (Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey; Lane, Helen; Baker, Tracey; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    JSC researchers study carcinogenesis, cancer prevention and treatment along with epidemiological (primarily retrospective and longitudinal) studies, modeling, and interactions with the environment such as radiation, nutritional, and endocrine changes related to space flight along with behaviors such as smoking. Cancer research is a major focus for human space flight due to the exposure to space radiation which consists of particles of varying charges and energies, and secondary neutrons. The JSC laboratories collaborate with investigators from the U.S. as well as our European and Japanese partners. We use accelerator facilities at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Loma Linda University and Los Alamos National Laboratory that generate high energy charged particles and neutrons to simulate cosmic radiation and solar particle events. The research using cultured cells and animals concentrates on damage and repair from the level of DNA to organ tissues, due to exposure to simulated space radiation exposure, that contribute to the induction of leukemia and solid tumors in most major tissues such as lung, colon, liver and breast. The goal of the research is to develop a mathematical model that can predict cancer morbidity and mortality risks with sufficient accuracy for a given space mission.

  6. 76 FR 50487 - National Cancer Institute Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI SPORE in Childhood ALL, Skin, Brain, Lung....395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute Notice of Closed...

  7. Hospitals report on cancer centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., is first-place winner among cancer centers. Holy Cross Hospital's Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., is named second; and, Cardinal Health System's Ball Cancer Center, Muncie, Ind., third.

  8. 76 FR 576 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Mesothelioma, Lung, Breast and Ovarian Cancers. Date: February 2-3, 2011. Time: 8....395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  9. Center for Cancer Genomics | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) was established to unify the National Cancer Institute's activities in cancer genomics, with the goal of advancing genomics research and translating findings into the clinic to improve the precise diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In addition to promoting genomic sequencing approach

  10. 75 FR 16488 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes...

  11. 77 FR 15782 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes...

  12. 78 FR 50068 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to... sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the Contact...

  13. Evaluation of institutional cancer registries in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuervo, L G; Roca, S; Rodríguez, M N; Stein, J; Izquierdo, J; Trujillo, A; Mora, M

    1999-09-01

    The four primary objectives of this descriptive study were to: 1) design a quality-measurement instrument for institutional cancer registries (ICRs), 2) evaluate the existing ICRs in Colombia with the designed instrument, 3) categorize the different registries according to their quality and prioritize efforts that will efficiently promote better registries with the limited resources available, and 4) determine the institution with the greatest likelihood of successfully establishing Colombia's second population-based cancer registry. In 1990 the National Cancer Institute of Colombia developed 13 institution-based cancer registries in different Colombian cities in order to promote the collection of data from a large group of cancer diagnostic and treatment centers. During the first half of 1997, this evaluation reviewed 12 registries; one of the original 13 no longer existed. All of the Colombian institutions (hospitals) that maintain institution-based cancer registries were included in the study. At each institution, a brief survey was administered to the hospital director, the registry coordinator, and the registrar (data manager). Researchers investigated the institutions by looking at six domains that are in standard use internationally. Within each domain, questions were developed and selected through the Delphi method. Each domain and each question were assigned weights through a consensus process. In most cases, two interviewers went to each site to collect the information. The university hospitals in Cali, Pereira, and Medellín had substantially higher scores, reflecting a good level of performance. Four of the 12 institutions had almost no cancer registry work going on. Five of the 12 hospital directors considered that the information provided by the cancer registries influenced their administrative decisions. Three of the registries had patient survival data. Four of the institutions allocated specific resources to operate their cancer registries; in the

  14. Institutional shared resources and translational cancer research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Paoli Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development and maintenance of adequate shared infrastructures is considered a major goal for academic centers promoting translational research programs. Among infrastructures favoring translational research, centralized facilities characterized by shared, multidisciplinary use of expensive laboratory instrumentation, or by complex computer hardware and software and/or by high professional skills are necessary to maintain or improve institutional scientific competitiveness. The success or failure of a shared resource program also depends on the choice of appropriate institutional policies and requires an effective institutional governance regarding decisions on staffing, existence and composition of advisory committees, policies and of defined mechanisms of reporting, budgeting and financial support of each resource. Shared Resources represent a widely diffused model to sustain cancer research; in fact, web sites from an impressive number of research Institutes and Universities in the U.S. contain pages dedicated to the SR that have been established in each Center, making a complete view of the situation impossible. However, a nation-wide overview of how Cancer Centers develop SR programs is available on the web site for NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the U.S., while in Europe, information is available for individual Cancer centers. This article will briefly summarize the institutional policies, the organizational needs, the characteristics, scientific aims, and future developments of SRs necessary to develop effective translational research programs in oncology. In fact, the physical build-up of SRs per se is not sufficient for the successful translation of biomedical research. Appropriate policies to improve the academic culture in collaboration, the availability of educational programs for translational investigators, the existence of administrative facilitations for translational research and an efficient organization

  15. Institutional aspects of the energy centers concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, George H.

    1977-03-01

    Information is presented concerning the socio-economic impacts of nuclear energy centers; equity considerations relating to taxation and revenue distribution; report on jurisdictional authorities of state and local government related to centralized and decentralized alternative energy systems; federal-state conflicts and cooperation in the siting of nuclear energy facilities; the energy park experience in Pennsylvania; and a socio-economic institution summary of energy centers in Washington State.

  16. National Cancer Institute News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life among African-American cancer survivors. Study finds premature death rates diverge in the United States by race and ethnicity January 25, 2017 Premature death rates declined among Hispanics, blacks, and Asian/Pacific ...

  17. National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalona, William J; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Camp, Nicola J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooney, Kathleen A; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Freedman, Matthew L; Gudmundsson, Julius; Kittles, Rick A; Margulies, Elliott H; McGuire, Barry B; Ostrander, Elaine A; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Witte, John S; Isaacs, William B

    2011-05-15

    Compelling evidence supports a genetic component to prostate cancer susceptibility and aggressiveness. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified more than 30 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. It remains unclear, however, whether such genetic variants are associated with disease aggressiveness--one of the most important questions in prostate cancer research today. To help clarify this and substantially expand research in the genetic determinants of prostate cancer aggressiveness, the first National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop assembled researchers to develop plans for a large new research consortium and patient cohort. The workshop reviewed the prior work in this area and addressed the practical issues in planning future studies. With new DNA sequencing technology, the potential application of sequencing information to patient care is emerging. The workshop, therefore, included state-of-the-art presentations by experts on new genotyping technologies, including sequencing and associated bioinformatics issues, which are just beginning to be applied to cancer genetics.

  18. 78 FR 3901 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ...: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852. Contact Person... Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, ] 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 8135, Bethesda, MD...: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Washington/Rockville, 1750 Rockville...

  19. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    Coeur d’Alene, ID IASLC 9th World Conference on Lung Cancer, Cellular Targeting in the Molecular Diagnosis of Lung Cancer, Tokyo, Japan The...World Conference on Lung Cancer, Cellular Targeting in the Molecular Diagnosis of Lung Cancer, Tokyo, Japan The first International Conference on

  20. American Institute for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Cancer By Cancer Site What Is Cancer Foods That Fight Cancer Tools You Can Use Cancer Infographics & Multimedia Studying ... About Cancer By Cancer Site What Is Cancer Foods That Fight Cancer Tools You Can Use Cancer Infographics & Multimedia Studying ...

  1. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Neurocognitive Deficits in Children who Received Cancer Treatment Affecting the Central Nervous System (HLMCC 0707) • Melatonin and sleep hygiene...Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young. (PI: Jeffrey Krischer, Ph.D.) The aetiology of type 1 diabetes (T1D) remains unknown, however...progression to diabetes . To test these hypotheses, large groups of young children at risk for T1D must be followed prospectively with collection of

  2. 78 FR 19275 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel Tumor Immunology. Date: June 26-27, 2013. Time... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116...

  3. Center of nanotechnology for cancer diagnosis and treatment launched in Tianjin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ On 24 August, a center of nanotechnology for cancer diagnosis and treatment was officially inaugurated in Tianjin. The center was jointly established by the CAS Institute of High-energy Physics, the CAS affiliated National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, and the Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital.

  4. Cancer survivorship research: a review of the literature and summary of current NCI-designated cancer center projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, J Phil; Dean, Julie A; Paskett, Electra D

    2011-10-01

    The number of cancer survivors and the amount of cancer survivorship research have grown substantially during the past three decades. This article provides a review of interventional and observational cancer survivorship research efforts as well as a summary of current cancer survivorship research projects being conducted by National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers in an effort to identify areas that need further attention.

  5. How Effective Are Clinical Pathways With and Without Online Peer-Review? An Analysis of Bone Metastases Pathway in a Large, Integrated National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Flickinger, John C.; Rakfal, Susan M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rodgers, Edwin [Via Oncology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Heron, Dwight E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Clinical pathways are an important tool used to manage the quality in health care by standardizing processes. This study evaluated the impact of the implementation of a peer-reviewed clinical pathway in a large, integrated National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center Network. Methods: In 2003, we implemented a clinical pathway for the management of bone metastases with palliative radiation therapy. In 2009, we required the entry of management decisions into an online tool that records pathway choices. The pathway specified 1 or 5 fractions for symptomatic bone metastases with the option of 10-14 fractions for certain clinical situations. The data were obtained from 13 integrated sites (3 central academic, 10 community locations) from 2003 through 2010. Results: In this study, 7905 sites were treated with 64% of courses delivered in community practice and 36% in academic locations. Academic practices were more likely than community practices to treat with 1-5 fractions (63% vs. 23%; p < 0.0001). The number of delivered fractions decreased gradually from 2003 to 2010 for both academic and community practices (p < 0.0001); however, greater numbers of fractions were selected more often in community practices (p < 0.0001). Using multivariate logistic regression, we found that a significantly greater selection of 1-5 fractions developed after implementation online pathway monitoring (2009) with an odds ratio of 1.2 (confidence interval, 1.1-1.4) for community and 1.3 (confidence interval, 1.1-1.6) for academic practices. The mean number of fractions also decreased after online peer review from 6.3 to 6.0 for academic (p = 0.07) and 9.4 to 9.0 for community practices (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: This is one of the first studies to examine the efficacy of a clinical pathway for radiation oncology in an integrated cancer network. Clinical pathway implementation appears to be effective in changing patterns of care, particularly with online clinical

  6. 75 FR 10295 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Washington, DC/Rockville Hotel, 1750 Rockville Pike.... Place: Legacy Hotel and Meeting Center, 1775 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Gerald... Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Blvd., Room 8101, Bethesda, MD...

  7. 76 FR 42718 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    .... Time: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Washington/DC Rockville, Hotel and Executive Meeting Center, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20582. Contact Person... Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 8113, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  8. 77 FR 14026 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel & Executive Meeting Center, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Zhiqiang Zou... Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Blvd., Room 8050A, MSC 8329, Bethesda, MD...

  9. 75 FR 57473 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ....m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Alexandria Old Town..., Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH... evaluate contract proposals. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli...

  10. 78 FR 38355 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ...: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Peter J... Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 9606 Medical Center Drive, 7W514, MSC 9750, Bethesda, MD 20892... evaluate grant applications. Place: Doubletree Hotel Bethesda, 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD...

  11. 75 FR 7489 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... applications. Place: Legacy Hotel and Meeting Center, 1775 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person... Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 7141, Bethesda, MD 20892.... Place: Hilton Washington/Rockville, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person:...

  12. 78 FR 8155 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Immunology. ] Date: March 15, 2013. Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI Omnibus Cancer Biology...

  13. The Dartmouth Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence: magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ian; Fiering, Steve N; Griswold, Karl E; Hoopes, P Jack; Kekalo, Katerina; Ndong, Christian; Paulsen, Keith; Petryk, Alicea A; Pogue, Brian; Shubitidze, Fridon; Weaver, John

    2015-01-01

    The Dartmouth Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence - one of nine funded by the National Cancer Institute as part of the Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - focuses on the use of magnetic nanoparticles for cancer diagnostics and hyperthermia therapy. It brings together a diverse team of engineers and biomedical researchers with expertise in nanomaterials, molecular targeting, advanced biomedical imaging and translational in vivo studies. The goal of successfully treating cancer is being approached by developing nanoparticles, conjugating them with Fabs, hyperthermia treatment, immunotherapy and sensing treatment response.

  14. 75 FR 16816 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, NCI SPORE in Skin and Prostate Cancers. Date..., Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  15. Brain Mapping Center Opens at Institute of Biophysics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Agroup of world-class scie, ntists in brain imaging came to China's capital to .witness the inauguration of the Beijing MRI Center for Brain Research, which was officially opened on May 25 at the CAS Institute of Biophysics.

  16. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute process of accreditation according to the standards of the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Stefano; Di Turi, Annunziata; Caolo, Giuseppina; Pignatelli, Adriana C; Papa, Elena; Branca, Marta; Cerimele, Marina; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-01-01

    The accreditation process is, on the one hand, a tool used to homogenize procedures, rendering comparable and standardized processes of care, and on the other, a methodology employed to develop a culture of quality improvement. Although not yet proven by evidence-based studies that health outcomes improve as a result of an accreditation to excellence, it is undeniable that better control of healthcare processes results in better quality and safety of diagnostic and therapeutic pathways. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute underwent the accreditation process in accordance with the standards criteria set by the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI), and it has recently completed the process, acquiring its designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC). This was an invaluable opportunity for the Regina Elena Institute to create a more cohesive environment, to widely establish a culture of quality, to implement an institutional information system, and to accelerate the process of patient involvement in strategic decisions. The steps of the process allowed us to evaluate the performance and the organization of the institute and put amendments in place designed to be adopted through 26 improvement actions. These actions regarded several aspects of the institute, including quality culture, information communication technology system, care, clinical trials unit, disease management team, nursing, and patient empowerment and involvement. Each area has a timeline. We chose to present the following 3 improvement actions: clinical trial center, computerized ambulatory medical record, and centrality of patient and humanization of clinical pathway.

  17. Center for Herbal Research on Colorectal Cancer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Research Area: Herbs Program:Centers of Excellence for Research on CAM Description:Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of...

  18. 75 FR 20370 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ...@mail.nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Breast Cancer... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  19. 76 FR 16431 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Lymphoma, Breast, Ovarian.... 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  20. 75 FR 67379 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Prostate, Skin, Pancreatic and other.... 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  1. 76 FR 9353 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ....nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Prostate Imaging..., Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  2. Breast Cancer Center Support Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    also occur with increased frequency in gene carriers, such prostate cancer. First-degree relatives of individuals with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation have...Tumor M 36 Asian Prostate Cancer M 52 Caucasian Ovarian Cancer F 56 Caucasian Cervical Cancer F 43 Caucasian Breast Cancer F 45 Caucasian Cancer of...address transportation barriers, alternate mechanisms were put in place for provision of parking and taxi vouchers. It was expected that many of the women

  3. 77 FR 24969 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Breast, Prostate and... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  4. 77 FR 49450 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI REVIEW of P50 and R01 applications in Lung, Skin, Ovarian... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  5. 78 FR 41939 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI Omnibus Review, Cancer Etiology/Genetics... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and...

  6. 78 FR 27408 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Methods for the Detection of Cancer Recurrence in Post-Therapy Breast Cancer Patients. Date: June 4, 2013... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  7. 75 FR 3239 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Basal-like Breast Cancer Assay. Date: March 10, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m..., Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  8. 78 FR 28235 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... Diagnostic Assay to Detect Basal- like Breast Cancer. Date: June 13, 2013. Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m..., Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  9. The Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center Summer Fellows Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depken, Diane E.; Zeman, Catherine L.; Lensch, Ellen Kabat; Brown, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the background, activities, and outcomes of the Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center (ATEEC) and its Summer Fellows Institutes as a model for disciplinary and cross-disciplinary infusion of environmental science and technology content, curriculum, and methods into the classroom. Presents experiences, themes, and activities…

  10. Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfano, Robert R.; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2002-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.

  11. 75 FR 21002 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... Panel, SPORE in Lymphoma and Breast Cancer. Date: June 15-16, 2010. Time: 5 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  12. 78 FR 14099 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... Treatment for Prostate Cancer. Date: March 28, 2013. Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  13. 77 FR 26772 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ..., Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to... assistance, such as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify...

  14. Inter-institutional development of a poster-based cancer biology learning tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraos-Selim, Cecile; Modzelewski, Ruth A; Steinman, Richard A

    2010-09-01

    There is a paucity of African-American Cancer researchers. To help address this, an educational collaboration was developed between a Comprehensive Cancer Center and a distant undergraduate biology department at a minority institution that sought to teach students introductory cancer biology while modeling research culture. A student-centered active learning curriculum was established that incorporated scientific poster presentations and simulated research exercises to foster learning of cancer biology. Students successfully mined primary literature for supportive data to test cancer-related hypotheses. Student feedback indicated that the poster project substantially enhanced depth of understanding of cancer biology and laid the groundwork for subsequent laboratory work. This inter-institutional collaboration modeled the research process while conveying facts and concepts about cancer.

  15. Alliance Against Cancer, the network of Italian cancer centers bridging research and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paoli, Paolo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Ferrarini, Manlio; Pelicci, PierGiuseppe; Dellabona, Paolo; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Mantovani, Alberto; Musto, Pellegrino; Opocher, Giuseppe; Picci, Piero; Ricciardi, Walter; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-11-14

    Alliance Against Cancer (ACC) was established in Rome in 2002 as a consortium of six Italian comprehensive cancer centers (Founders). The aims of ACC were to promote a network among Italian oncologic institutions in order to develop specific, advanced projects in clinical and translational research. During the following years, many additional full and associate members joined ACC, that presently includes the National Institute of Health, 17 research-oriented hospitals, scientific and patient organizations. Furthermore, in the last three years ACC underwent a reorganization process that redesigned the structure, governance and major activities. The present goal of ACC is to achieve high standards of care across Italy, to implement and harmonize principles of modern personalized and precision medicine, by developing cost effective processes and to provide tailored information to cancer patients. We herein summarize some of the major initiatives that ACC is currently developing to reach its goal, including tumor genetic screening programs, establishment of clinical trial programs for cancer patients treated in Italian cancer centers, facilitate their access to innovative drugs under development, improve quality through an European accreditation process (European Organization of Cancer Institutes), and develop international partnerships. In conclusion, ACC is a growing organization, trying to respond to the need of networking in Italy and may contribute significantly to improve the way we face cancer in Europe.

  16. 75 FR 60132 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI...; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395..., Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September...

  17. 75 FR 71712 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI...; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395..., Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November...

  18. 77 FR 43098 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal NCI... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93....398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated:...

  19. 77 FR 58852 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; R13 Review Teleconference. Date: October 24..., Panel; Immunology. Date: December 6, 2012. Time: 7:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  20. 76 FR 64090 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ..., Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116....) Contact Person: Timothy C. Meeker, MD, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  1. 78 FR 78982 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to... sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the Contact...

  2. Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesko, Samuel M.

    2007-07-31

    . For colorectal cancer, the stage at diagnosis of cases diagnosed in northeast Pennsylvania was compared to data from prior years. A population-based interview study of healthy adults was conducted to document the status of cancer screening and to estimate the prevalence of established cancer risk factors in this community. This study is similar in design to that used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). EXPERIMENTAL METHODS AND PROCEDURES: This program includes two distinct but related projects. The first project uses existing data to conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania, and the second is a population-based study of cancer risk factors and cancer screening behaviors in this same population. HUMAN SUBJECTS CONSIDERATIONS This program includes two projects: cancer surveillance and a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior. The cancer surveillance project involves only the use of existing aggregate data or de-identified data. As such, the surveillance project is exempt from human subjects considerations. The study of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors includes data from a random sample of adult residents of northeast Pennsylvania who are 18 or more years of age. All races, ethnicities and both sexes are included in proportion to their representation in the population. Subjects are interviewed anonymously by telephone; those who are unable to complete an interview in English are ineligible. This project has been reviewed and approved by the Scranton-Temple Residency Program IRB (IRB00001355), which is the IRB for the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute.

  3. Integrative Medicine Program- MD Anderson Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T Lee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Integrative Medicine Program at MD Anderson Cancer Center was first established in 1998.  Our mission is to empower patients with cancer and their families to become active partners in their own physical, psycho-spiritual, and social health through personalized education and evidenced-based clinical care to optimize health, quality of life, and clinical outcomes across the cancer continuum.  The program consists of three main components: clinical care, research, and education.  The Integrative Medicine Center provides clinical services to patients through individual and group programs.  The clinical philosophy of the center is to work collaboratively with the oncology teams to build comprehensive and integrative care plans that are personalized, evidence-based, and safe with the goal of improving clinical outcomes.  The individual services comprise of integrative oncology consultation, acupuncture, meditation, music therapy, nutrition, and oncology massage.  The center also provides a variety of group programs including meditation, yoga, tai chi, cooking classes and others.  Over the past 13 years, over 70,000 patients and families have participated in services and programs offered by the center.  The research portfolio focuses on three main areas: mind-body interventions, acupuncture, and meditation.  This lecture will focus on providing an overview of the Integrative Medicine Program at MD Anderson with a focus on the clinical services provided.  Participants will learn about the integrative clinical model and how this is applied to the care of cancer patients at MD Anderson Cancer Center.  Current and future research topics will be discussed as well as patient cases.

  4. 76 FR 41273 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ...: Gail J Bryant, MD, Medical Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  5. 78 FR 15023 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... applications and the discussions could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as... Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NHH,...

  6. 76 FR 26309 - National Cancer Institute; Notice Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ...: Washington DC North Hilton Hotel, 620 Perry Parkway, Gaithersburg, MD 20877. Contact Person: Lalita D... Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 7141, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  7. 76 FR 80375 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel & Executive M, 1750 Rockville Pike... Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116...

  8. 77 FR 12600 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ...: Bethesda Marriott Suites, 6711 Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20817. Contact Person: Ellen K Schwartz.... Place: Bethesda Marriott Suites, 6711 Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20817. Contact Person: Savvas C...: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Research Infrastructure Support for HMOs....

  9. 76 FR 776 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY... Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Date: February 2 and 3, 2011. Time of Meeting: Approximately 8... Language Institute Foreign Language Center and Presidio of Monterey (DLIFLC & POM), Building...

  10. 75 FR 43496 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY... Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Date: August 10 and 11, 2010. Time of Meeting: Approximately 8... Language Institute Foreign Language Center and Presidio of Monterey (DLIFLC & POM), Building...

  11. 76 FR 39076 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY... Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Date: August 3 and 4, 2011. Time of Meeting: Approximately 8 a... Language Institute Foreign Language Center and Presidio of Monterey (DLIFLC & POM), Building...

  12. 78 FR 41072 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93..., Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: July 2, 2013. David Clary, Program...

  13. 78 FR 66370 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93..., Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS). Dated: October 30, 2013. Melanie J. Gray,...

  14. 77 FR 12318 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... outcome of the evaluation will provide information for consideration by an internal NCI committee that... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93....398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  15. 77 FR 70170 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93..., Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November 16, 2012. Melanie J. Gray,...

  16. Secondary Educational Institution Centered Diffusion of ICT in Rural Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin

    were: an integrated purchase and training facilitation, smart classroom implementation, educational administration, extracurricular activities, a non-formal computer literacy center, and school-based internship. Two live-in field studies were conducted: from August 2011 to January 2012 and from August......This dissertation presents a holistic approach for exploring, analyzing, solving, and circumventing the barriers to the integration and adoption of ICT in relation to the learning environments of secondary educational institutions in rural Bangladesh. It contributes to the fields of ICT...... in the secondary education systems (i.e., covering grades 6–12) in Bangladesh. Having positioned this investigation within the transformative paradigm, I took six strategic approaches to diffuse ICT in the learning environment of the stakeholders in rural private vocational school. The ICT diffusion strategies...

  17. 75 FR 7489 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Portable e-Technology Diet and Physical Activity Tools for Consumers. Date: April... Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute... Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Blvd.,...

  18. 76 FR 31619 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ..., 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Hotel... Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Blvd., Rm 8053, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-496-7421... Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116...

  19. 78 FR 15021 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The outcome of the evaluation will provide information to internal... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396... Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 4, 2013. Melanie J. Gray, Program...

  20. [Certified prostate cancer centers and second opinion centers for testicular cancer: successful models of uro-oncology cancer care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwend, J E; Albers, P; Schrader, M

    2011-08-01

    Establishment of organ site-specific cancer centers by the German Cancer Society (GCS) is part of the basic politically driven reform of oncology care in Germany. Since 2007 an increasing number of prostate cancer centers have been guided toward certification by the OnkoZert GmbH of the GCS. Currently 68 centers are certified and together with ongoing certification proceedings will amount to 81 prostate cancer centers, which cover about one fourth of cases of primary prostate cancer. Urology is of particular importance in the management of these centers. For the most part, urologists belonging to a clinical unit are the initiators of the certification process, thus ensuring that uro-oncology is firmly entrenched in the specialty with involvement of outpatient service providers. Fears that authority will be lost are unfounded as long as responsibility for this task is taken seriously and active use is made of the possibilities for creativity. A similarly important function is fulfilled by the testicular cancer centers that offer second opinion services, which were initiated by urology conjointly with German Cancer Aid to pursue the goal of quality assurance for this tumor entity and therefore likewise secure the position of this tumor in the realm of urologists. By applying such strategic approaches, urologists will succeed in sustainably safeguarding their future importance in a very competitive environment and in counteracting the encroachments of other specialties by exhibiting clear orientation.

  1. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  2. Patient-Centered Cancer Care Programs in Italy: Benchmarking Global Patient Education Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truccolo, Ivana; Cipolat Mis, Chiara; Cervo, Silvia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Bongiovanni, Marilena; Bearz, Alessandra; Sartor, Ivana; Baldo, Paolo; Ferrarin, Emanuela; Fratino, Lucia; Mascarin, Maurizio; Roncadin, Mario; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Muzzatti, Barbara; De Paoli, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In Italy, educational programs for cancer patients are currently provided by the national government, scientific societies, and patient advocate organizations. Several gaps limit their effectiveness, including the lack of coordinated efforts, poor involvement of patient feedback in the planning of programs, as well as a lack of resources on innovative cancer-related topics. This process is parallel to a strong shift in the attitude of patients towards health in general and taking charge of their own health conditions in particular. The National Cancer Institute in the USA and the Organization of European Cancer Institutes encourage comprehensive cancer centers in providing educational programs conceived to overcome these gaps. The goal of this paper is to identify and describe the key elements necessary to develop a global patient education program and provide recommendations for strategies with practical examples for implementation in the daily activities of cancer institutes. A multidisciplinary committee was established for patient education, including patient representatives as equal partners, to define, implement, verify, and evaluate the fundamental steps for establishing a comprehensive education program. Six essential topics were identified for the program: appropriate communication of cancer epidemiology, clinical trial information, new therapeutic technologies, support in the use of medicines, psycho-oncological interventions, age-personalized approaches, and training programs for healthcare providers. Integration of these topics along with patient feedback is the key to a successful model for educational programs. An integrated educational program can transform a comprehensive cancer center to an institution that provides research and care for and with patients.

  3. Enrollment and Racial Disparities in National Cancer Institute Cancer Treatment Clinical Trials in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullig, Leah L.; Fortune-Britt, Alice G.; Rao, Shangbang; Tyree, Seth D.; Godley, Paul A.; Carpenter, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical trials provide access to innovative, quality cancer treatment. Simultaneously, broad access helps ensure trial inclusion of heterogeneous patient populations, which improves generalizability of findings and development of interventions that are effective for diverse populations. We provide updated data describing enrollment into cancer treatment trials in North Carolina. Methods For 1996 to 2009, person-level data regarding cancer clinical trial enrollment and cancer incidence were obtained from the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Enrollment rates were estimated as the ratio of trial enrollment to cancer incidence for race, gender, and year for each county, Area Health Education Center (AHEC) region, and the state overall. Enrollment rates for common cancers are presented. Results From 1996 to 2009, North Carolina NCI treatment trial enrollment rate was 2.4% and 2.2% for whites and minorities, respectively. From 2007 to 2009, rates were 3.8% for white females, 3.5% for minority females, 1.3% for white men, and 1.0% for minority men, with greater enrollment among more urban populations (2.4%) than the most rural populations (1.5%). Limitations This study is limited to NCI-sponsored treatment trials in North Carolina. Policies governing collection of original data necessitate a delay in data availability. Conclusions Effort is needed to ensure trial access and enrollment among all North Carolina populations. Specifically, we identified racial and gender disparities, particularly for certain cancers (e.g., breast). Programs in North Carolina and across the nation can use the methods we employ to assess their success in broadening clinical trials enrollment for diverse populations. PMID:26763244

  4. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports SUMMARY... Institutes of Health (NIH), has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request for...

  5. 75 FR 11896 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute...: Adriana Stoica, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Special Review & Logistics Branch, Division of...

  6. 75 FR 54161 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... grant applications. Place: Doubletree Hotel Bethesda (Formerly Holiday Inn Select), 8120 Wisconsin..., Research Programs Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116... applications. Place: Hilton Washington/Rockville, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact...

  7. 78 FR 16272 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Rockville, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852..., Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 8131, Bethesda.... Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: Doubletree Hotel Bethesda, 8120...

  8. 78 FR 30933 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ...: Robert Bird, Ph.D., Chief, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities... Person: Timothy C. Meeker, MD, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed...

  9. 77 FR 62223 - Board of Visitors Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... No: 2012-25204] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Board of Visitors Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of open meeting... of Committee: Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Date: October...

  10. 75 FR 47797 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY... & 14, 2010 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center in...

  11. 77 FR 13571 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY... Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Date: March 21, 2012. Time of Meeting: Approximately 8 a.m. through 4:30 p.m. Please allow extra time for gate security for both days. Location: Defense...

  12. 76 FR 45543 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY: Department of the Army, DOD. ACTION: Notice; cancellation. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center meeting scheduled for August 3 and 4, 2011 published in the...

  13. 75 FR 59720 - Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... OFFICE Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) AGENCY... appointing not more than 15 members to a Methodology Committee of the Patient- Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In addition, the Directors of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the...

  14. Walking the Tightrope: Directing a Student Health Center at a Research Institution with an Academic Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmas, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Reporting lines for directors of student health centers (SHCs) at colleges and universities are a matter of continuing interest for those of us who must follow them. SHC directors at institutions with academic medical centers face a greater number of reporting choices that also have the potential of being more politically charged. The author…

  15. A nurse practitioner-led urgent care center: meeting the needs of the patient with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegg, Tracy A

    2013-08-01

    Providing comprehensive care for patients with cancer is complex with regard to severe treatment-related side effects. Hundreds of thousands of patients with cancer visit the emergency department (ED) each year, and more than half report multiple visits. In the United States, few of the National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers have an ED specifically for patients with cancer. EDs often are an overcrowded and expensive way in which to care for the urgent needs of patients with cancer. In addition, a looming shortage exists for both primary care providers and oncologists who can address symptom issues. As the Affordable Care Act is implemented, more patients will enter the healthcare system, placing a demand on providers that the current supply cannot meet. A report from the Institute of Medicine advocates that nurse practitioners (NPs) are more than competent to provide for the unique urgent care needs of patients with cancer. The aim of this article is to describe an NP-led urgent care center for patients with cancer and how that care center provides access to vital, expeditious, and cost-effective care.

  16. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functional Annotation of Cancer Genomes Principal Investigator: William C. Hahn, M.D., Ph.D. The comprehensive characterization of cancer genomes has and will continue to provide an increasingly complete catalog of genetic alterations in specific cancers. However, most epithelial cancers harbor hundreds of genetic alterations as a consequence of genomic instability. Therefore, the functional consequences of the majority of mutations remain unclear.

  17. Breast cancer in pregnancy: an institutional experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquisett, Abraham Hernández; Vicent, Carmen Herrero; Gregori, Joaquín Gavilá; Zotano, Ángel Guerrero; Porta, Vicente Guillem; Simón, Amparo Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 12 months of delivery. Nowadays PABC can be safely diagnosed, staged, and treated during pregnancy with good outcomes for both the mother and the fetus. Recent studies suggest that prognosis of women diagnosed during postpartum seems to be worse. In order to gain a better understanding of the PABC, we reviewed our centre’s experience. Patients and methods We assessed the clinicopathological parameters, evolution, and outcome of patients treated in the Fundación Instituto Valenciano de Oncología of Valencia, Spain, from October 1990 to October 2013, and compared the results of patients diagnosed during pregnancy (group ‘A’) and patients diagnosed within one year of delivery (group ‘B’). Of 12,000 cases of breast cancer registered in our database, 35 cases of PABC were identified. We included 11 patients in group ‘A’ and 24 in group ‘B’. Results In our group the median age was 35 years (range 29–42), of which ten (28%) patients had family history (first grade) of breast cancer, four patients were BRCA 1 mutation carriers. Axillary node compromise was found in 19 patients (53.5%), 24 patients were stage II or III at diagnosis (68.5%), 22 (62.8%) were ER positive, and nine (25.7%) were HER-2 positive. In group A (n = 11), five patients diagnosed before 18th week decided that a therapeutic abortion be performed before treatment, two patients were treated during pregnancy, one with chemotherapy without treatment associated complications during delivery. Four women diagnosed after 28th week decided to delay the treatment until delivery. After a follow up of 172 months, the relapse free survival (RFS) was 69% at five years and 45% at ten years. Overall survival (OS) at five years was 90.8% and 74.2% at ten years for all patients. For group ‘A’ OS was higher

  18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  19. The National Cancer Institute's Physical Sciences - Oncology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Michael Graham

    In 2009, the NCI launched the Physical Sciences - Oncology Centers (PS-OC) initiative with 12 Centers (U54) funded through 2014. The current phase of the Program includes U54 funded Centers with the added feature of soliciting new Physical Science - Oncology Projects (PS-OP) U01 grant applications through 2017; see NCI PAR-15-021. The PS-OPs, individually and along with other PS-OPs and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OCs), comprise the Physical Sciences-Oncology Network (PS-ON). The foundation of the Physical Sciences-Oncology initiative is a high-risk, high-reward program that promotes a `physical sciences perspective' of cancer and fosters the convergence of physical science and cancer research by forming transdisciplinary teams of physical scientists (e.g., physicists, mathematicians, chemists, engineers, computer scientists) and cancer researchers (e.g., cancer biologists, oncologists, pathologists) who work closely together to advance our understanding of cancer. The collaborative PS-ON structure catalyzes transformative science through increased exchange of people, ideas, and approaches. PS-ON resources are leveraged to fund Trans-Network pilot projects to enable synergy and cross-testing of experimental and/or theoretical concepts. This session will include a brief PS-ON overview followed by a strategic discussion with the APS community to exchange perspectives on the progression of trans-disciplinary physical sciences in cancer research.

  20. Systemic treatment with capecitabine as maintenance therapy in patients with recurring or metastatic breast cancer: experience in the Oncology Hospital, National Medical Center Siglo XXI, Mexican Social Security Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-González, Manuel; Quintana-Quintana, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Metastatic breast cancer as initial onset represents between 20 and 30 % of cases and is considered an incurable disease. The goal of its treatment is palliative, looking for increasing the survival while reducing the symptoms. Maintenance chemotherapy studies for metastatic breast cancer have demonstrated to prolong the progression-free survival, with unclear results in terms of overall survival. The main objectives of our study were the progression-free survival and overall survival in patients with recurring or metastatic breast cancer treated with capecitabine in the maintenance chemotherapy setting compared with patients not receiving maintenance chemotherapy. As secondary objectives, the frequency of dose-limiting toxicities and response rate were determined. A non-probabilistic sampling was used, through expert selection of patients from the recurring/metastatic breast cancer survey cared within the period from January 1, 2007, to December 21, 2012. A total of 77 patients were included. Clinical data of advanced/recurrent breast cancer patients that were treated with capecitabine were recorded. The study achieved its primary objective, since the progression-free survival was prolonged for the maintenance therapy group: 6.6 versus 18.1 months, p Siglo XXI Oncology Hospital extends the overall survival and progression-free survival with a good toxicity profile.

  1. New Hires at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifty-one people joined the facility in November and December 2013. The National Cancer Institute welcomes… Emily Boward Emad Darvishi Shuo Gu Sanath Kumar Janaka Robert Kortum Yasmin Lachir Jinbian Liu Yang Liu Eric Ramirez Salazar Brett Shelley Li Xia Jaeho Yoon

  2. 76 FR 5597 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... applications. Place: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact...D, Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities..., Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room...

  3. 77 FR 4052 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ...: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel & Executive....m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville, 1750... Programs Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116...

  4. 75 FR 3242 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    .... Place: Washington DC North Hilton Hotel, 620 Perry Parkway, Gaithersburg, MD 20877. Contact Person... Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 7147, Bethesda, MD 20892-8329, 301-496.... Time: 7:45 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton...

  5. A Medical Center Network for Optimized Lung Cancer Biospecimen Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0818 TITLE: A Medical Center Network for Optimized Lung Cancer Biospecimen Banking PRINCIPAL...Biospecimen Resource Network: A medical center network for optimized lung cancer biospecimen banking 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0818... audit sampling the source forms of 15 randomly selected patients from each Resource Site. The purpose of the audit was make certain required clinical

  6. Gastrointestinal Tumor Board: An Evolving Experience in Tehran Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Haddad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI cancers are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in Iran, with stomach adenocarcinoma as the most common cancer in men and the second common cancer in women. Also, some parts of Northern Iran have one of the highest incidences of esophageal cancer in the world. Multi-disciplinary organ-based joint clinics and tumor boards are a well-recognized necessity for modern treatment of cancer and are routinely utilized in developed countries, especially in major academic centres. But this concept is relatively new in developing countries, where cancer treatment centres are burdened by huge loads of patients and have to cope with a suboptimum availability of resources and facilities. Cancer Institute of Tehran University of Medical Sciences is the oldest and the only comprehensive cancer treatment centre in Iran, with a long tradition of a general tumor board for all cancers. But with the requirements of modern oncology, there has been a very welcome attention to sub-specialized organ-based tumor boards and joint clinics here in the past few years. Considering this, we started a multi-disciplinary tumor board for GI cancers in our institute in early 2010 as the first such endeavor here. We hereby review this 2-year evolving experience. The process of establishment of a GI tumor board, participations from different oncology disciplines and related specialties, the cancers presented and discussed in the 2 years of this tumor board, the general intents of treatment for the decisions made and the development of interest in this tumor board among the Tehran oncology community will be reviewed. The GI tumor board of Tehran Cancer Institute started its work in January 2010, with routine weekly sessions. A core group of 2 physicians from each surgical, radiation and medical oncology departments plus one gastroenterologist, GI pathologist and radiologist was formed, but participation from all interested physicians was encouraged. An

  7. Multi-institutional Registry for Prostate Cancer Radiosurgery: An Observational Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra eFreeman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Title: Multi-institutional Registry for Prostate Cancer Radiosurgery: An Observational Clinical TrialAuthors: Debra Freeman, MD*; Gregg Dickerson, MD; Mark Perman, MDObjective: To report on the design, methodology and early outcome results of a multi-institutional registry study of prostate cancer radiosurgery.Methods: The Registry for Prostate Cancer Radiosurgery (RPCR was established in 2010 to further evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of prostate radiosurgery (SBRT for the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer. Men with prostate cancer were asked to voluntarily participate in the Registry. Demographic, baseline medical and treatment-related data were collected and stored electronically in a HIPAA-compliant database, maintained by Advertek, Inc. Enrolled men were asked to complete short, multiple choice questionnaires regarding their bowel, bladder and sexual function. Patient-reported outcome forms were collected at baseline and at regular intervals (every 3-6 months following treatment. Serial PSA measurements were obtained at each visit and included in the collected data.Results: From July 2010 to July 2013, nearly 2000 men from 45 participating sites were enrolled in the registry. The majority (86% received radiosurgery as monotherapy. At 2 years follow-up, biochemical disease free survival was 92%. No Grade 3 late urinary toxicity was reported. One patient developed Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (rectal bleeding. Erectile function was preserved in 80% of men <70 yeats old. Overall compliance with data entry was 64%.Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative option to conventional radiotherapy for the treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer. The Registry for Prostate Cancer Radiosurgery represents the collective experience of multiple institutions, including community-based cancer centers, with outcome results in keeping with published, prospective trials of prostate SBRT.

  8. Penile cancer brachytherapy HDR mould technique used at the Holycross Cancer Center

    OpenAIRE

    Matys, Robert; Kubicka-Mendak, Iwona; Łyczek, Jarosław; Pawłowski, Piotr; Stawiarska, Iwona; Miedzinska, Joanna; Banatkiewicz, Paweł; Łaskawska-Wiatr, Aldona; Wittych, Justyna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this pictorial essay is to present the mould based HDR brachytherapy technique used at the Holycross Cancer Center for penile cancer patients. We use images to describe this method step by step.

  9. Penile cancer brachytherapy HDR mould technique used at the Holycross Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, Robert; Kubicka-Mendak, Iwona; Lyczek, Jarosław; Pawłowski, Piotr; Stawiarska, Iwona; Miedzinska, Joanna; Banatkiewicz, Paweł; Laskawska-Wiatr, Aldona; Wittych, Justyna

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this pictorial essay is to present the mould based HDR brachytherapy technique used at the Holycross Cancer Center for penile cancer patients. We use images to describe this method step by step.

  10. Assessment of diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer cases at two cancer centers in Egypt and Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Catherine; Soliman, Amr S; Omar, Sherif; Khaled, Hussein; Eissa, Saad; Ayed, Farhat Ben; Khalafallah, Samir; Ayoub, Wided Ben; Kantor, Elizabeth D; Merajver, Sofia; Swain, Sandra M; Gail, Mitchell; Brown, Linda Morris

    2013-04-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is largely clinical and therefore inherently somewhat subjective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnosis of IBC at two centers in North Africa where a higher proportion of breast cancer is diagnosed as IBC than in the United States (U.S.). Physicians prospectively enrolled suspected IBC cases at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) - Cairo, Egypt, and the Institut Salah Azaiz (ISA), Tunisia, recorded extent and duration of signs/symptoms of IBC on standardized forms, and took digital photographs of the breast. After second-level review at study hospitals, photographs and clinical information for confirmed IBC cases were reviewed by two U.S. oncologists. We calculated percent agreement between study hospital and U.S. oncologist diagnoses. Among cases confirmed by at least one U.S. oncologist, we calculated median extent and duration of signs and Spearman correlations. At least one U.S. oncologist confirmed the IBC diagnosis for 69% (39/50) of cases with photographs at the NCI-Cairo and 88% (21/24) of cases at the ISA. All confirmed cases had at least one sign of IBC (erythema, edema, peau d'orange) that covered at least one-third of the breast. The median duration of signs ranged from 1 to 3 months; extent and duration of signs were not statistically significantly correlated. From the above-mentioned outcomes, it can be concluded that the diagnosis of a substantial proportion of IBC cases is unambiguous, but a subset is difficult to distinguish from other types of locally advanced breast cancer. Among confirmed cases, the extent of signs was not related to delay in diagnosis.

  11. 76 FR 81952 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... 24-25, 2012. Time: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton...., Scientific Review Officer, Research Programs Review Branch, Division of Extramual Activities, National Cancer... evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli...

  12. National Cancer Center Singapore: the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Melissa; Soo, Khee Chee

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in Singapore, comprising almost 30% of annual deaths. The incidence and prevalence continue to rise, resulting in Singapore having the highest age-standardized rate of cancer in southeast Asia. A review of national health policies in 1992 resulted in the creation of a National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) in 1999. The current NCCS, with its three pillars of clinical service, research and education, manages about 70% of all new cancer cases in the countries public healthcare system. As it outgrows its current outfit and looks to the new NCCS building in 2020, the goal must be for strategic planning to attract and retain the best minds and heart in the field of cancer if it were to continue to be successful in achieving its vision and mission. This article chronicles the NCCS's history and details the foundation of its strategic plans.

  13. [The management by the processes in a cancer center, an utopian initiative?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, David; Mihura, Jeanne; Sallé, Françoise; Sarini, Jérôme; Colin, Valérie

    2008-01-01

    The process approach is a mode of quality improvement. It leans on the cartography's establishment, allows to redefine organization around patients trajectory, the measure of defects and their correction. The process pilot is a new actor in the management of the establishment. It is developed since 3 years in the Institute Claudius Regaud, regional cancer center treatment of Midi-Pyrénées.

  14. Breast Cancer Translational Research Center of Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    the standard of care for treating breast diseases and breast cancer. This approach integrates prevention , screening, diagnosis, treatment and...follow a healthy lifestyle ?” (submitted for publication clearance April 2015). Ellsworth RE, Mamula KA, Costantino NS, Deyarmin B, Kostyniak PJ, Chi...disorders. The project will continue utilizing a multidisciplinary approach as the standard of care for treating breast diseases and breast cancer. This

  15. New Cancer Prevention and Control Central Institutional Review Board Established | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Central Institutional Review Board (CIRB) Initiative announced the establishment of the Cancer Prevention and Control (CPC) CIRB January 14, extending the benefits of centralized review to investigators participating in clinical trials sponsored by the Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP). |

  16. Cancer Imaging at the Crossroads of Precision Medicine: Perspective From an Academic Imaging Department in a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Abbeele, Annick D; Krajewski, Katherine M; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Fennessy, Fiona M; DiPiro, Pamela J; Nguyen, Quang-Dé; Harris, Gordon J; Jacene, Heather A; Lefever, Greg; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2016-04-01

    The authors propose one possible vision for the transformative role that cancer imaging in an academic setting can play in the current era of personalized and precision medicine by sharing a conceptual model that is based on experience and lessons learned designing a multidisciplinary, integrated clinical and research practice at their institution. The authors' practice and focus are disease-centric rather than imaging-centric. A "wall-less" infrastructure has been developed, with bidirectional integration of preclinical and clinical cancer imaging research platforms, enabling rapid translation of novel cancer drugs from discovery to clinical trial evaluation. The talents and expertise of medical professionals, scientists, and staff members have been coordinated in a horizontal and vertical fashion through the creation of Cancer Imaging Consultation Services and the "Adopt-a-Radiologist" campaign. Subspecialized imaging consultation services at the hub of an outpatient cancer center facilitate patient decision support and management at the point of care. The Adopt-a-Radiologist campaign has led to the creation of a novel generation of imaging clinician-scientists, fostered new collaborations, increased clinical and academic productivity, and improved employee satisfaction. Translational cancer research is supported, with a focus on early in vivo testing of novel cancer drugs, co-clinical trials, and longitudinal tumor imaging metrics through the imaging research core laboratory. Finally, a dedicated cancer imaging fellowship has been developed, promoting the future generation of cancer imaging specialists as multidisciplinary, multitalented professionals who are trained to effectively communicate with clinical colleagues and positively influence patient care.

  17. The proposed EROSpace institute, a national center operated by space grant universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul L.; Swiden, LaDell R.; Waltz, Frederick A.

    1993-01-01

    The "EROSpace Institute" is a proposed visiting scientist program in associated with the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center (EDC). The Institute would be operated by a consortium of universities, possible drawn from NASA's Space Grant College and Fellowship Program consortia and the group of 17 capability-enhancement consortia, or perhaps from consortia though out the nation with a topical interest in remote sensing. The National Center for Atmospheric Research or the Goddard Institute for Space Studies provide models for the structure of such an institute. The objectives of the Institute are to provide ready access to the body of data housed at the EDC and to increase the cadre of knowledgeable and trained scientists able to deal with the increasing volume of remote sensing data to become available from the Earth Observing System. The Institute would have a staff of about 100 scientists at any one time, about half permanent staff, and half visiting scientists. The latter would include graduate and undergraduate students, as well as faculty on temporary visits, summer fellowships, or sabbatical leaves. The Institute would provide office and computing facilities, as well as Internet linkages to the home institutions so that scientists could continue to participate in the program from their home base.

  18. Results of an Institutional LGBT Climate Survey at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Sean D; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Eckstrand, Kristen L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the climate and culture experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees and students at one large academic medical center. An anonymous, online institutional climate survey was used to assess the attitudes and experiences of LGBT employees and students. There were 42 LGBT and 14 non-LGBT survey participants. Results revealed that a surprisingly large percentage of LGBT individuals experienced pressure to remain "closeted" and were harassed despite medical center policies of non-discrimination. Continuing training, inclusive policies and practices, and the development of mechanisms to address LGBT-specific harassment are necessary for improving institutional climate.

  19. Koch Institute Symposium on Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Adam; Joshi, Nikhil S; Szeto, Gregory L; Zhu, Eric; Eisen, Herman N; Irvine, Darrell J

    2013-10-01

    The 12(th) annual summer symposium of The Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT was held in Cambridge, MA, on June 14(th), 1023. The symposium entitled "Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy" focused on recent advances in preclinical research in basic immunology and biomedical engineering, and their clinical application in cancer therapies. The day-long gathering also provided a forum for discussion and potential collaborations between engineers and clinical investigators. The major topics presented include: (i) enhancement of adoptive cell therapy by engineering to improve the ability and functionality of T-cells against tumor cells; (ii) current therapies using protein and antibody therapeutics to modulate endogenous anti-tumor immunity; and (iii) new technologies to identify molecular targets and assess therapeutic efficacy, and devices to control and target drug delivery more effectively and efficiently.

