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Sample records for cancer gene discovered

  1. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  2. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanavichit, Apichart

    2002-01-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  3. Discovering biomarkers from gene expression data for predicting cancer subgroups using neural networks and relational fuzzy clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Animesh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The four heterogeneous childhood cancers, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and Ewing sarcoma present a similar histology of small round blue cell tumor (SRBCT and thus often leads to misdiagnosis. Identification of biomarkers for distinguishing these cancers is a well studied problem. Existing methods typically evaluate each gene separately and do not take into account the nonlinear interaction between genes and the tools that are used to design the diagnostic prediction system. Consequently, more genes are usually identified as necessary for prediction. We propose a general scheme for finding a small set of biomarkers to design a diagnostic system for accurate classification of the cancer subgroups. We use multilayer networks with online gene selection ability and relational fuzzy clustering to identify a small set of biomarkers for accurate classification of the training and blind test cases of a well studied data set. Results Our method discerned just seven biomarkers that precisely categorized the four subgroups of cancer both in training and blind samples. For the same problem, others suggested 19–94 genes. These seven biomarkers include three novel genes (NAB2, LSP1 and EHD1 – not identified by others with distinct class-specific signatures and important role in cancer biology, including cellular proliferation, transendothelial migration and trafficking of MHC class antigens. Interestingly, NAB2 is downregulated in other tumors including Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Neuroblastoma but we observed moderate to high upregulation in a few cases of Ewing sarcoma and Rabhdomyosarcoma, suggesting that NAB2 might be mutated in these tumors. These genes can discover the subgroups correctly with unsupervised learning, can differentiate non-SRBCT samples and they perform equally well with other machine learning tools including support vector machines. These biomarkers lead to four simple human interpretable

  4. The power of the age standardized incidence rate to discover the gene link between cancer diseases: development of a new epidemiological method to save money, time, and effort for genetic scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Ibrahim G; Hussain, Issam I; Alghamdi, Mohamed S; El-Sheemy, Mohammed A

    2015-01-01

    This study provides an incipient epidemiological rule using the concept of direct method of standardization to determine the genetic link between cancer diseases. The overall 8 or 10 years age standardized incidence rate (ASIR) for both cancer diseases, for example (A) and (B) should be calculated for all regions of the country. A line chart should be used to display the overall ASIR trend of both diseases (A and B). Pearson's correlation can be used to determine the strength of the association between the overall ASIRs of both diseases. The overlap or opposite direction of the overall ASIR trend of both diseases (A and B) should be determined and studied for possible associations between cancer diseases. If the trend of the overall 8 or 10 years ASIR of a disease (A) follows that of disease (B) in all regions of the country, then the genes of patients with both diseases (A and B) will be highly homogeneous, and they should be studied in the region with the highest and lowest overall ASIR for both diseases (A and B). In addition, if there is an opposite direction or overlapping trend for both diseases (A and B) in certain regions of the country or among specific groups of people with the same demographic characteristics, then the genes of patients will be investigated for both diseases to identify the potential gene link between cancer diseases. This study revealed that the overall ASIR trends of female breast cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancer are very similar in all regions of Saudi Arabia and England. Our epidemiological evidence helps to save money, time, and effort for testing the potential gene link between cancer diseases.

  5. Prostate cancer heterogeneity: Discovering novel molecular targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Massari, Francesco; Iacovelli, Roberto; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Di Nunno, Vincenzo; Giunchi, Francesca; Brunelli, Matteo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) shows a broad spectrum of biological and clinical behavior, which represents the epiphenomenon of an extreme genetic heterogeneity. Recent genomic profiling studies have deeply improved the knowledge of the genomic landscape of localized and metastatic PCa. The AR and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways are the two most frequently altered, representing therefore interestingly targets for therapy. Moreover, somatic or germline aberrations of DNA repair genes (DRGs) have been observed at high frequency, supporting the potential role of platinum derivatives and PARP inhibitors as effective therapeutic strategies. In the future, the identification of driver mutations present at a specific stage of the disease, the classification PCa based on specific molecular alterations, and the selection of the most appropriate therapy based on biomarkers predictors of response represent the foundations for an increasingly more accurate personalized medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Discovering implicit entity relation with the gene-citation-gene network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Song

    Full Text Available In this paper, we apply the entitymetrics model to our constructed Gene-Citation-Gene (GCG network. Based on the premise there is a hidden, but plausible, relationship between an entity in one article and an entity in its citing article, we constructed a GCG network of gene pairs implicitly connected through citation. We compare the performance of this GCG network to a gene-gene (GG network constructed over the same corpus but which uses gene pairs explicitly connected through traditional co-occurrence. Using 331,411 MEDLINE abstracts collected from 18,323 seed articles and their references, we identify 25 gene pairs. A comparison of these pairs with interactions found in BioGRID reveal that 96% of the gene pairs in the GCG network have known interactions. We measure network performance using degree, weighted degree, closeness, betweenness centrality and PageRank. Combining all measures, we find the GCG network has more gene pairs, but a lower matching rate than the GG network. However, combining top ranked genes in both networks produces a matching rate of 35.53%. By visualizing both the GG and GCG networks, we find that cancer is the most dominant disease associated with the genes in both networks. Overall, the study indicates that the GCG network can be useful for detecting gene interaction in an implicit manner.

  7. Cancer Genes in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Telbany, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is now known as a disease of genomic alterations. Mutational analysis and genomics profiling in recent years have advanced the field of lung cancer genetics/genomics significantly. It is becoming more accepted now that the identification of genomic alterations in lung cancer can impact therapeutics, especially when the alterations represent “oncogenic drivers” in the processes of tumorigenesis and progression. In this review, we will highlight the key driver oncogenic gene mutations and fusions identified in lung cancer. The review will summarize and report the available demographic and clinicopathological data as well as molecular details behind various lung cancer gene alterations in the context of race. We hope to shed some light into the disparities in the incidence of various genetic mutations among lung cancer patients of different racial backgrounds. As molecularly targeted therapy continues to advance in lung cancer, racial differences in specific genetic/genomic alterations can have an important impact in the choices of therapeutics and in our understanding of the drug sensitivity/resistance profile. The most relevant genes in lung cancer described in this review include the following: EGFR, KRAS, MET, LKB1, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK, RET, and ROS1. Commonly identified genetic/genomic alterations such as missense or nonsense mutations, small insertions or deletions, alternative splicing, and chromosomal fusion rearrangements were discussed. Relevance in current targeted therapeutic drugs was mentioned when appropriate. We also highlighted various targeted therapeutics that are currently under clinical development, such as the MET inhibitors and antibodies. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the landscape of genomic alterations in lung cancer is expected to be much transformed and detailed in upcoming years. These genomic landscape differences in the context of racial disparities should be emphasized both in tumorigenesis and in drug

  8. Discovering disease-associated genes in weighted protein-protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Cai, Meng; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2018-04-01

    Although there have been many network-based attempts to discover disease-associated genes, most of them have not taken edge weight - which quantifies their relative strength - into consideration. We use connection weights in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network to locate disease-related genes. We analyze the topological properties of both weighted and unweighted PPI networks and design an improved random forest classifier to distinguish disease genes from non-disease genes. We use a cross-validation test to confirm that weighted networks are better able to discover disease-associated genes than unweighted networks, which indicates that including link weight in the analysis of network properties provides a better model of complex genotype-phenotype associations.

  9. A novel method to discover fluoroquinolone antibiotic resistance (qnr genes in fragmented nucleotide sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulund Fredrik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotics are central in modern health care and are used to treat and prevent a wide range of bacterial infections. The recently discovered qnr genes provide a mechanism of resistance with the potential to rapidly spread between bacteria using horizontal gene transfer. As for many antibiotic resistance genes present in pathogens today, qnr genes are hypothesized to originate from environmental bacteria. The vast amount of data generated by shotgun metagenomics can therefore be used to explore the diversity of qnr genes in more detail. Results In this paper we describe a new method to identify qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. We show, using cross-validation, that the method has a high statistical power of correctly classifying sequences from novel classes of qnr genes, even for fragments as short as 100 nucleotides. Based on sequences from public repositories, the method was able to identify all previously reported plasmid-mediated qnr genes. In addition, several fragments from novel putative qnr genes were identified in metagenomes. The method was also able to annotate 39 chromosomal variants of which 11 have previously not been reported in literature. Conclusions The method described in this paper significantly improves the sensitivity and specificity of identification and annotation of qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. The predicted novel putative qnr genes in the metagenomic data support the hypothesis of a large and uncharacterized diversity within this family of resistance genes in environmental bacterial communities. An implementation of the method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.math.chalmers.se/qnr/.

  10. Discovery of cancer common and specific driver gene sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cancer is known as a disease mainly caused by gene alterations. Discovery of mutated driver pathways or gene sets is becoming an important step to understand molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis. However, systematically investigating commonalities and specificities of driver gene sets among multiple cancer types is still a great challenge, but this investigation will undoubtedly benefit deciphering cancers and will be helpful for personalized therapy and precision medicine in cancer treatment. In this study, we propose two optimization models to de novo discover common driver gene sets among multiple cancer types (ComMDP) and specific driver gene sets of one certain or multiple cancer types to other cancers (SpeMDP), respectively. We first apply ComMDP and SpeMDP to simulated data to validate their efficiency. Then, we further apply these methods to 12 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and obtain several biologically meaningful driver pathways. As examples, we construct a common cancer pathway model for BRCA and OV, infer a complex driver pathway model for BRCA carcinogenesis based on common driver gene sets of BRCA with eight cancer types, and investigate specific driver pathways of the liquid cancer lymphoblastic acute myeloid leukemia (LAML) versus other solid cancer types. In these processes more candidate cancer genes are also found. PMID:28168295

  11. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  12. Discovering time-lagged rules from microarray data using gene profile classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponzoni Ignacio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene regulatory networks have an essential role in every process of life. In this regard, the amount of genome-wide time series data is becoming increasingly available, providing the opportunity to discover the time-delayed gene regulatory networks that govern the majority of these molecular processes. Results This paper aims at reconstructing gene regulatory networks from multiple genome-wide microarray time series datasets. In this sense, a new model-free algorithm called GRNCOP2 (Gene Regulatory Network inference by Combinatorial OPtimization 2, which is a significant evolution of the GRNCOP algorithm, was developed using combinatorial optimization of gene profile classifiers. The method is capable of inferring potential time-delay relationships with any span of time between genes from various time series datasets given as input. The proposed algorithm was applied to time series data composed of twenty yeast genes that are highly relevant for the cell-cycle study, and the results were compared against several related approaches. The outcomes have shown that GRNCOP2 outperforms the contrasted methods in terms of the proposed metrics, and that the results are consistent with previous biological knowledge. Additionally, a genome-wide study on multiple publicly available time series data was performed. In this case, the experimentation has exhibited the soundness and scalability of the new method which inferred highly-related statistically-significant gene associations. Conclusions A novel method for inferring time-delayed gene regulatory networks from genome-wide time series datasets is proposed in this paper. The method was carefully validated with several publicly available data sets. The results have demonstrated that the algorithm constitutes a usable model-free approach capable of predicting meaningful relationships between genes, revealing the time-trends of gene regulation.

  13. Discovering and understanding oncogenic gene fusions through data intensive computational approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latysheva, Natasha S.; Babu, M. Madan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although gene fusions have been recognized as important drivers of cancer for decades, our understanding of the prevalence and function of gene fusions has been revolutionized by the rise of next-generation sequencing, advances in bioinformatics theory and an increasing capacity for large-scale computational biology. The computational work on gene fusions has been vastly diverse, and the present state of the literature is fragmented. It will be fruitful to merge three camps of gene fusion bioinformatics that appear to rarely cross over: (i) data-intensive computational work characterizing the molecular biology of gene fusions; (ii) development research on fusion detection tools, candidate fusion prioritization algorithms and dedicated fusion databases and (iii) clinical research that seeks to either therapeutically target fusion transcripts and proteins or leverages advances in detection tools to perform large-scale surveys of gene fusion landscapes in specific cancer types. In this review, we unify these different—yet highly complementary and symbiotic—approaches with the view that increased synergy will catalyze advancements in gene fusion identification, characterization and significance evaluation. PMID:27105842

  14. Gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yiping; Dang, Siwen; Hou, Peng

    2013-09-23

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Over 70% of new cases and deaths occur in developing countries. In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research mainly focuses on genetic alterations, including gastric cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for normal development and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression patterns in mammals. Disruption of epigenetic processes can lead to altered gene function and malignant cellular transformation. Recent advancements in the rapidly evolving field of cancer epigenetics have shown extensive reprogramming of every component of the epigenetic machinery in cancer, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, noncoding RNAs, and microRNAs. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter regions of gene, which leads to inactivation of tumor suppressor and other cancer-related genes in cancer cells, is the most well-defined epigenetic hallmark in gastric cancer. The advantages of gene methylation as a target for detection and diagnosis of cancer in biopsy specimens and non-invasive body fluids such as serum and gastric washes have led to many studies of application in gastric cancer. This review focuses on the most common and important phenomenon of epigenetics, DNA methylation, in gastric cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of the Novel Fanconi Anemia Gene SLX4/FANCP in Familial Breast Cancer Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Janine L.; van Mil, Saskia E.; Crossan, Gerry; Sabbaghian, Nelly; de Leeneer, Kim; Poppe, Bruce; Adank, Muriel; Gille, Hans; Verheul, Henk; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; de Winter, Johan P.; Claes, Kathleen; Tischkowitz, Marc; Waisfisz, Quinten

    2013-01-01

    SLX4/FANCP is a recently discovered novel disease gene for Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare recessive disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and increased cancer susceptibility. Three of the 15 FA genes are breast cancer susceptibility genes in heterozygous mutation carriers-BRCA2, PALB2, and

  16. Stem-Like Memory T Cells Are Discovered | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    T cells are the white blood cells that are the body’s first line of attack against foreign invaders.  When designing immunotherapies to treat cancer the goal is to prolong the immune response of T cells a bit beyond what the body normally does when a bacterium or a virus is encountered.   Nicholas P. Restifo, M.D., working with Luca Gattinoni, M.D., and other colleagues in CCR’s Surgery Branch recently discovered a subset within the human T cell population that may help clinicians to do just  this.

  17. Mouse Models of Breast Cancer: Platforms for Discovering Precision Imaging Diagnostics and Future Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, H Charles; Buck, Jason R; Cook, Rebecca S

    2016-02-01

    Representing an enormous health care and socioeconomic challenge, breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Although many of the challenges associated with preventing, treating, and ultimately curing breast cancer are addressable in the laboratory, successful translation of groundbreaking research to clinical populations remains an important barrier. Particularly when compared with research on other types of solid tumors, breast cancer research is hampered by a lack of tractable in vivo model systems that accurately recapitulate the relevant clinical features of the disease. A primary objective of this article was to provide a generalizable overview of the types of in vivo model systems, with an emphasis primarily on murine models, that are widely deployed in preclinical breast cancer research. Major opportunities to advance precision cancer medicine facilitated by molecular imaging of preclinical breast cancer models are discussed. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. ► Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. ► DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. ► The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 °C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) γH2AX immunostaining to detect γH2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 °C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 °C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by γH2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and telomere functions are denatured. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide direct evidence of hyperthermia induced gene amplification.

  19. Hereditary Breast Cancer: The Era of New Susceptibility Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Apostolou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females. 5%–10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary and are caused by pathogenic mutations in the considered reference BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. As sequencing technologies evolve, more susceptible genes have been discovered and BRCA1 and BRCA2 predisposition seems to be only a part of the story. These new findings include rare germline mutations in other high penetrant genes, the most important of which include TP53 mutations in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, STK11 mutations in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and PTEN mutations in Cowden syndrome. Furthermore, more frequent, but less penetrant, mutations have been identified in families with breast cancer clustering, in moderate or low penetrant genes, such as CHEK2, ATM, PALB2, and BRIP1. This paper will summarize all current data on new findings in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  20. Functional genetic screens as tools to discover signaling pathways targeted by cancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epping, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    In chapter 1 we introduce various anti-cancer drugs and focus on histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs). Histone deacetylases are enzymes which catalyze the removal of acetyl groups from histones and other proteins, thereby regulating gene activity and protein function and activity. Several HDACI

  1. MHC Genes and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pillai, Shiv

    2000-01-01

    Tumors are believed to emerge only when immune surveillance fails. We wished to ascertain whether the failure to inherit putative protective alleles of HLA class II genes is linked to the development of breast cancer...

  2. Introduction: Cancer Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Constructing, evaluating, and interpreting gene networks generally sits within the broader field of systems biology, which continues to emerge rapidly, particular with respect to its application to understanding the complexity of signaling in the context of cancer biology. For the purposes of this volume, we take a broad definition of systems biology. Considering an organism or disease within an organism as a system, systems biology is the study of the integrated and coordinated interactions of the network(s) of genes, their variants both natural and mutated (e.g., polymorphisms, rearrangements, alternate splicing, mutations), their proteins and isoforms, and the organic and inorganic molecules with which they interact, to execute the biochemical reactions (e.g., as enzymes, substrates, products) that reflect the function of that system. Central to systems biology, and perhaps the only approach that can effectively manage the complexity of such systems, is the building of quantitative multiscale predictive models. The predictions of the models can vary substantially depending on the nature of the model and its inputoutput relationships. For example, a model may predict the outcome of a specific molecular reaction(s), a cellular phenotype (e.g., alive, dead, growth arrest, proliferation, and motility), a change in the respective prevalence of cell or subpopulations, a patient or patient subgroup outcome(s). Such models necessarily require computers. Computational modeling can be thought of as using machine learning and related tools to integrate the very high dimensional data generated from modern, high throughput omics technologies including genomics (next generation sequencing), transcriptomics (gene expression microarrays; RNAseq), metabolomics and proteomics (ultra high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry), and "subomic" technologies to study the kinome, methylome, and others. Mathematical modeling can be thought of as the use of ordinary

  3. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each......' C, and clustered Dukes' D separately. Real-time PCR of 10 known genes and 5 ESTs demonstrated excellent reproducibility of the array-based findings. The most frequently altered genes belonged to functional categories of metabolism (22%), transcription and translation (11%), and cellular processes (9...

  4. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor\\'s vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  5. Targeted exon sequencing successfully discovers rare causative genes and clarifies the molecular epidemiology of Japanese deafness patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Maiko; Naito, Takehiko; Nishio, Shin-ya; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Target exon resequencing using Massively Parallel DNA Sequencing (MPS) is a new powerful strategy to discover causative genes in rare Mendelian disorders such as deafness. We attempted to identify genomic variations responsible for deafness by massive sequencing of the exons of 112 target candidate genes. By the analysis of 216randomly selected Japanese deafness patients (120 early-onset and 96 late-detected), who had already been evaluated for common genes/mutations by Invader assay and of which 48 had already been diagnosed, we efficiently identified causative mutations and/or mutation candidates in 57 genes. Approximately 86.6% (187/216) of the patients had at least one mutation. Of the 187 patients, in 69 the etiology of the hearing loss was completely explained. To determine which genes have the greatest impact on deafness etiology, the number of mutations was counted, showing that those in GJB2 were exceptionally higher, followed by mutations in SLC26A4, USH2A, GPR98, MYO15A, COL4A5 and CDH23. The present data suggested that targeted exon sequencing of selected genes using the MPS technology followed by the appropriate filtering algorithm will be able to identify rare responsible genes including new candidate genes for individual patients with deafness, and improve molecular diagnosis. In addition, using a large number of patients, the present study clarified the molecular epidemiology of deafness in Japanese. GJB2 is the most prevalent causative gene, and the major (commonly found) gene mutations cause 30-40% of deafness while the remainder of hearing loss is the result of various rare genes/mutations that have been difficult to diagnose by the conventional one-by-one approach. In conclusion, target exon resequencing using MPS technology is a suitable method to discover common and rare causative genes for a highly heterogeneous monogenic disease like hearing loss.

  6. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  7. Gene therapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloza, Eric M; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2006-09-01

    Lung cancer patients suffer a 15% overall survival despite advances in chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery. This unacceptably low survival rate is due to the usual finding of advanced disease at diagnosis. However, multimodality strategies using conventional therapies only minimally improve survival rates even in early stages of lung cancer. Attempts to improve survival in advanced disease using various combinations of platinum-based chemotherapy have demonstrated that no regimen is superior, suggesting a therapeutic plateau and the need for novel, more specific, and less toxic therapeutic strategies. Over the past three decades, the genetic etiology of cancer has been gradually delineated, albeit not yet completely. Understanding the molecular events that occur during the multistep process of bronchogenic carcinogenesis may make these tasks more surmountable. During these same three decades, techniques have been developed which allow transfer of functional genes into mammalian cells. For example, blockade of activated tumor-promoting oncogenes or replacement of inactivated tumor-suppressing or apoptosis-promoting genes can be achieved by gene therapy. This article will discuss the therapeutic implications of these molecular changes associated with bronchogenic carcinomas and will then review the status of gene therapies for treatment of lung cancer. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Discovering the miR-26a-5p Targetome in Prostate Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzo, Milena; Berti, Gabriele; Russo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    in the tumorigenesis related pathways. Methods. The transfection of DU-145 prostate cancer cells with miR-26a-5p was done using nucleofection. The biological effects induced by miR-26a-5p re-expression were detected with routine assays for cell proliferation, cell cycle, survival, apoptosis and cell migration. The mi......Purpose. miR-26a-5p is a tumor suppressor (TS) miRNA often downregulated in several tumor tissues and tumor cell lines. In this work, we performed the re-expression of the miR-26a-5p in DU-145 prostate cancer cells to collect genes interacting with miR-26a-5p and analyzed their integration...... to integrate target genes in KEGG pathways and Protein-Protein Interaction networks (PPINs) and modules were built. Results. miR-26a-5p exerted an anti-proliferative effect acting at several levels, by decreasing survival and migration and inducing both cell cycle block and apoptosis. The analysis of the mi...

  9. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in the Etiology of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adegoke, Olufemi

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this CDA is to evaluate the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in the etiology of breast cancer in two ongoing case-control studies, the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS...

  10. Text analysis of MEDLINE for discovering functional relationships among genes: evaluation of keyword extraction weighting schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Navathe, Shamkant B; Pivoshenko, Alex; Dasigi, Venu G; Dingledine, Ray; Ciliax, Brian J

    2006-01-01

    One of the key challenges of microarray studies is to derive biological insights from the gene-expression patterns. Clustering genes by functional keyword association can provide direct information about the functional links among genes. However, the quality of the keyword lists significantly affects the clustering results. We compared two keyword weighting schemes: normalised z-score and term frequency-inverse document frequency (TFIDF). Two gene sets were tested to evaluate the effectiveness of the weighting schemes for keyword extraction for gene clustering. Using established measures of cluster quality, the results produced from TFIDF-weighted keywords outperformed those produced from normalised z-score weighted keywords. The optimised algorithms should be useful for partitioning genes from microarray lists into functionally discrete clusters.

  11. Search for new breast cancer susceptibility genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburg, Rogier Abel

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the search for new high-risk breast cancer susceptibility genes by linkage analysis. To date 20-25% of familial breast cancer is explained by mutations in the high-risk BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes. For the remaining families the genetic etiology is

  12. Novel Florfenicol and Chloramphenicol Resistance Gene Discovered in Alaskan Soil by Using Functional Metagenomics▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kevin S.; Anderson, Janet M.; Schwarz, Stefan; Williamson, Lynn; Handelsman, Jo; Singer, Randall S.

    2010-01-01

    Functional metagenomics was used to search for florfenicol resistance genes in libraries of cloned DNA isolated from Alaskan soil. A gene that mediated reduced susceptibility to florfenicol was identified and designated pexA. The predicted PexA protein showed a structure similar to that of efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily. PMID:20543056

  13. Novel florfenicol and chloramphenicol resistance gene discovered in Alaskan soil by using functional metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kevin S; Anderson, Janet M; Schwarz, Stefan; Williamson, Lynn; Handelsman, Jo; Singer, Randall S

    2010-08-01

    Functional metagenomics was used to search for florfenicol resistance genes in libraries of cloned DNA isolated from Alaskan soil. A gene that mediated reduced susceptibility to florfenicol was identified and designated pexA. The predicted PexA protein showed a structure similar to that of efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily.

  14. Bayesian nonparametric variable selection as an exploratory tool for discovering differentially expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbaba, Babak; Johnson, Wesley O

    2013-05-30

    High-throughput scientific studies involving no clear a priori hypothesis are common. For example, a large-scale genomic study of a disease may examine thousands of genes without hypothesizing that any specific gene is responsible for the disease. In these studies, the objective is to explore a large number of possible factors (e.g., genes) in order to identify a small number that will be considered in follow-up studies that tend to be more thorough and on smaller scales. A simple, hierarchical, linear regression model with random coefficients is assumed for case-control data that correspond to each gene. The specific model used will be seen to be related to a standard Bayesian variable selection model. Relatively large regression coefficients correspond to potential differences in responses for cases versus controls and thus to genes that might 'matter'. For large-scale studies, and using a Dirichlet process mixture model for the regression coefficients, we are able to find clusters of regression effects of genes with increasing potential effect or 'relevance', in relation to the outcome of interest. One cluster will always correspond to genes whose coefficients are in a neighborhood that is relatively close to zero and will be deemed least relevant. Other clusters will correspond to increasing magnitudes of the random/latent regression coefficients. Using simulated data, we demonstrate that our approach could be quite effective in finding relevant genes compared with several alternative methods. We apply our model to two large-scale studies. The first study involves transcriptome analysis of infection by human cytomegalovirus. The second study's objective is to identify differentially expressed genes between two types of leukemia. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Riproximin is a recently discovered type II ribosome inactivating protein with potential for treating cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adwan, Hassan; Bayer, Helene; Pervaiz, Asim; Sagini, Micah; Berger, Martin R

    2014-11-01

    The development of new anticancer drugs is a salient problem and the traditional use of plants is a potentially rich source of information for detecting new molecules with antineoplastic activity. Riproximin is a recently detected cytotoxic type II ribosome inactivating protein with high selectivity for certain tumor cell lines. Its activity was recognized as the main component in a plant powder used by African healers for treating cancer. By ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase gene sequencing analysis, the powder was identified to be derived from the plant Ximenia americana. The cDNA sequence of riproximin was identified, the protein was modeled to contain one A- and a B-chain, respectively, and a reliable purification procedure from kernels of X. americana was established. Riproximin displays high but differential antiproliferative activity in a panel of human and rodent cancer cell lines, with concentrations inhibiting cell proliferation by 50% (IC50 values) that diverge by a factor of 100. Consistent antineoplastic activity was detected in colorectal and pancreatic cancer liver metastasis models in rats. The cytotoxic mechanism of action was determined to be based on cellular uptake of riproximin followed by its A-chain prompted depurination of the 28S ribosomal RNA and induction of unfolded protein response. Riproximin's specificity depended on its B-chain connected binding to cell surface glycans, the presence of which is crucial for subsequent internalization into cells and cytotoxicity. These N- and O-glycans include bi- and tri-antennary NA structures (NA2/NA3) as well as Tn3 structures (clustered Tn antigen). Riproximin was found to crosslink proteins with N- and O-glycan structure, thus indicating both types of binding sites on its B chain. Due to this crosslinking ability, riproximin is expected to show prominent cytotoxicity towards cells expressing both, NA2/NA3 and clustered Tn structures. Apart from the properties of riproximin, the plant X. americana

  16. Prostate Cancer Gene Discovery Using ROMA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaacs, William B

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that a subset of men who develop prostate cancer (PCa) do so as a result of an inherited chromosomal deletion or amplification affecting the function of one or more critical prostate cancer susceptibility genes...

  17. Transcriptome Profiling to Discover Putative Genes Associated with Paraquat Resistance in Goosegrass (Eleusine indica L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jing; Shen, Xuefeng; Ma, Qibin; Yang, Cunyi; Liu, Simin; Chen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background Goosegrass (Eleusine indica L.), a serious annual weed in the world, has evolved resistance to several herbicides including paraquat, a non-selective herbicide. The mechanism of paraquat resistance in weeds is only partially understood. To further study the molecular mechanism underlying paraquat resistance in goosegrass, we performed transcriptome analysis of susceptible and resistant biotypes of goosegrass with or without paraquat treatment. Results The RNA-seq libraries generated 194,716,560 valid reads with an average length of 91.29 bp. De novo assembly analysis produced 158,461 transcripts with an average length of 1153.74 bp and 100,742 unigenes with an average length of 712.79 bp. Among these, 25,926 unigenes were assigned to 65 GO terms that contained three main categories. A total of 13,809 unigenes with 1,208 enzyme commission numbers were assigned to 314 predicted KEGG metabolic pathways, and 12,719 unigenes were categorized into 25 KOG classifications. Furthermore, our results revealed that 53 genes related to reactive oxygen species scavenging, 10 genes related to polyamines and 18 genes related to transport were differentially expressed in paraquat treatment experiments. The genes related to polyamines and transport are likely potential candidate genes that could be further investigated to confirm their roles in paraquat resistance of goosegrass. Conclusion This is the first large-scale transcriptome sequencing of E. indica using the Illumina platform. Potential genes involved in paraquat resistance were identified from the assembled sequences. The transcriptome data may serve as a reference for further analysis of gene expression and functional genomics studies, and will facilitate the study of paraquat resistance at the molecular level in goosegrass. PMID:24927422

  18. Transcript profiling of a bitter variety of narrow-leafed lupin to discover alkaloid biosynthetic genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Ting; Nagy, Istvan; Mancinotti, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Lupins (Lupinus spp.) are nitrogen-fixing legumes that accumulate toxic alkaloids in their protein-rich beans. These anti-nutritional compounds belong to the family of quinolizidine alkaloids (QAs), which are of interest to the pharmaceutical and chemical industries. To unleash the potential...... different tissues and two different sequencing technologies. In addition, we present a list of 33 genes that are closely co-expressed with LDC and that represent strong candidates for involvement in lupin alkaloid biosynthesis. One of these genes encodes a copper amine oxidase able to convert the product......, transporters, and regulators involved in lupin alkaloid biosynthesis....

  19. Genetic similarity between cancers and comorbid Mendelian diseases identifies candidate driver genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Rachel D; Emmett, Kevin J; Madubata, Chioma; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Rabadan, Raul

    2015-04-30

    Despite large-scale cancer genomics studies, key somatic mutations driving cancer, and their functional roles, remain elusive. Here, we propose that analysis of comorbidities of Mendelian diseases with cancers provides a novel, systematic way to discover new cancer genes. If germline genetic variation in Mendelian loci predisposes bearers to common cancers, the same loci may harbour cancer-associated somatic variation. Compilations of clinical records spanning over 100 million patients provide an unprecedented opportunity to assess clinical associations between Mendelian diseases and cancers. We systematically compare these comorbidities against recurrent somatic mutations from more than 5,000 patients across many cancers. Using multiple measures of genetic similarity, we show that a Mendelian disease and comorbid cancer indeed have genetic alterations of significant functional similarity. This result provides a basis to identify candidate drivers in cancers including melanoma and glioblastoma. Some Mendelian diseases demonstrate 'pan-cancer' comorbidity and shared genetics across cancers.

  20. Prioritizing genes associated with prostate cancer development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorlov, Ivan P; Logothetis, Christopher J; Sircar, Kanishka; Zhao, Hongya; Maity, Sankar N; Navone, Nora M; Gorlova, Olga Y; Troncoso, Patricia; Pettaway, Curtis A; Byun, Jin Young

    2010-01-01

    The genetic control of prostate cancer development is poorly understood. Large numbers of gene-expression datasets on different aspects of prostate tumorigenesis are available. We used these data to identify and prioritize candidate genes associated with the development of prostate cancer and bone metastases. Our working hypothesis was that combining meta-analyses on different but overlapping steps of prostate tumorigenesis will improve identification of genes associated with prostate cancer development. A Z score-based meta-analysis of gene-expression data was used to identify candidate genes associated with prostate cancer development. To put together different datasets, we conducted a meta-analysis on 3 levels that follow the natural history of prostate cancer development. For experimental verification of candidates, we used in silico validation as well as in-house gene-expression data. Genes with experimental evidence of an association with prostate cancer development were overrepresented among our top candidates. The meta-analysis also identified a considerable number of novel candidate genes with no published evidence of a role in prostate cancer development. Functional annotation identified cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, and cell motility as the top functions associated with prostate cancer development. We identified 10 genes--CDC2, CCNA2, IGF1, EGR1, SRF, CTGF, CCL2, CAV1, SMAD4, and AURKA--that form hubs of the interaction network and therefore are likely to be primary drivers of prostate cancer development. By using this large 3-level meta-analysis of the gene-expression data to identify candidate genes associated with prostate cancer development, we have generated a list of candidate genes that may be a useful resource for researchers studying the molecular mechanisms underlying prostate cancer development

  1. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Davis, Brian J.; Wilson, Torrence M.; Wiseman, Gregory A.; Federspiel, Mark J.; Morris, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our institution attempts to address this deficiency. The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is responsible for the ability of the thyroid gland to transport and concentrate iodide. The characteristics of the NIS gene suggest that it could represent an ideal therapeutic gene for cancer therapy. Published results from Mayo Clinic researchers have indicated several important successes with the use of the NIS gene and prostate gene therapy. Studies have demonstrated that transfer of the human NIS gene into prostate cancer using adenovirus vectors in vitro and in vivo results in efficient uptake of radioactive iodine and significant tumor growth delay with prolongation of survival. Preclinical successes have culminated in the opening of a phase I trial for patients with advanced prostate disease which is currently accruing patients. Further study will reveal the clinical promise of NIS gene therapy in the treatment of prostate as well as other malignancies.

  2. Discovering genes associated with dormancy in the monogonont rotifer Brachionus plicatilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kube Michael

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microscopic monogonont rotifers, including the euryhaline species Brachionus plicatilis, are typically found in water bodies where environmental factors restrict population growth to short periods lasting days or months. The survival of the population is ensured via the production of resting eggs that show a remarkable tolerance to unfavorable conditions and remain viable for decades. The aim of this study was to generate Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs for molecular characterisation of processes associated with the formation of resting eggs, their survival during dormancy and hatching. Results Four normalized and four subtractive libraries were constructed to provide a resource for rotifer transcriptomics associated with resting-egg formation, storage and hatching. A total of 47,926 sequences were assembled into 18,000 putative transcripts and analyzed using both Blast and GO annotation. About 28–55% (depending on the library of the clones produced significant matches against the Swissprot and Trembl databases. Genes known to be associated with desiccation tolerance during dormancy in other organisms were identified in the EST libraries. These included genes associated with antioxidant activity, low molecular weight heat shock proteins and Late Embryonic Abundant (LEA proteins. Real-time PCR confirmed that LEA transcripts, small heat-shock proteins and some antioxidant genes were upregulated in resting eggs, therefore suggesting that desiccation tolerance is a characteristic feature of resting eggs even though they do not necessarily fully desiccate during dormancy. The role of trehalose in resting-egg formation and survival remains unclear since there was no significant difference between resting-egg producing females and amictic females in the expression of the tps-1 gene. In view of the absence of vitellogenin transcripts, matches to lipoprotein lipase proteins suggest that, similar to the situation in dipterans, these

  3. Gene therapy in oral cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M Sathish; Masthan, K M K; Babu, N Aravindha; Dash, Kailash Chandra

    2013-06-01

    Gene therapy is the use of DNA as an agent to treat disease. Gene therapy aims at the insertion of a functional gene into the cells of a patient for the correction of an inborn error of metabolism, to alter or repair an acquired genetic abnormality, and to provide new function to the cell. Many experiments have been done with respect to its application in various diseases.Today, most of the gene therapy studies are aimed at cancer and hereditary diseases which are linked to genetic defects. Cancer usually occurs due to the production of multiple mutations in a single cell which cause it to proliferate out of control. Several methods such as surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy have been used widely to treat cancers. But, the cancer patients who are not helped by these therapies can be treated by gene therapy. The purpose of this article is to review the use and purpose of gene therapy in oral cancer.

  4. Associations Between Cancer Predisposition Testing Panel Genes and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J; Shimelis, Hermela; Hu, Chunling; Hart, Steven N; Polley, Eric C; Na, Jie; Hallberg, Emily; Moore, Raymond; Thomas, Abigail; Lilyquist, Jenna; Feng, Bingjian; McFarland, Rachel; Pesaran, Tina; Huether, Robert; LaDuca, Holly; Chao, Elizabeth C; Goldgar, David E; Dolinsky, Jill S

    2017-09-01

    Germline pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to an increased lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, the relevance of germline variants in other genes from multigene hereditary cancer testing panels is not well defined. To determine the risks of breast cancer associated with germline variants in cancer predisposition genes. A study population of 65 057 patients with breast cancer receiving germline genetic testing of cancer predisposition genes with hereditary cancer multigene panels. Associations between pathogenic variants in non-BRCA1 and non-BRCA2 predisposition genes and breast cancer risk were estimated in a case-control analysis of patients with breast cancer and Exome Aggregation Consortium reference controls. The women underwent testing between March 15, 2012, and June 30, 2016. Breast cancer risk conferred by pathogenic variants in non-BRCA1 and non-BRCA2 predisposition genes. The mean (SD) age at diagnosis for the 65 057 women included in the analysis was 48.5 (11.1) years. The frequency of pathogenic variants in 21 panel genes identified in 41 611 consecutively tested white women with breast cancer was estimated at 10.2%. After exclusion of BRCA1, BRCA2, and syndromic breast cancer genes (CDH1, PTEN, and TP53), observed pathogenic variants in 5 of 16 genes were associated with high or moderately increased risks of breast cancer: ATM (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 2.22-3.62), BARD1 (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.31-3.63), CHEK2 (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.31-1.67), PALB2 (OR, 7.46; 95% CI, 5.12-11.19), and RAD51D (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.21-7.88). Conversely, variants in the BRIP1 and RAD51C ovarian cancer risk genes; the MRE11A, RAD50, and NBN MRN complex genes; the MLH1 and PMS2 mismatch repair genes; and NF1 were not associated with increased risks of breast cancer. This study establishes several panel genes as high- and moderate-risk breast cancer genes and provides estimates of breast cancer risk associated with pathogenic variants in these genes among

  5. Cancer suicide gene therapy: a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Saúl Abenhamar; Carrillo, Esmeralda; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Martín, Ana; Perán, Macarena; Marchal, Juan Antonio; Boulaiz, Houria

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is considered the second leading cause of death worldwide despite the progress made in early detection and advances in classical therapies. Advancing in the fight against cancer requires the development of novel strategies, and the suicide gene transfer to tumor cells is providing new possibilities for cancer therapy. In this manuscript, authors present an overview of suicide gene systems and the latest innovations done to enhance cancer suicide gene therapy strategies by i) improving vectors for targeted gene delivery using tissue specific promoter and receptors; ii) modification of the tropism; and iii) combining suicide genes and/or classical therapies for cancer. Finally, the authors highlight the main challenges to be addressed in the future. Even if many efforts are needed for suicide gene therapy to be a real alternative for cancer treatment, we believe that the significant progress made in the knowledge of cancer biology and characterization of cancer stem cells accompanied by the development of novel targeted vectors will enhance the effectiveness of this type of therapeutic strategy. Moreover, combined with current treatments, suicide gene therapy will improve the clinical outcome of patients with cancer in the future.