  20. Adaptation of Individual Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Chinese Immigrant Cancer Patients | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the study is to modify a type of counseling called "Individual Meaning Centered Psychotherapy" to meet the needs of Chinese cancer patients. Many cancer patients use counseling or other resources to help cope with the emotional burden of their illnesses. Counseling often helps them cope with cancer by giving them a place to express their feelings. "Meaning-Centered" counseling aims to teach cancer patients how to maintain or even increase a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives, despite cancer. |

  1. Pioneering the Transdisciplinary Team Science Approach: Lessons Learned from National Cancer Institute Grantees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Amanda L; Stipelman, Brooke A; Hall, Kara L; Nebeling, Linda; Stokols, Daniel; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute has been a leader in supporting transdisciplinary (TD) team science. From 2005-2010, the NCI supported Transdisciplinary Research on Energetic and Cancer I (TREC I), a center initiative fostering the TD integration of social, behavioral, and biological sciences to examine the relationships among obesity, nutrition, physical activity and cancer. In the final year of TREC I, we conducted qualitative in-depth-interviews with 31 participating investigators and trainees to learn more about their experiences with TD team science, including challenges, facilitating factors, strategies for success, and impacts. Five main challenges emerged: (1) limited published guidance for how to engage in TD team science, when TREC I was implemented; (2) conceptual and scientific challenges inherent to efforts to achieve TD integration; (3) discipline-based differences in values, terminology, methods, and work styles; (4) project management challenges involved in TD team science; and (5) traditional incentive and reward systems that do not recognize or reward TD team science. Four main facilitating factors and strategies for success emerged: (1) beneficial attitudes and beliefs about TD research and team science; (2) effective team processes; (3) brokering and bridge-building activities by individuals holding particular roles in a research center; and (4) funding initiative characteristics that support TD team science. Broad impacts of participating in TD team science in the context of TREC I included: (1) new positive attitudes about TD research and team science; (2) new boundary-crossing collaborations; (3) scientific advances related to research approaches, findings, and dissemination; (4) institutional culture change and resource creation in support of TD team science; and (5) career advancement. Funding agencies, academic institutions, and scholarly journals can help to foster TD team science through funding opportunities, institutional policies on

  2. Building global health through a center-without-walls: the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermund, Sten H; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; Khedkar, Sheetal; Jia, Yujiang; Etherington, Carol; Vergara, Alfredo

    2008-02-01

    The Institute for Global Health at Vanderbilt enables the expansion and coordination of global health research, service, and training, reflecting the university's commitment to improve health services and outcomes in resource-limited settings. Global health encompasses both prevention via public health and treatment via medical care, all nested within a broader community-development context. This has fostered university-wide collaborations to address education, business/economics, engineering, nursing, and language training, among others. The institute is a natural facilitator for team building and has been especially helpful in organizing institutional responses to global health solicitations from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and other funding agencies. This center-without-walls philosophy nurtures noncompetitive partnerships among and within departments and schools. With extramural support from the NIH and from endowment and developmental investments from the school of medicine, the institute funds new pilot projects to nurture global educational and research exchanges related to health and development. Vanderbilt's newest programs are a CDC-supported HIV/AIDS service initiative in Africa and an overseas research training program for health science graduate students and clinical fellows. New opportunities are available for Vanderbilt students, staff, and faculty to work abroad in partnership with international health projects through a number of Tennessee institutions now networked with the institute. A center-without-walls may be a model for institutions contemplating strategic investments to better organize service and teaching opportunities abroad, and to achieve greater successes in leveraging extramural support for overseas and domestic work focused on tropical medicine and global health.

  3. Genetic Factors in Breast Cancer: Center for Interdisciplinary Biobehavioral Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Cancer Institute of New Jersey); Erin Moshier, Elizabeth Zaita, Katie Dorn, Anneisha Camp- bell, Ana Estevez, Joan Bratton, Melissa Solis, Sherly Jacob...18) Costa -Pinto FA, Palermo-Neto J: Neuroimmune interactions in stress, Neuroimmunomodulation 2010; 17(3):196-9. 19) Smith AJP, Humphries SE

  4. SATISFACTION FROM HEALTH INSURANCE INSTITUTIONS AMONG PEOPLE ATTENDING THE PRIMARY HEALTH CARE CENTERS IN ANKARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma ILHAN

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the status of satisfaction from health insurance institutions among people at age 18 and over , attending the primary health care centers in Ankara city center. This study was conducted by applying a questionnaire to the persons attending to four primary health care center and two Mather-Child Health Care and Family Planning Centers in Ankara City Center between May 20-July 20, 2003. 3184 persons applied to six primary health care centers in Ankara city center were interviewed. The median age of the subjects was 38; 66.4 % were women; 30.9 % were primary school graduate and 48.8% were housewife. 100% of the subjects who own private health insurance were satisfied with their insurance status. This rate was 92.0% for the subjects who were under coverage of Emekli Sandigi, and 79% for those who were under coverage of Bag-Kur. The most common health insurance institution the subjects were not satisfied with, was SSK with 48.4 % unsatisfaction rate. “The capability of being physically emamined and treated in any health facility he/she want” was in the first rank among the satisfaction reasons (54.2%. “The absence of this capability” was the most common reason for unsatisfaction (44.0%. 51.6 of the subjects were satisfied with their own health insurance institution, Emekli Sandigi was the most preffered institution with a percentage of 22.3. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(4.000: 244-253

  5. Unveiling Ceremony on Customer Satisfaction Assessment Center of Chine National Institute of Standardization Was Held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ On May 12, the Customer Satisfaction Assessment Center of China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS), jointly set up by CNIS and Tsinghua University and specialized in conducting theoretical research on Customer Satisfaction and the related investigation and assessment work; was formally established in Beijing.

  6. 77 FR 22349 - OSHA Training Institute Education Center; Notice of Competition and Request for Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ..., emails, Web site urls and screen shots, postcards, use of social media, and any other associated relevant... Institute Education Center and deliver standard classroom instruction on a regional basis. State or local... regarding classrooms, laboratories, and testing facilities available; and organization's ability to...

  7. Institutional History of an Interactive Science Center: The Founding and Development of the Exploratorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Rodney T.; Loomis, Molly; Crain, Rhiannon

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the historical conditions that fostered significant reform in science education. To understand these conditions, we employ a framework drawn from the new institutionalism in organization theory to study the founding and early development of the Exploratorium--a prominent science center that greatly impacted the field of science…

  8. [Body-centered psychotherapy IKP (Institute of Body-Centered Psychotherapy): holistic psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer-Groeli, Y

    1996-03-01

    Body centered Psychotherapy IKP is treated in this article under the aspect of a holistic approach. First the theory and the system of science are summarised and shown as to which amount they are changing concerning knowledge of details and wholeness. It is pointed out that the actual paradigma "to the depth" has to be completed by that of "wideness". The way of holistic-multirelational thinking, stating a diagnosis and doing therapy is demonstrated along a case study going on at the background of a therapeutic encounter-relationship which is emotionally warm (Gestalt-approach).

  9. "Innovation" institutes in academic health centers: enhancing value through leadership, education, engagement, and scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jesse M; Farmer, Steven A; Akman, Jeffrey S

    2014-09-01

    In the next decade, the biggest change in medicine in the United States will be the organizational transformation of the delivery system. Organizations-including academic health centers-able to achieve better outcomes for less will be the financial winners as new payment models become more prevalent. For medical educators, the question is how to prepare the next generation of physicians for these changes. One solution is the development of new "innovation" or "value" institutes. Around the nation, many of these new institutes are focused on surmounting barriers to value-based care in academic health centers, educating faculty, house staff, and medical students in discussions of cost-conscious care. Innovation institutes can also lead discussions about how value-based care may impact education in environments where there may be less autonomy and more standardization. Quality metrics will play a larger role at academic health centers as metrics focus more on outcomes than processes. Optimizing outcomes will require that medical educators both learn and teach the principles of patient safety and quality improvement. Innovation institutes can also facilitate cross-institutional discussions to compare data on utilization and outcomes, and share best practices that maximize value. Another barrier to cost-conscious care is defensive medicine, which is highly engrained in U.S. medicine and culture. Innovation institutes may not be able to overcome all the barriers to making medical care more cost-conscious, but they can be critical in enabling academic health centers to optimize their teaching and research missions while remaining financially competitive.

  10. Cancer complementary and alternative medicine research at the US National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Libin

    2012-05-01

    The United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) supports complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) research which includes different methods and practices (such as nutrition therapies) and other medical systems (such as Chinese medicine). In recent years, NCI has spent around $120 million each year on various CAM-related research projects on cancer prevention, treatment, symptom/side effect management and epidemiology. The categories of CAM research involved include nutritional therapeutics, pharmacological and biological treatments, mind-body interventions, manipulative and body based methods, alternative medical systems, exercise therapies, spiritual therapies and energy therapies on a range of types of cancer. The NCI Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) supports various intramural and extramural cancer CAM research projects. Examples of these cancer CAM projects are presented and discussed. In addition, OCCAM also supports international research projects.

  11. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use at a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qianlai; Asher, Gary N

    2016-05-04

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is common among cancer patients, but the majority of CAM studies do not specify the time periods in relation to cancer diagnoses. We sought to define CAM use by cancer patients and investigate factors that might influence changes in CAM use in relation to cancer diagnoses. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of adults diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung, or colorectal cancer between 2010 and 2012 at the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Questionnaires were sent to 1794 patients. Phone calls were made to nonrespondents. Log binomial/Poisson regressions were used to investigate the association between cancer-related changes in CAM use and conversations about CAM use with oncology providers. Results We received 603 (33.6 %) completed questionnaires. The mean age (SD) was 64 (11) years; 62% were female; 79% were white; and 98% were non-Hispanic. Respondents reported the following cancer types: breast (47%), prostate (27%), colorectal (14%), lung (11%). Eighty-nine percent reported lifetime CAM use. Eighty-five percent reported CAM use during or after initial cancer treatment, with category-specific use as follows: mind-body medicine 39%, dietary supplements 73%, body-based therapies 30%, and energy medicine 49%. During treatment CAM use decreased for all categories except energy medicine. After treatment CAM use returned to pretreatment levels for most CAMs except chiropractic. Initiation of CAM use after cancer diagnosis was positively associated with a patient having a conversation about CAM use with their oncology provider, mainly driven by patient-initiated conversations. Conclusions Consistent with previous studies, CAM use was common among our study population. Conversations about CAM use with oncology providers appeared to influence cessation of mind-body medicine use after cancer diagnosis.

  12. 78 FR 312 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, Montgomery County Conference Center... North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, Montgomery County Conference Center Facility, 5701...

  13. Family-Centered Care in Juvenile Justice Institutions: A Mixed Methods Study Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Eva; Rigter, Henk; Breuk, René; van der Vaart, Wander; Vermeiren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment and rehabilitation interventions in juvenile justice institutions aim to prevent criminal reoffending by adolescents and to enhance their prospects of successful social reintegration. There is evidence that these goals are best achieved when the institution adopts a family-centered approach, involving the parents of the adolescents. The Academic Workplace Forensic Care for Youth has developed two programs for family-centered care for youth detained in groups for short-term and long-term stay, respectively. Objective The overall aim of our study is to evaluate the family-centered care program in the first two years after the first steps of its implementation in short-term stay groups of two juvenile justice institutions in the Netherlands. The current paper discusses our study design. Methods Based on a quantitative pilot study, we opted for a study with an explanatory sequential mixed methods design. This pilot is considered the first stage of our study. The second stage of our study includes concurrent quantitative and qualitative approaches. The quantitative part of our study is a pre-post quasi-experimental comparison of family-centered care with usual care in short-term stay groups. The qualitative part of our study involves in-depth interviews with adolescents, parents, and group workers to elaborate on the preceding quantitative pilot study and to help interpret the outcomes of the quasi-experimental quantitative part of the study. Results We believe that our study will result in the following findings. In the quantitative comparison of usual care with family-centered care, we assume that in the latter group, parents will be more involved with their child and with the institution, and that parents and adolescents will be more motivated to take part in therapy. In addition, we expect family-centered care to improve family interactions, to decrease parenting stress, and to reduce problem behavior among the adolescents. Finally, we assume

  14. CPTAC Establishes Formal Relationships with Two Academic Institutions in Taiwan - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) has entered into memorandum of understandings (MOUs) with Chang Gung University and Academia Sinica, in Taipei, Taiwan.

  15. Meharry-Johns Hopkins Center for Prostate Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    formerly at the Institute for Health, Social, and Community Research (IHSCR) Center for Survey Research ( CSR ) at Shaw University in Raleigh, NC...survey will be conducted at CSR which is now located at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHBSPH) located in Raleigh, NC. The Sons...at Meharry. 4 Dr. LaVeist secured definitive IRB approval at JHU. 5 Working budgets were developed and sub-contract with JHU was signed by both

  16. Cancer immunotherapy out of the gate: the 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute International Immunotherapy Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontonoz, Matthew; Gee, Connie E

    2015-05-01

    The 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute (CRI) International Immunotherapy Symposium was held from October 5-8, 2014, in New York City. Titled "Cancer Immunotherapy: Out of the Gate," the symposium began with a Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium satellite meeting focused on issues in immunotherapy drug development, followed by five speaker sessions and a poster session devoted to basic and clinical cancer immunology research. The second annual William B. Coley lecture was delivered by Lieping Chen, one of the four recipients of the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology; the other three recipients were Gordon Freeman, Tasuku Honjo, and Arlene Sharpe. Prominent themes of the conference were the use of genomic technologies to identify neoantigens and the emergence of new immune modulatory molecules, beyond CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1, as new therapeutic targets for immunotherapy.

  17. Completion of Green Building by Korea Institute of Energy Research - Energy{center_dot}Conservation{center_dot}Environmental Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Dong [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER), which was fully aware that the effective utilization of energy could not only save energy but also reduce the environmental pollution due to a combustion exhaust gas, has built and operated 'the Ultra Energy Saving Building' whose energy consumption was only a fifth of general buildings as a example. KIER has started to research the project for the technology development and spread of Green Building in 'Enertech 21' - the most important research program of 1994 year - and has constructed the central building of the Institute with only the current available technology since the early of 1997 year, via researches by a step. Finally, KIER held the ceremony for the completion of Green Building in March sixth. This building is not just the first green building in Korea but also the representative building of energy environment research center, which will be marked out for a model for the domestic construction and construction industry in future. Therefore, this building has functions of exhibition, publicity, education, and experimentation for the building researchers as well as the office and researching place that is original function of this building. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. PubMed QUEST: The PubMed Query Search Tool. An informatics tool to aid cancer centers and cancer investigators in searching the PubMed databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Hanauer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Searching PubMed for citations related to a specific cancer center or group of authors can be labor-intensive. We have created a tool, PubMed QUEST, to aid in the rapid searching of PubMed for publications of interest. It was designed by taking into account the needs of entire cancer centers as well as individual investigators. The experience of using the tool by our institution’s cancer center administration and investigators has been favorable and we believe it could easily be adapted to other institutions. Use of the tool has identified limitations of automated searches for publications based on an author’s name, especially for common names. These limitations could likely be solved if the PubMed database assigned a unique identifier to each author

  19. Studies on retrospective analysis of leading primary cancers and improvement of cancer treatment method in Korea cancer center hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong In; Lee, Kang Hyun; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Ki Wha; Kang, Sung Mok

    2000-12-01

    a. Retrospective studies included cancers of the stomach, breast, bladder, salivary gland, thyroid, esophagus, endometrium and ovary. (1) Study cancers were analyzed about clinical characteristics, prognostic factors influenced on survival time, survival rate, etc. (2) Among 5,305 study patients, 1,405(26.5%) were identified with death, 3,485(65.7%) were alive and 415(7.8%) were not identified. b. Prospective studies included 10 subjects such as bladder cancer, retinoblastoma, malignant patients, gastric cancer, uterine cervix cancer and ovary cancer. We are continuing registering eligible study patients. c. Results for 11 papers were published at the journal. d. We established follow-up system in order to identify the survival for study subjects through National Statistical Office, Government Provincial Office and Cancer Registration System at Korea Cancer Center Hospital. e. At present, we are establishing computerized registration system about case report form for study cancers.

  20. Prognostic Factors and Recurrence in Breast Cancer: Experience at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Stankov, A.; J. E. Bargallo-Rocha; A. Ñamendys-Silva Silvio; Ramirez, M. T.; Stankova-Ninova, K.; Meneses-Garcia, A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prognostic and predictive factors that relate to locoregional or distant recurrences in breast cancer patients who have been treated at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico. Multivariate, time-dependent Cox regression analyses indicate that the pN status (positive versus negative lymph node; P = 0.003; HR (hazard ratio), 3.47; CI (confidence interval), 1.52–7.91) and the pathological complete response of the patient to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (...

  1. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center monthly report to the Steering Committee, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-02

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot FGD unit continued this month with High Velocity Scrubbing and the Tampa Electric Company (TECO) Tailored Collaboration test block. Additionally, Phase III of the Toxics Removal/Carbon Injection test block was conducted concurrently with FGD testing. At the beginning of the month, a second phase of third-party testing began for Suncor, Inc. The Suncor Gypsum Sample Collection test block (MSUN) began on June 5 on the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet FGD unit. Testing was completed on June 13. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, testing continued this month as ammonia slip measurements were conducted under low catalyst inlet temperatures and at baseline conditions.

  2. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-01-12

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified.

  3. [The preliminary draft of the methodology report by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiemann, Guido

    2012-01-01

    There is a mismatch between results of clinical trials and the needs of patients. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) in the US will commission research that supports patients and providers of care to make informed decisions. The preliminary draft of a methodology report presented by PCORI contains methodological standards which researchers will have to take into account when applying for funds from PCORI. An innovative instrument, the "Translation Tool" has been introduced to judge the best match between a specific research question and the corresponding methods. The "Translation Tool" structures the necessary trade-offs (e.g. between validity, patient-centered endpoints, timeliness, and resources) in a transparent manner. This article summarizes the development, structure and content of the methodology report. (As supplied by publisher).

  4. Cancer Care Initiative: Creation of a Comprehensive Cancer Center at Naval Medical Center Dan Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-24

    clinic had Cancer Care Initiative 6 a dedicated satellite pharmacy staffed by a part-time pharmacist who prepared chemotherapy solutions...patient education information; 80% want clinical research trials; and 79% want end-of-life palliative care to be included as part of a CCC. Physicians...prevention, early detection, staging evaluation, initial and subsequent treatment, long-term follow-up, palliative and hospice care , and supportive

  5. Development of 3D interactive visual objects using the Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Visualization Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilb, D.; Reif, C.; Peach, C.; Keen, C. S.; Smith, B.; Mellors, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Within the last year scientists and educators at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), the Birch Aquarium at Scripps and San Diego State University have collaborated with education specialists to develop 3D interactive graphic teaching modules for use in the classroom and in teacher workshops at the SIO Visualization center (http://siovizcenter.ucsd.edu). The unique aspect of the SIO Visualization center is that the center is designed around a 120 degree curved Panoram floor-to-ceiling screen (8'6" by 28'4") that immerses viewers in a virtual environment. The center is powered by an SGI 3400 Onyx computer that is more powerful, by an order of magnitude in both speed and memory, than typical base systems currently used for education and outreach presentations. This technology allows us to display multiple 3D data layers (e.g., seismicity, high resolution topography, seismic reflectivity, draped interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images, etc.) simultaneously, render them in 3D stereo, and take a virtual flight through the data as dictated on the spot by the user. This system can also render snapshots, images and movies that are too big for other systems, and then export smaller size end-products to more commonly used computer systems. Since early 2002, we have explored various ways to provide informal education and outreach focusing on current research presented directly by the researchers doing the work. The Center currently provides a centerpiece for instruction on southern California seismology for K-12 students and teachers for various Scripps education endeavors. Future plans are in place to use the Visualization Center at Scripps for extended K-12 and college educational programs. In particular, we will be identifying K-12 curriculum needs, assisting with teacher education, developing assessments of our programs and products, producing web-accessible teaching modules and facilitating the development of appropriate teaching tools to be

  6. Free-standing cancer centers: rationale for improving cancer care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokich, J J; Silvers, S; Brereton, H; Byfield, J; Bick, R

    1989-10-01

    Free-standing cancer centers (FSCC) represent a growing trend in cancer care delivery within community practice. The critical components to FSCC are multidisciplinary cancer care, a complete menu of direct care and support services, a commitment to clinical trials and clinical investigation, and a comprehensive program for quality assurance. The advantages of FSCC to the community, to hospital programs, to the practicing surgical, medical, and radiation oncologists, and to the third-party carriers, including health maintenance organizations, are detailed. The development of an FSCC depends on the resolution of issues of (a) competition (between hospitals, hospitals and physicians, therapeutic disciplines, regional comprehensive cancer centers and FSCCs) and (b) concerns about conflict of interest. The ideal model of FSCC may well be represented by the joint venture of community hospital(s) and the community oncologists.

  7. Colon Cancer Biomarkers To Identify Patients Suitable For Therapeutic Intervention | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  8. The use of Facebook social network in libraries from research centers and institutions in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Nora Laudano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the adoption and main use of the Facebook platform by libraries from research centers and institutes in Argentina. After a bibliographic review on the subject, the methodological procedures employed are discussed in order to identify, firstly, the institutions that presently has this communication tool, and secondly, the use of it according to a series of variables, among which the following may be mentioned: the initial moment, the links with other communication media managed by the institution (websites and social networks, the number of followers, the use of images, the frequency and type of posts, and finally, the quantity and quality of the comments. In the results, the information gathered is studied to obtain a quantitative and qualitative analysis, in order to construct a global scene. In the conclusions, the little number of libraries that has adopted Facebook prevents the projection of any statement beyond the cases. However, those detected aspects related to the appropriation dynamics can be used to think other circumstances. Among them are, on one hand, the diversity of situations related to the construction of a communication strategy defined by the frequency and quality of the publications; on the other hand, the functionality that usually acquires Facebook as a dissemination media, rather than exploits it as a space for exchange and collective construction.

  9. 78 FR 8157 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701... applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center,...

  10. 78 FR 8156 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, Montgomery County Conference Center Facility, 5701 Marinelli Road... contract proposals. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda...:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: Doubletree Hotel...

  11. 75 FR 71713 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    .... Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852...: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center,...

  12. 77 FR 59934 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Rd., Bethesda, MD 20852. Contact Person: Zhiqiang Zou... evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road...: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, North Bethesda, MD 20852....

  13. Postpartum remodeling, lactation, and breast cancer risk: summary of a National Cancer Institute-sponsored workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica M; Arcaro, Kathleen F; Balkam, Jane J; Eliassen, A Heather; Hassiotou, Foteini; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Michels, Karin B; Palmer, Julie R; Schedin, Pepper; Stuebe, Alison M; Watson, Christine J; Sherman, Mark E

    2013-02-06

    The pregnancy-lactation cycle (PLC) is a period in which the breast is transformed from a less-developed, nonfunctional organ into a mature, milk-producing gland that has evolved to meet the nutritional, developmental, and immune protection needs of the newborn. Cessation of lactation initiates a process whereby the breast reverts to a resting state until the next pregnancy. Changes during this period permanently alter the morphology and molecular characteristics of the breast (molecular histology) and produce important, yet poorly understood, effects on breast cancer risk. To provide a state-of-the-science summary of this topic, the National Cancer Institute invited a multidisciplinary group of experts to participate in a workshop in Rockville, Maryland, on March 2, 2012. Topics discussed included: 1) the epidemiology of the PLC in relation to breast cancer risk, 2) breast milk as a biospecimen for molecular epidemiological and translational research, and 3) use of animal models to gain mechanistic insights into the effects of the PLC on breast carcinogenesis. This report summarizes conclusions of the workshop, proposes avenues for future research on the PLC and its relationship with breast cancer risk, and identifies opportunities to translate this knowledge to improve breast cancer outcomes.

  14. Consensus report of the national cancer institute clinical trials planning meeting on pancreas cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Philip A; Mooney, Margaret; Jaffe, Deborah; Eckhardt, Gail; Moore, Malcolm; Meropol, Neal; Emens, Leisha; O'Reilly, Eileen; Korc, Murray; Ellis, Lee; Benedetti, Jacqueline; Rothenberg, Mace; Willett, Christopher; Tempero, Margaret; Lowy, Andrew; Abbruzzese, James; Simeone, Diane; Hingorani, Sunil; Berlin, Jordan; Tepper, Joel

    2009-11-20

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality, despite significant improvements in diagnostic imaging and operative mortality rates. The 5-year survival rate remains less than 5% because of microscopic or gross metastatic disease at time of diagnosis. The Clinical Trials Planning Meeting in pancreatic cancer was convened by the National Cancer Institute's Gastrointestinal Cancer Steering Committee to discuss the integration of basic and clinical knowledge in the design of clinical trials in PDAC. Major emphasis was placed on the enhancement of research to identify and validate the relevant targets and molecular pathways in PDAC, cancer stem cells, and the microenvironment. Emphasis was also placed on developing rational combinations of targeted agents and the development of predictive biomarkers to assist selection of patient subsets. The development of preclinical tumor models that are better predictive of human PDAC must be supported with wider availability to the research community. Phase III clinical trials should be implemented only if there is a meaningful clinical signal of efficacy and safety in the phase II setting. The emphasis must therefore be on performing well-designed phase II studies with uniform sets of basic entry and evaluation criteria with survival as a primary endpoint. Patients with either metastatic or locally advanced PDAC must be studied separately.

  15. 76 FR 28236 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-16

    .... Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852... applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD...

  16. Student Services/One Stop Centers: A Qualitative Examination of Implementation at Three Post-Secondary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Janine M.

    2012-01-01

    This research investigates Student Services/One Stop Centers at three post-secondary institutions, looking at the origination of the centers and success through the lens of behavioral theories. Comparing the 3-stage Group Dynamics Theory of Lewin (1947), Social Learning Theory of Bandura (1977), and the 8-stage Change Management Model of Kotter…

  17. Characteristics of Early Recipients of Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Stephany; Bazemore, Andrew; Merenstein, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is grounded in the goals of increasing access, improving quality, and reducing cost in the U.S. health care system. The ACA established the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to help accomplish these goals through patient-focused research. PCORI has a different charge than its federally supported counterpart, the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-to fund research that ultimately helps patients make better-informed health care decisions. The authors examined characteristics of the recipients and settings of the first six rounds of PCORI funding and differentiated PCORI and NIH funding patterns to analyze the extent to which PCORI is accomplishing the goals set out by the ACA. The authors performed a retrospective review of publicly available datasets, supplemented by a short questionnaire to funded PCORI principal investigators (PIs). The authors analyzed PCORI's first six funding cycles (2011-2014) and data on NIH funding patterns (2000-2013) to determine whether PCORI and NIH funding patterns differed by investigator, department, and institution, and whether PCORI had funded research in primary care settings. The authors found that PCORI is funding a more diverse cadre of PIs and biomedical departments than is NIH, but not a greater diversity of institutions, and that less than one-third of PCORI studies involve or are relevant to primary care--the largest patient care platform in the United States. As PCORI looks to be refunded, it is important that research funding is further evaluated and publicly acknowledged to assess whether goals are being achieved.

  18. Economic constraints - the growing challenge for Western breast cancer centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Rene P; Lux, Michael P; Hoellthaler, Josef; Beckmann, Matthias W; Voigt, Wieland

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer care in Western countries has reached a considerable level of quality and standardization, which has contributed to the decline in breast cancer mortality. Certified Breast Cancer Centers (BCC) represent an important element of this development. Related to changes in reimbursement and growing costs, BCC face economic constraints which ultimately could endanger the achievements of the past. Thus, BCC have to optimize their care strategies from an economic perspective, particularly by increasing efficiency but also by adapting their service portfolio. This could result in competitive advantages and additional revenue by increasing case numbers and extra charges to patients. Furthermore, an intensification of collaboration with the outpatient sector resulting in an integrated and managed 'trans-sectoral' care approach which could allow to shift unprofitable procedures to the outpatient sector - in the sense of a win-win situation for both sectors and without loss of care quality - seems reasonable. Structured and specialized consulting approaches can further be a lever to fulfill economic requirements in order to avoid cuts in medical care quality for the sake of a balanced budget. In this review, economic constraints of BCC with a focus on the German healthcare system and potential approaches to ameliorate these financial burdens are being discussed.

  19. Chemoirradiation for glioblastoma multiforme: the national cancer institute experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Ho

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Standard treatment for glioblastoma (GBM is surgery followed by radiation (RT and temozolomide (TMZ. While there is variability in survival based on several established prognostic factors, the prognostic utility of other factors such as tumor size and location are not well established. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The charts of ninety two patients with GBM treated with RT at the National Cancer Institute (NCI between 1998 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Most patients received RT with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Topographic locations were classified using preoperative imaging. Gross tumor volumes were contoured using treatment planning systems utilizing both pre-operative and post-operative MR imaging. RESULTS: At a median follow-up of 18.7 months, the median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS for all patients was 17.9 and 7.6 months. Patients with the smallest tumors had a median OS of 52.3 months compared to 16.3 months among patients with the largest tumors, P = 0.006. The patients who received bevacizumab after recurrence had a median OS of 23.3 months, compared to 16.3 months in patients who did not receive it, P = 0.0284. The median PFS and OS in patients with periventricular tumors was 5.7 and 17.5 months, versus 8.9 and 23.3 months in patients with non-periventricular tumors, P = 0.005. CONCLUSIONS: Survival in our cohort was comparable to the outcome of the defining EORTC-NCIC trial establishing the use of RT+TMZ. This study also identifies several potential prognostic factors that may be useful in stratifying patients.

  20. Characterization of the peer review network at the Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin W Boyack

    Full Text Available The National Institutes of Health (NIH is the largest source of funding for biomedical research in the world. This funding is largely effected through a competitive grants process. Each year the Center for Scientific Review (CSR at NIH manages the evaluation, by peer review, of more than 55,000 grant applications. A relevant management question is how this scientific evaluation system, supported by finite resources, could be continuously evaluated and improved for maximal benefit to the scientific community and the taxpaying public. Towards this purpose, we have created the first system-level description of peer review at CSR by applying text analysis, bibliometric, and graph visualization techniques to administrative records. We identify otherwise latent relationships across scientific clusters, which in turn suggest opportunities for structural reorganization of the system based on expert evaluation. Such studies support the creation of monitoring tools and provide transparency and knowledge to stakeholders.

  1. An overview and discussion of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute's decision aid portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer, Christopher C; Crowley, Matthew J; Lawrence, William F; Gierisch, Jennifer M; Gaglio, Bridget; Williams, John W; Myers, Evan R; Kendrick, Amy; Slutsky, Jean; Sanders, Gillian D

    2016-07-01

    Decision aids (DAs) help patients make informed healthcare decisions in a manner consistent with their values and preferences. Despite their promise, DAs developed with public research dollars are not being implemented and adopted in real-world patient care settings at a rate consistent with which they are being developed. To appraise the sum of the parts of the portfolio and create a strategic imperative surrounding future funding, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) tasked the Duke Evidence Synthesis Group with evaluating its DA portfolio. This paper describes PCORI's portfolio of DAs according to the Duke Evidence Synthesis Group's analysis in the context of PCORI's mission and the field of decision science. The results revealed a diversity within PCORI's portfolio of funded DA projects. Findings support the movement toward more rigorous DA development, assessment and maintenance. PCORI's funding priorities related to DAs are clarified and comparative questions of interest are posed.

  2. 75 FR 42453 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-21

    .... Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: The Future of Cancer Research: Accelerating Scientific Innovation. Place... language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the Contact Person listed below... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research;...

  3. Complications in Neck Dissection 10 years ex-perience with 268 cases in the Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. OSKOUI

    1973-07-01

    Full Text Available Immediate and late post operative complications or radical Neck Dissection were discussed. Preventive measures and the treatment of each were mentioned briefly. Our 10 years experience with complications or neck dissection in the Cancer Institute was presented.

  4. Primary Care Research in the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute's Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Joe V; Slutsky, Jean R

    2016-04-01

    In their article in this issue, Mazur and colleagues analyze the characteristics of early recipients of funding from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). Mazur and colleagues note correctly that PCORI has a unique purpose and mission and suggest that it should therefore have a distinct portfolio of researchers and departments when compared with other funders such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Responding on behalf of PCORI, the authors of this Commentary agree with the characterization of PCORI's mission as distinct from that of NIH and others. They agree too that data found on PCORI's Web site demonstrate that PCORI's portfolio of researchers and departments is more diverse and more heavily populated with clinician researchers, as would be expected. The authors take issue with Mazur and colleagues' suggestion that because half of clinical visits occur within primary care settings, half of PCORI's funded research should be based in primary care departments. PCORI's portfolio reflects what patients and others tell PCORI are the critical questions. Many of these do, in fact, occur with more complex conditions in specialty care. The authors question whether the research of primary care departments is too narrowly focused and whether it sufficiently considers study of these complex conditions. Research on more complex conditions including heart failure, coronary artery disease, and multiple comorbid conditions could be highly valuable when approached from the primary care perspective, where many of the comparative effectiveness questions first arise.

  5. The NIH-NIAID Schistosomiasis Resource Center at the Biomedical Research Institute: Molecular Redux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, James J.; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Miller, André N.; Henein, Lucie; Mentink-Kane, Margaret M.; Hsieh, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a health burden in many parts of the world. The complex life cycle of Schistosoma parasites and the economic and societal conditions present in endemic areas make the prospect of eradication unlikely in the foreseeable future. Continued and vigorous research efforts must therefore be directed at this disease, particularly since only a single World Health Organization (WHO)-approved drug is available for treatment. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)–National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Schistosomiasis Resource Center (SRC) at the Biomedical Research Institute provides investigators with the critical raw materials needed to carry out this important research. The SRC makes available, free of charge (including international shipping costs), not only infected host organisms but also a wide array of molecular reagents derived from all life stages of each of the three main human schistosome parasites. As the field of schistosomiasis research rapidly advances, it is likely to become increasingly reliant on omics, transgenics, epigenetics, and microbiome-related research approaches. The SRC has and will continue to monitor and contribute to advances in the field in order to support these research efforts with an expanding array of molecular reagents. In addition to providing investigators with source materials, the SRC has expanded its educational mission by offering a molecular techniques training course and has recently organized an international schistosomiasis-focused meeting. This review provides an overview of the materials and services that are available at the SRC for schistosomiasis researchers, with a focus on updates that have occurred since the original overview in 2008. PMID:27764112

  6. 78 FR 57400 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ...: Biomedical Cloud Technology; Electronic Health Records; Advocate and Organizational Engagement; and Proposed Organizational Change: Division of Extramural Activities. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31,...

  7. Between prevention and therapy: Gio Batta Gori and the National Cancer Institute's Diet, Nutrition and Cancer Programme, 1974-1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, David

    2012-10-01

    This paper explores the origins of the Diet, Nutrition and Cancer Programme (DNCP) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and its fate under its first director, Gio Batta Gori. The DNCP is used to explore the emergence of federal support for research on diet, nutrition and cancer following the 1971 Cancer Act, the complex relations between cancer prevention and therapeutics in the NCI during the 1970s, the broader politics around diet, nutrition and cancer during that decade, and their relations to Senator George McGovern's select committee on Nutrition and Human Needs. It also provides a window onto the debates and struggles over whether NCI research should be funded by contracts or grants, the nature of the patronage system within the federal cancer research agency, how a director, Gio Gori, lost patronage within that system and how a tightening of the budget for cancer research in the mid-to-late 1970s affected the DNCP.

  8. 78 FR 19496 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; The National Cancer Institute (NCI) SmokefreeTXT Program Evaluation SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section... submitted ] to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve the...

  9. Cancer in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children : A case series from the Children's Cancer Group and the National Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granovsky, MO; Mueller, BU; Nicholson, HS; Rosenberg, PS; Rabkin, CS

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and the clinical outcome of patients with these tumors. Methods: We retrospectively surveyed the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and the National Cancer institute (NCI) for cases of cancer that oc

  10. 78 FR 59362 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... Boulevard, Gaithersburg, MD 20878. Contact Person: Caron A. Lyman, Ph.D., Chief, Research Programs Review... B: Exploratory Grants. Date: November 18, 2013. Time: 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research;...

  11. 78 FR 4422 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... Prevention and Etiology. Date: February 27, 2013. Time: 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and...

  12. 78 FR 28234 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    .... Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel and Conference... and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel and Conference Center,...

  13. A clinicoepidemiological study of esophageal cancer patients at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soumaya Ezzat; Hisham El Hossieny; Mohamed Abd Alla; Azza Nasr; Nagwan Anter; Ahmed Adel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to (1) assess the clinicoepidemiological characteristics of esopha-geal cancer patients, (2) analyze the prognostic factors determining treatment failure and survival, and (3) evaluate the results of various treatment modalities for locoregional and disseminated disease and their ef ect on disease-free survival and overal survival (OS). Methods Clinicoepidemiological retrospective data from 81 esophageal cancer patients treated at the Na-tional Cancer Institute of Cairo between 2007 and 2011 were evaluated. Results The study showed that patients with esophageal cancer commonly present with local y advanced disease (87.7% had T-stage 3 and 12.3% had T-stage 4). There was a significant correlation between surgery and survival; patients who received radical surgery and postoperative radiation had a better median survival than patients who received radical radiotherapy (20 months vs. 16 months, respectively; P = 0.04). There was also a significant statistical correlation between radical concomitant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) and pal iative treatment. Patients who received radical NCRT had a better median survival than patients who received pal-liative radiotherapy (16 months vs. 10 months, respectively; P = 0.001). The median fol ow-up period for al patients was 7 months. The median OS of the whole group was 12 months. The OS after 1 and 2 years was 57.8% and 15%, respectively. Conclusion High-dose NCRT is an acceptable alternative for patients unfit for surgery or with inoperable disease. High-dose radiation is more ef ective than low-dose radiation in terms of local control, time to relapse, and OS. Further study using a larger series of patients and introducing new treatment protocols is necessary for a final evaluation.

  14. Critical Appraisal of Translational Research Models for Suitability in Performance Assessment of Cancer Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, Abinaya; Sullivan, Richard; Bakker, Suzanne; van Harten, Wim H.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to critically appraise translational research models for suitability in performance assessment of cancer centers. Process models, such as the Process Marker Model and Lean and Six Sigma applications, seem to be suitable for performance assessment of cancer centers. However, they must be thoroughly tested in practice.

  15. Incidental pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: clinical characteristics and outcome – a comprehensive cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Razeq H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hikmat N Abdel-Razeq1, Asem H Mansour2, Yousef M Ismael11Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, JordanBackground and objectives: Cancer patients undergo routine imaging studies much more than others. The widespread use of the recently introduced multi-detector CT scanners has resulted in an increasing number of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE in asymptomatic cancer patients. The significance and clinical outcome of such incidental PE is described.Methods: Both radiology department and hospital databases were searched for all cancer patients with a diagnosis of incidental PE. CT scans were performed using a 64-slice scanner with a 5.0 mm slice thickness.Results: During the study period, 34 patients with incidental PE were identified. The mean age (±SD was 57.7 (±12.4 years. All patients had active cancer, gastric, lung, colorectal, and lymphomas being the most frequent. Most patients had advanced-stage disease at the time of PE diagnosis; 26 (77% patients had stage IV, whereas only 3 patients had stages I or II disease. Twenty-seven (79% patients had their PE while undergoing active treatment with chemotherapy (68% or radiotherapy (12%; none, however, were on hormonal therapy. Most (74% patients had their PE diagnosed without history of recent hospital admission. Except for 5 (15%, all other patients were anticoagulated. With follow-up, 2 patients developed recurrent PE, 2 others had clinical and echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension, and 9 (26% died suddenly within 30 days of the diagnosis of incidental PE; 2 of these where among the 5 patients who were not anticoagulated.Conclusion: Incidental PE in cancer patients is increasingly encountered. Similar to symptomatic PE, many were diagnosed in patients with advanced stage disease and while undergoing active anti-cancer therapy. A significant percentage of patients had recurrent emboli, pulmonary hypertension

  16. 78 FR 50065 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ...: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center... North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852. Contact Person: Sonya...: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda...

  17. The IRSN Institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety Cadarache Center; L'IRSN Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire Centre de Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The research programs of the IRSN in the Cadarache Center concern the nuclear safety (reactor safety, nuclear fuels behavior during accidents, fires in nuclear installations), the protection and the control of radioactive materials, the human and the environment protection. The programs are presented and discussed. This presentation includes also the regional impact of the Institute at Cadarache (economical impact, relations with the universities and international meetings). (A.L.B.)

  18. Status of stable isotopes separation at the Electromagnetic Plants of the Russian Research Center, ``Kurchatov Institute''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzmine, R. N.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Pigarov, Ju. D.; Staroverov, L. I.; Tchesnokov, V. M.

    1999-12-01

    The four chamber electromagnetic isotope separator was constructed at the Russian Research Center (RRC) "Kurchatov Institute" more than 50 years ago. During this period, the plant was used for the development of ion sources and separation technologies. Isotopes of over 40 different elements have been separated. About 20 years ago, the reconstruction of two chambers was completed. The homogeneous magnetic field in these chambers was replaced with a field which falls-off on the radius ( r) as 1/ r. After reconstruction, the dispersion was increased by a factor of four and the enrichment of the isotopes was increased considerably. Ion beam collection was also facilitated. Many highly enriched isotopes were produced in the new chambers, including Gd, Yb, Zn, Tl, Pd, and others. One of the important problems now, is the reduction of all aspects of production costs for isotopes. A project to perfect the ion-optic scheme (IOS) for two chambers was carried out with the expected result of a dispersion of 44 mm at 1% relative mass difference. As a result of the modified ion source, increased productivity of the separators is expected. Other areas of ion source development in progress include: development of "standard" ion sources for the separators with inhomogeneous fields, development of high-temperature sources for Pd isotopes, and development of an ion source with sputtering supply for Ir, Pt, and other elements.

  19. Improving clinical research and cancer care delivery in community settings: evaluating the NCI community cancer centers program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fennell Mary L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this article, we describe the National Cancer Institute (NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP pilot and the evaluation designed to assess its role, function, and relevance to the NCI's research mission. In doing so, we describe the evolution of and rationale for the NCCCP concept, participating sites' characteristics, its multi-faceted aims to enhance clinical research and quality of care in community settings, and the role of strategic partnerships, both within and outside of the NCCCP network, in achieving program objectives. Discussion The evaluation of the NCCCP is conceptualized as a mixed method multi-layered assessment of organizational innovation and performance which includes mapping the evolution of site development as a means of understanding the inter- and intra-organizational change in the pilot, and the application of specific evaluation metrics for assessing the implementation, operations, and performance of the NCCCP pilot. The assessment of the cost of the pilot as an additional means of informing the longer-term feasibility and sustainability of the program is also discussed. Summary The NCCCP is a major systems-level set of organizational innovations to enhance clinical research and care delivery in diverse communities across the United States. Assessment of the extent to which the program achieves its aims will depend on a full understanding of how individual, organizational, and environmental factors align (or fail to align to achieve these improvements, and at what cost.

  20. A Comparison of Innovative Training Techniques at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Research Report 1426.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Brian J.

    A study evaluated the comparative training effectiveness of three language instruction methods: (1) suggestopedia, (2) the standard methodology used at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, a functional skill-building approach, and (3) a flexible-scheduling version of the standard methodology, with pacing based on group…

  1. Coastline Community College World Trade Center Institute Business and International Education Program. Final Performance Report: A Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Chet; Secord, Debra A.

    Under a Title VI-B grant, California's Coastline Community College (CCC) conducted a needs assessment survey establishing a database of international training needs, developed five courses and 10 workshops in international business, and formed the World Trade Center Institute (WTCI). This report provides information on the activities and…

  2. Morphometric features of the genus Paeonia L. in the introduction conditions of the Botanical Garden-Institute, Ufa Research Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina A. Reut

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the Botanical Garden-Institute, Ufa Research Center conducted the study of morphometric features of four alien species PaeoniaL. Revealed that the most of labile symptoms observed in labile P. anomalaand P. lactiflora, the lowest – in P. hybridaand P. tenuifolia.

  3. Critical appraisal of the suitability of translational research models for performance assessment of cancer institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, A.; Sullivan, R.; Bakker, S.; Harten, van W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Translational research is a complex cumulative process that takes time. However, the operating environment for cancer centers engaged in translational research is now financially insecure. Centers are challenged to improve results and reduce time from discovery to practice innovations. P

  4. P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) to support participation in the ETCTN

    Science.gov (United States)

    P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) to support participation in the ETCTN

  5. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Universal Interfaces and Information Technology Access under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for a competition in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend to use this priority to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

  6. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Research Training Centers. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for a Rehabilitation Research Training Center (RRTC) on Disability Statistics and Demographics under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for a competition in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend to use this priority to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

  7. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Technologies to Support Successful Aging with Disability under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for a competition in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend to use this priority to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

  8. 78 FR 64223 - National Cancer Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ..., November 07, 2013, 8:00 a.m. to November 07, 2013, 6:00 p.m., Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference... Marriott Washingtonian Center, 9751 Washingtonian Blvd., Gaithersburg, MD 20878. The date and time of...

  9. 75 FR 60130 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    .... Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852..., DC DuPont Circle Hotel, 1143 New Hampshire Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20037. Contact Person:...

  10. Proton treatment facility at National Cancer Center Hospital East

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Teiji [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East

    2002-06-01

    In 1997, the proton- treatment facility that has the therapeutic Azimuthally Varying Field (AVF) cyclotron accelerator (C235) is constructed at National Cancer Center Hospital East. The facility has 3-irradiation ports (rooms) that are 2-rotationg gantry ports and 1-horizontal fixed port. The C235 can accelerate proton to 235 MeV with the beam intensity of 300 nA. The external diameter is a very compact with about 4 m. The radio frequency is 106 MHz, the accelerating voltage is about 60 kV, and the harmonic number is 4. A beam stability of the C235 has an important relation with the uniformity of an irradiation field and is a very difficulty. The measured result indicated that the incident beam position against the 2.5-% dose uniformity must be into the 0.5- and 6.6-mm{phi} circles with the double-scattering and wobbler methods, respectively. The proton beam therapy began at the end of November 1998. It has been curing 97 patients by the present. Also, the proton therapy system at our hospital got an approval as medical equipment from the Japanese government in April 2001. And the proton therapy at our hospital was approved as a high advanced medical technology from the Japanese government in July 2001. The treatment expenses are 2883,000 yen uniformly. (author)

  11. MIDWESTERN REGIONAL CENTER OF THE DOE NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR CLIMATIC CHANGE RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University

    2014-02-28

    The goal of NICCR (National Institute for Climatic Change Research) was to mobilize university researchers, from all regions of the country, in support of the climatic change research objectives of DOE/BER. The NICCR Midwestern Regional Center (MRC) supported work in the following states: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio. The MRC of NICCR was able to support nearly $8 million in climatic change research, including $6,671,303 for twenty projects solicited and selected by the MRC over five requests for proposals (RFPs) and $1,051,666 for the final year of ten projects from the discontinued DOE NIGEC (National Institute for Global Environmental Change) program. The projects selected and funded by the MRC resulted in 135 peer-reviewed publications and supported the training of 25 PhD students and 23 Masters students. Another 36 publications were generated by the final year of continuing NIGEC projects supported by the MRC. The projects funded by the MRC used a variety of approaches to answer questions relevant to the DOE’s climate change research program. These included experiments that manipulated temperature, moisture and other global change factors; studies that sought to understand how the distribution of species and ecosystems might change under future climates; studies that used measurements and modeling to examine current ecosystem fluxes of energy and mass and those that would exist under future conditions; and studies that synthesized existing data sets to improve our understanding of the effects of climatic change on terrestrial ecosystems. In all of these efforts, the MRC specifically sought to identify and quantify responses of terrestrial ecosystems that were not well understood or not well modeled by current efforts. The MRC also sought to better understand and model important feedbacks between terrestrial ecosystems, atmospheric chemistry, and regional

  12. Science, Passion & Compassion vs. Cancer: Tania Crombet MD PhD, Director of Clinical Research. Molecular Immunology Center, Havana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gory, Conner

    2016-10-01

    Soon after the Molecular Immunology Center (CIM) was established in 1994 (a founding institution of Havana's biotechnology and pharmaceutical campus known as the scientific pole), Dr Crombet completed her master's thesis there. She joined CIM's team in 1998 and in 2004 was designated Director of Clinical Research. She has participated in the research, development and clinical trials of some of Cuba's most innovative therapies and vaccines, including CIMAvax-EGF for non-small cell lung cancer patients. In 2015, this therapy completed Phase IV clinical trials in Cuba and is now used in primary health care services throughout the country's national health system. CIM and Roswell Park Cancer Institute (Buffalo, New York) received US Department of Treasury approval in 2015 to test CIMAvax-EGF and other CIM products in the United States, opening the way for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to consider joint ground-breaking Phase I and II clinical trials in the USA. Recent regulatory changes introduced by President Barack Obama may make applying for such licenses a thing of the past-at least that is what researchers hope. In any case, the work of Dr Crombet and the teams at CIM is making headway in cancer immunotherapy, within the broader goals of the institution's mandate…the subject of our interview.

  13. Engaging patients and stakeholders in research proposal review: the patient-centered outcomes research institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleurence, Rachael L; Forsythe, Laura P; Lauer, Michael; Rotter, Jason; Ioannidis, John P A; Beal, Anne; Frank, Lori; Selby, Joseph V

    2014-07-15

    The inaugural round of merit review for the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) in November 2012 included patients and other stakeholders, as well as scientists. This article examines relationships among scores of the 3 reviewer types, changes in scoring after in-person discussion, and the effect of inclusion of patient and stakeholder reviewers on the review process. In the first phase, 363 scientists scored 480 applications. In the second phase, 59 scientists, 21 patients, and 31 stakeholders provided a "prediscussion" score and a final "postdiscussion" score after an in-person meeting for applications. Bland-Altman plots were used to characterize levels of agreement among and within reviewer types before and after discussion. Before discussion, there was little agreement among average scores given by the 4 lead scientific reviewers and patient and stakeholder reviewers. After discussion, the 4 primary reviewers showed mild convergence in their scores, and the 21-member panel came to a much stronger agreement. Of the 25 awards with the best (and lowest) scores after phase 2, only 13 had ranked in the top 25 after the phase 1 review by scientists. Five percent of the 480 proposals submitted were funded. The authors conclude that patient and stakeholder reviewers brought different perspectives to the review process but that in-person discussion led to closer agreement among reviewer types. It is not yet known whether these conclusions are generalizable to future rounds of peer review. Future work would benefit from additional data collection for evaluation purposes and from long-term evaluation of the effect on the funded research.

  14. Epidemiological profile of nonmelanoma skin cancer in renal transplant recipients: experience of a referral center

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Flávia Regina; Ogawa, Marilia Marufuji; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando Costa; Tomimori, Jane

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in humans and also the malignant disease that is increasingly common among kidney transplant recipients. OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiological characteristics of renal transplant recipients with nonmelanoma skin cancer seen at a referral transplantation center. METHODS: Cross-sectional descriptive study with renal transplant recipients presenting nonmelanoma skin cancer, treated at a transplantation referral cente...

  15. 76 FR 76981 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    .... to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center.... Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel &...

  16. ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership: An Oncology Social Work Response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Jones, Barbara; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Altilio, Terry A; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-09-01

    ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership was a multi-year National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded grant for the development and implementation of an innovative educational program for oncology social workers. The program's curriculum focused upon six core competencies of psychosocial-spiritual support necessary to meet the standard of care recommended by the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report: Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. The curriculum was delivered through a collaborative partnership between the City of Hope National Medical Center and the two leading professional organizations devoted exclusively to representing oncology social workers--the Association of Oncology Social Work and the Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers. Initial findings support the feasibility and acceptability of this tailored leadership skills-building program for participating oncology social workers.

  17. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  18. Treatment of Prostate Cancer using Anti-androgen Small Molecules | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop and commercialize a new class of small molecules for the treatment of prostate cancer. General information on co-development research collaborations, can be found on our web site (http://ttc.nci.nih.gov/forms).

  19. Cancer Inhibitors Isolated from an African Plant | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Development Program is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer inhibitors isolated from the African plant Phyllanthus englerii. The technology is also available for exclusive or non-exclusive licensing.

  20. Biomarkers For Breast Cancer Based On Genetic Instability | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is difficult to establish a prognosis for breast cancer because the clinical course and survival times of patients with the disease vary greatly.  The National Cancer Institute's Genetics Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize prognostic tests for breast cancer based on a 12-gene expression signature.

  1. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Corrêa Coelho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%, with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71% patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2% patients. In 50 patients (86%, sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%, hypothyroidism (43%, mucositis (33% and diarrhea (29%. Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%, hypertension (12%, thrombocytopenia (7%, neutropenia (5% and hand-foot syndrome (5%. Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS.

  2. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. PMID:27564279

  3. [Management of breast cancers diagnosed at the Pasteur Institute of Madagascar from 1995 to 2001].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharisolo Vololonantenaina, C R; Rabarijaona, L P; Rajemiarimoelisoa, C; Rasendramino, M; Migliani, R

    2002-01-01

    Breast cancer is a great problem of public health all over the world. In developed countries, breast cancer represents the most common cancer in females. Its incidence is also increasing in developing country. In Madagascar, no data is available to estimate the real incidence and prevalence rates of breast cancer. However, the data at the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar can confirm the extent of the problem even if it is not at a national scale. The authors report the results of a retrospective study from histological examination at the Laboratory of pathological anatomy of the IPM, during 7 years. Among 2,337 cases of cancer, 16% (373) were breast cancer. Most of them were a female breast cancer (356 cases). The average age is 48 years old. 30% of the tumors were more than 2 cm in size, corresponding at least to the T2 stade from the International Union Against Cancer anatomoclinical classification. The current histological type is the infiltrating ductal carcinoma (80%), about 2/3 belong to the grade 3 of the Scarff-Bloom-Richardson histopronostical classification. Early diagnosis of the cancer is difficult because of the insufficiency of the sanitary infrastructure, particularly for cervical and breast cancers. A national policy for screening must be set up in order to decrease the rate of these invasive carcinomas. In the meantime, informing women and training all the medical staff is a priority. Recording all the data in Madagascar would be desirable.

  4. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, Youssef H., E-mail: youssefzaidan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Shiue, Kevin; Weed, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Terry, Colin [Methodist Research Institute, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Freeman, Stephen; Krowiak, Edward; Borrowdale, Robert; Huntley, Tod [CENTA Otolaryngology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Yeh, Alex [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3-88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4-6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  5. The Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Astro Space Center: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D [Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory, Astro Space Center, Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-30

    The development of Russian (formerly Soviet) radio astronomy is indissolubly linked with the P N Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Russian Academy of Sciences. From the late 1940s, the institute conducted most of its radio astronomy research in the Crimea, at stations or on field trips; in the late 1950s, the center of gravity of research moved to the southern Moscow region, where one of the largest radio astronomy observatories in the country and in the world was developed within less than twenty years. The observatory unique instrumentation system is briefly reviewed in a historical perspective. Key research areas and some major achievements are outlined, and the prospects of the observatory as (currently) part of the LPI Astro Space Center are examined. (conferences and symposia)

  6. 78 FR 2678 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... (OMB) for review and approval. Written comments and/or suggestions from the public and affected... comments in writing, request more information on the proposed project, or to obtain a copy of the data... developed (and is managed) by the ] National Cancer Institute (NCI) Tobacco Control Research Branch...

  7. Meharry-Johns Hopkins Center for Prostate Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Prostate cancer, Dietary risk factors , Lycopene, Genetic predisposition, African-Americans, Cancer research training, Quality of life, Community...that of CA men (73.9 per 100,000 AA / 25.6 per 100,000 C). Genetic and dietary factors have been identified in explaining a portion of the excess...cancer may occur earlier and be more aggressive among African-American men.  Other possible risk factors include obesity , lifestyle and environmental

  8. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This ch...

  9. [Cervical cancers diagnosed at the Pasteur Institute of Madagascar from 1992 to 2002].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharisolo Vololonantenaina, C R; Rabarijaona, L P; Soares, J L; Rasendramino, M; Pécarrère, J L; Khun, H; Huerre, M

    2003-01-01

    In Madagascar, the epidemiological data actualized concerning the cancer of the collus of uterus are not available because of the absence of register of cancer. The objective of this study is to achieve a first assessment of the problem, to complete the epidemiological knowledge, to point out the tool of precoce detection of the precancerous lesions, to propose the measures aiming to improve the management of the patients and to contribute to the institution of a register of cancer. This is a retrospective survey on the frequency of the cancer of the cervix observed from 1992 to 2002 about 23,908 withdrawals addressed to the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar for anatomopathological exam and 12,605 cervical smears for cytological exam. In pathological anatomy, 2,621 (63.4%) of 4,136 cases of diagnosed cancer, have been observed in women. 687 cases (26.2%) of them were localized in the collus. The 3/4 of the cancers of the cervix is invasive and the mean age is 48.2 years old at the time of diagnosis. The cytology detects only 74 cases of invasive cancer of which most don't have an histological confirmation. 274 pre-lesions of cervix cancer were diagnosed for this period, the majority lesions are cytological diagnosis. In spite of a non representative recruitment of the general population, and by the number of withdrawals considered, these results may represent indicators of the epidemiological situation and justify the institution of program to detect the precancerous lesions in a national scale.

  10. Epidemiology of epithelial ovarian cancer, a single institution-based study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Kumar Saini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of mortality among all cancers of female genital tract in countries where effective cervical cancer screening program exists. As the world's population ages, remarkable increase in the total number of ovarian cancer cases are expected. This is preliminary epidemiological study to decide priorities in ovarian cancer research. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted with primary epithelial ovarian cancer cases registered in J. K. Cancer Institute, Kanpur (Uttar Pradesh, from 2007 to 2009. Patients' age at diagnosis, clinical feature, parity of patients, tumor histological type, Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, chemotherapy regimens, and overall survival data were collected and analyzed. Results: One hundred and sixty-three cases of primary ovarian epithelial cancer were analyzed. Patients' mean age at diagnosis was 55.98 ± 9.24 (median = 55. Serous adenocarcinoma (49.69% was the most prevalent type of histopathology followed by endometroid (19.1%, mucinous (10.42% and clear cell (4.29%. Combination of taxane and platin was most commonly used first line regimen in newly diagnosed as well as in relapsed patients post 1 year. Survival was not significantly different in various histopathology (log-rank P = 0.7406, but advancing stage demonstrated gradually poor survival (log-rank P < 0.05 when compared with early stage disease. Conclusion: Research efforts should be in the direction to find early diagnostic and effective screening tools as well as better therapeutic approaches for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

  11. Cost of the Cervical Cancer Screening Program at the Mexican Social Security Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Granados-García

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate the annual cost of the National Cervical Cancer Screening Program (CCSP of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS. Materials and methods. This cost analysis examined regional coverage rates reported by IMSS. We estimated the number of cytology, colposcopy, biopsy and pathology evaluations, as well as the diagnostic test and treatment costs for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II and III (CIN 2/3 and cervical cancer. Diagnostic test costs were estimated using a micro-costing technique. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Results. The cost to perform 2.7 million cytology tests was nearly 38 million dollars, which represents 26.1% of the total program cost (145.4 million. False negatives account for nearly 43% of the program costs. Conclusion. The low sensitivity of the cytology test generates high rates of false negatives, which results in high institutional costs from the treatment of undetected cervical cancer cases.

  12. St. Edward Mercy Medical Center, Fort Smith, AR. Human resource planning identifies institutional need, available personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, J M

    1981-04-01

    Human resource planning, which allows health care facilities to identify future staffing needs and to project staffing availability, will increase as institutions seek to balance quality, costs, employees' needs.

  13. Center of Excellence for Individualization of Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    genes, apoptosis-related genes, DNA repair genes, etc.) (Brabletz et al., 2005; Collado et al., 2005; Dikmen et al., 2005) Validation of the DASL...5-FU resistance in metastatic breast cancer. San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium . 2006. Ref Type: Abstract Collado ,M., Gil,J., Efeyan,A., Guerra

  14. Final priorities; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces priorities under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). Specifically, we announce priorities for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Rehabilitation Strategies, Techniques, and Interventions (Priority 1), Information and Communication Technologies Access (Priority 2), Individual Mobility and Manipulation (Priority 3), and Physical Access and Transportation (Priority 4). The Assistant Secretary may use one or more of these priorities for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend these priorities to improve community living and participation, health and function, and employment outcomes of individuals with disabilities.

  15. Validation of the memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center nomogram to predict disease-specific survival after R0 resection in a Chinese gastric cancer population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donglai Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prediction of disease-specific survival (DSS for individual patient with gastric cancer after R0 resection remains a clinical concern. Since the clinicopathologic characteristics of gastric cancer vary widely between China and western countries, this study is to evaluate a nomogram from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC for predicting the probability of DSS in patients with gastric cancer from a Chinese cohort. METHODS: From 1998 to 2007, clinical data of 979 patients with gastric cancer who underwent R0 resection were retrospectively collected from Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute and used for external validation. The performance of the MSKCC nomogram in our population was assessed using concordance index (C-index and calibration plot. RESULTS: The C-index for the MSKCC predictive nomogram was 0.74 in the Chinese cohort, compared with 0.69 for American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC staging system (P<0.0001. This suggests that the discriminating value of MSKCC nomogram is superior to AJCC staging system for prognostic prediction in the Chinese population. Calibration plots showed that the actual survival of Chinese patients corresponded closely to the MSKCC nonogram-predicted survival probabilities. Moreover, MSKCC nomogram predictions demonstrated the heterogeneity of survival in stage IIA/IIB/IIIA/IIIB disease of the Chinese patients. CONCLUSION: In this study, we externally validated MSKCC nomogram for predicting the probability of 5- and 9-year DSS after R0 resection for gastric cancer in a Chinese population. The MSKCC nomogram performed well with good discrimination and calibration. The MSKCC nomogram improved individualized predictions of survival, and may assist Chinese clinicians and patients in individual follow-up scheduling, and decision making with regard to various treatment options.

  16. 76 FR 5595 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Member Conflict: Immunology. Date: February... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Cancer Etiology. Date: February 28, 2011... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed...

  17. Critical Appraisal of Translational Research Models for Suitability in Performance Assessment of Cancer Centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Abinaya; Sullivan, Richard; Bakker, Suzanne; Harten, van Wim H.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Translational research is a complex cumulative process that takes time. However, the operating environment for cancer centers engaged in translational research is now financially insecure. Centers are challenged to improve results and reduce time from discovery to practice innovations. P

  18. [Cancer in Madagascar. Experience of the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar from September 1992 to June 1996].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharisolo Vololonantenaina, C; Pécarrère, J L; Roux, J F

    1998-01-01

    The Unit of the anatomo-pathology in the "Institut Pasteur de Madagascar" (IPM) examined in the period from September 1992 to June 1996 tissue specimens from 10,275 patients. Tumorous pathology presented 40% of the tissues and half of which were of malign etiology. 64% of the cancer diagnosed were in females. Cervical cancer was most frequently observed (17%), followed by breast cancer (16%). Cancer in the gastro-intestinal tract (15%) was most often located in the colon without sex difference. Stomach cancer occurring predominantly in males presented 25% of the total cases of cancer in the gastro-intestinal tract. Cancer of liver is rarely diagnosed despite the high prevalence of infection with hepatitis B virus. Skin cancer constituted 9% of the malign diagnosis and was mainly found in males. Children under 15 years old presented 7.4% of the total cases of malignancy with the haematopoietic tissues (30%) and the eyes (17%) as the most frequent topic locations. Due to a very low seroprevalence of the HIV in Madagascar, malign tumours associated to AIDS were only seen in a few rare cases. The review of cancer cases in the IPM may not be representative for the cancer epidemiology of Madagascar because of a general very low level of health care coverage, especially in the rural areas. Furthermore, a major part of the specimens originates from easily accessible organsystems, whereas other organs seem less investigated due to lack of appropriate available technique. Therefore, it is not feasible for the moment to establish a cancer register in Madagascar, although the Unit of Pathology in the IPM can offer a valid cancer diagnostical service.

  19. Thyroid metastases from colorectal cancer: the Institut Gustave Roussy experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lièvre, Astrid; Leboulleux, Sophie; Boige, Valérie; Travagli, Jean-Paul; Dromain, Clarisse; Elias, Dominique; Ducreux, Michel; Malka, David

    2006-08-01

    The prevalence of thyroid metastases in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is unknown. We retrieved the records of all patients with CRC and pathologically proved thyroid metastasis for the period 1993-2004. Among 5,862 consecutive patients with CRC, 6 (0.1%) were diagnosed with thyroid metastases, a median of 61 months after the diagnosis of primary tumour, and a median of 19 months after the last surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation of other metastases (which were present in all cases). Signs and symptoms, when present (n=3), consisted of cervical pain, cervical adenopathy, goitre, dysphagia, and/or dysphonia. In other cases, the diagnosis was made by positron emission tomography scanning. Thyroidectomy was performed in the 5 patients with isolated thyroid metastases, with cervical lymph node dissection being required in all cases. The only patient treated conservatively because of concomitant liver and lung metastases developed life-threatening dyspnoea, which required emergent tracheal stenting. Median overall survival was 77 months, 58 months, and 12 months after the diagnosis of primary CRC, initial metastases, and thyroid metastasis, respectively. It is concluded that thyroid metastases are rare and occur late in the course of CRC. Thyroidectomy (with cervical lymph node dissection) may result in prevention or improvement of life-threatening symptoms and prolonged survival.

  20. Acupuncture Research at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javdan, Bahar; Cassileth, Barrie

    2015-06-01

    Acupuncture may help treat specific cancer-related symptoms. Here, we summarize our clinical trials that sought to determine acupuncture's role in managing cancer-related symptoms. Trials have been conducted to determine acupuncture's ability to mitigate cancer-related symptoms including dyspnea, fatigue, xerostomia, lymphedema, hot flashes, postoperative ileus, pain and dysfunction after neck dissection, and postthoracotomy pain. Published studies indicate that acupuncture versus placebo acupuncture failed to reduce cancer-related dyspnea. Both true and sham acupuncture alleviated fatigue slightly, but no significant differences between groups emerged. Compared with sham acupuncture, our research showed that acupuncture significantly improved saliva production in patients with xerostomia and significantly reduced lymphedema patients' arm circumference in a pilot study. However, acupuncture failed to significantly reduce hot flashes and was no more successful than sham acupuncture in reducing postoperative ileus. Significant reductions in pain and dysfunction occurred in cancer patients after neck dissection. In a feasibility study, acupuncture was found to be acceptable to lung cancer patients and did not interfere with standard postoperative care. In summary, acupuncture is a potential candidate for the treatment of some important cancer-related symptoms. Large clinical trials and research to investigate mechanistic pathways are warranted.

  1. 78 FR 27974 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Written... comments in writing, or request more information on the proposed project, contact: Dorothy Farrell, Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National...

  2. New organizational and funds flow models for an academic cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahlinger, David A; Pai, Chih-Wen; Waldinger, Marcy B; Billi, John E; Wicha, Max S

    2004-07-01

    The clinical impetus to develop cancer centers has been the recognition that many cancer patients require a comprehensive treatment plan coordinated across multiple specialties. Developing an effective organizational and financial structure among the multiple entities that comprise an academic cancer center has, however, been a challenge. The authors describe an effort to realize a sustainable clinical operation at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMCCC) by developing an appropriate management structure and financial model. The modified organizational structure established a clear line of administrative authority and held faculty members accountable for their effort in the UMCCC. A unified budget aligned financial incentive among all stakeholders to increase efficiency, revenue, and margin. The authors report preliminary financial evidence of the success of the new managerial structure.

  3. Meaning-centered psychotherapy: a form of psychotherapy for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lori P Montross; Meier, Emily A; Irwin, Scott A

    2014-10-01

    Caring for patients with cancer involves addressing their myriad physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs. Although many cancer treatments focus on physical or psychological needs, few treatments specifically target the basic need for meaning and spiritual well-being in this population. This article describes the creation and evolution of a new psychotherapy devoted to these needs, a therapy termed "meaning-centered psychotherapy." In this article, a detailed description of meaning-centered psychotherapy is provided. An explanation of the current research findings related to this treatment are also offered, with information about the various group and individual treatments as well as the new expansions for use with cancer survivors or nursing staff. Overall, meaning-centered psychotherapy shows promise for enhancing meaning and spiritual well-being among patients with cancer and offers exciting possibilities for future research in other areas.

  4. Chemotherapy for elderly patients with advanced cancer: A pilot study in Institute of Oncology Bucharest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorescu, Alexandru C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives First objective was better understanding of the indications of chemotherapy in elderly with advanced cancer, tolerability and toxicity of chemotherapy in this age group. The second objective was to define current practice in chemotherapy for elderly people with advanced cancer for a selected group of patients treated in Institute of Oncology Bucharest (IOB). Materials and Methods The study makes a clinical analysis of medical records of 27 patients from the archive of Institute of Oncology Bucharest treated by the same doctor. Patients were selected according to: age ≥ 65 years, ECOG performance status 0–1, normal blood counts and blood biochemistry, histological confirmation of the diagnosis of cancer, patients should received at least 3 cycles of chemotherapy. We extract characteristics of the patients to see if they were a homogeneous group of patients and to compare them with data from the literature. Overall survival was calculated by the Kaplan Meyer curve. Results 295 patients more then 65 years were treated in our site in 2 years 2011, 2012. 93 patients received chemotherapy and only 27 patients were enrolled in this study following inclusion criteria. Common sites of cancer were lung and breast. The most used cytostatics for lung cancer was gemcitabine and carboplatine and cyclophosphamide, metotrexat and 5 fluorouracil for breast cancer. Toxicity was mild with the prevalence of hematologic toxicity. Overall survival without taking into account the type of cancer was 27.7 month. Conclusions For selected patients, chemotherapy was well tolerated and appears to prolong survival regardless of the location of cancer. The relatively small number of elderly patients who received chemotherapy is probably due to lack of compliance to treatment, the increased number of co-morbidities and evaluation of performance status only by the ECOG index known not to be good enough to establish the indication of chemotherapy. PMID:27847881

  5. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1 triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3. Methods We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II, European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, Multiethnic Cohort (MEC, Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Women's Health Study (WHS. Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  6. A Novel Cross-Disciplinary Multi-Institute Approach to Translational Cancer Research: Lessons Learned from Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashokkumar A. Patel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC, http://www.pcabc.upmc.edu is one of the first major project-based initiatives stemming from the Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance that was funded for four years by the Department of Health of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The objective of this was to initiate a prototype biorepository and bioinformatics infrastructure with a robust data warehouse by developing a statewide data model (1 for bioinformatics and a repository of serum and tissue samples; (2 a data model for biomarker data storage; and (3 a public access website for disseminating research results and bioinformatics tools. The members of the Consortium cooperate closely, exploring the opportunity for sharing clinical, genomic and other bioinformatics data on patient samples in oncology, for the purpose of developing collaborative research programs across cancer research institutions in Pennsylvania. The Consortium’s intention was to establish a virtual repository of many clinical specimens residing in various centers across the state, in order to make them available for research. One of our primary goals was to facilitate the identification of cancer specific biomarkers and encourage collaborative research efforts among the participating centers.Methods: The PCABC has developed unique partnerships so that every region of the state can effectively contribute and participate. It includes over 80 individuals from 14 organizations, and plans to expand to partners outside the State. This has created a network of researchers, clinicians, bioinformaticians, cancer registrars, program directors, and executives from academic and community health systems, as well as external corporate partners - all working together to accomplish a common mission. The various sub-committees have developed a common IRB protocol template, common data elements for standardizing data collections for three organ sites, intellectual

  7. METACHRONOUS SECOND PRIMARY CANCERS: CLINICAL ANALYSES OF 506 CASES IN A SINGLE INSTITUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Xiang-qian; HAO Chun-yi; GAO Fei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the clinical features and prognosis of multiple primary cancers, in order to make improvement of diagnosis and treatment. Methods: A total of 506 patients with two primary cancers admitted from 1973 to 2004 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: These cases accounted for 0.9% of all the hospitalized cases in the same period among which 126 were males, with the ratio of male to female 1:3. The median age at the onset of the first disease was 48 y (ranged from 24 to 77). The interval between the two cancers was longer in patients under 50 y and in males, but without statistical significance. The onset age of the two primary cancers was mainly centered around 40 to 60 y, while 70% of the second cancer occurred within 80 m after the first cancer but half of them occurred within five years. The interval between the two cancers played crucial role in affecting the prognosis (P<0.005). Conclusion: Fewer lethal cancers are involved in either the primary or the secondary malignancies. The interval between the two primaries contributes most to the prognoses.

  8. German Bowel Cancer Center: An Attempt to Improve Treatment Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof Jannasch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colorectal cancer remains the second most common cause of death from malignancies, but treatment results show high diversity. Certified bowel cancer centres (BCC are the basis of a German project for improvement of treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze if certification would enhance short-term outcome in rectal cancer surgery. Material and Methods. This quality assurance study included 8197 patients with rectal cancer treated between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2010. We compared cohorts treated in certified and noncertified hospitals regarding preoperative variables and perioperative outcomes. Outcomes were verified by matched-pair analysis. Results. Patients of noncertified hospitals had higher ASA-scores, higher prevalence of risk factors, more distant metastases, lower tumour localization, lower frequency of pelvic MRI, and higher frequencies of missing values and undetermined TNM classifications (significant differences only. Outcome analysis revealed more general complications in certified hospitals (20.3% versus 17.4%, p=0.03. Both cohorts did not differ significantly in percentage of R0-resections, intraoperative complications, anastomotic leakage, in-hospital death, and abdominal wall dehiscence. Conclusions. The concept of BCC is a step towards improving the structural and procedural quality. This is a good basis for improving outcome quality but cannot replace it. For a primary surgical disease like rectal cancer a specific, surgery-targeted program is still needed.

  9. Laryngeal Cancer: 12-Year Experience of a Single Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkovsky, V; Wallenfels, P; Calkovska, A; Hajtman, A

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal cancer is about the twentieth most common cancer in the world and more than 150,000 new cases are diagnosed annually. The aim of the study was to evaluate the history, diagnostics, treatment outcomes, and prognosis in patients with laryngeal cancer in Northern Slovakia. We analyzed retrospectively 227 patients (207 males, 20 females) with laryngeal carcinoma treated in the period 2003-2014 at the Clinic of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery of the Jessenius Faculty of Medicine and Martin University Hospital in Martin, Slovakia. The majority of patients were in the sixth (38.0 %) and seventh decade of life (30.8 %). Two hundred and seventeen patients (95.6 %) were smokers or ex-smokers. Sixty-six percent of patients were diagnosed with glottic or transglottic carcinoma, related probably to the anatomical structure of the larynx and exposure to inhalation pollutants. It is alarming that the majority of patients with malignant laryngeal disease were admitted to the hospital in advanced stages. In 151 (66.5 %) of patients, the extent of infiltration was T3 or T4, and 156 (68 %) patients were in disease stage III and IV. The incidence and mortality of laryngeal cancer suggest the need to intensify the prevention and to search for an early clinical stage of laryngeal cancer using a targeted screening.

  10. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, February 1996. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System and the Trace Element Removal test blocks. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with impinger capture solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) was utilized in the TER test configuration this month. The B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit is being installed utilizing the Mini Pilot Flue Gas System. The 1.0 MW Cold- Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  11. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-25

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). Specifically, we announce a priority for a Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP) on Improving Methods of Evaluating Return on Investment (ROI) for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program (VR Program). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on an area of national need. We intend for the priority to contribute to improved employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

  12. The Writing Center Paradox: Talk about Legitimacy and the Problem of Institutional Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    Scholarship on writing centers often relies on validation systems that reconcile tensions between equality and plurality by privileging one over the other. According to feminist political theorist Chantal Mouffe, neither absolute equality nor absolute plurality are possible in any democratic system, a conflict she calls "the democratic paradox"…

  13. Geothermal Research at the Geo-Heat Center Oregon Institute of Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    1997-01-01

    The Geo-Heat Center was established in 1975 to provide information and technical services for geothermal energy direct-use and development--mainly utilizing low- and moderate-temperature resources (<150oC). The Center is funded by the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). Our main functions are (1) technical assistance, (2) resource information, (3) advising and referrals, (4) speaker’s bureau, (5) tours of geothermal systems, (6) publications, (7) research, and (8) stocking a geothermal library. During 1997, the Geo-Heat Center staff provided assistance to 761 individuals, companies and municipalities--up to eight hours of technical assistance can be provided free of charge. Staff members have also participated in numerous international geothermal direct-use projects. The Center has developed a “Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook” and publishes a free “Quarterly Bulletin” on geothermal direct-use projects and research. The Geo-Heat Center also has a website (http://www.oit.edu/~geoheat). Several of these direct-use research projects are discussed in the paper, including: a) Downhole Heat Exchangers, b) A Cost Comparison of Commercial Ground- Source Heat Pump Systems, c) A Spreadsheet for Geothermal Energy Cost Evaluation, d) Utilization of Silica Waste from Geothermal Power Production, e) Fossil Fuel-Fired Peak Heating for Geothermal Greenhouses, f) Selected Cost Considerations for the Geothermal District Heating in Existing Single-Family Residential Areas, and g) Collocated Resources Inventory of Wells and Hot Springs in the Western U.S.

  14. Qualification of NCI-Designated Cancer Centers for Quantitative PET/CT Imaging in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, Joshua S; Reddin, Janet S; Opanowski, Adam; Kinahan, Paul E; Siegel, Barry A; Shankar, Lalitha K; Karp, Joel S

    2017-03-02

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed the Centers for Quantitative Imaging Excellence (CQIE) initiative in 2010 to pre-qualify imaging facilities at all of the NCI-designated Comprehensive and Clinical Cancer Centers for oncology trials using advanced imaging techniques, including positron emission tomography (PET). This paper reviews the CQIE PET/CT (Computed Tomography) scanner qualification process and results in detail. Methods: Over a period of approximately 5 years, sites were requested to submit a variety of phantom, including uniform and ACR (American College of Radiology) phantoms, PET/CT images, as well as examples of clinical images. Submissions were divided into 3 distinct time points: initial submission (T0), followed by two requalification submissions (T1 and T2). Images were analyzed using standardized procedures and scanners received a pass or fail designation. Sites had the opportunity to submit new data for failed scanners. Quantitative results were compared: across scanners within a given time point and across time points for a given scanner. Results: 65 unique PET/CT scanners across 42 sites were submitted for CQIE T0 qualification, with 64 passing qualification. 44 (68%) of the scanners from T0 had data submitted for T2. From T0 to T2 the percentage of scanners passing the CQIE qualification on the first attempt rose from 38% in T1 to 67% in T2. The most common reasons for failure were: standardized uptake value (SUV) out of specifications, incomplete data submission and uniformity issues. Uniform phantom and ACR phantom results between scanner manufacturers are similar. Conclusion: The results of the CQIE process show that periodic requalification may decrease the frequency of deficient data submissions. The CQIE project also highlighted the concern within imaging facilities about the burden of maintaining different qualifications and accreditations. Finally, we note that for quantitative imaging-based trials the relationships between

  15. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... associated with risk of recurrence in women with early-stage breast cancer can be used to identify the most appropriate ... novel agents, technologies, and markers for better diagnosis, prognosis, screening, prevention, and treatment of breast cancer. Summer 2014 Issue: Volume 9 Number 2 Page ...

  16. A breast cancer clinical registry in an Italian comprehensive cancer center: an instrument for descriptive, clinical, and experimental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baili, Paolo; Torresani, Michele; Agresti, Roberto; Rosito, Giuseppe; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Veneroni, Silvia; Cavallo, Ilaria; Funaro, Francesco; Giunco, Marco; Turco, Alberto; Amash, Hade; Scavo, Antonio; Minicozzi, Pamela; Bella, Francesca; Meneghini, Elisabetta; Sant, Milena

    2015-01-01

    In clinical research, many potentially useful variables are available via the routine activity of cancer center-based clinical registries (CCCR). We present the experience of the breast cancer clinical registry at Fondazione IRCCS "Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori" to give an example of how a CCCR can be planned, implemented, and used. Five criteria were taken into consideration while planning our CCCR: (a) available clinical and administrative databases ought to be exploited to the maximum extent; (b) open source software should be used; (c) a Web-based interface must be designed; (d) CCCR data must be compatible with population-based cancer registry data; (e) CCCR must be an open system, able to be connected with other data repositories. The amount of work needed for the implementation of a CCCR is inversely linked with the amount of available coded data: the fewer data are available in the input databases as coded variables, the more work will be necessary, for information technology staff, text mining analysis, and registrars (for collecting data from clinical records). A cancer registry in a comprehensive cancer center can be used for several research aspects, such as estimate of the number of cases needed for clinical studies, assessment of biobank specimens with specific characteristics, evaluation of clinical practice and adhesion to clinical guidelines, comparative studies between clinical and population sets of patients, studies on cancer prognosis, and studies on cancer survivorship.

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma: consensus recommendations of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials Planning Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Melanie B; Jaffe, Deborah; Choti, Michael M; Belghiti, Jacques; Curley, Steven; Fong, Yuman; Gores, Gregory; Kerlan, Robert; Merle, Phillipe; O'Neil, Bert; Poon, Ronnie; Schwartz, Lawrence; Tepper, Joel; Yao, Francis; Haller, Daniel; Mooney, Margaret; Venook, Alan

    2010-09-01

    Hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults and the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide. The incidence of HCC in the United States is rising steadily because of the prevalence of hepatitis C viral infection and other causes of hepatic cirrhosis. The majority of patients have underlying hepatic dysfunction, which complicates patient management and the search for safe and effective therapies. The Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) in HCC was convened by the National Cancer Institute's Gastrointestinal Cancer Steering Committee to identify the key knowledge gaps in HCC and define clinical research priorities. The CTPM structured its review according to current evidence-based treatment modalities in HCC and prioritized the recommendations on the basis of the patient populations representing the greatest unmet medical need.

  18. The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    403: 385-389, 2000. Sharma• D. and Fondell, J. D. Ordered recruitment of histone acetvltransferases and the TRAP/Mediator complex to thyroid hormone...Co-chair of GU committee at the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 4/2003 Grant study section, Department of Defense (DOD), breast cancer RFA 6/2002...recruitment of histone acetyltransfeiases and the TRAP/Mediator complex to thyroid hormone-responsive promoters in vivo. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99, 7934

  19. Annual report to the nation on the status of cancer, 1975-2006, featuring colorectal cancer trends and impact of interventions (risk factors, screening, and treatment) to reduce future rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.K. Edwards (Brenda); E. Ward (Elizabeth); B.A. Kohler (Betsy); C. Eheman (Christie); A. Zauber (Ann); R.N. Anderson (Robert); A. Jemal (Ahmedin); M.J. Schymura (Maria); I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); L.C. Seeff (Laura); M. van Ballegooijen (Marjolein); S.L. Goede (Luuk); L.A.G. Ries (Lynn)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. The American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate annually to provide updated information regarding cancer occurrence and

  20. A Short Assessment of Select Remediation Issues at the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gephart, Roy E.

    2007-06-01

    At the invitation of the National Academies, Roy Gephart traveled to Russia with an eight-member U.S. team during June, 2008 to participate in a workshop hosted by the National Academies and the Russian Academy of Sciences on radiation contamination and remediation issues in the former Soviet Union. Cleanup problems were assessed by the American participants for six Russian sites: Kurchatov Institute, Lakes 10 and 11 at Mayak, Andreev Bay, Krasnokamensk Mining Enterprise (Siberia), Almaz Mining Enterprise (North Caucasus), and one site for testing peaceful nuclear explosions. Roy lead the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute review session and wrote an assessment of key cleanup issues. Kurchatov is the leading institute in the Former Soviet Union devoted to military and civilian nuclear programs. Founded in 1943 in the outskirts of Moscow, this 100 hectare site of nearly undeveloped, prime real estate is now surrounded by densely populated urban and business districts. Today there are growing concerns over the public safety and environmental security of the site resulting from increasingly obsolete nuclear facilities and a legacy of inadequate waste management practices that resulted in contaminant releases and challenging remediation problems. In addition, there is growing concern over the presence of nuclear facilities within urban areas creating potential targets for terrorist attacks.

  1. Medical diplomacy and global mental health: from community and national institutions to regional centers of excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan; Kohrt, Brandon A

    2013-12-01

    We explore how regional medical diplomacy can increase funding for global mental health initiatives. Interventions for infectious diseases have dominated medical diplomacy by focusing on security concerns. The global mental health movement has adopted similar strategies, but unsuccessfully since mental illnesses do not cause international epidemics. Instead, realpolitik arguments may increase funding by prioritizing economic productivity and regional diplomacy based on cultural ties to advance mental health services and research at the community level. In South Asia, initiatives to train personnel and provide refugee services offer a foundation for regional centers of excellence. This model can be expanded elsewhere.

  2. "Less Clicking, More Watching": Results from the User-Centered Design of a Multi-Institutional Web Site for Art and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergo, John; Karat, Clare-Marie; Karat, John; Pinhanez, Claudio; Arora, Renee; Cofino, Thomas; Riecken, Doug; Podlaseck, Mark

    This paper summarizes a 10-month long research project conducted at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center aimed at developing the design concept of a multi-institutional art and culture web site. The work followed a user-centered design (UCD) approach, where interaction with prototypes and feedback from potential users of the web site were sought…

  3. Institutional profile: integrated center for research and treatment of vertigo, balance and ocular motor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Thomas; Zwergal, Andreas; Jahn, Klaus; Strupp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the German BMBF (German Ministry of Education and Research) established an Integrated Center for Research and Treatment (IFB(LMU)) of Vertigo, Balance and Ocular Motor Disorders in Munich. After the 10-year period of funding by the BMBF, it is envisioned that the (IFB(LMU)) will continue over the long term with the joint support of the University Hospital, the Medical Faculty, and the Bavarian State. Vertigo is one of the most common complaints in medicine. Despite its high prevalence, patients with vertigo generally receive either inappropriate or inadequate treatment. This deplorable situation is internationally well known and its causes are multiple: insufficient interdisciplinary cooperation, no standardized diagnostics and therapy, the failure to translate findings of basic science into clinical applications, and the scarcity of clinical multicenter studies. The (IFB(LMU)) will constitute a suitable tool with which these structural, clinical, and scientific deficits can be overcome. It will also make possible the establishment of an international interdisciplinary referral center. Munich has become the site of a unique concentration of leading experts on vertigo, balance and ocular motor disorders, both in the clinical and basic sciences. Academic structures have paved the way for the creation of an interdisciplinary horizontal network that also allows structured, vertical academic career paths via the Bachelor's and Master's degree programs in Neuroscience, a Graduate School of Systemic Neurosciences, and the Munich Center for Neurosciences - Brain and Mind. The (IFB(LMU)) has the following objectives as regards structure and content: to create an independent patient-oriented clinical research center under the auspices of the Medical Faculty but with autonomous administration and budget; to overcome existing clinical and academic barriers separating the traditional specializations; to establish a standardized interdisciplinary longitudinal and

  4. Web services-based access to local clinical trial databases: a standards initiative of the Association of American Cancer Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Douglas C; Evans, Richard M; Afrin, Lawrence B; DeTeresa, Richard M; Ko, Dave; Mitchell, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    Electronic discovery of the clinical trials being performed at a specific research center is a challenging task, which presently requires manual review of the center's locally maintained databases or web pages of protocol listings. Near real-time automated discovery of available trials would increase the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical trial searching, and would facilitate the development of new services for information providers and consumers. Automated discovery efforts to date have been hindered by issues such as disparate database schemas, vocabularies, and insufficient standards for easy intersystem exchange of high-level data, but adequate infrastructure now exists that make possible the development of applications for near real-time automated discovery of trials. This paper describes the current state (design and implementation) of the Web Services Specification for Publication and Discovery of Clinical Trials as developed by the Technology Task Force of the Association of American Cancer Institutes. The paper then briefly discusses a prototype web service-based application that implements the specification. Directions for evolution of this specification are also discussed.

  5. Development and Current Status of National Cancer Center for Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jie; LIN Hong-sheng; HOU Wei; ZHANG Pei-tong; HUA Bao-jin

    2011-01-01

    @@ Chinese medicine (CM) is an important feature of cancer treatment in China.Especially in the last 10years, the effect of CM in cancer treatment has been of high concern and has been accepted by experts and patients locally and overseas.The oncology department (OD) of Guang'anmen Hospital (GAMH) of China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences (CATCM),which will mark its 50th anniversary in 2013, is one of China's most-respected centers devoted exclusively to cancer patient care, research, education, and prevention through CM.It is located at the campus of GAMH,central Beijing.

  6. Comparative study of minimally invasive versus open esophagectomy for esophageal cancer in a single cancer center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Juwei; Yuan Zuyang; Zhang Baihua; Li Ning; Lyu Fang; Mao Yousheng; Xue Qi

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to minimize the injury reaction during the surgery and reduce the morbidity rate,hence reducing the mortality rate of esophagectomy,minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) was introduced.The aim of this study was to compare the postoperative outcomes in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma undergoing minimally invasive or open esophagectomy (OE).Methods The medical records of 176 consecutive patients,who underwent minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) between January 2009 and August 2013 in Cancer Institute & Hospital,Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences,were retrospectively reviewed.In the same period,142 patients who underwent OE,either Ivor Lewis or McKeown approach,were selected randomly as controls.The clinical variables of paired groups were compared,including age,sex,Charlson score,tumor location,duration of surgery,number of harvested lymph nodes,morbidity rate,the rate of leak,pulmonary morbidity rate,mortality rate,and hospital length of stay (LOS).Results The number of harvested lymph nodes was not significantly different between MIE group and OE group (median 20 vs.16,P=0.740).However,patients who underwent MIE had longer operation time than the OE group (375 vs.300 minutes,P <0.001).Overall morbidity,pulmonary morbidity,the rate of leak,in-hospital death,and hospital LOS were not significantly different between MIE and OE groups.Morbidities including anastomotic leak and pulmonary morbidity,inhospital death,hospital LOS,and hospital expenses were not significantly different between MIE and OE groups as well.Conclusions MIE and OE appear equivalent with regard to early oncological outcomes.There is a trend that hospital LOS and hospital expenses are reduced in the MIE group than the OE group.

  7. Security and privacy requirements for a multi-institutional cancer research data grid: an interview-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weems William A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data protection is important for all information systems that deal with human-subjects data. Grid-based systems – such as the cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG – seek to develop new mechanisms to facilitate real-time federation of cancer-relevant data sources, including sources protected under a variety of regulatory laws, such as HIPAA and 21CFR11. These systems embody new models for data sharing, and hence pose new challenges to the regulatory community, and to those who would develop or adopt them. These challenges must be understood by both systems developers and system adopters. In this paper, we describe our work collecting policy statements, expectations, and requirements from regulatory decision makers at academic cancer centers in the United States. We use these statements to examine fundamental assumptions regarding data sharing using data federations and grid computing. Methods An interview-based study of key stakeholders from a sample of US cancer centers. Interviews were structured, and used an instrument that was developed for the purpose of this study. The instrument included a set of problem scenarios – difficult policy situations that were derived during a full-day discussion of potentially problematic issues by a set of project participants with diverse expertise. Each problem scenario included a set of open-ended questions that were designed to elucidate stakeholder opinions and concerns. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and used for both qualitative and quantitative analysis. For quantitative analysis, data was aggregated at the individual or institutional unit of analysis, depending on the specific interview question. Results Thirty-one (31 individuals at six cancer centers were contacted to participate. Twenty-four out of thirty-one (24/31 individuals responded to our request- yielding a total response rate of 77%. Respondents included IRB directors and policy-makers, privacy and

  8. Combined MTX{center_dot}5-FU{center_dot}CDGP for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakoda, Takema; Kitano, Hiroya [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Saitoh, Yuko; Ikeda, Hiroki; Dake, Yoshihiro; Enomoto, Tadao [Japanese Red Cross Society Wakayama Medical Center (Japan); Seno, Satoshi [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan); Kawano, Atsushi [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Combination chemotherapy including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and nedaplatin (CDGP) with methotrexate (MTX) and leucovorin (LV) was administered for modulation in patients with head and neck cancer. We treated 19 patients with MTX{center_dot}5-FU{center_dot}CDGP consisting of 150 mg/body of MTX on day 1 followed by a 3-day continuous infusion of 5-FU at 3,500 mg/m{sup 2} and 17 injections of LV at 15 mg and infusion of CDGP at 100 mg/m{sup 2}. Six patients had recurrent head and neck cancer, and 13 had newly diagnosed disease. Eleven of the new patients were concurrently treated with radiation therapy. Treatment-associated toxicity was significant, including mucositis and myelosuppression, but acceptable. Sixteen patients were eligible for evaluation of response. The overall complete response rate was 75.0% (12/16). Patients treated with radiotherapy had a 90.0% (9/10) overall complete response rate. (author)

  9. Western Regional Center of the National Institute for Climatic Change Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungate, Bruce A. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

    2013-05-02

    The major goal of this project was fostering, integrating, synthesizing, and disseminating experimental, observational, and modeling research on predicted climate change in the western region of the U.S. and the impacts of that change on the structure, productivity, and climatic interactions of the region's natural and managed ecological systems. This was accomplished through administering a competitive grants program developed in collaboration with the other four regional centers of the NICCR. The activities supported included efforts to synthesize research on climate change in the western U.S. through meta-analysis studies, model comparisons, and data synthesis workshops. Results from this work were disseminated to the scientific and public media. This project also supported the development of the NICCR web site, hosted at NAU, which was used as the means to accept pre-proposal and proposal submissions for each funding cycle, and served as a clearing house for public outreach for results from NICCR-funded research

  10. Instituting a Smoke-Free Policy for City Recreation Centers and Playgrounds, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Leung, JD

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background In the United States, more than 600 municipalities have smoke-free parks, and more than 100 have smoke-free beaches. Nevertheless, adoption of outdoor smoke-free policies has been slow in certain regions. Critical to widespread adoption is the sharing of knowledge about the policy development and implementation process. In this article, we describe our experience in making City of Philadelphia recreation centers and playgrounds smoke-free. Community Context Of the 10 largest US cities, Philadelphia has among the highest rates of adult and youth smoking. Our objectives for an outdoor smoke-free policy included protecting against secondhand smoke, supporting a normative message that smoking is harmful, motivating smokers to quit, and mitigating tobacco-related sanitation costs. Methods The Philadelphia Department of Public Health and the Department of Parks and Recreation engaged civic leaders, agency staff, and community stakeholders in the following steps: 1 making the policy case, 2 vetting policy options and engaging stakeholders, and 3 implementing policy. Near-term policy impacts were assessed through available data sources. Outcome More than 220 recreation centers, playgrounds, and outdoor pools became smoke-free through a combined mayoral executive order and agency regulation. Support for the policy was high. Estimates suggest a policy reach of 3.6 million annual visitors and almost 850 acres of new smoke-free municipal property. Interpretation Localities can successfully implement outdoor smoke-free policies with careful planning and execution. Such policies hold great potential for reducing exposure to secondhand smoke, promoting nonsmoking norms, and providing additional motivation for residents to quit smoking.

  11. Stage I seminoma: treatment outcome at King Hussein Cancer Center in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khader Jamal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this report is to address treatment outcomes of patients with early-stage seminoma in a single institution with special reference to patients with history of surgical violation of the scrotum. Methods Seventy four patients with pure seminoma were treated at King Hussein Cancer Center (Amman, Jordan between 2003 and 2010. All patients underwent orchiectomy. All but 3 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. Patients who underwent surgical violation of the scrotum prior to referral were managed by further excision or irradiation of the scrotal scar. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 200 months (mean, 33 months. Results At the time of follow-up; all but one patient remain alive. The 3-year relapse-free survival for the entire cohort was 95.9%. Three patients developed relapse, all of whom received adjuvant irradiation following inguinal orchiectomy and initially harbored tumors larger than 4 cm upon pathological examination. Median time to relapse was 14 months (range, 8–25 months. None were associated with elevated tumor markers prior to detection of relapse. All but one patient were successfully salvaged by chemotherapy. Conclusions Our results confirm the excellent prognosis of patients with early-stage seminoma treated by orchiectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy in a developing country. Although all patients who developed relapse demonstrated adverse pathological findings upon initial assessment, no consistent predictor of relapse was found. Scrotal scar re-excision or irradiation in patients with prior history of surgical violation of the scrotum are effective measures in preventing local failure.

  12. Retrospective Analysis of Cancer with Behcets Disease: Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Bozkurt Duman

    2014-02-01

    Results: One of our 105 patients with BD was found to have solid tumor in the rate of 0.9 %. The remaining 104 patients with BD were in follow up without any malignancy in this period. The malignancy that we reported was invasive right breast carcinoma in a 55-year-old woman with BD. A radically modified right mastectomy and axillary lymphadenectomy were performed and postoperative doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide therapy for four cycles and hormonal therapy with tamoxifen and leuprolide acetate was administered as adjuvant therapy. This patient had a history of 16 years colchicine usage as medication for BD. Conclusion:The rheumatologic diseases can predispose malignancy, the autoimmune nature of BD or the immunosupressive medicines could be possible causes of this carcinoma. However, in our study only one patient had malignancy. The another point of view; management and also prevention of cancer with BD is important entity.

  13. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong, E-mail: jungkim@cau.ac.kr; Choi, Kyung-Hee, E-mail: khchoi@cau.ac.kr

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  14. Sentinel node biopsy for early-stage oral cavity cancer: the VU University Medical Center experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Toom, I.J.; Heuveling, D.A.; Flach, G.B.; van Weert, S.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; van Schie, A.; Bloemena, E.; Leemans, C.R.; de Bree, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) in head and neck cancer is recently introduced as the staging technique of oral squamous cell carcinoma. We report the results of SNB in patients diagnosed with a T1-T2 oral squamous cell carcinoma and clinically negative (N0) neck in a single center. Methods A

  15. Refractory Research Group - U.S. DOE, Albany Research Center [Institution Profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, James P.

    2004-09-01

    The refractory research group at the Albany Research Center (ARC) has a long history of conducting materials research within the U.S. Bureau of Mines, and more recently, within the U.S. Dept. of Energy. When under the U.S. Bureau of Mines, research was driven by national needs to develop substitute materials and to conserve raw materials. This mission was accomplished by improving refractory material properties and/or by recycling refractories using critical and strategic materials. Currently, as a U.S. Dept of Energy Fossil Energy field site, research is driven primarily by the need to assist DOE in meeting its vision to develop economically and environmentally viable technologies for the production of electricity from fossil fuels. Research at ARC impacts this vision by: • Providing information on the performance characteristics of materials being specified for the current generation of power systems; • Developing cost-effective, high performance materials for inclusion in the next generation of fossil power systems; and • Solving environmental emission and waste problems related to fossil energy systems. A brief history of past refractory research within the U.S. Bureau of Mines, the current refractory research at ARC, and the equipment and capabilities used to conduct refractory research at ARC will be discussed.

  16. Difficulties of Turkish Science Gifted Teachers: Institutions of Science and Art Centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Küçük

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the fundamental problems of science gifted teachers (SG/Ts who teach Turkish gifted children (G/C and compare it with the international milieu. Turkish G/C are taught in different educational contexts named “Science and Art Centers” (SACs in which better opportunities are presented for them. In this project, field observations were done at three of the SACs in Turkey - in Bayburt, Sinop, and Trabzon - and, semi-structured interviews were conducted with each of ten SG/Ts who work in these centers by one of the researchers. Data analysis showed that SG/Ts do not perceive their duties holistically and feel they need help with measurement and assessment techniques, modern learning theories, planning and implementation of a research project, questioning techniques and using laboratory-based methods for G/C. Moving from the research data, it is suggested that in service education courses, which include the above issues, should be organized for the SG/Ts and they should be encouraged to use an action research approach in teaching G/C in SACs.

  17. Practical Education Support to Foster Engineers at Manufacturing and Engineering Design Center in Muroran Institute of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Toshiharu; Hanajima, Naohiko; Shimizu, Kazumichi; Satoh, Kohki

    To foster engineers with creative power, Muroran Institute of Technology established Manufacturing and Engineering Design Center (MEDeC) that concentrates on Monozukuri. MEDeC consists of three project groups : i) Education Support Group provides educational support for practical training classes on and off campus and PDCA (plan-do-check-action) -conscious engineering design education related to Monozukuri ; ii) Fundamental Manufacturing Research Group carries out nurture research into fundamental and innovative technology of machining and manufacturing, and iii) Regional Cooperation Group coordinates the activities in cooperation with bureau, schools and industries in and around Muroran City. MEDeC has a fully integrated collection of machine tools and hand tools for manufacturing, an atelier, a tatara workplace, implements for measurement and related equipment designed for practically teaching state-of-the-practice manufacturing methods.