  6. Potential Therapeutic Modalities in Cancer Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prithvi Sinha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of huge concerted efforts, the treatment of cancer, a disease frequently associated with genetic alterations caused due to hereditary or environmental factors, remains a challenge. The last few years have witnessed emergence of several innovative and effective modalities for the treatment of solid tumours and hematological malignancies. Gene therapy has shown enormous potential for cancer treatment, especially for metastatic cancers which unlike localized solid tumours, may not be amenable to surgery or other treatment options. Gene therapy aims to introduce a correct copy of the malfunctioning gene in the tumour environment by using viral or non-viral methods to impede or inhibit its growth. This review provides an overview of three main approaches for cancer gene therapy namely immunotherapy, oncolytic therapy and gene transfer therapy. Immunotherapy augments the host immune system in order to destroy cancer cells while oncolytic therapy uses genetically engineered viruses such as to effectively kill cancer cells. Clinical studies so far have shown that cells can be engineered to express gene products that can specifically target cancer cells and prevents their growth and metastasis. Though gene therapy for cancer is yet to see extensive clinical use, it is likely that in combination with other treatment modalities, it will help in controlling and possibly curing cancer in the near future.

  7. The promise of discovering population-specific disease-associated genes in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Nathan; Moorjani, Priya; Rai, Niraj; Sarkar, Biswanath; Tandon, Arti; Patterson, Nick; Bhavani, Gandham SriLakshmi; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Mustak, Mohammed S; Srinivasan, Sudha; Kaushik, Amit; Vahab, Saadi Abdul; Jagadeesh, Sujatha M; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Singh, Lalji; Reich, David; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2017-09-01

    The more than 1.5 billion people who live in South Asia are correctly viewed not as a single large population but as many small endogamous groups. We assembled genome-wide data from over 2,800 individuals from over 260 distinct South Asian groups. We identified 81 unique groups, 14 of which had estimated census sizes of more than 1 million, that descend from founder events more extreme than those in Ashkenazi Jews and Finns, both of which have high rates of recessive disease due to founder events. We identified multiple examples of recessive diseases in South Asia that are the result of such founder events. This study highlights an underappreciated opportunity for decreasing disease burden among South Asians through discovery of and testing for recessive disease-associated genes.

  8. Hormonal Involvement in Breast Cancer Gene Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    and s ubsequently amp lified at the Yale University sequenc ing facility for Illumina sequencing. However, it required a lot of effort to obtain this...and Polyak K. (2008). Genome-wide functi onal synergy between amp lified and mutated genes in human breast cancer. Cancer Res. 68: 9532-9540...east cancer patient samples. Other co-amp lified genes, within the HER2 amplicon and/or at other regions, could serve as additional novel target s for

  9. Endocrine aspects of cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzon, Luisa; Boscaro, Marco; Palù, Giorgio

    2004-02-01

    The field of cancer gene therapy is in continuous expansion, and technology is quickly moving ahead as far as gene targeting and regulation of gene expression are concerned. This review focuses on the endocrine aspects of gene therapy, including the possibility to exploit hormone and hormone receptor functions for regulating therapeutic gene expression, the use of endocrine-specific genes as new therapeutic tools, the effects of viral vector delivery and transgene expression on the endocrine system, and the endocrine response to viral vector delivery. Present ethical concerns of gene therapy and the risk of germ cell transduction are also discussed, along with potential lines of innovation to improve cell and gene targeting.

  10. A computational pipeline to discover highly phylogenetically informative genes in sequenced genomes: application to Saccharomyces cerevisiae natural strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazzotti, Matteo; Berná, Luisa; Stefanini, Irene; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2012-05-01

    The quest for genes representing genetic relationships of strains or individuals within populations and their evolutionary history is acquiring a novel dimension of complexity with the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. In fact, sequencing an entire genome uncovers genetic variation in coding and non-coding regions and offers the possibility of studying Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations at the strain level. Nevertheless, the disadvantageous cost-benefit ratio (the amount of details disclosed by NGS against the time-expensive and expertise-demanding data assembly process) still precludes the application of these techniques to the routinely assignment of yeast strains, making the selection of the most reliable molecular markers greatly desirable. In this work we propose an original computational approach to discover genes that can be used as a descriptor of the population structure. We found 13 genes whose variability can be used to recapitulate the phylogeny obtained from genome-wide sequences. The same approach that we prove to be successful in yeasts can be generalized to any other population of individuals given the availability of high-quality genomic sequences and of a clear population structure to be targeted.

  11. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, M J

    2012-02-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2 for predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene methylation need to be standardised, simplified and evaluated in external quality assurance programmes. It is concluded that methylated genes have the potential to provide a new generation of cancer biomarkers.

  12. Cytokine gene polymorphisms and their association with cervical cancer: A North Indian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesh Kumar Gupta

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Therefore, the promoter polymorphisms in cytokine genes can be used as biomarkers to predict cervical cancer susceptibility in a north Indian population. However, such studies need to be carried out in different ethnic populations in order to discover the specific risk alleles, genotypes and combinations for disease prediction.

  13. Mismatch repair gene expression in gastroesophageal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracea, Amelia; Angelescu, Cristina; Danciulescu, Mihaela; Ciurea, Marius; Ioana, Mihai; Burada, Florin

    2015-09-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes play a critical role in maintaining genomic stability, and the impairment of MMR machinery is associated with different human cancers, mainly colorectal cancer. The purpose of our study was to analyze gene expression patterns of three MMR genes (MSH2, MHS6, and EXO1) in gastroesophageal cancers, a pathology in which the contribution of DNA repair genes remains essentially unclear. A total of 45 Romanian patients diagnosed with sporadic gastroesophageal cancers were included in this study. For each patient, MMR mRNA levels were measured in biopsied tumoral (T) and peritumoral (PT) tissues obtained by upper endoscopy. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with specific TaqMan probes was used to measure gene expression levels for MSH2, MSH6, and EXO1 genes. A significant association was observed for the investigated MMR genes, all of which were detected to be upregulated in gastroesophageal tumor samples when compared with paired normal samples. In the stratified analysis, the association was limited to gastric adenocarcinoma samples. We found no statistically significant associations between MMR gene expression and tumor site or histological grade. In our study, MSH2, MSH6, and EXO1 genes were overexpressed in gastroesophageal cancers. Further investigations based on more samples are necessary to validate our findings.

  14. Help Seeking Behavior of Women with Self-Discovered Breast Cancer Symptoms: A Meta-Ethnographic Synthesis of Patient Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakbazan, Zohreh; Taghipour, Ali; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective Patient delay makes a critical contribution to late diagnosis and poor survival in cases of breast cancer. Identifying the factors that influence patient delay could provide information for adopting strategies that shorten this delay. The aim of this meta-ethnography was to synthesize existing qualitative evidence in order to gain a new understanding of help seeking behavior in women with self-discovered breast cancer symptoms and to determine the factors that influence patient delay. Methods The design was a meta-ethnography approach. A systematic search of the articles was performed in different databases including Elsevier, PubMed, ProQuest and SCOPUS. Qualitative studies with a focus on help seeking behaviors in women with self-discovered breast cancer symptoms and patient delay, published in the English language between 1990 and 2013 were included. The quality appraisal of the articles was carried out using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme qualitative research checklist and 13 articles met the inclusion criteria. The synthesis was conducted according to Noblit and Hare’s meta-ethnographic approach (1988), through reciprocal translational analysis and lines-of-argument. Findings The synthesis led to identification of eight repeated key concepts including: symptom detection, initial symptom interpretation, symptom monitoring, social interaction, emotional reaction, priority of medical help, appraisal of health services and personal-environmental factors. Symptom interpretation is identified as the important step of the help seeking process and which changed across the process through active monitoring of their symptoms, social interactions and emotional reactions. The perceived seriousness of the situation, priority to receive medical attention, perceived inaccessibility and unacceptability of the health care system influenced women’s decision-making about utilizing health services. Conclusion Help seeking processes are

  15. Barriers to early presentation of self-discovered breast cancer in Singapore and Malaysia: a qualitative multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jennifer N W; Potrata, Barbara; Simonella, Leonardo; Ng, Celene W Q; Aw, Tar-Ching; Dahlui, Maznah; Hartman, Mikael; Mazlan, Rifhan; Taib, Nur Aishah

    2015-12-21

    To explore and compare barriers to early presentation of self-discovered breast cancer in Singapore and Malaysia. A qualitative interview study with thematic analysis of transcripts. 67 patients with self-discovered breast symptoms were included in the analysis. Of these, 36% were of Malay ethnicity, 39% were Chinese and 25% Indian, with an average age of 58 years (range 24-82 years). The number of women diagnosed at early stages of cancer almost equalled those at advanced stages. Approximately three-quarters presented with a painless lump, one-quarter experienced a painful lump and 10% had atypical symptoms. University hospital setting in Singapore and Malaysia. Patients revealed barriers to early presentation not previously reported: the poor quality of online website information about breast symptoms, financial issues and the negative influence of relatives in both countries, while perceived poor quality of care and services in state-run hospitals and misdiagnosis by healthcare professionals were reported in Malaysia. The pattern of presentation by ethnicity remained unchanged where more Malay delayed help-seeking and had more advanced cancer compared to Chinese and Indian patients. There are few differences in the pattern of presentation and in the reported barriers to seek medical care after symptom discovery between Singapore and Malaysia despite their differing economic status. Strategies to reduce delayed presentation are: a need to improve knowledge of disease, symptoms and causes, quality of care and services, and quality of online information; and addressing fear of diagnosis, treatment and hospitalisation, with more effort focused on the Malay ethnic group. Training is needed to avoid missed diagnoses and other factors contributing to delay among health professionals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Identification of Genetic Susceptibility to Childhood Cancer through Analysis of Genes in Parallel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plon, Sharon E.; Wheeler, David A.; Strong, Louise C.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Pirics, Michael; Meng, Qingchang; Cheung, Hannah C.; Begin, Phyllis R.; Muzny, Donna M.; Lewis, Lora; Biegel, Jaclyn A.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical cancer genetic susceptibility analysis typically proceeds sequentially beginning with the most likely causative gene. The process is time consuming and the yield is low particularly for families with unusual patterns of cancer. We determined the results of in parallel mutation analysis of a large cancer-associated gene panel. We performed deletion analysis and sequenced the coding regions of 45 genes (8 oncogenes and 37 tumor suppressor or DNA repair genes) in 48 childhood cancer patients who also (1) were diagnosed with a second malignancy under age 30, (2) have a sibling diagnosed with cancer under age 30 and/or (3) have a major congenital anomaly or developmental delay. Deleterious mutations were identified in 6 of 48 (13%) families, 4 of which met the sibling criteria. Mutations were identified in genes previously implicated in both dominant and recessive childhood syndromes including SMARCB1, PMS2, and TP53. No pathogenic deletions were identified. This approach has provided efficient identification of childhood cancer susceptibility mutations and will have greater utility as additional cancer susceptibility genes are identified. Integrating parallel analysis of large gene panels into clinical testing will speed results and increase diagnostic yield. The failure to detect mutations in 87% of families highlights that a number of childhood cancer susceptibility genes remain to be discovered. PMID:21356188

  17. Cooperation and antagonism among cancer genes: the renal cancer paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin; Brugarolas, James

    2013-07-15

    It is poorly understood how driver mutations in cancer genes work together to promote tumor development. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) offers a unique opportunity to study complex relationships among cancer genes. The four most commonly mutated genes in RCC of clear-cell type (the most common type) are two-hit tumor suppressor genes, and they cluster in a 43-Mb region on chromosome 3p that is deleted in approximately 90% of tumors: VHL (mutated in ∼80%), PBRM1 (∼50%), BAP1 (∼15%), and SETD2 (∼15%). Meta-analyses that we conducted show that mutations in PBRM1 and SETD2 co-occur in tumors at a frequency higher than expected by chance alone, indicating that these mutations may cooperate in tumorigenesis. In contrast, consistent with our previous results, mutations in PBRM1 and BAP1 tend to be mutually exclusive. Mutation exclusivity analyses (often confounded by lack of statistical power) raise the possibility of functional redundancy. However, mutation exclusivity may indicate negative genetic interactions, as proposed herein for PBRM1 and BAP1, and mutations in these genes define RCC with different pathologic features, gene expression profiles, and outcomes. Negative genetic interactions among cancer genes point toward broader context dependencies of cancer gene action beyond tissue dependencies. An enhanced understanding of cancer gene dependencies may help to unravel vulnerabilities that can be exploited therapeutically. ©2013 AACR.

  18. Gene Delivery for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pang, Shen

    2001-01-01

    .... Enhanced by the bystander effect, the specific expression of the DTA gene causes significant cell death in prostate cancer cell cultures, with very low background cell eradication in control cell lines...

  19. Recombinational Repair Genes and Breast Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shima, Naoko

    2004-01-01

    To seek novel DNA double strand break (DSB) repair genes that may influence breast cancer risk, phenotype-based saeen for chromosome instability mutations in mice, successfully yielding four mutations...

  20. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  1. Newly discovered breast cancer susceptibility loci on 3p24 and 17q23.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Shahana; Thomas, Gilles; Ghoussaini, Maya

    2009-01-01

    strong evidence for additional susceptibility loci on 3p (rs4973768: per-allele OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.08-1.13, P = 4.1 x 10(-23)) and 17q (rs6504950: per-allele OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.92-0.97, P = 1.4 x 10(-8)). Potential causative genes include SLC4A7 and NEK10 on 3p and COX11 on 17q....

  2. Transcriptome analysis of Panax vietnamensis var. fuscidicus discovers putative ocotillol-type ginsenosides biosynthesis genes and genetic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Hui; Ma, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Jia-Jin; Chen, Jun-Wen; Tang, Qing-Yan; He, Mu-Han; Xu, Xiang-Zeng; Jiang, Ni-Hao; Yang, Sheng-Chao

    2015-03-08

    P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus, called "Yesanqi" in Chinese, is a new variety of P. vietnamensis, which was first found in Jinping County, the southern part of Yunnan Province, China. Compared with other Panax plants, this species contains higher content of ocotillol-type saponin, majonoside R2. Despite the pharmacological importance of ocotillol-type saponins, little is known about their biosynthesis in plants. Hence, P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus is a suitable medicinal herbal plant species to study biosynthesis of ocotillol-type saponins. In addition, the available genomic information of this important herbal plant is lacking. To investigate the P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus transcriptome, Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 sequencing platform was employed. We produced 114,703,210 clean reads, assembled into 126,758 unigenes, with an average length of 1,304 bp and N50 of 2,108 bp. Among these 126,758 unigenes, 85,214 unigenes (67.23%) were annotated based on the information available from the public databases. The transcripts encoding the known enzymes involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis were identified in our Illumina dataset. A full-length cDNA of three Squalene epoxidase (SE) genes were obtained using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and the expression patterns of ten unigenes were analyzed by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Furthermore, 15 candidate cytochrome P450 genes and 17 candidate UDP-glycosyltransferase genes most likely to involve in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway were discovered from transcriptome sequencing of P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus. We further analyzed the data and found 21,320 simple sequence repeats (SSRs), 30 primer pairs for SSRs were randomly selected for validation of the amplification and polymorphism in 13 P. vietnamensis var. fuscidiscus accessions. Meanwhile, five major triterpene saponins in roots of P. vietnamensis var. fuscidicus were determined using high performance

  3. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumniczky, K.; Safrany, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  4. Discovering Che-1/AATF: a new attractive target for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eIezzi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional cofactor Che-1/AATF is currently emerging as an important component of the DNA damage response machinery, the complex signaling network that maintains genome integrity and prevents tumorigenesis. Moreover this protein is involved in a wide range of cellular pathways, regulating proliferation and survival in both physiological and pathological conditions. Notably, some evidence indicates that dysregulation of Che-1/AATF levels are associated with the transformation process and elevated levels of Che-1/AATF are required for tumor cell survival. It is for these reasons that Che-1/AATF has been regarded as an attractive, still theoretical, therapeutic target for cancer treatments. In this review, we will provide an updated overview of Che-1/AATF activities, from transcriptional regulation to DNA damage response.

  5. Discovering mammography-based machine learning classifiers for breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Pollán, Raúl; Guevara-López, Miguel Angel; Suárez-Ortega, Cesar; Díaz-Herrero, Guillermo; Franco-Valiente, Jose Miguel; Rubio-Del-Solar, Manuel; González-de-Posada, Naimy; Vaz, Mario Augusto Pires; Loureiro, Joana; Ramos, Isabel

    2012-08-01

    This work explores the design of mammography-based machine learning classifiers (MLC) and proposes a new method to build MLC for breast cancer diagnosis. We massively evaluated MLC configurations to classify features vectors extracted from segmented regions (pathological lesion or normal tissue) on craniocaudal (CC) and/or mediolateral oblique (MLO) mammography image views, providing BI-RADS diagnosis. Previously, appropriate combinations of image processing and normalization techniques were applied to reduce image artifacts and increase mammograms details. The method can be used under different data acquisition circumstances and exploits computer clusters to select well performing MLC configurations. We evaluated 286 cases extracted from the repository owned by HSJ-FMUP, where specialized radiologists segmented regions on CC and/or MLO images (biopsies provided the golden standard). Around 20,000 MLC configurations were evaluated, obtaining classifiers achieving an area under the ROC curve of 0.996 when combining features vectors extracted from CC and MLO views of the same case.

  6. Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Cancer with Bilateral Renal Metastases Discovered Incidentally During Work-Up of Primary Endometrial Cancer: A Rare Occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubana, Sandeep Singh; Singh, Navdeep; Tuli, Sandeep S; Bashir, Tayyaba; Sachmechi, Issac; Kemeny, Margaret M

    2015-07-16

    Follicular variant of papillary thyroid cancer (FV-PTC) is the second most common subtype of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) after classic PTC. FV-PTC is characterized by nuclear features consistent with classic PTC but has a follicular architecture that lacks classic papillary morphology. Thyroid cancer rarely metastasizes to the kidney. Only 6 cases of FV-PTC metastasizing to the kidney have been reported in the English literature. We are reporting a case of FV-PTC with bilateral renal metastases discovered incidentally during work-up of primary endometrial cancer. A 70-year-old woman presented with post-menopausal bleeding secondary to endometrial cancer. Staging work-up showed multiple bilateral lung nodules, bilateral soft tissue kidney masses, and multinodular goiter. The pathological and immnohistochemical profile of the lung biopsy was consistent with primary well-differentiated lung adenocarcinoma. Follow-up computerized tomography scan showed stable lung nodules and enlarging renal masses, which was suggestive of bilateral renal cancer. While the histologic features of the renal biopsy were not typical, the immunohistochemical staining of renal biopsy was positive for Paired box 8, thyroid transcription factor-1, thyroglobulin, and cytokeratin 7, suggesting the thyroid as the primary cancer site. The final histopathology on surgical specimen of total thyroidectomy revealed follicular variant of papillary thyroid cancer. The presence of pulmonary nodules and kidney masses does not always suggest the lung or the kidney as primary tumor sites. The clinician should be aware of the possibility of metastasis and look for the primary source, which in the present case was FV-PTC. Immunohistochemistry plays an important role in determining the primary site of origin. In case of multiple-organ metastases, each metastatic lesion should be biopsied as soon as possible for definitive diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  7. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle t...

  8. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gen...

  9. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Nils; Duffy, M.J; Napieralski, R.

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that meas......Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested...... that measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2...... for predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene...

  10. Cancer genes in lung cancer: racial disparities: are there any?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Telbany, Ahmed; Ma, Patrick C

    2012-07-01

    Cancer is now known as a disease of genomic alterations. Mutational analysis and genomics profiling in recent years have advanced the field of lung cancer genetics/genomics significantly. It is becoming more accepted now that the identification of genomic alterations in lung cancer can impact therapeutics, especially when the alterations represent "oncogenic drivers" in the processes of tumorigenesis and progression. In this review, we will highlight the key driver oncogenic gene mutations and fusions identified in lung cancer. The review will summarize and report the available demographic and clinicopathological data as well as molecular details behind various lung cancer gene alterations in the context of race. We hope to shed some light into the disparities in the incidence of various genetic mutations among lung cancer patients of different racial backgrounds. As molecularly targeted therapy continues to advance in lung cancer, racial differences in specific genetic/genomic alterations can have an important impact in the choices of therapeutics and in our understanding of the drug sensitivity/resistance profile. The most relevant genes in lung cancer described in this review include the following: EGFR, KRAS, MET, LKB1, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK, RET, and ROS1. Commonly identified genetic/genomic alterations such as missense or nonsense mutations, small insertions or deletions, alternative splicing, and chromosomal fusion rearrangements were discussed. Relevance in current targeted therapeutic drugs was mentioned when appropriate. We also highlighted various targeted therapeutics that are currently under clinical development, such as the MET inhibitors and antibodies. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the landscape of genomic alterations in lung cancer is expected to be much transformed and detailed in upcoming years. These genomic landscape differences in the context of racial disparities should be emphasized both in tumorigenesis and in drug sensitivity

  11. FGF receptor genes and breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, D; Pineda, S; Michailidou, K

    2014-01-01

    Background:Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Genome-wide association studies have identified FGFR2 as a breast cancer susceptibility gene. Common variation in other fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors might also modify risk. We tested this hypothesis by studying...... was observed for SNPs in the FGF receptor genes. The strongest evidence in European women was for rs743682 in FGFR3; the estimated per-allele odds ratio was 1.05 (95% confidence interval=1.02-1.09, P=0.0020), which is substantially lower than that observed for SNPs in FGFR2.Conclusion:Our results suggest...

  12. Alternative Polyadenylation Patterns for Novel Gene Discovery and Classification in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguzhan Begik

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Certain aspects of diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of cancer patients are still important challenges to be addressed. Therefore, we propose a pipeline to uncover patterns of alternative polyadenylation (APA, a hidden complexity in cancer transcriptomes, to further accelerate efforts to discover novel cancer genes and pathways. Here, we analyzed expression data for 1045 cancer patients and found a significant shift in usage of poly(A signals in common tumor types (breast, colon, lung, prostate, gastric, and ovarian compared to normal tissues. Using machine-learning techniques, we further defined specific subsets of APA events to efficiently classify cancer types. Furthermore, APA patterns were associated with altered protein levels in patients, revealed by antibody-based profiling data, suggesting functional significance. Overall, our study offers a computational approach for use of APA in novel gene discovery and classification in common tumor types, with important implications in basic research, biomarker discovery, and precision medicine approaches.

  13. Gene expression signature analysis identifies vorinostat as a candidate therapy for gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Claerhout

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer continues to be one of the deadliest cancers in the world and therefore identification of new drugs targeting this type of cancer is thus of significant importance. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate a therapeutic agent which might improve the outcomes for gastric cancer patients in the future.Using microarray technology, we generated a gene expression profile of human gastric cancer-specific genes from human gastric cancer tissue samples. We used this profile in the Broad Institute's Connectivity Map analysis to identify candidate therapeutic compounds for gastric cancer. We found the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat as the lead compound and thus a potential therapeutic drug for gastric cancer. Vorinostat induced both apoptosis and autophagy in gastric cancer cell lines. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy however, increased the therapeutic efficacy of vorinostat, indicating that a combination of vorinostat with autophagy inhibitors may therapeutically be more beneficial. Moreover, gene expression analysis of gastric cancer identified a collection of genes (ITGB5, TYMS, MYB, APOC1, CBX5, PLA2G2A, and KIF20A whose expression was elevated in gastric tumor tissue and downregulated more than 2-fold by vorinostat treatment in gastric cancer cell lines. In contrast, SCGB2A1, TCN1, CFD, APLP1, and NQO1 manifested a reversed pattern.We showed that analysis of gene expression signature may represent an emerging approach to discover therapeutic agents for gastric cancer, such as vorinostat. The observation of altered gene expression after vorinostat treatment may provide the clue to identify the molecular mechanism of vorinostat and those patients likely to benefit from vorinostat treatment.

  14. Gene analysis techniques and susceptibility gene discovery in non-BRCA1/BRCA2 familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloraifi, Fatima; Boland, Michael R; Green, Andrew J; Geraghty, James G

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in females worldwide occurring in both hereditary and sporadic forms. Women with inherited pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have up to an 85% risk of developing breast cancer in their lifetimes. These patients are candidates for risk-reduction measures such as intensive radiological screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. However, only about 20% of familial breast cancer cases are attributed to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, while a further 5-10% are attributed to mutations in other rare susceptibility genes such as TP53, STK11, PTEN, ATM and CHEK2. A multitude of genome wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted confirming low-risk common variants associated with breast cancer in excess of 90 loci, which may contribute to a further 23% of the heritability. We currently find ourselves in "the next generation", with technologies offering deep sequencing at a fraction of the cost. Starting off primarily in a research setting, multi-gene panel testing is now utilized in the clinic to sequence multiple predisposing genes simultaneously (otherwise known as multi-gene panel testing). In this review, we focus on the hereditary breast cancer discoveries, techniques and the challenges we face in this complex disease, especially in the light of the vast amount of data we now have at hand. It has been 20 years since the first breast cancer susceptibility gene has been discovered and there has been substantial progress in unraveling the genetic component of the disease. However, hereditary breast cancer remains a challenging topic subject to common debate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptome analysis of buds and leaves using 454 pyrosequencing to discover genes associated with the biosynthesis of active ingredients in Lonicera japonica Thunb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lonicera japonica Thunb. is a plant used in traditional Chinese medicine known for its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-carcinogenic, and antiviral pharmacological properties. The major active secondary metabolites of this plant are chlorogenic acid (CGA and luteoloside. While the biosynthetic pathways of these metabolites are relatively well known, the genetic information available for this species, especially the biosynthetic pathways of its active ingredients, is limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained one million reads (average length of 400 bp in a whole sequence run using a Roche/454 GS FLX titanium platform. Altogether, 85.69% of the unigenes covering the entire life cycle of the plant were annotated and 325 unigenes were assigned to secondary metabolic pathways. Moreover, 2039 unigenes were predicted as transcription factors. Nearly all of the possible enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of CGA and luteoloside were discovered in L. japonica. Three hydroxycinnamoyl transferase genes, including two hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase genes and one hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT gene featuring high similarity to known genes from other species, were cloned. The HCT gene was discovered for the first time in L. japonica. In addition, 188 candidate cytochrome P450 unigenes and 245 glycosyltransferase unigenes were found in the expressed sequence tag (EST dataset. CONCLUSION: This study provides a high quality EST database for L. japonica by 454 pyrosequencing. Based on the EST annotation, a set of putative genes involved in CGA and luteoloside biosynthetic pathways were discovered. The database serves as an important source of public information on genetic markers, gene expression, genomics, and functional genomics in L. japonica.

  16. Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Issues Subscribe June 2013 Print this issue Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer Send us your comments By analyzing genes in hundreds of endometrial tumors, scientists identified details ... therapies for some patients. Endometrial cancer affects the lining ...

  17. Gene expression in early stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biewenga, Petra; Buist, Marrije R.; Moerland, Perry D.; van Thernaat, Emiel Ver Loren; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Baas, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Pelvic lymph node metastases are the main prognostic factor for survival in early stage cervical cancer, yet accurate detection methods before surgery are lacking. In this study, we examined whether gene expression profiling can predict the presence of lymph node metastasis in early stage

  18. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffy, M.J.; Napieralski, R.; Martens, J.W.; Span, P.N.; Spyratos, F.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Brunner, N.; Foekens, J.A.; Schmitt, M.

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that

  19. Clinical adenoviral gene therapy for prostate cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schenk, E.; Essand, M.; Bangma, Ch. H.; Barber, Ch.; Behr, J.-P.; Briggs, S.; Carlisle, R.; Cheng, W.-S.; Danielsson, A.; Dautzenberg, I. J. C.; Dzojic, H.; Erbacher, P.; Fisher, K.; Frazier, A.; Georgopoulos, L. J.; Hoeben, R.; Kochanek, S.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Kraaij, R.; Kreppel, F.; Lindholm, L.; Magnusson, M.; Maitland, N.; Neuberg, P.; Nilsson, B.; Ogris, M.; Remy, J.-S.; Scaife, M.; Schooten, E.; Seymour, L.; Totterman, T.; Uil, T. G.; Ulbrich, Karel; Veldhoven-Zweistra, J. L. M.; de Vrij, J.; van Weerden, W.; Wagner, E.; Willemsen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2010), s. 807-813 ISSN 1043-0342 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2010

  20. gene polymorphisms in Iranian prostate cancer subjects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-10-25

    Oct 25, 2010 ... 1Genetic Research Group, Molecular and Bioinformatics Unit, Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health ... GSTM1 (odds ratio 0.54, 95% CI 0.27 - 1.08) genes and higher risk of prostate cancer among Iranian ..... transferase; mechanism and relevance to variations in human risk.

  1. Discovering Wavelets

    CERN Document Server

    Aboufadel, Edward

    1999-01-01

    An accessible and practical introduction to wavelets. With applications in image processing, audio restoration, seismology, and elsewhere, wavelets have been the subject of growing excitement and interest over the past several years. Unfortunately, most books on wavelets are accessible primarily to research mathematicians. Discovering Wavelets presents basic and advanced concepts of wavelets in a way that is accessible to anyone with only a fundamental knowledge of linear algebra. The basic concepts of wavelet theory are introduced in the context of an explanation of how the FBI uses wavelets

  2. Extensive decoupling of metabolic genes in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Ed; Sander, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Tumorigenesis requires the re-organization of metabolism to support malignant proliferation. We examine how the altered metabolism of cancer cells is reflected in the rewiring of co-expression patterns among metabolic genes. Focusing on breast and clear-cell kidney tumors, we report the existence of key metabolic genes which act as hubs of differential co-expression, showing significantly different co-regulation patterns between normal and tumor states. We compare our findings to those from classical differential expression analysis, and counterintuitively observe that the extent of a gene's differential co-expression only weakly correlates with its differential expression, suggesting that the two measures probe different features of metabolism. Focusing on this discrepancy, we use changes in co-expression patterns to highlight the apparent loss of regulation by the transcription factor HNF4A in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, despite no differential expression of HNF4A. Finally, we aggregate the results of differential co-expression analysis into a Pan-Cancer analysis across seven distinct cancer types to identify pairs of metabolic genes which may be recurrently dysregulated. Among our results is a cluster of four genes, all components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which show significant loss of co-expression in tumor tissue, pointing to potential mitochondrial dysfunction in these tumor types.

  3. Gene Expression Signature Analysis Identifies Vorinostat as a Candidate Therapy for Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woonyoung; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, KyoungHyun; Kim, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ju-Seog; Mills, Gordon B.; Cho, Jae Yong

    2011-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer continues to be one of the deadliest cancers in the world and therefore identification of new drugs targeting this type of cancer is thus of significant importance. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate a therapeutic agent which might improve the outcomes for gastric cancer patients in the future. Methodology/Principal Findings Using microarray technology, we generated a gene expression profile of human gastric cancer–specific genes from human gastric cancer tissue samples. We used this profile in the Broad Institute's Connectivity Map analysis to identify candidate therapeutic compounds for gastric cancer. We found the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat as the lead compound and thus a potential therapeutic drug for gastric cancer. Vorinostat induced both apoptosis and autophagy in gastric cancer cell lines. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy however, increased the therapeutic efficacy of vorinostat, indicating that a combination of vorinostat with autophagy inhibitors may therapeutically be more beneficial. Moreover, gene expression analysis of gastric cancer identified a collection of genes (ITGB5, TYMS, MYB, APOC1, CBX5, PLA2G2A, and KIF20A) whose expression was elevated in gastric tumor tissue and downregulated more than 2-fold by vorinostat treatment in gastric cancer cell lines. In contrast, SCGB2A1, TCN1, CFD, APLP1, and NQO1 manifested a reversed pattern. Conclusions/Significance We showed that analysis of gene expression signature may represent an emerging approach to discover therapeutic agents for gastric cancer, such as vorinostat. The observation of altered gene expression after vorinostat treatment may provide the clue to identify the molecular mechanism of vorinostat and those patients likely to benefit from vorinostat treatment. PMID:21931799

  4. Identification of fusion genes in breast cancer by paired-end RNA-sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgren, Henrik; Murumagi, Astrid; Kangaspeska, Sara; Nicorici, Daniel; Hongisto, Vesa; Kleivi, Kristine; Rye, Inga H; Nyberg, Sandra; Wolf, Maija; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, chromosomal translocations and fusion genes have been an underappreciated class of mutations in solid tumors. Next-generation sequencing technologies provide an opportunity for systematic characterization of cancer cell transcriptomes, including the discovery of expressed fusion genes resulting from underlying genomic rearrangements. We applied paired-end RNA-seq to identify 24 novel and 3 previously known fusion genes in breast cancer cells. Supported by an improved bioinformatic approach, we had a 95% success rate of validating gene fusions initially detected by RNA-seq. Fusion partner genes were found to contribute promoters (5' UTR), coding sequences and 3' UTRs. Most fusion genes were associated with copy number transitions and were particularly common in high-level DNA amplifications. This suggests that fusion events may contribute to the selective advantage provided by DNA amplifications and deletions. Some of the fusion partner genes, such as GSDMB in the TATDN1-GSDMB fusion and IKZF3 in the VAPB-IKZF3 fusion, were only detected as a fusion transcript, indicating activation of a dormant gene by the fusion event. A number of fusion gene partners have either been previously observed in oncogenic gene fusions, mostly in leukemias, or otherwise reported to be oncogenic. RNA interference-mediated knock-down of the VAPB-IKZF3 fusion gene indicated that it may be necessary for cancer cell growth and survival. In summary, using RNA-sequencing and improved bioinformatic stratification, we have discovered a number of novel fusion genes in breast cancer, and identified VAPB-IKZF3 as a potential fusion gene with importance for the growth and survival of breast cancer cells.

  5. Gene dosage, expression, and ontology analysis identifies driver genes in the carcinogenesis and chemoradioresistance of cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Lando

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrative analysis of gene dosage, expression, and ontology (GO data was performed to discover driver genes in the carcinogenesis and chemoradioresistance of cervical cancers. Gene dosage and expression profiles of 102 locally advanced cervical cancers were generated by microarray techniques. Fifty-two of these patients were also analyzed with the Illumina expression method to confirm the gene expression results. An independent cohort of 41 patients was used for validation of gene expressions associated with clinical outcome. Statistical analysis identified 29 recurrent gains and losses and 3 losses (on 3p, 13q, 21q associated with poor outcome after chemoradiotherapy. The intratumor heterogeneity, assessed from the gene dosage profiles, was low for these alterations, showing that they had emerged prior to many other alterations and probably were early events in carcinogenesis. Integration of the alterations with gene expression and GO data identified genes that were regulated by the alterations and revealed five biological processes that were significantly overrepresented among the affected genes: apoptosis, metabolism, macromolecule localization, translation, and transcription. Four genes on 3p (RYBP, GBE1 and 13q (FAM48A, MED4 correlated with outcome at both the gene dosage and expression level and were satisfactorily validated in the independent cohort. These integrated analyses yielded 57 candidate drivers of 24 genetic events, including novel loci responsible for chemoradioresistance. Further mapping of the connections among genetic events, drivers, and biological processes suggested that each individual event stimulates specific processes in carcinogenesis through the coordinated control of multiple genes. The present results may provide novel therapeutic opportunities of both early and advanced stage cervical cancers.

  6. Nonviral Delivery Systems For Cancer Gene Therapy: Strategies And Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Gayong; Kim, Dongyoon; Le, Quoc-Viet; Park, Gyu Thae; Kwon, Taekhyun; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2018-01-19

    Gene therapy has been receiving widespread attention due to its unique advantage in regulating the expression of specific target genes. In the field of cancer gene therapy, modulation of gene expression has been shown to decrease oncogenic factors in cancer cells or increase immune responses against cancer. Due to the macromolecular size and highly negative physicochemical features of plasmid DNA, efficient delivery systems are an essential ingredient for successful gene therapy. To date, a variety of nanostructures and materials have been studied as nonviral gene delivery systems. In this review, we will cover nonviral delivery strategies for cancer gene therapy, with a focus on target cancer genes and delivery materials. Moreover, we will address current challenges and perspectives for nonviral delivery-based cancer gene therapeutics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Ancient genes establish stress-induced mutation as a hallmark of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Cisneros

    Full Text Available Cancer is sometimes depicted as a reversion to single cell behavior in cells adapted to live in a multicellular assembly. If this is the case, one would expect that mutation in cancer disrupts functional mechanisms that suppress cell-level traits detrimental to multicellularity. Such mechanisms should have evolved with or after the emergence of multicellularity. This leads to two related, but distinct hypotheses: 1 Somatic mutations in cancer will occur in genes that are younger than the emergence of multicellularity (1000 million years [MY]; and 2 genes that are frequently mutated in cancer and whose mutations are functionally important for the emergence of the cancer phenotype evolved within the past 1000 million years, and thus would exhibit an age distribution that is skewed to younger genes. In order to investigate these hypotheses we estimated the evolutionary ages of all human genes and then studied the probability of mutation and their biological function in relation to their age and genomic location for both normal germline and cancer contexts. We observed that under a model of uniform random mutation across the genome, controlled for gene size, genes less than 500 MY were more frequently mutated in both cases. Paradoxically, causal genes, defined in the COSMIC Cancer Gene Census, were depleted in this age group. When we used functional enrichment analysis to explain this unexpected result we discovered that COSMIC genes with recessive disease phenotypes were enriched for DNA repair and cell cycle control. The non-mutated genes in these pathways are orthologous to those underlying stress-induced mutation in bacteria, which results in the clustering of single nucleotide variations. COSMIC genes were less common in regions where the probability of observing mutational clusters is high, although they are approximately 2-fold more likely to harbor mutational clusters compared to other human genes. Our results suggest this ancient mutational

  8. A Double Selection Approach to Achieve Specific Expression of Toxin Genes for Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curiel, David T; Siegal, Gene; Wang, Minghui

    2005-01-01

    ... embodies the requisite properties of efficacy and specificity required for ovarian cancer gene therapy. This approach is based on targeting the delivered anti-cancer gene to tumor via two complimentary approaches...

  9. A Double Selection Approach to Achieve Specific Expression of Toxin Genes for Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curiel, David T; Siegal, Gene; Wang, Minghui

    2006-01-01

    ... embodies the requisite properties of efficacy and specificity required for ovarian cancer gene therapy. This approach is based on targeting the delivered anti-cancer gene to tumor via two complimentary approaches...

  10. Meta-analysis of cell- specific transcriptomic data using fuzzy c-means clustering discovers versatile viral responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Atif; Katanic, Dejan; Thakar, Juilee

    2017-06-06

    Despite advances in the gene-set enrichment analysis methods; inadequate definitions of gene-sets cause a major limitation in the discovery of novel biological processes from the transcriptomic datasets. Typically, gene-sets are obtained from publicly available pathway databases, which contain generalized definitions frequently derived by manual curation. Recently unsupervised clustering algorithms have been proposed to identify gene-sets from transcriptomics datasets deposited in public domain. These data-driven definitions of the gene-sets can be context-specific revealing novel biological mechanisms. However, the previously proposed algorithms for identification of data-driven gene-sets are based on hard clustering which do not allow overlap across clusters, a characteristic that is predominantly observed across biological pathways. We developed a pipeline using fuzzy-C-means (FCM) soft clustering approach to identify gene-sets which recapitulates topological characteristics of biological pathways. Specifically, we apply our pipeline to derive gene-sets from transcriptomic data measuring response of monocyte derived dendritic cells and A549 epithelial cells to influenza infections. Our approach apply Ward's method for the selection of initial conditions, optimize parameters of FCM algorithm for human cell-specific transcriptomic data and identify robust gene-sets along with versatile viral responsive genes. We validate our gene-sets and demonstrate that by identifying genes associated with multiple gene-sets, FCM clustering algorithm significantly improves interpretation of transcriptomic data facilitating investigation of novel biological processes by leveraging on transcriptomic data available in the public domain. We develop an interactive 'Fuzzy Inference of Gene-sets (FIGS)' package (GitHub: https://github.com/Thakar-Lab/FIGS ) to facilitate use of of pipeline. Future extension of FIGS across different immune cell-types will improve mechanistic

  11. Diverse, Biologically Relevant, and Targetable Gene Rearrangements in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer and Other Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Timothy M; Lehmann, Brian D; Beeler, J Scott; Li, Chung-I; Li, Zhu; Jin, Hailing; Stricker, Thomas P; Shyr, Yu; Pietenpol, Jennifer A

    2016-08-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and other molecularly heterogeneous malignancies present a significant clinical challenge due to a lack of high-frequency "driver" alterations amenable to therapeutic intervention. These cancers often exhibit genomic instability, resulting in chromosomal rearrangements that affect the structure and expression of protein-coding genes. However, identification of these rearrangements remains technically challenging. Using a newly developed approach that quantitatively predicts gene rearrangements in tumor-derived genetic material, we identified and characterized a novel oncogenic fusion involving the MER proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (MERTK) and discovered a clinical occurrence and cell line model of the targetable FGFR3-TACC3 fusion in TNBC. Expanding our analysis to other malignancies, we identified a diverse array of novel and known hybrid transcripts, including rearrangements between noncoding regions and clinically relevant genes such as ALK, CSF1R, and CD274/PD-L1 The over 1,000 genetic alterations we identified highlight the importance of considering noncoding gene rearrangement partners, and the targetable gene fusions identified in TNBC demonstrate the need to advance gene fusion detection for molecularly heterogeneous cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4850-60. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Discovering candidate genes that regulate resin canal number in Pinus taeda stems by integrating genetic analysis across environments, ages, and populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, JW; Walker, AR; Neves, LG; Munoz, P; Resende, MFR; Neale, DB; Wegrzyn, JL; Huber, DA; Kirst, M; Davis, JM; Peter, GF

    2014-09-30

    Genetically improving constitutive resin canal development in Pinus stems may enhance the capacity to synthesize terpenes for bark beetle resistance, chemical feedstocks, and biofuels. To discover genes that potentially regulate axial resin canal number (RCN), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4027 genes were tested for association with RCN in two growth rings and three environments in a complex pedigree of 520 Pinus taeda individuals (CCLONES). The map locations of associated genes were compared with RCN quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in a (P.taedaxPinuselliottii)xP.elliottii pseudo-backcross of 345 full-sibs (BC1). Resin canal number was heritable (h(2)0.12-0.21) and positively genetically correlated with xylem growth (r(g)0.32-0.72) and oleoresin flow (r(g)0.15-0.51). Sixteen well-supported candidate regulators of RCN were discovered in CCLONES, including genes associated across sites and ages, unidirectionally associated with oleoresin flow and xylem growth, and mapped to RCN QTLs in BC1. Breeding is predicted to increase RCN 11% in one generation and could be accelerated with genomic selection at accuracies of 0.45-0.52 across environments. There is significant genetic variation for RCN in loblolly pine, which can be exploited in breeding for elevated terpene content.

  13. Discovering candidate genes that regulate resin canal number in Pinus taeda stems by integrating genetic analysis across environments, ages, and populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Jared W; Walker, Alejandro R; Neves, Leandro G; Munoz, Patricio; Resende, Marcio F R; Neale, David B; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Huber, Dudley A; Kirst, Matias; Davis, John M; Peter, Gary F

    2015-01-01

    Genetically improving constitutive resin canal development in Pinus stems may enhance the capacity to synthesize terpenes for bark beetle resistance, chemical feedstocks, and biofuels. To discover genes that potentially regulate axial resin canal number (RCN), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4027 genes were tested for association with RCN in two growth rings and three environments in a complex pedigree of 520 Pinus taeda individuals (CCLONES). The map locations of associated genes were compared with RCN quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in a (P. taeda × Pinus elliottii) × P. elliottii pseudo-backcross of 345 full-sibs (BC1). Resin canal number was heritable (h(2) ˜ 0.12-0.21) and positively genetically correlated with xylem growth (rg ˜ 0.32-0.72) and oleoresin flow (rg ˜ 0.15-0.51). Sixteen well-supported candidate regulators of RCN were discovered in CCLONES, including genes associated across sites and ages, unidirectionally associated with oleoresin flow and xylem growth, and mapped to RCN QTLs in BC1. Breeding is predicted to increase RCN 11% in one generation and could be accelerated with genomic selection at accuracies of 0.45-0.52 across environments. There is significant genetic variation for RCN in loblolly pine, which can be exploited in breeding for elevated terpene content. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Discovering Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    R. Andersen, J.; Antipin, O.; Azuelos, G.

    2011-01-01

    We provide a pedagogical introduction to extensions of the Standard Model in which the Higgs is composite. These extensions are known as models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking or, in brief, Technicolor. Material covered includes: motivations for Technicolor, the construction of underly...... the relevant experimental benchmarks for Vanilla, Running, Walking, and Custodial Technicolor, and a natural fourth family of leptons, by laying out the framework to discover these models at the Large Hadron Collider....... of underlying gauge theories leading to minimal models of Technicolor, the comparison with electroweak precision data, the low energy effective theory, the spectrum of the states common to most of the Technicolor models, the decays of the composite particles and the experimental signals at the Large Hadron...... Collider. The level of the presentation is aimed at readers familiar with the Standard Model but who have little or no prior exposure to Technicolor. Several extensions of the Standard Model featuring a composite Higgs can be reduced to the effective Lagrangian introduced in the text. We establish...

  15. [Application of multifactor dimensionality reduction on the interactions between gene-gene, gene-environment and the risk sporadic colorectal cancer in Chinese population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ming-Juan; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Shuang-Shuang; Zhang, Yong-Jing; Xu, Mei; Ma, Xin-Yuan; Yao, Kai-Yan; Chen, Kun

    2008-06-01

    To identify the association between risk of sporadic colorectal cancer and the common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repairs genes, gene to gene interactions among them and their gene to environment interactions with common environmental factors. In this population-based case-control study, 206 primary colorectal cancer cases and 845 cancer-free healthy controls were enrolled. Genotyping was carried out using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique, with the status of subjects case or controls unknown. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) and logistic analysis were both used for association analysis. As compared to the younger age group (> or = 42, or = 61 years) increased significantly (OR = 2.04, 95% CI: 1.49-2.80). Similar result was observed in the family cancer history (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.05-2.17). However, no significant association between any single DNA repair gene SNP and colorectal cancer risk was discovered. Results from MDR analysis only showed a significant interaction among the four following factors: age, alcohol drinking, XRCC1 Arg194Trp and OGG1 Ser326Cys (the cross-validation consistency = 10/10, the average testing accuracy = 0.616, P = 0.011). Using a logistic regression model, the "high-risk" individuals had a significantly elevated risk of colorectal cancer compared to those "low- risk" individuals classified by the above MDR model (OR = 2.72, 95% CI: 1.66-4.47). The impact of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes on the risk of sporadic colorectal cancer exhibited a low-penetrance characteristics while the intricate interactions existing among them and with environmental factors.

  16. Polyamine Metabolites Profiling for Characterization of Lung and Liver Cancer Using an LC-Tandem MS Method with Multiple Statistical Data Mining Strategies: Discovering Potential Cancer Biomarkers in Human Plasma and Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Xu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines, one of the most important kind of biomarkers in cancer research, were investigated in order to characterize different cancer types. An integrative approach which combined ultra-high performance liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry detection and multiple statistical data processing strategies including outlier elimination, binary logistic regression analysis and cluster analysis had been developed to discover the characteristic biomarkers of lung and liver cancer. The concentrations of 14 polyamine metabolites in biosamples from lung (n = 50 and liver cancer patients (n = 50 were detected by a validated UHPLC-MS/MS method. Then the concentrations were converted into independent variables to characterize patients of lung and liver cancer by binary logic regression analysis. Significant independent variables were regarded as the potential biomarkers. Cluster analysis was engaged for further verifying. As a result, two values was discovered to identify lung and liver cancer, which were the product of the plasma concentration of putrescine and spermidine; and the ratio of the urine concentration of S-adenosyl-l-methionine and N-acetylspermidine. Results indicated that the established advanced method could be successfully applied to characterize lung and liver cancer, and may also enable a new way of discovering cancer biomarkers and characterizing other types of cancer.

  17. Systems biology-guided identification of synthetic lethal gene pairs and its potential use to discover antibiotic combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aziz, Ramy K.; Monk, Jonathan M.; Lewis, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    be found that inhibit the growth of Gram-negative bacteria. One set of molecules was identified that, depending on the concentrations, inhibits E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in an additive or antagonistic manner. These findings pinpoint specific ways in which to improve the predictive ability...... and phenotype, but their ability to accurately simulate gene-gene interactions has not been investigated extensively. Here we assess how accurately a metabolic model for Escherichia coli computes one particular type of gene-gene interaction, synthetic lethality, and find that the accuracy rate is between 25...

  18. Prognostic Gene Expression Profiles in Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristina Pilekær

    Each year approximately 4,800 Danish women are diagnosed with breast cancer. Several clinical and pathological factors are used as prognostic and predictive markers to categorize the patients into groups of high or low risk. Around 90% of all patients are allocated to the high risk group and offe......Each year approximately 4,800 Danish women are diagnosed with breast cancer. Several clinical and pathological factors are used as prognostic and predictive markers to categorize the patients into groups of high or low risk. Around 90% of all patients are allocated to the high risk group...... clinical courses, and they may be useful as novel prognostic biomarkers in breast cancer. The aim of the present project was to predict the development of metastasis in lymph node negative breast cancer patients by RNA profiling. We collected and analyzed 82 primary breast tumors from patients who...... developed metastasis and 82 primary breast tumors from patients who remained metastasis-free, by microarray gene expression profiling. We employed a nested case-control design, where samples were matched, in this study one-to-one, to exclude differences in gene expression based on tumor type, tumor size...

  19. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in prostate, breast and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopp, Tine Iskov

    The incidence of cancer in the western world has increased steeply during the last 50 years. For three of the most prevalent cancer types in Denmark, prostate, breast and colorectal cancer (PC, BC and CRC, respectively), only a small fraction (1-15%) of the incidences are caused by highly penetrant......, such as alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity, inflammation and high meat intake; whereas other factors protect against cancer, such as high intake of dietary fibre, fruits and vegetables, and physical activity. Investigating the interactions between genetic variations and environmental factors, such as dietary...... was used to examine gene-gene and geneenvironment interactions in relation to risk of cancer (Paper I-V). A human intervention trial (Paper V) was conducted in order to directly examine the effect on concurrent use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and alcohol consumption on circulating...

  20. Resequencing three candidate genes discovers seven potentially deleterious variants susceptibility to major depressive disorder and suicide attempts in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shitao; Leung, Cherry She Ting; Lam, Macro Hb; Wing, Yun Kwok; Waye, Mary Miu Yee; Tsui, Stephen Kwok Wing

    2017-03-01

    To date almost 200 genes were found to be associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) or suicide attempts (SA), but very few genes were reported for their molecular mechanisms. This study aimed to find out whether there were common or rare variants in three candidate genes altering the risk for MDD and SA in Chinese. Three candidate genes (HOMER1, SLC6A4 and TEF) were chosen for resequencing analysis and association studies as they were reported to be involved in the etiology of MDD and SA. Following that, bioinformatics analyses were applied on those variants of interest. After resequencing analysis and alignment for the amplicons, a total of 34 common or rare variants were found in the randomly selected 36 Hong Kong Chinese patients with both MDD and SA. Among those, seven variants show potentially deleterious features. Rs60029191 and a rare variant located in regulatory region of the HOMER1 gene may affect the promoter activities through interacting with predicted transcription factors. Two missense mutations existed in the SLC6A4 coding regions were firstly reported in Hong Kong Chinese MDD and SA patients, and both of them could affect the transport efficiency of SLC6A4 to serotonin. Moreover, a common variant rs6354 located in the untranslated region of this gene may affect the expression level or exonic splicing of serotonin transporter. In addition, both of a most studied polymorphism rs738499 and a low-frequency variant in the promoter region of the TEF gene were found to be located in potential transcription factor binding sites, which may let the two variants be able to influence the promoter activities of the gene. This study elucidated the potentially molecular mechanisms of the three candidate genes altering the risk for MDD and SA. These findings implied that not only common variants but rare variants could make contributions to the genetic susceptibility to MDD and SA in Chinese. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genotype, phenotype and cancer: Role of low penetrance genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Role of heredity and lifestyle in sporadic cancers is well documented. Here we focus on the influence of low penetrance genes and habits, with emphasis on tobacco habit in causing head and neck cancers. Role of such gene-environment interaction can be well studied in individuals with multiple primary cancers.

  2. Expression of KLK2 gene in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Shafai

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The expression of KLK2 gene in people with prostate cancer is the higher than the healthy person; finally, according to the results, it could be mentioned that the KLK2 gene considered as a useful factor in prostate cancer, whose expression is associated with progression and development of the prostate cancer.

  3. Evolutionary Origins of Cancer Driver Genes and Implications for Cancer Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xin-Yi; Jiang, Ling-Han; Zhou, Xiong-Hui; Cui, Ze-Jia; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2017-07-14

    The cancer atavistic theory suggests that carcinogenesis is a reverse evolution process. It is thus of great interest to explore the evolutionary origins of cancer driver genes and the relevant mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis. Moreover, the evolutionary features of cancer driver genes could be helpful in selecting cancer biomarkers from high-throughput data. In this study, through analyzing the cancer endogenous molecular networks, we revealed that the subnetwork originating from eukaryota could control the unlimited proliferation of cancer cells, and the subnetwork originating from eumetazoa could recapitulate the other hallmarks of cancer. In addition, investigations based on multiple datasets revealed that cancer driver genes were enriched in genes originating from eukaryota, opisthokonta, and eumetazoa. These results have important implications for enhancing the robustness of cancer prognosis models through selecting the gene signatures by the gene age information.

  4. CHK2, A Candidate Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Gene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Wanguo

    2005-01-01

    .... However, this area has been understudied in prostate cancer. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that genetic defects in this pathway may confer susceptibility to prostate cancer using a mutation screening of candidate gene approach...

  5. New genes linked to lung cancer susceptibility in Asian women

    Science.gov (United States)

    An international group of scientists has identified three genes that predispose Asian women who have never smoked to lung cancer. The discovery of specific genetic variations, which have not previously been associated with lung cancer risk in other popul

  6. Identification of candidate methylation-responsive genes in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickerson Erin B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant methylation of gene promoter regions has been linked to changes in gene expression in cancer development and progression. Genes associated with CpG islands (CGIs are especially prone to methylation, but not all CGI-associated genes display changes in methylation patterns in cancers. Results In order to identify genes subject to regulation by methylation, we conducted gene expression profile analyses of an ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR-3 before and after treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC. An overlapping subset of these genes was found to display significant differences in gene expression between normal ovarian surface epithelial cells and malignant cells isolated from ovarian carcinomas. While 40% of all human genes are associated with CGIs, > 94% of the overlapping subset of genes is associated with CGIs. The predicted change in methylation status of genes randomly selected from the overlapping subset was experimentally verified. Conclusion We conclude that correlating genes that are upregulated in response to 5-aza-dC treatment of cancer cell lines with genes that are down-regulated in cancer cells may be a useful method to identify genes experiencing epigenetic-mediated changes in expression over cancer development.

  7. [Genetic basis of head and neck cancers and gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Halil Erdem; Özkırış, Mahmut; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Surgery and combinations of traditional treatments are not successful enough particularly for advanced stage head and neck cancer. The major disadvantages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the lack of specificity for the target tissue and toxicity to the patient. As a result, gene therapy may offer a more specific approach. The aim of gene therapy is to present therapeutic genes into cancer cells which selectively eliminate malignant cells with no systemic toxicity to the patient. This article reviews the genetic basis of head and neck cancers and important concepts in cancer gene therapy: (i) inhibition of oncogenes; (ii) tumor suppressor gene replacement; (iii) regulation of immune response against malignant cells; (iv) genetic prodrug activation; and (v) antiangiogenic gene therapy. Currently, gene therapy is not sufficient to replace the traditional treatments of head and neck cancers, however there is no doubt that it will have an important role in the near future.

  8. Discovering Potential Correlations via Hypercontractivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeji; Gao, Weihao; Kannan, Sreeram; Oh, Sewoong; Viswanath, Pramod

    2017-11-01

    Discovering a correlation from one variable to another variable is of fundamental scientific and practical interest. While existing correlation measures are suitable for discovering average correlation, they fail to discover hidden or potential correlations. To bridge this gap, (i) we postulate a set of natural axioms that we expect a measure of potential correlation to satisfy; (ii) we show that the rate of information bottleneck, i.e., the hypercontractivity coefficient, satisfies all the proposed axioms; (iii) we provide a novel estimator to estimate the hypercontractivity coefficient from samples; and (iv) we provide numerical experiments demonstrating that this proposed estimator discovers potential correlations among various indicators of WHO datasets, is robust in discovering gene interactions from gene expression time series data, and is statistically more powerful than the estimators for other correlation measures in binary hypothesis testing of canonical examples of potential correlations.

  9. Novel Functional Screen for New Breast Cancer Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, Mary-Claire; Welcsh, Piri L

    2004-01-01

    Genetic instability is a hallmark of tumor development. Mechanisms for maintenance of genomic stability are heterogeneous and identification of the genes responsible a critical goal of cancer biologists...

  10. A Novel Functional Screen for New Breast Cancer Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, Mary-Claire; Welcsh, Piri L

    2005-01-01

    Genetic instability is a hallmark of tumor development. Mechanisms for maintenance of genomic stability are heterogeneous and identification of the genes responsible a critical goal of cancer biologists...

  11. Identifying molecular subtypes in human colon cancer using gene expression and DNA methylation microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhonglu; Wang, Wenhui; Li, Jinming

    2016-02-01

    Identifying colon cancer subtypes based on molecular signatures may allow for a more rational, patient-specific approach to therapy in the future. Classifications using gene expression data have been attempted before with little concordance between the different studies carried out. In this study we aimed to uncover subtypes of colon cancer that have distinct biological characteristics and identify a set of novel biomarkers which could best reflect the clinical and/or biological characteristics of each subtype. Clustering analysis and discriminant analysis were utilized to discover the subtypes in two different molecular levels on 153 colon cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Data Portal. At gene expression level, we identified two major subtypes, ECL1 (expression cluster 1) and ECL2 (expression cluster 2) and a list of signature genes. Due to the heterogeneity of colon cancer, the subtype ECL1 can be further subdivided into three nested subclasses, and HOTAIR were found upregulated in subclass 2. At DNA methylation level, we uncovered three major subtypes, MCL1 (methylation cluster 1), MCL2 (methylation cluster 2) and MCL3 (methylation cluster 3). We found only three subtypes of CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colon cancer instead of the four subtypes in the previous reports, and we found no sufficient evidence to subdivide MCL3 into two distinct subgroups.

  12. Learning a structural and functional representation for gene expressions: To systematically dissect complex cancer phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanbo; Liu, Quan; Huang, Shan; Yuan, Bo

    2017-05-08

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease, thus one of the central problems is how to dissect the resulting complex phenotypes in terms of their biological building blocks. Computationally, this is to represent and interpret high dimensional observations through a structural and conceptual abstraction into the most influential determinants underlying the problem. The working hypothesis of this report is to consider gene interaction to be largely responsible for the manifestation of complex cancer phenotypes, thus where the representation is to be conceptualized. Here we report a representation learning strategy combined with regularizations, in which gene expressions are described in terms of a regularized product of meta-genes and their expression levels. The meta-genes are constrained by gene interactions thus representing their original topological contexts. The expression levels are supervised by their conditional dependencies among the observations thus providing a cluster-specific constraint. We obtain both of these structural constraints using a node-based graphical model. Our representation allows the selection of more influential modules, thus implicating their possible roles in neoplastic transformations. We validate our representation strategy by its robust recognitions of various cancer phenotypes comparing with various classical methods. The modules discovered are either shared or specify for different types or stages of human cancers, all of which are consistent with literature and biology.

  13. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  14. Nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy: Recent advances, challenges, and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Zhang, Miqin

    2016-12-01

    Compared to conventional treatments, gene therapy offers a variety of advantages for cancer treatment including high potency and specificity, low off-target toxicity, and delivery of multiple genes that concurrently target cancer tumorigenesis, recurrence, and drug resistance. In the past decades, gene therapy has undergone remarkable progress, and is now poised to become a first line therapy for cancer. Among various gene delivery systems, nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their desirable characteristics including low toxicity profiles, well-controlled and high gene delivery efficiency, and multi-functionalities. This review provides an overview on gene therapeutics and gene delivery technologies, and highlight recent advances, challenges and insights into the design and the utility of nanoparticles in gene therapy for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Discovering Genes Essential to the Hypothalamic Regulation of Human Reproduction Using a Human Disease Model: Adjusting to Life in the "-Omics" Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamou, M I; Cox, K H; Crowley, William F

    2016-02-01

    The neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction is an intricate process requiring the exquisite coordination of an assortment of cellular networks, all converging on the GnRH neurons. These neurons have a complex life history, migrating mainly from the olfactory placode into the hypothalamus, where GnRH is secreted and acts as the master regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Much of what we know about the biology of the GnRH neurons has been aided by discoveries made using the human disease model of isolated GnRH deficiency (IGD), a family of rare Mendelian disorders that share a common failure of secretion and/or action of GnRH causing hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Over the last 30 years, research groups around the world have been investigating the genetic basis of IGD using different strategies based on complex cases that harbor structural abnormalities or single pleiotropic genes, endogamous pedigrees, candidate gene approaches as well as pathway gene analyses. Although such traditional approaches, based on well-validated tools, have been critical to establish the field, new strategies, such as next-generation sequencing, are now providing speed and robustness, but also revealing a surprising number of variants in known IGD genes in both patients and healthy controls. Thus, before the field moves forward with new genetic tools and continues discovery efforts, we must reassess what we know about IGD genetics and prepare to hold our work to a different standard. The purpose of this review is to: 1) look back at the strategies used to discover the "known" genes implicated in the rare forms of IGD; 2) examine the strengths and weaknesses of the methodologies used to validate genetic variation; 3)substantiate the role of known genes in the pathophysiology of the disease; and 4) project forward as we embark upon a widening use of these new and powerful technologies for gene discovery. (Endocrine Reviews 36: 603-621, 2015).

  16. Discovering Genes Essential to the Hypothalamic Regulation of Human Reproduction Using a Human Disease Model: Adjusting to Life in the “-Omics” Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamou, M. I.; Cox, K. H.

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction is an intricate process requiring the exquisite coordination of an assortment of cellular networks, all converging on the GnRH neurons. These neurons have a complex life history, migrating mainly from the olfactory placode into the hypothalamus, where GnRH is secreted and acts as the master regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Much of what we know about the biology of the GnRH neurons has been aided by discoveries made using the human disease model of isolated GnRH deficiency (IGD), a family of rare Mendelian disorders that share a common failure of secretion and/or action of GnRH causing hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Over the last 30 years, research groups around the world have been investigating the genetic basis of IGD using different strategies based on complex cases that harbor structural abnormalities or single pleiotropic genes, endogamous pedigrees, candidate gene approaches as well as pathway gene analyses. Although such traditional approaches, based on well-validated tools, have been critical to establish the field, new strategies, such as next-generation sequencing, are now providing speed and robustness, but also revealing a surprising number of variants in known IGD genes in both patients and healthy controls. Thus, before the field moves forward with new genetic tools and continues discovery efforts, we must reassess what we know about IGD genetics and prepare to hold our work to a different standard. The purpose of this review is to: 1) look back at the strategies used to discover the “known” genes implicated in the rare forms of IGD; 2) examine the strengths and weaknesses of the methodologies used to validate genetic variation; 3) substantiate the role of known genes in the pathophysiology of the disease; and 4) project forward as we embark upon a widening use of these new and powerful technologies for gene discovery. PMID:26394276

  17. The development of genes associated with radiosensitivity of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongyan; Chen Zhihua; He Guifang

    2007-01-01

    It has a good application prospect to predict effects of radiotherapy by examining radiosensitivity of patients with cervical cancers before their radiotherapy. Prediction of tumor cell radiosensitivity according to their level of gene expression and gene therapy to reverse radio-resistance prior to radiation on cervical cancers are heated researches on tumor therapy. The expression of some proliferation-related genes, apoptosis-related genes and hypoxia-related genes can inerease the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer. Microarray technology may have more direct applications to the study of biological pathway contributing to radiation resistance and may lead to development of alternative treatment modalities. (authors)

  18. Can gene fusions serve for fingerprints of radiogenic cancers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nori

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that malignancies in blood cells often bear specific chromosome translocations or gene fusions. In recent years, the presence of fusion genes became to be known also among solid cancers as driver mutations. However, representative solid cancers bearing specific gene fusions are limited to cancers of thyroid, prostate, and sarcomas among which only thyroid cancer risk is known to be related to radiation exposures. On the other hand, it is extremely rare to find recurrent reciprocal translocations among common cancers such as in the lung, stomach, breast, and colon, which form a major component of radiation risks. It is therefore unlikely that radiation increases the risk of cancer by inducing specific translocations (gene fusions) but more likely through induction of mutations (including deletions). Although gene fusions could play a role in radiation carcinogenesis, it does not seem good enough to serve for a radiation fingerprint. (author)

  19. Fusion gene microarray reveals cancer type-specificity among fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvf, Marthe; Thomassen, Gard O S; Bakken, Anne Cathrine; Celestino, Ricardo; Fioretos, Thoas; Lind, Guro E; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2011-05-01

    Detection of fusion genes for diagnostic purposes and as a guide to treatment is well-established in hematological malignancies, and the prevalence of fusion genes in epithelial cancers is also increasingly appreciated. To study whether established fusion genes are present within additional cancer types, we have used an updated version of our fusion gene microarray in a systematic survey of reported fusion genes in multiple cancer types. We assembled a comprehensive database of published fusion genes, including those reported only in individual studies and samples, and fusion genes resulting from deep sequencing of cancer genomes and transcriptomes. From the total set of 548 fusion genes, we designed 599,839 oligonucleotides, targeting both chimeric transcript junctions as well as sequences internal to each of the fusion gene partners. We investigated the presence of fusion genes in a series of 67 cell lines representing 15 different cancer types. Data from ten leukemia cell lines with known fusion gene status were used to develop an automated scoring algorithm, and in five cell lines the correct fusion gene was the top scoring hit, and one came second. Two additional fusion genes, BCAS4-BCAS3 in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line and CCDC6-RET in the TPC-1 thyroid cancer cell line were validated as true positive fusion transcripts. However, these fusion genes were not new to these cancer types, and none of 548 fusion genes were identified from a novel cancer type. We therefore find it unlikely that the assayed fusion genes are commonly present across multiple cancer types. 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Expressed Gene Fusions as Frequent Drivers of Poor Outcomes in Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matissek, Karina J; Onozato, Maristela L; Sun, Sheng; Zheng, Zongli; Schultz, Andrew; Lee, Jesse; Patel, Kristofer; Jerevall, Piiha-Lotta; Saladi, Srinivas Vinod; Macleay, Allison; Tavallai, Mehrad; Badovinac-Crnjevic, Tanja; Barrios, Carlos; Beşe, Nuran; Chan, Arlene; Chavarri-Guerra, Yanin; Debiasi, Marcio; Demirdögen, Elif; Egeli, Ünal; Gökgöz, Sahsuvar; Gomez, Henry; Liedke, Pedro; Tasdelen, Ismet; Tolunay, Sahsine; Werutsky, Gustavo; St Louis, Jessica; Horick, Nora; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Le, Long Phi; Bardia, Aditya; Goss, Paul E; Sgroi, Dennis C; Iafrate, A John; Ellisen, Leif W

    2018-03-01

    We sought to uncover genetic drivers of hormone receptor-positive (HR + ) breast cancer, using a targeted next-generation sequencing approach for detecting expressed gene rearrangements without prior knowledge of the fusion partners. We identified intergenic fusions involving driver genes, including PIK3CA, AKT3, RAF1 , and ESR1 , in 14% (24/173) of unselected patients with advanced HR + breast cancer. FISH confirmed the corresponding chromosomal rearrangements in both primary and metastatic tumors. Expression of novel kinase fusions in nontransformed cells deregulates phosphoprotein signaling, cell proliferation, and survival in three-dimensional culture, whereas expression in HR + breast cancer models modulates estrogen-dependent growth and confers hormonal therapy resistance in vitro and in vivo Strikingly, shorter overall survival was observed in patients with rearrangement-positive versus rearrangement-negative tumors. Correspondingly, fusions were uncommon (fusions as frequent and potentially actionable drivers in HR + breast cancer. Significance: By using a powerful clinical molecular diagnostic assay, we identified expressed intergenic fusions as frequent contributors to treatment resistance and poor survival in advanced HR + breast cancer. The prevalence and biological and prognostic significance of these alterations suggests that their detection may alter clinical management and bring to light new therapeutic opportunities. Cancer Discov; 8(3); 336-53. ©2017 AACR. See related commentary by Natrajan et al., p. 272 See related article by Liu et al., p. 354 This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 253 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. De novo transcriptome sequencing and comparative analysis to discover genes involved in ovarian maturity in Strongylocentrotus nudus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhiying; Wang, Qiai; Wu, Kaikai; Wei, Zhenlin; Zhou, Zunchun; Liu, Xiaolin

    2017-09-01

    Strongylocentrotus nudus is an edible sea urchin, mainly harvested in China. Correlation studies indicated that S. nudus with larger diameter have a prolonged marketing time and better palatability owing to their precocious gonads and extended maturation process. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is still unknown. Here, transcriptome sequencing was applied to study the ovaries of adult S. nudus with different shell diameters to explore the possible mechanism. In this study, four independent cDNA libraries were constructed, including two from the big size urchins and two from the small ones using a HiSeq™2500 platform. A total of 88,581 unigenes were acquired with a mean length of 1354bp, of which 66,331 (74.88%) unigenes could be annotated using six major publicly available databases. Comparative analysis revealed that 353 unigenes were differentially expressed (with log2(ratio)≥1, FDR≤0.001) between the two groups. Of these, 20 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were selected to confirm the accuracy of RNA-seq data by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, gene ontology and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses were performed to find the putative genes and pathways related to ovarian maturity. Eight unigenes were identified as significant DEGs involved in reproduction related pathways; these included Mos, Cdc20, Rec8, YP30, cytochrome P450 2U1, ovoperoxidase, proteoliaisin, and rendezvin. Our research fills the gap in the studies on the S. nudus ovaries using transcriptome analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Bii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  3. Identification of Human HK Genes and Gene Expression Regulation Study in Cancer from Transcriptomics Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer. PMID:23382867

  4. Engineering and Functional Characterization of Fusion Genes Identifies Novel Oncogenic Drivers of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hengyu; Villafane, Nicole; Dogruluk, Turgut; Grzeskowiak, Caitlin L; Kong, Kathleen; Tsang, Yiu Huen; Zagorodna, Oksana; Pantazi, Angeliki; Yang, Lixing; Neill, Nicholas J; Kim, Young Won; Creighton, Chad J; Verhaak, Roel G; Mills, Gordon B; Park, Peter J; Kucherlapati, Raju; Scott, Kenneth L

    2017-07-01

    Oncogenic gene fusions drive many human cancers, but tools to more quickly unravel their functional contributions are needed. Here we describe methodology permitting fusion gene construction for functional evaluation. Using this strategy, we engineered the known fusion oncogenes, BCR-ABL1, EML4-ALK , and ETV6-NTRK3, as well as 20 previously uncharacterized fusion genes identified in The Cancer Genome Atlas datasets. In addition to confirming oncogenic activity of the known fusion oncogenes engineered by our construction strategy, we validated five novel fusion genes involving MET, NTRK2 , and BRAF kinases that exhibited potent transforming activity and conferred sensitivity to FDA-approved kinase inhibitors. Our fusion construction strategy also enabled domain-function studies of BRAF fusion genes. Our results confirmed other reports that the transforming activity of BRAF fusions results from truncation-mediated loss of inhibitory domains within the N-terminus of the BRAF protein. BRAF mutations residing within this inhibitory region may provide a means for BRAF activation in cancer, therefore we leveraged the modular design of our fusion gene construction methodology to screen N-terminal domain mutations discovered in tumors that are wild-type at the BRAF mutation hotspot, V600. We identified an oncogenic mutation, F247L, whose expression robustly activated the MAPK pathway and sensitized cells to BRAF and MEK inhibitors. When applied broadly, these tools will facilitate rapid fusion gene construction for subsequent functional characterization and translation into personalized treatment strategies. Cancer Res; 77(13); 3502-12. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Genotype, phenotype and cancer: Role of low penetrance genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-01-07

    Jan 7, 2005 ... Role of heredity and lifestyle in sporadic cancers is well documented. Here we focus on the influence of low penetrance genes and habits, with emphasis on tobacco habit in causing head and neck cancers. Role of such gene-environment interaction can be well studied in individuals with multiple primary ...