  18. Vaginal Radical Trachelectomy for early stage cervical cancer. Results of the Danish National Single Center Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerberg, L; Høgdall, C; Loft, A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present and evaluate an unselected national single center strategy with fertility preserving trachelectomy in cervical cancer. In 2003 nationwide single-center referral of women for trachelectomies was agreed upon between all Danish departments performing cervical cancer surgery...... with the purpose of increasing volume, to increase surgical safety and facilitate follow-up. METHODS: Prospective data were recorded in the Danish Gynecological Cancer Database of all Vaginal Radical Trachelectomies (VRT) performed in Denmark between 2002 and 2013. Oncologic, fertility and obstetrical outcomes...... of 120 unselected consecutive VRTs were assessed. To obtain complete follow-up about fertility treatment, pregnancy and obstetric outcome the women filled out an electronic questionnaire. Median follow-up: 55.7 months. RESULTS: 85.8% of the patients had stage IB1 disease, 68.3% squamous cell carcinomas...

  19. Transoral resection of pharyngeal cancer: summary of a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, November 6-7, 2011, Arlington, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, David J; Ridge, John A; Brizel, David M; Holsinger, F Christopher; Haughey, Bruce H; O'Sullivan, Brian; Genden, Eric M; Beitler, Jonathan J; Weinstein, Gregory S; Quon, Harry; Chepeha, Douglas B; Ferris, Robert L; Weber, Randal S; Movsas, Benjamin; Waldron, John; Lowe, Val; Ramsey, Scott; Manola, Judith; Yueh, Bevan; Carey, Thomas E; Bekelman, Justin E; Konski, Andre A; Moore, Eric; Forastiere, Arlene; Schuller, David E; Lynn, Jean; Ullmann, Claudio Dansky

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances now permit resection of many pharyngeal tumors through the open mouth, an approach that can greatly reduce the morbidity of surgical exposure. These transoral techniques are being rapidly adopted by the surgical community and hold considerable promise. On November 6-7, 2011, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address how to further investigate the use of transoral surgery, both in the good prognosis human papillomavirus (HPV)-initiated oropharyngeal cancers, and in those with HPV-unrelated disease. The proceedings of this meeting are summarized.

  20. Frontiers in cancer epidemiology: a challenge to the research community from the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program at the National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Muin J; Freedman, Andrew N; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harvey, Chinonye E; Kaefer, Christie; Reid, Britt C; Rogers, Scott; Schully, Sheri D; Seminara, Daniela; Verma, Mukesh

    2012-07-01

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is developing scientific priorities for cancer epidemiology research in the next decade. We would like to engage the research community and other stakeholders in a planning effort that will include a workshop in December 2012 to help shape new foci for cancer epidemiology research. To facilitate the process of defining the future of cancer epidemiology, we invite the research community to join in an ongoing web-based conversation at http://blog-epi.grants.cancer.gov/ to develop priorities and the next generation of high-impact studies.

  1. Heat pump centered integrated community energy systems: system development. Georgia Institute of Technology final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, D.W.; Trammell, B.C.; Dixit, B.S.; McCurry, D.C.; Rindt, B.A.

    1979-12-01

    Heat Pump Centered-Integrated Community Energy Systems (HP-ICES) show the promise of utilizing low-grade thermal energy for low-quality energy requirements such as space heating and cooling. The Heat Pump - Wastewater Heat Recovery (HP-WHR) scheme is one approach to an HP-ICES that proposes to reclaim low-grade thermal energy from a community's wastewater effluent. This report develops the concept of an HP-WHR system, evaluates the potential performance and economics of such a system, and examines the potential for application. A thermodynamic performance analysis of a hypothetical system projects an overall system Coefficient of Performance (C.O.P.) of from 2.181 to 2.264 for waste-water temperatures varying from 50/sup 0/F to 80/sup 0/F. Primary energy source savings from the nationwide implementation of this system is projected to be 6.0 QUADS-fuel oil, or 8.5 QUADS - natural gas, or 29.7 QUADS - coal for the period 1980 to 2000, depending upon the type and mix of conventional space conditioning systems which could be displaced with the HP-WHR system. Site-specific HP-WHR system designs are presented for two application communities in Georgia. Performance analyses for these systems project annual cycle system C.O.P.'s of 2.049 and 2.519. Economic analysis on the basis of a life cycle cost comparison shows one site-specific system design to be cost competitive in the immediate market with conventional residential and light commercial HVAC systems. The second site-specific system design is shown through a similar economic analysis to be more costly than conventional systems due mainly to the current low energy costs for natural gas. It is anticipated that, as energy costs escalate, this HP-WHR system will also approach the threshold of economic viability.

  2. Hepatobilio-pancreatic robotic surgery: initial experience from a single center institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Yolanda; Vicente, Emilio; Ielpo, Benedetto; Duran, Hipolito; Diaz, Eduardo; Fabra, Isabel; Malave, Luis; Ferri, Valentina; Plaza, Carlos; Lindemann, Jan Lammel; D'Andrea, Vito; Caruso, Riccardo

    2016-12-30

    The use of robotic surgery in the hepatobilio-pancreatic (HBP) field is still limited. Our aim is to present our early experience of robotic liver resection. A retrospective review of robotic pancreatic and liver resection was performed at Sanchinarro University hospital from October 2010 to April 2016. Since the beginning of the robotic program in our center, 22 hepatic procedures and 45 pancreatic robotic procedures have been performed. Of the 21 patients subjected to liver resection, 13 (65%) were for malignancy. There were two left hepatectomies, one right hepatectomy, one associated liver partition and portal vein ligation staged procedure (both steps by robotic approach), three bisegmentectomies and three segmentectomies, eight wedge resections, and three pericystectomies. The mean operating time was 282 min. The overall conversion rate and postoperative complication rate were 4.7 and 19%, respectively. The mean length of hospital stay was 13.4 days (range 4-64 days). Of the 45 patients subjected to pancreatic resection, 22 were male and 23 female. The average age of all patients was 62 years (range 31-82 years). The mean operating room (OR) time was 370 min (120-780 min). Among the procedures performed were 15 pancreatico-duodenectomies, 19 distal pancreatectomies, and 11 enucleations. All procedures in the HBP area were R0. Our early experience shows that robotic surgery is a safe and feasible procedure in the HBP area. The complication and mortality rates are comparable to those of open surgery, but with the advantages of minimally invasive surgery.

  3. Preliminary Analysis of Difficulty of Importing Pattern-Based Concepts into the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhe; Geller, James

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of biomedical ontologies is difficult. We have developed a pattern-based method for dealing with the problem of identifying missing concepts in the National Cancer Institute thesaurus (NCIt). Specifically, we are mining patterns connecting NCIt concepts with concepts in other ontologies to identify candidate missing concepts. However, the final decision about a concept insertion is always up to a human ontology curator. In this paper, we are estimating the difficulty of this task for a domain expert by counting possible choices for a pattern-based insertion. We conclude that even with support of our mining algorithm, the insertion task is challenging.

  4. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Samuels, Noah

    2015-10-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This change of understanding in supportive and palliative care for patients with lung cancer can be further advanced through the understanding that there is a need to address bio-psycho-spiritual concerns and health belief models, within the context of the family socio-cultural environment, for both patients and their caregivers. There is also a need to address the psycho-spiritual effects of cancer on those health care professionals treating patients with lung cancer, in order to reduce compassion fatigue and increase resilience. Future directions for supportive care for patients with lung cancer may include the development of a patient-tailored treatment approach, assisted by the integration of a multidisciplinary team of health care providers and evidence-based complementary medicine practices, within conventional supportive care practice.

  5. Deutsches SOFIA Institut (DSI) at the SOFIA Science Center: engineering and scientific contributions to the airborne observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jürgen; Colditz, Sebastian; Lachenmann, Michael; Pfüller, Enrico; Schindler, Karsten; Wiedemann, Manuel; Zinnecker, Hans; Krabbe, Alfred

    2016-09-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a 2.5-meter infrared telescope built into a Boeing 747SP. In 2014 SOFIA reached its "Full Operational Capability" milestone and nowadays takes off about three times a week to observe the infrared sky from altitudes above most of the atmosphere's water vapor content. Despite reaching this major milestone, efforts to improve the observatory's performance are continuing in many areas. The team of the Deutsches SOFIA Institut, DSI (German SOFIA Institute) at the SOFIA Science Center in Moffett Field, CA works in several engineering areas to improve the observatory's performance and its efficiency. DSI supports the allocation process of SOFIA's observation time for guest observers, provides and supports two facility science instruments and conducts an observing program of stellar occultations by small objects of the solar system. This paper summarizes results and ongoing work on a spare secondary mirror made of aluminum, the new and improved Focal Plane Imager (FPI+) that has become a facility science instrument, the Field-Imaging Far-Infrared Line Spectrometer (FIFI-LS), new cameras and optics for the Fine Field and Wide Field Imagers (FFI+ and WFI+), real-time astrometric solution of star field images, ground support equipment and astronomical observations.

  6. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal test block (TER) as the Pilot was operated under forced oxidation conditions. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued as investigations into various activated carbons, metal amalgams, and impinger capture solutions were conducted. Following these studies, a brief test of the Pilot High Velocity FGD configuration (PHV) was conducted. This test block will be continued at the end of the month after the Fall outage is completed. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. During this month`s outage, the inlet and outlet damper plates were sealed to isolate the SCR system from flue gas. Also, the internals of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE) and catalyst reactor tower were inspected and cleaned so that the system could be available for future test activities. Monthly inspections of all SCR system equipment placed in this cold-standby mode, as well as the fire safety systems in the SCR building, will continue to be conducted by the ECTC maintenance department and will include manual rotation of the booster fan.

  7. Male breast cancer: a report of 127 cases at a Moroccan institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijami Fouad

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male breast cancer (MBC is a rare disease representing less than 1% of all malignancies in men and only 1% of all incident breast cancers. Our study details clinico-pathological features, treatments and prognostic factors in a large Moroccan cohort. Findings One hundred and twenty-seven patients were collected from 1985 to 2007 at the National Institute of Oncology in Rabat, Morocco. Median age was 62 years and median time for consultation 28 months. The main clinical complaint was a mass beneath the areola in 93, 5% of the cases. Most patients have an advanced disease. Ninety-one percent of tumors were ductal carcinomas. Management consisted especially of radical mastectomy; followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and hormonal therapy with or without chemotherapy. The median of follow-up was 30 months. The evolution has been characterized by local recurrence; in twenty two cases (17% of all patients. Metastasis occurred in 41 cases (32% of all patients. The site of metastasis was the bone in twenty cases; lung in twelve cases; liver in seven case; liver and skin in one case and pleura and skin in one case. Conclusion Male breast cancer has many similarities to breast cancer in women, but there are distinct features that should be appreciated. Future research for better understanding of this disease at national or international level are needed to improve the management and prognosis of male patients.

  8. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommendations and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Holly R; Bergkvist, Leif; Wolk, Alicja

    2016-06-01

    The World Cancer Research Fund/American Association for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) has published eight nutrition-related recommendations for the prevention of cancer. However, few prospective studies have examined these recommendations by breast cancer hormone receptor subtype and only one case-control study has included the dietary supplements recommendation in their evaluation. We investigated whether adherence to the WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations was associated with breast cancer incidence, overall and by hormone receptor subtype, in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Among 31,514 primarily postmenopausal women diet and lifestyle factors were assessed with a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. A score was constructed based on adherence to the recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, energy density, plant foods, animal foods, alcoholic drinks and dietary supplements (score range 0-7). Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). During 15 years of follow-up 1,388 cases of breast cancer were identified. Women who met six to seven recommendations had a 51% decreased risk of breast cancer compared to women meeting only zero to two recommendations (95% CI = 0.35-0.70). The association between each additional recommendation met and breast cancer risk was strongest for the ER-positive/PR-positive subtype (HR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.79-0.94), while for the ER-negative/PR-negative subtype the individual recommendations regarding plant and animal foods were most strongly associated with reduced risk. Our findings support that adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations reduces breast cancer risk in a population of primarily postmenopausal women. Promoting these recommendations to the public could help reduce breast cancer incidence.

  9. State Institution "National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" - research activities and scientific advance in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyka, D; Sushko, V; Chumak, A; Buzunov, V; Talko, V; Yanovych, L

    2014-09-01

    Research activities and scientific advance achieved in 2013 at the State Institution "National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" (NRCRM) concerning medical problems of the Chornobyl disaster, radiation medicine, radiobiology, radiation hygiene and epidemiology in collaboration with the WHO network of medical preparedness and assistance in radiation accidents are outlined in the annual report. Key points include the research results of XRCC1 and XPD gene polymorphism in thyroid cancer patients, CD38 gene GG genotype as a risk factor for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, frequency of 185delAG and 5382insC mutations in BRCA1 gene in women with breast cancer, cognitive function and TERF1, TERF2, TERT gene expression both with telomere length in human under the low dose radiation exposure. The "source-scattering/shielding structures- man" models for calculation of partial dose values to the eye lens and new methods for radiation risk assessment were developed and adapted. Radiation risks of leukemia including chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the cohort of liquidators were published according to the "case-control" study results after 20 years of survey. Increase of non-tumor morbidity in liquidators during the 1988-2011 with the maximum level 12-21 years upon irradiation was found. Incidence in evacuees appeared being of two-peak pattern i.e. in the first years after the accident and 12 years later. Experimental studies have concerned the impact of radio-modifiers on cellular systems, reproductive function in the population, features of the child nutrition in radiation contamination area were studied. Report also shows the results of scientific and organizational, medical and preventive work, staff training, and implementation of innovations. The NRCRM Annual Report was approved at the Scientific Council meeting of NAMS on March 3, 2014.

  10. Treatment Outcomes and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A Report from Cancer Institute of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzania, Mehrzad; Safaee, Seyed Reza; Shahi, Farhad; Jahanzad, Issa; Zahedi, Ghazal; Mehdizadeh, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) have a more aggressive course and are associated with poorer prognosis in comparison with other subtypes of breast cancer. One of the most common subtypes of TNBC is basal-like. The aim of this study was to investigate clinicopathological characteristics and clinical course of TNBC in Iranian women and compare them with other studies. Subjects and Methods: Between March 2009 and February 2011, patients with breast cancer in Cancer Institute of Iran were selected and then followed-up for 2 years. Paraffin-embedded tumor block of all TNBC patients were evaluated for CK5/6 and EGFR using IHC method. Results: Among 267 breast cancer patients, 60 cases with TNBC were identified (22.5%), 31 patients (51.7%) had basal-like and 29 patients (48.3%) had non-basal-like tumors. The median age of participants with TNBC was 49.6 years. Among our patients, 70% had positive lymph nodes.93.4% of all patients at the time of diagnosis were stage II or III and tumor size was at least 3 centimeters. No grade 1 TNBC was found in this study. During the follow-up period, there were 26 recurrences and 7 deaths. Conclusion: The percentage of basal-like subtype among Iranian women with TNBC was lower compared to other studies, while bone metastases, clinical stage, lymph node involvement and tumor size were higher. Clinicopathological findings in basal and non-basal-like subgroups were not different, but the probability of lymph node involvement was more common in patients who were EGFR positive.

  11. Treatment Outcomes and Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A Report from Cancer Institute of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzania, Mehrzad; Safaee, Seyed Reza; Shahi, Farhad; Jahanzad, Issa; Zahedi, Ghazal; Mehdizadeh, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) have a more aggressive course and are associated with poorer prognosis in comparison with other subtypes of breast cancer. One of the most common subtypes of TNBC is basal-like. The aim of this study was to investigate clinicopathological characteristics and clinical course of TNBC in Iranian women and compare them with other studies. Subjects and Methods: Between March 2009 and February 2011, patients with breast cancer in Cancer Institute of Iran were selected and then followed-up for 2 years. Paraffin-embedded tumor block of all TNBC patients were evaluated for CK5/6 and EGFR using IHC method. Results: Among 267 breast cancer patients, 60 cases with TNBC were identified (22.5%), 31 patients (51.7%) had basal-like and 29 patients (48.3%) had non-basal-like tumors. The median age of participants with TNBC was 49.6 years. Among our patients, 70% had positive lymph nodes.93.4% of all patients at the time of diagnosis were stage II or III and tumor size was at least 3 centimeters. No grade 1 TNBC was found in this study. During the follow-up period, there were 26 recurrences and 7 deaths. Conclusion: The percentage of basal-like subtype among Iranian women with TNBC was lower compared to other studies, while bone metastases, clinical stage, lymph node involvement and tumor size were higher. Clinicopathological findings in basal and non-basal-like subgroups were not different, but the probability of lymph node involvement was more common in patients who were EGFR positive. PMID:28286613

  12. Patient and Other Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Funded Studies of Patients with Kidney Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukor, Daniel; Cohen, Lewis M; Cope, Elizabeth L; Ghahramani, Nasrollah; Hedayati, S Susan; Hynes, Denise M; Shah, Vallabh O; Tentori, Francesca; Unruh, Mark; Bobelu, Jeanette; Cohen, Scott; Dember, Laura M; Faber, Thomas; Fischer, Michael J; Gallardo, Rani; Germain, Michael J; Ghahate, Donica; Grote, Nancy; Hartwell, Lori; Heagerty, Patrick; Kimmel, Paul L; Kutner, Nancy; Lawson, Susan; Marr, Lisa; Nelson, Robert G; Porter, Anna C; Sandy, Phillip; Struminger, Bruce B; Subramanian, Lalita; Weisbord, Steve; Young, Bessie; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2016-09-07

    Including target populations in the design and implementation of research trials has been one response to the growing health disparities endemic to our health care system, as well as an aid to study generalizability. One type of community-based participatory research is "Patient Centered-Research", in which patient perspectives on the germane research questions and methodologies are incorporated into the study. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) has mandated that meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement be incorporated into all applications. As of March 2015, PCORI funded seven clinically-focused studies of patients with kidney disease. The goal of this paper is to synthesize the experiences of these studies to gain an understanding of how meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement can occur in clinical research of kidney diseases, and what the key barriers are to its implementation. Our collective experience suggests that successful implementation of a patient- and stakeholder-engaged research paradigm involves: (1) defining the roles and process for the incorporation of input; (2) identifying the particular patients and other stakeholders; (3) engaging patients and other stakeholders so they appreciate the value of their own participation and have personal investment in the research process; and (4) overcoming barriers and challenges that arise and threaten the productivity of the collaboration. It is our hope that the experiences of these studies will further interest and capacity for incorporating patient and stakeholder perspectives in research of kidney diseases.

  13. Using the accreditation journey to achieve global impact: UHN's experience at the Kuwait Cancer Control Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladha-Waljee, Nafeesa; McAteer, Stephen; Nickerson, Veronica; Khalfan, Adil

    2014-01-01

    On January 1, 2011, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre (PM) - University Health Network (UHN) began a five-year partnership agreement with the Kuwait Ministry of Health's Kuwait Cancer Control Center (KCCC) to enhance cancer care services. Over the course of the partnership, opportunities for improvement were identified by UHN experts in order to accelerate KCCC's development toward subspecialty cancer care. Many of these opportunities involved building a robust infrastructure to support foundational hospital operation processes and procedures. Harnessing UHN's own successes in accreditation, the partnership took advantage of the national accreditation mandate in Kuwait to initiate a quality program and drive clinical improvement at KCCC. This resulted in improved staff engagement, better awareness and alignment of administration with clinical management and a stronger patient safety culture. This article discusses the successes and lessons learned at KCCC that may provide insight to healthcare providers implementing Accreditation Canada International's accreditation framework in other countries and cultures.

  14. Bariatric Surgery and Liver Cancer in a Consortium of Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baiyu; Yang, Hannah P; Ward, Kristy K; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; McGlynn, Katherine A

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is implicated as an important factor in the rising incidence of liver cancer in the USA. Bariatric surgery is increasingly used for treating morbid obesity and comorbidities. Using administrative data from UHC, a consortium of academic medical centers in the USA, we compared the prevalence of liver cancer among admissions with and without a history of bariatric surgery within a 3-year period. Admissions with a history of bariatric surgery had a 61 % lower prevalence of liver cancer compared to those without a history of bariatric surgery (prevalence ratio 0.39, 95 % confidence interval 0.35-0.44), and these inverse associations persisted within strata of sex, race, and ethnicity. This hospital administrative record-based analysis suggests that bariatric surgery could play a role in liver cancer prevention.

  15. Space weather monitoring by ground-based means carried out in Polar Geophysical Center at Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzhura, Alexander

    A real-time information on geophysical processes in polar regions is very important for goals of Space Weather monitoring by the ground-based means. The modern communication systems and computer technology makes it possible to collect and process the data from remote sites without significant delays. A new acquisition equipment based on microprocessor modules and reliable in hush climatic conditions was deployed at the Roshydromet networks of geophysical observations in Arctic and is deployed at observatories in Antarctic. A contemporary system for on-line collecting and transmitting the geophysical data from the Arctic and Antarctic stations to AARI has been realized and the Polar Geophysical Center (PGC) arranged at AARI ensures the near-real time processing and analyzing the geophysical information from 11 stations in Arctic and 5 stations in Antarctic. The space weather monitoring by the ground based means is one of the main tasks standing before the Polar Geophysical Center. As studies by Troshichev and Janzhura, [2012] showed, the PC index characterizing the polar cap magnetic activity appeared to be an adequate indicator of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere and the energy that is accumulating in the magnetosphere. A great advantage of the PC index application over other methods based on satellite data is a permanent on-line availability of information about magnetic activity in both northern and southern polar caps. A special procedure agreed between Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) and Space Institute of the Danish Technical University (DTUSpace) ensures calculation of the unified PC index in quasi-real time by magnetic data from the Thule and Vostok stations (see public site: http://pc-index.org). The method for estimation of AL and Dst indices (as indicators of state of the disturbed magnetosphere) based on data on foregoing PC indices has been elaborated and testified in the Polar Geophysical Center. It is

  16. De-Risking Immunotherapy: Report of a Consensus Workshop of the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellman, Ira; Hubbard-Lucey, Vanessa M; Tontonoz, Matthew J; Kalos, Michael D; Chen, Daniel S; Allison, James P; Drake, Charles G; Levitsky, Hy; Lonberg, Nils; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Fearon, Douglas T; Wherry, E John; Lowy, Israel; Vonderheide, Robert H; Hwu, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    With the recent FDA approvals of pembrolizumab and nivolumab, and a host of additional immunomodulatory agents entering clinical development each year, the field of cancer immunotherapy is changing rapidly. Strategies that can assist researchers in choosing the most promising drugs and drug combinations to move forward through clinical development are badly needed in order to reduce the likelihood of late-stage clinical trial failures. On October 5, 2014, the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute, a collaborative think tank composed of stakeholders from academia, industry, regulatory agencies, and patient interest groups, met to discuss strategies for de-risking immunotherapy development, with a focus on integrating preclinical and clinical studies, and conducting smarter early-phase trials, particularly for combination therapies. Several recommendations were made, including making better use of clinical data to inform preclinical research, obtaining adequate tissues for biomarker studies, and choosing appropriate clinical trial endpoints to identify promising drug candidates and combinations in nonrandomized early-phase trials.

  17. Health beliefs related to breast cancer screening behaviours in women who applied to cancer early detection center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Serpil Talas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting women in Turkey. The early detection methods for breast cancer have been associated with health belief variables. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine women's health beliefs related to breast cancer screening behaviours. Methods: This study was designed as descriptive and cross-sectional survey and was performed on 344 women who applied the Nigde Cancer Early Diagnosis, Screening and Education Center between May and October 2009. The data were collected using a questionnaire which consists of socio-demographic characteristics and breast cancer risk factors and Health Belief Model Scale. Data analysis was performed using frequency and Mann-Whitney U Test. All values of p0.05. According to study results, the rate of regular BSE performance rate for women was found low. Therefore, KETEM was planned to the training programs related to breast cancer screening methods. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(3.000: 265-271

  18. "US-JAPAN CONFERENCE: INFLAMMATION, DIABETES AND CANCER" held at the Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte, CA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko; Lin, Ren-Jang; Jove, Richard

    2011-12-01

    The conference was held to facilitate research collaborations between US and Japan scientists, and to commemorate the rich history of the Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope (COH) research contributed by many Japanese doctors. Most noticeable is Dr. Ryojun Kinoshita, an internationally renowned oncologist who built the first research team at the campus of COH Medical Center in 1952. The conference received enthusiastic support from Junichi Ihara, Consul General of Japan, Los Angeles. During the two day conference, seven scientists from Japan, six scientists from Southern California, and six scientists from COH presented various aspects of cancer and diabetes research which included nuclear receptor regulation, DNA base and chromatin modifications, cancer glycosylation, circadian clock, cell polarity, tumorigenesis, micro and small RNA therapies, genomics, epigenetics, and signaling.

  19. Lower Breast Cancer Risk among Women following the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research Lifestyle Recommendations: EpiGEICAM Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Castelló

    Full Text Available According to the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the "American Institute of Cancer Research" (WCRF/AICR one in four cancer cases could be prevented through a healthy diet, weight control and physical activity.To explore the association between the WCRF/AICR recommendations and risk of breast cancer.During the period 2006 to 2011 we recruited 973 incident cases of breast cancer and 973 controls from 17 Spanish Regions. We constructed a score based on 9 of the WCRF/AICR recommendations for cancer prevention:: 1Maintain adequate body weight; 2Be physically active; 3Limit the intake of high density foods; 4Eat mostly plant foods; 5Limit the intake of animal foods; 6Limit alcohol intake; 7Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; 8Meet nutritional needs through diet; S1Breastfeed infants exclusively up to 6 months. We explored its association with BC by menopausal status and by intrinsic tumor subtypes (ER+/PR+ & HER2-; HER2+; ER&PR-&HER2- using conditional and multinomial logistic models respectively.Our results point to a linear association between the degree of noncompliance and breast cancer risk. Taking women who met 6 or more recommendations as reference, those meeting less than 3 showed a three-fold excess risk (OR=2.98(CI95%:1.59-5.59, especially for postmenopausal women (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.24;10.47 and ER+/PR+&HER2- (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.84;7.05 and HER2+ (OR=4.23(CI95%:1.66;10.78 tumors. Noncompliance of recommendations regarding the consumption of foods and drinks that promote weight gain in premenopausal women (OR=2.24(CI95%:1.18;4.28; p for interaction=0.014 and triple negative tumors (OR=2.93(CI95%:1.12-7.63; the intake of plant foods in postmenopausal women (OR=2.35(CI95%:1.24;4.44 and triple negative tumors (OR=3.48(CI95%:1.46-8.31; and the alcohol consumption in ER+/PR+&HER2- tumors (OR=1.52 (CI95%:1.06-2.19 showed the strongest associations.Breast cancer prevention might be possible by following the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the

  20. Severe punishment of children by staff in Romanian placement centers for school-aged children: effects of child and institutional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Adrian V; Stativa, Ecaterina; Pennings, Jacquelyn S; Cross, David R; Ekas, Naomi; Purvis, Karyn B; Parris, Sheri R

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether children's characteristics and/or institutional characteristics were predictors of severe punishments (including beatings) and/or frequency of punishments that children received from staff in Romanian institutions. The data was hierarchical with institutionalized children (N=1391) nested within 44 institutions, and the measurement of punishments by the staff and frequency of punishments had a binary distribution. Thus, multilevel logistic regression models were used to examine the effects of individual and institutional level variables on reported punishments and to account for the clustering of the children within institutions. Two general patterns of results emerged. First, regarding individual level variables, it was found that: (1) amount of time spent by children in their current institutions had a significant effect on the probability of being punished by staff and the frequency of this punishment; (2) the probability of being punished was higher for boys than for girls; and (3) having no siblings in the institution increased the odds of being punished several times. Second, regarding institutional level variables: (4) being in placement centers for school-aged children with a traditional type of institutional organization increased the odds of severe punishment compared to a familial/mixed type. The results of the present study highlight the importance of understanding the consequences of institutionalization in a broader way, where children not only experienced early severe psychosocial deprivation as documented in other studies, but also high levels of severe punishments administered by institutional staff.

  1. Gene-environment interactions in cancer epidemiology: a National Cancer Institute Think Tank report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Carolyn M; Mechanic, Leah E; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Kraft, Peter; Gillanders, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Cancer risk is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common (minor allele frequency [MAF] > 0.05) and less common (0.01 Think Tank" on January 10-11, 2012. The objective of the Think Tank was to facilitate discussions on (1) the state of the science, (2) the goals of G × E interaction studies in cancer epidemiology, and (3) opportunities for developing novel study designs and analysis tools. This report summarizes the Think Tank discussion, with a focus on contemporary approaches to the analysis of G × E interactions. Selecting the appropriate methods requires first identifying the relevant scientific question and rationale, with an important distinction made between analyses aiming to characterize the joint effects of putative or established genetic and environmental factors and analyses aiming to discover novel risk factors or novel interaction effects. Other discussion items include measurement error, statistical power, significance, and replication. Additional designs, exposure assessments, and analytical approaches need to be considered as we move from the current small number of success stories to a fuller understanding of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors.

  2. A Knowledge-Based Approach to Improving and Homogenizing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning Quality Among Treatment Centers: An Example Application to Prostate Cancer Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, David [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Lo, Joseph [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiology and Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Das, Shiva K., E-mail: shiva.das@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning can have wide variation among different treatment centers. We propose a system to leverage the IMRT planning experience of larger institutions to automatically create high-quality plans for outside clinics. We explore feasibility by generating plans for patient datasets from an outside institution by adapting plans from our institution. Methods and Materials: A knowledge database was created from 132 IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer at our institution. The outside institution, a community hospital, provided the datasets for 55 prostate cancer cases, including their original treatment plans. For each “query” case from the outside institution, a similar “match” case was identified in the knowledge database, and the match case’s plan parameters were then adapted and optimized to the query case by use of a semiautomated approach that required no expert planning knowledge. The plans generated with this knowledge-based approach were compared with the original treatment plans at several dose cutpoints. Results: Compared with the original plan, the knowledge-based plan had a significantly more homogeneous dose to the planning target volume and a significantly lower maximum dose. The volumes of the rectum, bladder, and femoral heads above all cutpoints were nominally lower for the knowledge-based plan; the reductions were significantly lower for the rectum. In 40% of cases, the knowledge-based plan had overall superior (lower) dose–volume histograms for rectum and bladder; in 54% of cases, the comparison was equivocal; in 6% of cases, the knowledge-based plan was inferior for both bladder and rectum. Conclusions: Knowledge-based planning was superior or equivalent to the original plan in 95% of cases. The knowledge-based approach shows promise for homogenizing plan quality by transferring planning expertise from more experienced to less experienced institutions.

  3. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines and risk of death in Europe : results from the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Romaguera, Dora; Peeters, Petra H.; van Gils, Carla H.; Chan, Doris S. M.; Romieu, Isabelle; Freisling, Heinz; Ferrari, Pietro; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Fagherazzi, Guy; Dartois, Laureen; Li, Kuanrong; Tikk, Kaja; Bergmann, Manuela M.; Boeing, Heiner; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Dahm, Christina C.; Luisa Redondo, Maria; Agudo, Antonio; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Amiano, Pilar; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J.; Crowe, Francesca; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Orfanos, Philippos; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Ros, Martine M.; May, Anne; Wirfalt, Elisabet; Sonestedt, Emily; Johansson, Ingegerd; Hallmans, Goeran; Lund, Eiliv; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Parr, Christine L.; Riboli, Elio; Norat, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued recommendations on diet, physical activity, and weight management for cancer prevention on the basis of the most comprehensive collection of available evidence. Objective: We inves

  4. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines and risk of death in Europe: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort study1,4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergnaud, A.C.; Romaguera, D.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Gils, C.H. van; Chan, D.S.; Romieu, I.; Freisling, H.; Ferrari, P.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Fagherazzi, G.; Dartois, L.; Li, K.; Tikk, K.; Bergmann, M.M.; Boeing, H.; Tjonneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Overvad, K.; Dahm, C.C.; Redondo, M.L.; Agudo, A.; Sanchez, M.J.; Amiano, P.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Ardanaz, E.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.J.; Crowe, F.; Trichopoulou, A.; Orfanos, P.; Trichopoulos, D.; Masala, G.; Sieri, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Ros, M.M.; May, A.; Wirfalt, E.; Sonestedt, E.; Johansson, I.; Hallmans, G.; Lund, E.; Weiderpass, E.; Parr, C.L.; Riboli, E.; Norat, T.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued recommendations on diet, physical activity, and weight management for cancer prevention on the basis of the most comprehensive collection of available evidence. OBJECTIVE: We inves

  5. Altered plasma apolipoprotein modifications in patients with pancreatic cancer: protein characterization and multi-institutional validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Honda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among the more common human malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreas has the worst prognosis. The poor outcome seems to be attributable to difficulty in early detection. METHODS: We compared the plasma protein profiles of 112 pancreatic cancer patients with those of 103 sex- and age-matched healthy controls (Cohort 1 using a newly developed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (oMALDI QqTOF (quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS system. RESULTS: We found that hemi-truncated apolipoprotein AII dimer (ApoAII-2; 17252 m/z, unglycosylated apolipoprotein CIII (ApoCIII-0; 8766 m/z, and their summed value were significantly decreased in the pancreatic cancer patients [P = 1.36×10(-21, P = 4.35×10(-14, and P = 1.83×10(-24 (Mann-Whitney U-test; area-under-curve values of 0.877, 0.798, and 0.903, respectively]. The significance was further validated in a total of 1099 plasma/serum samples, consisting of 2 retrospective cohorts [Cohort 2 (n = 103 and Cohort 3 (n = 163] and a prospective cohort [Cohort 4 (n = 833] collected from 8 medical institutions in Japan and Germany. CONCLUSIONS: We have constructed a robust quantitative MS profiling system and used it to validate alterations of modified apolipoproteins in multiple cohorts of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  6. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer.

  7. Incidence of postpartum post-cesarean hysterectomy at the Institute of gynecology and obstetrics, Clinical center of Serbia, Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparić Radmila

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Postpartum hysterectomy means hysterectomy at least 6 weeks after delivery or cesarean section. It is usually performed in life-threatening situations. Incidence of postpartum hysterectomy varies from 0.02% to 0.3% of total number of deliveries. Objective. The aim of this study was to show and compare the incidence of postpartum hysterectomy after the cesarean section at the Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Clinical Center of Serbia. We compared two five-year periods: the first period 1987-1982 and the second 2000-2004. Method. The retrospective study analyzed all patients treated at the Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics who had had hysterectomy until six weeks after vaginal delivery or cesarean section. We analyzed the number of deliveries and the number of postpartum hysterectomies. Results. There were 50,467 deliveries (3,542 cesarean sections and 91 postpartum hysterectomies (70 or 76.92% after cesarean section in the first period. In the second period, there were 34,035 deliveries (7,105 cesarean sections and 64 hysterectomies (39 or 60.94 % after cesarean section. The overall incidence of postpartum hysterectomy was 1.98/1,000 in the first and 1.88/1,000 deliveries in the second period. The incidence of post-cesarean hysterectomy decreased from 19.76/1,000 in the first period to 5.49/1,000 in the second period. Conclusion. It is crucial for each obstetrician to cautiously distinguish and reach an appropriate decision about the exact indications for cesarean delivery having in mind growing incidence of cesarean sections, which is the main risk factor for puerperal morbidity and mortality. .

  8. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline.

  9. Akhiezer Institute for Theoretical Physics at the National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology', National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine: origins, events, facts, comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan'shina, A. V.

    2013-09-01

    The titled institute is the only historical example in Ukraine of a scientific school maintaining research continuity for over 80 years already. Today, it seems appropriate to remember the origins, to reflect on where this longevity came from, and to take a look at numerous behind-the-scenes legends and fiction stories that have grown around the institute.

  10. The John Milner Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research Practicum | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health and the Department of Nutrition at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center are offering a one-week educational opportunity in Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research for individuals with a sustained commitment to nutrition and health promotion. |

  11. Formative and summative evaluation efforts for the Teacher Enhancement Institute conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center, summer 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Randal D.

    1994-01-01

    The Teacher Enhancement Institute (TEI) at NASA Langley Research Center was developed in response to Executive Order 12821 which mandates national laboratories to 'assist in the mathematics and science education of our Nation's students, teachers, parents, and the public by establishing programs at their agency to provide for training elementary and secondary school teachers to improve their knowledge of mathematics and science. Such programs, to the maximum extent possible, shall involve partnerships with universities, state and local elementary and secondary school authorities, corporations and community based organizations'. The faculty worked closely with one another and the invited speakers to insure that the sessions supported the objectives. Speakers were informed of the objectives and given guidance concerning form and function for the session. Faculty members monitored sessions to assist speakers and to provide a quality control function. Faculty provided feedback to speakers concerning general objective accomplishment. Participant comments were also provided when applicable. Post TEI surveys asked for specific comments about each TEI session. During the second of the two, two week institutes, daily critiques were provided to the participants for their reflection. This seemed to provide much improved feedback to speakers and faculty because the sessions were fresh in each participant's mind. Between sessions one and two, some changes were made to the program as a result of the formative evaluation process. Those changes, though, were minor in nature and comprised what may be called 'fine tuning' a well conceived and implemented program. After the objectives were written, an assessment instrument was developed to test the accomplishment of the objectives. This instrument was actually two surveys, one given before the TEI and one given after the TEI. In using such a series, it was expected that changes in the participants induced by attendance at TEI may be

  12. Partial Cystectomy after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Contemporary Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Bazzi, Wassim M.; Kopp, Ryan P.; Donahue, Timothy F.; Bernstein, Melanie; Russo, Paul; Bochner, Bernard H.; Donat, Sherri M.; Dalbagni, Guido; Herr, Harry W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To report our contemporary experience with partial cystectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods. Retrospective review of patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and partial cystectomy for urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 1995 to 2013. Log-rank test and Cox regression models were used to analyze variables possibly associated with recurrence-free, advanced recurrence-free (free from recurrence beyond sa...

  13. Immunotherapy of head and neck cancer: Emerging clinical trials from a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Planning Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Julie E; Cohen, Ezra; Ferris, Robert L; Adelstein, David J; Brizel, David M; Ridge, John A; O'Sullivan, Brian; Burtness, Barbara A; Butterfield, Lisa H; Carson, William E; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Gajewski, Thomas F; Gillison, Maura L; Hodge, James W; Le, Quynh-Thu; Raben, David; Strome, Scott E; Lynn, Jean; Malik, Shakun

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances have permitted successful therapeutic targeting of the immune system in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). These new immunotherapeutic targets and agents are being rapidly adopted by the oncologic community and hold considerable promise. The National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address the issue of how to further investigate the use of immunotherapy in patients with HNSCC. The goals of the meeting were to consider phase 2 or 3 trial designs primarily in 3 different patient populations: those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-initiated oropharyngeal cancers; those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-negative HNSCC; and those with recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. In addition, a separate committee was formed to develop integrative biomarkers for the clinical trials. The meeting started with an overview of key immune components and principles related to HNSCC, including immunosurveillance and immune escape. Four clinical trial concepts were developed at the meeting integrating different immunotherapies with existing standards of care. These designs were presented for implementation by the head and neck committees of the National Cancer Institute-funded National Clinical Trials Network. This article summarizes the proceedings of this Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, the purpose of which was to facilitate the rigorous development and design of randomized phase 2 and 3 immunotherapeutic trials in patients with HNSCC. Although reviews usually are published immediately after the meeting is held, this report is unique because there are now tangible clinical trial designs that have been funded and put into practice and the studies are being activated to accrual. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  14. Clinical Features of Male Breast Cancer: Experiences from Seven Institutions Over 20 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Hyung; Ha, Kyung Sun; Jung, Yun Hwa; Won, Hye Sung; An, Ho Jung; Lee, Guk Jin; Kang, Donghoon; Park, Ji Chan; Park, Sarah; Byun, Jae Ho; Suh, Young Jin; Kim, Jeong Soo; Park, Woo Chan; Jung, Sang Seol; Park, Il Young; Chung, Su-Mi; Woo, In Sook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer treatment has progressed significantly over the past 20 years. However, knowledge regarding male breast cancer (MBC) is sparse because of its rarity. This study is an investigation of the clinicopathologic features, treatments, and clinical outcomes of MBC. Materials and Methods Clinical records of 59 MBC patients diagnosed during 1995-2014 from seven institutions in Korea were reviewed retrospectively. Results Over a 20-year period, MBC patients accounted for 0.98% among total breast cancer patients, and increased every 5 years. The median age of MBC patientswas 66 years (range, 24 to 87 years). Forty-three patients (73%) complained of a palpable breast mass initially. The median symptom duration was 5 months (range, 1 to 36 months). Mastectomy was performed in 96% of the patients. The most frequent histology was infiltrating ductal carcinoma (75%). Ninety-one percent of tumors (38/43) were estrogen receptor–positive, and 28% (11/40) showed epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) overexpression. After curative surgery, 42% of patients (19/45) received adjuvant chemotherapy; 77% (27/35) received hormone therapy. Five out of ten patients with HER-2 overexpressing tumors did not receive adjuvant anti–HER-2 therapy, while two out of four patients with HER-2 overexpressing tumors received palliative trastuzumab for recurrent and metastatic disease. Letrozole was used for one patient in the palliative setting. The median overall survival durations were 7.2 years (range, 0.6 to 17.0 years) in patients with localized disease and 2.9 years (range, 0.6 to 4.3 years) in those with recurrent or metastatic disease. Conclusion Anti–HER-2 and hormonal therapy, except tamoxifen, have been underutilized in Korean MBC patients compared to female breast cancer patients. With the development of precision medicine, active treatment with targeted agents should be applied. Further investigation of the unique pathobiology of MBC is clinically warranted

  15. Current situation of sexual and reproductive health of men deprived of liberty in the Institutional Care Center of San Jose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorita Rivas Fonseca

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the current status of the issue of sexual and reproductive health ofthe prisoners Institutional Care Center (CAI of San Jose. It is a descriptive study. Through a strategic samplingdetermined the participation of 102 men. The information was obtained by applying a self-administeredquestionnaire with closed and open questions. As a result relevant to your socio-demographic profile, it appearsthat deprived of their liberty is a very heterogeneous group. As regards sexual and reproductive health, the firstconcept they relate to the prevention of disease and the second reproductive aspects, this shows limitations inknowledge on the topics, something that affects the daily life activities and self-care. It is concluded that researchby nurses Gyneco-obstetric in the deprived of liberty is almost null not only in the country but in the world,especially if it comes with the male population. In the case of CAI Prison, health care is not enough for thenumber of inmates who inhabit (overpopulation of almost 50%, this implies a deterioration in health and physicalcondition of these people, as well as sexual and reproductive health

  16. A patient-centered methodology that improves the accuracy of prognostic predictions in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Kashani-Sabet

    Full Text Available Individualized approaches to prognosis are crucial to effective management of cancer patients. We developed a methodology to assign individualized 5-year disease-specific death probabilities to 1,222 patients with melanoma and to 1,225 patients with breast cancer. For each cancer, three risk subgroups were identified by stratifying patients according to initial stage, and prediction probabilities were generated based on the factors most closely related to 5-year disease-specific death. Separate subgroup probabilities were merged to form a single composite index, and its predictive efficacy was assessed by several measures, including the area (AUC under its receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. The patient-centered methodology achieved an AUC of 0.867 in the prediction of 5-year disease-specific death, compared with 0.787 using the AJCC staging classification alone. When applied to breast cancer patients, it achieved an AUC of 0.907, compared with 0.802 using the AJCC staging classification alone. A prognostic algorithm produced from a randomly selected training subsample of 800 melanoma patients preserved 92.5% of its prognostic efficacy (as measured by AUC when the same algorithm was applied to a validation subsample containing the remaining patients. Finally, the tailored prognostic approach enhanced the identification of high-risk candidates for adjuvant therapy in melanoma. These results describe a novel patient-centered prognostic methodology with improved predictive efficacy when compared with AJCC stage alone in two distinct malignancies drawn from two separate populations.

  17. Postoperative Survival Estimation of Gastric Cancer Patients in Cancer Institute of Tehran, Imam Khomeini Hospital and Its Relative Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kazemnejad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Gastric Cancer (GC is one of the most common causes of death in the world. The most important cause of high death rate related to GC is late diagnosis of the disease. The main treatment of gastric cancer in its primary stage of is surgery, and radiotherapy and chemotherapy are supplementary treatments. There are some factors that affect survival after surgery. This study aimed to assess the survival of patients with GC under surgery and to determine the risk factors of this cancer. Materials & Methods: A total of 262 patients with GC under surgery were followed and included in the study from 21st of March 2003 to 21st of March 2007 in the cancer institute of Tehran, Imam Khomeini Hospital, . The staging of the disease before the surgery was based on CT-Scan and endosonography and after the surgery was based on the pathologic reports. The survival of the patients was determined by their periodical referrals and our telephone contacts with their relatives. The survival times were considered as the time from the diagnosis up to the death or the end of the study. The effect of the various risk factors including gender, age at diagnosis, tumor site, pathologic stage of the disease, type of treatment, metastases and relapse were evaluated. Kaplan-Miere approach was used to estimate survival and Log-rank test and proportional Cox model to evaluate the related factors. Data were analyzed using Spss16 statistical software. Results: 75.2% of patients were men and 34.4% cases of patients experienced death. The mean follow-up time was 19.317.4. The mean age at diagnosis was 5811.5 and survival mean and median were 49 and 27 months respectively. The one, three and five year survival of the patients were 0.85, 0.41 and 0.3 respectively. Gender, pathologic stage, age at diagnosis and weight-loss were significantly related to the survival in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The diagnosis of the cancer in primary stages causes

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Metastasis Suppression in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    and breast carcinoma metastasis, Wake Forest University Cancer Center, July 28 Molecular mechanisms controlling melanoma and breast carcinoma...Bowman Show, August 17 Molecular regulation of melanoma and breast carcinoma metastasis, Wake Forest University Cancer Center, July 28 Molecular...Institute, April 20, Pathology ofNeoplasia Cumberland Unit, American Cancer Society, April 19; Breast Cancer Research Ministerio de Sanidad y

  19. Effectiveness of fentanyl transdermal patch (fentanyl-TTS, durogegic) for radiotherapy induced pain and cancer pain: multi-center trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae [Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-12-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of fentanyl-TTS in the management of radiotherapy induced acute pain and cancer pain treated with radiotherapy. Our study was open labelled prospective phase IV multi-center study, the study population included patients with more 4 numeric rating scale (NRS) score pain although managed with other analgesics or more than 6 NRS score pain without analgesics. Patients divided into two groups: patients with radiotherapy induced pain (Group A) and patients with cancer pain treated with radiotherapy (Group B). All patients received 25 ug/hr of fentanyl transdermal patch. Primary end point was pain relief: second end points were change in patient quality of life, a degree of satisfaction for patients and clinician, side effects. Between March 2005 and June 2005, 312 patients from 26 participating institutes were registered, but 249 patients completed this study. Total number of patients in each group was 185 in Group A, 64 in Group B. Mean age was 60 years and male to female ratio was 76:24. Severe pain NRS score at 2 weeks after the application of fentanyl was decreased from 7.03 to 4.01, {rho} = 0.003. There was a significant improvement in insomnia, social functioning, and quality of life. A degree of satisfaction for patients and clinician was very high. The most common reasons of patients' satisfactions was good pain control. Ninety six patients reported side effect. Nausea was the most common side effect. There was no serious side effect. Fentanyl-TTS was effective in both relieving pain with good tolerability and improving the quality of life for patients with radiotherapy induced acute pain and cancer pain treated with radiotherapy. The satisfaction of the patients and doctors was good. There wa no major side effect.

  20. BEST: A Learner-Centered Workplace Literacy Partnership of the Vermont Institute for Self-Reliance and General Electric Aircraft Engines Rutland, VT. Final Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashof, Judith R.

    The Vermont Institute for Self Reliance (VISR) conducted a Basic Educational Skills for Training (BEST) program, a national demonstration project in workplace literacy, from April 1990 to March 1992. BEST provided learner-centered, context-based literacy instruction onsite, on company time, at two General Electric (GE) Aircraft Engines Rutland…

  1. Epidemiological profile of nonmelanoma skin cancer in renal transplant recipients: experience of a referral center*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Flávia Regina; Ogawa, Marilia Marufuji; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando Costa; Tomimori, Jane

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in humans and also the malignant disease that is increasingly common among kidney transplant recipients. OBJECTIVE To determine the epidemiological characteristics of renal transplant recipients with nonmelanoma skin cancer seen at a referral transplantation center. METHODS Cross-sectional descriptive study with renal transplant recipients presenting nonmelanoma skin cancer, treated at a transplantation referral center between 08/01/2004 and 08/31/2009. Analyzed variables were: gender, age, skin phototype, occupational and recreational sun exposure, use of photoprotection, personal and family history of non-melanoma skin cancer, clinical type and location, time between transplantation and the appearance of the first nonmelanoma skin cancer, occurrence of viral warts, timing of transplantation, type of donor, cause of kidney failure, previous transplants, comorbidities, pre-transplant dialysis, type and duration of dialysis. RESULTS 64 subjects were included. Males - 71.9%; low skin phototypes (up to Fitzpatrick III) - 89%; mean age - 57.0 years - and mean age at transplant - 47.3 years; sun exposure - 67.2% occupational - and 64.1% recreational; photoprotection - 78.2% (although only 34.4% in a regular manner); squamous cell carcinoma - 67.2%; squamous cell carcinoma/basal cell carcinoma ratio - 2:1; personal history of nonmelanoma skin cancer - 25% - and family history - 10.9%; location at photoexposed area - 98.4%; average latency time between transplantation and first nonmelanoma skin cancer appearance - 78.3 months; viral warts (HPV) after transplant - 53.1%; average timing of transplantation - 115.5 months; living donor - 64.1%; triple regimen (antirejection) - 73.2%; comorbidities - 92.2%; pre-transplant dialysis - 98.4%; hemodialysis - 71.7%; average duration of dialysis - 39.1 months; previous transplants - 3.1%; hypertension as cause of renal failure - 46.9%. CONCLUSION This study allowed

  2. 2014 Korean Liver Cancer Study Group-National Cancer Center Korea practice guideline for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The guideline for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was first developed in 2003 and revised in 2009 by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group and the National Cancer Center, Korea. Since then, many studies on HCC have been carried out in Korea and other countries. In particular, a substantial body of knowledge has been accumulated on diagnosis, staging, and treatment specific to Asian characteristics, especially Koreans, prompting the proposal of new strategies. Accordingly, the new guideline presented herein was developed on the basis of recent evidence and expert opinions. The primary targets of this guideline are patients with suspicious or newly diagnosed HCC. This guideline provides recommendations for the initial treatment of patients with newly diagnosed HCC.