  6. Functional genomics to discover antibiotic resistance genes: The paradigm of resistance to colistin mediated by ethanolamine phosphotransferase in Shewanella algae MARS 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telke, Amar A; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-12-01

    Shewanella algae MARS 14 is a colistin-resistant clinical isolate retrieved from bronchoalveolar lavage of a hospitalised patient. A functional genomics strategy was employed to discover the molecular support for colistin resistance in S. algae MARS 14. A pZE21 MCS-1 plasmid-based genomic expression library was constructed in Escherichia coli TOP10. The estimated library size was 1.30×10(8) bp. Functional screening of colistin-resistant clones was carried out on Luria-Bertani agar containing 8 mg/L colistin. Five colistin-resistant clones were obtained after complete screening of the genomic expression library. Analysis of DNA sequencing results found a unique gene in all selected clones. Amino acid sequence analysis of this unique gene using the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) and KEGG databases revealed that this gene encodes ethanolamine phosphotransferase (EptA, or so-called PmrC). Reverse transcription PCR analysis indicated that resistance to colistin in S. algae MARS 14 was associated with overexpression of EptA (27-fold increase), which plays a crucial role in the arrangement of outer membrane lipopolysaccharide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  7. Targeted cancer gene therapy : the flexibility of adenoviral gene therapy vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rots, MG; Curiel, DT; Gerritsen, WR; Haisma, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors are promising reagents for therapeutic interventions in humans, including gene therapy for biologically complex diseases like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this regard, the major advantage of adenoviral vectors is their superior in vivo gene transfer

  8. Unifying the genomics-based classes of cancer fusion gene partners: large cancer fusion genes are evolutionarily conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pava, Libia M; Morton, Daniel T; Chen, Ren; Blanck, George

    2012-11-01

    Genes that fuse to cause cancer have been studied to determine molecular bases for proliferation, to develop diagnostic tools, and as targets for drugs. To facilitate identification of additional, cancer fusion genes, following observation of a chromosomal translocation, we have characterized the genomic features of the fusion gene partners. Previous work indicated that cancer fusion gene partners, are either large or evolutionarily conserved in comparison to the neighboring genes in the region of a chromosomal translocation. These results raised the question of whether large cancer fusion gene partners were also evolutionarily conserved. We developed two methods for quantifying evolutionary conservation values, allowing the conclusion that both large and small cancer fusion gene partners are more evolutionarily conserved than their neighbors. Additionally, we determined that cancer fusion gene partners have more 3' untranslated region secondary structures than do their neighbors. Coupled with previous algorithms, with or without transcriptome approaches, we expect these results to assist in the rapid and efficient use of chromosomal translocations to identify cancer fusion genes. The above parameters for any gene of interest can be accessed at www.cancerfusiongenes.com.

  9. Erdheim-Chester disease with novel gene mutations discovered as an incidental finding in explanted liver of a patient with hepatitis C cirrhosis: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaoyan; Thorson, John A; Hughes, Tudor; Nguyen, John C; Wang, Huan-You; Lin, Grace Y

    2016-09-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare form of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis characterized by xanthogranulomatous infiltration of foamy histiocytes frequently involving bone and other organ systems. We herein report a unique case of ECD discovered incidentally in an explanted liver in a 65-year-old male with end-stage liver disease secondary to hepatitis C cirrhosis. Histological examination and immunohistochemical studies in the explanted liver revealed prominent foamy histiocytes that were CD68 positive, but CD1a and S100 negative. Mutational hotspot analysis of the explanted liver using a panel of 47 most common cancer-related genes performed by next generation sequencing (NGS) revealed likely somatic mutations in the PDGFRA, PTEN, and HNF1A genes, but no BRAF codon 600 mutations were detected. The bone marrow showed similar findings as in the liver. Whole body PET and bone scans demonstrated increased heterogeneous uptake in bilateral humeral and femoral diaphysis, most compatible with ECD. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of ECD that involves mainly bone marrow and liver with novel genomic alterations. Our case highlights the diversity and complexity of this disease entity and the importance of multi-modality approach integrating clinical and radiologic features with histopathologic and molecular/genomic findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Revealing targeted therapy for human cancer by gene module maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, David J.; Nuyten, Dimitry S. A.; Regev, Aviv; Lin, Meihong; Adler, Adam S.; Segal, Eran; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2008-01-01

    A major goal of cancer research is to match specific therapies to molecular targets in cancer. Genome-scale expression profiling has identified new subtypes of cancer based on consistent patterns of variation in gene expression, leading to improved prognostic predictions. However, how these new

  11. Germline variants in the ATM gene and breast cancer susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chaymaa Marouf

    2017-03-06

    Mar 6, 2017 ... investigate the associations between the c.7271T > G and c.1066–. 6T > G ATM gene variants and breast cancer risk in case-control ser- ies from Moroccan population. 2. Subjects and methods. 2.1. Study population. Cases were 163 female patients affected with breast cancer as the first diagnosed cancer.

  12. Tumour suppressor genes in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Ganesan, Trivadi S

    2002-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death from gynaecological malignancies in the western world, and sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer is its most predominant form. The aetiology of sporadic ovarian cancer remains unknown. Genetic studies have enabled a better understanding...... of the evolution of tumour progression. A major focus of research has been to identify tumour suppressor genes implicated in sporadic ovarian cancer over the past decade. Several tumour suppressor genes have been identified by strategies such as positional cloning and differential expression display. Further...... research is warranted to understand fully their contribution to the pathogenesis of sporadic ovarian cancer....

  13. Identification of gene fusion transcripts by transcriptome sequencing in BRCA1-mutated breast cancers and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kevin C H; Lalonde, Emilie; Li, Lili; Cavallone, Luca; Natrajan, Rachael; Lambros, Maryou B; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Hakas, Jarle; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Fenwick, Kerry; Lord, Chris J; Ashworth, Alan; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Basik, Mark; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Majewski, Jacek; Foulkes, William D

    2011-10-27

    Gene fusions arising from chromosomal translocations have been implicated in cancer. However, the role of gene fusions in BRCA1-related breast cancers is not well understood. Mutations in BRCA1 are associated with an increased risk for breast cancer (up to 80% lifetime risk) and ovarian cancer (up to 50%). We sought to identify putative gene fusions in the transcriptomes of these cancers using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We used Illumina sequencing technology to sequence the transcriptomes of five BRCA1-mutated breast cancer cell lines, three BRCA1-mutated primary tumors, two secretory breast cancer primary tumors and one non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cell line. Using a bioinformatics approach, our initial attempt at discovering putative gene fusions relied on analyzing single-end reads and identifying reads that aligned across exons of two different genes. Subsequently, latter samples were sequenced with paired-end reads and at longer cycles (producing longer reads). We then refined our approach by identifying misaligned paired reads, which may flank a putative gene fusion junction. As a proof of concept, we were able to identify two previously characterized gene fusions in our samples using both single-end and paired-end approaches. In addition, we identified three novel in-frame fusions, but none were recurrent. Two of the candidates, WWC1-ADRBK2 in HCC3153 cell line and ADNP-C20orf132 in a primary tumor, were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and RT-PCR. RNA-Seq expression profiling of these two fusions showed a distinct overexpression of the 3' partner genes, suggesting that its expression may be under the control of the 5' partner gene's regulatory elements. In this study, we used both single-end and paired-end sequencing strategies to discover gene fusions in breast cancer transcriptomes with BRCA1 mutations. We found that the use of paired-end reads is an effective tool for transcriptome profiling of gene fusions. Our findings suggest that

  14. Identification of gene fusion transcripts by transcriptome sequencing in BRCA1-mutated breast cancers and cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Kevin CH

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene fusions arising from chromosomal translocations have been implicated in cancer. However, the role of gene fusions in BRCA1-related breast cancers is not well understood. Mutations in BRCA1 are associated with an increased risk for breast cancer (up to 80% lifetime risk and ovarian cancer (up to 50%. We sought to identify putative gene fusions in the transcriptomes of these cancers using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq. Methods We used Illumina sequencing technology to sequence the transcriptomes of five BRCA1-mutated breast cancer cell lines, three BRCA1-mutated primary tumors, two secretory breast cancer primary tumors and one non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cell line. Using a bioinformatics approach, our initial attempt at discovering putative gene fusions relied on analyzing single-end reads and identifying reads that aligned across exons of two different genes. Subsequently, latter samples were sequenced with paired-end reads and at longer cycles (producing longer reads. We then refined our approach by identifying misaligned paired reads, which may flank a putative gene fusion junction. Results As a proof of concept, we were able to identify two previously characterized gene fusions in our samples using both single-end and paired-end approaches. In addition, we identified three novel in-frame fusions, but none were recurrent. Two of the candidates, WWC1-ADRBK2 in HCC3153 cell line and ADNP-C20orf132 in a primary tumor, were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and RT-PCR. RNA-Seq expression profiling of these two fusions showed a distinct overexpression of the 3' partner genes, suggesting that its expression may be under the control of the 5' partner gene's regulatory elements. Conclusions In this study, we used both single-end and paired-end sequencing strategies to discover gene fusions in breast cancer transcriptomes with BRCA1 mutations. We found that the use of paired-end reads is an effective tool for

  15. Meta-analysis of Cancer Gene Profiling Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Janine; Winter, Christof; Schroeder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous measurement of thousands of genes gives the opportunity to personalize and improve cancer therapy. In addition, the integration of meta-data such as protein-protein interaction (PPI) information into the analyses helps in the identification and prioritization of genes from these screens. Here, we describe a computational approach that identifies genes prognostic for outcome by combining gene profiling data from any source with a network of known relationships between genes.

  16. Identification of Prostate Cancer Predisposition Genes on the Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH -15 -1-0638 TITLE: Identification of Prostate Cancer Predisposition Genes on the Y Chromosome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Identification of Prostate Cancer Predisposition Genes on the Y Chromosome 5b. GRANT NUMBER Chromosome 5c. PROGRAM...difficult. We hypothesize the existence of Y chromosome genes/variants related to increased risk, and propose multiple genetic analyses to efficiently

  17. A Rational Approach for Discovering and Validating Cancer Markers in Very Small Samples Using Mass Spectrometry and ELISA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Zangar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying useful markers of cancer can be problematic due to limited amounts of sample. Some samples such as nipple aspirate fluid (NAF or early-stage tumors are inherently small. Other samples such as serum are collected in larger volumes but archives of these samples are very valuable and only small amounts of each sample may be available for a single study. Also, given the diverse nature of cancer and the inherent variability in individual protein levels, it seems likely that the best approach to screen for cancer will be to determine the profile of a battery of proteins. As a result, a major challenge in identifying protein markers of disease is the ability to screen many proteins using very small amounts of sample. In this review, we outline some technological advances in proteomics that greatly advance this capability. Specifically, we propose a strategy for identifying markers of breast cancer in NAF that utilizes mass spectrometry (MS to simultaneously screen hundreds or thousands of proteins in each sample. The best potential markers identified by the MS analysis can then be extensively characterized using an ELISA microarray assay. Because the microarray analysis is quantitative and large numbers of samples can be efficiently analyzed, this approach offers the ability to rapidly assess a battery of selected proteins in a manner that is directly relevant to traditional clinical assays.

  18. Systematic assessment of multi-gene predictors of pan-cancer cell line sensitivity to drugs exploiting gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Linh; Dang, Cuong C; Ballester, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Selected gene mutations are routinely used to guide the selection of cancer drugs for a given patient tumour. Large pharmacogenomic data sets, such as those by Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDSC) consortium, were introduced to discover more of these single-gene markers of drug sensitivity. Very recently, machine learning regression has been used to investigate how well cancer cell line sensitivity to drugs is predicted depending on the type of molecular profile. The latter has revealed that gene expression data is the most predictive profile in the pan-cancer setting. However, no study to date has exploited GDSC data to systematically compare the performance of machine learning models based on multi-gene expression data against that of widely-used single-gene markers based on genomics data. Methods: Here we present this systematic comparison using Random Forest (RF) classifiers exploiting the expression levels of 13,321 genes and an average of 501 tested cell lines per drug. To account for time-dependent batch effects in IC 50 measurements, we employ independent test sets generated with more recent GDSC data than that used to train the predictors and show that this is a more realistic validation than standard k-fold cross-validation. Results and Discussion: Across 127 GDSC drugs, our results show that the single-gene markers unveiled by the MANOVA analysis tend to achieve higher precision than these RF-based multi-gene models, at the cost of generally having a poor recall (i.e. correctly detecting only a small part of the cell lines sensitive to the drug). Regarding overall classification performance, about two thirds of the drugs are better predicted by the multi-gene RF classifiers. Among the drugs with the most predictive of these models, we found pyrimethamine, sunitinib and 17-AAG. Conclusions: Thanks to this unbiased validation, we now know that this type of models can predict in vitro tumour response to some of these drugs. These models

  19. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines treated with dioscin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The long-term goal of our study is to understand the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of breast cancer metastasis in human and to discover new possible genetic markers for use in clinical practice. We have used microarray technology (Human OneArray microarray, phylanxbiotech.com) to compare gene ex...

  20. Gene Signature in Sessile Serrated Polyps Identifies Colon Cancer Subtype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanth, Priyanka; Bronner, Mary P.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Burt, Randall W.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Delker, Don A.

    2016-01-01

    Sessile serrated colon adenoma/polyps (SSA/Ps) are found during routine screening colonoscopy and may account for 20–30% of colon cancers. However, differentiating SSA/Ps from hyperplastic polyps (HP) with little risk of cancer is challenging and complementary molecular markers are needed. Additionally, the molecular mechanisms of colon cancer development from SSA/Ps are poorly understood. RNA sequencing was performed on 21 SSA/Ps, 10 HPs, 10 adenomas, 21 uninvolved colon and 20 control colon specimens. Differential expression and leave-one-out cross validation methods were used to define a unique gene signature of SSA/Ps. Our SSA/P gene signature was evaluated in colon cancer RNA-Seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify a subtype of colon cancers that may develop from SSA/Ps. A total of 1422 differentially expressed genes were found in SSA/Ps relative to controls. Serrated polyposis syndrome (n=12) and sporadic SSA/Ps (n=9) exhibited almost complete (96%) gene overlap. A 51-gene panel in SSA/P showed similar expression in a subset of TCGA colon cancers with high microsatellite instability (MSI-H). A smaller seven-gene panel showed high sensitivity and specificity in identifying BRAF mutant, CpG island methylator phenotype high (CIMP-H) and MLH1 silenced colon cancers. We describe a unique gene signature in SSA/Ps that identifies a subset of colon cancers likely to develop through the serrated pathway. These gene panels may be utilized for improved differentiation of SSA/Ps from HPs and provide insights into novel molecular pathways altered in colon cancer arising from the serrated pathway. PMID:27026680

  1. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  2. Id-1 gene and gene products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-08-19

    A method for treatment of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises targeting and modulating Id-1 gene expression, if any, for the Id-1 gene, or gene products in breast or other epithelial cancers in a patient by delivering products that modulate Id-1 gene expression. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that cancer cells are invasive and metastatic.

  3. Discovering the role of the apolipoprotein gene and the genes in the putative pullulan biosynthesis pathway on the synthesis of pullulan, heavy oil and melanin in Aureobasidium pullulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian; Huang, Siyao; Chen, Yefu; Guo, Xuewu; Xiao, Dongguang

    2017-12-18

    Pullulan produced by Aureobasidium pullulans presents various applications in food manufacturing and pharmaceutical industry. However, the pullulan biosynthesis mechanism remains unclear. This work proposed a pathway suggesting that heavy oil and melanin may correlate with pullulan production. The effects of overexpression or deletion of genes encoding apolipoprotein, UDPG-pyrophosphorylase, glucosyltransferase, and α-phosphoglucose mutase on the production of pullulan, heavy oil, and melanin were examined. Pullulan production increased by 16.93 and 8.52% with the overexpression of UDPG-pyrophosphorylase and apolipoprotein genes, respectively. Nevertheless, the overexpression or deletion of other genes exerted little effect on pullulan biosynthesis. Heavy oil production increased by 146.30, 64.81, and 33.33% with the overexpression of UDPG-pyrophosphorylase, α-phosphoglucose mutase, and apolipoprotein genes, respectively. Furthermore, the syntheses of pullulan, heavy oil, and melanin can compete with one another. This work may provide new guidance to improve the production of pullulan, heavy oil, and melanin through genetic approach.

  4. Text mining in cancer gene and pathway prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Riedlinger, Gregory; Szolovits, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Prioritization of cancer implicated genes has received growing attention as an effective way to reduce wet lab cost by computational analysis that ranks candidate genes according to the likelihood that experimental verifications will succeed. A multitude of gene prioritization tools have been developed, each integrating different data sources covering gene sequences, differential expressions, function annotations, gene regulations, protein domains, protein interactions, and pathways. This review places existing gene prioritization tools against the backdrop of an integrative Omic hierarchy view toward cancer and focuses on the analysis of their text mining components. We explain the relatively slow progress of text mining in gene prioritization, identify several challenges to current text mining methods, and highlight a few directions where more effective text mining algorithms may improve the overall prioritization task and where prioritizing the pathways may be more desirable than prioritizing only genes.

  5. Polymeric Nanoparticle-Mediated Gene Delivery for Lung Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amreddy, Narsireddy; Babu, Anish; Muralidharan, Ranganayaki; Munshi, Anupama; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, researchers have focused on targeted gene therapy for lung cancer, using nanoparticle carriers to overcome the limitations of conventional treatment methods. The main goal of targeted gene therapy is to develop more efficient therapeutic strategies by improving the bioavailability, stability, and target specificity of gene therapeutics and to reduce off-target effects. Polymer-based nanoparticles, an alternative to lipid and inorganic nanoparticles, efficiently carry nucleic acid therapeutics and are stable in vivo. Receptor-targeted delivery is a promising approach that can limit non-specific gene delivery and can be achieved by modifying the polymer nanoparticle surface with specific receptor ligands or antibodies. This review highlights the recent developments in gene delivery using synthetic and natural polymer-based nucleic acid carriers for lung cancer treatment. Various nanoparticle systems based on polymers and polymer combinations are discussed. Further, examples of targeting ligands or moieties used in targeted, polymer-based gene delivery to lung cancer are reviewed.

  6. Predicting prostate cancer risk through incorporation of prostate cancer gene 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankerst, Donna Pauler; Groskopf, Jack; Day, John R; Blase, Amy; Rittenhouse, Harry; Pollock, Brad H; Tangen, Cathy; Parekh, Dipen; Leach, Robin J; Thompson, Ian

    2008-10-01

    The online Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator combines prostate specific antigen, digital rectal examination, family and biopsy history, age and race to determine the risk of prostate cancer. In this report we incorporate the biomarker prostate cancer gene 3 into the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator. Methodology was developed to incorporate new markers for prostate cancer into the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator based on likelihood ratios calculated from separate case control or cohort studies. The methodology was applied to incorporate the marker prostate cancer gene 3 into the risk calculator based on a cohort of 521 men who underwent prostate biopsy with measurements of urinary prostate cancer gene 3, serum prostate specific antigen, digital rectal examination and biopsy history. External validation of the updated risk calculator was performed on a cohort of 443 European patients, and compared to Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risks, prostate specific antigen and prostate cancer gene 3 by area underneath the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity and specificity. The AUC of posterior risks (AUC 0.696, 95% CI 0.641-0.750) was higher than that of prostate specific antigen (AUC 0.607, 95% CI 0.546-0.668, p = 0.001) and Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risks (AUC 0.653, 95% CI 0.593-0.714, p 0.05). Sensitivities of posterior risks were higher than those of prostate cancer gene 3, prostate specific antigen and Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risks. New markers for prostate cancer can be incorporated into the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator by a novel approach. Incorporation of prostate cancer gene 3 improved the diagnostic accuracy of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator.

  7. MicroRNA Processing Gene Methylation and Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Brian Thomas; Zheng, Yinan; Zhang, Zhou; Liu, Lei; Kocherginsky, Masha; Murphy, Robert; Achenbach, Chad; Musa, Jonah; Wehbe, Firas; Just, Allan; Shen, Jincheng; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea; Hou, Lifang

    2018-02-23

    Dysregulation of microRNA (miRNA) and methylation levels are epigenetic hallmarks of cancer, potentially linked via miRNA processing genes. Studies have found genetic alterations to miRNA processing genes in cancer cells and human population studies. Our objective was to prospectively examine changes in DNA methylation of miRNA processing genes and their associations with cancer risk. We examined cohort data from the Department of Veterans' Affairs' Normative Aging Study. Participants were assessed every 3-5 years starting in 1999 through 2013 including questionnaires, medical record review, and blood collection. Blood from 686 consenting participants was analyzed using the Illumina 450K BeadChip array to measure methylation at CpG sites throughout the genome. We selected 19 genes based on a literature review, with 519 corresponding CpG sites. We then used Cox Proportional Hazards models to examine associations with cancer incidence, and Generalized Estimating Equations to examine associations with cancer prevalence. Associations at false discovery rate (FDR) time to cancer development (positively for cg06751583, inversely for cg23230564 and cg21034183) whereas methylation of one CpG site (DROSHA: cg16131300) was positively associated with cancer prevalence. DNA methylation of DROSHA, a key miRNA processing gene, and TNRC6B may play a role in early carcinogenesis. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Identification of Gene Expression Pattern Related to Breast Cancer Survival Using Integrated TCGA Datasets and Genomic Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several large-scale human cancer genomics projects such as TCGA offered huge genomic and clinical data for researchers to obtain meaningful genomics alterations which intervene in the development and metastasis of the tumor. A web-based TCGA data analysis platform called TCGA4U was developed in this study. TCGA4U provides a visualization solution for this study to illustrate the relationship of these genomics alternations with clinical data. A whole genome screening of the survival related gene expression patterns in breast cancer was studied. The gene list that impacts the breast cancer patient survival was divided into two patterns. Gene list of each of these patterns was separately analyzed on DAVID. The result showed that mitochondrial ribosomes play a more crucial role in the cancer development. We also reported that breast cancer patients with low HSPA2 expression level had shorter overall survival time. This is widely different to findings of HSPA2 expression pattern in other cancer types. TCGA4U provided a new perspective for the TCGA datasets. We believe it can inspire more biomedical researchers to study and explain the genomic alterations in cancer development and discover more targeted therapies to help more cancer patients.

  9. Vectors and strategies for nonviral cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahle, Jessica; Walther, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This review presents recent developments in the use of nonviral vectors and transfer technologies in cancer gene therapy. Tremendous progress has been made in developing cancer gene therapy in ways that could be applicable to treatments. Numerous efforts are focused on methods of attacking known and novel targets more efficiently and specifically. In parallel to progress in nonviral vector design and delivery technologies, important achievements have been accomplished for suicide, gene replacement, gene suppression and immunostimulatory therapies. New nonviral cancer gene therapies have been developed based on emerging RNAi (si/shRNA-, miRNA) or ODN. This review provides an overview of recent gene therapeutic strategies in which nonviral vectors have been used experimentally and in clinical trials. Furthermore, we present current developments in nonviral vector systems in association with important chemical and physical gene delivery technologies and their potential for the future. Nonviral gene therapy has maintained its position as an approach for treating cancer. This is reflected by the fact that more than 17% of all gene therapy trials employ nonviral approaches. Thus, nonviral vectors have emerged as a clinical alternative to viral vectors for the appropriate expression and delivery of therapeutic genes.

  10. DriverFinder: A Gene Length-Based Network Method to Identify Cancer Driver Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi-Jing Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of multi-omics data of cancer can help people to explore cancers comprehensively. However, with a large volume of different omics and functional data being generated, there is a major challenge to distinguish functional driver genes from a sea of inconsequential passenger genes that accrue stochastically but do not contribute to cancer development. In this paper, we present a gene length-based network method, named DriverFinder, to identify driver genes by integrating somatic mutations, copy number variations, gene-gene interaction network, tumor expression, and normal expression data. To illustrate the performance of DriverFinder, it is applied to four cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas including breast cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, thyroid carcinoma, and kidney renal clear cell carcinoma. Compared with some conventional methods, the results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective. Moreover, it can decrease the influence of gene length in identifying driver genes and identify some rare mutated driver genes.

  11. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, Albert [Helsingfors, FI; Vogelstein, Bert [Baltimore, MD; Kinzler, Kenneth W [Baltimore, MD

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  12. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Chiu; Shen, Zan; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie CM

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971, scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of anti-angiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized and sustained expression of therapeutic gene product inside the tumor after gene transfer. This review provides the up-to-date information about the strategies and the vectors studied in the field of anti-angiogenesis cancer gene therapy. PMID:17109514

  13. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Siegel

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2. A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003. Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  14. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  15. Relevance of Fusion Genes in Pediatric Cancers: Toward Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupain, Célia; Harttrampf, Anne Catherine; Urbinati, Giorgia; Geoerger, Birgit; Massaad-Massade, Liliane

    2017-03-17

    Pediatric cancers differ from adult tumors, especially by their very low mutational rate. Therefore, their etiology could be explained in part by other oncogenic mechanisms such as chromosomal rearrangements, supporting the possible implication of fusion genes in the development of pediatric cancers. Fusion genes result from chromosomal rearrangements leading to the juxtaposition of two genes. Consequently, an abnormal activation of one or both genes is observed. The detection of fusion genes has generated great interest in basic cancer research and in the clinical setting, since these genes can lead to better comprehension of the biological mechanisms of tumorigenesis and they can also be used as therapeutic targets and diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of fusion genes and their particularities in pediatric cancers, as well as their relevance in murine models and in the clinical setting. We also point out the difficulties encountered in the discovery of fusion genes. Finally, we discuss future perspectives and priorities for finding new innovative therapies in childhood cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Relevance of Fusion Genes in Pediatric Cancers: Toward Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Dupain

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cancers differ from adult tumors, especially by their very low mutational rate. Therefore, their etiology could be explained in part by other oncogenic mechanisms such as chromosomal rearrangements, supporting the possible implication of fusion genes in the development of pediatric cancers. Fusion genes result from chromosomal rearrangements leading to the juxtaposition of two genes. Consequently, an abnormal activation of one or both genes is observed. The detection of fusion genes has generated great interest in basic cancer research and in the clinical setting, since these genes can lead to better comprehension of the biological mechanisms of tumorigenesis and they can also be used as therapeutic targets and diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of fusion genes and their particularities in pediatric cancers, as well as their relevance in murine models and in the clinical setting. We also point out the difficulties encountered in the discovery of fusion genes. Finally, we discuss future perspectives and priorities for finding new innovative therapies in childhood cancer.

  17. A Genetic Interaction Screen for Breast Cancer Progression Driver Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    phenotypes in the future. We have stably labeled these cell lines with both the green fluorescent protein ( GFP ) and the the red fluorescent protein (RFP...different breast cancer cells that are tagged with flurocent proteins , we have discovered that breast cells of different genotypes could promote invasion...v-Ras cells and that the protein levels of p53 and p21 are also increased (Fig. 7A). These data indicate that Grik3 affects tumorigenesis by

  18. Germline variants in the ATM gene and breast cancer susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Germline variants in the ATM gene and breast cancer susceptibility in Moroccan women: A meta-analysis. Chaymaa Marouf, Omar Hajji, Amal Tazzite, Hassan Jouhadi, Abdellatif Benider, Sellama Nadifi ...

  19. Alpha(1,3) Galactosyltransferase Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Link, Charles

    2003-01-01

    .... In vitro transduction of MCF-7, and T47D human breast cancer cells with an HSV amplicon vector resulted in expression of the suicide gene as detected by specific binding of labeled IB-4 isolectin...

  20. Genes Involved in Oxidation and Prostate Cancer Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Platz, Elizabeth A

    2008-01-01

    We are evaluating whether polymorphisms in genes involved in the genesis of oxidative species, detoxification of oxidative species, or repair of oxidative DNA damage influence risk of prostate cancer...

  1. Targeting a Novel Vector for Breast Cancer Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bzik, David

    2002-01-01

    .... The primary purpose and scope of this IDEA award project is to experimentally examine approaches to safely target the Toxoplasma gondii parasite gene therapy vector to breast cancer tissue using...

  2. Rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene found for the first time in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer cases among atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamatani, K.; Mukai, M.; Takahashi, K.; Nakachi, K.; Kusunoki, Y. [Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Hayashi, Y. [Geriatric Health Service Facility Hidamari, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: Thyroid cancer is one of the malignancies most strongly associated with ionizing radiation in humans. Epidemiology studies of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors have indicated that excess relative risk of papillary thyroid cancer per Gy was remarkably high in the survivors. We therefore aim to clarify mechanisms linking A-bomb radiation exposure and development of papillary thyroid cancer. Toward this end, we intend to clarify characteristics of gene alterations occurring in radiation-associated adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer from the Life Span Study cohort of A-bomb survivors. We have thus far found that with increased radiation dose, papillary thyroid cancer cases with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC rearrangements) significantly increased and papillary thyroid cancer cases with point mutations (mainly BRAF-V600E) significantly decreased. Papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations that carried no mutations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF or RAS genes tended to increase with increased radiation dose. In addition, we found that relative frequency of these papillary thyroid cancer cases significantly decreased with time elapsed since exposure. Through analysis of papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations, we recently discovered a new type of rearrangement for the first time in papillary thyroid cancer, i.e., rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene, although identification of any partner gene(s) is needed. Specifically, rearrangement of ALK was found in 10 of 19 exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations but not in any of the six non-exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases. Furthermore, papillary thyroid cancer with ALK rearrangement was frequently found in the cases with high radiation dose or with short time elapsed since A-bomb exposure. These results suggest that chromosomal rearrangement, typically of RET and ALK, may play an important

  3. Rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene found for the first time in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer cases among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamatani, K.; Mukai, M.; Takahashi, K.; Nakachi, K.; Kusunoki, Y.; Hayashi, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full text of the publication follows: Thyroid cancer is one of the malignancies most strongly associated with ionizing radiation in humans. Epidemiology studies of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors have indicated that excess relative risk of papillary thyroid cancer per Gy was remarkably high in the survivors. We therefore aim to clarify mechanisms linking A-bomb radiation exposure and development of papillary thyroid cancer. Toward this end, we intend to clarify characteristics of gene alterations occurring in radiation-associated adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer from the Life Span Study cohort of A-bomb survivors. We have thus far found that with increased radiation dose, papillary thyroid cancer cases with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC rearrangements) significantly increased and papillary thyroid cancer cases with point mutations (mainly BRAF-V600E) significantly decreased. Papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations that carried no mutations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF or RAS genes tended to increase with increased radiation dose. In addition, we found that relative frequency of these papillary thyroid cancer cases significantly decreased with time elapsed since exposure. Through analysis of papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations, we recently discovered a new type of rearrangement for the first time in papillary thyroid cancer, i.e., rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene, although identification of any partner gene(s) is needed. Specifically, rearrangement of ALK was found in 10 of 19 exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations but not in any of the six non-exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases. Furthermore, papillary thyroid cancer with ALK rearrangement was frequently found in the cases with high radiation dose or with short time elapsed since A-bomb exposure. These results suggest that chromosomal rearrangement, typically of RET and ALK, may play an important

  4. Highly parallel identification of essential genes in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Biao; Cheung, Hiu Wing; Subramanian, Aravind; Sharifnia, Tanaz; Okamoto, Michael; Yang, Xiaoping; Hinkle, Greg; Boehm, Jesse S; Beroukhim, Rameen; Weir, Barbara A; Mermel, Craig; Barbie, David A; Awad, Tarif; Zhou, Xiaochuan; Nguyen, Tuyen; Piqani, Bruno; Li, Cheng; Golub, Todd R; Meyerson, Matthew; Hacohen, Nir; Hahn, William C; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M; Root, David E

    2008-12-23

    More complete knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer will improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Efforts such as The Cancer Genome Atlas are systematically characterizing the structural basis of cancer, by identifying the genomic mutations associated with each cancer type. A powerful complementary approach is to systematically characterize the functional basis of cancer, by identifying the genes essential for growth and related phenotypes in different cancer cells. Such information would be particularly valuable for identifying potential drug targets. Here, we report the development of an efficient, robust approach to perform genome-scale pooled shRNA screens for both positive and negative selection and its application to systematically identify cell essential genes in 12 cancer cell lines. By integrating these functional data with comprehensive genetic analyses of primary human tumors, we identified known and putative oncogenes such as EGFR, KRAS, MYC, BCR-ABL, MYB, CRKL, and CDK4 that are essential for cancer cell proliferation and also altered in human cancers. We further used this approach to identify genes involved in the response of cancer cells to tumoricidal agents and found 4 genes required for the response of CML cells to imatinib treatment: PTPN1, NF1, SMARCB1, and SMARCE1, and 5 regulators of the response to FAS activation, FAS, FADD, CASP8, ARID1A and CBX1. Broad application of this highly parallel genetic screening strategy will not only facilitate the rapid identification of genes that drive the malignant state and its response to therapeutics but will also enable the discovery of genes that participate in any biological process.

  5. BTG2 Antiproliferative Gene and Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walden, Paul D

    2007-01-01

    Levels of the BTG2 tumor suppressor protein diminish during the transition of normal prostate epithelial cells into prostate cancer cells and restoration of BTG2 expression in prostate cancer cells...

  6. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  7. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  8. Bacteria as vectors for gene therapy of cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baban, Chwanrow K

    2012-01-31

    Anti-cancer therapy faces major challenges, particularly in terms of specificity of treatment. The ideal therapy would eradicate tumor cells selectively with minimum side effects on normal tissue. Gene or cell therapies have emerged as realistic prospects for the treatment of cancer, and involve the delivery of genetic information to a tumor to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. However, there is still much to be done before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved, primarily developing the means of targeting genes to tumors safely and efficiently. An emerging family of vectors involves bacteria of various genera. It has been shown that bacteria are naturally capable of homing to tumors when systemically administered resulting in high levels of replication locally. Furthermore, invasive species can deliver heterologous genes intra-cellularly for tumor cell expression. Here, we review the use of bacteria as vehicles for gene therapy of cancer, detailing the mechanisms of action and successes at preclinical and clinical levels.

  9. Intracellular delivery of potential therapeutic genes: prospects in cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Athirah; Sayyad, Mustak; Rosli, Rozita; Maruyama, Atsushi; Chowdhury, Ezharul H

    2014-01-01

    Conventional therapies for malignant cancer such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with poor survival rates owing to the development of cellular resistance to cancer drugs and the lack of targetability, resulting in unwanted adverse effects on healthy cells and necessitating the lowering of therapeutic dose with consequential lower efficacy of the treatment. Gene therapy employing different types of viral and non-viral carriers to transport gene(s) of interest and facilitating production of the desirable therapeutic protein(s) has tremendous prospects in cancer treatments due to the high-level of specificity in therapeutic action of the expressed protein(s) with diminished off-target effects, although cancer cell-specific delivery of transgene(s) still poses some challenges to be addressed. Depending on the potential therapeutic target genes, cancer gene therapy could be categorized into tumor suppressor gene replacement therapy, immune gene therapy and enzyme- or prodrug-based therapy. This review would shed light on the current progress of delivery of potentially therapeutic genes into various cancer cells in vitro and animal models utilizing a variety of viral and non-viral vectors.

  10. HER2 Genetic Link to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    When researchers discovered the HER2 gene's importance to breast cancer growth, this led to the development of trastuzumab and other treatments that have improved survival for women with HER2-positive breast cancer.

  11. RNA Chimeras as a Gene Signature of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    viruses . Nature 1970;227:1029-31. (25) Lovf M, Thomassen GO, Bakken AC, Celestino R, Fioretos T, Lind GE, et al. Fusion gene microarray reveals cancer...landscapes of somatic rearrangement in human breast cancer genomes. Nature 2009;462:1005-10. Possible Formation of Mitochondrial-RNA Containing

  12. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Toss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65–85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  13. The Key Genes of Chronic Pancreatitis which Bridge Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Can be Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Li, Rui; Wang, Heping; Li, Lisha; Li, Huiyu; Li, Yulin

    2018-04-01

    An important question in systems biology is what role the underlying molecular mechanisms play in disease progression. The relationship between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer needs further exploration in a system view. We constructed the disease network based on gene expression data and protein-protein interaction. We proposed an approach to discover the underlying core network and molecular factors in the progression of pancreatic diseases, which contain stages of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer core network and key factors were revealed and then verified by gene set enrichment analysis of pathways and diseases. The key factors provide the microenvironment for tumor initiation and the change of gene expression level of key factors bridge chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Some new candidate genes need further verification by experiments. Transcriptome profiling-based network analysis reveals the importance of chronic pancreatitis genes and pathways in pancreatic cancer development on a system level by computational method and they can be therapeutic targets.

  14. Vitamin D metabolic pathway genes and pancreatic cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Arem

    Full Text Available Evidence on the association between vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. This inconsistency may be partially attributable to variation in vitamin D regulating genes. We selected 11 vitamin D-related genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, VDR, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP27A1, RXRA, CRP2, CASR and CUBN totaling 213 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and examined associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study included 3,583 pancreatic cancer cases and 7,053 controls from the genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer PanScans-I-III. We used the Adaptive Joint Test and the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product statistic for pathway and gene analyses, and unconditional logistic regression for SNP analyses, adjusting for age, sex, study and population stratification. We examined effect modification by circulating vitamin D concentration (≤50, >50 nmol/L for the most significant SNPs using a subset of cohort cases (n = 713 and controls (n = 878. The vitamin D metabolic pathway was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p = 0.830. Of the individual genes, none were associated with pancreatic cancer risk at a significance level of p<0.05. SNPs near the VDR (rs2239186, LRP2 (rs4668123, CYP24A1 (rs2762932, GC (rs2282679, and CUBN (rs1810205 genes were the top SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer (p-values 0.008-0.037, but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Associations between these SNPs and pancreatic cancer were not modified by circulating concentrations of vitamin D. These findings do not support an association between vitamin D-related genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Future research should explore other pathways through which vitamin D status might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

  15. DDEC: Dragon database of genes implicated in esophageal cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2009-07-06

    Background: Esophageal cancer ranks eighth in order of cancer occurrence. Its lethality primarily stems from inability to detect the disease during the early organ-confined stage and the lack of effective therapies for advanced-stage disease. Moreover, the understanding of molecular processes involved in esophageal cancer is not complete, hampering the development of efficient diagnostics and therapy. Efforts made by the scientific community to improve the survival rate of esophageal cancer have resulted in a wealth of scattered information that is difficult to find and not easily amendable to data-mining. To reduce this gap and to complement available cancer related bioinformatic resources, we have developed a comprehensive database (Dragon Database of Genes Implicated in Esophageal Cancer) with esophageal cancer related information, as an integrated knowledge database aimed at representing a gateway to esophageal cancer related data. Description: Manually curated 529 genes differentially expressed in EC are contained in the database. We extracted and analyzed the promoter regions of these genes and complemented gene-related information with transcription factors that potentially control them. We further, precompiled text-mined and data-mined reports about each of these genes to allow for easy exploration of information about associations of EC-implicated genes with other human genes and proteins, metabolites and enzymes, toxins, chemicals with pharmacological effects, disease concepts and human anatomy. The resulting database, DDEC, has a useful feature to display potential associations that are rarely reported and thus difficult to identify. Moreover, DDEC enables inspection of potentially new \\'association hypotheses\\' generated based on the precompiled reports. Conclusion: We hope that this resource will serve as a useful complement to the existing public resources and as a good starting point for researchers and physicians interested in EC genetics. DDEC is

  16. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alice W.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Stram, Douglas A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K.H.; van Altena, Anne M.; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D.; Cook, Linda S.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McLaughlin, John R.; Risch, Harvey A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C.; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Methods Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. Results We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p = 0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p = 0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p = 0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p = 0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p = 0.060, overall invasive). Conclusions Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. PMID:25528498

  17. Biomarker discovery for colon cancer using a 761 gene RT-PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hackett James R

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR is widely recognized to be the gold standard method for quantifying gene expression. Studies using RT-PCR technology as a discovery tool have historically been limited to relatively small gene sets compared to other gene expression platforms such as microarrays. We have recently shown that TaqMan® RT-PCR can be scaled up to profile expression for 192 genes in fixed paraffin-embedded (FPE clinical study tumor specimens. This technology has also been used to develop and commercialize a widely used clinical test for breast cancer prognosis and prediction, the Onco typeDX™ assay. A similar need exists in colon cancer for a test that provides information on the likelihood of disease recurrence in colon cancer (prognosis and the likelihood of tumor response to standard chemotherapy regimens (prediction. We have now scaled our RT-PCR assay to efficiently screen 761 biomarkers across hundreds of patient samples and applied this process to biomarker discovery in colon cancer. This screening strategy remains attractive due to the inherent advantages of maintaining platform consistency from discovery through clinical application. Results RNA was extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FPE tissue, as old as 28 years, from 354 patients enrolled in NSABP C-01 and C-02 colon cancer studies. Multiplexed reverse transcription reactions were performed using a gene specific primer pool containing 761 unique primers. PCR was performed as independent TaqMan® reactions for each candidate gene. Hierarchal clustering demonstrates that genes expected to co-express form obvious, distinct and in certain cases very tightly correlated clusters, validating the reliability of this technical approach to biomarker discovery. Conclusion We have developed a high throughput, quantitatively precise multi-analyte gene expression platform for biomarker discovery that approaches low density DNA arrays in numbers of

  18. A Critical Perspective On Microarray Breast Cancer Gene Expression Profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontrop, H.M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Microarrays offer biologists an exciting tool that allows the simultaneous assessment of gene expression levels for thousands of genes at once. At the time of their inception, microarrays were hailed as the new dawn in cancer biology and oncology practice with the hope that within a decade diseases

  19. Identification of certain cancer-mediating genes using Gaussian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-29

    Sep 29, 2015 ... the notion of fuzzy set theory, for validating the clusters obtained by a clustering algorithm applied on cancer gene expression data. GFI is then used for the identification of genes that have altered quite significantly from normal state to carcinogenic state with respect to their mRNA expression patterns.

  20. Genome-wide prediction of cancer driver genes based on SNP and cancer SNV data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Quanze; He, Quanyuan; Liu, Xiaohui; Wei, Youheng; Shen, Suqin; Hu, Xiaohui; Li, Qiao; Peng, Xiangwen; Wang, Lin; Yu, Long

    2014-01-01

    Identifying cancer driver genes and exploring their functions are essential and the most urgent need in basic cancer research. Developing efficient methods to differentiate between driver and passenger somatic mutations revealed from large-scale cancer genome sequencing data is critical to cancer driver gene discovery. Here, we compared distinct features of SNP with SNV data in detail and found that the weighted ratio of SNV to SNP (termed as WVPR) is an excellent indicator for cancer driver genes. The power of WVPR was validated by accurate predictions of known drivers. We ranked most of human genes by WVPR and did functional analyses on the list. The results demonstrate that driver genes are usually highly enriched in chromatin organization related genes/pathways. And some protein complexes, such as histone acetyltransferase, histone methyltransferase, telomerase, centrosome, sin3 and U12-type spliceosomal complexes, are hot spots of driver mutations. Furthermore, this study identified many new potential driver genes (e.g. NTRK3 and ZIC4) and pathways including oxidative phosphorylation pathway, which were not deemed by previous methods. Taken together, our study not only developed a method to identify cancer driver genes/pathways but also provided new insights into molecular mechanisms of cancer development.

  1. Routine port-site excision in incidentally discovered gallbladder cancer is not associated with improved survival: A multi-institution analysis from the US Extrahepatic Biliary Malignancy Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethun, Cecilia G; Postlewait, Lauren M; Le, Nina; Pawlik, Timothy M; Poultsides, George; Tran, Thuy; Idrees, Kamran; Isom, Chelsea A; Fields, Ryan C; Krasnick, Bradley A; Weber, Sharon M; Salem, Ahmed; Martin, Robert C G; Scoggins, Charles R; Shen, Perry; Mogal, Harveshp D; Schmidt, Carl; Beal, Eliza; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Cardona, Kenneth; Maithel, Shishir K

    2017-06-01

    Current data on the utility of port-site excision (PSE) during re-resection for incidentally discovered gallbladder cancer (IGBC) in the US are conflicting and limited to single-institution series. All patients with IGBC who underwent curative re-resection at 10 institutions from 2000 to 2015 were included. Patients with and without PSE were compared. Primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Of 449 pts with GBC, 266 were incidentally discovered, of which 193(73%) underwent curative re-resection and had port-site data; 47 pts(24%) underwent PSE, 146(76%) did not. The PSE rate remained similar over time (2000-2004: 33%; 2005-2009: 22%; 2010-2015:22%; P = 0.36). Both groups had similar demographics, operative procedures, and post-operative complications. There was no difference in T-stage (T1: 9 vs. 11%; T2: 52 vs. 52%; T3: 39 vs. 38%; P = 0.96) or LN involvement (36 vs. 41%; P = 0.7) between groups. A 3-year OS was similar between PSE and no PSE groups (65 vs. 43%; P = 0.07). On univariable analysis, residual disease at re-resection (HR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.4-3.3; P = 0.001), high tumor grade, and advanced T-stage were associated with decreased OS. Only grade and T-stage, but not PSE, persisted on multivariable analysis. Distant disease recurrence-rate was identical between PSE and no PSE groups (80 vs. 81%; P = 1.0). Port-site excision during re-resection for IGBC is not associated with improved overall survival and has the same distant disease recurrence compared to no port-site excision. Routine port-site excision is not recommended. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Malignancy of Cancers and Synthetic Lethal Interactions Associated With Mutations of Cancer Driver Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Yue; Han, Ze-Guang; He, Kun-Yan

    2016-02-01

    The mutation status of cancer driver genes may correlate with different degrees of malignancy of cancers. The doubling time and multidrug resistance are 2 phenotypes that reflect the degree of malignancy of cancer cells. Because most of cancer driver genes are hard to target, identification of their synthetic lethal partners might be a viable approach to treatment of the cancers with the relevant mutations.The genome-wide screening for synthetic lethal partners is costly and labor intensive. Thus, a computational approach facilitating identification of candidate genes for a focus synthetic lethal RNAi screening will accelerate novel anticancer drug discovery.We used several publicly available cancer cell lines and tumor tissue genomic data in this study.We compared the doubling time and multidrug resistance between the NCI-60 cell lines with mutations in some cancer driver genes and those without the mutations. We identified some candidate synthetic lethal genes to the cancer driver genes APC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 by comparison of their gene phenotype values in cancer cell lines with the relevant mutations and wild-type background. Further, we experimentally validated some of the synthetic lethal relationships we predicted.We reported that mutations in some cancer driver genes mutations in some cancer driver genes such as APC, KRAS, or PIK3CA might correlate with cancer proliferation or drug resistance. We identified 40, 21, 5, 43, and 18 potential synthetic lethal genes to APC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53, respectively. We found that some of the potential synthetic lethal genes show significantly higher expression in the cancers with mutations of their synthetic lethal partners and the wild-type counterparts. Further, our experiments confirmed several synthetic lethal relationships that are novel findings by our methods.We experimentally validated a part of the synthetic lethal relationships we predicted. We plan to perform further experiments to validate

  3. A Genome Wide Linkage Search for Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paula; McGuffog, Lesley; Easton, Douglas F.; Mann, Graham J.; Pupo, Gulietta M.; Newman, Beth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Szabo, Csilla; Southey, Melissa; Renard, Hélène; Odefrey, Fabrice; Lynch, Henry; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Couch, Fergus; Hopper, John L.; Giles, Graham G.; McCredie, Margaret R. E.; Buys, Saundra; Andrulis, Irene; Senie, Ruby; Goldgar, David E.; Oldenburg, Rogier; Kroeze-Jansema, Karin; Kraan, Jaennelle; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Klijn, Jan G. M.; van Asperen, Christi; van Leeuwen, Inge; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Cornelisse, Cees J.; Devilee, Peter; Baskcomb, Linda; Seal, Sheila; Barfoot, Rita; Mangion, Jon; Hall, Anita; Edkins, Sarah; Rapley, Elizabeth; Wooster, Richard; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D. Gareth; Futreal, P. Andrew; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Weber, Barbara L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Stratton, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in known breast cancer susceptibility genes account for a minority of the familial aggregation of the disease. To search for further breast cancer susceptibility genes, we performed a combined analysis of four genome-wide linkage screens, which included a total of 149 multiple case breast cancer families. All families included at least three cases of breast cancer diagnosed below age 60 years, at least one of whom had been tested and found not to carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Evidence for linkage was assessed using parametric linkage analysis, assuming both a dominant and a recessive mode of inheritance, and using nonparametric methods. The highest LOD score obtained in any analysis of the combined data was 1.80 under the dominant model, in a region on chromosome 4 close to marker D4S392. Three further LOD scores over 1 were identified in the parametric analyses and two in the nonparametric analyses. A maximum LOD score of 2.40 was found on chromosome arm 2p in families with four or more cases of breast cancer diagnosed below age 50 years. The number of linkage peaks did not differ from the number expected by chance. These results suggest regions that may harbor novel breast cancer susceptibility genes. They also indicate that no single gene is likely to account for a large fraction of the familial aggregation of breast cancer that is not due to mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. PMID:16575876

  4. Nonlinear dimensionality reduction of gene expression data for visualization and clustering analysis of cancer tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinlong; Luo, Zhigang

    2010-08-01

    Gene expression data are the representation of nonlinear interactions among genes and environmental factors. Computing analysis of these data is expected to gain knowledge of gene functions and disease mechanisms. Clustering is a classical exploratory technique of discovering similar expression patterns and function modules. However, gene expression data are usually of high dimensions and relatively small samples, which results in the main difficulty for the application of clustering algorithms. Principal component analysis (PCA) is usually used to reduce the data dimensions for further clustering analysis. While PCA estimates the similarity between expression profiles based on the Euclidean distance, which cannot reveal the nonlinear connections between genes. This paper uses nonlinear dimensionality reduction (NDR) as a preprocessing strategy for feature selection and visualization, and then applies clustering algorithms to the reduced feature spaces. In order to estimate the effectiveness of NDR for capturing biologically relevant structures, the comparative analysis between NDR and PCA is exploited to five real cancer expression datasets. Results show that NDR can perform better than PCA in visualization and clustering analysis of complex gene expression data. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cancer therapeutic target genes identified on chromosome 20q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An integrated quantitative genome data analysis was recently able to pinpoint 18 genes on human chromosome 20q that could potentially serve as novel molecular targets for cancer therapy. Researchers Antoine M Snijders and Jian-Hua Mao from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Biological Systems and Engineering Division in Berkeley, California, United States, in their study published by the journal Advances in Modern Oncology Research (AMOR sought to compare the amounts of individual mRNAs – messenger RNAs that specify the amino acid sequence of the protein products of gene expression – in cancerous human tissues with corresponding normal tissues. The duo conducted a meta-analysis of genes on chromosome 20q that are found to be consistently upregulated across different human tumor types, while collecting gene transcript data of normal and tumor tissues across 11 different tumor types including brain, breast, colon, gastric, head and neck, liver, lung, ovarian, cervix, pancreas, and prostate cancers. “We calculated the differential expression of all 301 genes present on chromosome 20q for which gene transcript data was available. We then filtered for genes that were upregulated in tumors by at least 1.5 fold (p < 0.05 in seven or more tumor types,” they said. The resulting analysis identified 18 genes – some such as AURKA, UBE2C, TPX2, FAM83D, ZNF217, SALL4 and MMP9 have been previously known to potentially cause cancer. The 18-gene signature is revealed by the study to have robustly elevated levels across human cancers. “We observed significant association of our signature with disease-free survival in all 18 independent data… These data indicated that our signature is broadly predictive for disease-free survival, independent of tumor type,” the researchers said. In certain cases, Snijders and Mao found that increased gene expression was associated with better prognosis. “For example, the increased expressions of MMP9 and

  6. Bacterial Toxins for Oncoleaking Suicidal Cancer Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahle, Jessica; Walther, Wolfgang

    For suicide gene therapy, initially prodrug-converting enzymes (gene-directed enzyme-producing therapy, GDEPT) were employed to intracellularly metabolize non-toxic prodrugs into toxic compounds, leading to the effective suicidal killing of the transfected tumor cells. In this regard, the suicide gene therapy has demonstrated its potential for efficient tumor eradication. Numerous suicide genes of viral or bacterial origin were isolated, characterized, and extensively tested in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating their therapeutic potential even in clinical trials to treat cancers of different entities. Apart from this, growing efforts are made to generate more targeted and more effective suicide gene systems for cancer gene therapy. In this regard, bacterial toxins are an alternative to the classical GDEPT strategy, which add to the broad spectrum of different suicide approaches. In this context, lytic bacterial toxins, such as streptolysin O (SLO) or the claudin-targeted Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) represent attractive new types of suicide oncoleaking genes. They permit as pore-forming proteins rapid and also selective toxicity toward a broad range of cancers. In this chapter, we describe the generation and use of SLO as well as of CPE-based gene therapies for the effective tumor cell eradication as promising, novel suicide gene approach particularly for treatment of therapy refractory tumors.

  7. Genome-wide identification of key modulators of gene-gene interaction networks in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Wang, Li-Ju; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chuang, Eric Y; Chen, Yidong

    2017-10-03

    With the advances in high-throughput gene profiling technologies, a large volume of gene interaction maps has been constructed. A higher-level layer of gene-gene interaction, namely modulate gene interaction, is composed of gene pairs of which interaction strengths are modulated by (i.e., dependent on) the expression level of a key modulator gene. Systematic investigations into the modulation by estrogen receptor (ER), the best-known modulator gene, have revealed the functional and prognostic significance in breast cancer. However, a genome-wide identification of key modulator genes that may further unveil the landscape of modulated gene interaction is still lacking. We proposed a systematic workflow to screen for key modulators based on genome-wide gene expression profiles. We designed four modularity parameters to measure the ability of a putative modulator to perturb gene interaction networks. Applying the method to a dataset of 286 breast tumors, we comprehensively characterized the modularity parameters and identified a total of 973 key modulator genes. The modularity of these modulators was verified in three independent breast cancer datasets. ESR1, the encoding gene of ER, appeared in the list, and abundant novel modulators were illuminated. For instance, a prognostic predictor of breast cancer, SFRP1, was found the second modulator. Functional annotation analysis of the 973 modulators revealed involvements in ER-related cellular processes as well as immune- and tumor-associated functions. Here we present, as far as we know, the first comprehensive analysis of key modulator genes on a genome-wide scale. The validity of filtering parameters as well as the conservativity of modulators among cohorts were corroborated. Our data bring new insights into the modulated layer of gene-gene interaction and provide candidates for further biological investigations.

  8. Combining Gene Signatures Improves Prediction of Breast Cancer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xi; Naume, Bjørn; Langerød, Anita; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Lingjærde, Ole Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background Several gene sets for prediction of breast cancer survival have been derived from whole-genome mRNA expression profiles. Here, we develop a statistical framework to explore whether combination of the information from such sets may improve prediction of recurrence and breast cancer specific death in early-stage breast cancers. Microarray data from two clinically similar cohorts of breast cancer patients are used as training (n = 123) and test set (n = 81), respectively. Gene sets from eleven previously published gene signatures are included in the study. Principal Findings To investigate the relationship between breast cancer survival and gene expression on a particular gene set, a Cox proportional hazards model is applied using partial likelihood regression with an L2 penalty to avoid overfitting and using cross-validation to determine the penalty weight. The fitted models are applied to an independent test set to obtain a predicted risk for each individual and each gene set. Hierarchical clustering of the test individuals on the basis of the vector of predicted risks results in two clusters with distinct clinical characteristics in terms of the distribution of molecular subtypes, ER, PR status, TP53 mutation status and histological grade category, and associated with significantly different survival probabilities (recurrence: p = 0.005; breast cancer death: p = 0.014). Finally, principal components analysis of the gene signatures is used to derive combined predictors used to fit a new Cox model. This model classifies test individuals into two risk groups with distinct survival characteristics (recurrence: p = 0.003; breast cancer death: p = 0.001). The latter classifier outperforms all the individual gene signatures, as well as Cox models based on traditional clinical parameters and the Adjuvant! Online for survival prediction. Conclusion Combining the predictive strength of multiple gene signatures improves prediction of breast

  9. Combining gene signatures improves prediction of breast cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several gene sets for prediction of breast cancer survival have been derived from whole-genome mRNA expression profiles. Here, we develop a statistical framework to explore whether combination of the information from such sets may improve prediction of recurrence and breast cancer specific death in early-stage breast cancers. Microarray data from two clinically similar cohorts of breast cancer patients are used as training (n = 123 and test set (n = 81, respectively. Gene sets from eleven previously published gene signatures are included in the study. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the relationship between breast cancer survival and gene expression on a particular gene set, a Cox proportional hazards model is applied using partial likelihood regression with an L2 penalty to avoid overfitting and using cross-validation to determine the penalty weight. The fitted models are applied to an independent test set to obtain a predicted risk for each individual and each gene set. Hierarchical clustering of the test individuals on the basis of the vector of predicted risks results in two clusters with distinct clinical characteristics in terms of the distribution of molecular subtypes, ER, PR status, TP53 mutation status and histological grade category, and associated with significantly different survival probabilities (recurrence: p = 0.005; breast cancer death: p = 0.014. Finally, principal components analysis of the gene signatures is used to derive combined predictors used to fit a new Cox model. This model classifies test individuals into two risk groups with distinct survival characteristics (recurrence: p = 0.003; breast cancer death: p = 0.001. The latter classifier outperforms all the individual gene signatures, as well as Cox models based on traditional clinical parameters and the Adjuvant! Online for survival prediction. CONCLUSION: Combining the predictive strength of multiple gene signatures improves

  10. Molecular Signature of Cancer at Gene Level or Pathway Level? Case Studies of Colorectal Cancer and Prostate Cancer Microarray Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With recent advances in microarray technology, there has been a flourish in genome-scale identification of molecular signatures for cancer. However, the differentially expressed genes obtained by different laboratories are highly divergent. The present discrepancy at gene level indicates a need for a novel strategy to obtain more robust signatures for cancer. In this paper we hypothesize that (1 the expression signatures of different cancer microarray datasets are more similar at pathway level than at gene level; (2 the comparability of the cancer molecular mechanisms of different individuals is related to their genetic similarities. In support of the hypotheses, we summarized theoretical and experimental evidences, and conducted case studies on colorectal and prostate cancer microarray datasets. Based on the above assumption, we propose that reliable cancer signatures should be investigated in the context of biological pathways, within a cohort of genetically homogeneous population. It is hoped that the hypotheses can guide future research in cancer mechanism and signature discovery.

  11. Gene therapy of cancer by vaccines carrying inserted immunostimulatory genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2007), s. 71-73 ISSN 0015-5500 Grant - others:EU-FP6 NoE Clinigene(XE) 018933; Liga proti rakovině, Praha(CZ) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : gene therapy * immunostimulatory genes * vaccine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.596, year: 2007

  12. Mutation analysis of breast cancer gene BRCA among breast cancer Jordanian females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atoum, Manar F.; Al-Kayed, Sameer A.

    2004-01-01

    To screen mutations of the tumor suppressor breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) within 3 exons among Jordanian breast cancer females. A total of 135 Jordanian breast cancer females were genetically analyzed by denaturing gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) for mutation detection in 3 BRCA1 exons (2, 11 and 20) between 2000-2002 in Al-Basheer Hospital, Amman, Jordan. Of the studied patients 50 had a family history of breast cancer, 28 had a family history of cancer other than breast cancer, and 57 had no family history of any cancer. Five germline mutations were detected among breast cancer females with a family history of breast cancers (one in exon 2 and 4 mutations in exon 11). Another germline mutation (within exon 11) was detected among breast cancer females with family history of cancer other than breast cancer, and no mutation was detected among breast cancer females with no family history of any cancer or among normal control females. Screening mutations within exon 2, exon 11 and exon 20 showed that most screened mutations were within BRCA1 exon 11 among breast cancer Jordanian families with a family history of breast cancer. (author)

  13. Thiazolidinediones inhibit REG Iα gene transcription in gastrointestinal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Akiyo; Takahashi, Iwao; Takasawa, Shin; Nata, Koji; Noguchi, Naoya; Ikeda, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Shervani, Nausheen J.; Suzuki, Iwao; Uruno, Akira; Unno, Michiaki; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Akira

    2009-01-01

    REG (Regenerating gene) Iα protein functions as a growth factor for gastrointestinal cancer cells, and its mRNA expression is strongly associated with a poor prognosis in gastrointestinal cancer patients. We here demonstrated that PPARγ-agonist thiazolidinediones (TZDs) inhibited cell proliferation and REG Iα protein/mRNA expression in gastrointestinal cancer cells. TZDs inhibited the REG Iα gene promoter activity, via its cis-acting element which lacked PPAR response element and could not bind to PPARγ, in PPARγ-expressing gastrointestinal cancer cells. The inhibition was reversed by co-treatment with a specific PPARγ-antagonist GW9662. Although TZDs did not inhibit the REG Iα gene promoter activity in PPARγ-non-expressing cells, PPARγ overexpression in the cells recovered their inhibitory effect. Taken together, TZDs inhibit REG Iα gene transcription through a PPARγ-dependent pathway. The TZD-induced REG Iα mRNA reduction was abolished by cycloheximide, indicating the necessity of novel protein(s) synthesis. TZDs may therefore be a candidate for novel anti-cancer drugs for patients with gastrointestinal cancer expressing both REG Iα and PPARγ.

  14. Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genes of Mitochondrial Components in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirches, E

    2009-01-01

    Although the observation of aerobic glycolysis of tumor cells by Otto v. Warburg had demonstrated abnormalities of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cancer decades ago, there was no clear evidence for a functional role of mutant mitochondrial proteins in cancer development until the early years of the 21st century. In the year 2000, a major breakthrough was achieved by the observation, that several genes coding for subunits of the respiratory chain (ETC) complex II, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are tumor suppressor genes in heritable paragangliomas, fulfilling Knudson’s classical two-hit hypothesis. A functional inactivation of both alleles by germline mutations and chromosomal losses in the tumor tissue was found in the patients. Later, SDH mutations were also identified in sporadic paragangliomas and pheochromocytomas. Genes of the mitochondrial ATP-synthase and of mitochondrial iron homeostasis have been implicated in cancer development at the level of cell culture and mouse experiments. In contrast to the well established role of some nuclear SDH genes, a functional impact of the mitochondrial genome itself (mtDNA) in cancer development remains unclear. Nevertheless, the extremely high frequency of mtDNA mutations in solid tumors raises the question, whether this small circular genome might be applicable to early cancer detection. This is a meaningful approach, especially in cancers, which tend to spread tumor cells early into bodily fluids or faeces, which can be screened by non-invasive methods. PMID:19949549

  15. Frequent epigenetic inactivation of Wnt antagonist genes in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Toyota, M; Caraway, H; Gabrielson, E; Ohmura, T; Fujikane, T; Nishikawa, N; Sogabe, Y; Nojima, M; Sonoda, T; Mori, M; Hirata, K; Imai, K; Shinomura, Y; Baylin, S B; Tokino, T

    2008-01-01

    Although mutation of APC or CTNNB1 (β-catenin) is rare in breast cancer, activation of Wnt signalling is nonetheless thought to play an important role in breast tumorigenesis, and epigenetic silencing of Wnt antagonist genes, including the secreted frizzled-related protein (SFRP) and Dickkopf (DKK) families, has been observed in various tumours. In breast cancer, frequent methylation and silencing of SFRP1 was recently documented; however, altered expression of other Wnt antagonist genes is largely unknown. In the present study, we found frequent methylation of SFRP family genes in breast cancer cell lines (SFRP1, 7 out of 11, 64%; SFRP2, 11 out of 11, 100%; SFRP5, 10 out of 11, 91%) and primary breast tumours (SFRP1, 31 out of 78, 40%; SFRP2, 60 out of 78, 77%; SFRP5, 55 out of 78, 71%). We also observed methylation of DKK1, although less frequently, in cell lines (3 out of 11, 27%) and primary tumours (15 out of 78, 19%). Breast cancer cell lines express various Wnt ligands, and overexpression of SFRPs inhibited cancer cell growth. In addition, overexpression of a β-catenin mutant and depletion of SFRP1 using small interfering RNA synergistically upregulated transcriptional activity of T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancer factor. Our results confirm the frequent methylation and silencing of Wnt antagonist genes in breast cancer, and suggest that their loss of function contributes to activation of Wnt signalling in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:18283316

  16. Differential epigenetic regulation of TOX subfamily high mobility group box genes in lung and breast cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathewos Tessema

    Full Text Available Aberrant cytosine methylation affects regulation of hundreds of genes during cancer development. In this study, a novel aberrantly hypermethylated CpG island in cancer was discovered within the TOX2 promoter. TOX2 was unmethylated in normal cells but 28% lung (n = 190 and 23% breast (n = 80 tumors were methylated. Expression of two novel TOX2 transcripts identified was significantly reduced in primary lung tumors than distant normal lung (p<0.05. These transcripts were silenced in methylated lung and breast cancer cells and 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment re-expressed both. Extension of these assays to TOX, TOX3, and TOX4 genes that share similar genomic structure and protein homology with TOX2 revealed distinct methylation profiles by smoking status, histology, and cancer type. TOX was almost exclusively methylated in breast (43% than lung (5% cancer, whereas TOX3 was frequently methylated in lung (58% than breast (30% tumors. TOX4 was unmethylated in all samples and showed the highest expression in normal lung. Compared to TOX4, expression of TOX, TOX2 and TOX3 in normal lung was 25, 44, and 88% lower, respectively, supporting the premise that reduced promoter activity confers increased susceptibility to methylation during lung carcinogenesis. Genome-wide assays revealed that siRNA-mediated TOX2 knockdown modulated multiple pathways while TOX3 inactivation targeted neuronal development and function. Although these knockdowns did not result in further phenotypic changes of lung cancer cells in vitro, the impact on tissue remodeling, inflammatory response, and cell differentiation pathways suggest a potential role for TOX2 in modulating tumor microenvironment.

  17. Germline mutations of TP53 gene in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damineni, Surekha; Rao, Vadlamudi Raghavendra; Kumar, Satish; Ravuri, Rajasekar Reddy; Kagitha, Sailaja; Dunna, Nageswara Rao; Digumarthi, Raghunadharao; Satti, Vishnupriya

    2014-09-01

    Germline alterations of the TP53 gene encoding the p53 protein have been observed in the majority of families with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a rare dominantly inherited disorder with breast cancer. Genomic DNA samples of 182 breast cancer cases and 186 controls were sequenced for TP53 mutations in the exon 5-9 and intervening introns 5, 7-9. Direct sequencing was done using Applied Biosystem 3730 DNA analyzer. In the present study, we observed nine mutations in the sequenced region, of which five were novel. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was done for all the mutations; C14181T, T14201G, and G13203A have shown deviation from HWE. High linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between C14181T (rs129547788) and T14201G (rs12951053) (r (2) = 0.98.3; D' = 1.00), whereas other observed mutations do not show strong LD with any of the other mutations. None of the intronic mutations has shown significant association with the breast cancer, two exonic mutations G13203A (rs28934578) and A14572G are significantly (P = 0.04, P = 0.007) associated with breast cancer. Germline mutations observed in DNA-binding domain of the gene showed significant association with breast cancer. This study reports five novel germline mutations in the TP53 gene out of which one mutation may confer significant risk to the breast cancer. Mutations in DNA-binding domain of TP53 gene may play role in the early onset and prognosis of breast cancer. The population-based studies of germline mutations in DNA-binding domain of TP53 gene helps in identification of individuals and families who are at risk of developing cancers.

  18. Anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles containing IL12 and salmosin genes for targeted cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Seok; Kang, Seong Jae; Jeong, Hwa Yeon; Kim, Min Woo; Park, Sang Il; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Hong Sung; Kim, Keun Sik; Park, Yong Serk

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-directed gene delivery is of major interest in the field of cancer gene therapy. Varied functionalizations of non-viral vectors have been suggested to enhance tumor targetability. In the present study, we prepared two different types of anti-EGF receptor (EGFR) immunonanoparticles containing pDNA, neutrally charged liposomes and cationic lipoplexes, for tumor-directed transfection of cancer therapeutic genes. Even though both anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles had a high binding affinity to the EGFR-positive cancer cells, the anti-EGFR immunolipoplex formulation exhibited approximately 100-fold higher transfection to the target cells than anti-EGFR immunoliposomes. The lipoplex formulation also showed a higher transfection to SK-OV-3 tumor xenografts in mice. Thus, IL12 and/or salmosin genes were loaded in the anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes and intravenously administered to mice carrying SK-OV-3 tumors. Co-transfection of IL12 and salmosin genes using anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes significantly reduced tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Furthermore, combinatorial treatment with doxorubicin synergistically inhibited tumor growth. These results suggest that anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes containing pDNA encoding therapeutic genes could be utilized as a gene-transfer modality for cancer gene therapy.

  19. Risk of metachronous colon cancer following surgery for rectal cancer in mismatch repair gene mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Parry, Susan; Parry, Bryan; Kalady, Matthew F; Macrae, Finlay A; Ahnen, Dennis J; Young, Graeme P; Lipton, Lara; Winship, Ingrid; Boussioutas, Alex; Young, Joanne P; Buchanan, Daniel D; Arnold, Julie; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A; Haile, Robert W; Lindor, Noralane M; Gallinger, Steven; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    Despite regular surveillance colonoscopy, the metachronous colorectal cancer risk for mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation carriers after segmental resection for colon cancer is high and total or subtotal colectomy is the preferred option. However, if the index cancer is in the rectum, management decisions are complicated by considerations of impaired bowel function. We aimed to estimate the risk of metachronous colon cancer for MMR gene mutation carriers who underwent a proctectomy for index rectal cancer. This retrospective cohort study comprised 79 carriers of germline mutation in a MMR gene (18 MLH1, 55 MSH2, 4 MSH6, and 2 PMS2) from the Colon Cancer Family Registry who had had a proctectomy for index rectal cancer. Cumulative risks of metachronous colon cancer were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. During median 9 years (range 1-32 years) of observation since the first diagnosis of rectal cancer, 21 carriers (27 %) were diagnosed with metachronous colon cancer (incidence 24.25, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 15.81-37.19 per 1,000 person-years). Cumulative risk of metachronous colon cancer was 19 % (95 % CI 9-31 %) at 10 years, 47 (95 % CI 31-68 %) at 20 years, and 69 % (95 % CI 45-89 %) at 30 years after surgical resection. The frequency of surveillance colonoscopy was 1 colonoscopy per 1.16 years (95 % CI 1.01-1.31 years). The AJCC stages of the metachronous cancers, where available, were 72 % stage I, 22 % stage II, and 6 % stage III. Given the high metachronous colon cancer risk for MMR gene mutation carriers diagnosed with an index rectal cancer, proctocolectomy may need to be considered.

  20. P53 Gene Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sommer, Steve S

    2005-01-01

    .... The central hypothesis of this proposal is that variability in the patterns of p53 mutagensis in breast cancer reflects differences in exposures to different amounts and/or types of diverse environmental mutagens...

  1. BTG2 Antiproliferative Gene and Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walden, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    .... During this study we showed that BTG2 protein expression is lost as an early event in prostate carcinogenesis and that prostate cancer cells degrade BTG2 at a greater rate than noncancerous prostate cells...

  2. Systematic assessment of multi-gene predictors of pan-cancer cell line sensitivity to drugs exploiting gene expression data [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linh Nguyen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selected gene mutations are routinely used to guide the selection of cancer drugs for a given patient tumour. Large pharmacogenomic data sets were introduced to discover more of these single-gene markers of drug sensitivity. Very recently, machine learning regression has been used to investigate how well cancer cell line sensitivity to drugs is predicted depending on the type of molecular profile. The latter has revealed that gene expression data is the most predictive profile in the pan-cancer setting. However, no study to date has exploited GDSC data to systematically compare the performance of machine learning models based on multi-gene expression data against that of widely-used single-gene markers based on genomics data. Methods: Here we present this systematic comparison using Random Forest (RF classifiers exploiting the expression levels of 13,321 genes and an average of 501 tested cell lines per drug. To account for time-dependent batch effects in IC50 measurements, we employ independent test sets generated with more recent GDSC data than that used to train the predictors and show that this is a more realistic validation than K-fold cross-validation. Results and Discussion: Across 127 GDSC drugs, our results show that the single-gene markers unveiled by the MANOVA analysis tend to achieve higher precision than these RF-based multi-gene models, at the cost of generally having a poor recall (i.e. correctly detecting only a small part of the cell lines sensitive to the drug. Regarding overall classification performance, about two thirds of the drugs are better predicted by multi-gene RF classifiers. Among the drugs with the most predictive of these models, we found pyrimethamine, sunitinib and 17-AAG. Conclusions: We now know that this type of models can predict in vitro tumour response to these drugs. These models can thus be further investigated on in vivo tumour models.

  3. Expression of circadian clock genes and proteins in urothelial cancer is related to cancer-associated genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litlekalsoy, Jorunn; Rostad, Kari; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Hostmark, Jens G.; Laerum, Ole Didrik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate invasive and metastatic potential of urothelial cancer by investigating differential expression of various clock genes/proteins participating in the 24 h circadian rhythms and to compare these gene expressions with transcription of other cancer-associated genes. Twenty seven paired samples of tumour and benign tissue collected from patients who underwent cystectomy were analysed and compared to 15 samples of normal bladder tissue taken from patients who underwent cystoscopy for benign prostate hyperplasia (unrelated donors). Immunohistochemical analyses were made for clock and clock-related proteins. In addition, the gene-expression levels of 22 genes (clock genes, casein kinases, oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and cytokeratins) were analysed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Considerable up- or down-regulation and altered cellular distribution of different clock proteins, a reduction of casein kinase1A1 (CSNK1A1) and increase of casein kinase alpha 1 E (CSNK1E) were found. The pattern was significantly correlated with simultaneous up-regulation of stimulatory tumour markers, and a down-regulation of several suppressor genes. The pattern was mainly seen in aneuploid high-grade cancers. Considerable alterations were also found in the neighbouring bladder mucosa. The close correlation between altered expression of various clock genes and common tumour markers in urothelial cancer indicates that disturbed function in the cellular clock work may be an important additional mechanism contributing to cancer progression and malignant behaviour. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2580-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  4. Identifying candidate driver genes by integrative ovarian cancer genomics data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinguo; Lu, Jibo

    2017-08-01

    Integrative analysis of molecular mechanics underlying cancer can distinguish interactions that cannot be revealed based on one kind of data for the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients. Tumor samples exhibit heterogeneity in omics data, such as somatic mutations, Copy Number Variations CNVs), gene expression profiles and so on. In this paper we combined gene co-expression modules and mutation modulators separately in tumor patients to obtain the candidate driver genes for resistant and sensitive tumor from the heterogeneous data. The final list of modulators identified are well known in biological processes associated with ovarian cancer, such as CCL17, CACTIN, CCL16, CCL22, APOB, KDF1, CCL11, HNF1B, LRG1, MED1 and so on, which can help to facilitate the discovery of biomarkers, molecular diagnostics, and drug discovery.

  5. MIM, a Potential Metastasis Suppressor Gene in Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Goo Lee

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a modified version of the mRNA differential display technique, five human bladder cancer cell lines from low grade to metastatic were analyzed to identify differences in gene expression. A 316-bp cDNA (C11300 was isolated that was not expressed in the metastatic cell line TccSuP. Sequence analysis revealed that this gene was identical to KIAA 0429, has a 5.3-kb transcript that mapped to 8824.1. The protein is predicted to be 356 amino acids in size and has an actin-binding WH2 domain. Northern blot revealed expression in multiple normal tissues, but none in a metastatic breast cancer cell line (SKBR3 or in metastatic prostatic cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC3. We have named this gene Missing in Metastasis (MIM and our data suggest that it may be involved in cytoskeletal organization.