  3. Indicators of malnutrition in children with cancer: A study of 690 patients from a tertiary care cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large data pertaining to indicators of malnutrition in children with cancer is lacking from India. In view of this, we prospectively analyzed consecutive de novo childhood patients with cancer presenting at a tertiary care center. Materials And Methods: Height and weight of each child (n = 690 were compared with World Health Organization child growth standards-2006 for that particular age and sex to get weight-for-age, height-for-age, and weight-for-height indices and below 2SD of the reference median on these indices were considered as underweight, stunted, and wasted, respectively. Body mass index (BMI for age was also analyzed for thinness and obesity. Results: Prevalence of malnutrition based on Z-score for weight-for-age, height-for-age, weight-for-height, and BMI-for-age was 30%, 31%, 35%, and 41%, respectively. Weight-for-age (underweight was significantly associated (P = 0.018 with solid tumors. Height-for-age, weight-for-age, and BMI-for-age were significantly associated (P = 0.007, P = 0.016, and P ≤ 0.001, respectively with rural community. Conclusion: Malnutrition was observed in approximately one-third of children with cancer. Malnutrition is associated with solid tumors and those coming from rural community. Wasting has a higher prevalence in children with cancer in <5 years of age group.

  4. Quality of life and disease understanding: impact of attending a patient-centered cancer symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrnos, Leslie; Dueck, Amylou C; Scherber, Robyn; Glassley, Pamela; Stigge, Rachel; Northfelt, Donald; Mikhael, Joseph; Aguirre, Annette; Bennett, Robert M; Mesa, Ruben A

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of a patient-centered symposium as an educational intervention on a broad population of cancer patients. We developed a comprehensive patient symposium. Through voluntary questionnaires, we studied the impact of this cancer symposium on quality of life, cancer-specific knowledge, and symptom management among cancer patients. Symposium attendees were provided surveys prior to and 3 months following the educational intervention. Surveys included (1) EORTC-QLQ-C30; (2) disease understanding tool developed for this conference; (3) validated disease-specific questionnaires. Changes over time were assessed using McNemar's tests and paired t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. A total of 158 attendees completed the pre-convention survey. Most respondents reported at least "quite a bit" of understanding regarding treatment options, screening modalities, symptomatology, and cancer-related side effects. Attendees endorsed the least understanding of disease-related stress, risk factors, fatigue management, and legal issues related to disease/treatment. At 3 months, there was improvement in understanding (12 of 14 areas of self-reported knowledge especially regarding nutrition, and stress/fatigue management). However, no significant change was seen in QLQ-C30 functioning, fatigue, pain, or insomnia. A patient symposium, as an educational intervention improves a solid knowledge base amongst attendees regarding their disease, increases knowledge in symptom management, but may be insufficient to impact QoL as a single intervention.

  5. National Cancer Institute-supported chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy trials: outcomes and lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majithia, Neil; Temkin, Sarah M.; Ruddy, Kathryn J.; Beutler, Andreas S.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is one of the most common and debilitating complications of cancer treatment. Due to a lack of effective management options for patients with CIPN, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a series of trials aimed at both prevention and treatment. A total of 15 such studies were approved, evaluating use of various neuro-modulatory agents which have shown benefit in other neuropathic pain states. Aside from duloxetine, none of the pharmacologic methods demonstrated therapeutic benefit for patients with CIPN. Despite these disappointing results, the series of trials revealed important lessons that have informed subsequent work. Some examples of this include the use of patient-reported symptom metrics, the elimination of traditional—yet unsubstantiated—practice approaches, and the discovery of molecular genetic predictors of neuropathy. Current inquiry is being guided by the results from these large-scale trials, and as such, stands better chance of identifying durable solutions for this treatment-limiting toxicity. PMID:26686859

  6. Photodynamic Therapy in Gynecologic Malignancies: A Review of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Mayor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a treatment modality used in the management of solid tumor malignancies that employs the use of a photosensitizing agent, a light source and oxygen in order to illicit a direct cytotoxic effect. Its use in gynecologic malignancies is somewhat novel and has been used for palliative and curative intent. At the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the use of PDT in the management of gynecologic cancers began in the mid 1980s and since that time 35 patients have received PDT as a treatment for recurrent or metastatic cutaneous and vulvar, vaginal, anal, and cervical recurrences. In our experience, 85% patients with metastatic cutaneous lesions had a complete response. Twenty-seven percent of patients with metastatic vaginal, cervical or anal recurrences had a complete response to therapy with a median response time of 28 months. Side effects from the treatment included moderate to severe burning sensation, pain and edema at the treatment site requiring narcotic pain medication for symptom management in patients who underwent treatment to cutaneous lesions as well as lower genital tract recurrences. PDT should be considered an option in patients who are too frail to undergo the standard of care or decline the standard of care in lieu of a less invasive treatment modality.

  7. Photodynamic Therapy in Gynecologic Malignancies: A Review of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Paul C.; Lele, Shashikant

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality used in the management of solid tumor malignancies that employs the use of a photosensitizing agent, a light source and oxygen in order to illicit a direct cytotoxic effect. Its use in gynecologic malignancies is somewhat novel and has been used for palliative and curative intent. At the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the use of PDT in the management of gynecologic cancers began in the mid 1980s and since that time 35 patients have received PDT as a treatment for recurrent or metastatic cutaneous and vulvar, vaginal, anal, and cervical recurrences. In our experience, 85% patients with metastatic cutaneous lesions had a complete response. Twenty-seven percent of patients with metastatic vaginal, cervical or anal recurrences had a complete response to therapy with a median response time of 28 months. Side effects from the treatment included moderate to severe burning sensation, pain and edema at the treatment site requiring narcotic pain medication for symptom management in patients who underwent treatment to cutaneous lesions as well as lower genital tract recurrences. PDT should be considered an option in patients who are too frail to undergo the standard of care or decline the standard of care in lieu of a less invasive treatment modality. PMID:27669307

  8. Radiation-Therapeutic Agent Clinical Trials: Leveraging Advantages of a National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Naoko; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bernhard, Eric J; Zwiebel, James; Norman Coleman, C; Kunos, Charles A

    2016-10-01

    A number of oncology phase II radiochemotherapy trials with promising results have been conducted late in the overall experimental therapeutic agent development process. Accelerated development and approval of experimental therapeutic agents have stimulated further interest in much earlier radiation-agent studies to increase the likelihood of success in phase III trials. To sustain this interest, more forward-thinking preclinical radiobiology experimental designs are needed to improve discovery of promising radiochemotherapy plus agent combinations for clinical trial testing. These experimental designs should better inform next-step radiation-agent clinical trial dose, schedule, exposure, and therapeutic effect. Recognizing the need for a better strategy to develop preclinical data supporting radiation-agent phase I or II trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and the NCI-Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch of the Radiation Research Program have partnered to promote earlier radiobiology studies of CTEP portfolio agents. In this Seminars in Radiation Oncology article, four key components of this effort are discussed. First, we outline steps for accessing CTEP agents for preclinical testing. Second, we propose radiobiology studies that facilitate transition from preclinical testing to early phase trial activation. Third, we navigate steps that walk through CTEP agent strategic development paths available for radiation-agent testing. Fourth, we highlight a new NCI-sponsored cooperative agreement grant supporting in vitro and in vivo radiation-CTEP agent testing that informs early phase trial designs. Throughout the article, we include contemporary examples of successful radiation-agent development initiatives.

  9. Improving breast cancer survivors’ knowledge using a patient-centered intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, Jesus G.; Hemmelgarn, Marian; Viveros, Lori; Odele, Patience; Feldman, Nancy R.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-income, minority women with breast cancer experience a range of barriers to receiving survivorship information. Our objective was to test a novel, patient-centered intervention aimed at improving communication about survivorship care. Methods We developed a wallet card to provide oncologic and follow-up care survivorship information to breast cancer patients. We used a prospective, pre–post design to assess the intervention at a safety net hospital. The intervention was given by a patient navigator or community health worker. Results Patient knowledge (n = 130) of personal cancer history improved from baseline pretest to 1 week after the intervention for stage (66–93%; P < .05), treatment (79–92%; P < .05), and symptoms of recurrence (48–89%; P <.05), which was retained at 3 months. The intervention reduced the number of patients who were unsure when their mammogram was due (15–5% at 1 week and 6%at 3 months; P <.05). Nearly 90% reported they would be likely to share their survivorship card with their providers. Conclusion A patient-centered survivorship card improved short-term recall of key survivorship care knowledge and seems to be effective at reducing communication barriers for this population. Further studies are warranted to assess long-term retention and the impact on receipt of appropriate survivorship follow-up care. PMID:26032819

  10. 谈PCB企业中央研究院的战略定位%The strategic positioning of printed circuit board enterprise center institute

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄勇; 朱兴华; 陈正清; 吴会兰

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the strategic positioning of printed circuit board enterprise center institute, By constructing a entities department of printed circuit board enterprise institute to create the basis platform of the technological innovation system, from the strategic height to make its overall planning, enhance the innovation capability and core competitiveness, eventually become the center of technological and product innovation, the center of innovation management and resource integration, the Center of industrial planning and the center of talent aggregation. The four centers are interdependent with each other.%主要讲述了电路板企业中央研究院的战略定位,通过组建中央研究院实体部门,建立企业创新研究体系的基础平台,从战略高度对其进行整体规划,增强中央研究院的创新能力和核心竞争力,最终成为企业的产品技术研发中心、创新管理及资源整合中心、发展规划中心和人才聚合中心。四大中心职能相互依赖,相互配合。

  11. Biological Semiconductors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Cancer Diagnostic Program and the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological semiconductors as diagnostic sensors.

  12. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junn, Jacqueline C.; Kim, Irene A.; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Tan, Marietta; Fan, Katherine Y.; Lake, Spencer T.; Zaboli, David; Messing, Barbara P.; Ulmer, Karen; Harrer, Karen B.; Gold, Dorothy; Ryniak, Keri L.; Zinreich, Eva S.; Tang, Mei; Levine, Marshall A.; Blanco, Ray G.; Saunders, John R.; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients. PMID:23118755

  13. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C. Junn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients.

  14. Ensuring quality cancer care: a follow-up review of the Institute of Medicine's 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, Tracy; Albright, Heidi W; Feeley, Thomas W; Walters, Ron; Burke, Thomas W; Aloia, Thomas; Bruera, Eduardo; Buzdar, Aman; Foxhall, Lewis; Hui, David; Summers, Barbara; Rodriguez, Alma; Dubois, Raymond; Shine, Kenneth I

    2012-05-15

    Responding to growing concerns regarding the safety, quality, and efficacy of cancer care in the United States, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences commissioned a comprehensive review of cancer care delivery in the US health care system in the late 1990s. The National Cancer Policy Board (NCPB), a 20-member board with broad representation, performed this review. In its review, the NCPB focused on the state of cancer care delivery at that time, its shortcomings, and ways to measure and improve the quality of cancer care. The NCPB described an ideal cancer care system in which patients would have equitable access to coordinated, guideline-based care and novel therapies throughout the course of their disease. In 1999, the IOM published the results of this review in its influential report, Ensuring Quality Cancer Care. The report outlined 10 recommendations, which, when implemented, would: 1) improve the quality of cancer care, 2) increase the current understanding of quality cancer care, and 3) reduce or eliminate access barriers to quality cancer care. Despite the fervor generated by this report, there are lingering doubts regarding the safety and quality of cancer care in the United States today. Increased awareness of medical errors and barriers to quality care, coupled with escalating health care costs, has prompted national efforts to reform the health care system. These efforts by health care providers and policymakers should bridge the gap between the ideal state described in Ensuring Quality Cancer Care and the current state of cancer care in the United States.

  15. Assessment of cancer care in Indian elderly cancer patients: A single center study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Anindya; Shahi, UP

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This prospective study aimed to assess the profiles of elderly cancer patient to optimize cancer care in Indian setup. The profiles have been compared with that of younger patients in terms of epidemiological, clinical data, co-morbidity, treatment, toxicity, clinical outcome, and survival pattern. Materials and Methods: The study comprised cancer patients attending radiotherapy outdoor (November 2005 to June 2006). There were 104 patients of age ≥60 years (elderly group) and 121 patients of 45-59 years (younger group). Results: Elderly group had median age 65 years (60-88 years) with M:F = 1:1. The younger group had median age 50 years (45-59 years) with M:F = 1:2. Elderly had higher proportion of gastrointestinal and genito-urinary tract malignancies. Younger group had higher proportion of breast, lymphoma, and brain tumor. 13% had co-morbidity, 50% received treatment, 27% were treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery, and two-third of these cases belong to elderly group. Majority tolerated treatment well. 10% had significant grade of toxicity. 57% of elderly patients did not accept and one-fourth of all cases did not complete the prescribed treatment. 88% cases were responders of which 70% showed complete response. There were no differences between two groups. At 12 months 35% of treated patients came for follow-up. At first 12 months, 60-70% were alive without disease. Conclusion: There were differences between two groups in terms of performance status, treatment acceptance, and treatment modality prescribed. Elderly patients deserve same opportunity as younger patients for treatment and survival options from the oncologist. PMID:24455630

  16. Assessment of cancer care in Indian elderly cancer patients: A single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: This prospective study aimed to assess the profiles of elderly cancer patient to optimize cancer care in Indian setup. The profiles have been compared with that of younger patients in terms of epidemiological, clinical data, co-morbidity, treatment, toxicity, clinical outcome, and survival pattern. Materials and Methods: The study comprised cancer patients attending radiotherapy outdoor (November 2005 to June 2006. There were 104 patients of age ≥60 years (elderly group and 121 patients of 45-59 years (younger group. Results: Elderly group had median age 65 years (60-88 years with M:F = 1:1. The younger group had median age 50 years (45-59 years with M:F = 1:2. Elderly had higher proportion of gastrointestinal and genito-urinary tract malignancies. Younger group had higher proportion of breast, lymphoma, and brain tumor. 13% had co-morbidity, 50% received treatment, 27% were treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery, and two-third of these cases belong to elderly group. Majority tolerated treatment well. 10% had significant grade of toxicity. 57% of elderly patients did not accept and one-fourth of all cases did not complete the prescribed treatment. 88% cases were responders of which 70% showed complete response. There were no differences between two groups. At 12 months 35% of treated patients came for follow-up. At first 12 months, 60-70% were alive without disease. Conclusion: There were differences between two groups in terms of performance status, treatment acceptance, and treatment modality prescribed. Elderly patients deserve same opportunity as younger patients for treatment and survival options from the oncologist.

  17. Preliminary results of SIB-IMRT in head and neck cancers: Report from a regional cancer center in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakraborty Santam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Intensity-modulated radiotherapy using simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT is an attractive method for the treatment of head and neck cancers with sparing of the salivary function. Aims : To assess the feasibility, toxicity, and tumor control using SIB-IMRT in locally advanced head and neck cancers in the Indian setting. Settings and Design : The study was conducted in a regional cancer center in northern India. A review of the treatment result of the first 20 patients is presented. Methods and Materials : SIB-IMRT was planned for 20 patients-14 patients were treated with the SIB-72 schedule delivering a dose of 72 Gy, 66 Gy, and 57 Gy to the PTV GTV , PTV CTV1 , and PTV CTV2 in 33 fractions. Six patients were treated with the SIB-66 schedule delivering 66 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy to the above-mentioned volumes in 30 fractions. Patients were monitored for toxicity using the CTCAE v 3.0 criteria. Descriptive analysis of toxicity and actuarial estimates of the loco-regional control and survival are presented. Results : Grade III mucositis was seen in 65% patients. None of the patients had Grade III dermatitis. The projected 2-year overall survival was 95%. Conclusion : SIB-IMRT schedules evaluated were found to be safe and effective and are being subjected to further prospective studies.

  18. Epidemiologic characteristics of oral cancer:single-center analysis of 4097 patients from the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Zhang; Ming Song; Fan Gao; AnKui Yang; WenKuan Chen; ShuWei Chen; Huan Li; Xing Zhang; ZhongYuan Yang; XinLin Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral cancer is a common type of head and neck cancers. Knowing its epidemiologic characteristics is crucial to preventing, diagnosing, and treating this cancer. This study aimed to explore the epidemiologic characteris‑tics of oral cancer in South China. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 4097 oral cancer patients treated at the Sun Yat‑sen University Cancer Center between 1960 and 2013. We compared the age of onset, sex ratio, pathologic type, and primary tumor location among three subcultural areas (Guangfu, Hakka, and Chaoshan) and between an economically developed region and a less‑developed one in Guangdong. Results: Overall, oral cancer had a male‑to‑female ratio of approximately 2:1, and this ratio decreased over time. Oral cancer occurred mostly in patients of 45–64 years old (54.5%), and the percentage of older patients gradually increased over time. The most common tumor location was the tongue. Squamous cell carcinoma was the predomi‑nant pathologic type. The percentage of blood type O in oral cancer patients was lower than that in the healthy pop‑ulation. The male‑to‑female ratio in the Chaoshan area was higher than that in the Guangfu and Hakka areas, whereas the age of disease onset in Guangfu was higher than that in Hakka and Chaoshan. The male‑to‑female ratio was lower and the age of disease onset was higher in the economically developed region than in the less‑developed region. Conclusion: The incidence of oral cancer in South China presents typical characteristics to which doctors should pay attention when diagnosing and treating oral cancer patients.

  19. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tralongo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Tralongo1, Francesco Ferraù2, Nicolò Borsellino3, Francesco Verderame4, Michele Caruso5, Dario Giuffrida6, Alfredo Butera7, Vittorio Gebbia81Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Siracusa; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Vincenzo, Taormina; 3Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Buccheri La Ferla, Palermo; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Giovanni Paolo II, Sciacca; 5Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Humanitas, Catania; 6Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania; 7Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento; 8Medical Oncology Unit, Dipartimento Oncologico, La Maddalena, Università degli Studi, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients' needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients' needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective.Keywords: cancer, home care

  20. The Cost analysis of cervical cancer screening services provided by Damavand health center in 2013

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    Arezoo Chouhdari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, the health sector in many countries is facing with severe resource constraints; hence it is absolutely necessary that cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness assessment have a major role in design of health services. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-benefit and effectiveness of cervical cancer screening service (Pap smear test done by the health centers in Damavand County in 2013.  Methods: This is a descriptive study with cross-sectional method. All data was extracted from existing documents in Damavand health network.Cost of service screening for doing Pap smear test (manpower costs of performing the service, the cost of transferring samples, water, electricity, telephone and gas was estimated in all health centers then results, were compared with the incomes of this service.  Results: Screening program coverage was 22.3%, 6.9% and 6.05% in 2011, 2012 and 2013 respectively. All costs and incomes of units performing Pap smear screening test were calculated. Entire costs and incomes of this service during 2013 were respectively 303,009,000 and 11,640,000 RLS equal $12,227 and $496.73. Therefore, the cost-benefit ratio of this screening test was approximately 0.040.  Conclusion: The costs of units performing cervical cancer screening test in Damavand Health Center were much more than this benefit and because of a none-positive Pap smear test in spite of high cost, performing this test in Damavand health centers was not cost effective.

  1. Analysis of 57 nonagenarian cancer patients treated by radical radiotherapy. A survey of eight institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Ishikura, Satoshi [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East; Oguchi, Masahiko; Niibe, Hideo; Yorozu, Atsunori; Nakano, Kikuo; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Watanabe, Sadao; Teshima, Teruki

    1999-08-01

    As the human society grows more aged, it is considered important to elucidate factors essential in applying radical radiotherapy (RT) to the elderly, with ages as high as 90 years and greater. A retrospective survey was conducted for patients 90 years of age or older who received radiotherapy with radical intent in eight leading institutions in Japan from 1990 through 1995. Fifty-seven nonagenarian patients were studied. Their ages ranged up to 98 (median 91) and there was a strong female preponderance (M/F: 16/41). The distribution by site was as follows: head and neck, 16; skin and adnexae, 11; uterine cervix, 7; esophagus, 6. The prevailing histopathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma (34), followed by adenocarcinomas (8). The highest age at RT was 98 years [female, skin cancer, died of senility 2.5 years after treatment, with no evidence of disease (NED)] and the longest survivor is 102 years old (female, glottic cancer T2, age at RT 93, alive NED for 8 years, uses wheel-chair). The rate of completion of treatment was 75% (43/57), if the treatment field was limited to the gross primary tumor volume only and if the cumulative dose was above 80% of the tolerable adult dose. Familial escort was necessary for most of the patients in completing the day-to-day RT. Radiotherapy is feasible with radical intent even in the elderly, if the treatment field is limited to the gross primary tumor volume only, if the cumulative dose is above 80% of the tolerable adult dose and if familial support is adequate. (author)

  2. The preclinical new drug research program of the National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, J S

    1984-01-01

    The discovery and development of anticancer drugs with clinical potential are the responsibility of the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment, National Cancer Institute (NCI). Approximately 10,000 compounds/year are selectively acquired and screened against murine tumor models in order to discover new, active materials. The program required to accomplish this objective, as well as the subsequent tasks of formulation development and toxicology testing, is described. Since its inception in 1955, the preclinical new drug research program of the NCI has played a major role in the discovery and development of new agents which have been entered into clinical trial. The NCI has been responsible for the discovery of eight of the 16 commercially available drugs discovered since 1955. In addition, the NCI has played an important role in the clinical evaluation of all 16 of these New Drug Application (NDA)-approved drugs. During 1977-1982, the NCI filed Investigational New Drug Applications (INDA) for 33 cytotoxic agents. It was responsible for the discovery of the antitumor activity of 73% of these compounds. Most of the INDA compounds were acquired directly through NCI efforts. The DTP active acquisition program was responsible for obtaining 69% of these materials, with an additional 12% coming from the DTP intramural research program. Only 19% were received as voluntary submissions. The DTP active acquisition and screening effort is shown to have played even a larger role in identifying and obtaining those compounds which are currently in earlier stages of the NCI drug discovery and development process.

  3. Tumor induction following intraoperative radiotherapy: Late results of the National Cancer Institute canine trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.; Duray, P.; DeLuca, A.; Anderson, W.; Sindelar, W.; Kinsella, T. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy has been employed in human cancer research for over a decade. Since 1979, trials to assess the acute and late toxicity of IORT have been carried out at the National Cancer Institute in an adult dog model in an attempt to establish dose tolerance guidelines for a variety of organs. Of the 170 animals entered on 12 studies with a minimum follow-up of 2 years, 148 dogs received IORT; 22 control animals received only surgery. Animals were sacrificed at designated intervals following IORT, usually at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 60 month intervals. 102 of 148 irradiated dogs were sacrificed less than 24 months; 46 dogs were followed greater than or equal to 24 months after IORT. To date, 34 of the 46 animals have been sacrificed; the 12 remaining animals are to be followed to 5 years. These 12 animals have minimum follow-up of 30 months. In the irradiated group followed for greater than or equal to 24 months, 10 tumors have arisen in 9 animals. One animal developed an incidental spontaneous breast carcinoma outside the IORT port, discovered only at scheduled post-mortem exam. The remaining nine tumors arose within IORT ports. Two tumors were benign neural tumors--a neuroma and a neurofibroma. One animal had a collision tumor comprised of grade I chondrosarcoma adjacent to grade III osteosarcoma arising in lumbar vertebrae. Two other grade III osteosarcomas, one grade III fibrosarcoma, and one grade III malignant fibrous histiocytoma arose in retroperitoneal/paravertebral sites. An embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides) arose within the irradiated urinary bladder of one animal. No sham irradiated controls nor IORT animals sacrificed less than 24 months have developed any spontaneous or radiation-induced tumors. The time range of diagnoses of tumors was 24-58 months. The IORT dose range associated with tumor development was 20-35 Gy.

  4. Incidence of Venous Thromboembolic Events in Mandated Risk Assessment versus Optional DVT Prophylaxis Era at a Large Tertiary Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukar, Moshim; Asaro, Joseph; Aquino, Anthony; Groman, Adrienne; Skitzki, Joseph; Kane, John M

    2015-09-01

    Cancer patients are thought to be at high risk for venous thromboembolic events (DVT/PE). Beginning in October 2007, our tertiary cancer center instituted "mandated risk assessment" computerized DVT prophylaxis order entry, for all hospital admissions with an option for active opt out by the physician with a stated reason. Retrospective review of all DVT/PE events within 30 days of a hospital admission [any inpatient admission (IA) and outpatient surgery (OPS)] in comparable "optional (O)" (January 2005-September 2007) vs "mandated risk assessment (M)" (October 2007-May 2010) DVT prophylaxis order eras. Patient demographics, admission details, type of prophylaxis, treatment, and outcome were also analyzed. There were 16,363 for the O (11,944 IA/4,419 OPS) and 17,757 for the M (12,957 IA/4,800 OPS) DVT prophylaxis order eras. The number of DVT/PE events in the O era was 67 (prevalence 0.41%) versus 102 for the M era (prevalence 0.57%), P = 0.037. In the DVT/PE patients, DVT prophylaxis had been ordered during the index admission in 66 per cent for O versus 83 per cent for M (P = 0.008). Low-molecular-weight heparin was increasingly used in M era (33% vs 16%, P = 0.009). There was also no difference between O vs M era for status at DVT/PE diagnosis (outpatient 36% vs 24%) or associated symptoms. There were no deaths attributable to DVT/PE in the O era versus 3 deaths in the M era. Although DVT prophylaxis use improved with "mandated risk assessment" ordering, the DVT/PE incidence did not decrease. It may be difficult to overcome the surprisingly low baseline prevalence and multiple risk factors in this population.

  5. Research activity by National Center of Archaeological studies of Institute of History of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitdikov Ayrat G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work of the National Center for Archaeological Studies named after A.Sh. Khalikov with the Institute of History named after Sh Mardjani of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan (NCAS in 2013 was conducted within three Departments: prehistoric and medieval archaeology, conservation studies, and a bioarchaeological laboratory. The basic problems were: “Archaeology of the ancient population of the Volga-Kama: the formation and interaction of cultures”; “Medieval Turkic-Tatar civilization: the emergence, development, interaction with the peoples of Eurasia”; “Anthropology and genetics of the ancient population of the Middle Volga region”. Within the project on “Geographic information systems of Tatarstan archaeological heritage”, preparatory works for monitoring of the condition of cultural heritage objects located in the Kuibyshev and Nizhnekamsk reservoirs zones of influence were conducted. Archaeological fieldwork was conducted in the framework of the Primitive, Early Bulgar, Kazan, Bulgar, Lower Volga, Sviyazhsk archaeological expeditions and Preservation and salvation expedition in the area of Nizhnekamsk and Kuibyshev reservoirs. Beyond the Republic of Tatarstan, exploratory research was conducted in the territory of the Chuvash and Mordovian republics, Ulyanovsk and Samara Oblasts. The study of monuments in the Lower Volga region continued in collaboration with colleagues from the Astrakhan Oblast and the Republic of Mari El. Joint international archaeological research was carried out in the territory of the Republic of Bulgaria and Ukraine. 5 conferences were organized, including 4 international ones. The NCAS staff participated in 16 conferences, including 11 international ones. 2 Doctor habilitatus and 3 Doctor’s theses were defended. 5 collections of articles and theses, and 4 issues of the “Privolzhskaya arkheologiya” (Volga region archaeology were published. The NCAS staff prepared 216

  6. A UAS-Facility at the Energy, Environment and Water Research (EEWRC) Center of The Cyprus Institute (CyI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, M. A.; Ioannou, S.; Keleshis, C.

    2012-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are widely used for different earth-sciences applications providing chiefly a link between in-situ ground based measurements and satellite remote sensing observations. The "Autonomous Flying Platforms for Atmospheric and Earth Surface Observations" project (APAESO) of the Energy, Environment and Water Research Center (EEWRC) at the Cyprus Institute is aimed at the dual purpose of carrying out atmospheric and earth-surface observations in the (Eastern) Mediterranean (APAESO is being supported by a grant of the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation: ΝΕΑ ΥΠΟΔΟΜΗ/ΝΕΚΥΠ/0308/09). After having acquired four CRUISERS (ET-Air, Slovakia) as UAS platforms and a substantial range of scientific instruments to be employed on these platforms, we are currently in the process of specifying and implementing a more permanent, operational UAS Facility at the EEWRC of CyI. This facility will consist of three main components: (i) Ground/Operation component (GOC); (ii) Instrumentation/Mission component (IMC) and (iii) Flight team component (FTC). The GOC will be comprised by the following elements: a) a dedicated Control and Operation Facility, which will be employed mainly during flight operations and scientific missions, b) workshops and technical infrastructure and c) appropriate storage space for platforms, platform elements, scientific instrumentations, spare parts and maintenance and miscellaneous materials. The already mentioned range of different scientific instruments for atmospheric measurements and remote sensing investigations and a number of "mandatory" instruments, which will be flown on every mission (e.g., basic meteorological sensors, a simple video camera, GPS, etc.) as well as a calibration and gauging laboratory forms the core of the IMC. The FTC consists mainly of a number of skilled and experienced pilots with a basic understanding of scientific UAS applications. The implementation of appropriate pre-, in- and post

  7. Prognostic factors of overall survival in renal cancer patients – single oncological center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajetan Juszczak

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The clinical course of renal cancer remains difficult to predict. Attempts to appoint new independent prognostic factors (IPFs and comparisons of already identified ones among populations are inevitable to develop more effective prognostic instruments. The aim of this study was to evaluate IPFs of overall survival in a given population of patients with renal cancer.Materials and methods. Retrospective analysis of 148 patients with renal cancer treated at the Oncological Institute in Cracow from 2000 to 2007 was performed. Mean follow–up was 51 months. Using the log–rang test, a group of clinicopathological and biochemical features was analyzed in respect to their influence on overall survival. Results were presented as Kaplan–Meier curves. Final identification of IPFs was made by multivariate Cox regression analysis.Results. Overall survival rate at 1, 2, and 5–year follow–up was 58.8%, 38.2%, and 21.4%, respectively. The set of identified IPFs consisted of performance status, smoking history, hemoglobin concentration, anatomical staging, tumor grade, and the presence of microvascular invasion. It was confirmed that only nephrectomy increases significantly overall survival.Conclusions. Apart from smoking history, the role of all other IPFs identified in our study is well documented in the literature. Smoking history seems to be a new IPF with strong negative impact on survival in patients with RCC.

  8. A Guide to Off-Campus Student Project Center Operations. A Manual Based Upon the Model Project Center of Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Massachusetts. Project Report No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Francis C.; And Others

    Under a 1972 grant from the National Science Foundation's College Science Improvement Program (CoSIP), Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) undertook a major educational experiment involving the total reorientation of its educational programs. The encompassing effort is referred to as the WPI PLAN. A major facet of the WPI PLAN involves student…

  9. A Picture Really is Worth a Thousand Words: Public Engagement with the National Cancer Institute on Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalova, Yulia A; Krieger, Janice L

    2017-03-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) provides pertinent information about cancer prevention, treatment, and research advancements that is considered objective and accurate. NCI's presence on social media is an example of a growing effort in promoting and facilitating audience engagement with evidence-based information about health and cancer. However, it is unknown what strategies are most effective for engaging audiences via this communication platform. To evaluate this important question, we analyzed data on posts, associated comments, and meta-data from official NCI Facebook page between July 2010 and February 2015 (end of data collection). Results show that audience engagement is associated with the format of cancer-related social media posts. Specifically, posts with photos received significantly more likes, comments, and shares than videos, links, and status updates. The findings have important implications for how social media can be more effectively utilized to promote public engagement with important public health issues.

  10. Fertility preservation in female cancer patients:a single center experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Sigismondi; Enrico Papaleo; Paola Viganò; Simona Vailati; Massimo Candiani; Jessica Ottolina; Valentina E. Di Mattei; Giorgia Mangili

    2015-01-01

    Advances in cancer treatment allow women to be cured and live longer. However, the necessary chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens have a negative impact on future fertility. Oncofertility has emerged as a new interdisciplinary field to address the issue of gonadotoxicity associated with cancer treatment and to facilitate fertility preservation, including oocyte and ovarian tissue cryopreservation. These fertility issues are often inadequately addressed, and referral rates to oncofertility centers are low. The aim of this study was to report the 3-year experience of the San Raffaele Oncofertility Unit. A total of 96 patients were referred to the Oncofertility Unit for evaluation after the diagnosis of cancer and before gonadotoxic treatment between April 2011 and June 2014. Of the 96 patients, 30 (31.2%) were affected by breast cancers, 20 (20.8%) by sarcomas, 28 (29.2%) by hematologic malignancies, 13 (13.5%) by central nervous system cancers, 3 (3.1%) by bowel tumors, 1 (1.0%) by Wilms’ tumor, and 1 (1.0%) by a thyroid tumor; 47 (49.0%) were referred for oocyte cryopreservation before starting chemotherapy, 20 (20.8%) were referred for ovarian tissue cryopreservation, and 29 (30.2%) were not recruited. The mean time between the patients’ counseling and oocyte retrieval was 15 days (range, 2–37 days). The mean time between the laparoscopic surgery and the beginning of treatment was 4 days (range, 2–10 days). The number of patients who were referred increased over time, whereas the rate of patients who were not recruited decreased, showing an improvement in referrals to the Oncofertility Unit and in the patients’ counseling and understanding. Our results indicate that an effective multidisciplinary oncofertility team is necessary for prompt referrals and treatment.

  11. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  12. From traditional to patient-centered learning: curriculum change as an intervention for changing institutional culture and promoting professionalism in undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Charles E; McBride, Rosanne B; Vari, Richard C; Olson, Linda; Wilson, H David

    2007-11-01

    The authors reframe a curriculum change from a traditional lecture-based to an integrated patient-centered approach as an intervention for changing the culture and hidden curriculum of an institution in ways that promote professionalism. Within this context, the authors articulate some of the inherent process and relational factors brought about by these curricular changes that are essential elements of this intervention process. In 1998 the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences (UNDSMHS) introduced a new preclinical patient-centered learning (PCL) curriculum for first- and second-year medical students. Case-based, small-group learning forms the critical foundation of the PCL process, and an integrated basic and clinical science didactic component supports this process. At the student level, the case-based PCL process generates innovative opportunities for professionalism education from the explicitly articulated formal content that arises naturally from the cases, but more importantly from the implicit values inherent to the PCL small-group process itself--humanism, accountability, pursuit of excellence, and altruism. Further, the organizational changes necessary for the transformation to the PCL curriculum required process changes at student, faculty, and administrative levels that have resulted in a cultural shift toward relationship centeredness within the institution. The authors describe the evolution and structure of the PCL curriculum at UNDSMHS and how this curricular transformation has served as an intervention that promotes professionalism and institutional culture change through (1) processes at the student level that present new opportunities for professionalism education, and (2) processes at student, faculty, administrative, and institutional levels that have created an institutional culture that supports, models, and promotes relationship-centered professional values.

  13. Transformational leadership, transnational culture and political competence in globalizing health care services: a case study of Jordan's King Hussein Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pappas Gregory

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following the demise of Jordan's King Hussein bin Talal to cancer in 1999, the country's Al-Amal Center was transformed from a poorly perceived and ineffectual cancer care institution into a Western-style comprehensive cancer center. Renamed King Hussein Cancer Center (KHCC, it achieved improved levels of quality, expanded cancer care services and achieved Joint Commission International accreditation under new leadership over a three-year period (2002–2005. Methods An exploratory case research method was used to explain the rapid change to international standards. Sources including personal interviews, document review and on-site observations were combined to conduct a robust examination of KHCC's rapid changes. Results The changes which occurred at the KHCC during its formation and leading up to its Joint Commission International (JCI accreditation can be understood within the conceptual frame of the transformational leadership model. Interviewees and other sources for the case study suggest the use of inspirational motivation, idealized influence, individualized consideration and intellectual stimulation, four factors in the transformational leadership model, had significant impact upon the attitudes and motivation of staff within KHCC. Changes in the institution were achieved through increased motivation and positive attitudes toward the use of JCI continuous improvement processes as well as increased professional training. The case study suggests the role of culture and political sensitivity needs re-definition and expansion within the transformational leadership model to adequately explain leadership in the context of globalizing health care services, specifically when governments are involved in the change initiative. Conclusion The KHCC case underscores the utility of the transformational leadership model in an international health care context. To understand leadership in globalizing health care services, KHCC

  14. Proton Therapy At Siteman Cancer Center: The State Of The Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Charles

    2011-06-01

    Barnes-Jewish Hospital is on the verge of offering proton radiation therapy to its patients. Those treatments will be delivered from the first Monarch 250, a state-of-the-art cyclotron produced by Still River Systems, Inc., Littleton, MA. The accelerator is the world's first superconducting synchrocyclotron, with a field-strength of 10 tesla, providing the smallest accelerator for high-energy protons currently available. On May 14, 2010 it was announced that the first production unit had successfully extracted 250 MeV protons. That unit is scheduled for delivery to the Siteman Cancer Center, an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center at Washington University School of Medicine. At a weight of 20 tons and with a diameter of less than 2 meters the compact cyclotron will be mounted on a gantry, another first for proton therapy systems. The single-energy system includes 3 contoured scatterers and 14 different range modulators to provide 24 distinct beam delivery configurations. This allows proton fields up to 25 cm in diameter, with a maximum range from 5.5 to 32 cm and spread-out-Bragg-peak extent up to 20 cm. Monte Carlo simulations have been run using MCNPX to simulate the clinical beam properties. Those calculations have been used to commission a commercial treatment planning system prior to final clinical measurements. MCNPX was also used to calculate the neutron background generated by protons in the scattering system and patient. Additional details of the facility and current status will be presented.

  15. Outcomes of locally advanced prostate cancer: a single institution study of 209 patients in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshihiro Saito; Yasuo Kitamura; Shuichi Komatsubara; Yasuo Matsumoto; Tadashi Sugita; Noboru Hara

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the outcomes for Asian populations with locally advanced/clinical stage Ⅲ prostate cancer (Pca)treated with currently prevailing modalities. Methods: We reviewed the record of 209 patients with clinical stage Ⅲ Pca, who were treated at Niigata Cancer Center Hospital between 1992 and 2003. Treatment options included hormone therapy-combined radical prostatectomy (RP+HT), hormone therapy-combined external beam irradiation (EBRT+HT) and primary hormone therapy (PHT). Results: The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 80.3%and 46.1% in all cohorts, respectively. The survival rates were 87.3% and 66.5% in the RP+HT group, 94.9% and 70.0% in the EBRT+HT group and 66.1% and 17.2% in the PHT group, respectively. A significant survival advantage was found in the EBRT+HT group compared with that in the PHT group (P < 0.0001). Also, the RP+HT group had better survival than the PHT group (P = 0.0107). The 5- and 10-year disease-specific survival rates for all cases were 92.5% and 80.0%, respectively. They were 93.8% and 71.4% in the RP+HT group, 96.6% and 93.6% in the EBRT+HT group and 88.6% and 62.3% in the PHT group, respectively. A survival advantage was found in the EBRT+HT group compared with the PHT group (P = 0.029). No significant difference was found in disease-specific survival between the EBRT+HT and RP+HT groups or between the RP+HT and PHT groups. Conclusion: Although our findings indicate that radiotherapy plus HT has a survival advantage in this stage of Pca, we recommend therapies that take into account the patients' social and medical conditions for Asian men with clinical stage Ⅲ PCa.

  16. Collaboration Opportunities with the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB) at NCI | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB) at the National Cancer Institute has developed the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB), which is a unique infrastructure for collecting biospecimens for the purpose of conducting biospecimen research. Biospecimens from the BPV program will be made available to collaborators with the capability to perform molecular analysis as part of a collaborative research agreement with the NCI-BBRB.

  17. Improved Methods for the Clinical Manufacture of Proteins Used In Cancer Immunotherapy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is an immune system modulating protein (cytokine) that stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of T- lymphocytes.  In the clinical context, IL-15 is being investigated for use in the treatment of diseases such as cancer.  Manufacture of IL-15 for clinical use can be problematic. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to co-develop or license methods that facilitate pharmaceutical purification and processing of Interleukin-15 (IL-15).

  18. Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: a comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheyu; Zhang, Yefei; Franzin, Luisa; Cormier, Janice N; Chan, Wenyaw; Xu, Hua; Du, Xianglin L

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute's SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 breast and colorectal cancer patients were included. Age-adjusted breast cancer incidence was 134.74 per 100,000 in Texas and 131.78 per 100,000 in SEER in 1995-2011, whereas age-adjusted colorectal cancer incidence was 50.52 per 100,000 in Texas and 49.44 per 100,000 in SEER. Breast cancer incidence increased from 1995 to 2001, decreased from 2002 to 2006, and then remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2011. For colorectal cancer, the incidence increased in 1995-1997, and then decreased continuously from 1998 to 2011 in Texas and SEER areas. Incidence rates and relative risks by age, gender and ethnicity were identical between Texas and SEER.

  19. Minimally invasive esophagectomy for cancer: Single center experience after 44 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelović Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. At the Department of Minimally Invasive Upper Digestive Surgery of the Hospital for Digestive Surgery in Belgrade, hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy (hMIE has been a standard of care for patients with resectable esophageal cancer since 2009. As a next and final step in the change management, from January 2015 we utilized total minimally invasive esophagectomy (tMIE as a standard of care. Objective. The aim of the study was to report initial experiences in hMIE (laparoscopic approach for cancer and analyze surgical technique, major morbidity and 30-day mortality. Methods. A retrospective cohort study included 44 patients who underwent elective hMIE for esophageal cancer at the Department for Minimally Invasive Upper Digestive Surgery, Hospital for Digestive Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade from April 2009 to December 2014. Results. There were 16 (36% middle thoracic esophagus tumors and 28 (64% tumors of distal thoracic esophagus. Mean duration of the operation was 319 minutes (approximately five hours and 20 minutes. The average blood loss was 173.6 ml. A total of 12 (27% of patients had postoperative complications and mean intensive care unit stay was 2.8 days. Mean hospital stay after surgery was 16 days. The average number of harvested lymph nodes during surgery was 31.9. The overall 30-day mortality rate within 30 days after surgery was 2%. Conclusion. As long as MIE is an oncological equivalent to open esophagectomy (OE, better relation between cost savings and potentially increased effectiveness will make MIE the preferred approach in high-volume esophageal centers that are experienced in minimally invasive procedures.

  20. Managing Multi-Center Recruitment in the PLCO Cancer Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohagan, John K; Broski, Karen; Gren, Lisa H; Fouad, Mona N; Higgins, Darlene; Lappe, Karen; Ogden, Sheryl; Shambaugh, Vicki; Pinsky, Paul F; O'Brien, Barbara; Yurgalevich, Susan; Riley, Tom; Wright, Patrick; Prorok, Philip C

    2015-01-01

    There were significant recruitment challenges specific to the PLCO Cancer Screening Trial. Large numbers of participants were to be randomized from ten catchment areas nationwide within time and budgetary constraints. The eligible population was elderly and had to meet health and behavioral thresholds. Informed consent was required to participate and be randomized to screening for three cancers at periodic clinic visits or to a usual care arm that included no clinical visits. Consenting required special efforts to fully explain the trial and its potential scientific benefit to future patients with potentially no benefits but possible harms to PLCO participants. Participation would include continued follow-up for at least 13 years after randomization. Strong collaborative investments were required by the NCI and screening centers (SCs) to assure timely recruitment and appropriate racial participation. A trial-wide pilot phase tested recruitment and protocol follow through at SCs and produced a vanguard population of 11,406 participants. NCI announced the trial nationally in advance of the pilot and followed with an even more intense collaborative role with SCs for the main phase to facilitate trial-wide efficient and timely recruitment. Special efforts to enhance recruitment in the main phase included centralized and local monitoring of progress, cross-linking SCs to share experiences in problem solving, centralized training, substantial additional funding dedicated to recruitment and retention, including specialized programs for minority recruitment, obtaining national endorsement by the American Cancer Society, launching satellite recruitment and screening centers, including minority focused satellites, and adding a new SC dedicated to minority recruitment.

  1. An Institutional Retrospective Analysis of 93 Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer: Treatment Outcomes, Diagnosis-Specific Prognostic Factors

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic factors and indexes of a series of 93 patients with breast cancer and brain metastases (BM) in a single institution. Treatment outcomes were evaluated according to the major prognostic indexes (RPA, BSBM, GPA scores) and breast cancer subtypes. Independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) were identified. The median OS values according to GPA 0–1, 1.5–2, 2.5–3 and 3.5–4, were 4.5, 9.5, 14.2 and 19.1 months, respect...

  2. Prospective multi-center trial utilizing electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thropay John P

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A modified form of high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy has been developed called Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT. EBT uses a kilovolt X-ray source and does not require treatment in a shielded vault or a HDR afterloader unit. A multi-center clinical study was carried out to evaluate the success of treatment delivery, safety and toxicity of EBT in patients with endometrial cancer. Methods A total of 15 patients with stage I or II endometrial cancer were enrolled at 5 sites. Patients were treated with vaginal EBT alone or in combination with external beam radiation. Results The prescribed doses of EBT were successfully delivered in all 15 patients. From the first fraction through 3 months follow-up, there were 4 CTC Grade 1 adverse events and 2 CTC Grade II adverse events reported that were EBT related. The mild events reported were dysuria, vaginal dryness, mucosal atrophy, and rectal bleeding. The moderate treatment related adverse events included dysuria, and vaginal pain. No Grade III or IV adverse events were reported. The EBT system performed well and was associated with limited acute toxicities. Conclusions EBT shows acute results similar to HDR brachytherapy. Additional research is needed to further assess the clinical efficacy and safety of EBT in the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  3. 76 FR 66728 - Government-Owned Inventions; Licensing and Collaborative Research Opportunity for PANVAC-Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... the Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, NCI. The CRADA partner... Research Opportunity for PANVAC--Cancer Vaccine for the Prevention and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer... Technology Transfer Center, National Cancer Institute, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Suite 450, Rockville,...

  4. The Broad Institute: Screening for Dependencies in Cancer Cell Lines Using Small Molecules | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using cancer cell-line profiling, we established an ongoing resource to identify, as comprehensively as possible, the drug-targetable dependencies that specific genomic alterations impart on human cancers. We measured the sensitivity of hundreds of genetically characterized cancer cell lines to hundreds of small-molecule probes and drugs that have highly selective interactions with their targets, and that collectively modulate many distinct nodes in cancer cell circuitry.

  5. Predictors of pathologic complete response after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Cheol [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Kim, Mi Young; Oh, Young Ki; Baek, Sung Gyu [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To identify possible predictors of pathologic complete response (pCR) of rectal cancer after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). We conducted a retrospective review of 53 patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CCRT followed by radical surgery at a single center between January 2007 and December 2012. The median radiotherapy dose to the pelvis was 54.0 Gy (range, 45.0 to 63.0 Gy). Five-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy was administered via continuous infusion with leucovorin. The pCR rate was 20.8%. The downstaging rate was 66%. In univariate analyses, poor and undifferentiated tumors (p = 0.020) and an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (p = 0.040) were significantly associated with pCR, while female gender (p = 0.070), initial carcinoembryonic antigen concentration of <5.0 ng/dL (p = 0.100), and clinical stage T2 (p = 0.100) were marginally significant factors. In multivariate analysis, an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (odds ratio, 0.139; 95% confidence interval, 0.022 to 0.877; p = 0.036) was significantly associated with pCR, while stage T2 (odds ratio, 5.363; 95% confidence interval, 0.963 to 29.877; p = 0.055) was a marginally significant risk factor. We suggest that the interval from finishing CCRT to surgery is a predictor of pCR after preoperative CCRT in patients with rectal cancer. Stage T2 cancer may also be an important predictive factor. We hope to perform a robust study by collecting data during treatment to obtain more advanced results.

  6. State-of-the-art prostate cancer treatment and research. A report from the Cancer Institute of New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, R S; Kumar, P; Hait, W N; Weiss, R E

    2001-02-01

    Prostate cancer is a devastating disease that will be diagnosed in approximately 200,000 men in 2001. New methods for screening, prevention, and treatment are being developed. In addition, novel agents for the treatment of resistant prostate cancer are being developed in clinical trials. This review summarizes the recent efforts in diet, screening, novel systemic therapies, and alternative medicine for prostate cancer.