  6. Ensemble of gene signatures identifies novel biomarkers in colorectal cancer activated through PPARγ and TNFα signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Maria Pagnotta

    Full Text Available We describe a novel bioinformatic and translational pathology approach, gene Signature Finder Algorithm (gSFA to identify biomarkers associated with Colorectal Cancer (CRC survival. Here a robust set of CRC markers is selected by an ensemble method. By using a dataset of 232 gene expression profiles, gSFA discovers 16 highly significant small gene signatures. Analysis of dichotomies generated by the signatures results in a set of 133 samples stably classified in good prognosis group and 56 samples in poor prognosis group, whereas 43 remain unreliably classified. AKAP12, DCBLD2, NT5E and SPON1 are particularly represented in the signatures and selected for validation in vivo on two independent patients cohorts comprising 140 tumor tissues and 60 matched normal tissues. Their expression and regulatory programs are investigated in vitro. We show that the coupled expression of NT5E and DCBLD2 robustly stratifies our patients in two groups (one of which with 100% survival at five years. We show that NT5E is a target of the TNF-α signaling in vitro; the tumor suppressor PPARγ acts as a novel NT5E antagonist that positively and concomitantly regulates DCBLD2 in a cancer cell context-dependent manner.

  7. Random Subspace Aggregation for Cancer Prediction with Gene Expression Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Precisely predicting cancer is crucial for cancer treatment. Gene expression profiles make it possible to analyze patterns between genes and cancers on the genome-wide scale. Gene expression data analysis, however, is confronted with enormous challenges for its characteristics, such as high dimensionality, small sample size, and low Signal-to-Noise Ratio. Results. This paper proposes a method, termed RS_SVM, to predict gene expression profiles via aggregating SVM trained on random subspaces. After choosing gene features through statistical analysis, RS_SVM randomly selects feature subsets to yield random subspaces and training SVM classifiers accordingly and then aggregates SVM classifiers to capture the advantage of ensemble learning. Experiments on eight real gene expression datasets are performed to validate the RS_SVM method. Experimental results show that RS_SVM achieved better classification accuracy and generalization performance in contrast with single SVM, K-nearest neighbor, decision tree, Bagging, AdaBoost, and the state-of-the-art methods. Experiments also explored the effect of subspace size on prediction performance. Conclusions. The proposed RS_SVM method yielded superior performance in analyzing gene expression profiles, which demonstrates that RS_SVM provides a good channel for such biological data.

  8. Discovering biological progression underlying microarray samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Qiu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In biological systems that undergo processes such as differentiation, a clear concept of progression exists. We present a novel computational approach, called Sample Progression Discovery (SPD, to discover patterns of biological progression underlying microarray gene expression data. SPD assumes that individual samples of a microarray dataset are related by an unknown biological process (i.e., differentiation, development, cell cycle, disease progression, and that each sample represents one unknown point along the progression of that process. SPD aims to organize the samples in a manner that reveals the underlying progression and to simultaneously identify subsets of genes that are responsible for that progression. We demonstrate the performance of SPD on a variety of microarray datasets that were generated by sampling a biological process at different points along its progression, without providing SPD any information of the underlying process. When applied to a cell cycle time series microarray dataset, SPD was not provided any prior knowledge of samples' time order or of which genes are cell-cycle regulated, yet SPD recovered the correct time order and identified many genes that have been associated with the cell cycle. When applied to B-cell differentiation data, SPD recovered the correct order of stages of normal B-cell differentiation and the linkage between preB-ALL tumor cells with their cell origin preB. When applied to mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation data, SPD uncovered a landscape of ESC differentiation into various lineages and genes that represent both generic and lineage specific processes. When applied to a prostate cancer microarray dataset, SPD identified gene modules that reflect a progression consistent with disease stages. SPD may be best viewed as a novel tool for synthesizing biological hypotheses because it provides a likely biological progression underlying a microarray dataset and, perhaps more importantly, the

  9. Gene Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer: Specificity, Issues and Hopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouanet, Marie; Lebrin, Marine; Gross, Fabian; Bournet, Barbara; Cordelier, Pierre; Buscail, Louis

    2017-06-08

    A recent death projection has placed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as the second cause of death by cancer in 2030. The prognosis for pancreatic cancer is very poor and there is a great need for new treatments that can change this poor outcome. Developments of therapeutic innovations in combination with conventional chemotherapy are needed urgently. Among innovative treatments the gene therapy offers a promising avenue. The present review gives an overview of the general strategy of gene therapy as well as the limitations and stakes of the different experimental in vivo models, expression vectors (synthetic and viral), molecular tools (interference RNA, genome editing) and therapeutic genes (tumor suppressor genes, antiangiogenic and pro-apoptotic genes, suicide genes). The latest developments in pancreatic carcinoma gene therapy are described including gene-based tumor cell sensitization to chemotherapy, vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy (chimeric antigen receptor T-cells strategy). Nowadays, there is a specific development of oncolytic virus therapies including oncolytic adenoviruses, herpes virus, parvovirus or reovirus. A summary of all published and on-going phase-1 trials is given. Most of them associate gene therapy and chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy. The first results are encouraging for most of the trials but remain to be confirmed in phase 2 trials.

  10. Gene Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer: Specificity, Issues and Hopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Rouanet

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A recent death projection has placed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as the second cause of death by cancer in 2030. The prognosis for pancreatic cancer is very poor and there is a great need for new treatments that can change this poor outcome. Developments of therapeutic innovations in combination with conventional chemotherapy are needed urgently. Among innovative treatments the gene therapy offers a promising avenue. The present review gives an overview of the general strategy of gene therapy as well as the limitations and stakes of the different experimental in vivo models, expression vectors (synthetic and viral, molecular tools (interference RNA, genome editing and therapeutic genes (tumor suppressor genes, antiangiogenic and pro-apoptotic genes, suicide genes. The latest developments in pancreatic carcinoma gene therapy are described including gene-based tumor cell sensitization to chemotherapy, vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy (chimeric antigen receptor T-cells strategy. Nowadays, there is a specific development of oncolytic virus therapies including oncolytic adenoviruses, herpes virus, parvovirus or reovirus. A summary of all published and on-going phase-1 trials is given. Most of them associate gene therapy and chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy. The first results are encouraging for most of the trials but remain to be confirmed in phase 2 trials.

  11. Approaches to diagnose DNA mismatch repair gene defects in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Diaz, Javier; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-02-01

    The DNA repair pathway mismatch repair (MMR) is responsible for the recognition and correction of DNA biosynthetic errors caused by inaccurate nucleotide incorporation during replication. Faulty MMR leads to failure to address the mispairs or insertion deletion loops (IDLs) left behind by the replicative polymerases and results in increased mutation load at the genome. The realization that defective MMR leads to a hypermutation phenotype and increased risk of tumorigenesis highlights the relevance of this pathway for human disease. The association of MMR defects with increased risk of cancer development was first observed in colorectal cancer patients that carried inactivating germline mutations in MMR genes and the disease was named as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Currently, a growing list of cancers is found to be MMR defective and HNPCC has been renamed Lynch syndrome (LS) partly to include the associated risk of developing extra-colonic cancers. In addition, a number of non-hereditary, mostly epigenetic, alterations of MMR genes have been described in sporadic tumors. Besides conferring a strong cancer predisposition, genetic or epigenetic inactivation of MMR genes also renders cells resistant to some chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, diagnosis of MMR deficiency has important implications for the management of the patients, the surveillance of their relatives in the case of LS and for the choice of treatment. Some of the alterations found in MMR genes have already been well defined and their pathogenicity assessed. Despite this substantial wealth of knowledge, the effects of a large number of alterations remain uncharacterized (variants of uncertain significance, VUSs). The advent of personalized genomics is likely to increase the list of VUSs found in MMR genes and anticipates the need of diagnostic tools for rapid assessment of their pathogenicity. This review describes current tools and future strategies for addressing the relevance

  12. Mapping Interactive Cancer Susceptibility Genes in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    85-97. Butler, J. M., R. Schoske, et al. (2002). "A novel multiplex for simultaneous amplification of 20 Y chromosome STR markers." Forensic Sci...Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 7Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology /Oncology and 8Clinical Research Office, Robert J...Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; 9Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology /Oncology

  13. Selenium nanoparticles: potential in cancer gene and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiyo, Fiona; Singh, Moganavelli

    2017-05-01

    In recent decades, colloidal selenium nanoparticles have emerged as exceptional selenium species with reported chemopreventative and therapeutic properties. This has sparked widespread interest in their use as a carrier of therapeutic agents with results displaying synergistic effects of selenium with its therapeutic cargo and improved anticancer activity. Functionalization remains a critical step in selenium nanoparticles' development for application in gene or drug delivery. In this review, we highlight recent developments in the synthesis and functionalization strategies of selenium nanoparticles used in cancer drug and gene delivery systems. We also provide an update of recent preclinical studies utilizing selenium nanoparticles in cancer therapeutics.

  14. Mutation analysis of the AATF gene in breast cancer families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haanpää, Maria; Reiman, Mervi; Nikkilä, Jenni; Erkko, Hannele; Pylkäs, Katri; Winqvist, Robert

    2009-01-01

    About 5-10% of breast cancer is due to inherited disease predisposition. Many previously identified susceptibility factors are involved in the maintenance of genomic integrity. AATF plays an important role in the regulation of gene transcription and cell proliferation. It induces apoptosis by associating with p53. The checkpoint kinases ATM/ATR and CHEK2 interact with and phosphorylate AATF, enhancing its accumulation and stability. Based on its biological function, and direct interaction with several known breast cancer risk factors, AATF is a good candidate gene for being involved in heritable cancer susceptibility. Here we have screened the entire coding region of AATF in affected index cases from 121 Finnish cancer families for germline defects, using conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis and direct sequencing. Altogether seven different sequence changes were observed, one missense variant and six intronic ones. Based on the in silico analyses of these sequence alterations, as well as their occurrence in cases and controls, none of them, however, were predicted to be pathogenic. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the mutation screening of the AATF gene in familial breast cancer cases. No evidence for the association with breast cancer was observed

  15. A four gene signature predictive of recurrent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisarof, Justin; McCall, Matthew; Newman, Laurel; Bshara, Wiam; Mohler, James L; Morrison, Carl; Land, Hartmut

    2017-01-10

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of non-dermatological cancer among US men, with an increasing incidence due to the aging population. Patients diagnosed with clinically localized disease identified as intermediate or high-risk are often treated by radical prostatectomy. Approximately 33% of these patients will suffer recurrence after surgery. Identifying patients likely to experience recurrence after radical prostatectomy would lead to improved clinical outcomes, as these patients could receive adjuvant radiotherapy. Here, we report a new tool for prediction of prostate cancer recurrence based on the expression pattern of a small set of cooperation response genes (CRGs). CRGs are a group of genes downstream of cooperating oncogenic mutations previously identified in a colon cancer model that are critical to the cancer phenotype. We show that systemic dysregulation of CRGs is also found in prostate cancer, including a 4-gene signature (HBEGF, HOXC13, IGFBP2, and SATB1) capable of differentiating recurrent from non-recurrent prostate cancer. To develop a suitable diagnostic tool to predict disease outcomes in individual patients, multiple algorithms and data handling strategies were evaluated on a training set using leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV). The best-performing algorithm, when used in combination with a predictive nomogram based on clinical staging, predicted recurrent and non-recurrent disease outcomes in a blinded validation set with 83% accuracy, outperforming previous methods. Disease-free survival times between the cohort of prostate cancers predicted to recur and predicted not to recur differed significantly (p = 1.38x10-6). Therefore, this test allows us to accurately identify prostate cancer patients likely to experience future recurrent disease immediately following removal of the primary tumor.

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillat, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.fillat@crg.es; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano [Programa Gens i Malaltia, Centre de Regulació Genòmica-CRG, UPF, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona-PRBB and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-18

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  17. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the

  18. The gene regulatory network for breast cancer: Integrated regulatory landscape of cancer hallmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eEmmert-Streib

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we infer the breast cancer gene regulatory network from gene expression data. This network is obtained from the application of the BC3Net inference algorithm to a large-scale gene expression data set consisting of $351$ patient samples. In order to elucidate the functional relevance of the inferred network, we are performing a Gene Ontology (GO analysis for its structural components. Our analysis reveals that most significant GO-terms we find for the breast cancer network represent functional modules of biological processes that are described by known cancer hallmarks, including translation, immune response, cell cycle, organelle fission, mitosis, cell adhesion, RNA processing, RNA splicing and response to wounding. Furthermore, by using a curated list of census cancer genes, we find an enrichment in these functional modules. Finally, we study cooperative effects of chromosomes based on information of interacting genes in the beast cancer network. We find that chromosome $21$ is most coactive with other chromosomes. To our knowledge this is the first study investigating the genome-scale breast cancer network.

  19. A network-based drug repositioning infrastructure for precision cancer medicine through targeting significantly mutated genes in the human cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feixiong; Zhao, Junfei; Fooksa, Michaela; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-07-01

    Development of computational approaches and tools to effectively integrate multidomain data is urgently needed for the development of newly targeted cancer therapeutics. We proposed an integrative network-based infrastructure to identify new druggable targets and anticancer indications for existing drugs through targeting significantly mutated genes (SMGs) discovered in the human cancer genomes. The underlying assumption is that a drug would have a high potential for anticancer indication if its up-/down-regulated genes from the Connectivity Map tended to be SMGs or their neighbors in the human protein interaction network. We assembled and curated 693 SMGs in 29 cancer types and found 121 proteins currently targeted by known anticancer or noncancer (repurposed) drugs. We found that the approved or experimental cancer drugs could potentially target these SMGs in 33.3% of the mutated cancer samples, and this number increased to 68.0% by drug repositioning through surveying exome-sequencing data in approximately 5000 normal-tumor pairs from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Furthermore, we identified 284 potential new indications connecting 28 cancer types and 48 existing drugs (adjusted P < .05), with a 66.7% success rate validated by literature data. Several existing drugs (e.g., niclosamide, valproic acid, captopril, and resveratrol) were predicted to have potential indications for multiple cancer types. Finally, we used integrative analysis to showcase a potential mechanism-of-action for resveratrol in breast and lung cancer treatment whereby it targets several SMGs (ARNTL, ASPM, CTTN, EIF4G1, FOXP1, and STIP1). In summary, we demonstrated that our integrative network-based infrastructure is a promising strategy to identify potential druggable targets and uncover new indications for existing drugs to speed up molecularly targeted cancer therapeutics. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All

  20. The relationship between Prostate CAncer gene 3 (PCA3) and prostate cancer significance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Poppel, Hein; Haese, Alexander; Graefen, Markus; de la Taille, Alexandre; Irani, Jacques; de Reijke, Theo; Remzi, Mesut; Marberger, Michael

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the relationship between Prostate CAncer gene 3 (PCA3) and prostate cancer significance. PATIENTS AND METHODS Clinical data from two multi-centre European open-label, prospective studies evaluating the clinical utility of the PCA3 assay in guiding initial and repeat biopsy

  1. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC).

  2. MMP-8, A Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    and RD mutations were generated using the Chameleon double- stranded site-directed mutagenesis kit (Strata- gene). The fragments were released by...receptor TβR-I, the type II receptor TβR- II, the regulatory Smads (Smad2 and Smad3), and Smad4 (8). Most of these components have mutations in several...human cancers. But, mutations in TGF-β receptors or Smads are rare in breast cancer (9, 10). Moreover, for breast cancer cells, TGF-β1 is a crucial

  3. A Search for Gene Fusions/Translocations in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    cancer cell lines with validated AGTR1 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 -1.0 Normal Breast Fibroadenoma Breast Ductal Carcinoma A -1.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 4.0 3.0...in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Arul M. Chinnaiyan, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Michigan...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Search for Gene Fusions/Translocations in Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0110 5c. PROGRAM

  4. Genomic hotspots but few recurrent fusion genes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimereli, Danai; Fumagalli, Debora; Brown, David; Gacquer, David; Rothé, Françoise; Salgado, Roberto; Larsimont, Denis; Sotiriou, Christos; Detours, Vincent

    2018-02-13

    The advent of next generation sequencing technologies has boosted the interest in exploring the role of fusion genes in the development and progression of solid tumors. In breast cancer, most of the detected gene fusions seem to be "passenger" events while the presence of recurrent and driver fusions is still under study. We performed RNA sequencing in 55 well-characterized breast cancer samples and 10 adjacent normal breast tissues, complemented by an analysis of SNP array data. We explored the presence of fusion genes and defined their association with breast cancer subtypes, clinical-pathologic characteristics and copy number aberrations. Overall, 370 fusions were detected across the majority of the samples. HER2+ samples had significantly more fusions than triple negative and luminal subtypes. The number of fusions was correlated with histological grade, Ki67 and tumor size. Clusters of fusion genes were observed across the genome and a significant correlation of fusions with copy number aberrations and more specifically amplifications was also revealed. Despite the large number of fusion events, only a few were recurrent, while recurrent individual genes forming fusions with different partners were also detected including the estrogen receptor 1 gene in the previously detected ESR1-CCDC170 fusion. Overall we detected novel gene fusion events while we confirmed previously reported fusions. Genomic hotspots of fusion genes, differences between subtypes and small number of recurrent fusions are the most relevant characteristics of these events in breast cancer. Further investigation is necessary to comprehend the biological significance of these fusions. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Common filaggrin gene mutations and risk of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Sørensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As carriers of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations may have a compromised cervical mucosal barrier against human papillomavirus infection, our primary objective was to study their risk of cervical cancer. METHODS: We genotyped 586 cervical cancer patients for the two most common FLG...... mutations, R501X and 2282del4, using blood from the Copenhagen Hospital Biobank, Denmark. Controls (n = 8050) were genotyped in previous population-based studies. Information on cervical cancer, mortality and emigration were obtained from national registers. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated by logistic...... and stratification by cancer stage. RESULTS: The primary results showed that FLG mutations were not associated with the risk of cervical cancer (6.3% of cases and 7.7% of controls were carriers; OR adjusted 0.81, 95% CI 0.57-1.14; OR adjusted+ weighted 0.96, 95% CI 0.58-1.57). Among cases, FLG mutations increased...

  6. Gene expression of the mismatch repair gene MSH2 in primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Kuramochi, Hidekazu; Crüger, Dorthe Gylling

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is caused by defective mismatch repair (MMR) and is one of the very few molecular markers with proven clinical importance in colorectal cancer with respect to heredity, prognosis, and treatment effect. The gene expression of the MMR gene MSH2 may be a quantitative...... marker for the level of MMR and a potential molecular marker with clinical relevance. The aim was to investigate the gene expression of MSH2 in primary operable colorectal cancer in correlation with MSI, protein expression, and promoter hypermethylation. In a cohort of 210 patients, the primary tumor...... and lymphnode metastases were analyzed with immunohistochemistry, methylation and MSI analyses, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The median gene expression of MSH2 was 1.00 (range 0.16-11.2, quartiles 0.70-1.51) and there was good agreement between the gene expression in primary tumor and lymph...

  7. Expression of MAGE and BAGE genes in Japanese breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujie, T; Mori, M; Ueo, H; Sugimachi, K; Akiyoshi, T

    1997-04-01

    The MAGE and BAGE genes code for distinct antigens, which are recognized on melanoma cells as well as on other various tumor cells by autologous cytolytic T lymphocytes. These antigens may thus constitute useful targets for specific immunotherapy, since no expression of MAGE or BAGE genes has been recognized in normal tissue except for the testis. We studied the MAGE-1, MAGE-3, and BAGE gene expression observed in 49 Japanese breast cancers. Gene expression was evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Out of 49 tumor tissue specimens of primary breast cancers, the expression of MAGE-1, -3 and BAGE was recognized in 15 (31%), 12 (24%), and 4 (8%) tumors, respectively. The expression of MAGE and BAGE genes is not recognized in normal breast tissue. The expression of the MAGE-3 gene was frequently recognized in tumors with lymphatic and/or vascular vessel permeations. Either MAGE-1 or -3 gene expressions were induced in 1 of 3 MAGE-1 negative breast cell lines or 1 of 3 MAGE-3 negative breast cell lines by the treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. These findings suggest that: 1) the identification of such antigens coded by MAGE or BAGE genes may thus offer the possibility of using specific immunotherapy, and 2) the use of a demethylating agent may increase the number of patients who might be candidates for MAGE specific immunotherapy.

  8. DDPC: Dragon database of genes associated with prostate cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Maqungo, Monique

    2010-09-29

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men. PC is relatively difficult to diagnose due to a lack of clear early symptoms. Extensive research of PC has led to the availability of a large amount of data on PC. Several hundred genes are implicated in different stages of PC, which may help in developing diagnostic methods or even cures. In spite of this accumulated information, effective diagnostics and treatments remain evasive. We have developed Dragon Database of Genes associated with Prostate Cancer (DDPC) as an integrated knowledgebase of genes experimentally verified as implicated in PC. DDPC is distinctive from other databases in that (i) it provides pre-compiled biomedical text-mining information on PC, which otherwise require tedious computational analyses, (ii) it integrates data on molecular interactions, pathways, gene ontologies, gene regulation at molecular level, predicted transcription factor binding sites on promoters of PC implicated genes and transcription factors that correspond to these binding sites and (iii) it contains DrugBank data on drugs associated with PC. We believe this resource will serve as a source of useful information for research on PC. DDPC is freely accessible for academic and non-profit users via http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/ddpc/ and http://cbrc .kaust.edu.sa/ddpc/. The Author(s) 2010.

  9. The Prognostic 97 Chemoresponse Gene Signature in Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matondo, Abel; Jo, Yong Hwa; Shahid, Muhammad; Choi, Tae Gyu; Nguyen, Minh Nam; Nguyen, Ngoc Ngo Yen; Akter, Salima; Kang, Insug; Ha, Joohun; Maeng, Chi Hoon; Kim, Si-Young; Lee, Ju-Seog; Kim, Jayoung; Kim, Sung Soo

    2017-08-29

    Patient diagnosis and care would be significantly improved by understanding the mechanisms underlying platinum and taxane resistance in ovarian cancer. Here, we aim to establish a gene signature that can identify molecular pathways/transcription factors involved in ovarian cancer progression, poor clinical outcome, and chemotherapy resistance. To validate the robustness of the gene signature, a meta-analysis approach was applied to 1,020 patients from 7 datasets. A 97-gene signature was identified as an independent predictor of patient survival in association with other clinicopathological factors in univariate [hazard ratio (HR): 3.0, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.66-5.44, p = 2.7E-4] and multivariate [HR: 2.88, 95% CI 1.57-5.2, p = 0.001] analyses. Subset analyses demonstrated that the signature could predict patients who would attain complete or partial remission or no-response to first-line chemotherapy. Pathway analyses revealed that the signature was regulated by HIF1α and TP53 and included nine HIF1α-regulated genes, which were highly expressed in non-responders and partial remission patients than in complete remission patients. We present the 97-gene signature as an accurate prognostic predictor of overall survival and chemoresponse. Our signature also provides information on potential candidate target genes for future treatment efforts in ovarian cancer.

  10. RUNX: a trilogy of cancer genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders H; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2002-01-01

    The RUNX family of transcription factors plays pivotal roles during normal development and in neoplasias. Recent data involve RUNX3 as an important tumor suppressor in gastric cancers and pose interesting questions about how perturbed levels and interspecific competition among RUNX family members...

  11. The role of S100 genes in breast cancer progression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Eadaoin

    2012-02-01

    The S100 gene family encode low molecular weight proteins implicated in cancer progression. In this study, we analyzed the expression of four S100 genes in one cohort of patients with breast cancer and 16 S100 genes in a second cohort. In both cohorts, the expression of S100A8 and S1009 mRNA level was elevated in high-grade compared to low-grade tumors and in estrogen receptor-negative compared to estrogen receptor-positive tumors. None of the S100 transcripts investigated were significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis. Notably, multiple S100 genes, including S100A1, S100A2, S100A4, S100A6, S100A8, S100A9, S100A10, S100A11, and S100A14 were upregulated in basal-type breast cancers compared to non-basal types. Using Spearman\\'s correlation analysis, several S100 transcripts correlated significantly with each other, the strongest correlation has been found between S100A8 and S100A9 (r = 0.889, P < 0.001, n = 295). Of the 16 S100 transcripts investigated, only S100A11 and S100A14 were significantly associated with patient outcome. Indeed, these two transcripts predicted outcome in the cohort of patients that did not receive systemic adjuvant therapy. Based on our findings, we conclude that the different S100 genes play varying roles in breast cancer progression. Specific S100 genes are potential targets for the treatment of basal-type breast cancers.

  12. The role of S100 genes in breast cancer progression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Eadaoin

    2011-06-01

    The S100 gene family encode low molecular weight proteins implicated in cancer progression. In this study, we analyzed the expression of four S100 genes in one cohort of patients with breast cancer and 16 S100 genes in a second cohort. In both cohorts, the expression of S100A8 and S1009 mRNA level was elevated in high-grade compared to low-grade tumors and in estrogen receptor-negative compared to estrogen receptor-positive tumors. None of the S100 transcripts investigated were significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis. Notably, multiple S100 genes, including S100A1, S100A2, S100A4, S100A6, S100A8, S100A9, S100A10, S100A11, and S100A14 were upregulated in basal-type breast cancers compared to non-basal types. Using Spearman\\'s correlation analysis, several S100 transcripts correlated significantly with each other, the strongest correlation has been found between S100A8 and S100A9 (r = 0.889, P < 0.001, n = 295). Of the 16 S100 transcripts investigated, only S100A11 and S100A14 were significantly associated with patient outcome. Indeed, these two transcripts predicted outcome in the cohort of patients that did not receive systemic adjuvant therapy. Based on our findings, we conclude that the different S100 genes play varying roles in breast cancer progression. Specific S100 genes are potential targets for the treatment of basal-type breast cancers.

  13. Targeted sequencing of established and candidate colorectal cancer genes in the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Leon; Guo, Yan; Du, Liping; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Lindor, Noralane M; Gruber, Stephen B; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2017-11-07

    The underlying genetic cause of colorectal cancer (CRC) can be identified for 5-10% of all cases, while at least 20% of CRC cases are thought to be due to inherited genetic factors. Screening for highly penetrant mutations in genes associated with Mendelian cancer syndromes using next-generation sequencing (NGS) can be prohibitively expensive for studies requiring large samples sizes. The aim of the study was to identify rare single nucleotide variants and small indels in 40 established or candidate CRC susceptibility genes in 1,046 familial CRC cases (including both MSS and MSI-H tumor subtypes) and 1,006 unrelated controls from the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort using a robust and cost-effective DNA pooling NGS strategy. We identified 264 variants in 38 genes that were observed only in cases, comprising either very rare (minor allele frequency cancer susceptibility genes BAP1, CDH1, CHEK2, ENG, and MSH3 . For the candidate CRC genes, we identified likely pathogenic variants in the helicase domain of POLQ and in the LRIG1 , SH2B3 , and NOS1 genes and present their clinicopathological characteristics. Using a DNA pooling NGS strategy, we identified novel germline mutations in established CRC susceptibility genes in familial CRC cases. Further studies are required to support the role of POLQ , LRIG1 , SH2B3 and NOS1 as CRC susceptibility genes.

  14. Blood Gene Expression Profiling of Breast Cancer Survivors Experiencing Fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landmark-Hoyvik, Hege; Dumeaux, Vanessa; Reinertsen, Kristin V.; Edvardsen, Hege; Fossa, Sophie D.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To extend knowledge on the mechanisms and pathways involved in maintenance of radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) by performing gene expression profiling of whole blood from breast cancer (BC) survivors with and without fibrosis 3-7 years after end of radiotherapy treatment. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles from blood were obtained for 254 BC survivors derived from a cohort of survivors, treated with adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer 3-7 years earlier. Analyses of transcriptional differences in blood gene expression between BC survivors with fibrosis (n = 31) and BC survivors without fibrosis (n = 223) were performed using R version 2.8.0 and tools from the Bioconductor project. Gene sets extracted through a literature search on fibrosis and breast cancer were subsequently used in gene set enrichment analysis. Results: Substantial differences in blood gene expression between BC survivors with and without fibrosis were observed, and 87 differentially expressed genes were identified through linear analysis. Transforming growth factor-β1 signaling was identified as the most significant gene set, showing a down-regulation of most of the core genes, together with up-regulation of a transcriptional activator of the inhibitor of fibrinolysis, Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 in the BC survivors with fibrosis. Conclusion: Transforming growth factor-β1 signaling was found down-regulated during the maintenance phase of fibrosis as opposed to the up-regulation reported during the early, initiating phase of fibrosis. Hence, once the fibrotic tissue has developed, the maintenance phase might rather involve a deregulation of fibrinolysis and altered degradation of extracellular matrix components.

  15. Cancer classification based on gene expression using neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H P; Niu, Z J; Bai, Y P; Tan, X H

    2015-12-21

    Based on gene expression, we have classified 53 colon cancer patients with UICC II into two groups: relapse and no relapse. Samples were taken from each patient, and gene information was extracted. Of the 53 samples examined, 500 genes were considered proper through analyses by S-Kohonen, BP, and SVM neural networks. Classification accuracy obtained by S-Kohonen neural network reaches 91%, which was more accurate than classification by BP and SVM neural networks. The results show that S-Kohonen neural network is more plausible for classification and has a certain feasibility and validity as compared with BP and SVM neural networks.

  16. Differential gene expression profiling in blood from patients with digestive system cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Masao; Sakai, Yoshio; Yamashita, Taro; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Sakai, Akito; Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Nakamoto, Yasunari; Tatsumi, Isamu; Miyazaki, Yoshitaka; Tanno, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2010-09-10

    To develop a non-invasive and sensitive diagnostic test for cancer using peripheral blood, we evaluated gene expression profiling of blood obtained from patients with cancer of the digestive system and normal subjects. The expression profiles of blood-derived total RNA obtained from 39 cancer patients (11 colon cancer, 14 gastric cancer, and 14 pancreatic cancer) was clearly different from those obtained from 15 normal subjects. By comparing the gene expression profiles of cancer patients and normal subjects, 25 cancer-differentiating genes (p3) were identified and an "expression index" deduced from the expression values of these genes differentiated the validation cohort (11 colon cancer, 8 gastric cancer, 18 pancreatic cancer, and 15 normal subjects) into cancer patients and normal subjects with 100% (37/37) and 87% (13/15) accuracy, respectively. Although, the expression profiles were not clearly different between the cancer patients, some characteristic genes were identified according to the stage and species of the cancer. Interestingly, many immune-related genes such as antigen presenting, cell cycle accelerating, and apoptosis- and stress-inducing genes were up-regulated in cancer patients, reflecting the active turnover of immune regulatory cells in cancer patients. These results showed the potential relevance of peripheral blood gene expression profiling for the development of new diagnostic examination tools for cancer patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, A.W.; Tyrer, J.P.; Doherty, J.A.; Stram, D.A.; Kupryjanczyk, J.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, A.; Plisiecka-Halasa, J.; Spiewankiewicz, B.; Myers, E.J.; Study, G.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Fasching, P.A.; Beckmann, M.W.; Ekici, A.B.; Hein, A.; Vergote, I.; Nieuwenhuysen, E. Van; Lambrechts, D.; Wicklund, K.G.; Eilber, U.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Chang-Claude, J.; Rudolph, A.; Sucheston-Campbell, L.; Odunsi, K.; Moysich, K.B.; Shvetsov, Y.B.; Thompson, P.J.; Goodman, M.T.; Wilkens, L.R.; Dork, T.; Hillemanns, P.; Durst, M.; Runnebaum, I.B.; Bogdanova, N.; Pelttari, L.M.; Nevanlinna, H.; Leminen, A.; Edwards, R.P.; Kelley, J.L.; Harter, P.; Schwaab, I.; Heitz, F.; Bois, A. du; Orsulic, S.; Lester, J.; Walsh, C.; Karlan, B.Y.; Hogdall, E.; Kjaer, S.K.; Jensen, A.; Vierkant, R.A.; Cunningham, J.M.; Goode, E.L.; Fridley, B.L.; Southey, M.C.; Giles, G.G.; Bruinsma, F.; Wu, X.; Hildebrandt, M.A.T.; Lu, K.; Liang, D.; Bisogna, M.; Levine, D.A.; Weber, R.P.; Schildkraut, J.M.; Iversen, E.S.; Berchuck, A.; Terry, K.L.; Cramer, D.W; Tworoger, S.S.; Poole, E.M.; Olson, S.H.; Orlow, I.; Bandera, E.V.; Bjorge, L.; Tangen, I.L.; Salvesen, H.B.; Krakstad, C.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Altena, A.M. van; Bean, Y.; Pejovic, T.; Kellar, M.; Le, N.D.; Cook, L.S.; Kelemen, L.E.; Brooks-Wilson, A.; Lubinski, J.; Gronwald, J.; Cybulski, C.; Jakubowska, A.; Wentzensen, N.; Brinton, L.A.; Lissowska, J.; Yang, H.; Nedergaard, L.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of

  18. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  19. Adenovirus-derived vectors for prostate cancer gene therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de Vrij, J.; Willemsen, R. A.; Lindholm, L.; Hoeben, R. C.; Bangma, Ch. H.; Barber, Ch.; Behr, J.-P.; Briggs, S.; Carlisle, R.; Cheng, W.-S.; Dautzenberg, I. J. C.; de Ridder, C.; Dzojic, H.; Erbacher, P.; Essand, M.; Fisher, K.; Frazier, A.; Georgopoulos, L. J.; Jennings, I.; Kochanek, S.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Kraaij, R.; Kreppel, F.; Magnusson, M.; Maitland, N.; Neuberg, P.; Nugent, R.; Ogris, M.; Remy, J.-S.; Scaife, M.; Schenk, E.; Schooten, E.; Seymour, L.; Slade, M.; Szyjanowicz, P.; Totterman, T.; Uil, T. G.; Ulbrich, Karel; van der Weel, L.; van Weerden, W.; Wagner, E.; Zuber, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2010), s. 795-805 ISSN 1043-0342 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2010

  20. IRGM gene polymorphisms and risk of gastric cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burada, F.; Plantinga, T.S.; Ioana, M.; Rosentul, D.; Angelescu, C.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Netea, M.G.; Saftoiu, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to assess the possible association of polymorphisms in the autophagy gene IRGM (rs13361189 and rs4958847) with the risk of gastric cancer. METHODS: A total of 102 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma, 52 with chronic gastritis and 351 healthy controls were included in this

  1. Adenoviral gene therapy for pancreatic cancer: Where do we stand?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, Koert F. D.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Wesseling, John G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer is poor. This is mainly caused by the late diagnosis, the aggressive biology and the lack of effective treatment modalities. Adenoviral gene therapy has the potential to selectively treat both primary tumor and (micro) metastatic tissue.

  2. Olaparib Approved for Breast Cancers with BRCA Gene Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved olaparib (Lynparza®) to treat metastatic breast cancers that have inherited mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes as well as a companion diagnostic test for selecting candidates for the therapy.

  3. Genotype, phenotype and cancer: Role of low penetrance genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    a change in the amino acid and in the remaining the change is non-conservative (Cargill et al 1999). Epidemiological studies aim at studying SNPs in candidate ..... polygenic disorders like cancer, diabetes, obesity etc. it is the genes in combination with the environment, which determine the susceptibility to the disease.

  4. Songs about Cancer, Gene Expression, and the Biochemistry of Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineman, Richard H.

    2018-01-01

    These three biology songs can be used for educational purposes to teach about biochemical concepts. They touch on three different topics: (1) cancer progression and germ cells, (2) gene expression, promoters, and repressors, and (3) electronegativity and the biochemical basis of photosynthesis.

  5. Identification of certain cancer-mediating genes using Gaussian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effectiveness of the methodology has been demonstrated on three gene expression cancer datasets dealing with human lung, colon and leukemia. ... Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Netaji Subhash Engineering College, Kolkata, India; Machine Intelligence Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata, ...

  6. Bivalent Epigenetic Control of Oncofetal Gene Expression in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Frietze, Seth E; Gordon, Jonathan A; Heath, Jessica L; Messier, Terri; Hong, Deli; Boyd, Joseph R; Kang, Mingu; Imbalzano, Anthony N; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2017-12-01

    Multiple mechanisms of epigenetic control that include DNA methylation, histone modification, noncoding RNAs, and mitotic gene bookmarking play pivotal roles in stringent gene regulation during lineage commitment and maintenance. Experimental evidence indicates that bivalent chromatin domains, i.e., genome regions that are marked by both H3K4me3 (activating) and H3K27me3 (repressive) histone modifications, are a key property of pluripotent stem cells. Bivalency of developmental genes during the G 1 phase of the pluripotent stem cell cycle contributes to cell fate decisions. Recently, some cancer types have been shown to exhibit partial recapitulation of bivalent chromatin modifications that are lost along with pluripotency, suggesting a mechanism by which cancer cells reacquire properties that are characteristic of undifferentiated, multipotent cells. This bivalent epigenetic control of oncofetal gene expression in cancer cells may offer novel insights into the onset and progression of cancer and may provide specific and selective options for diagnosis as well as for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Overview of genes, diet and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mathers, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative epidemiological analysis suggests that about one third of the variation in cancer risk can be attributed to variation in dietary exposure but it has proved difficult, using conventional epidemiological approaches, to identify which dietary components, in what amounts and over what time-scales are protective or potentially hazardous. Work in this area has been hampered by the lack of robust surrogate endpoints. However, the rapidly accumulating knowledge of the biological basis of...