  7. Earthquake Education and Public Information Centers: A Collaboration Between the Earthquake Country Alliance and Free-Choice Learning Institutions in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degroot, R. M.; Springer, K.; Brooks, C. J.; Schuman, L.; Dalton, D.; Benthien, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    In 1999 the Southern California Earthquake Center initiated an effort to expand its reach to multiple target audiences through the development of an interpretive trail on the San Andreas fault at Wallace Creek and an earthquake exhibit at Fingerprints Youth Museum in Hemet. These projects and involvement with the San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands beginning in 2007 led to the creation of Earthquake Education and Public Information Centers (EPIcenters) in 2008. The impetus for the development of the network was to broaden participation in The Great Southern California ShakeOut. In 2009 it has grown to be more comprehensive in its scope including its evolution into a statewide network. EPIcenters constitute a variety of free-choice learning institutions, representing museums, science centers, libraries, universities, parks, and other places visited by a variety of audiences including families, seniors, and school groups. They share a commitment to demonstrating and encouraging earthquake preparedness. EPIcenters coordinate Earthquake Country Alliance activities in their county or region, lead presentations or organize events in their communities, or in other ways demonstrate leadership in earthquake education and risk reduction. The San Bernardino County Museum (Southern California) and The Tech Museum of Innovation (Northern California) serve as EPIcenter regional coordinating institutions. They interact with over thirty institutional partners who have implemented a variety of activities from displays and talks to earthquake exhibitions. While many activities are focused on the time leading up to and just after the ShakeOut, most EPIcenter members conduct activities year round. Network members at Kidspace Museum in Pasadena and San Diego Natural History Museum have formed EPIcenter focus groups on early childhood education and safety and security. This presentation highlights the development of the EPIcenter network, synergistic activities resulting from this

  8. Knowledge, attitude and preventive practices of women for breast cancer in the educational institutions of Lahore, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokher, Samina; Qureshi, Warda; Mahmood, Saqib; Saleem, Afaf; Mahmud, Sumbal

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer incidence rates, pattern of presentation and survival rates vary worldwide. High incidence, advanced stage disease presentation and low survival rates have been reported from Pakistan. Lack of awareness and screening facilities along with poor socioeconomic status are the main causes. A survey based upon multiple choice questionnaires was conducted during an awareness campaign in women educational institutions of Lahore, to assess the baseline knowledge, attitude towards breast self examination (BSE), clinical breast examination (CBE) and source of information used by them. 1155 filled questionnaires were analyzed by SPSS version 12. The majority (83.7%) of the respondents were 10 and 31.5% had education. Only 27% had "good" while 14% had "poor" and 59% had "fair" knowledge scores about breast cancer. Television was the most commonly cited source of information but was associated with lower knowledge score. The knowledge scores and practice of BSE had a positive association with education level. The respondents had better knowledge of life time risk and association of early diagnosis with better chances of cure, but worse knowledge of risk factors as compared to women in educational institutions of other countries. Generally the respondents of present study had low level of knowledge of breast cancer. Properly designed awareness campaign on television and in educational institutions can be effective to raise the knowledge level, the best long term strategy for this purpose.

  9. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; McMaken, Bruce; Styles, John; Cox, James

    2003-08-01

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week.

  10. Bacteriological profile and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of clinical isolates in a tertiary care cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Bhat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This increased risk of bacterial infections in the cancer patient is further compounded by the rising trends of antibiotic resistance in commonly implicated organisms. In the Indian setting this is particularly true in case of Gram negative bacilli such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter spp. Increasing resistance among Gram positive organisms is also a matter of concern. The aim of this study was to document the common organisms isolated from bacterial infections in cancer patients and describe their antibiotic susceptibilities. Methods: We conducted a 6 month study of all isolates from blood, urine, skin/soft tissue and respiratory samples of patients received from medical and surgical oncology units in our hospital. All samples were processed as per standard microbiology laboratory operating procedures. Isolates were identified to species level and susceptibility tests were performed as per Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines -2012. Results: A total of 285 specimens from medical oncology (114 and surgical oncology services (171 were cultured. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter spp. were most commonly encountered. More than half of the Acinetobacter strains were resistant to carbapenems. Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae to cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones and carbapenems was >50%. Of the Staphylococcus aureus isolates 41.67% were methicillin resistant. Conclusion: There is, in general, a high level of antibiotic resistance among gram negative bacilli, particularly E. coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter spp. Resistance among Gram positives is not as acute, although the MRSA incidence is increasing.

  11. The struturing of an Ergonomics Program as a Center of Occupational Health Component in a public health institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugão, Suzana S M; Ricart, Simone L S I; Pinheiro, Renata M S; Gonçalves, Waldney M

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the description and discussion of a pilot project in an ergonomic action developed in a public health institution. This project involves the implantation of an Ergonomics Program (PROERGO) in a department of this institution, guided by a methodology structured on six stages, referenced in the literature by ergonomics authors. The methodology includes the training of workers and the formation of facilitators and multipliers of the ergonomics actions, aiming to the implementation of a cyclical process of actions and the consolidation of an ergonomics culture in the organization. Starting from the results of this experiment we intend to replicate this program model in other departments of the institution and to propose the methodology applied as a strategy of intervention to Occupational Health area.

  12. Provider beliefs associated with cervical cancer screening interval recommendations: A pilot study in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine B. Roland

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Messages that promote the benefits of longer screening intervals after a normal co-test, the natural history of human papillomavirus and cervical cancer, and low risk of developing cancer with a longer interval may be useful to promote evidence-based screening in this population of Federally Qualified Health Center providers. Dissemination of targeted messages through professional journals and specialty organizations should be considered.

  13. Final Report: Northeastern Regional Center of the DOE's National Institute for Climatic Change Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Kenneth

    2014-01-14

    Administration of the NERC of NICCR began at Penn State in December of 2005 and ended in December of 2011. During that time, five requests for proposals were released and five rounds of proposals were reviewed, awarded and administered. Throughout this award, 203 pre-proposals have been received by the NERC in five RFPS and 110 full proposals invited. Of the 110 full proposals reviewed, 53 were funded (most in full, some partially) resulting in 51 subcontracts. These awards were distributed among 17 universities and 3 non-governmental research institutes. Full proposals have been received from 29 universities and 5 non-governmental research institutes. Research activities have now been completed.

  14. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... promising opportunities based on nanotechnology from academic research to the clinical environment; 4... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To Promote Translational Research and Development Opportunities of Nanotechnology-Based Cancer...

  15. A pilot study to assess the level of depression and the coping strategies adopted by cancer patients receiving treatment in Mizoram State Cancer Institute, Aizawl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitumoni Konwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer, the second most common cause of death, has become a major health problem. Depression is the most common psychological problem encountered in patients with cancer. The coping skills adopted may affect the mental health of patients. Therefore, this research is undertaken to assess the level of depression and coping strategy adopted by the patients diagnosed with cancer. Materials and methods: A descriptive study to assess the level of depression and coping strategy adopted by cancer patients receiving treatment in Mizoram State Cancer Institute, Aizawl was carried out from April to May 2014 with 30 convenient samples. Depression was assessed by using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS developed by Zigmond and Snaith in 1983. Coping strategy adopted by patients were assessed by revised version of the Ways of Coping Checklist developed by Folkman and Lazarus in 1985. Results: Findings of the study showed that depression was universal to all the cancer patients. Majority of cancer patients (66.5% had moderate depression while 13.26% of the cancer patients had severe depression, and only 6.7% of them reported to have low depression. The most effective coping strategy adopted was reappraisal, followed by distancing. There is significant correlation between depression and reappraisal (r=-0.538, p<0.002, and also with depression and acceptance (r=-0.415, p<0.022 strategies. Conclusion: As depression is universal to all cancer patients, use of appropriate coping strategy is very essential to improve their quality of life. The recognition of coping strategies by health team may enable appropriate information and interventions to be provided at optimal times for each individual.

  16. 76 FR 45825 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Institute of Medicine Report...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... Process; Institute of Medicine Report: ``Medical Devices and the Public's Health, The FDA 510(k) Clearance... Medicine (IOM) report entitled: ``Medical Devices and the Public's Health, The FDA 510(k) Clearance Process.... ADDRESSES: See the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for electronic access to the document....

  17. Aggressive Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Increases Survival: A Scandinavian Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Watten Brudvik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We examined overall and disease-free survivals in a cohort of patients subjected to resection of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRLM in a 10-year period when new treatment strategies were implemented. Methods. Data from 239 consecutive patients selected for liver resection of CRLM during the period from 2002 to 2011 at a single center were used to estimate overall and disease-free survival. The results were assessed against new treatment strategies and established risk factors. Results. The 5-year cumulative overall and disease-free survivals were 46 and 24%. The overall survival was the same after reresection, independently of the number of prior resections and irrespectively of the location of the recurrent disease. The time intervals between each recurrence were similar (11 ± 1 months. Patients with high tumor load given neoadjuvant chemotherapy had comparable survival to those with less extensive disease without neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Positive resection margin or resectable extrahepatic disease did not affect overall survival. Conclusion. Our data support that one still, and perhaps to an even greater extent, should seek an aggressive therapeutic strategy to achieve resectable status for recurrent hepatic and extrahepatic metastases. The data should be viewed in the context of recent advances in the understanding of cancer biology and the metastatic process.

  18. Interactive breast cancer segmentation based on relevance feedback: from user-centered design to evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouze, A.; Kieffer, S.; Van Brussel, C.; Moncarey, R.; Grivegnée, A.; Macq, B.

    2009-02-01

    Computer systems play an important role in medical imaging industry since radiologists depend on it for visualization, interpretation, communication and archiving. In particular, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems help in lesion detection tasks. This paper presents the design and the development of an interactive segmentation tool for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. The tool conception is based upon a user-centered approach in order to ensure that the application is of real benefit to radiologists. The analysis of user expectations, workflow and decision-making practices give rise to the need for an interactive reporting system based on the BIRADS, that would not only include the numerical features extracted from the segmentation of the findings in a structured manner, but also support human relevance feedback as well. This way, the numerical results from segmentation can be either validated by end-users or enhanced thanks to domain-experts subjective interpretation. Such a domain-expert centered system requires the segmentation to be sufficiently accurate and locally adapted, and the features to be carefully selected in order to best suit user's knowledge and to be of use in enhancing segmentation. Improving segmentation accuracy with relevance feedback and providing radiologists with a user-friendly interface to support image analysis are the contributions of this work. The preliminary result is first the tool conception, and second the improvement of the segmentation precision.

  19. Laparoscopic and open postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection in patients with advanced testicular cancer – a single center analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busch Jonas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The open approach represents the gold standard for postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (O-PCLND in patients with residual testicular cancer. We analyzed laparoscopic postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (L-PCLND and O-PCLND at our institution. Methods Patients underwent either L-PCLND (n = 43 or O-PCLND (n = 24. Categorical and continuous variables were compared using the Fisher exact test and Mann–Whitney U test respectively. Overall survival was evaluated with the log-rank test. Results Primary histology was embryonal cell carcinomas (18 patients, pure seminoma (2 cases and mixed NSGCTs (47 patients. According to the IGCCCG patients were categorized into “good”, “intermediate” and “poor prognosis” disease in 55.2%, 14.9% and 20.8%, respectively. Median operative time for L-PCLND was 212 min and 232 min for O-PCLND (p = 0.256. Median postoperative duration of drainage and hospital stay was shorter after L-PCLND (0.0 vs. 3.5 days; p 500 ml was almost equally distributed (8.6% vs. 14.2%: p = 0.076. No significant differences were observed for injuries of major vessels and postoperative complications (p = 0.758; p = 0.370. Tumor recurrence occurred in 8.6% following L-PCLND and in 14.2% following O-PCLND with a mean disease-free survival of 76.6 and 89.2 months, respectively. Overall survival was 83.3 and 95.0 months for L-PCNLD and O-PCLND, respectively (p = 0.447. Conclusions L-PCLND represents a safe surgical option for well selected patients at an experienced center.

  20. Pazopanib in metastatic renal cancer: a “real-world” experience at National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Chiara Cecere

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a real-world study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS and the overall survival (OS were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included Objective Response Rate (ORR, Disease Control Rate (DCR, and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-18.5 months. The median OS (mOS was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6-39.9 months; the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3% and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (3, gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR=0.05 [95% CI, 0.05-055], p=0.01; HR=0.10 [95% CI, 0.02-0.43], p=0.002 respectively. A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p= 0.2 and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites 6 (p= 0.08. Worst OS was observed in patients age >70 years old (HR=6.91 [95% CI, 1.49-31.91], p=0.01. The treatment was well tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR=0.22 [95% CI, 0.05-0.8], p=0.03 and thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR=0.12 [95% CI, 0.02-0.78], p=0.02. Our results are consistent with those reported in prospective phase III trials and the published retrospective

  1. Change in the risk stratification of prostate cancer after Slide Review by a uropathologist: the experience of a reference center for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Camara-Lopes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Brachytherapy is an option for treating low-risk prostate cancer (PC. Biochemical control of low-risk disease can reach 95%. The practice advocated is that a review of prostate biopsies should be mandatory before choosing the best treatment for patients with PC. Our objective was to evaluate the change in PC risk after review of a prostate biopsy by an experienced uropathologist at a reference hospital. Materials and Methods Between December 2003 and August 2012, 182 men were referred to our institution for brachytherapy to treat PC. Their slides were reviewed by the same uropathologist. Results and Discussion Classification risk disagreement occurred in 71 (39% cases, including one in which no tumor was observed. The main cause of risk change was related to the Gleason score (GS, with 57 (81.4% cases upgraded to GS 7 or 8. Tumor volume was also compared, although only the number of fragments was reported in most original reports. The concordance of the number of cores affected by tumor was 43.9%, and in 49% of the cases, the number was decreased by the uropathologist. Perineural invasion (PNI was reported in one quarter of original reports, and the agreement was 58%. Conclusion Slide review by an uropathologist remains essential at reference radiotherapy centers for the treatment of PC. The change in PC risk evaluation is mainly due to the GS, but tumor volume and PNI, which are important for the characterization of tumor aggressiveness, are also misinterpreted and could drive a change in the therapy choice.

  2. RSB: Research Specimen Banking across the Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Pense, Rick; Grose, Tim; Anderson, Lynn; Lee, H

    2001-01-01

    Research Specimen Banking (RSB) system is a component of the translational investigations infrastructure at Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. It was implemented to provide specimen management functions to support basic science cancer research taking place in conjunction with caner clinical trials. RSB handles the receipt and distribution of clinical specimens to the research labs, with identifiers that both mask personal identity and enable linkage of clinical data to correlative re...

  3. Children Thyroid Cancer treatment in Saint-Petersburg Endocrine SurgeryCenter and Mayo Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Filippovich Romanchishen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThyroid cancer (TC is the most often malignant tumor in childhood and made 1.5 – 3.0% of all children population or 45.3% of pediatric endocrine epithelial cancers. A lot of questions concerning to volume of thyroid surgery, postoperative radio iodine therapy (RIT needs to be discussed.AimEstimation of childhood sporadic thyroid cancer specificity and comparison of children and adolescents treatment in Saint-Petersburg Endocrine Surgery Center (Russia and Mayo Clinic (USA.Material and methodsDuring 1970 –2011 in the Saint-Petersburg Center (1 group were operated 105 TC children and adolescent (up to 20 yeas and in Mayo Clinic – 188 (2 group in  1940 – 2000 period. Since of 80-s in those clinics were used the same perioperative examinations, like TSH, T4, T3 blood levels, USG, fine needles aspiration biopsy, CT and morphological examinations.Results and discussionAverage age of the Saint-Petersburg Center and Rochester patients was the same and achieve 16.3±0.3 and 16.0±0.5, accordingly. In both groups has prevailed girls: in the 1 group they made 73.3% (M:F 1:2.7 and in the 2 – 70.7% (M:F 1:2.4. Childhood differentiated TC were associated with aggressive behavior: regional metastases were found in 53.0% and 81.4%, extrathyroid TC spreading – in 9.6 and 19.7%, distant metastases - in 9.6 and 4.8%, accordingly. In our Center (1 group we have performed hemithyroidectomies and subtotal Thyroidectomies in 58.1% with ipsilateral central neck dissection (CND. In Mayo Clinic in all TC cases were performed thyroidectomy (TE since 1950. TC relapses we have no   observed in 1 group and they have place in 6.9% 2 group patients, recurring lymphatic metastases – in 8.4% and 20.7%, accordingly. Radioiodine therapy (RIT has performed in 21.1% and 25.5% operated children.In 1 group 95 (96.0 % of 99 operated were alive during 5 – 36 years, in the 2– only in two cases reason of death was TC, but in 14 – other malignant tumor

  4. A new institution devoted to insect science: The Florida Museum of Natural History, McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akito Y.Kawahara; Thomas C.Emmel; Jacqueline Miller; Andrew D.Warren

    2012-01-01

    The Florida Museum of Natural History's McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity,on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville,Florida,has become one of the world's largest institutions for research on butterflies and moths,and an important research facility for insect science.The facility was constructed by combining the staff and merging the Lepidoptera holdings from the Allyn Museum of Entomology,the Florida State Collection of Arthropods and other University of Florida collections,and now includes over ten million specimens from all over the world,rivaling some of the largest Lepidoptera research collections globally.The facility includes a team of domestic and international researchers studying many areas of lepidopterology,including behavior,biodiversity,biogeography,ecology,genomics,physiology,systematics and taxonomy.In this paper,we introduce the McGuire Center,its staff,and the many research activities for researchers across entomological disciplines.

  5. Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research Practicum | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health and the Department of Nutrition at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health are offering a one week educational opportunity in "Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research" for individuals with a sustained commitment to nutrition and health promotion. This one-week intense learning session provides specialized instruction in the role of diet and bioactive food components as modifiers of cancer incidence and tumor behavior. |

  6. A Ten-Year Assessment of a Biomedical Engineering Summer Research Internship within a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A. S.; Wu, X.; Frye, C. A.; Mathur, A. B.; Patrick, C. W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A Biomedical Engineering Internship Program conducted within a Comprehensive Cancer Center over a 10 year period was assessed and evaluated. Although this is a non-traditional location for an internship, it is an ideal site for a multidisciplinary training program for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. We made a…

  7. Comparison of Serum Selenium Levels in Breast Cancer Patients and Healthy People at a Cancer Institute in 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Maleki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast Cancer is one of the most important fatal cancers in women. The mean age of breast cancer in Iran is 48.8 years which is very lower than other countries. Selenium can play an important role in reduction of cancer in several ways, for example selenium increases immunity response and protects cells from oxidation of free radicals and also decreases carcinogenic metabolites. Breast cancer is one of the most important cancers in our country because its incidence is very high and the mean age of patients is very low. Different studies have shown the benefits of selenium in prevention of cancer and since many years selenium has been used as a dietary supplement in advanced countries. Several studies regarding relationship between selenium levels and breast cancer have been done in different countries. We therefore planned a study to evaluate serum selenium levels in breast cancer patients and compare them with a healthy control group. Methods: We selected 45 patients younger than 48 years old and 33 patients older than 48 years old who had not yet received any therapy (surgery, chemotherapy, etc for their cancer as a case group and 46 healthy people who were matched with the patients as a control group and included 23 persons younger and 23 persons older than 48 years old. From each participant, 5cc blood was derived and in several stages, serum selenium levels were evaluated using atomic absorption technology. Data about type of cancer, stage, grade, IHC and cigarette smoking were also collected. Results: The mean Se level was 161.20 μg/l (SD=46.27 μg/l in the patients and 189.13 μg/l (SD=48.75 μg/l in the control group that was statistically significant (P48 years old was 155.39 μg/l (SD=46.68 μg/l that was lower than the control groups. Difference in serum selenium levels between patients and controls in the older group was significant (P=0.007, but in the younger group, it was not statistically significant (P=0

  8. [A rare cancer: cancers of the small intestine. 25 cases diagnosed at the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar from 1992 to 2001].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharisolo Vololonantenaina, C R; Dina, T J N; Ravalisoa, A

    2003-01-01

    A retrospective survey of cases of cancer of the small intestine observed in the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar (IPM), in the Centre Hospitalier de Soavinandriana (CenHoSoa) and in the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d'Antananarivo/Hôpital Joseph Ravoahangy Andrianavalona (CHUA/HJRA), has been undertaken with the goal to find out epidemiological and diagnostical particularities, as well as the therapeutic measures and their results. Only 25 cases have been found in 10 years (from 1992 to 2001). They represent 5.4% of the digestive cancers diagnosed by the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar. They concern 14 women and 11 men with a mean age of 36 years old at the time of diagnosis. The motive of hospitalization was an acute abdomen (peritonitis, perforation, occlusive syndrome, König's syndrome) in 64.3%, and a chronic abdominal pain often associated with abdominal mass in 35.7%. The duodenum is the predilection seat of the small bowel cancers (50%), followed by the ileum (25%) and the jejunum (10%). A diffuse shape has been observed in 15% of the cases. The most frequent histological type is the lymphoma (40%) followed by the adenocarcinoma (32%).

  9. Preliminary results of robotic colorectal surgery at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Saad Zaghloul

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the outcomes of robotic colorectal cancer intervention in Egyptian patients. Our preliminary results suggest that robotic-assisted surgery for colorectal cancer can be carried out safely and according to oncological principles.

  10. Predictors of Radiation Therapy Noncompliance in an Urban Academic Cancer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Rapkin, Bruce D. [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Debayan; Haynes-Lewis, Hilda; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Garg, Madhur, E-mail: mgarg@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the frequency of patient noncompliance in an urban radiation oncology department and identify predictors of noncompliance. Methods and Materials: We identified patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent in our department from 2007 to 2012 for 1 of 7 commonly treated malignancies. Patients who missed 2 or more scheduled RT appointments were deemed “noncompliant.” An institutional database was referenced to obtain clinical and demographic information for each patient, as well as a quantitative estimate of each patient's socioeconomic status. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with RT noncompliance. Results: A total of 2184 patients met eligibility criteria. Of these, 442 (20.2%) were deemed “noncompliant.” On multivariate analysis, statistically significant predictors of noncompliance included diagnosis of head-and-neck, cervical, or uterine cancer, treatment during winter months, low socioeconomic status, and use of a long treatment course (all P<.05). Conclusion: This is the first large effort examining patient noncompliance with daily RT. We have identified demographic, clinical, and treatment-related factors that can be used to identify patients at high risk for noncompliance. These findings may inform future strategies to improve adherence to prescribed therapy.

  11. 2D AND 3D dose verification at The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital using EPIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijnheer, Ben; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Tielenburg, Rene; Van Herk, Marcel; Vijlbrief, Ron; Stroom, Joep

    2010-11-01

    A review is given of the clinical use of EPID dosimetry in the Department of Radiation Oncology of The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital. All curative plans (almost all IMRT or VMAT) are verified with EPID dosimetry, mostly in vivo. The 2D approach for IMRT verification and the 3D method for VMAT verification are elucidated and their clinical implementation described. It has been shown that EPID dosimetry plays an important role in the total chain of verification procedures that are implemented in our department. It provides a safety net for advanced treatments such as IMRT and VMAT, as well as a full account of the dose delivered.

  12. Pazopanib in Metastatic Renal Cancer: A “Real-World” Experience at National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Sabrina C.; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Della Pepa, Chiara; Di Napoli, Marilena; Crispo, Anna; Iovane, Gelsomina; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Domenico; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Maiolino, Piera; Muto, Paolo; Perdonà, Sisto; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Facchini, Gaetano; D'Aniello, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a “real-world” study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS) and the overall survival (OS) were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS) of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9–18.5 months). The median OS (mOS) was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6–39.9 months); the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3 and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (< 3 vs. ≥3), gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR = 0.05 [95% CI, 0.05–0.55], p = 0.01; HR = 0.10 [95% CI, 0.02–0.43], p = 0.002, respectively). A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p = 0.2) and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites < 6 vs. ≥6) (p = 0.08). Worst OS was observed in patients aged ≥70 years old (HR = 6.91 [95% CI, 1.49–31.91], p = 0.01). The treatment was well-tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR = 0.22 [95% CI, 0.05–0.8], p = 0.03). Thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism) seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR = 0.12 [95% CI, 0.02–0.78], p = 0.02). Our results are consistent with those reported in

  13. MRI and Diffusion-Weighted MRI Volumetry for Identification of Complete Tumor Responders After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Rectal Cancer: A Bi-institutional Validation Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambregts, Doenja M J; Rao, Sheng-Xiang; Sassen, Sander; Martens, Milou H; Heijnen, Luc a; Buijsen, Jeroen; Sosef, Meindert; Beets, Geerard L; Vliegen, Roy a; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Retrospective single-center studies have shown that diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is promising for identification of patients with rectal cancer with a complete tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), using certain volumetric thresholds.\

  14. Cryotherapy for Primary Treatment of Prostate Cancer: Intermediate Term Results of a Prospective Study from a Single Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alvarez Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Published data about cryotherapy for prostate cancer (PC treatment are based on case series with a lack of clinical trials and the inexistence of a validated definition of biochemical failure. A prospective study with standardized followup protocol was conducted in our institution. Material and Methods. Prospective study of a series of cases including 108 patients diagnosed with localized PC at clinical stage T1c-T2c treated by primary cryoablation and median followup of 61 months. Criteria of biochemical recurrence were unified according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO. End points were biochemical progression-free survival (BPFS, cancer-specific survival, and overall survival. Rate of complications was reported. Results. The BPFS for low-, medium-, and high-risk patients was 96.4%, 91.2%, and 62.2%, respectively. Cancer-specific survival was 98.1%. Overall survival reached 94.4%. Complications included incontinence in 5.6%, urinary tract obstruction in 1.9%, urethral sloughing in 5.6%, haematuria in 1.9%, perineal pain in 11.1%, and prostatorectal fistula in 0.9%. Erectile disfunction was found in 98.1%. Conclusions. Cryotherapy is an effective and minimally invasive treatment for primary PC in well-selected cases, with low surgical risk and good results in terms of BPFS, cancer-specific survival, and overall survival.

  15. Cryotherapy for Primary Treatment of Prostate Cancer: Intermediate Term Results of a Prospective Study from a Single Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, S. Alvarez; Arias Fúnez, F.; Bueno Bravo, C.; Rodríguez-Patrón Rodríguez, R.; Sanz Mayayo, E.; Palacios, V. Hevia; Burgos Revilla, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Published data about cryotherapy for prostate cancer (PC) treatment are based on case series with a lack of clinical trials and the inexistence of a validated definition of biochemical failure. A prospective study with standardized followup protocol was conducted in our institution. Material and Methods. Prospective study of a series of cases including 108 patients diagnosed with localized PC at clinical stage T1c-T2c treated by primary cryoablation and median followup of 61 months. Criteria of biochemical recurrence were unified according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO). End points were biochemical progression-free survival (BPFS), cancer-specific survival, and overall survival. Rate of complications was reported. Results. The BPFS for low-, medium-, and high-risk patients was 96.4%, 91.2%, and 62.2%, respectively. Cancer-specific survival was 98.1%. Overall survival reached 94.4%. Complications included incontinence in 5.6%, urinary tract obstruction in 1.9%, urethral sloughing in 5.6%, haematuria in 1.9%, perineal pain in 11.1%, and prostatorectal fistula in 0.9%. Erectile disfunction was found in 98.1%. Conclusions. Cryotherapy is an effective and minimally invasive treatment for primary PC in well-selected cases, with low surgical risk and good results in terms of BPFS, cancer-specific survival, and overall survival. PMID:24693437

  16. Multi-center evaluation of post-operative morbidity and mortality after optimal cytoreductive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Rafii

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: While optimal cytoreduction is the standard of care for advanced ovarian cancer, the related post-operative morbidity has not been clearly documented outside pioneering centers. Indeed most of the studies are monocentric with inclusions over several years inducing heterogeneity in techniques and goals of surgery. We assessed the morbidity of optimal cytoreduction surgery for advanced ovarian cancer within a short inclusion period in 6 referral centers dedicated to achieve complete cytoreduction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The 30 last optimal debulking surgeries of 6 cancer centers were included. Inclusion criteria included: stage IIIc- IV ovarian cancer and optimal surgery performed at the site of inclusion. All post-operative complications within 30 days of surgery were recorded and graded using the Memorial secondary events grading system. Student-t, Chi2 and non-parametric statistical tests were performed. RESULTS: 180 patients were included. There was no demographic differences between the centers. 63 patients underwent surgery including intestinal resections (58 recto-sigmoid resection, 24 diaphragmatic resections, 17 splenectomies. 61 patients presented complications; One patient died post-operatively. Major (grade 3-5 complications requiring subsequent surgeries occurred in 21 patients (11.5%. 76% of patients with a major complication had undergone an ultraradical surgery (P = 0.004. CONCLUSION: While ultraradical surgery may result in complete resection of peritoneal disease in advanced ovarian cancer, the associated complication rate is not negligible. Patients should be carefully evaluated and the timing of their surgery optimized in order to avoid major complications.

  17. Implementation of a Lateral TBI protocol in a Mexican Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Francisco; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko; Sosa, Modesto A.

    2008-08-01

    The development of a Lateral Total Body Irradiation protocol to be implemented at a High Specialty Medical Unit in Mexico as preparatory regimen for bone marrow transplant and treatment of several lymphomas is presented. This protocol was developed following AAPM specifications and has been validated for application at a cancer care center in United States. This protocol fundamentally focuses on patient care, avoiding instability and discomfort that may be encountered by other treatment regimes. In vivo dose verification with TLD-100 chips for each anatomical region of interest was utilized. TLD-100 chips were calibrated using a 6 MV photon beam for 10-120 cGy. Experimental results show TLD measurements with an error less than 1%. Standard deviations for calculated and measured doses for seven patients have been obtained. Data gathered for different levels of compensation indicate that a 3% measured tolerance level is acceptable. TLD point-dose measurements have been used to verify the dose beyond partial transmission lung blocks. Dose measurements beyond the lung block showed variation about 50% respects to prescribe dose. Midplane doses to the other anatomical sites were less than 2.5% respect of the prescribed dose.

  18. Strengthening the role of universities in addressing sustainability challenges: the Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions as an institutional experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. Hart

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As the magnitude, complexity, and urgency of many sustainability problems increase, there is a growing need for universities to contribute more effectively to problem solving. Drawing upon prior research on social-ecological systems, knowledge-action connections, and organizational innovation, we developed an integrated conceptual framework for strengthening the capacity of universities to help society understand and respond to a wide range of sustainability challenges. Based on experiences gained in creating the Senator George J. Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions (Mitchell Center, we tested this framework by evaluating the experiences of interdisciplinary research teams involved in place-based, solutions-oriented research projects at the scale of a single region (i.e., the state of Maine, USA. We employed a multiple-case-study approach examining the experiences of three interdisciplinary research teams working on tidal energy development, adaptation to climate change, and forest vulnerability to an invasive insect. Drawing upon documents, observations, interviews, and other data sources, three common patterns emerged across these cases that were associated with more effective problem-solving strategies. First, an emphasis on local places and short-term dynamics in social-ecological systems research provides more frequent opportunities for learning while doing. Second, iterative stakeholder engagement and inclusive forms of knowledge co-production can generate substantial returns on investment, especially when researchers are dedicated to a shared process of problem identification and they avoid framing solutions too narrowly. Although these practices are time consuming, they can be accelerated by leveraging existing stakeholder relationships. Third, efforts to mobilize interdisciplinary expertise and link knowledge with action are facilitated by an organizational culture that emphasizes mutual respect, adaptability, and solutions

  19. The Center for Environmental Kinetics Analysis: an NSF- and DOE-funded Environmental Molecular Science Institute (EMSI) at Penn State

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    S. L. Brantley; William D. Burgos; Brian A. Dempsey; Peter J. Heaney; James D. Kubicki; Peter C. Lichtner; Bruce E. Logan; Carmen E. Martinez; Karl T. Mueller; Kwadwo A. Osseo-Asare; Ming Tien; Carl I. Steefel, Glenn A. Waychunas; and John M. Zachara

    2007-04-19

    Physicochemical and microbiological processes taking place at environmental interfaces influence natural processes as well as the transport and fate of environmental contaminants, the remediation of toxic chemicals, and the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. A team of scientists and engineers has been assembled to develop and apply new experimental and computational techniques to expand our knowledge of environmental kinetics. We are also training a cohort of talented and diverse students to work on these complex problems at multiple length scales and to compile and synthesize the kinetic data. Development of the human resources capable of translating molecular-scale information into parameters that are applicable in real world, field-scale problems of environmental kinetics is a major and relatively unique objective of the Institute's efforts. The EMSI team is a partnership among 10 faculty at The Pennsylvania State University (funded by the National Science Foundation Divisions of Chemistry and Earth Sciences), one faculty member at Juniata College, one faculty member at the University of Florida, and four researchers drawn from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (funded by the Department of Energy Division of Environmental Remediation Sciences). Interactions among the applied and academic scientists drives research approaches aimed toward solving important problems of national interest. The Institute is organized into three interest groups (IGs) focusing on the processes of dissolution (DIG), precipitation (PIG), and microbial reactions at surfaces (BIG). Some of the research activity from each IG is highlighted to the right. The IGs interact with each other as each interest group studies reactions across the molecular, microscopic, mesoscopic and, in most cases, field scales. For example, abiotic dissolution and precipitation reactions of Fe oxides as studied in the Dissolution

  20. A Standard Set of Value-Based Patient-Centered Outcomes for Breast Cancer: The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wee Loon; Schouwenburg, Maartje G; van Bommel, Annelotte C M; Stowell, Caleb; Allison, Kim H; Benn, Karen E; Browne, John P; Cooter, Rodney D; Delaney, Geoff P; Duhoux, Francois P; Ganz, Patricia A; Hancock, Patricia; Jagsi, Reshma; Knaul, Felicia M; Knip, Anne M; Koppert, Linetta B; Kuerer, Henry M; McLaughin, Sarah; Mureau, Marc A M; Partridge, Ann H; Reid, Dereesa Purtell; Sheeran, Lisa; Smith, Thomas J; Stoutjesdijk, Mark J; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T F D; Wengström, Yvonne; Yip, Cheng-Har; Saunders, Christobel

    2016-12-29

    A major challenge in value-based health care is the lack of standardized health outcomes measurements, hindering optimal monitoring and comparison of the quality of health care across different settings globally. The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) assembled a multidisciplinary international working group, comprised of 26 health care providers and patient advocates, to develop a standard set of value-based patient-centered outcomes for breast cancer (BC). The working group convened via 8 teleconferences and completed a follow-up survey after each meeting. A modified 2-round Delphi method was used to achieve consensus on the outcomes and case-mix variables to be included. Patient focus group meetings (8 early or metastatic BC patients) and online anonymized surveys of 1225 multinational BC patients and survivors were also conducted to obtain patients' input. The standard set encompasses survival and cancer control, and disutility of care (eg, acute treatment complications) outcomes, to be collected through administrative data and/or clinical records. A combination of multiple patient-reported outcomes measurement (PROM) tools is recommended to capture long-term degree of health outcomes. Selected case-mix factors were recommended to be collected at baseline. The ICHOM will endeavor to achieve wide buy-in of this set and facilitate its implementation in routine clinical practice in various settings and institutions worldwide.

  1. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer Symptoms Symptoms of cancer ... tumor Obesity Pancreatic cancer Prostate cancer Stomach cancer Testicular cancer Throat or larynx cancer Thyroid cancer Patient Instructions ...

  2. The role of depression in the development of breast cancer: analysis of registry data from a single institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Ali; Jarvandi, Soghra; Ebrahimi, Mandana; Haghighat, Shahpar; Ansari, Mariam

    2004-01-01

    Although controversial, the belief that developing breast cancer may be associated with psychological distress is not uncommon. The present study examined the role of psychological variables in the development of breast cancer in women attending a breast clinic for medical examination in Tehran, Iran. During a three-year period (1997-1999) a trained female nurse interviewed all women attending the Iranian Center for Breast Cancer (ICBC) before a confirmed diagnosis was made (N = 3000). Data were collected on demographic variables (age, education and marital status), known risk factors (age at menarche, age at first time full term pregnancy, family history of breast cancer, menopausal status, and oral contraceptive use), psychological variables, including history of psychiatric medications, depression (depressed mood, hopelessness, and loss of interests and pleasures), anxiety (mental and somatic signs) and two single measures of overall health and quality of life. In all, 243 patients were diagnosed as having breast cancer. A total of 486 patients with benign disease were randomly selected from the original cohort as controls. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the predictive effect of each factor on the risk of breast cancer. There were no significant differences between cases and controls except for age at menarche (P = 0.007) and family history of breast cancer (P<0.001). With regard to psychological variables studied, the results showed that there were significant differences between cases and controls regarding depression (depressed mood P<0.0001, hopelessness P = 0.001, and loss of interest and pleasures P = 0.001), and anxiety (mental signs P = 0.006). Finally, after performing multiple logistic regression analysis in addition to family history and age at menarche, depressed mood and hopelessness showed significant results (odds ratios of 1.90, and 1.63 respectively). The findings of the present study suggest

  3. Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA): Universities, Oceanographic Institutions, Science Centers and Aquariums Working Together to Improve Ocean Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S.; McDonnell, J.; Halversen, C.; Zimmerman, T.

    2006-12-01

    Ocean observatories have already demonstrated their ability to maintain long-term time series, capture episodic events, provide context for improved shipboard sampling, and improve accessibility to a broader range of participants. Communicating Ocean Sciences, an already existing college course (http://www.cacosee.net/collegecourse) from COSEE California has demonstrated its ability to teach future scientists essential communication skills. The NSF-funded Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA) project will leverage these experiences and others to demonstrate a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. The COSIA effort will be one of the pathfinders for ensuring that the new scientific results from the increasing U.S. investments in ocean observatories is effectively communicated to the nation, and will serve as a model for other fields. Our presentation will describe a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. COSIA established partnerships between informal science education institutions and universities nationwide to facilitate quality outreach by scientists and the delivery of rigorous, cutting edge science by informal educators while teaching future scientists (college students) essential communication skills. The COSIA model includes scientist-educator partnerships that develop and deliver a college course derived from COS that teaches communication skills through the understanding of learning theory specifically related to informal learning environments and the practice of these skills at aquariums and science centers. The goals of COSIA are to: provide a model for establishing substantive, long-term partnerships between scientists and informal science education institutions to meet their respective outreach needs; provide future scientists with experiences delivering outreach to informal

  4. Advancing Cancer Systems Biology: Introducing the Center for the Development of a Virtual Tumor, CViT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Martin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrative cancer biology research relies on a variety of data-driven computational modeling and simulation methods and techniques geared towards gaining new insights into the complexity of biological processes that are of critical importance for cancer research. These include the dynamics of gene-protein interaction networks, the percolation of subcellular perturbations across scales and the impact they may have on tumorigenesis in both experiments and clinics. Such innovative ‘systems’ research will greatly benefi t from enabling Information Technology that is currently under development, including an online collaborative environment, a Semantic Web based computing platform that hosts data and model repositories as well as high-performance computing access. Here, we present one of the National Cancer Institute’s recently established Integrative Cancer Biology Programs, i.e. the Center for the Development of a Virtual Tumor, CViT, which is charged with building a cancer modeling community, developing the aforementioned enabling technologies and fostering multi-scale cancer modeling and simulation.

  5. [Bioethics in medical institutions--new custom or help? The example of clinical ethics consultation at a University Medical Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, G

    2014-08-01

    Although ethics committees are well established in the medical sciences for human clinical trials, animal research and scientific integrity, the development of clinical ethics in German hospitals started much later during the first decade of the twenty-first century. Clinical ethics consultation should be pragmatic and problem-centered and can be defined as an ethically qualified and informed conflict management within a given legal framework to deal with and resolve value-driven, normative problems in the care of patients. Clinical ethics consultations enable shared clinical decision-making of all parties (e.g. clinicians, patients, family and surrogates) involved in a particular patient's care. The clinical ethicist does not act as an ethics expert by making independent recommendations or decisions; therefore, the focus is different from other medical consultants. Ethics consultation was first established by healthcare ethics committees (HEC) or clinical ethics consultation (CEC) groups which were called in to respond to an ethically problematic situation. To avoid ethical dilemmas or crises and to act preventively with regard to ethical issues in individual patients, an ethics liaison service is an additional option to ethics case consultations which take place on a regular basis by scheduled ethics rounds during the normal ward rounds. The presence of the ethicist offers some unique advantages: it allows early recognition of even minor ethical problems and accommodates the dynamics of ethical and clinical goal-setting in the course of patient care. Most importantly, regular and non-authoritative participation of the ethicist in normal ward rounds allows continuous ethical education of the staff within the everyday clinical routine. By facilitating clinical ethical decision-making, the ethicist seeks to empower physicians and medical staff to deal appropriately with ethical problems by themselves. Because of this proactive approach, the ethics liaison service

  6. [Factors affecting the adoption of ICT tools in experiments with bioinformatics in biopharmaceutical organizations: a case study in the Brazilian Cancer Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitassi, Claudio; Gonçalves, Antonio Augusto; Moreno Júnior, Valter de Assis

    2014-01-01

    The scope of this article is to identify and analyze the factors that influence the adoption of ICT tools in experiments with bioinformatics at the Brazilian Cancer Institute (INCA). It involves a descriptive and exploratory qualitative field study. Evidence was collected mainly based on in-depth interviews with the management team at the Research Center and the IT Division. The answers were analyzed using the categorical content method. The categories were selected from the scientific literature and consolidated in the Technology-Organization-Environment (TOE) framework created for this study. The model proposed made it possible to demonstrate how the factors selected impacted INCA´s adoption of bioinformatics systems and tools, contributing to the investigation of two critical areas for the development of the health industry in Brazil, namely technological innovation and bioinformatics. Based on the evidence collected, a research question was posed: to what extent can the alignment of the factors related to the adoption of ICT tools in experiments with bioinformatics increase the innovation capacity of a Brazilian biopharmaceutical organization?

  7. Trends in Breast Reconstruction by Ethnicity: An Institutional Review Centered on the Treatment of an Urban Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodby, Katherine A; Danielson, Kirstie K; Shay, Elizabeth; Robinson, Emilie; Benjamin, Martin; Antony, Anuja K

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have investigated reconstructive decisions after mastectomy and such studies document a preference among African American women for autologous tissue-based procedures and among Latin American women for implant-based reconstructions, however, there is a paucity of studies evaluating the current relationship between ethnicity and reconstructive preferences. This institutional review provides a unique, up-to-date evaluation of an understudied urban population composed of majority ethnic minority patients and explores reconstructive trends. Consecutive breast reconstruction patients were entered into a prospectively maintained database at the University of Illinois at Chicago and affiliate hospitals between July 2010 and October 2013. Demographics and oncologic characteristics including tumor stage, pathology, BRCA status, and adjuvant treatment were reviewed, and reconstructive trends were assessed by racial group with a focus on reconstructive procedure, mastectomy volume, and implant characteristics. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS (version 9.2). One-hundred and sixty breast reconstructions were performed in 105 women; of which 50 per cent were African American, 26 per cent Hispanic, 22 per cent Caucasian, and 2 per cent Asian. Age, tumor stage, prevalence of triple negative disease, chemotherapy, and radiation treatment was comparable between groups. Rates of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus were slightly higher in African American and Hispanic cohorts, with more African American patients having one or more of these comorbidities as compared with the Caucasian and Hispanic cohorts (P = 0.047). Despite comparable positive BRCA testing rates, significant differences were seen in the percentage of bilateral mastectomy; 68 per cent African American, 48 per cent Caucasian, and 30 per cent Hispanic (P = 0.004). Hispanics predominantly underwent flap-based reconstruction (56%), while African American (74%) and Caucasian (60

  8. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients.

  9. Dose-Painted Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Report of Acute Toxicity and Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachnic, Lisa A., E-mail: lisa.kachnic@bmc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Tsai, Henry K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Coen, John J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hartshorn, Kevan [Department of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Kwak, Eunice L. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Willins, John D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Ryan, David P. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hong, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chemoradiation for anal cancer yields effective tumor control, but is associated with significant acute toxicity. We report our multi-institutional experience using dose-painted IMRT (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: Between August 2005 and May 2009, 43 patients were treated with DP-IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy for biopsy-proven, squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal at two academic medical centers. DP-IMRT was prescribed as follows: T2N0: 42 Gy, 1.5 Gy/fraction (fx) to elective nodal planning target volume (PTV) and 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fx to anal tumor PTV; T3-4N0-3: 45 Gy, 1.5 Gy/fx to elective nodal PTV, and 54 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fx to the anal tumor and metastatic nodal PTV >3 cm with 50.4 Gy, 1.68 Gy/fx to nodal PTVs {<=}3 cm in size. Acute and late toxicity was reported by the treating physician. Actuarial analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 58 years; 67% female; 16% Stage I, 37% II; 42% III; 5% IV. Fourteen patients were immunocompromised: 21% HIV-positive and 12% on chronic immunosuppression. Median follow-up was 24 months (range, 0.6-43.5 months). Sixty percent completed chemoradiation without treatment interruption; median duration of treatment interruption was 2 days (range, 2-24 days). Acute Grade 3+ toxicity included: hematologic 51%, dermatologic 10%, gastrointestinal 7%, and genitourinary 7%. Two-year local control, overall survival, colostomy-free survival, and metastasis-free survival were 95%, 94%, 90%, and 92%, respectively. Conclusions: Dose-painted IMRT appears effective and well-tolerated as part of a chemoradiation therapy regimen for the treatment of anal canal cancer.

  10. Cyberknife fractionated radiotherapy for adrenal metastases: Preliminary report from a multispecialty Indian cancer care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinanjan Basu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Metastasis to adrenal gland from lung, breast, and kidney malignancies are quite common. Historically radiotherapy was intended for pain palliation. Recent studies with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT including Cyberknife robotic radiosurgery aiming at disease control brings about encouraging results. Here we represent the early clinical experience with Cyberknife stereotactic system from an Indian cancer care center. The main purpose of this retrospective review is to serve as a stepping stone for future prospective studies with non- invasive yet effective technique compared to surgery. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed four cases of adrenal metastases (three: lung and one: renal cell carcinoma treated with Cyberknife SBRT. X sight spine tracking was employed for planning and treatment delivery. Patients were evaluated for local response clinically as well as with PETCT based response criteria.Results: With a median gross tumor volume of 20.5 cc and median dose per fraction of 10 Gy, two patients had complete response (CR and two had partial response (PR when assessed 8-12 weeks post treatment as per RECIST. There was no RTOG grade 2 or more acute adverse events and organs at risk dosage were acceptable. Till last follow up all the patients were locally controlled and alive. Conclusion: Cyberknife SBRT with its unique advantages like non- invasive, short duration outpatient treatment technique culminating in similar local control rates in comparison to surgery is an attractive option. World literature of linear accelerator based SBRT and our data with Cyberknife SBRT with small sample size and early follow up are similar in terms of local control in adrenal metastases. Future prospective data would reveal more information on the management of adrenal metastases.

  11. Acute inpatient palliative medicine in a cancer center: clinical problems and medical interventions--a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, Ruth; Rivera, Nilo; Walsh, Declan; LeGrand, Susan; Davis, Mellar P

    2007-01-01

    The clinical characteristics and medical interventions of the 100 consecutive cancer admissions to the acute care inpatient palliative medicine unit at the Cleveland Clinic for 2 months are described. Median age was 62 years (range, 31 to 92 years). The male-female ratio was 1:1. Most admissions were referred by hematology-oncology and had prior antineoplastic therapy. Reasons for admission were symptom control and cancer-related complications. Patients underwent invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, hydration, transfusions, radiation, or chemotherapy, or a combination, during their admission. Most were discharged home with hospice care or had outpatient clinic follow-up. The mortality rate was 20%. Aggressive multidisciplinary management of symptoms, disease complications, comorbid conditions, and psychosocial problems were provided. Palliative medicine physicians provided continuity of care in the outpatient clinic and at home. An acute inpatient palliative medicine unit within a tertiary level medical center has a definable and important role in comprehensive cancer care.

  12. Characteristics of Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric cancer: A study of 235 cases at a comprehensive cancer center in U.S.A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yingyan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV has been shown to be associated with gastric cancer. However, inconsistent findings have been reported regarding the distribution of EBV infected cells (in normal gastric epithelium vs. intestinal metaplastic cells vs. in neoplastic cells and the characteristics of EBV-associated gastric cancer. Lymph node positive EBV-associated gastric cancer has not been systematically studied. The aims of this study were to evaluate EBV-associated gastric cancer, to assess the distribution of EBV infected cells including all positive lymph nodes, and to define the characteristics of EBV-associated gastric cancer. Design The study included primary gastric cancer patients who underwent surgical resection with no preoperative treatment at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1987 and 2006. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from these resection specimens were assessed for EBV by in situ hybridization, the gold standard for EBV detection in tissue. EBV status was analyzed along with clinicopathologic parameters including age, gender, tumor type, lymph node status, and pathologic stage of the tumor. Results Among 235 patients, 12 had intranuclear expression of EBV. EBV staining was seen only in tumor cells and no detectable EBV was observed in normal gastric mucosa, intestinal metaplasia or stromal cells. Eight of 12 patients with EBV-associated gastric cancer had regional lymph node metastasis. Of note, metastatic tumor cells in all of the involved lymph nodes of these 8 cases contained EBV. The epidemiologic data showed 11 of the 12 patients with EBV-associated gastric cancer were men, ranging in age from 54 to 78 years (mean age, 60 years; median age, 62.1 years. The age distribution for non-EBV associated gastric cancer patients ranged from 21 to 93 years (mean age, 67 years; median age, 66.4 years. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that EBV is present exclusively in gastric cancer cells. The detection of EBV in

  13. Effect of Metformin Use on Survival in Resectable Pancreatic Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambe, Chenwi M; Mahipal, Amit; Fulp, Jimmy; Chen, Lu; Malafa, Mokenge P

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies have demonstrated that metformin use in diabetic patients is associated with reduced cancer incidence and mortality. Here, we aimed to determine whether metformin use was associated with improved survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. All patients with diabetes who underwent resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma between 12/1/1986 and 4/30/2013 at our institution were categorized by metformin use. Survival analysis was done using the Kaplan-Meier method, with log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards multivariable regression models. For analyses of our data and the only other published study, we used Meta-Analysis version 2.2. We identified 44 pancreatic cancer patients with diabetes who underwent resection of the primary tumor (19 with ongoing metformin use, 25 never used metformin). There were no significant differences in major clinical and demographic characteristics between metformin and non-metformin users. Metformin users had a better median survival than nonusers, but the difference was not statistically significant (35.3 versus 20.2 months; P = 0.3875). The estimated 2-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates for non-metformin users were 42%, 28%, and 14%, respectively. Metformin users fared better with corresponding rates of 68%, 34%, and 34%, respectively. In our literature review, which included 111 patients from the two studies (46 metformin users and 65 non-users), overall hazard ratio was 0.668 (95% CI 0.397-1.125), with P = 0.129. Metformin use was associated with improved survival outcomes in patients with resected pancreatic cancer, but the difference was not statistically significant. The potential benefit of metformin should be investigated in adequately powered prospective studies.