  8. Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    or immunotoxin therapy, natural vector-host tropisms must be altered. Recent improvements in monoclonal antibody (mAb) engineering have expanded the...endocytosis. To achieve targeted gene therapy or immunotoxin therapy, natural vector-host tropisms must be altered. Recent improvements in monoclonal...trafficking of monoclonal antibody- antigen to an endolysosomal pathway is important. After altering targeting specificities, prokaryotic and plant

  9. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Wilson, Peter J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K; Cowley, Mark J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Gill, Anthony J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Daly, Roger J; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Hodges, Sally E; Reid, Jeffrey G; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E; Yung, Christina K; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Mann, Karen M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Adams, David J; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Rust, Alistair G; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuveson, David A; Copeland, Neal G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R; Hudson, Thomas J; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Pearson, John V; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  10. The genetic alteration of retinoblastoma gene in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Il; Shim, Yung Mok; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Retinoblastoma(RB) gene is the prototype of tumor suppressor gene and it`s alteration have been frequently observed in a large number of human tumors. To investigate the role of RB in esophageal cancer, we studied 36 esophageal cancer tissues with Southern blot analysis to detect gross LOH and PCR-SSCP method to find minute LOH and mutation, if any. In the cases with abnormalities, the nucleotide sequence analysis was performed. Allelic loss of chromosome 13q14 occurred in 20 out of 32 informative cases (62.5%) by Southern analysis. Furthermore, PCR-LOH added three positive cases. Mobility shift by PCR-SSCP was observed in one case at exon 22, which showed 1 bp deletion in codon 771 of RB gene resulting in frame shift mutation. Besides, nine PCR-band alteration in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue were observed in exon 14 and 22, but mutation was not found on sequencing analysis suggesting the epigenetic alteration in tumor tissue. Analysis of the clinical data did not show any difference depending upon RB alteration. However, the total incidence of RB gene may play an important role in the development of esophageal cancer. The main genetic alteration of RB gene was deletion detected by Southern blot and one bp deletion leading to frame shift was also observed. 8 figs, 5 tabs. (Author).

  11. The Nuclear Death Domain Protein p84N5; a Candidate Breast Cancer Susceptibility Gene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Godwin, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    ...% of all cases of breast cancer exhibit a familial pattern of incidence. Efforts to identify the genetic basis of familial breast cancer reached fruition some years ago, when the breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 were identified...

  12. The Nuclear Death Domain Protein p84N5; a Candidate Breast Cancer Susceptibility Gene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Godwin, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    ...% of all cases of breast cancer exhibit a familial pattern of incidence. Efforts to identify the genetic basis of familial breast cancer reached fruition some years ago, when the breast-cancer susceptibility genes, BRCAl and BRCA2 were identified...

  13. Gene expression of circulating tumour cells in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bölke E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnostic tools to predict the prognosis in patients suffering from breast cancer (BC need further improvements. New technological achievements like the gene profiling of circulating tumour cells (CTC could help identify new prognostic markers in the clinical setting. Furthermore, gene expression patterns of CTC might provide important informations on the mechanisms of tumour cell metastasation. Materials and methods We performed realtime-PCR and multiplex-PCR analyses following immunomagnetic separation of CTC. Peripheral blood (PB samples of 63 patients with breast cancer of various stages were analyzed and compared to a control group of 14 healthy individuals. After reverse-transcription, we performed multiplex PCR using primers for the genes ga733.3, muc-1 and c-erbB2. Mammaglobin1, spdef and c-erbB2 were analyzed applying realtime-PCR. Results ga733.2 overexpression was found in 12.7% of breast cancer cases, muc-1 in 15.9%, mgb1 in 9.1% and spdef in 12.1%. In this study, c-erbB2 did not show any significant correlation to BC, possibly due to a highly ambient expression. Besides single gene analyses, gene profiles were additionally evaluated. Highly significant correlations to BC were found in single gene analyses of ga733.2 and muc-1 and in gene profile analyses of ga733.3*muc-1 and GA7 ga733.3*muc-1*mgb1*spdef. Conclusion Our study reveals that the single genes ga733.3, muc-1 and the gene profiles ga733.3*muc-1 and ga733.3*3muc-1*mgb1*spdef can serve as markers for the detection of CTC in BC. The multigene analyses found highly positive levels in BC patients. Our study indicates that not single gene analyses but subtle patterns of multiple genes lead to rising accuracy and low loss of specificity in detection of breast cancer cases.

  14. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of suicide genes in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Collico, Veronica; Zuppone, Stefania; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics have been employed in cancer treatment for decades due to their efficacy in killing the malignant cells, but the other side of the coin showed off-target effects, onset of drug resistance and recurrences. To overcome these limitations, different approaches have been investigated and suicide gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative. This approach consists in the introduction of genetic materials into cancerous cells or the surrounding tissue to cause cell death or retard the growth of the tumor mass. Despite promising results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, this innovative approach has been limited, for long time, to the treatment of localized tumors, due to the suboptimal efficiency in introducing suicide genes into cancer cells. Nanoparticles represent a valuable non-viral delivery system to protect drugs in the bloodstream, to improve biodistribution, and to limit side effects by achieving target selectivity through surface ligands. In this scenario, the real potential of suicide genes can be translated into clinically viable treatments for patients. In the present review, we summarize the recent advances of inorganic nanoparticles as non-viral vectors in terms of therapeutic efficacy, targeting capacity and safety issues. We describe the main suicide genes currently used in therapy, with particular emphasis on toxin-encoding genes of bacterial and plant origin. In addition, we discuss the relevance of molecular targeting and tumor-restricted expression to improve treatment specificity to cancer tissue. Finally, we analyze the main clinical applications, limitations and future perspectives of suicide gene therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cooperative Epigenetic Modulation by Cancer Amplicon Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Lixin; Tolga Emre, N. C.; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Chung, Hye-Jung; Steidl, Christian; Slack, Graham; Wright, George W.; Lenz, Georg; Ngo, Vu N.; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Xu, Weihong; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yandan; Lamy, Laurence; Davis, R. Eric; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Maloney, David; Thomas, Craig J.; Möller, Peter; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Savage, Kerry; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Chan, Wing C.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Levens, David; Staudt, Louis M.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome band 9p24 is frequently amplified in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). To identify oncogenes in this amplicon, we screened an RNA interference library targeting amplicon genes and thereby identified JAK2 and the histone demethylase JMJD2C as essential genes in these lymphomas. Inhibition of JAK2 and JMJD2C cooperated in killing these lymphomas by decreasing tyrosine 41 phosphorylation and increasing lysine 9 trimethylation of histone H3, promoting heterochromatin formation. MYC, a major target of JAK2-mediated histone phosphorylation, was silenced following JAK2 and JMJD2C inhibition, with a corresponding increase in repressive chromatin. Hence, JAK2 and JMJD2C cooperatively remodel the PMBL and HL epigenome, offering a mechanistic rationale for the development of JAK2 and JMJD2C inhibitors in these diseases. PMID:21156283

  16. PDI Coamplified Genes in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Therefore, we could not generate any data during the first year. This is a copy of our first-year progress report that goes beyond the period from 6-1-14...year we purchased several antibodies from multiple vendors and tested them in various ovarian cancer cell lines. We had to contact, test, and validate...obtained from the same mice. HE Y $ NC I$A DR $R es $ Fa t_ T$ OV CA R$ 8$ OV CA R$ 5$ SK OV 3$ TO V2 1$ Fa t$_ N$ HE Y $I nv as ion $ OV CA R$ 3$ GAPDH

  17. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  18. Copy Number Alterations in Enzyme-Coding and Cancer-Causing Genes Reprogram Tumor Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashwini Kumar; Eils, Roland; König, Rainer

    2016-07-15

    Somatic copy number alterations frequently occur in the cancer genome affecting not only oncogenic or tumor suppressive genes, but also passenger and potential codriver genes. An intrinsic feature resulting from such genomic perturbations is the deregulation in the metabolism of tumor cells. In this study, we have shown that metabolic and cancer-causing genes are unexpectedly often proximally positioned in the chromosome and share loci with coaltered copy numbers across multiple cancers (19 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas). We have developed an analysis pipeline, Identification of Metabolic Cancer Genes (iMetCG), to infer the functional impact on metabolic remodeling from such coamplifications and codeletions and delineate genes driving cancer metabolism from those that are neutral. Using our identified metabolic genes, we were able to classify tumors based on their tissue and developmental origins. These metabolic genes were similar to known cancer genes in terms of their network connectivity, isoform frequency, and evolutionary features. We further validated these identified metabolic genes by (i) using gene essentiality data from several tumor cell lines, (ii) showing that these identified metabolic genes are strong indicators for patient survival, and (iii) observing a significant overlap between our identified metabolic genes and known cancer-metabolic genes. Our analyses revealed a hitherto unknown generic mechanism for large-scale metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells based on linear gene proximities between cancer-causing and -metabolic genes. We have identified 119 new metabolic cancer genes likely to be involved in rewiring cancer cell metabolism. Cancer Res; 76(14); 4058-67. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Functional analysis of prognostic gene expression network genes in metastatic breast cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Geiger

    Full Text Available Identification of conserved co-expression networks is a useful tool for clustering groups of genes enriched for common molecular or cellular functions [1]. The relative importance of genes within networks can frequently be inferred by the degree of connectivity, with those displaying high connectivity being significantly more likely to be associated with specific molecular functions [2]. Previously we utilized cross-species network analysis to identify two network modules that were significantly associated with distant metastasis free survival in breast cancer. Here, we validate one of the highly connected genes as a metastasis associated gene. Tpx2, the most highly connected gene within a proliferation network specifically prognostic for estrogen receptor positive (ER+ breast cancers, enhances metastatic disease, but in a tumor autonomous, proliferation-independent manner. Histologic analysis suggests instead that variation of TPX2 levels within disseminated tumor cells may influence the transition between dormant to actively proliferating cells in the secondary site. These results support the co-expression network approach for identification of new metastasis-associated genes to provide new information regarding the etiology of breast cancer progression and metastatic disease.

  20. Degradable Polyethylenimine-Based Gene Carriers for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hu-Lin; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Xing, Lei; Firdous, Jannatul; Cao, Wuji; He, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Yong; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Li, Hui-Shan; Cho, Chong-Su

    2017-04-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant DNA or gene silencing using siRNA have become a prominent area of research in cancer therapy. However, their use in clinical applications is limited due to overall safety concerns and suboptimal efficacy. Although non-viral vectors such as polycationic polymers do not offer the same level of transfection efficiency as their viral counterparts, they still demonstrate immense potential as alternatives to viral vectors, given their versatility, low immunogenicity, ease of large-scale production, and ability to accelerate gene transfer with well-designed delivery platforms. Among these polymers, polyethylenimine (PEI) is considered a state-of-the-art gene carrier, owing to its ability to improve gene transfer capacity and intracellular delivery. Nonetheless, PEI suffers from the critical shortcoming of non-degradability that can lead to severe cytotoxic effects, despite the fact that the level of this toxicity decreases with molecular weight (MW). As a result, a considerable amount of effort has been devoted to designing low-MW PEI derivatives with degradable linkages. This review will categorize the recent advances in these degradable PEI derivatives based on their degradable chemistries, including ester, disulfide, imine, carbamate, amide, and ketal linkages, and summarize their application in gene therapies against various major cancer malignancies.

  1. Hierarchical clustering of breast cancer methylomes revealed differentially methylated and expressed breast cancer genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hsuan Lin

    Full Text Available Oncogenic transformation of normal cells often involves epigenetic alterations, including histone modification and DNA methylation. We conducted whole-genome bisulfite sequencing to determine the DNA methylomes of normal breast, fibroadenoma, invasive ductal carcinomas and MCF7. The emergence, disappearance, expansion and contraction of kilobase-sized hypomethylated regions (HMRs and the hypomethylation of the megabase-sized partially methylated domains (PMDs are the major forms of methylation changes observed in breast tumor samples. Hierarchical clustering of HMR revealed tumor-specific hypermethylated clusters and differential methylated enhancers specific to normal or breast cancer cell lines. Joint analysis of gene expression and DNA methylation data of normal breast and breast cancer cells identified differentially methylated and expressed genes associated with breast and/or ovarian cancers in cancer-specific HMR clusters. Furthermore, aberrant patterns of X-chromosome inactivation (XCI was found in breast cancer cell lines as well as breast tumor samples in the TCGA BRCA (breast invasive carcinoma dataset. They were characterized with differentially hypermethylated XIST promoter, reduced expression of XIST, and over-expression of hypomethylated X-linked genes. High expressions of these genes were significantly associated with lower survival rates in breast cancer patients. Comprehensive analysis of the normal and breast tumor methylomes suggests selective targeting of DNA methylation changes during breast cancer progression. The weak causal relationship between DNA methylation and gene expression observed in this study is evident of more complex role of DNA methylation in the regulation of gene expression in human epigenetics that deserves further investigation.

  2. The significance of mismatch repair genes in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Jang, You-Jin; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jong-Han; Park, Sung-Soo; Park, Seong-Heum; Kim, Chong-Suk; Mok, Young-Jae

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a form of genetic instability characterized by new alleles not present in the normal genotype. This mutation occurs by altered DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Studies of limited numbers of patients have reported conflicting results regarding the association of the MSI phenotype with gastric cancer. This study aims to evaluate the clinical significance of mismatch repair genes in gastric cancer. We studied 156 gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy from March 2010 to February 2011 in our hospital. Mismatch repair status was determined by the immunohistochemical analysis of human MutL Homolog 1 (hMLH1) and human MutS Homolog 2 (hMSH2) expression. Seventeen (10.9%) cases did not express hMLH1 but all cases expressed hMSH2. In univariate analyses, the expression of hMLH1 was associated with age, nodal status, and Lauren's classification. In multivariate analyses, there was no statistically significant association between the loss of hMLH1 expression and selected clinical parameters. The expression of hMLH1 was associated with age, nodal status, and Lauren's classification. Our results suggest that MMR gene abnormalities play an important role in the tumorigenesis of patients demonstrating gastric cancer.

  3. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino

    2012-01-01

    were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n......¿=¿76) colon cancers, was reproduced. The stages II and III colon cancers were subsequently classified as either stage I-like (good prognosis) or stage IV-like (poor prognosis) and assessed by the 36 months cumulative incidence of relapse. RESULTS: In the GEO data set, results were reproducible in stage...... correctly predicted as stage IV-like, and the remaining patients were predicted as stage I-like and unclassifiable, respectively. Stage II patients could not be stratified. CONCLUSIONS: The 128-gene signature showed reproducibility in stage III colon cancer, but could not predict recurrence in stage II...

  4. MANAGEMENT OF BREAST CANCER WITH BRCA GENE MUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Ari Sumardika

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE The management of individual who has a genetic predisposition for breast cancer requires careful planning. It is estimated that 5-10% of breast cancer in Western countries is a hereditary breast cancer and 80-90% of them is the result of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes mutations. The individual with BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations have a high risk for experiencing breast cancer and other types of cancer, especially ovarian cancer. Although there are some differences, management of patients with hereditary breast cancer in principle is equal to management of non-hereditary breast cancer. Contra lateral mastectomy surgery and/or oophorectomy may be considered as initial therapy. The uses of breast conserving surgery in patients with BRCA-positive status are still controversial because of the risk of recurrence on ipsilateral breast, so did the use of ionization radiation modalities. Post surgery follow up is an important aspect in the management of patients with mutations of these genes in which follow up aims to find local recurrence, secondary breast cancer, contra lateral breast cancer as early as possible /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  5. Innovation status of gene therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Ruiz, Maricruz; Perez-Santos, Martin

    2015-01-01

    To analyze multi-source data including publications and patents, and try to draw the whole landscape of the research and development community in the field of gene therapy for breast cancer. Publications and patents were collected from the Web of science and databases of the five major patent offices of the world, respectively. Bibliometric methodologies and technology are used to investigate publications/patents, their contents and relationships. A total of 2,043 items published and 947 patents from 1994 to 2013 including "gene therapy for breast cancer" were retrieved. The top five countries in global publication share were USA, China, Germany, Japan and England. On the other hand, USA, Australia, England, South Korea and Japan were the main producers of patents. The universities and enterprises of USA had the highest amount of publication and patents. Adenovirus- and retrovirus-based gene therapies and small interfering RNA (siRNA) interference therapies were the main topics both in publications and patents. The above results show that global research in the field of gene therapy for breast cancer is increasing and the main participants in this field are USA and Canada in North America, China, Japan and South Korea in Asia, and England, Germany, and Italy in Europe. Also, this article demonstrates the usefulness of bibliometrics to address key evaluation questions and define future areas of research.

  6. Methylation of Breast Cancer Predisposition Genes in Early-Onset Breast Cancer: Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron M Scott

    Full Text Available DNA methylation can mimic the effects of both germline and somatic mutations for cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1 and p16INK4a. Constitutional DNA methylation of the BRCA1 promoter has been well described and is associated with an increased risk of early-onset breast cancers that have BRCA1-mutation associated histological features. The role of methylation in the context of other breast cancer predisposition genes has been less well studied and often with conflicting or ambiguous outcomes. We examined the role of methylation in known breast cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer predisposition and tumor development. We applied the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip (HM450K array to blood and tumor-derived DNA from 43 women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 years and measured the methylation profiles across promoter regions of BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, PALB2, CDH1, TP53, FANCM, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Prior genetic testing had demonstrated that these women did not carry a germline mutation in BRCA1, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, TP53, BRCA2, CDH1 or FANCM. In addition to the BRCA1 promoter region, this work identified regions with variable methylation at multiple breast cancer susceptibility genes including PALB2 and MLH1. Methylation at the region of MLH1 in these breast cancers was not associated with microsatellite instability. This work informs future studies of the role of methylation in breast cancer susceptibility gene silencing.

  7. Methylation of Breast Cancer Predisposition Genes in Early-Onset Breast Cancer: Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Cameron M; Joo, JiHoon Eric; O'Callaghan, Neil; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Wong, Ee Ming; Southey, Melissa C

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation can mimic the effects of both germline and somatic mutations for cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1 and p16INK4a. Constitutional DNA methylation of the BRCA1 promoter has been well described and is associated with an increased risk of early-onset breast cancers that have BRCA1-mutation associated histological features. The role of methylation in the context of other breast cancer predisposition genes has been less well studied and often with conflicting or ambiguous outcomes. We examined the role of methylation in known breast cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer predisposition and tumor development. We applied the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip (HM450K) array to blood and tumor-derived DNA from 43 women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 years and measured the methylation profiles across promoter regions of BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, PALB2, CDH1, TP53, FANCM, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Prior genetic testing had demonstrated that these women did not carry a germline mutation in BRCA1, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, TP53, BRCA2, CDH1 or FANCM. In addition to the BRCA1 promoter region, this work identified regions with variable methylation at multiple breast cancer susceptibility genes including PALB2 and MLH1. Methylation at the region of MLH1 in these breast cancers was not associated with microsatellite instability. This work informs future studies of the role of methylation in breast cancer susceptibility gene silencing.

  8. Predisposing genes in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huusko, P. (Pia)

    1999-01-01

    Abstract In the present study, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, the two major genes predisposing individuals to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, were screened in Finnish and Turkish cancer families. Germline BRCA1 mutations were found in 7% (6/88) and BRCA2 mutations in 6% (5/88) of the Finnish families studied in Oulu. Two distinct BRCA1 (3745delT, 4216nt-2A→G) and three BRCA2 (999delTCAAA, 6503delTT, 9346nt-2A→G) mutations were identified, all of which are recurrently found in Finland....

  9. Optimization of laser capture microdissection and RNA amplification for gene expression profiling of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasmatzis George

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To discover prostate cancer biomarkers, we profiled gene expression in benign and malignant cells laser capture microdissected (LCM from prostate tissues and metastatic prostatic adenocarcinomas. Here we present methods developed, optimized, and validated to obtain high quality gene expression data. Results RNase inhibitor was included in solutions used to stain frozen tissue sections for LCM, which improved RNA quality significantly. Quantitative PCR assays, requiring minimal amounts of LCM RNA, were developed to determine RNA quality and concentration. SuperScript II™ reverse transcriptase was replaced with SuperScript III™, and SpeedVac concentration was eliminated to optimize linear amplification. The GeneChip® IVT labeling kit was used rather than the Enzo BioArray™ HighYield™ RNA transcript labeling kit since side-by-side comparisons indicated high-end signal saturation with the latter. We obtained 72 μg of labeled complementary RNA on average after linear amplification of about 2 ng of total RNA. Conclusion Unsupervised clustering placed 5/5 normal and 2/2 benign prostatic hyperplasia cases in one group, 5/7 Gleason pattern 3 cases in another group, and the remaining 2/7 pattern 3 cases in a third group with 8/8 Gleason pattern 5 cases and 3/3 metastatic prostatic adenocarcinomas. Differential expression of alpha-methylacyl coenzyme A racemase (AMACR and hepsin was confirmed using quantitative PCR.

  10. NCG 4.0: the network of cancer genes in the era of massive mutational screenings of cancer genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Omer; Pendino, Vera; D’Antonio, Matteo; Ratti, Emanuele; Gentilini, Marco; Ciccarelli, Francesca D.

    2014-01-01

    NCG 4.0 is the latest update of the Network of Cancer Genes, a web-based repository of systems-level properties of cancer genes. In its current version, the database collects information on 537 known (i.e. experimentally supported) and 1463 candidate (i.e. inferred using statistical methods) cancer genes. Candidate cancer genes derive from the manual revision of 67 original publications describing the mutational screening of 3460 human exomes and genomes in 23 different cancer types. For all 2000 cancer genes, duplicability, evolutionary origin, expression, functional annotation, interaction network with other human proteins and with microRNAs are reported. In addition to providing a substantial update of cancer-related information, NCG 4.0 also introduces two new features. The first is the annotation of possible false-positive cancer drivers, defined as candidate cancer genes inferred from large-scale screenings whose association with cancer is likely to be spurious. The second is the description of the systems-level properties of 64 human microRNAs that are causally involved in cancer progression (oncomiRs). Owing to the manual revision of all information, NCG 4.0 constitutes a complete and reliable resource on human coding and non-coding genes whose deregulation drives cancer onset and/or progression. NCG 4.0 can also be downloaded as a free application for Android smart phones. Database URL: http://bio.ieo.eu/ncg/ PMID:24608173

  11. Multi-gene fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect cell cycle gene copy number aberrations in young breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Bai, Jingchao; Hao, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Yunhui; Zhang, Xiaobei; Yuan, Weiping; Hu, Linping; Cheng, Tao; Zetterberg, Anders; Lee, Mong-Hong; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease of cell cycle, and the dysfunction of cell cycle checkpoints plays a vital role in the occurrence and development of breast cancer. We employed multi-gene fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) to investigate gene copy number aberrations (CNAs) of 4 genes (Rb1, CHEK2, c-Myc, CCND1) that are involved in the regulation of cell cycle, in order to analyze the impact of gene aberrations on prognosis in the young breast cancer patients. Gene copy number aberrations of these 4 genes were more frequently observed in young breast cancer patients when compared with the older group. Further, these CNAs were more frequently seen in Luminal B type, Her2 overexpression, and tiple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) type in young breast cancer patients. The variations of CCND1, Rb1, and CHEK2 were significantly correlated with poor survival in the young breast cancer patient group, while the amplification of c-Myc was not obviously correlated with poor survival in young breast cancer patients. Thus, gene copy number aberrations (CNAs) of cell cycle-regulated genes can serve as an important tool for prognosis in young breast cancer patients.

  12. STAT3 Target Genes Relevant to Human Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, Richard L.; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery, the STAT3 transcription factor has been extensively studied for its function as a transcriptional regulator and its role as a mediator of development, normal physiology, and pathology of many diseases, including cancers. These efforts have uncovered an array of genes that can be positively and negatively regulated by STAT3, alone and in cooperation with other transcription factors. Through regulating gene expression, STAT3 has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in many cellular processes including oncogenesis, tumor growth and progression, and stemness. Interestingly, recent studies suggest that STAT3 may behave as a tumor suppressor by activating expression of genes known to inhibit tumorigenesis. Additional evidence suggested that STAT3 may elicit opposing effects depending on cellular context and tumor types. These mixed results signify the need for a deeper understanding of STAT3, including its upstream regulators, parallel transcription co-regulators, and downstream target genes. To help facilitate fulfilling this unmet need, this review will be primarily focused on STAT3 downstream target genes that have been validated to associate with tumorigenesis and/or malignant biology of human cancers

  13. Mutations in the AXIN1 gene in advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yardy, George W; Bicknell, David C; Wilding, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt signalling pathway directs aspects of embryogenesis and is thought to contribute to maintenance of certain stem cell populations. Disruption of the pathway has been observed in many different tumour types. In bowel, stomach, and endometrial cancer, this is usually due to mutation of genes...... encoding Wnt pathway components APC or beta-catenin. Such mutations are rare in hepatocellular carcinomas and medulloblastomas with Wnt pathway dysfunction, and there, mutation in genes for other Wnt molecules, such as Axin, is more frequently found....

  14. Perspective Insight into Future Potential Fusion Gene Transcript Biomarker Candidates in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryong Nam Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing has accelerated the discovery of a variety of new fusion gene types in clinical breast cancer samples by analyzing cancer genomes and transcriptomes. Although previous studies have focused on a few clinically validated oncogenic fusion genes as diagnostic and therapeutic targets in breast cancer, a perspective consideration has not been given thus far for a plethora of breast cancer fusion genes, which are being newly identified at an overwhelmingly increasing pace. In this perspective review, we discuss diverse fusion gene types recently identified in a variety of breast cancer subtypes, including breast clinical cancer samples in TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas database. This perspective review will confer fresh and promising guidance onto breast cancer surgeons, clinical oncologists, and tumor biologists in determining research directions for seeking and developing novel fusion gene biomarkers for breast cancer diagnostics and therapeutic treatment in upcoming years.

  15. Perspective Insight into Future Potential Fusion Gene Transcript Biomarker Candidates in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ryong Nam; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young

    2018-02-07

    Next generation sequencing has accelerated the discovery of a variety of new fusion gene types in clinical breast cancer samples by analyzing cancer genomes and transcriptomes. Although previous studies have focused on a few clinically validated oncogenic fusion genes as diagnostic and therapeutic targets in breast cancer, a perspective consideration has not been given thus far for a plethora of breast cancer fusion genes, which are being newly identified at an overwhelmingly increasing pace. In this perspective review, we discuss diverse fusion gene types recently identified in a variety of breast cancer subtypes, including breast clinical cancer samples in TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) database. This perspective review will confer fresh and promising guidance onto breast cancer surgeons, clinical oncologists, and tumor biologists in determining research directions for seeking and developing novel fusion gene biomarkers for breast cancer diagnostics and therapeutic treatment in upcoming years.

  16. Systematic assessment of multi-gene predictors of pan-cancer cell line sensitivity to drugs exploiting gene expression data [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linh Nguyen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selected gene mutations are routinely used to guide the selection of cancer drugs for a given patient tumour. Large pharmacogenomic data sets, such as those by Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDSC consortium, were introduced to discover more of these single-gene markers of drug sensitivity. Very recently, machine learning regression has been used to investigate how well cancer cell line sensitivity to drugs is predicted depending on the type of molecular profile. The latter has revealed that gene expression data is the most predictive profile in the pan-cancer setting. However, no study to date has exploited GDSC data to systematically compare the performance of machine learning models based on multi-gene expression data against that of widely-used single-gene markers based on genomics data. Methods: Here we present this systematic comparison using Random Forest (RF classifiers exploiting the expression levels of 13,321 genes and an average of 501 tested cell lines per drug. To account for time-dependent batch effects in IC50 measurements, we employ independent test sets generated with more recent GDSC data than that used to train the predictors and show that this is a more realistic validation than standard k-fold cross-validation. Results and Discussion: Across 127 GDSC drugs, our results show that the single-gene markers unveiled by the MANOVA analysis tend to achieve higher precision than these RF-based multi-gene models, at the cost of generally having a poor recall (i.e. correctly detecting only a small part of the cell lines sensitive to the drug. Regarding overall classification performance, about two thirds of the drugs are better predicted by the multi-gene RF classifiers. Among the drugs with the most predictive of these models, we found pyrimethamine, sunitinib and 17-AAG. Conclusions: Thanks to this unbiased validation, we now know that this type of models can predict in vitro tumour response to some of these

  17. Somatostatin receptor gene transfer inhibits established pancreatic cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celinski, Scott A; Fisher, William E; Amaya, Felipe; Wu, Yuan Qing; Yao, Q; Youker, Keith A; Li, Min

    2003-11-01

    Most human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells do not express somatostatin receptors, and somatostatin does not inhibit the growth of these cancers. We have demonstrated previously that somatostatin inhibits the growth of pancreatic cancers expressing somatostatin receptor subtype-2 (SSTR2), but not receptor-negative cancers. SSTR2 expression may be an important tumor-suppressor pathway that is lost in human pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that SSTR2 gene transfer would restore the growth-inhibitory response of human pancreatic cancer to somatostatin. Palpable human pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors were established on the backs of nude mice by subcutaneous injection of cultured cells (Panc-1). The animals were divided into 5 groups (n = 10/group). Group I served as an untreated control. Group II received an intramuscular injection of the long-acting somatostatin analogue Sandostatin LAR. Group III received Lac-Z expressing adenovirus via intraperitoneal injection. Group IV received SSTR2 expressing adenovirus via intraperitoneal injection. Group V received SSTR2 expressing adenovirus via intraperitoneal injection and an intramuscular injection of Sandostatin LAR. The rate of tumor growth was assessed with calipers. After 28 days, the animals were anesthetized and exsanguanated, and the tumors were excised and weighed. Plasma somatostatin and octreotide levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Expression of cell-surface somatostatin-receptor protein and known tumor-suppressor proteins was determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Systemic delivery of SSTR2-expressing adenovirus by intraperitoneal injection resulted in expression of SSTR2 protein in the subcutaneous human pancreatic cancers. Final tumor weight was significantly decreased in the groups expressing SSTR2 receptors compared to the other 3 groups. Treatment with Sandostatin LAR increased plasma octreotide levels as determined by radioimmunoassay

  18. MNS16A tandem repeats minisatellite of human telomerase gene: a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Philipp; Baierl, Andreas; Feik, Elisabeth; Führlinger, Gerhard; Leeb, Gernot; Mach, Karl; Holzmann, Klaus; Micksche, Michael; Gsur, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Telomerase reactivation and expression of human telomerase gene [human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)] are hallmarks of unlimited proliferation potential of cancer cells. A polymorphic tandem repeats minisatellite of hTERT gene, termed MNS16A was reported to influence hTERT expression. To assess the role of MNS16A as potential biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC), we investigated for the first time the association of MNS16A genotypes with risk of colorectal polyps and CRC. In the ongoing colorectal cancer study of Austria (CORSA), 3842 Caucasian participants were recruited within a large screening project in the province Burgenland including 90 CRC cases, 308 high-risk polyps, 1022 low-risk polyps and 1822 polyp free controls verified by colonoscopy. MNS16A genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA. Associations of MNS16A genotypes with CRC risk were estimated by logistic regression analysis computing odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We identified five different variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) of MNS16A including VNTR-364, a newly discovered rare variant. VNTR-274 allele was associated with a 2.7-fold significantly increased risk of CRC compared with the VNTR-302 wild-type (OR = 2.69; 95% CI = 1.11-6.50; P = 0.028). In our CORSA study, the medium length VNTR-274 was identified as risk factor for CRC. Although, this population-based study herewith reports the largest cohort size concerning MNS16A thus far, further large-scale studies in diverse populations are warranted to confirm hTERT MNS16A genotype as potential biomarker for assessment of CRC risk.

  19. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called "tumor microenvironment (TME)", in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  20. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called “tumor microenvironment (TME”, in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  1. Screening for common copy-number variants in cancer genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Jess; Majerus, Tamsin M O; Walker, Susan; Armour, John A L

    2010-12-01

    For most cases of colorectal cancer that arise without a family history of the disease, it is proposed that an appreciable heritable component of predisposition is the result of contributions from many loci. Although progress has been made in identifying single nucleotide variants associated with colorectal cancer risk, the involvement of low-penetrance copy number variants is relatively unexplored. We have used multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH) in a fourfold multiplex (QuadMAPH), positioned at an average resolution of one probe per 2 kb, to screen a total of 1.56 Mb of genomic DNA for copy number variants around the genes APC, AXIN1, BRCA1, BRCA2, CTNNB1, HRAS, MLH1, MSH2, and TP53. Two deletion events were detected, one upstream of MLH1 in a control individual and the other in APC in a colorectal cancer patient, but these do not seem to correspond to copy number polymorphisms with measurably high population frequencies. In summary, by means of our QuadMAPH assay, copy number measurement data were of sufficient resolution and accuracy to detect any copy number variants with high probability. However, this study has demonstrated a very low incidence of deletion and duplication variants within intronic and flanking regions of these nine genes, in both control individuals and colorectal cancer patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Bacteria closely related to Phyllobacterium trifolii according to their 16S rRNA gene are discovered in the nodules of Hungarian sainfoin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baĭmiev, Al Kh; Baĭmiev, An Kh; Gubaĭdullin, I I; Kulikova, O L; Chemeris, A V

    2007-05-01

    The population genetic diversity and phylogeny of the bacteria entering the symbiosis with sainfoin that grows on the Chesnokovskaya Mountain, Ufa region, Republic of Bashkortostan, have been studied. RAPD analysis of DNA polymorphism of the microbial strains grown from the nodules of 20 plants using several random primers detected a high degree of genetic homogeneity in their population as compared with the populations of rhizobia of other leguminous plants growing at the same site. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes of the three most different samples have demonstrated that these genes were identical and display 99.9% homology with the sequence of Phyllobacterium trifolii 16S rRNA gene.

  3. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Maliandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  4. A systematic study on drug-response associated genes using baseline gene expressions of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi; Fang, Yun; Wang, Fayou; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-03-01

    We have studied drug-response associated (DRA) gene expressions by applying a systems biology framework to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data. More than 4,000 genes are inferred to be DRA for at least one drug, while the number of DRA genes for each drug varies dramatically from almost 0 to 1,226. Functional enrichment analysis shows that the DRA genes are significantly enriched in genes associated with cell cycle and plasma membrane. Moreover, there might be two patterns of DRA genes between genders. There are significantly shared DRA genes between male and female for most drugs, while very little DRA genes tend to be shared between the two genders for a few drugs targeting sex-specific cancers (e.g., PD-0332991 for breast cancer and ovarian cancer). Our analyses also show substantial difference for DRA genes between young and old samples, suggesting the necessity of considering the age effects for personalized medicine in cancers. Lastly, differential module and key driver analyses confirm cell cycle related modules as top differential ones for drug sensitivity. The analyses also reveal the role of TSPO, TP53, and many other immune or cell cycle related genes as important key drivers for DRA network modules. These key drivers provide new drug targets to improve the sensitivity of cancer therapy.

  5. A systematic study on drug-response associated genes using baseline gene expressions of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi; Fang, Yun; Wang, Fayou; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-03-10

    We have studied drug-response associated (DRA) gene expressions by applying a systems biology framework to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data. More than 4,000 genes are inferred to be DRA for at least one drug, while the number of DRA genes for each drug varies dramatically from almost 0 to 1,226. Functional enrichment analysis shows that the DRA genes are significantly enriched in genes associated with cell cycle and plasma membrane. Moreover, there might be two patterns of DRA genes between genders. There are significantly shared DRA genes between male and female for most drugs, while very little DRA genes tend to be shared between the two genders for a few drugs targeting sex-specific cancers (e.g., PD-0332991 for breast cancer and ovarian cancer). Our analyses also show substantial difference for DRA genes between young and old samples, suggesting the necessity of considering the age effects for personalized medicine in cancers. Lastly, differential module and key driver analyses confirm cell cycle related modules as top differential ones for drug sensitivity. The analyses also reveal the role of TSPO, TP53, and many other immune or cell cycle related genes as important key drivers for DRA network modules. These key drivers provide new drug targets to improve the sensitivity of cancer therapy.

  6. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous....... This review describes and discusses the current status of the application of gene therapy in relation to SCLC Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...... DNA into malignant cells causing them to die. Since SCLC is a highly disseminated malignancy, the gene therapeutic agent must be administered systemically, obligating a high level of targeting of tumor tissue and the use of delivery vehicles designed for systemic circulation of the therapeutic DNA...

  7. Suppression subtractive hybridization identified differentially expressed genes in lung adenocarcinoma: ERGIC3 as a novel lung cancer-related gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Mingsong; Tu, Tao; Huang, Yunchao; Cao, Yi

    2013-01-01

    To understand the carcinogenesis caused by accumulated genetic and epigenetic alterations and seek novel biomarkers for various cancers, studying differentially expressed genes between cancerous and normal tissues is crucial. In the study, two cDNA libraries of lung cancer were constructed and screened for identification of differentially expressed genes. Two cDNA libraries of differentially expressed genes were constructed using lung adenocarcinoma tissue and adjacent nonmalignant lung tissue by suppression subtractive hybridization. The data of the cDNA libraries were then analyzed and compared using bioinformatics analysis. Levels of mRNA and protein were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-RT-PCR) and western blot respectively, as well as expression and localization of proteins were determined by immunostaining. Gene functions were investigated using proliferation and migration assays after gene silencing and gene over-expression. Two libraries of differentially expressed genes were obtained. The forward-subtracted library (FSL) and the reverse-subtracted library (RSL) contained 177 and 59 genes, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that these genes were involved in a wide range of cellular functions. The vast majority of these genes were newly identified to be abnormally expressed in lung cancer. In the first stage of the screening for 16 genes, we compared lung cancer tissues with their adjacent non-malignant tissues at the mRNA level, and found six genes (ERGIC3, DDR1, HSP90B1, SDC1, RPSA, and LPCAT1) from the FSL were significantly up-regulated while two genes (GPX3 and TIMP3) from the RSL were significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05). The ERGIC3 protein was also over-expressed in lung cancer tissues and cultured cells, and expression of ERGIC3 was correlated with the differentiated degree and histological type of lung cancer. The up-regulation of ERGIC3 could promote cellular migration and proliferation in vitro. The

  8. MicroRNA-gene signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Drakaki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths and is characterized by early metastasis and pronounced resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Despite extensive esearch efforts, there is not any substantial progress regarding the identification of novel drugs against pancreatic cancer. Although the introduction of the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine improved clinical response, the prognosis of these patients remained extremely poor with a 5-year survival rate of 3-5%. Thus, the identification of the novel molecular pathways involved in pancreatic oncogenesis and the development of new and potent therapeutic options are highly desirable. Here, we describe how microRNAs control signaling pathways that are frequently deregulated during pancreatic oncogenesis. In addition, we provide evidence that microRNAs could be potentially used as novel pancreatic cancer therapeutics through reversal of chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance or regulation of essential molecular pathways. Further studies should integrate the deregulated genes and microRNAs into molecular networks in order to identify the central regulators of pancreatic oncogenesis. Targeting these central regulators could lead to the development of novel targeted therapeutic approaches for pancreatic cancer patients.