  14. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer: 30-Year Experience in a Single Institution in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jingu, Keiichi, E-mail: kjingu-jr@rad.med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Tanabe, Takaya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata (Japan); Ariga, Hisanori; Umezawa, Rei; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Ken; Koto, Masashi; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Kubozono, Masaki; Shimizu, Eiji; Abe, Keiko; Yamada, Shogo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with or without external beam radiotherapy ({+-} EBRT) for localized pancreatic cancer in the past three decades and to analyze prognostic factors by multivariate analysis. Methods and Materials: Records for 322 patients with pancreatic cancer treated by IORT {+-} EBRT in Tohoku University Hospital between 1980 and 2009 were reviewed. One hundred ninety-two patients who had no distant organ metastases or dissemination at the time of laparotomy were enrolled in the present study. Results: Eighty-three patients underwent gross total resection (R0: 48 patients, R1: 35 patients), and 109 patients underwent only biopsy or palliative resection. Fifty-five patients underwent adjuvant EBRT, and 124 underwent adjuvant chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 and 40 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up period was 37.5 months. At the time of the analysis, 166 patients had disease recurrence, and 35 patients had local failure. The 2-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) rates were 71.0% and 16.9%, respectively. Comparison of the results for each decade showed that OS was significantly improved decade by decade (2-year: 25.0% vs. 18.8% vs. 4.2%, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that degree of resection (R0-1 vs. R2, hazard ratio = 1.97, p = 0.001) and adjuvant chemotherapy (yes vs. no, hazard ratio = 1.54, p = 0.028) had significant impacts on OS. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grade 4 or 5 was observed in four patients. Conclusion: Excellent local control for pancreatic cancer with few cases of severe late toxicity was achieved by using IORT. OS of patients with pancreatic cancer treated by IORT {+-} EBRT improved significantly decade by decade. Multivariate analysis showed that degree of resection and adjuvant chemotherapy had significant impacts on OS.

  15. Positive impact of elastography in breast cancer diagnosis: an institutional experience

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Elastography (ES) is a technique that, when associated with traditional B mode ultrasound (US), allows the degree of elasticity of tissue to be evaluated according to a color scale system. The aims of the study were to compare the diagnostic characteristics of two widely used techniques adopted in breast cancer screening; US and color Doppler (CD), with those of the same two techniques plus ES, and assessment of the same diagnostic characteristics when the three methods were applied to lesion...

  16. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    biomarkers to determine the presence of or progression to aggressive disease. ( Lead site: FHCRC) Milestone 2. Execute collaboration agreement with...panel of four-kallikrein plasma-based markers to determine the presence of or progression to clinically relevant prostate cancer. ( Lead site: FHCRC... Lead site: FHCRC) Milestone 10. Urine specimens identified for analysis. Due 12/30/2014 COMPLETED Milestone 11. PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG validation

  17. [Awareness about breast cancer and mammography in elderly women who frequent Daycare Centers in São Paulo (SP, Brazil)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Glenda Dias; Chubaci, Rosa Yuka Sato

    2011-05-01

    Early detection at the initial stage of breast cancer through mammography is the best way of reducing morbidity and mortality rates. The scope of this study was to establish awareness about breast cancer and mammography among elderly women, if they take the exam and discover the reasons that lead them to take the exam or not. A cross-sectional and exploratory study was conducted with 98 elderly women in three Senior Citizen Daycare Centers in São Paulo. With respect to awareness of mammography as the exam used for early detection of breast cancer, 55% of the women answered that they knew. The majority of these women (77.6%) had taken the exam and 22.4% had never done so. The reasons most frequently cited for taking a mammography were concern with health (53.8%) and medical recommendation (38.5%). The reasons for not taking the exam were not having a medical recommendation (50%), conviction that they will never have the illness (23.1%), didn't feel symptoms (19.2%) and fear (7.7%). This study showed that the subject of "breast cancer" is well known by the women, however mammography needs to be explained better. The fact that there are elderly women who have never submitted to the exam reveals the ongoing need to stage educational campaigns about breast cancer and the early detection exams.

  18. 75 FR 71134 - National Institutes of Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting..., Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November 16, 2010. Jennifer S....

  19. The National Institutes of Health Affordable Cancer Technologies Program: Improving Access to Resource-Appropriate Technologies for Cancer Detection, Diagnosis, Monitoring, and Treatment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divi, Rao; Gwede, Michael; Tandon, Pushpa; Sorg, Brian S.; Ossandon, Miguel R.; Agrawal, Lokesh; Pai, Vinay; Baker, Houston; Lash, Tiffani Bailey

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) technologies have proved valuable in cancer detection, diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment in the developed world, and have shown promise in low-and-middle-income countries (LMIC) as well. Despite this promise, the unique design constraints presented in low-resource settings, coupled with the variety of country-specific regulatory and institutional dynamics, have made it difficult for investigators to translate successful POC cancer interventions to the LMIC markets. In response to this need, the National Cancer Institute has partnered with the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering to create the National Institutes of Health Affordable Cancer Technologies (ACTs) program. This program seeks to simplify the pathway to market by funding multidisciplinary investigative teams to adapt and validate the existing technologies for cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment in LMIC settings. The various projects under ACTs range from microfluidic cancer diagnostic tools to novel treatment devices, each geared for successful clinical adaptation to LMIC settings. Via progression through this program, each POC innovation will be uniquely leveraged for successful clinical translation to LMICs in a way not before seen in this arena. PMID:27730015

  20. Age-dependent Characteristics in Women with Breast Cancer: Mastectomy and Reconstructive Trends at an Urban Academic Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodby, Katherine A; Robinson, Emilie; Danielson, Kirstie K; Quinn, Karina P; Antony, Anuja K

    2016-03-01

    Breast reconstruction is an important aspect of treatment after breast cancer. Postmastectomy reconstruction bears a significant impact on a woman's postsurgical confidence, sexuality, and overall well-being. Previous studies have inferred that women under age 40 years have unique characteristics that distinguish them from an older cohort. Identifying age-dependent trends will assist with counseling women on mastectomy and reconstruction. To identify age-dependent trends, 100 consecutive women were sampled from a prospectively maintained breast reconstruction database at an urban academic institution from June 2010 through June 2013. Women were placed into two cohorts breast cancer. Younger women typically present with more aggressive features requiring oncologic treatment including chemotherapy and radiation. Mastectomy and reconstructive choices also demonstrate age-dependent characteristics. Women in younger age groups are more likely to pursue risk-reduction procedures and implant-based strategies, whereas older women had a higher propensity for abdominal-based autologous reconstruction. In addition, preferential reconstructive strategies correlate with age-dependent archetypical features of the breast (higher profile implants in younger patients; autologous reconstruction on affected side mimicking natural ptosis, and contralateral mastopexy in older patients). These trends seem to be consistent with each increasing year of age. Age-related preferences and expectations, age-dependent body habitus and breast shape, and lifetime risk play a role in the choices pursued for mastectomy and reconstruction.

  1. Comparison between preoperative and postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: An institutional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jun Gi; Oh, Seong Taek; Chung, Hyuk Jun; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Jeong, Song Mi; Yoon, Sel Chul; Jang, Hong Seok [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes of preoperative versus postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on locally advanced rectal cancer. Medical data of 114 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with CRT preoperatively (54 patients) or postoperatively (60 patients) from June 2003 to April 2011 was analyzed retrospectively. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) or a precursor of 5-FU-based concurrent CRT (median, 50.4 Gy) and total mesorectal excision were conducted for all patients. The median follow-up duration was 43 months (range, 16 to 118 months). The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS). The secondary end points were overall survival (OS), locoregional control, toxicity, and sphincter preservation rate. The 5-year DFS rate was 72.1% and 48.6% for the preoperative and postoperative CRT group, respectively (p = 0.05, the univariate analysis; p = 0.10, the multivariate analysis). The 5-year OS rate was not significantly different between the groups (76.2% vs. 69.0%, p = 0.23). The 5-year locoregional control rate was 85.2% and 84.7% for the preoperative and postoperative CRT groups (p = 0.98). The sphincter preservation rate of low-lying tumor showed significant difference between both groups (58.1% vs. 25.0%, p = 0.02). Pathologic tumor and nodal down-classification occurred after the preoperative CRT (53.7% and 77.8%, both p < 0.001). Acute and chronic toxicities were not significantly different between both groups (p = 0.10 and p = 0.62, respectively). The results confirm that preoperative CRT can be advantageous for improving down-classification rate and the sphincter preservation rate of low-lying tumor in rectal cancer.

  2. Center for the Evaluation of Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    cancer, recombinant erythropoietin (Epo) has declined in use because of recent Phase III trials showing more rapid cancer progression and reduced...Djulbegovic B et al. Venous thromboembo- lism and mortality associated with recombinant erythropoietin and dar- bepoetin administration for the

  3. Nasopharyngeal cancer mimicking otitic barotrauma in a resource-challenged center: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Adekunle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Nasopharyngeal cancer commonly manifests with cervical lymphadenopathy, recurrent epistaxis and progressive nasal obstruction. Neuro-ophthalmic and otologic manifestations can also occur. Isolated otologic presentations of nasopharyngeal cancer are rare and the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal cancer may not be foremost in the list of differentials. Case presentation We present the case of a 29-year-old Nigerian woman with bilateral conductive hearing loss and tinnitus after air travel. There were no other symptoms. The persistence of the symptoms after adequate treatment for otitic barotrauma necessitated re-evaluation, which led to a diagnosis of nasopharyngeal cancer. Conclusion Isolated otologic manifestations of nasopharyngeal cancer are rare in regions with low incidence of the disease. There is a need for it to be considered as a possible differential in patients presenting with bilateral serous otitis media.

  4. Status of Activities on Rehabilitation Of Radioactively Contaminated Facilities and the Site of Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, V. G.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Melkov, E. S; Ryazantsev, E. P.; Dikarev, V. S.; Gorodetsky, G. G.; Zverkov, Yu. A.; Kuznetsov, V. V.; Kuznetsova, T. I.

    2003-02-25

    This paper describes the program, the status, and the course of activities on rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated facilities and the territory of temporary radioactive waste (radwaste) disposal at the Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute'' (RRC KI) in Moscow as performed in 2001-2002. The accumulation of significant amounts of radwaste at RRC KI territory is shown to be the inevitable result of Institute's activity performed in the days of former USSR nuclear weapons project and multiple initial nuclear power projects (performed from 1950's to early 1970's). A characterization of RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is given. Described is the system of radiation control and monitoring as implemented on this site. A potential hazard of adverse impacts on the environment and population of the nearby housing area is noted, which is due to possible spread of the radioactive plume by subsoil waters. A description of the concept and project of the RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is presented. Specific nature of the activities planned and performed stems from the nearness of housing area. This paper describes main stages of the planned activities for rehabilitation, their expected terms and sources of funding, as well as current status of the project advancement. Outlined are the problems faced in the performance and planning of works. The latter include: diagnostics of the concrete-grouted repositories, dust-suppression technologies, packaging of the fragmented ILW and HLW, soil clean-up, radioactive plume spread prevention, broad radiation monitoring of the work zone and environment in the performance of rehabilitation works. Noted is the intention of RRC KI to establish cooperation with foreign, first of all, the U.S. partners for the solution of problems mentioned above.

  5. Regulation and Function of Cytokines that Predict Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Professor, Medicine Uro -Oncology Research Program Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute Cedars-Sinai Medical Center 8750 Beverly Blvd...Department of Medicine Uro -Oncology Research Program Leland Chung, Director Neil A. Bhowmick, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Medicine

  6. Does the cancer patient want to know? Results from a study in an Indian tertiary cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhawat Laxmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The disclosure of the diagnosis of cancer is a distressing and complex issue. Families and doctors still do not tell patients when they have cancer in the belief that the patient does not want to know and telling him would lead to fear and depression. The aim of this survey was to evaluate the information needs of Indian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 300 patients′ views was conducted with the help of an adaptation of Cassileth′s Information Needs questionnaire. Results: A majority of cancer patients exhibited a strong need for information about illness and treatment. Ninety-four percent wanted to know if their illness was cancer. Most patients also wanted to know the chance of cure (92%. Age, education, and type of treatment significantly affect information preferences. Gender did not have an effect on information needs. Conclusion: This study showed that most of the patients wanted to know about their illness, treatment, side-effects, and chances of cure.

  7. Can we expand active surveillance criteria to include biopsy Gleason 3+4 prostate cancer? A multi-institutional study of 2,323 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploussard, G.; Isbarn, H.; Briganti, A.; Sooriakumaran, P.; Surcel, C.I.; Salomon, L.; Freschi, M.; Mirvald, C.; Poel, H.G. van der; Jenkins, A.; Ost, P.; Oort, I.M. van; Yossepowitch, O.; Giannarini, G.; Bergh, R.C. van den

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the expandability of active surveillance (AS) to Gleason score 3+4 cancers by assessing the unfavorable disease risk in a large multi-institutional cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis including 2,323 patients with localized Gleason score 3+4 prosta

  8. Center for Research on Minority Health -- Prostate Cancer and Health Disparities Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Satcher is Director of the Center of Excellence on Health Disparities at the Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) in Atlanta, Georgia . He occupies the...can, and the rest of the time, try to keep the fish in her aquarium alive and swimming! Center for Research on Minority Health Department of Health

  9. Q&A: Muin Khoury on cancer epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Muin J; Rose, Suzanne

    2014-02-01

    Muin J. Khoury, MD, PhD, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office of Public Health Genomics and head of the National Cancer Institute's Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, talks about challenges and opportunities in cancer epidemiology research and efforts in the epidemiology community to transform the field.

  10. The costs of breast cancer in a Mexican public health institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Jacobo Alejandro Gómez-Rico1, Marina Altagracia-Martínez1, Jaime Kravzov-Jinich1, Rosario Cárdenas-Elizalde1, Consuelo Rubio-Poo21Universidad Autónoma Metropolitano–Xochimilco (UAM-X, Departments: Biological Systems and Healthcare, Biological and Health Sciences Division (DCBS; 2Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, Faculty of Professional Studies-Zaragoza (FES-ZaragozaAbstract: Breast cancer (BC is the second leading cause of death as a result of neoplasia in Mexico. This study aimed to identify the direct and indirect costs of treating female outpatients diagnosed with BC at a Mexican public hospital. A cross-sectional, observational, analytical study was conducted. A total of 506 medical records were analyzed and 102 were included in the cost analysis. The micro-costing process was used to estimate treatment costs. A 17-item questionnaire was used to obtain information on direct and indirect costs. Of the 102 women with BC included in the study, 92.2% (94 were at Stage II, and only 7.8% at Stage I. Total direct costs over six months for the 82 women who had modified radical mastectomy (MRM surgury were US$733,821.15. Total direct costs for the 15 patients with conservative surgery (CS were US$138,190.39. We found that the total economic burden in the study population was much higher for patients with MRM than for patients with CS.Keywords: breast cancer, Mexican women, direct and indirect costs

  11. The Scientific Foundation for personal genomics: recommendations from a National Institutes of Health-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention multidisciplinary workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Muin J; McBride, Colleen M; Schully, Sheri D; Ioannidis, John P A; Feero, W Gregory; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Gwinn, Marta; Simons-Morton, Denise G; Bernhardt, Jay M; Cargill, Michele; Chanock, Stephen J; Church, George M; Coates, Ralph J; Collins, Francis S; Croyle, Robert T; Davis, Barry R; Downing, Gregory J; Duross, Amy; Friedman, Susan; Gail, Mitchell H; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Green, Robert C; Greene, Mark H; Greenland, Philip; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Hsu, Andro; Hudson, Kathy L; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kimmel, Paul L; Lauer, Michael S; Miller, Amy M; Offit, Kenneth; Ransohoff, David F; Roberts, J Scott; Rasooly, Rebekah S; Stefansson, Kari; Terry, Sharon F; Teutsch, Steven M; Trepanier, Angela; Wanke, Kay L; Witte, John S; Xu, Jianfeng

    2009-08-01

    The increasing availability of personal genomic tests has led to discussions about the validity and utility of such tests and the balance of benefits and harms. A multidisciplinary workshop was convened by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to review the scientific foundation for using personal genomics in risk assessment and disease prevention and to develop recommendations for targeted research. The clinical validity and utility of personal genomics is a moving target with rapidly developing discoveries but little translation research to close the gap between discoveries and health impact. Workshop participants made recommendations in five domains: (1) developing and applying scientific standards for assessing personal genomic tests; (2) developing and applying a multidisciplinary research agenda, including observational studies and clinical trials to fill knowledge gaps in clinical validity and utility; (3) enhancing credible knowledge synthesis and information dissemination to clinicians and consumers; (4) linking scientific findings to evidence-based recommendations for use of personal genomics; and (5) assessing how the concept of personal utility can affect health benefits, costs, and risks by developing appropriate metrics for evaluation. To fulfill the promise of personal genomics, a rigorous multidisciplinary research agenda is needed.

  12. THE STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ENGLISH AND ARABIC TEACHING AND LEARNING AT THE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE CENTER OF STATE INSTITUTE FOR ISLAMIC STUDIES SHEKH NURJATI CIREBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmud Mahmud

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the effectiveness of English and Arabic teaching and learning the Language and Culture Center (LCC at the State Institute for Islamic Studies Shekh Nurjati Cirebon (SIIS SNJ based on the students’ perception. The study is to find out students’ opinion toward English and Arabic teaching and learning process and provide beneficial information for the teaching system in the LCC. This study used descriptive survey approach. The subjects were the students of English and Arabic intensive program. The data were collected through the questionnaire The results of the study are as follows. First, the teaching quality indicator is categorized as fairly effective. Second, the generic skills indicator is categorized as less effective. Third, students’ motivation indica-tor is categorized as less effective. Fourth, learning resources is categorized as not effective. Fifth, the assessment appropriateness is categorized as fairly effective. Sixth, the students’ workload is catego-rized as less effective. Seventh, the curriculum content is categorized as less effective. Keywords: students’ perception, teaching and learning, effectiveness.

  13. Gender and smoking-related risk of lung cancer. The Copenhagen Center for Prospective Population Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, E; Osler, M; Hein, H O;

    1998-01-01

    smokers with more than 60 pack-years of tobacco exposure. RRs did not differ much between men and women: adjusted for pack-years, age, and study population, the ratio between female and male smokers' RRs of developing lung cancer was 0.8 (95% confidence interval = 0.3-2.1). All histologic types were......Our aim was to compare risk of lung cancer associated with smoking by gender and histologic type. A total of 30,874 subjects, 44% women, from three prospective population-based studies with initial examinations between 1964 and 1992 were followed until 1994 through the National Cancer Registry....... There were 867 cases of lung cancer, 203 among women and 664 among men. Rates among female and male never-smokers were similar, although confidence intervals around rates were wide. Rate ratios (RRs) increased with number of pack-years for both men and women to a maximum of approximately 20 in inhaling...

  14. Unfavorable survival rates in Iranian patients with gastric cancers: a single center experience from Tehran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khedmat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of potential interfering factors that play major roles in the outcome of our patients with stomach cancer. 100 consecutive patients diagnosed with gastric cancers were prospectively observed, treated and followed from November 2009 to January. Absence of Helicobacter pylori infection (P=0.027, absence of vascularisation (P<0.001, and undetermined histopathological type of adenocarcinoma (P=0.003 were factors significantly associated with higher grade of gastric lesions. Life tables were used to define survival of gastric cancers. Survival rates of these patients at 1st week, 1st month, 2nd month, 3rd month, and 6th month were 97%, 96%, 91%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. The only determinant of 6 months of survival was age over 68 (P=0.039. Our study confirms our previous knowledge that gastric cancers have unfavorable outcome in Iran.

  15. Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

  16. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: U01 Natural Products Screening | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project was to enlarge the chemical space probed by Project 1 (High-Throughput siRNA Screening of a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line Panel) by screening an expanded natural products library (~40,000) in an effort to further define vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer. This new library is derived from a diverse collection of marine bacteria (prepared by Dr. John MacMillan, University of Texas Southwestern).

  17. Patient-Centered Cancer Care Programs in Italy: Benchmarking Global Patient Education Initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Truccolo, Ivana; Cipolat Mis, Chiara; Cervo, Silvia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Bongiovanni, Marilena; Bearz, Alessandra; Sartor, Ivana; Baldo, Paolo; Ferrarin, Emanuela; Fratino, Lucia; Mascarin, Maurizio; Roncadin, Mario; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Muzzatti, Barbara; Paoli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In Italy, educational programs for cancer patients are currently provided by the national government, scientific societies, and patient advocate organizations. Several gaps limit their effectiveness, including the lack of coordinated efforts, poor involvement of patient feedback in the planning of programs, as well as a lack of resources on innovative cancer-related topics. This process is parallel to a strong shift in the attitude of patients towards health in general and taking charge of th...

  18. Anterior urethra sparing cystoprostatectomy for bladder cancer: a 10-year, single center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Hayakawa, Nozomi; Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Ishihara, Hiroki; Ryoji, Osamu; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Decision making regarding the urethra before and after radical cystectomy due to urothelial carcinoma has always been controversial. To determine whether anterior urethra sparing cystoprostatectomy for bladder cancer is an oncologically-safe procedure, we evaluated the long-term oncologic clinical outcome. Patients and methods A total of 51 male patients with cTa-4N0-2M0 bladder cancer were treated with anterior urethra sparing cystoprostatectomy and simultaneous urinary diversion bet...

  19. Outcome of combined modality treatment including neoadjuvant chemotherapy of 128 cases of locally advanced breast cancer: Data from a tertiary cancer center in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Raina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is now the most common cancer in many parts of India and the incidence varies from 12 to 31/100000, and is rising. Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC accounts for 30 - 35% of all cases of breast cancers in India. LABC continues to present a challenge and imposes a major health impact in our country. Materials and Methods: We carried out a analysis of our LABC patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT at our hospital over a 10-year period, from January 1995 to December 2004. We analyzed the response to NACT, disease-free survival (DFS, and overall survival (OS. Results: Patients with stages IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC were included. LABC comprised of 26.24% (609 patients of new patients. One hundred and twenty-eight (31.1% patients received NACT. Median age was 48 years and estrogen receptor was positive in 64%. Chemotherapy protocol was an FEC (5-Fluorouracil, Epirubicin, Cyclophosphamide regimen in the following doses: Cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2, 5-FU 600 mg/m2, and Epirubicin 75 mg/m2 given every three weeks, six doses, followed by modified radical mastectomy (MRM and locoregional radiotherapy. The overall response rate (complete response (CR + partial response (PR was 84.4%, clinical CR (cCR was 13.3% and pathological CR (pCR was 7.8%. Median DFS and OS were 33 and 101 months, respectively. The disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS at five years were 41 and 58%, respectively. Conclusions: This study analyzes the outcome in patients who received NACT, in the largest number of LABC patients from a single center in India, and our results are comparable to the results reported from other centers.

  20. Contact | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    For more information about the Office of Cancer Genomics, please contact: Office of Cancer Genomics National Cancer Institute 31 Center Drive, 10A07 Bethesda, Maryland 20892-2580 Phone: (301) 451-8027 Fax: (301) 480-4368 Email: ocg@mail.nih.gov *Please note that this site will not function properly in Internet Explorer unless you completely turn off the Compatibility View*

  1. PUBLIC SCHOOL LAWS OF NORTH CAROLINA--COMMUNITY COLLEGES, TECHNICAL INSTITUTES, AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CENTERS. CHAPTER 115A, GENERAL STATUTES OF NORTH CAROLINA, INCLUDING AMENDMENTS ADOPTED BY THE 1965 AND 1967 GENERAL ASSEMBLIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina General Assembly, Raleigh.

    CHAPTER 115A OF THE GENERAL STATUTES OF NORTH CAROLINA PROVIDES FOR THE STATE'S COMMUNITY COLLEGES, TECHNICAL INSTITUTES, AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CENTERS. IT INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES--(1) GENERAL PROVISIONS FOR STATE ADMINISTRATION, (2) LOCAL ADMINISTRATION, (3) FINANCIAL SUPPORT, (4) BUDGETING, ACCOUNTING, AND FISCAL MANAGEMENT, (5)…

  2. Institute of Medicine's Report on Viral Hepatitis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-05-18

    In this podcast, Dr. John Ward, Director of CDC’s Division of Viral Hepatitis, discusses the 2010 report, Hepatitis and Liver Cancer: A National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis B and C, from the Institute of Medicine.  Created: 5/18/2010 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 5/18/2010.

  3. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization for Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases: A Single Institution Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W. Nace

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We sought to evaluate our experience using yttrium-90 (90Y resin microsphere hepatic radioembolization as salvage therapy for liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. Methods. A retrospective review of consecutive patients with unresectable mCRC who were treated with 90Y after failing first and second line systemic chemotherapy. Demographics, treatment dose, biochemical and radiographic response, toxicities, and survival were examined. Results. Fifty-one patients underwent 90Y treatments of which 69% were male. All patients had previously undergone extensive chemotherapy, 31% had undergone previous liver-directed therapy and 24% had a prior liver resection. Using RECIST criteria, either stable disease or a partial response was seen in 77% of patients. Overall median survival from the time of first 90Y treatment was 10.2 months (95% CI = 7.5–13.0. The absence of extrahepatic disease at the time of treatment with 90Y was associated with an improved survival, median survival of 17.0 months (95% CI = 6.4–27.6, compared to those with extrahepatic disease at the time of treatment with 90Y, 6.7 months (95% CI = 2.7–10.6 Conclusion: 90Y therapy is a safe locoregional therapy that provides an important therapeutic option to patients who have failed first and second line chemotherapy and have adequate liver function and performance status.

  4. Lifestyle and cancer prevention in female employees at a health institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Eugenia Canaval

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the relationship between lifestyle for prevention of cervix and breast cancer and perceptual cognitive factors from the Pender model in working women. Materials and methods: Correlation and cross-sectional study with a random sample of 143 working women. The Lifestyle index is the total score of 5 variables: Papanicolau test, breast self-exam, physical activity, body mass index, and cigarette smoking. Results: The mean age for the sample was 44.4 + 6.2; 87% of the women had higher education and 85% were working in health care services. A total of 89% of the women had unhealthy lifestyles because of the lack of regular physical activity, not having a Papanicolau test according to the norm, not practicing breast self-exams, and having an altered body mass index. There was significant correlation between lifestyle and occupation, and also with self-efficacy perception for breast self-examination. Conclusion: The lifestyles for most of the women sampled were unhealthy. Recommendations: It is also recommend conducting culturally sensitive healthcare campaigns in addition to setting up flexible attention schedules for women.

  5. Lifestyle and cancer prevention in female employees at a health institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Eugenia Canaval

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the relationship between lifestyle for prevention of cervix and breast cancer and perceptual cognitive factors from the Pender model in working women.Materials and methods: Correlation and cross-sectional study with a random sample of 143 working women. The Lifestyle index is the total score of 5 variables: Papanicolau test, breast self-exam, physical activity, body mass index, and cigarette smoking.Results: The mean age for the sample was 44.4 + 6.2; 87% of the women had higher education and 85% were working in health care services. A total of 89% of the women had unhealthy lifestyles because of the lack of regular physical activity, not having a Papanicolau test according to the norm, not practicing breast self-exams, and having an altered body mass index. There was significant correlation between lifestyle and occupation, and also with self-efficacy perception for breast self-examination.Conclusion: The lifestyles for most of the women sampled were unhealthy.Recommendations: It is recommend the reorientation of health services based on health promotion, which permit planning and executing health care, health education and nursing care programs specifically for working women. It is also recommend conducting culturally sensitive.

  6. The costs of breast cancer in a Mexican public health institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Rico, Jacobo Alejandro; Altagracia-Martínez, Marina; Kravzov-Jinich, Jaime; Cárdenas-Elizalde, Rosario; Rubio-Poo, Consuelo

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second leading cause of death as a result of neoplasia in Mexico. This study aimed to identify the direct and indirect costs of treating female outpatients diagnosed with BC at a Mexican public hospital. A cross-sectional, observational, analytical study was conducted. A total of 506 medical records were analyzed and 102 were included in the cost analysis. The micro-costing process was used to estimate treatment costs. A 17-item questionnaire was used to obtain information on direct and indirect costs. Of the 102 women with BC included in the study, 92.2% (94) were at Stage II, and only 7.8% at Stage I. Total direct costs over six months for the 82 women who had modified radical mastectomy (MRM) surgury were US$733,821.15. Total direct costs for the 15 patients with conservative surgery (CS) were US$138,190.39. We found that the total economic burden in the study population was much higher for patients with MRM than for patients with CS. PMID:22312199

  7. Validation of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center nomogram for predicting non-sentinel lymph node metastasis in sentinel lymph node-positive breast-cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi X

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Xiang Bi,1,* Yongsheng Wang,2 Minmin Li,1,* Peng Chen,2 Zhengbo Zhou,2 Yanbing Liu,2 Tong Zhao,2 Zhaopeng Zhang,2 Chunjian Wang,2 Xiao Sun,2 Pengfei Qiu2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Shandong Cancer Hospital, 2Breast Cancer Center, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this study Background: The main purpose of the study reported here was to validate the clinical value of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC nomogram that predicts non-sentinel lymph node (SLN metastasis in SLN-positive patients with breast cancer. Methods: Data on 1,576 patients who received sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB at the Shandong Cancer Hospital from December 2001 to March 2014 were collected in this study, and data on 509 patients with positive SLN were analyzed to evaluate the risk factors for non-SLN metastasis. The MSKCC nomogram was used to estimate the probability of non-SLN metastasis and was compared with actual probability after grouping into deciles. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve was drawn and predictive accuracy was assessed by calculating the area under the ROC curve. Results: Tumor size, histological grade, lymphovascular invasion, multifocality, number of positive SLNs, and number of negative SLNs were correlated with non-SLN metastasis (P<0.05 by univariate analysis. However, multivariate analysis showed that tumor size (P=0.039, histological grade (P=0.043, lymphovascular invasion (P=0.001, number of positive SLNs (P=0.001, and number of negative SLNs (P=0.000 were identified as independent predictors for non-SLN metastasis. The trend of actual probability in various decile groups was comparable to the predicted probability. The area under the ROC curve was 0.722. Patients with predictive values lower than 10% (97/492, 19.7% had a frequency of non-SLN metastasis of 17.5% (17/97. Conclusion: The

  8. International Center for Arid Land Ecology was established by Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography,CAS and University of California,Riverside,USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Invited by Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Professor Charles Lois, the vice chancellor of University of California, Riverside, USA, with his colleagues, visited the Institute and went to National Fukang Ecosystem

  9. Liver transplantation for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma at the Liver Cancer Institute of Fudan University, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jian; HE Yi-feng; YANG Guo-huan; SONG Kang; YUAN Zhou; WANG Yu-qi; TANG Zhao-you; FAN Jia; WU Zhi-quan; QIU Shuang-jian; HUANG Xiao-wu; YU Yao; WANG Zheng; SUN Jian; XIAO Yong-sheng

    2005-01-01

    Background Selection of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) remains controversial. Since there is a trend to expand the transplant criteria for HCC patients, we reviewed the data of patients with HCC who had received OLT at our institute to determine their survival and prognostic factors.Methods A total of 67 patients with HCC who had undergone OLT from April 2001 through December 2003 were reviewed retrospectively. Selection OLT candidates with HCC was dependent on the anatomical characteristics and/or the severity of underlying liver cirrhosis. The 67 patients were followed up for more than 6 months after transplantation. Their survival rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses using the Cox proportional hazards regression model were performed to reveal the factors affecting the survival rate.Results No perioperative death occurred in this series. The 1- and 2-year cumulative survival rates were 90.0% and 65.6%, and the disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 77.5% and 62.5% respectively. Univariate analysis revealed the tumor size, portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT), serum alpha-fetoprotein level, bilobular distribution of tumors, pTNM stage and histological differentiation were statistically significant factors affecting the DFS (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed tumor size and PVTT were independent and statistically significant factors affecting the DFS (P=0.005 and 0.010, respectively). In this series, all but 2 received systemic chemotherapy, among them 13 had tumor recurrence within 8 months after OLT.Conclusions OLT is indicated for patients with HCC, even for some patients with end-stage liver disease who may survive longer without tumor recurrence. Adjuvant chemotherapy may decrease the recurrence of HCC after OLT.

  10. Patient and primary care provider attitudes and adherence towards lung cancer screening at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Duy K; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Cheng, Iona; Naemi, Harris; Moy, Lisa M; Haile, Robert; Singh, Baldeep; Leung, Ann; Hsing, Ann; Nair, Viswam S

    2017-06-01

    Low dose CT (LDCT) for lung cancer screening is an evidence-based, guideline recommended, and Medicare approved test but uptake requires further study. We therefore conducted patient and provider surveys to elucidate factors associated with utilization. Patients referred for LDCT at an academic medical center were questioned about their attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs on lung cancer screening. Adherent patients were defined as those who met screening eligibility criteria and completed a LDCT. Referring primary care providers within this same medical system were surveyed in parallel about their practice patterns, attitudes, knowledge and beliefs about screening. Eighty patients responded (36%), 48 of whom were adherent. Among responders, non-Hispanic patients (p = 0.04) were more adherent. Adherent respondents believed that CT technology is accurate and early detection is useful, and they trusted their providers. A majority of non-adherent patients (79%) self-reported an intention to obtain a LDCT in the future. Of 36 of 87 (41%) responding providers, only 31% knew the correct lung cancer screening eligibility criteria, which led to a 37% inappropriate referral rate from 2013 to 2015. Yet, 75% had initiated lung cancer screening discussions, 64% thought screening was at least moderately effective, and 82% were interested in learning more of the 33 providers responding to these questions. Overall, patients were motivated and providers engaged to screen for lung cancer by LDCT. Non-adherent patient "procrastinators" were motivated to undergo screening in the future. Additional follow through on non-adherence may enhance screening uptake, and raising awareness for screening eligibility through provider education may reduce inappropriate referrals.

  11. Involvement of the Artemis Protein in the Relative Biological Efficiency Observed With the 76-MeV Proton Beam Used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calugaru, Valentin [Institut Curie Centre de Protonthérapie d' Orsay, Centre Universitaire, Orsay (France); Institut Curie, Centre Universitaire, Orsay (France); INSERM U612, Centre Universitaire, Orsay (France); Nauraye, Catherine [Institut Curie Centre de Protonthérapie d' Orsay, Centre Universitaire, Orsay (France); Cordelières, Fabrice P. [Institut Curie, Centre Universitaire, Orsay (France); Biard, Denis [Centre d' Etude Atomique, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, Institut des Maladies Emergentes et des Thérapies Innovantes, Service d' Etude des Prions et des Infections Atypiques, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); De Marzi, Ludovic [Institut Curie Centre de Protonthérapie d' Orsay, Centre Universitaire, Orsay (France); Hall, Janet; Favaudon, Vincent [Institut Curie, Centre Universitaire, Orsay (France); INSERM U612, Centre Universitaire, Orsay (France); Mégnin-Chanet, Frédérique, E-mail: frederique.megnin@inserm.fr [Institut Curie, Centre Universitaire, Orsay (France); INSERM U612, Centre Universitaire, Orsay (France)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Previously we showed that the relative biological efficiency for induced cell killing by the 76-MeV beam used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay increased with depth throughout the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). To investigate the repair pathways underlying this increase, we used an isogenic human cell model in which individual DNA repair proteins have been depleted, and techniques dedicated to precise measurements of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: The 3-Gy surviving fractions of HeLa cells individually depleted of Ogg1, XRCC1, and PARP1 (the base excision repair/SSB repair pathway) or of ATM, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, and Artemis (nonhomologous end-joining pathway) were determined at the 3 positions previously defined in the SOBP. Quantification of incident SSBs and DSBs by the alkaline elution technique and 3-dimensional (3D) immunofluorescence of γ-H2AX foci, respectively, was performed in SQ20 B cells. Results: We showed that the amount of SSBs and DSBs depends directly on the particle fluence and that the increase in relative biological efficiency observed in the distal part of the SOBP is due to a subset of lesions generated under these conditions, leading to cell death via a pathway in which the Artemis protein plays a central role. Conclusions: Because therapies like proton or carbon beams are now being used to treat cancer, it is even more important to dissect the mechanisms implicated in the repair of the lesions generated by these particles. Additionally, alteration of the expression or activity of the Artemis protein could be a novel therapeutic tool before high linear energy transfer irradiation treatment.

  12. Bridging the digital divide by increasing computer and cancer literacy: community technology centers for head-start parents and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salovey, Peter; Williams-Piehota, Pamela; Mowad, Linda; Moret, Marta Elisa; Edlund, Denielle; Andersen, Judith

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the establishment of two community technology centers affiliated with Head Start early childhood education programs focused especially on Latino and African American parents of children enrolled in Head Start. A 6-hour course concerned with computer and cancer literacy was presented to 120 parents and other community residents who earned a free, refurbished, Internet-ready computer after completing the program. Focus groups provided the basis for designing the structure and content of the course and modifying it during the project period. An outcomes-based assessment comparing program participants with 70 nonparticipants at baseline, immediately after the course ended, and 3 months later suggested that the program increased knowledge about computers and their use, knowledge about cancer and its prevention, and computer use including health information-seeking via the Internet. The creation of community computer technology centers requires the availability of secure space, capacity of a community partner to oversee project implementation, and resources of this partner to ensure sustainability beyond core funding.

  13. CYP17 genetic variation and risk of breast and prostate cancer from the national Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Stram, Daniel O.; Albanes, Demetrius; Altshuler, David; Berglund, Gran; Buring, Julie; Calle, Eugenia E.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Cox, David G.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hirschhorn, Joel; Hoover, Robert; Hunter, David J.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Linseisen, Jakob; Lund, Eiliv; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Riboli, Elio; Stampfer, Meir J.; Thun, Michael J.; Travis, Ruth; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Yeager, Meredith; Ziegler, Regina G.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    CYP17 encodes cytochrome p450c17 alpha, which mediates activities essential for the production of sex steroids. Common germ line variation in the CYP17 gene has been related to inconsistent results in breast and prostate cancer, with most studies focusing on the nonsynonymous single nucleotide polym

  14. Pattern of skin cancer among Saudi patients attending a tertiary care center in Dhahran, Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. A 20-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dawsari, Najla A; Amra, Nasir

    2016-12-01

    Skin cancer is the ninth most common malignancy in Saudi Arabia. It represented 3.2% of all newly diagnosed cancer cases in the year 2010. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology of skin cancer in relation to age, sex, and anatomic location among Saudi patients attending the Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare center in Dhahran, Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. We retrospectively reviewed the surgical pathology records of Saudi nationals from 1995 to 2014 at the Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare center, which directly provides for the healthcare needs of Saudi Aramco company employees and dependents in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Tumor metastases to skin, skin involvement by primary breast carcinoma, and B-cell leukemia/lymphoma with secondary involvement by skin were excluded. The total number of primary skin tumors was 204. The commonest cutaneous malignancies were basal cell carcinoma (36%) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (23%), with the head and neck being the commonest location for both tumors. Mycosis fungoides (MF) was the third most common malignancy (11%). Malignant melanoma was the fourth commonest skin malignancy (7%) with the lower extremities being the commonest location. The four most common skin cancers in our tertiary center in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia were squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, MF, and malignant melanoma. Other regions of Saudi Arabia report a similar pattern of skin cancers as our center, with MF having a higher frequency at our center.

  15. Comparison of the epidemiologic features and patterns of initial care for prostate cancer between public and private institutions: a survey by the Brazilian Society of Urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguinaldo Cesar Nardi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological features and patterns of initial care for prostate cancer at public and private institutions in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1,082 physicians affiliated to the Sao Paulo Section of the Brazilian Society of Urology were invited to participate in this cross-sectional, web-based survey. Between September 2004 and September 2005, participating urologists entered data on demographic, clinical and pathological characteristics of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer in their practice. Data on patients attended at public institutions were analyzed and compared with those patients attended at private practice. RESULTS: One hundred and ten society members contributed with data from 1915 patients, 1026 (53.6% of whom from public institutions. When compared with patients attended at private institutions, those attended at public institutions were older and more likely to be black, had higher serum prostate specific antigen (PSA levels, had a higher probability of being diagnosed with metastatic disease, but were less likely to undergo prostatectomy (all P < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, age, biopsy Gleason score, and being attended at a public institution were independently associated with metastatic disease upon diagnosis. The significant predictors of nonsurgical treatment were age, black race, and higher serum levels of PSA. CONCLUSIONS: A statewide registry provides valuable information regarding patient demographics, clinical features, and patterns of care. The results of this study suggest that significant disparities exist for patients with prostate cancer attended at different health-care systems. The relative contribution of biological versus socioeconomic features remains uncertain.

  16. Frequency of bacterial isolates and pattern of antimicrobial resistance in patients with hematological malignancies: A snapshot from tertiary cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sengar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections are the most important cause of mortality in patients with high-risk febrile neutropenia. Emergence of multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs has become a major challenge for hemato-oncologists. Knowledge of the prevalent organisms and their antimicrobial sensitivity can help deciding the empirical therapy at individual centers and allows timely measures to reduce the risk of antimicrobial resistance. AIMS: To evaluate the frequency of bacterial isolates from all the samples and the pattern of bacterial bloodstream infections and incidence of MDROs. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This is a retrospective analysis from a tertiary care cancer center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January to June 2014 information on all the samples received in Department of Microbiology was collected retrospectively. The data from samples collected from patients with hematological cancers were analyzed for types of bacterial isolates and antimicrobial sensitivity. RESULTS: A total of 739 isolates were identified with 67.9% of isolates being Gram-negative. The predominant Gram-negative organisms were Escherichia coli, Psuedomonas spp. and Klebsiella spp. Among the bacterial bloodstream infections, 66% were Gram-negative isolates. MDROs constituted 22% of all isolates in blood cultures. Incidence of resistant Gram-positive organisms was low in the present dataset (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci-1.3%. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis reconfirms the Gram-negative organisms as the predominant pathogens in bacteremia seen in patients with hematological cancers. The high frequency of multi-drug resistance in the dataset calls for the need of emergency measures to curtail further development and propagation of resistant organisms.

  17. Multi-institutional Pooled Analysis on Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganti, Alessio G. [Department of Radiotherapy, Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Unit of Radiotherapy, Unit of General Oncology, Fondazione Giovanni Paolo II, Campobasso (Italy); Falconi, Massimo [Department of Surgery, University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Stiphout, Ruud G.P.M. van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Medical Centre Maastricht (Netherlands); Mattiucci, Gian-Carlo, E-mail: gcmattiucci@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiotherapy, Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Alfieri, Sergio [Department of Surgery, Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Calvo, Felipe A. [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Dubois, Jean-Bernard [Département de Radiothérapie, CRLC, Montpellier Cedex (France); Fastner, Gerd [Department of Radiotherapy, PMU, Salzburg (Austria); Herman, Joseph M. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Maidment, Bert W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Miller, Robert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Reni, Michele [Department of Oncology, S. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Sharma, Navesh K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ippolito, Edy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Campus Biomedico, Roma (Italy); and others

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the impact of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) on overall survival (OS) after resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A multicenter retrospective review of 955 consecutive patients who underwent complete resection with macroscopically negative margins (R0-1) for invasive carcinoma (T1-4; N0-1; M0) of the pancreas was performed. Exclusion criteria included metastatic or unresectable disease at surgery, macroscopic residual disease (R2), treatment with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), and a histological diagnosis of no ductal carcinoma, or postoperative death (within 60 days of surgery). In all, 623 patients received postoperative radiation therapy (RT), 575 patients received concurrent chemotherapy (CT), and 462 patients received adjuvant CT. Results: Median follow-up was 21.0 months. Median OS after adjuvant CRT was 39.9 versus 24.8 months after no adjuvant CRT (P<.001) and 27.8 months after CT alone (P<.001). Five-year OS was 41.2% versus 24.8% with and without postoperative CRT, respectively. The positive impact of CRT was confirmed by multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.72; confidence interval [CI], 0.60-0.87; P=.001). Adverse prognostic factors identified by multivariate analysis included the following: R1 resection (HR = 1.17; CI = 1.07-1.28; P<.001), higher pT stage (HR = 1.23; CI = 1.11-1.37; P<.001), positive lymph nodes (HR = 1.27; CI = 1.15-1.41; P<.001), and tumor diameter >20 mm (HR = 1.14; CI = 1.05-1.23; P=.002). Multivariate analysis also showed a better prognosis in patients treated in centers with >10 pancreatic resections per year (HR = 0.87; CI = 0.78-0.97; P=.014) Conclusion: This study represents the largest comparative study on adjuvant therapy in patients after resection of carcinoma of the pancreas. Overall survival was better in patients who received adjuvant CRT.

  18. Monitoring of people and workers exposure to the electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields in an Italian national cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomba Raffaele

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The paper reports the electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields (emf measurements carried out in the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute (NCI. Several devices, used in diagnostics and in medical cures, can represent sources of emf for the workers and for the public subjected to the treatments. The aim is to evaluate their exposition, in order to assess the compliance with the law. Methods The investigations have been carried out in the departments of: intensive care, physiotherapy, MR presstherapy and in the surgical rooms. The measurements have been performed using broad band probes in the frequency ranges 5 Hz÷30 kHz and 100 kHz-3 GHz. Results The variability of the magnetic induction (B(μT levels is between 0,05 μT and 80 μT. The statistical distribution shows that most of the measurements are in the range 0,05 Conclusion The measurement of the emf levels in the NCI is recommended because of the presence of the oncological patients; their long stay near the equipments and their day-long exposure represent additional risk factors for which a prudent avoidance strategy have to de adopted.

  19. Workplace interpersonal conflicts among the healthcare workers: Retrospective exploration from the institutional incident reporting system of a university-affiliated medical center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Szu-Fen; Liang, Huey-Wen; Chen, Li-Chin; Lin, Chia-Kuei; Huang, Hsiao-Fang; Hsieh, Ming-Yuan; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Objective There have been concerns about the workplace interpersonal conflict (WIC) among healthcare workers. As healthcare organizations have applied the incident reporting system (IRS) widely for safety-related incidents, we proposed that this system might provide a channel to explore the WICs. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the reports to the IRS from July 2010 to June 2013 in a medical center. We identified the WICs and typed these conflicts according to the two foci (task content/process and interpersonal relationship) and the three properties (disagreement, interference, and negative emotion), and analyzed relevant data. Results Of the 147 incidents with WIC, the most common related processes were patient transfer (20%), laboratory tests (17%), surgery (16%) and medical imaging (16%). All of the 147 incidents with WIC focused on task content or task process, but 41 (27.9%) also focused on the interpersonal relationship. We found disagreement, interference, and negative emotion in 91.2%, 88.4%, and 55.8% of the cases, respectively. Nurses (57%) were most often the reporting workers, while the most common encounter was the nurse-doctor interaction (33%), and the majority (67%) of the conflicts were experienced concurrently with the incidents. There was a significant difference in the distribution of worker job types between cases focused on the interpersonal relationship and those without (p = 0.0064). The doctors were more frequently as the reporter when the conflicts focused on the interpersonal relationship (34.1%) than not on it (17.0%). The distributions of worker job types were similar between those with and without negative emotion (p = 0.125). Conclusions The institutional IRS is a useful place to report the workplace interpersonal conflicts actively. The healthcare systems need to improve the channels to communicate, manage and resolve these conflicts. PMID:28166260

  20. Viewpoint: A challenge to academic health centers and the National Institutes of Health to prevent unintended gender bias in the selection of clinical and translational science award leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Molly; Bland, Carole

    2007-02-01

    In controlled studies, both men and women preferentially select men over women for leadership positions, even when credentials are identical and despite field studies demonstrating women's equivalent or slightly better leadership effectiveness. The assumption that men will make better leaders than women is attributed to the pervasive existence of unconscious stereotypes that characterize both men and leaders as agentic or action oriented and women as dependent. The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap is a novel, prestigious award that will place considerable power in the hands of one principal investigator-conditions that predict activation of bias in favor of selecting male leaders. The authors review research supporting this assertion. To mitigate the impact of this bias and broaden the pool of potential leaders for this transformative initiative, the authors offer the following suggestions. To academic health centers they suggest (1) internal search committees comprised of at least 35% women that establish a priori the desired qualities for the CTSA leader and broadly solicit applicants, (2) explicit specification of the full range of desirable skills of a CTSA leader, and (3) systematic efforts to increase awareness of the negative impact of unconscious gender bias on women's advancement. To the NIH they suggest (1) the new multiple principal investigator rule for the CTSA program, (2) a statement in the request for applications (RFA) encouraging diversity among principal investigators, (3) repetition in the RFA of the public NIH statement of the importance of work life balance for young investigators, and (4) constitution of study sections with at least 35% women.

  1. [Perinatal mortality at the Medical Care Units of the IMSS (Mexico Social Security Institute), National Medical Center of Torreón].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez y Enríquez de Rivera, F C; Velázquez Trejo, M L; Roís Hernández, J

    1998-07-01

    To describe the situation of perinatal mortality during 1994 year in General Hospitals with Family Medicine number 16 and 18 of IMSS (Social Security Mexican Institut) National Medical Center in Torreón Coah. It was realized a retrospective study, were included 199 files of perinatal deaths occurred from January 1st to December 31 of 1994. The variables obtained were number of death for step, period, age, sex, weight and the cause of the cause of the death. Were eliminated the files without data of interest. For the analysis our utilized descriptive statistics. The rate of perinatal mortality was 20.17 per 1000 live birth, fetal death rate 9.58 by 1000 and the rate of neonatal death 12.97 per 1,000 live birth, fetal death rate 8.68 and neonatal death rate 12.30. The majority were in the perinatal period one with a rate of 16.71 by 1,000 live birth. Were most common in a male sex (53%) in pregnancies from 28 to 32 weeks (33.91%) and in babies with less of 1000 gr of weight (33.86%). The causes more frequents of deaths were the respiratory difficult syndrome (41.77%), the anomalies (19.62%) and hypoxia (9.49%). The perinatal mortality in our study was similar that in the rest of the country and is acorde with the literature. The perinatal mortality were in the perinatal period one. Is important to conduce a prospective studies.

  2. Yttrium-90 radioembolization for the treatment of unresectable liver cancer: Results of a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özhan Özgür

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effects of yttrium-90 (Y-90 resin microsphere radioembolization therapy on patients with unresectable liver cancer who do not benefit from chemotherapy. Methods: Fifty-five patients underwent radioembolization therapy included in the study whose had unresectable primary or metastatic liver cancer originating from the gastrointestinal tract. Three were excluded from the study after pre-evaluation angiography. Thirteen (23.6% of the remaining 52 patients had hepatocellular carcinoma and 39 (76.4% had metastatic liver cancer. Fifty-two patients underwent Y-90 radioembolization treatment. Each patient's response to the administered treatment was evaluated using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST and the overall probability of survival was displayed graphically by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: After Y-90 therapy, 47 patients were follow-up. While 57% of the patients responded to treatment as clinical benefit, the disease progressed in 43%. The median hepatic progression-free survival time of the patients was 3.4 months (95% confidence interval (ci:1.4-5.3 and the overall survival time was 11.3 months (95%, CI:8.7-14.03. Conclusion: This study emphasizes that Y-90 resin microsphere radioembolization treatment is effective in patients with unresectable liver cancer.

  3. Oncologists’ Perspectives on Concurrent Palliative Care in an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T.; Ahles, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To understand oncology clinicians’ perspectives about the care of advanced cancer patients following the completion of the ENABLE II (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a concurrent oncology palliative care model. Methods Qualitative interview study of 35 oncology clinicians about their approach to patients with advanced cancer and the effect of the ENABLE II RCT. Results Oncologists believed that integrating palliative care at the time of an advanced cancer diagnosis enhanced patient care and complemented their practice. Self-assessment of their practice with advanced cancer patients comprised four themes: 1) treating the whole patient, 2) focusing on quality versus quantity of life, 3) “some patients just want to fight”, and 4) helping with transitions; timing is everything. Five themes comprised oncologists’ views on the complementary role of palliative care: 1) “refer early and often”, 2) referral challenges: “Palliative” equals hospice; “Heme patients are different”, 3) palliative care as consultants or co-managers, 4) palliative care “shares the load”, and 5) ENABLE II facilitated palliative care integration. Conclusions Oncologists described the RCT as holistic and complementary, and as a significant factor in adopting concurrent care as a standard of care. PMID:23040412

  4. RAS testing in metastatic colorectal cancer: excellent reproducibility amongst 17 Dutch pathology centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boleij, A.; Tops, B.B.; Rombout, P.D.; Dequeker, E.M.; Ligtenberg, M.J.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 the European Medicine Agency (EMA) restricted the indication for anti-EGFR targeted therapy to metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with a wild-type RAS gene, increasing the need for reliable RAS mutation testing. We evaluated the completeness and reproducibility of RAS-testing in the Netherl

  5. BCIP: a gene-centered platform for identifying potential regulatory genes in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiaqi; Hu, Shuofeng; Chen, Yaowen; Li, Zongcheng; Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Hanyu; Shi, Qiang; Shao, Ningsheng; Ying, Xiaomin

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease with high heterogeneity. Many issues on tumorigenesis and progression are still elusive. It is critical to identify genes that play important roles in the progression of tumors, especially for tumors with poor prognosis such as basal-like breast cancer and tumors in very young women. To facilitate the identification of potential regulatory or driver genes, we present the Breast Cancer Integrative Platform (BCIP, http://omics.bmi.ac.cn/bcancer/). BCIP maintains multi-omics data selected with strict quality control and processed with uniform normalization methods, including gene expression profiles from 9,005 tumor and 376 normal tissue samples, copy number variation information from 3,035 tumor samples, microRNA-target interactions, co-expressed genes, KEGG pathways, and mammary tissue-specific gene functional networks. This platform provides a user-friendly interface integrating comprehensive and flexible analysis tools on differential gene expression, copy number variation, and survival analysis. The prominent characteristic of BCIP is that users can perform analysis by customizing subgroups with single or combined clinical features, including subtypes, histological grades, pathologic stages, metastasis status, lymph node status, ER/PR/HER2 status, TP53 mutation status, menopause status, age, tumor size, therapy responses, and prognosis. BCIP will help to identify regulatory or driver genes and candidate biomarkers for further research in breast cancer. PMID:28327601

  6. 78 FR 24428 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel Member Conflict: Cancer Biology and Genetics... Conflict: Neural Engineering and Neurogenetics. Date: May 22, 2013. Time: 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda:...

  7. 76 FR 6805 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Small Business: Immunology. Date: March 10-11, 2011. Time: 8:30 a.m... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Small Business: Cancer Drug Development and... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed...

  8. 78 FR 12071 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Overflow: Immunology. Date: March 13, 2013... Review Special Emphasis Panel; Small Business: Cancer Drug Development and Therapeutics. Date: March 14... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed...

  9. Sonographic Findings of Benign Breast Diseases, A Study of 111 Cases in Iranian Center for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. sedighi

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: Benign lesions are very common in breast. The most important consideration for physicians is to differentiate benign processes from malignant ones .Hence the clinicians and radi-ologists both wish to differentiate them even before surgical procedures. The Iranian Center for Breast Cancer linked to Jahad Daneshgahi Center is a referral place for patients with breast complaints. Patients & Methods: Retrospective study of sonographic findings of 111 patients with benign patho-logic diagnosis revealed 72.1% accuracy for sonogra-phy in diagnosing benign masses. In 31 cases (27.9%, the sonographic diagnosis was incorrect. Among the different benign lesions, the most common lesions were cysts, fibradenomas, and fibrocystic changes with respective sonographic accuracy of 100%, 90%, and 62.5%. Results: It shows that sonography has a high sensitiv-ity for diagnosis of benign breast lesions and this sen-sitivity is higher in cysts and fibradenomas which are the most common benign pathologies of breast. Conclusion: As a result, in this center sonography is an imaging modality for evaluating benign breast le-sion especially in young patients with dense breasts and palpable masses. Its unique role in diagnosis of the cysts is valuable especially to avoid repeated biopsies.

  10. Center of excellence in laser medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrish, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Achievements during the first six months of funding to prepare for a Center of Excellence in biomedical laser development include limited specific research projects within the Center's three broad interest areas, and program development to establish the Center and its activities. Progress in the three interest areas -- new medical laser systems development, optical diagnostics, and photosensitization, is reported. Feasibility studies and prototype development were emphasized, to enhance establishing a substantial Center through future support. Specific projects are an optimized laser-catheter system for reversal of vasospasm; optical detection of major skin burn depth and cancers using fluorescent drugs, and photosensitization of vascular tissues. In addition, an interdepartmental Laser Center was established at MGH to enhance collaborations and institutional committment to the Center of Excellence. Competitive postdoctoral research fellowships, with provision for matching funds from other departments, have been announced.

  11. A person-centered intervention targeting the psychosocial needs of gynecological cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mette Linnet; Duun-Henriksen, Anne-Katrine; Hansson, Eva Helena

    2016-01-01

    , depression, self-esteem, and self-reported ability to monitor and respond to symptoms of recurrence. METHODS: We randomly assigned 165 gynecological cancer survivors to usual care (UC) plus GSD-GYN-C or UC alone. Self-reported QOL-cancer survivor (QOL-CS) total score and subscale scores on physical......, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being were assessed before randomization and at 3 and 9 months after randomization using t tests. Bonferroni and Pipper corrections were applied for multiple testing adjustments. RESULTS: At 9 months, the GSD-GYN-C plus UC group scored significantly higher on the QOL......-CS total scale (P = 0.02) and on the QOL-CS physical well-being subscale (P = 0.01), compared to women receiving UC alone. After adjusting for baseline scores, only the difference in the physical well-being subscale was statistically significant. No other measured outcomes differed between the intervention...

  12. Italy INAF Data Center Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Italian INAF VLBI Data Center. Our Data Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics.

  13. Head and neck cancer in geriatric patients: Analysis of the pattern of care given at a tertiary cancer care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Thiagarajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background And Aim: The percentage of elderly people with head and neck cancers (HNC is on the rise. This makes HNC in this group of patients an important issue for healthcare providers. The present study was planned to analyze the patterns of care given to the geriatric patients and to identify the factors influencing the decision making process. Materials And Methods: Data of all the elderly patients (≥65 years registered in the year 2012, with histologically proven HNC (all sites, stages, histopathological types, except lymphoma, sarcoma and cervical metastasis of unknown origin receiving treatment (definitive/palliative were collected. Results: A total of 270 patients were included in this study. The median age was 72 years (range: 65–101, with predominant male population (70%, n = 190. Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC was the most common cancer (57%, n = 154. Eastern Co-Operative Oncology Group performance status (PS of 0–2 was seen in 91% of the patients. Co-morbidities were present in 139 (51.5% patients. 50% (n = 134 of the patients received palliative intent treatment, 45% (n = 123 definitive treatment, whereas in 5% (n = 13 the intent was not mentioned. Age, a clinical stage and PS significantly influenced the decision making on the intent of treatment. 208 (77% patients completed their treatment irrespective of the intent. Age was the only factor influencing treatment completion irrespective of the intent. Conclusion: Geriatric HNC patients frequently present with advanced disease, having multiple co-morbidities. Hence, a multidisciplinary team management of these patients is essential, also taking into account of the social and financial support available to these patients.

  14. Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    biospecimens followed protocols approved by the Institutional Review Board of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). Leukocyte concentrates...Antitumor Immunity and Checkpoint Immunotherapy. Cancer immunology research 2, 926-936 (2014). 17. Wherry, E.J. T cell exhaustion. Nat Immunol 12, 492... Cancer Vaccine Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David J. Chung, MD, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New

  15. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  16. Center of Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, J. Steven; Wood-Steed, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates how college and university student centers are becoming the institution's marketing tools. Explores how the Millennium Center at the University of Missouri in St. Louis exemplifies this new trend. (GR)

  17. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  18. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external) within the A. James Clark School...

  19. Danish Translation and Linguistic Validation of the U.S. National Cancer Institute's Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæksted, Christina; Nissen, Aase; Pappot, Helle

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) is the basis for standardized clinician-based grading and reporting of adverse events in cancer clinical trials. The U.S. National Cancer Institute has developed the Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the CTCAE (PRO-CTCAE) to i......CONTEXT: The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) is the basis for standardized clinician-based grading and reporting of adverse events in cancer clinical trials. The U.S. National Cancer Institute has developed the Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the CTCAE (PRO...

  20. The single institutional outcome of postoperative radiotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy in resected non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo Chun; Kim, Yeon Si; Oh, Se Jin; Lee, Yun Hee; Lee, Dong Soo; Song, Jin Ho; Kang, Jin Hyung; Park, Jae Ki [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This study was conducted to observe the outcomes of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy in resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in single institution. From 2002 to 2013, 78 patients diagnosed with NSCLC after curative resection were treated with radiotherapy alone (RT, n = 48) or concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT, n = 30). The indications of adjuvant radiation therapy were N2 node positive (n = 31), close or involved resection margin (n = 28), or gross residual disease due to incomplete resection (n = 19). The median radiation dose was 57.6 Gy (range, 29.9 to 66 Gy). Median survival time was 33.7 months (range, 4.4 to 140.3 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 49.5% (RT 46% vs. CCRT 55.2%; p = 0.731). The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 45.5% (RT 39.4% vs. CCRT 55.3%; p = 0.130). The 3-year local control rate was 68.1% (RT 64.4% vs. CCRT 77.7%; p = 0.165). The 3-year DMFS rate was 56.1% (RT 52.6% vs. CCRT 61.7%; p = 0.314). In multivariate analysis, age > or =66 years and pathologic stage III were significant poor prognostic factors for OS. Treatment failure occurred in 40 patients. Four patients had radiologically confirmed grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. In NSCLC, adjuvant RT or CCRT after curative surgery is a safe and feasible modality of treatment. OS gain was seen in patients less than 66 years. Postoperative CCRT showed a propensity of achieving better local control and improved disease-free survival compared to RT alone according to our data.

  1. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M Fouad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate

  2. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Khorshid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate, toxicity and OS.

  3. DOE SciDAC’s Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report for University of Southern California Information Sciences Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chervenak, Ann Louise [University of Southern California

    2013-12-19

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rowan, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G. [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y., E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia {>=}Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  5. Automated inter-rater reliability assessment and electronic data collection in a multi-center breast cancer study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enger Shelley M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The choice between paper data collection methods and electronic data collection (EDC methods has become a key question for clinical researchers. There remains a need to examine potential benefits, efficiencies, and innovations associated with an EDC system in a multi-center medical record review study. Methods A computer-based automated menu-driven system with 658 data fields was developed for a cohort study of women aged 65 years or older, diagnosed with invasive histologically confirmed primary breast cancer (N = 1859, at 6 Cancer Research Network sites. Medical record review with direct data entry into the EDC system was implemented. An inter-rater and intra-rater reliability (IRR system was developed using a modified version of the EDC. Results Automation of EDC accelerated the flow of study information and resulted in an efficient data collection process. Data collection time was reduced by approximately four months compared to the project schedule and funded time available for manuscript preparation increased by 12 months. In addition, an innovative modified version of the EDC permitted an automated evaluation of inter-rater and intra-rater reliability across six data collection sites. Conclusion Automated EDC is a powerful tool for research efficiency and innovation, especially when multiple data collection sites are involved.

  6. Preparation of cell blocks for lung cancer diagnosis and prediction: protocol and experience of a high-volume center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossakowski, Claudia A; Morresi-Hauf, Alicia; Schnabel, Philipp A; Eberhardt, Ralf; Herth, Felix J F; Warth, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive diagnostic techniques are increasingly being used to obtain specimens for pathological diagnosis and prediction. Referring to lung cancer, both endobronchial and endoesophageal ultrasound are used worldwide as diagnostic routine methods. Consequently, an increasing number of pathological samples are cytological and fewer are histological. On the other hand, the requirements for specific and sensitive tumor subtyping complemented by predictive analyses are steadily increasing and are an essential basis for evidence-based treatment decisions. In this article we focus on the cell block method as a helpful tool for diagnostic and predictive analyses in lung cancer and point out its advantages and disadvantages in comparison to conventional cytological and biopsy specimens. Furthermore, we retrospectively analyze the diagnostic results of the cell block method in a high-volume center over 5 years. The main advantages of cell blocks are the availability of established and validated protocols, archiving and the opportunity to have serial sections from the same specimens to provide or repeat molecular analyses. Actually, in case of tumor progression, even additional biomarkers can be tested using the original cell block when re-biopsies are not feasible. The cell block method should be considered as a reliable, complimentary approach to conventional cytological or biopsy procedures, which is helpful to fulfill the increasing requirements of high-quality diagnostics and prediction.

  7. Innovative patient-centered skills training addressing challenging issues in cancer communications: Using patient's stories that teach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Thomas W; Gorniewicz, James; Floyd, Michael; Tudiver, Fred; Odom, Amy; Zoppi, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    This workshop demonstrated the utility of a patient-centered web-based/digital Breaking Bad News communication training module designed to educate learners of various levels and disciplines. This training module is designed for independent, self-directed learning as well as group instruction. These interactive educational interventions are based upon video-recorded patient stories. Curriculum development was the result of an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort involving faculty from the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) Graduate Storytelling Program and the departments of Family and Internal Medicine at the James H. Quillen College of Medicine. The specific goals of the BBN training module are to assist learners in: (1) understanding a five-step patient-centered model that is based upon needs, preferences, and expectations of patients with cancer and (2) individualizing communication that is consistent with patient preferences in discussing emotions, informational detail, prognosis and timeline, and whether or not to discuss end-of-life issues. The pedagogical approach to the training module is to cycle through Emotional Engagement, Data, Modeled Practices, Adaptation Opportunities, and Feedback. The communication skills addressed are rooted in concepts found within the Reaching Common Ground communication training. A randomized control study investigating the effectiveness of the Breaking Bad News module found that medical students as well as resident physicians improved their communication skills as measured by an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Four other similarly designed modules were also created: Living Through Treatment, Transitions: From Curable to Treatable/From Treatable to End-of-Life, Spirituality, and Family.

  8. National Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Report (RPPR) Grant Closeout Grant Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts ...

  9. Funding Opportunities Available for Innovative SBIR Development - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Does your small business need early-stage financing to take its cancer research to the next level? The National Cancer Institute Small Business Innovation Research (NCI SBIR) Development Center has released $5 million for new contract funding opportunities to support cancer research and technology development in key emerging areas of need.

  10. Using Social Network Analysis to Evaluate Community Capacity Building of a Regional Community Cancer Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, John; Tyson, Dinorah Martinez; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Gwede, Clement; Vadaparampil, Susan; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Meade, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) is one of 25 Community Network Programs funded by the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities with the objectives to create a collaborative infrastructure of academic and community based organizations and to develop effective and sustainable interventions to…

  11. Association of family risk and lifestyle/comorbidities in ovarian cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira, Natalia; Azevedo Koike Folgueira, Maria Aparecida; Maistro, Simone; Encinas, Giselly; de Bock, Geertruida Hendrika; Estevez Diz, Maria Del Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to analyze factors that might indicate familial predisposition for ovarian cancer in patients diagnosed with this disease. Methods: in a prospective single center cohort study at the Institute of Cancer of the State of Sao Paulo (ICESP), 51 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer were includ

  12. Prevalence of mental disorders, psychosocial distress and need for psychosocial support in cancer patients – study protocol of an epidemiological multi-center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehnert Anja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical studies investigating the prevalence of mental disorders and psychological distress in cancer patients have gained increasing importance during recent years, particularly with the objective to develop and implement psychosocial interventions within the cancer care system. Primary purpose of this epidemiological cross-sectional multi-center study is to detect the 4-week-, 12-month-, and lifetime prevalence rates of comorbid mental disorders and to further assess psychological distress and psychosocial support needs in cancer patients across all major tumor entities within the in- and outpatient oncological health care and rehabilitation settings in Germany. Methods/Design In this multicenter, epidemiological cross-sectional study, cancer patients across all major tumor entities will be enrolled from acute care hospitals, outpatient cancer care facilities, and rehabilitation centers in five major study centers in Germany: Freiburg, Hamburg, Heidelberg, Leipzig and Würzburg. A proportional stratified random sample based on the nationwide incidence of all cancer diagnoses in Germany is used. Patients are consecutively recruited in all centers. On the basis of a depression screener (PHQ-9 50% of the participants that score below the cutoff point of 9 and all patients scoring above are assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview for Oncology (CIDI-O. In addition, all patients complete validated questionnaires measuring emotional distress, information and psychosocial support needs as well as quality of life. Discussion Epidemiological data on the prevalence of mental disorders and distress provide detailed and valid information for the estimation of the demands for the type and extent of psychosocial support interventions. The data will provide information about specific demographic, functional, cancer- and treatment-related risk factors for mental comorbidity and psychosocial distress, specific

  13. Profile of malignant spinal cord compression: One year study at regional cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Tariq Rasool

    2016-01-01

    Results: Most of the patients were in the age group of 41–60 years and there was no gender preponderance in patients. Female breast cancer was the most common incident (15.5% malignancy followed by multiple myeloma, lung, and prostatic carcinoma. Lower dorsal spine was the most common site of compression (35% followed by lumbar (31% and mid-dorsal (26% spine. 70 (91% patients had cord compression subsequent to bone metastasis while as other patients had leptomeningeal metastasis. In 31 (40% patients, spinal cord compression was the presenting symptom. Overall, only 26 patients had motor improvement after treatment. Conclusion: Grade of power before treatment was predictive of response to treatment and overall outcome of motor or sensory functions. Neurodeficit of more than 10 days duration was associated with poor outcome in neurological function.

  14. A single-center experience with abiraterone as treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thortzen, Anita; Thim, Stine; Røder, Martin Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous stimulation of the androgen receptor (AR) axis is a prerequisite for growth in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Abiraterone acetate (AA) is a potent inhibitor of extracellular and intracellular androgen synthesis by inhibition of the CYP-17 enzyme system, which...... has been shown to be up-regulated in CRPC. AA was recently introduced in the management of patients with metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) both before and after taxane-based chemotherapy. The purpose of this study is to report the initial clinical experience obtained from mCRPC patients managed on AA......% of the patients. Time to biochemical and radiological progression was 3.5 and 4.9 months, respectively. Overall survival was 13.2 months (95% CI: 9.0-17.4). CONCLUSION: Our initial experience with AA in the routine management of patients with mCRPC demonstrates an efficacy-effectiveness gap compared with clinical...

  15. El Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas en el control del cáncer en el Perú The role of the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases in the control of cancer in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Rosario Salazar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available La incidencia estimada de cáncer en el Perú es de 150 casos x 100 000 habitantes. Este ocupa el segundo lugar de las causas mortalidad a nivel nacional y se estima que el 75% de los casos se diagnostican en etapa avanzada y principalmente en Lima. En ese contexto, el Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas (INEN ha promovido la descentralización de la atención oncológica con la creación de los institutos regionales de enfermedades neoplásicas, las unidades oncológicas y los preventorios. Asimismo ha diseñado, desarrollado e implementado el Programa Presupuestal de Prevención y Control de Cáncer, por lo que desde el año 2011, más de 7000 establecimientos del país asignan recursos para la prevención, promoción y detección precoz de los cánceres más frecuentes en el Perú. Con el financiamiento del seguro estatal, se integraron los ejes estratégicos básicos para una atención integral del cáncer en la población de menores recursos. De esta manera y dentro de una política de estado integradora y articulada con el sector salud, nace el Plan Nacional para la Atención Integral del Cáncer y el Mejoramiento del Acceso a los Servicios Oncológicos en el Perú, denominado “Plan Esperanza”. En este artículo, desarrollamos el papel que viene cumpliendo el INEN en el control del cáncer como problema de salud pública, destacando la importancia del Programa Estratégico Presupuestal de Prevención y Control del Cáncer y de su papel en el “Plan Esperanza”With a mortality rate that constitutes the second nationwide, the estimated incidence of cancer in Peru is 150 cases x 100 000 inhabitants. Around 75% of the cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage and mainly in Lima. In this context, the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN has promoted the decentralization of oncological care creating regional institutes of neoplastic diseases, oncological units and prevention centers. In addition, INEN has designed

  16. David Nelson, MD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. David E Nelson is the Director of the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) Branch in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Prevention. The CPFP is an internationally renowned postdoctoral program designed to train early career scientific researchers and leaders in the field of cancer prevention. Dr. Nelson came to the CPFP in 2008 after working at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta for many years. |

  17. Design, development of water tank-type lung phantom and dosimetric verification in institutions participating in a phase I study of stereotactic body radiation therapy in patients with T2N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group trial (JCOG0702).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Teiji; Shirato, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Masayori; Miyabe, Yuki; Kito, Satoshi; Narita, Yuichirou; Onimaru, Rikiya; Ishikura, Satoshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    A domestic multicenter phase I study of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for T2N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer in inoperable patients or elderly patients who refused surgery was initiated as the Japan Clinical Oncology Group trial (JCOG0702) in Japan. Prior to the clinical study, the accuracy of dose calculation in radiation treatment-planning systems was surveyed in participating institutions, and differences in the irradiating dose between the institutions were investigated. We developed a water tank-type lung phantom appropriate for verification of the exposure dose in lung SBRT. Using this water tank-type lung phantom, the dose calculated in the radiation treatment-planning system and the measured dose using a free air ionization chamber and dosimetric film were compared in a visiting survey of the seven institutions participating in the clinical study. In all participating institutions, differences between the calculated and the measured dose in the irradiation plan were as follows: the accuracy of the absolute dose in the center of the simulated tumor measured using a free air ionization chamber was within 2%, the mean gamma value was ≤ 0.47 on gamma analysis following the local dose criteria, and the pass rate was >87% for 3%/3 mm from measurement of dose distribution with dosimetric film. These findings confirmed the accuracy of delivery doses in the institutions participating in the clinical study, so that a study with integration of the institutions could be initiated.

  18. Adolescents with Cancer in Italy: Improving Access to National Cooperative Pediatric Oncology Group (AIEOP) Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Andrea; Rondelli, Roberto; Pession, Andrea; Mascarin, Maurizio; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Mosso, Maria Luisa; Maule, Milena; Barisone, Elena; Bertolotti, Marina; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Jankovic, Momcilo; Fagioli, Franca; Biondi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    This analysis compared the numbers of patients treated at Italian pediatric oncology group (Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica [AIEOP]) centers with the numbers of cases predicted according to the population-based registry. It considered 32,431 patients registered in the AIEOP database (1989-2012). The ratio of observed (O) to expected (E) cases was 0.79 for children (0-14 years old) and 0.15 for adolescents (15-19 years old). The proportion of adolescents increased significantly over the years, however, from 0.05 in the earliest period to 0.10, 0.18, and then 0.28 in the latest period of observation, suggesting a greater efficacy of local/national programs dedicated to adolescents.

  19. Treatment outcome of patients with carcinoma of vulva: Experience from a tertiary cancer center of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Daya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of our retrospective study was to analyze and report the clinical outcome of patients with vulvar carcinoma (VC treated at our center. Materials and Methods: We retrieved the information regarding patients′ clinical details, treatment given, survival and complications from the case records of all VC patients who were treated at our center during the year 1998-2005. Overall survival (OS was determined with respect to age, histopathological grade, stage of disease, treatment group, pathological lymph node status, etc. Results: A total of 60 case records were retrieved for this retrospective analysis. Age ranged from 24 to 92 years (median 63 years. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO stage distribution was as follows: stage I: 2 patients; stage II: 17 patients; stage III: 31 patients; stage IV: 9 patients; and unknown stage: 1 patient. Thirty-three patients underwent surgery (wide local excision 3, radical vulvectomy 30. Eleven patients received postoperative radiation therapy (PORT, 12 received palliative radiation therapy (RT and 15 underwent definitive RT (5 of them received concurrent chemotherapy. Median follow-up period was 23 months (range 2-144 months. The 5-year OS for all stages was 41%. FIGO stage and pathological node positivity were found to be statistically significant prognostic factors for survival. Conclusion: Despite the majority of patients presenting in advanced stage, the 5-year OS of 41% in our series reflects a decent therapeutic outcome. The results have shown FIGO stage and pathological node positivity to be significant prognostic factors for survival. The use of preoperative chemotherapy/RT needs to be studied in our setup.

  20. Natural History of HPV and Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-12

    Dr. Phil Castle, an intramural research scientist at the National Institutes of Health, talks about the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, and cervical cancer and other anogenital cancers.  Created: 10/12/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  1. State and Perspectives of the Center for Collective Use «Accelerated Mass Spectrometry» of the Institute of Applied Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskalenko, V.B.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the development of the Center for collective use device «Accelerated Mass Spectrometry» IAP NASU. The results of the first experiments on the dating of some archaeological samples is presented. The main tasks aimed at further development of the Center are given.

  2. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

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    Leppert W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wojciech Leppert,1 Mikolaj Majkowicz,2 Maria Forycka,1 Eleonora Mess,3 Agata Zdun-Ryzewska2 1Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Quality of Life Research, Gdansk Medical University, Gdansk, Poland; 3Palliative Care Nursing Department, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Aim of the study: To assess quality of life (QoL in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU, and at a day care center (DCC. Patients and methods: QoL was assessed in advanced cancer patients at baseline and after 7 days of symptomatic treatment using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative Care (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS, and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS scale. Results: A total of 129 patients completed the study, with 51 patients treated at home, 51 patients treated at the PCU, and 27 patients at DCC. In the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, improvement in functional and symptom scales was observed except in physical functioning and fatigue levels; patients at DCC had a better physical functioning, global QoL, appetite, and fatigue levels. In the ESAS, improvement in all items was found except for drowsiness levels, which was stable in patients treated at DCC and deteriorated in home and PCU patients. Higher activity, better appetite and well-being, and less drowsiness were observed in patients treated at DCC. KPS was better in DCC patients compared to those treated at home and at the PCU; the latter group deteriorated. Conclusions: QoL improved in all patient groups, with better results in DCC patients and similar scores in those staying at home and at the PCU. Along with clinical assessment, baseline age, KPS, physical and emotional functioning may be considered when assigning patients to care at a DCC, PCU, or at home. Keywords: oncology, patient care

  3. Results of Second-Look Laparotomy in Advanced Ovarian Cancer: One Single Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damak, Tarak; Chargui, Riadh; Ben Hassouna, Jamel; Hechiche, Monia; Rahal, Khaled

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The goal of the study was to analyse the results of 85 cases of second-look laparotomy (SLL) and explore the influence of this procedure on survival. Patients and Methods. We reviewed retrospectively 85 cases of SLL collected and treated in our institute between 1994 and 2003. Results. Complete pathologic response (CPR) was 25.8%, microscopic disease (Rmicro) was 38.8%, and macroscopic disease (Rmacro) was 35.4%. In patients with negative SLL results, disease recurrence was diagnosed in 41%. The 3- and 5-year overall survival rates for the entire population were 91% and 87%, respectively. The 3- and 5-year disease-free survivals were, respectively, 76.3% and 58.5% in negative SLL versus 55.7% and 16% in positive SLL. The difference between the group of patients with complete response (76%) and the patients with residual microscopic disease (72%) was not significant. The tumoral residuum after initial surgery was the only prognostic factor influencing significantly the disease-free survival. On Cox regression model analysis, only initial tumoral residuum (P = 0.04) and tumoral residuum after SLL (P = 0.02) were independent prognostic factors for survival. Conclusions. The most important advantage of SLL is the early detection of recurrence and thus the early administration of consolidation treatment resulting in a better prognosis. PMID:23119177

  4. Pattern of palliative care, pain management and referral trends in patients receiving radiotherapy at a tertiary cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain is a common primary symptom of advanced cancer and metastatic disease, occurring in 50-75% of all patients. Although palliative care and pain management are essential components in oncology practice, studies show that these areas are often inadequately addressed. Materials and Methods: We randomly selected 152 patients receiving palliative radiotherapy (PRT from October 2006 to August 2008, excluding metastatic bone lesions. Patients′ records were studied retrospectively. Results: A median follow-up of 21 weeks was available for 119 males and 33 females with a median age of 55 years. Maximum (60% patients were of head and neck cancers followed by esophagus (14%, lung (10% and others. Dysphagia, growth/ulcer and pain were the chief indications for PRT. Pain was present in 93 (61% cases out of which, 56 (60% were referred to pain clinic. All except one consulted pain clinic with a median pain score of 8 (0-10 point scale. Fifty-three of these 56 patients (96% received opioid-based treatment with adequate pain relief in 33% cases and loss of follow-up in 40% cases. Only five (3% cases were referred to a hospice. Twenty-two (14% cases were considered for radical treatment following excellent response to PRT. Conclusion: In this selective sample, the standard of analgesic treatment was found to be satisfactory. However, there is a lot of scope for improvement regarding referral to pain clinic and later to the hospice. Patients′ follow-up needs to be improved along with future studies evaluating those patients who were considered for further RT till radical dose. Programs to change the patients′ attitude towards palliative care, physicians′ (residents′ training to improve communication skills, and institutional policies may be promising strategies.

  5. Center of cancer systems biology second annual workshop--tumor metronomics: timing and dose level dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Klement, Giannoula Lakka

    2013-05-15

    Metronomic chemotherapy, the delivery of doses in a low, regular manner so as to avoid toxic side effects, was introduced over 12 years ago in the face of substantial clinical and preclinical evidence supporting its tumor-suppressive capability. It constituted a marked departure from the classic maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) strategy, which, given its goal of rapid eradication, uses dosing sufficiently intense to require rest periods between cycles to limit toxicity. Even so, upfront tumor eradication is frequently not achieved with MTD, whereupon a de facto goal of longer-term tumor control is often pursued. As metronomic dosing has shown tumor control capability, even for cancers that have become resistant to the same drug delivered under MTD, the question arises whether it may be a preferable alternative dosing approach from the outset. To date, however, our knowledge of the coupled dynamics underlying metronomic dosing is neither sufficiently well developed nor widely enough disseminated to establish its actual potential. Meeting organizers thus felt the time was right, armed with new quantitative approaches, to call a workshop on "Tumor Metronomics: Timing and Dose Level Dynamics" to explore prospects for gaining a deeper, systems-level appreciation of the metronomics concept. The workshop proved to be a forum in which experts from the clinical, biologic, mathematical, and computational realms could work together to clarify the principles and underpinnings of metronomics. Among other things, the need for significant shifts in thinking regarding endpoints to be used as clinical standards of therapeutic progress was recognized.

  6. Portuguese validation of the Symptom Inventory of the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

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    Adriane Cristina Bernat Kolankiewicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the reliability and validity of the psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of the instrument for symptom assessment, titled MD Anderson Symptom Inventory - core. Method A cross-sectional study with 268 cancer patients in outpatient treatment, in the municipality of Ijuí, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Results The Cronbach’s alpha for the MDASI general, symptoms and interferences was respectively (0.857, (0.784 and (0.794. The factor analysis showed adequacy of the data (0.792. In total, were identified four factors of the principal components related to the symptoms. Factor I: sleep problems, distress (upset, difficulties in remembering things and sadness. Factor II: dizziness, nausea, lack of appetite and vomiting. Factor III: drowsiness, dry mouth, numbness and tingling. Factor IV: pain, fatigue and shortness of breath. A single factor was revealed in the component of interferences with life (0.780, with prevalence of activity in general (59.7%, work (54.9% and walking (49.3%. Conclusion The Brazilian version of the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory - core showed adequate psychometric properties in the studied population.

  7. Malignant melanoma: A retrospective series from a regional cancer center in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Kuldeep

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To present our experience in treating malignant melanoma patients. Methods and Materials : All melanoma patients treated at the Department of Radiotherapy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India, from 1995 to 2007 were studied retrospectively. The endpoints were loco-regional recurrence, distant recurrence, recurrence-free survival (RFS, and duration of follow-up (DOFU. RFS and DOFU were analyzed with respect to the factors like age, sex, tissue of origin, site of disease, number of nodes, lymphadenopathy, ulceration, stage, and operability to find out any association. Results : Seventy-two patients were found evaluable with 40 males and 32 females (median age 46.5 years. Eye was the commonest primary site with visual disturbance as the commonest symptom. Overall, 87% of the lesions were single, with most of the nonocular lesions presenting in the advanced stage. During the disease course, regional lymphadenopathy and distant metastases were seen in 33% and 32% of cases, respectively. Highest incidence of lymphadenopathy was seen in skin lesions and in primaries from trunk and extremities. Of all treated patients, 47% achieved complete response, 18% partial response, and others had either stable or progressive disease. The median DOFU was 6.2 months. RFS was studied only in curatively treated cases with a median of 10 months. Operability at presentation was the only prognostic factor influencing DOFU. Conclusion : Malignant melanoma is an uncommon disease in India carrying a lot of morbidity due to late presentation. Its management is still not clear regarding the optimum use and schedule of treatment modalities. More prospective studies in the future are required to come to a definite conclusion.

  8. Outcomes of adult medulloblastoma treated with a multimodality approach: A tertiary cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Mallick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Adult medulloblastoma (AMB is a rare central nervous system tumor. We aimed to analyze the treatment outcomes of AMB treated at our institute with surgery followed by craniospinal irradiation (CSI and adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the treatment charts of 31 patients of AMB treated from 2003-2011. The patient demography, treatment details and survival data were collected in a predesigned proforma. Kaplan Meier method was used to analyze disease free survival (DFS and the impact of prognostic factors was determined by univariate analysis (log rank test. Results: Male: Female ratio was 21:10. Cerebrospinal fluid dissemination was noted in 16% cases. CSI (36 Gray at 1.8 Gray/fraction to entire neuraxis and 20 Gray at 2 Gray/fraction boost to posterior fossa was used in all cases. 26 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy (carboplatin plus etoposide. Median follows up was 26.85 months (9.47-119.73 months. The estimated 3 and 5 years DFS was found to be 84.9% and 50.7% respectively. On univariate analysis, tumor located laterally had a trend towards better DFS (HR 3.04; 95%CI 0.722 to 12.812; P = 0.07 compared to midline tumors. Other factors like adjuvant chemotherapy, age, gender, surgical extent had no statistically significant impact on survival. Conclusion: The results of our study (largest series from India show that the regimen of surgery, adjuvant CSI and chemotherapy is feasible and confers descent survival. AMB patients should be treated with a multimodality approach in a tertiary care centre.

  9. Long-Term Survival and Local Relapse Following Surgery Without Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Upper Rectal Cancer: An International Multi-Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Seok; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Simon, Ng Siu Man; Law, Wai Lun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shan, Hester Cheung Yui; Kwak, Sang Gyu; Choi, Gyu-Seog

    2016-05-01

    Controversy remains regarding whether preoperative chemoradiation protocol should be applied uniformly to all rectal cancer patients regardless of tumor height. This pooled analysis was designed to evaluate whether preoperative chemoradiation can be safely omitted in higher rectal cancer.An international consortium of 7 institutions was established. A review of the database that was collected from January 2004 to May 2008 identified a series of 2102 patients with stage II/III rectal or sigmoid cancer (control arm) without concurrent chemoradiation. Data regarding patient demographics, recurrence pattern, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. The primary end point was the 5-year local recurrence rate.The local relapse rate of the sigmoid colon cancer (SC) and upper rectal cancer (UR) cohorts was significantly lower than that of the mid/low rectal cancer group (M-LR), with 5-year estimates of 2.5% for the SC group, 3.5% for the UR group, and 11.1% for the M-LR group, respectively. A multivariate analysis showed that tumor depth, nodal metastasis, venous invasion, and lower tumor level were strongly associated with local recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate of local failure was 90.6%, 92.5%, and 94.4% for tumors located within 5, 7, and 9 cm from the anal verge, respectively.Routine use of preoperative chemoradiation for stage II/III rectal tumors located more than 8 to 9 cm above the anal verge would be excessive. The integration of a more individualized approach focused on systemic control is warranted to improve survival in patients with upper rectal cancer.

  10. Comparison of primary radiation versus robotic surgery plus adjuvant radiation in high-risk prostate cancer: A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhsimranjot Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare robotic-prostatectomy plus adjuvant radiation therapy (RPRAT versus primary RT for high-risk prostate cancer (HRPCa. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed for the HRPCa patients treated in our institution between 2000 and 2010. One hundred and twenty-three patients with high-risk disease were identified. The Chi-square test and Fisher′s exact test were used to compare local control and distant failure rates between the two treatment modalities. For prostate-specific antigen comparisons between groups, Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used. Results: The median follow-up was 49 months (range: 3-138 months. Local control, biochemical recurrence rate, distant metastasis, toxicity, and disease-free survival were similar in the two groups. Conclusions: Primary RT is an excellent treatment option in patients with HRPCa, is equally effective and less expensive treatment compared with RPRAT. A prospective randomized study is required to guide treatment for patients with HRPCa.

  11. Noninvasive diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma: Elaboration on Korean liver cancer study group-National Cancer Center Korea Practice Guidelines compared with other guidelines and remaining issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jeong Min [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joong Won [Center for Liver Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be diagnosed based on characteristic findings of arterial-phase enhancement and portal/delayed 'washout' in cirrhotic patients. Several countries and major academic societies have proposed varying specific diagnostic criteria for HCC, largely reflecting the variable HCC prevalence in different regions and ethnic groups, as well as different practice patterns. In 2014, a new version of Korean practice guidelines for management of HCC was released by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group (KLCSG) and the National Cancer Center (NCC). According to the KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines, if the typical hallmark of HCC (i.e., hypervascularity in the arterial phase with washout in the portal or 3 min-delayed phases) is identified in a nodule ≥ 1 cm in diameter on either dynamic CT, dynamic MRI, or MRI using hepatocyte-specific contrast agent in high-risk groups, a diagnosis of HCC is established. In addition, the KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines provide criteria to diagnose HCC for subcentimeter hepatic nodules according to imaging findings and tumor marker, which has not been addressed in other guidelines such as Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and European Association for the Study of the Liver. In this review, we briefly review the new HCC diagnostic criteria endorsed by the 2014 KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines, in comparison with other recent guidelines; we furthermore address several remaining issues in noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, including prerequisite of sonographic demonstration of nodules, discrepancy between transitional phase and delayed phase, and implementation of ancillary features for HCC diagnosis.

  12. Noninvasive Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Elaboration on Korean Liver Cancer Study Group-National Cancer Center Korea Practice Guidelines Compared with Other Guidelines and Remaining Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Park, Joong-Won; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be diagnosed based on characteristic findings of arterial-phase enhancement and portal/delayed "washout" in cirrhotic patients. Several countries and major academic societies have proposed varying specific diagnostic criteria for HCC, largely reflecting the variable HCC prevalence in different regions and ethnic groups, as well as different practice patterns. In 2014, a new version of Korean practice guidelines for management of HCC was released by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group (KLCSG) and the National Cancer Center (NCC). According to the KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines, if the typical hallmark of HCC (i.e., hypervascularity in the arterial phase with washout in the portal or 3 min-delayed phases) is identified in a nodule ≥ 1 cm in diameter on either dynamic CT, dynamic MRI, or MRI using hepatocyte-specific contrast agent in high-risk groups, a diagnosis of HCC is established. In addition, the KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines provide criteria to diagnose HCC for subcentimeter hepatic nodules according to imaging findings and tumor marker, which has not been addressed in other guidelines such as Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and European Association for the Study of the Liver. In this review, we briefly review the new HCC diagnostic criteria endorsed by the 2014 KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines, in comparison with other recent guidelines; we furthermore address several remaining issues in noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, including prerequisite of sonographic demonstration of nodules, discrepancy between transitional phase and delayed phase, and implementation of ancillary features for HCC diagnosis.

  13. Tolerance and toxicity of neoadjuvant docetaxel, cisplatin and 5 fluorouracil regimen in technically unresectable oral cancer in resource limited rural based tertiary cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V M Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies indicate neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT can result in R0 resection in a substantial proportion of patients with technically unresectable oral cavity cancers. However, data regarding the efficacy and safety of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5 fluorouracil (TPF NACT in our setting is lacking. The present audit was proposed to evaluate the toxicities encountered during administration of this regimen. It was hypothesized that TPF NACT would be considered feasible for routine administration if an average relative dose intensity (ARDI of ≥0.90 or more in at least 70% of the patients. Materials and Methods: Technically unresectable oral cancers with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group PS 0-2, with biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma underwent two cycles of NACT with TPF regimen. Toxicity and response rates were noted following the CTCAE 4.03 and RECIST criteria. Descriptive analysis of completion rates (completing 2 cycles of planned chemotherapy with ARDI of 0.85 or more, reason for delay, toxicity, and response are presented. Results: The NACT was completed by all patients. The number of subjects who completed all planned cycles of chemotherapy are with the ARDI of the delivered chemotherapy been equal to or >0.85 was 11 (91.67%. All toxicity inclusive Grade 3-5 toxicity was seen in 11 patients (91.67%. The response rate of chemotherapy was 83.33%. There were three complete response, seven partial response, and two stable disease seen post NACT in this study. Conclusion: Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5 fluorouracil regimen can be routinely administered at our center with the supportive care methods and precautionary methods used in our study.

  14. Surgical approach for ulcerated locally advanced breast cancer. A single Center experience: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforgia, Rita; Punzo, Clelia; Panebianco, Annunziata; Volpi, Annalisa; Minafra, Marina; Sederino, Maria Grazia

    2017-01-12

    L’obiettivo del nostro studio è la valutazione della strategia chirurgica più idonea nei casi di LABC (Locally Advanced Breast Cancer) in condizioni di ulcerazione e sanguinamento. La diagnosi clinica del LABC prevede nella maggior parte dei casi una massa mammaria estesa associata ad edema, eritema, retrazione e sanguinamento, dolore, superficie cutanea irregolare e coinvolgimento linfonodale. L’intervento chirurgico di scelta per le forme T3-T4 è la mastectomia radicale che rappresenta un trattamento adeguato per il controllo locale della patologia. In caso di forme localmente avanzate e ulcerate, pur essendo forme inoperabili, l’exeresi chirurgica si rende necessaria per una bonifica locale. La presenza di fenomeni di ulcerazione e sanguinamento non rende possibile avviare un trattamento chemioterapico neoadiuvante ed è necessario eseguire interventi chirurgici palliativi. Il trattamento chirurgico stesso richiede mutilazioni ampie ed associate procedure di chirurgia plastica. Spesso per l’estensione della malattia ed il sovvertimento del corpus mammae durante l’exeresi chirurgica della mammella, la sezione su zone esenti da neoplasia non consente la chiusura immediata dei lembi. Abbiamo considerato, su un campione di 288 pazienti affette da carcinoma mammario, 11 donne con forme avanzate fra T4a e T4c (3.8%). E’ stata posta indicazione a trattamento chirurgico perché pazienti provenienti dal Pronto Soccorso con anemizzazione per neoplasie avanzate ulcerate e sanguinanti, non candidabili in prima istanza a chemioterapia neoadiuvante citoriduttiva. Le procedure adoperate per la ricostruzione della mammella sono state in 2 pazienti la rotazione di un lembo muscolo cutaneo, in 4 casi un innesto cutaneo prelevato dalla coscia, in 4 casi è stata utilizzata una matrice dermica biologica - sostituto cutaneo (INTEGRA) che è stata poi sostituita con un successivo innesto cutaneo a distanza di circa 20-30 giorni. Sono state osservate recidive in 2 casi

  15. Five-year Results of Whole Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer: The Fox Chase Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Lanea M.M., E-mail: Lanea.Keller@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sopka, Dennis M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Klayton, Tracy; Li Jinsheng; Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year outcomes using whole-breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of early-stage-breast cancer at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: A total of 946 women with early-stage breast cancer (stage 0, I, or II) were treated with IMRT after surgery with or without systemic therapy from 2003-2010. Whole-breast radiation was delivered via an IMRT technique with a median whole-breast radiation dose of 46 Gy and median tumor bed boost of 14 Gy. Endpoints included local-regional recurrence, cosmesis, and late complications. Results: With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 1-97 months), there were 12 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and one locoregional recurrence. The 5-year actuarial IBTR and locoregional recurrence rates were 2.0% and 2.4%. Physician-reported cosmestic outcomes were available for 645 patients: 63% were considered 'excellent', 33% 'good', and <1.5% 'fair/poor'. For physician-reported cosmesis, boost doses {>=}16 Gy, breast size >900 cc, or boost volumes >34 cc were significantly associated with a 'fair/poor' cosmetic outcome. Fibrosis, edema, erythema, and telangectasia were also associated with 'fair/poor' physician-reported cosmesis; erythema and telangectasia remained significant on multivariate analysis. Patient-reported cosmesis was available for 548 patients, and 33%, 50%, and 17% of patients reported 'excellent', 'good', and 'fair/poor' cosmesis, respectively. The use of a boost and increased boost volume: breast volume ratio were significantly associated with 'fair/poor' outcomes. No parameter for patient-reported cosmesis was significant on multivariate analysis. The chances of experiencing a treatment related effect was significantly associated with a boost dose {>=}16 Gy, receipt of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, large breast size, and electron boost energy

  16. Breast Cancer Research Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Research Update Winter 2017 Table of Contents National Cancer Institute ... Addressing Breast Cancer's Unequal Burden / Breast Cancer Research Update Winter 2017 Issue: Volume 11 Number 4 Page ...

  17. Survival of Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia under Treatment with the Protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 00-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Jaimes-Reyes, Ethel Zulie; Arellano-Galindo, José; García-Jiménez, Xochiketzalli; Tiznado-García, Héctor Manuel; Sánchez-Jara, Berenice; Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Ortíz-Torres, María Guadalupe; Ortíz-Fernández, Antonio; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Our aim in this paper is to describe the results of treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in Mexican children treated from 2006 to 2010 under the protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) 00-01. The children were younger than 16 years of age and had a diagnosis of ALL de novo. The patients were classified as standard risk if they were 1–9.9 years old and had a leucocyte count 100 × 109/L. The poor outcomes were associated with toxic death during induction, complete remission, and relapse. These factors remain the main obstacles to the success of this treatment in our population. PMID:25922837

  18. Instructional Style and Learner-Centered Approach: A Cross-Institutional Examination of Modality Preference for Online Course Delivery in a Graduate Professional Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnici, Laurie J.; Maatta, Stephanie L.; Klose, M. Katherine; Julien, Heidi; Bajjaly, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This case study examined student preference for delivery mode of online courses in two graduate degree programs in Library and Information Science. Within-group and between-groups comparisons indicated a distinct preference across the institutions. Findings from focus groups conducted with two cohorts of students enrolled in a federally funded…

  19. The KhoeSan Early Learning Center Pilot Project: Negotiating Power and Possibility in a South African Institute of Higher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wet, Priscilla

    2011-01-01

    As we search for a new paradigm in post-apartheid South Africa, the knowledge base and worldview of the KhoeSan first Indigenous peoples is largely missing. The South African government has established various mechanisms as agents for social change. Institutions of higher learning have implemented transformation programs. KhoeSan peoples, however,…

  20. Center of excellence in laser medicine. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrish, J.A.

    1992-09-01

    Achievements during the first six months of funding to prepare for a Center of Excellence in biomedical laser development include limited specific research projects within the Center`s three broad interest areas, and program development to establish the Center and its activities. Progress in the three interest areas -- new medical laser systems development, optical diagnostics, and photosensitization, is reported. Feasibility studies and prototype development were emphasized, to enhance establishing a substantial Center through future support. Specific projects are an optimized laser-catheter system for reversal of vasospasm; optical detection of major skin burn depth and cancers using fluorescent drugs, and photosensitization of vascular tissues. In addition, an interdepartmental Laser Center was established at MGH to enhance collaborations and institutional committment to the Center of Excellence. Competitive postdoctoral research fellowships, with provision for matching funds from other departments, have been announced.