  9. The Role of Sox Genes in Lung Morphogenesis and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongzhao Zhu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The human lung consists of multiple cell types derived from early embryonic compartments. The morphogenesis of the lung, as well as the injury repair of the adult lung, is tightly controlled by a network of signaling pathways with key transcriptional factors. Lung cancer is the third most cancer-related death in the world, which may be developed due to the failure of regulating the signaling pathways. Sox (sex-determining region Y (Sry box-containing family transcriptional factors have emerged as potent modulators in embryonic development, stem cells maintenance, tissue homeostasis, and cancerogenesis in multiple processes. Recent studies demonstrated that the members of the Sox gene family played important roles in the development and maintenance of lung and development of lung cancer. In this context, we summarize our current understanding of the role of Sox family transcriptional factors in the morphogenesis of lung, their oncogenic potential in lung cancer, and their potential impact in the diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted therapy of lung cancer.

  10. Lung cancer gene expression database analysis incorporating prior knowledge with support vector machine-based classification method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Desheng

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A reliable and precise classification is essential for successful diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Gene expression microarrays have provided the high-throughput platform to discover genomic biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Rational use of the available bioinformation can not only effectively remove or suppress noise in gene chips, but also avoid one-sided results of separate experiment. However, only some studies have been aware of the importance of prior information in cancer classification. Methods Together with the application of support vector machine as the discriminant approach, we proposed one modified method that incorporated prior knowledge into cancer classification based on gene expression data to improve accuracy. A public well-known dataset, Malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung adenocarcinoma gene expression database, was used in this study. Prior knowledge is viewed here as a means of directing the classifier using known lung adenocarcinoma related genes. The procedures were performed by software R 2.80. Results The modified method performed better after incorporating prior knowledge. Accuracy of the modified method improved from 98.86% to 100% in training set and from 98.51% to 99.06% in test set. The standard deviations of the modified method decreased from 0.26% to 0 in training set and from 3.04% to 2.10% in test set. Conclusion The method that incorporates prior knowledge into discriminant analysis could effectively improve the capacity and reduce the impact of noise. This idea may have good future not only in practice but also in methodology.

  11. The Genomic Landscape and Pharmacogenomic Interactions of Clock Genes in Cancer Chronotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Youqiong; Xiang, Yu; Ozguc, Fatma Muge; Kim, Yoonjin; Liu, Chun-Jie; Park, Peter K; Hu, Qingsong; Diao, Lixia; Lou, Yanyan; Lin, Chunru; Guo, An-Yuan; Zhou, Bingying; Wang, Li; Chen, Zheng; Takahashi, Joseph S; Mills, Gordon B; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Han, Leng

    2018-03-28

    Cancer chronotherapy, treatment at specific times during circadian rhythms, endeavors to optimize anti-tumor effects and to lower toxicity. However, comprehensive characterization of clock genes and their clinical relevance in cancer is lacking. We systematically characterized the alterations of clock genes across 32 cancer types by analyzing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, Cancer Therapeutics Response Portal, and The Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer databases. Expression alterations of clock genes are associated with key oncogenic pathways, patient survival, tumor stage, and subtype in multiple cancer types. Correlations between expression of clock genes and of other genes in the genome were altered in cancerous versus normal tissues. We identified interactions between clock genes and clinically actionable genes by analyzing co-expression, protein-protein interaction, and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data and also found that clock gene expression is correlated to anti-cancer drug sensitivity in cancer cell lines. Our study provides a comprehensive analysis of the circadian clock across different cancer types and highlights potential clinical utility of cancer chronotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Finding cancer genes in copy number data and insertional mutagenesis data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, C.N.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease. Step-wise alteration of genes that have a normal function in the cell can lead to the transformation of a healthy cell into a malignant cancer cell. Cancer genes provide several traits to the cell that allow it to become malignant. These traits have been researched for

  13. Targeted sequencing of cancer-related genes in colorectal cancer using next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Won Han

    Full Text Available Recent advance in sequencing technology has enabled comprehensive profiling of genetic alterations in cancer. We have established a targeted sequencing platform using next-generation sequencing (NGS technology for clinical use, which can provide mutation and copy number variation data. NGS was performed with paired-end library enriched with exons of 183 cancer-related genes. Normal and tumor tissue pairs of 60 colorectal adenocarcinomas were used to test feasibility. Somatic mutation and copy number alteration were analyzed. A total of 526 somatic non-synonymous sequence variations were found in 113 genes. Among these, 278 single nucleotide variations were 232 different somatic point mutations. 216 SNV were 79 known single nucleotide polymorphisms in the dbSNP. 32 indels were 28 different indel mutations. Median number of mutated gene per tumor was 4 (range 0-23. Copy number gain (>X2 fold was found in 65 genes in 40 patients, whereas copy number loss (genes in 39 patients. The most frequently altered genes (mutation and/or copy number alteration were APC in 35 patients (58%, TP53 in 34 (57%, and KRAS in 24 (40%. Altered gene list revealed ErbB signaling pathway as the most commonly involved pathway (25 patients, 42%. Targeted sequencing platform using NGS technology is feasible for clinical use and provides comprehensive genetic alteration data.

  14. Cancer-associated loss of TARSH gene expression in human primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Kunihiko; Shimada, Junichi; Uekawa, Natsuko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Maruyama, Mitsuo; Fushiki, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    We have previously identified mouse Tarsh as one of the cellular senescence-related genes and showed the loss of expression of TARSH mRNA in four human lung cancer cell lines. TARSH is a presumptive signal transduction molecule interacting with NESH, which is implicated to have some roles in lung cancer metastasis. The amplification of complete ORF-encoding TARSH cDNA was done with reverse transcription-PCR. Northern blotting was carried out using TARSH cDNA probes. To clarify the relationship between TARSH and lung cancer, we quantified TARSH mRNA expression in 15 human lung cancer cell lines and 32 primary non-small cell lung cancers. We first determined the complete ORF-encoding cDNA sequence which is expressed in the human lung. On the Northern hybridization analysis, TARSH was strongly expressed in the human lung. The expression of TARSH mRNA is remarkably downregulated in all the lung cancer cell lines examined. Furthermore, TARSH expression was significantly low in all of the tumor specimens when compared to the expression in corresponding non-neoplastic lung tissue specimens. The cancer-associated transcriptional inactivation of TARSH suggests that TARSH could be used as a biomarker for lung cancer development as well as a molecular adjunct for lung carcinogenesis in human.

  15. TGFβ receptor 1: an immune susceptibility gene in HPV-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levovitz, Chaya; Chen, Dan; Ivansson, Emma; Gyllensten, Ulf; Finnigan, John P; Alshawish, Sara; Zhang, Weijia; Schadt, Eric E; Posner, Marshal R; Genden, Eric M; Boffetta, Paolo; Sikora, Andrew G

    2014-12-01

    Only a minority of those exposed to human papillomavirus (HPV) develop HPV-related cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. Because host immunity affects infection and progression to cancer, we tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in immune-related genes is a determinant of susceptibility to oropharyngeal cancer and other HPV-associated cancers by performing a multitier integrative computational analysis with oropharyngeal cancer data from a head and neck cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS). Independent analyses, including single-gene, gene-interconnectivity, protein-protein interaction, gene expression, and pathway analysis, identified immune genes and pathways significantly associated with oropharyngeal cancer. TGFβR1, which intersected all tiers of analysis and thus selected for validation, replicated significantly in the head and neck cancer GWAS limited to HPV-seropositive cases and an independent cervical cancer GWAS. The TGFβR1 containing p38-MAPK pathway was significantly associated with oropharyngeal cancer and cervical cancer, and TGFβR1 was overexpressed in oropharyngeal cancer, cervical cancer, and HPV(+) head and neck cancer tumors. These concordant analyses implicate TGFβR1 signaling as a process dysregulated across HPV-related cancers. This study demonstrates that genetic variation in immune-related genes is associated with susceptibility to oropharyngeal cancer and implicates TGFβR1/TGFβ signaling in the development of both oropharyngeal cancer and cervical cancer. Better understanding of the immunogenetic basis of susceptibility to HPV-associated cancers may provide insight into host/virus interactions and immune processes dysregulated in the minority of HPV-exposed individuals who progress to cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Mutational analysis of the BRCA1 gene in 30 Czech ovarian cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most severe of oncological diseases. Inherited mutations in cancer susceptibility genes play a causal role in 5–10% of newly diagnosed tumours. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene alterations are found in the majority of these cases. The aim of this study was to analyse the BRCA1 gene in the ovarian ...

  17. Mutational analysis of the BRCA1 gene in 30 Czech ovarian cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most severe of oncological diseases. Inherited mutations in cancer susceptibility genes play a causal role in 5–10% of newly diagnosed tumours. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene alterations are found in the major- ity of these cases. The aim of this study was to analyse the BRCA1 gene in the ovarian ...

  18. Molecular genetic analysis of tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Je Ho; Park, Sang Yun

    1992-04-01

    To examine the loci of putative tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancers, we performed the molecular genetic analysis with fresh human ovarian cancers and observed the following data. Frequent allelic losses were observed on chromosomes 4p(42%), 6p(50%), 7p(43%), 8q(31%), 12p(38%), 12q(33%), 16p(33%), 16q(37%), and 19p(34%) in addition to the previously reported 6q, 11p, and 17p in ovarian caroinomas. we have used an additional probe, TCP10 to narrow down the deleted region on chromosome 6q. TCP10 was reported to be mapped to 6q 25-27. Allelic loss was found to be 40% in epithelial ovarian caroinomas. This finding suggests that chromosome 6q 24-27 is one of putative region haboring the tumor suppressor gene of epithelial ovarian cancer (particularly serous type). To examine the association between FAL(Fractional Allelic Loss) and histopathological features, the FAL value on each phenotypically different tumor was calculated as the ratio of the number of allelic losses versus the number of cases informative in each chromosomal arm. The average FALs for each phenotypically different tumor were: serous cystoadenocarcinomas. FAL=0.31 : mucinous 0.12 : and clear cell carcinoma. FAL=0.20. (Author)

  19. Statistical Redundancy Testing for Improved Gene Selection in Cancer Classification Using Microarray Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sunil Rao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In gene selection for cancer classifi cation using microarray data, we define an eigenvalue-ratio statistic to measure a gene’s contribution to the joint discriminability when this gene is included into a set of genes. Based on this eigenvalueratio statistic, we define a novel hypothesis testing for gene statistical redundancy and propose two gene selection methods. Simulation studies illustrate the agreement between statistical redundancy testing and gene selection methods. Real data examples show the proposed gene selection methods can select a compact gene subset which can not only be used to build high quality cancer classifiers but also show biological relevance.

  20. Transcriptome profiling to discover defense-related genes associated with resistance line ty-5 against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a whitefly-transmitted begomovirus, has caused serious economic losses to tomato crops in the U.S. and around the world. The most effective management would be the use of a TYLCV-resistant tomato cultivar. Several sources of TYLCV resistance genes have been ide...

  1. Characterization of A-11, a newly discovered X-chromosomal gene that is under both single-active-X control and tissue-specific control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadon, N.L.

    1987-01-01

    The A-11 transcript is present in fibroblasts, but is not normally expressed in B- or T-lymphoblastoid cells. The regulation of the A-11 loci on both the active and inactive X chromosomes is very easily perturbed. The A-11 locus on the fibroblast-derived inactive X in a hybrid cell is reactivated at a very high rate by 5-azacytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation, while the A-11 locus on the active X in B-lymphoblastoid cells is derepressed at a very high rate after gamma irradiation. The A-11 gene codes for a mature transcript of about 1.9 kb. The A-11 cDNA clone is incomplete, and contains 753 bases from the 3' end of the gene. A genomic clone that contains about 17 kb of human DNA and hybridizes to the A-11 cDNA was isolated. This clone contains at least the last exon of the A-11 gene, as determined by Northern blotting, nuclease protection experiments, and DNA sequencing. When the genomic clone is transferred into mouse cells. A-11 transcripts of both normal and abnormal sizes are produced, indicating that it is possible that the genomic clone contains the entire locus. However, at this time, the 5' end of the gene has not been located

  2. Finding Combination of Features from Promoter Regions for Ovarian Cancer-related Gene Group Classification

    KAUST Repository

    Olayan, Rawan S.

    2012-12-01

    In classification problems, it is always important to use the suitable combination of features that will be employed by classifiers. Generating the right combination of features usually results in good classifiers. In the situation when the problem is not well understood, data items are usually described by many features in the hope that some of these may be the relevant or most relevant ones. In this study, we focus on one such problem related to genes implicated in ovarian cancer (OC). We try to recognize two important OC-related gene groups: oncogenes, which support the development and progression of OC, and oncosuppressors, which oppose such tendencies. For this, we use the properties of promoters of these genes. We identified potential “regulatory features” that characterize OC-related oncogenes and oncosuppressors promoters. In our study, we used 211 oncogenes and 39 oncosuppressors. For these, we identified 538 characteristic sequence motifs from their promoters. Promoters are annotated by these motifs and derived feature vectors used to develop classification models. We made a comparison of a number of classification models in their ability to distinguish oncogenes from oncosuppressors. Based on 10-fold cross-validation, the resultant model was able to separate the two classes with sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 100% with the complete set of features. Moreover, we developed another recognition model where we attempted to distinguish oncogenes and oncosuppressors as one group from other OC-related genes. That model achieved accuracy of 82%. We believe that the results of this study will help in discovering other OC-related oncogenes and oncosuppressors not identified as yet.

  3. Fusion genes: A promising tool combating against cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Theobard, Rutaganda; Cheng, Hongye; Xing, Mengtao; Zhang, Jianying

    2018-01-31

    The driving roles of fusion genes during tumorigenesis have been recognized for decades, with efficacies demonstrated in clinical diagnosis and targeted therapy. With advances in sequencing technologies and computational biology, a surge in the identification of fusion genes has been witnessed during the past decade. The discovery and presence of splicing based fusions in normal tissues have challenged our canonical conceptions on fusion genes and offered us novel medical opportunities. The specificity of fusion genes to neoplastic tissues and their diverse functionalities during carcinogenesis foster them as promising tools in the battle against cancer. It is time to re-visit and comb through our cutting-edge knowledge on fusion genes to accelerate clinical translation of these internal markers. Urged as such, we are encouraged to categorize fusion events according to mechanisms leading to their generation, oncological consequences and clinical implications, offer insights on fusion occurrence across tumors from the system level, highlight feasible practices in fusion-related pharmaceutical development, and identify understudied yet important niches that may lead future research trend in this field. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification and Validation of Housekeeping Genes for Gene Expression Analysis of Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemma, Silvia; Avnet, Sofia; Salerno, Manuela; Chano, Tokuhiro; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulation, through the comparison of the gene expression signature in respect to the native cancer cells, is particularly important for the identification of novel and more effective anticancer strategies. However, CSC have peculiar characteristics in terms of adhesion, growth, and metabolism that possibly implies a different modulation of the expression of the most commonly used housekeeping genes (HKG), like b-actin (ACTB). Although it is crucial to identify which are the most stable HKG genes to normalize the data derived from quantitative Real-Time PCR analysis to obtain robust and consistent results, an exhaustive validation of reference genes in CSC is still missing. Here, we isolated CSC spheres from different musculoskeletal sarcomas and carcinomas as a model to investigate on the stability of the mRNA expression of 15 commonly used HKG, in respect to the native cells. The selected genes were analysed for the variation coefficient and compared using the popular algorithms NormFinder and geNorm to evaluate stability ranking. As a result, we found that: 1) Tata Binding Protein (TBP), Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ), Peptidylprolyl isomerase A (PPIA), and Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) are the most stable HKG for the comparison between CSC and native cells; 2) at least four reference genes should be considered for robust results; 3) the use of ACTB should not be recommended, 4) specific HKG should be considered for studies that are focused only on a specific tumor type, like sarcoma or carcinoma. Our results should be taken in consideration for all the studies of gene expression analysis of CSC, and will substantially contribute for future investigations aimed to identify novel anticancer therapy based on CSC targeting. PMID:26894994

  5. Genetic polymorphism of the OPG gene associated with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ney, Jasmin Teresa; Juhasz-Boess, Ingolf; Gruenhage, Frank; Graeber, Stefan; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Solomayer, Erich Franz; Assmann, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    The receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), its ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been reported to play a role in the pathophysiological bone turnover and in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Based on this we investigated the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within RANK, RANKL and OPG and their possible association to breast cancer risk. Genomic DNA was obtained from Caucasian participants consisting of 307 female breast cancer patients and 396 gender-matched healthy controls. We studied seven SNPs in the genes of OPG (rs3102735, rs2073618), RANK (rs1805034, rs35211496) and RANKL (rs9533156, rs2277438, rs1054016) using TaqMan genotyping assays. Statistical analyses were performed using the χ 2 -tests for 2 x 2 and 2 x 3 tables. The allelic frequencies (OR: 1.508 CI: 1.127-2.018, p=0.006) and the genotype distribution (p=0.019) of the OPG SNP rs3102735 differed significantly between breast cancer patients and healthy controls. The minor allele C and the corresponding homo- and heterozygous genotypes are more common in breast cancer patients (minor allele C: 18.4% vs. 13.0%; genotype CC: 3.3% vs. 1.3%; genotype CT: 30.3% vs. 23.5%). No significantly changed risk was detected in the other investigated SNPs. Additional analysis showed significant differences when comparing patients with invasive vs. non-invasive tumors (OPG rs2073618) as well as in terms of tumor localization (RANK rs35211496) and body mass index (RANKL rs9533156 and rs1054016). This is the first study reporting a significant association of the SNP rs3102735 (OPG) with the susceptibility to develop breast cancer in the Caucasian population

  6. Derivation of a triple mosaic adenovirus for cancer gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizhe Tang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A safe and efficacious cancer medicine is necessary due to the increasing population of cancer patients whose particular diseases cannot be cured by the currently available treatment. Adenoviral (Ad vectors represent a promising therapeutic medicine for human cancer therapy. However, several improvements are needed in order for Ad vectors to be effective cancer therapeutics, which include, but are not limited to, improvement of cellular uptake, enhanced cancer cell killing activity, and the capability of vector visualization and tracking once injected into the patients. To this end, we attempted to develop an Ad as a multifunctional platform incorporating targeting, imaging, and therapeutic motifs. In this study, we explored the utility of this proposed platform by generating an Ad vector containing the poly-lysine (pK, the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK, and the monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1 as targeting, tumor cell killing, and imaging motifs, respectively. Our study herein demonstrates the generation of the triple mosaic Ad vector with pK, HSV-1 TK, and mRFP1 at the carboxyl termini of Ad minor capsid protein IX (pIX. In addition, the functionalities of pK, HSV-1 TK, and mRFP1 proteins on the Ad vector were retained as confirmed by corresponding functional assays, indicating the potential multifunctional application of this new Ad vector for cancer gene therapy. The validation of the triple mosaic Ad vectors also argues for the ability of pIX modification as a base for the development of multifunctional Ad vectors.

  7. The Function of PTEN Tumor Suppressor Gene in Prostate Cancer Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Hong

    2001-01-01

    .... The recently identified tumor suppressor gene PTEN is a promising candidate for being involved in prostate cancer since it is frequently deleted in prostate cancer, especially in advanced or metastatic forms...

  8. The Function of PTEN Tumor Suppressor Gene in Prostate Cancer Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Hong

    2002-01-01

    .... The recently identified tumor suppressor gene PTEN is a promising candidate for being involved in prostate cancer since it is frequently deleted in prostate cancer, especially in advanced or metastatic forms...

  9. Common alleles in candidate susceptibility genes associated with risk and development of epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Notaridou, Maria; Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra

    2011-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation in the population is associated with susceptibility to epithelial ovarian cancer. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and expression microarray analysis identified nine genes associated with functional suppression of tumorogenicity in ovarian cancer cell lines...

  10. Screening for candidate genes related to breast cancer with cDNA microarray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Juan Xiang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to reveal the exact changes during the occurrence of breast cancer to explore significant new and promising genes or factors related to this disease. Methods: We compared the gene expression profiles of breast cancer tissues with its uninvolved normal breast tissues as controls using the cDNA microarray analysis in seven breast cancer patients. Further, one representative gene, named IFI30, was quantitatively analyzed by real-time PCR to confirm the result of the cDNA microarray analysis. Results: A total of 427 genes were identified with significantly differential expression, 221 genes were up-regulated and 206 genes were down-regulated. And the result of cDNA microarray analysis was validated by detection of IFI30 mRNA level changes by real-time PCR. Genes for cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell division, mitosis, apoptosis, and immune response were enriched in the up-regulated genes, while genes for cell adhesion, proteolysis, and transport were significantly enriched in the down-regulated genes in breast cancer tissues compared with normal breast tissues by a gene ontology analysis. Conclusion: Our present study revealed a range of differentially expressed genes between breast cancer tissues and normal breast tissues, and provide candidate genes for further study focusing on the pathogenesis and new biomarkers for breast cancer. Keywords: Breast neoplasms, Candidate genes, Microarray

  11. De Novo Sequencing and Analysis of the Safflower Transcriptome to Discover Putative Genes Associated with Safflor Yellow in Carthamus tinctorius L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuming Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L., an important traditional Chinese medicine, is cultured widely for its pharmacological effects, but little is known regarding the genes related to the metabolic regulation of the safflower’s yellow pigment. To investigate genes related to safflor yellow biosynthesis, 454 pyrosequencing of flower RNA at different developmental stages was performed, generating large databases.In this study, we analyzed 454 sequencing data from different flowering stages in safflower. In total, 1,151,324 raw reads and 1,140,594 clean reads were produced, which were assembled into 51,591 unigenes with an average length of 679 bp and a maximum length of 5109 bp. Among the unigenes, 40,139 were in the early group, 39,768 were obtained from the full group and 28,316 were detected in both samples. With the threshold of “log2 ratio ≥ 1”, there were 34,464 differentially expressed genes, of which 18,043 were up-regulated and 16,421 were down-regulated in the early flower library. Based on the annotations of the unigenes, 281 pathways were predicted. We selected 12 putative genes and analyzed their expression levels using quantitative real time-PCR. The results were consistent with the 454 sequencing results. In addition, the expression of chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase and anthocyanidin synthase, which are involved in safflor yellow biosynthesis and safflower yellow pigment (SYP content, were analyzed in different flowering periods, indicating that their expression levels were related to SYP synthesis. Moreover, to further confirm the results of the 454 pyrosequencing, full-length cDNA of chalcone isomerase (CHI and anthocyanidin synthase (ANS were cloned from safflower petal by RACE (Rapid-amplification of cDNA ends method according to fragment of the transcriptome.

  12. Recessive Cancer Genes Engage in Negative Genetic Interactions with Their Functional Paralogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo D’Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genetic heterogeneity offers a wide repertoire of molecular determinants to be screened as therapeutic targets. Here, we identify potential anticancer targets by exploiting negative genetic interactions between genes with driver loss-of-function mutations (recessive cancer genes and their functionally redundant paralogs. We identify recessive genes with additional copies and experimentally test our predictions on three paralogous pairs. We confirm digenic negative interactions between two cancer genes (SMARCA4 and CDH1 and their corresponding paralogs (SMARCA2 and CDH3. Furthermore, we identify a trigenic negative interaction between the cancer gene DNMT3A, its functional paralog DNMT3B, and a third gene, DNMT1, which encodes the only other human DNA-methylase domain. Although our study does not exclude other causes of synthetic lethality, it suggests that functionally redundant paralogs of cancer genes could be targets in anticancer therapy.

  13. The potential for tumor suppressor gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Andrew C; Ludwig, Megan L; Spector, Matthew E; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

  14. Gene expression analysis in human breast cancer associated blood vessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan T Jones

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5-72 fold in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of

  15. Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-29

    D-related gene polymorphisms and prostate cancer aggressiveness. TagSNPs (n=315) in 13 genes (VDR, GC, CYP24A1, CYP27A1 , CYP27B1, CYP2R1, CYP3A4...1.02-2.10) 0.0409 *Abbreviations: CASR: Calcium sensing receptor; CYP24A1: Cytochrome P450 24A1; CYP27A1 : Cytochrome P450 27A1; CYP27B1: Cytochrome...CYP24A1, CYP27A1 , CYP27B1, CYP2R1, CYP3A4, DHCR7, CASR, NADSYN1, RXRA, RXRB, RXRG) were genotyped using Illumina GoldenGate or Sequenom assays in 524

  16. Overview of Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression and its Applications to Cervical Cancer Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Chao

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the leading female cancers in Taiwan and ranks as the fifth cause of cancer death in the female population. Human papillomavirus has been established as the causative agent for cervical neoplasia and cervical cancer. However, the tumor biology involved in the prognoses of different cell types in early cancers and tumor responses to radiation in advanced cancers remain largely unknown. The introduction of microarray technologies in the 1990s has provided genome-wide strategies for searching tens of thousands of genes simultaneously. In this review, we first summarize the two types of microarrays: oligonucleotides microarray and cDNA microarray. Then, we review the studies of functional genomics in cervical cancer. Gene expression studies that involved cervical cancer cell lines, cervical cells of cancer versus normal ectocervix, cancer tissues of different histology, radioresistant versus radiosensitive patients, and the combinatorial gene expression associated with chromosomal amplifications are discussed. In particular, CEACAM5, TACSTD1, S100P, and MSLN have shown to be upregulated in adenocarcinoma, and increased expression levels of CEACAM5 and TACSTD1 were significantly correlated with poorer patient outcomes. On the other hand, 35 genes, including apoptotic genes (e.g. BIK, TEGT, SSI-3, hypoxia-inducible genes (e.g. HIF1A, CA12, and tumor cell invasion and metastasis genes (e.g. CTSL, CTSB, PLAU, CD44, have been noted to echo the hypothesis that increased tumor hypoxia leads to radiation resistance in cervical cancer during radiation.

  17. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves [El Cerrito, CA; Campisi, Judith [Berkeley, CA

    2008-09-30

    A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

  18. Breast Cancer Gene Therapy: Development of Novel Non-Invasive Magnetic Resonance Assay to Optimize Efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mason, Ralph P

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treatment of breast cancer. In particular; clinical trials are underway to apply therapeutic genes related to pro-drug activation or to modulate the activity of oncogenes by blocking promoter sites...

  19. Breast Cancer Gene Therapy: Development of Novel Non-Invasive Magnetic Resonance Assay to Optimize Efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mason, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treatment of breast cancer. In particular, clinical trials are underway to apply therapeutic genes related to pro-drug activation or to modulate the activity of oncogenes by blocking promoter sites...

  20. Breast Cancer Gene Therapy: Development of Novel Non-Invasive Magnetic Resonance Assay to Optimize Efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mason, Ralph P

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treatment of breast cancer. In particular clinical trials are underway to apply therapeutic genes related to pro-drug activation or to modulate the activity of oncogenes by blocking promoter sites...

  1. Breast Cancer Gene Therapy: Development of Novel Non-Invasive Magnetic Resonance Assay to Optimize Efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mason, Ralph P

    2006-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treatment of breast cancer. In particular clinical trials are underway to apply therapeutic genes related to pro-drug activation or to modulate the activity of oncogenes by blocking promoter sites...

  2. The 'PUCE CAFE' Project: the first 15K coffee microarray, a new tool for discovering candidate genes correlated to agronomic and quality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privat, Isabelle; Bardil, Amélie; Gomez, Aureliano Bombarely; Severac, Dany; Dantec, Christelle; Fuentes, Ivanna; Mueller, Lukas; Joët, Thierry; Pot, David; Foucrier, Séverine; Dussert, Stéphane; Leroy, Thierry; Journot, Laurent; de Kochko, Alexandre; Campa, Claudine; Combes, Marie-Christine; Lashermes, Philippe; Bertrand, Benoit

    2011-01-05

    Understanding the genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of coffee biology will have an impact on future agronomical improvements for this economically important tree. During the past years, EST collections were generated in Coffee, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics. The "PUCE CAFE" Project, organized by the scientific consortium NESTLE/IRD/CIRAD, has developed an oligo-based microarray using 15,721 unigenes derived from published coffee EST sequences mostly obtained from different stages of fruit development and leaves in Coffea Canephora (Robusta). Hybridizations for two independent experiments served to compare global gene expression profiles in three types of tissue matter (mature beans, leaves and flowers) in C. canephora as well as in the leaves of three different coffee species (C. canephora, C. eugenoides and C. arabica). Microarray construction, statistical analyses and validation by Q-PCR analysis are presented in this study. We have generated the first 15 K coffee array during this PUCE CAFE project, granted by Génoplante (the French consortium for plant genomics). This new tool will help study functional genomics in a wide range of experiments on various plant tissues, such as analyzing bean maturation or resistance to pathogens or drought. Furthermore, the use of this array has proven to be valid in different coffee species (diploid or tetraploid), drastically enlarging its impact for high-throughput gene expression in the community of coffee research.

  3. Students Discover Unique Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Three undergraduate students, from Leiden University in the Netherlands, have discovered an extrasolar planet. The extraordinary find, which turned up during their research project, is about five times as massive as Jupiter. This is also the first planet discovered orbiting a fast-rotating hot star. Omega Centauri ESO PR Photo 45a/08 A planet around a hot star The students were testing a method of investigating the light fluctuations of thousands of stars in the OGLE database in an automated way. The brightness of one of the stars was found to decrease for two hours every 2.5 days by about one percent. Follow-up observations, taken with ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, confirmed that this phenomenon is caused by a planet passing in front of the star, blocking part of the starlight at regular intervals. According to Ignas Snellen, supervisor of the research project, the discovery was a complete surprise. "The project was actually meant to teach the students how to develop search algorithms. But they did so well that there was time to test their algorithm on a so far unexplored database. At some point they came into my office and showed me this light curve. I was completely taken aback!" The students, Meta de Hoon, Remco van der Burg, and Francis Vuijsje, are very enthusiastic. "It is exciting not just to find a planet, but to find one as unusual as this one; it turns out to be the first planet discovered around a fast rotating star, and it's also the hottest star found with a planet," says Meta. "The computer needed more than a thousand hours to do all the calculations," continues Remco. The planet is given the prosaic name OGLE2-TR-L9b. "But amongst ourselves we call it ReMeFra-1, after Remco, Meta, and myself," says Francis. The planet was discovered by looking at the brightness variations of about 15 700 stars, which had been observed by the OGLE survey once or twice per night for about four years between 1997 and 2000. Because the data had been made public

  4. Highly preserved consensus gene modules in human papilloma virus 16 positive cervical cancer and head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianglan; Cha, In-Ho; Kim, Ki-Yeol

    2017-12-26

    In this study, we investigated the consensus gene modules in head and neck cancer (HNC) and cervical cancer (CC). We used a publicly available gene expression dataset, GSE6791, which included 42 HNC, 14 normal head and neck, 20 CC and 8 normal cervical tissue samples. To exclude bias because of different human papilloma virus (HPV) types, we analyzed HPV16-positive samples only. We identified 3824 genes common to HNC and CC samples. Among these, 977 genes showed high connectivity and were used to construct consensus modules. We demonstrated eight consensus gene modules for HNC and CC using the dissimilarity measure and average linkage hierarchical clustering methods. These consensus modules included genes with significant biological functions, including ATP binding and extracellular exosome. Eigengen network analysis revealed the consensus modules were highly preserved with high connectivity. These findings demonstrate that HPV16-positive head and neck and cervical cancers share highly preserved consensus gene modules with common potentially therapeutic targets.

  5. Analysis of Kras gene from induced pancreatic cancer rats administered with Momordicacharantia and Ocimumbasilicum leaf extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Minari

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze K-ras gene from induced pancreatic cancer rats administered with Momordicacharantia and Ocimumbasilicum leaf extracts. Methods: Twenty-five (25 adult rats weighing between 90–120 g were divided into 5 groups namely RA, RB, RC, NC and PC, each group had 5 rats. The PC which served as the control was fed with normal fish meal and water ad libitum; the NC which is the negative control received 20 mg/ml/week of Nitrosamines only while other groups received different concentrations of aqueous extract of both M. charantia and O. basilicum (200 mg, 100 mg, 50 mg and Nitrosamine. Qualitative phytochemical screening of the aqueous extract of both M. charantia and O. basilicum was carried out. The extraction of DNA was done using Jena Bioscience DNA preparation kit and the protocol was based on the spin column based genomic DNA purification from blood, animal and plant cells. Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the K-ras gene extracted from the pancreas tissues of experimental rats while hematoxylinand eosin staining was used for histological assay. Results: Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, flavonoids, saponins and glycosides in M. charantia while saponins, tannins and glycosides were discovered in O. basilicum. Significant reduction in the weight of rats treated with 200 mg of aqueous extracts of M. charantia and O. basilicum while rats that were dosed with nitrosamines only showed a slight increase in weight in the first three weeks when compared to the positive control. Histological studies revealed that there is both enlargement and reduction in the islet cell size, with one of the sections showing a normal islet cell size. While the agarose gel electrophoresis revealed that there may be possibility of prevention of damage to k-ras gene as a result of the effect of plants extract. Conclusion: This work has shown that the leaf extracts of both M. charantia and O. basilicum

  6. Multivariate Entropy Characterizes the Gene Expression and Protein-Protein Networks in Four Types of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Juarez-Flores

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an important urgency to detect cancer at early stages to treat it, to improve the patients’ lifespans, and even to cure it. In this work, we determined the entropic contributions of genes in cancer networks. We detected sudden changes in entropy values in melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, and squamous lung cell carcinoma associated to transitions from healthy controls to cancer. We also identified the most relevant genes involved in carcinogenic process of the four types of cancer with the help of entropic changes in local networks. Their corresponding proteins could be used as potential targets for treatments and as biomarkers of cancer.

  7. Discovering Phonemes of Bidayuh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jecky Misieng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There are generally three views of the notion of a phoneme. The structuralist view of the phoneme focuses on this language phenomenon as a phonetic reality. In discovering phonemes of a language, phonologists who hold this view will look for minimal contrasting pairs as a way to determine contrasting sounds of that language. They will also look for allophones or two sounds of the same phoneme which may appear in complementary distribution. This paper will discuss the possible application of the structuralist approach to analyzing the phonemes of a dialect of Bidayuh, one of the Malayo-Polynesian languages spoken in the northern region of Borneo.

  8. Discovering system requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  9. Myeloid translocation genes differentially regulate colorectal cancer programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, Bobak; Bradley, Amber M.; Mittal, Mukul K.; Short, Sarah P.; Thompson, Joshua J.; Barrett, Caitlyn W.; Naik, Rishi D.; Bilotta, Anthony J.; Washington, Mary K.; Revetta, Frank L.; Smith, Jesse J.; Chen, Xi; Wilson, Keith T.; Hiebert, Scott W.; Williams, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid translocation genes (MTGs), originally identified as chromosomal translocations in acute myelogenous leukemia, are transcriptional corepressors that regulate hematopoietic stem cell programs. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database revealed that MTGs were mutated in epithelial malignancy and suggested that loss of function might promote tumorigenesis. Genetic deletion of MTGR1 and MTG16 in the mouse has revealed unexpected and unique roles within the intestinal epithelium. Mtgr1−/− mice have progressive depletion of all intestinal secretory cells, and Mtg16−/− mice have a decrease in goblet cells. Furthermore, both Mtgr1−/− and Mtg16−/− mice have increased intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. We thus hypothesized that loss of MTGR1 or MTG16 would modify Apc1638/+-dependent intestinal tumorigenesis. Mtgr1−/− mice, but not Mtg16−/− mice, had a 10-fold increase in tumor multiplicity. This was associated with more advanced dysplasia, including progression to invasive adenocarcinoma, and augmented intratumoral proliferation. Analysis of ChIP-seq datasets for MTGR1 and MTG16 targets indicated that MTGR1 can regulate Wnt and Notch signaling. In support of this, immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis revealed that both Wnt and Notch signaling pathways were hyperactive in Mtgr1−/− tumors. Furthermore, in human colorectal cancer (CRC) samples MTGR1 was downregulated at both the transcript and protein level. Overall our data indicates that MTGR1 has a context dependent effect on intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:27270437

  10. A Gene Gravity Model for the Evolution of Cancer Genomes: A Study of 3,000 Cancer Genomes across 9 Cancer Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen-Ching; Zhao, Junfei; Jia, Peilin; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    Cancer development and progression result from somatic evolution by an accumulation of genomic alterations. The effects of those alterations on the fitness of somatic cells lead to evolutionary adaptations such as increased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and altered anticancer drug responses. However, there are few general mathematical models to quantitatively examine how perturbations of a single gene shape subsequent evolution of the cancer genome. In this study, we proposed the gene gravity model to study the evolution of cancer genomes by incorporating the genome-wide transcription and somatic mutation profiles of ~3,000 tumors across 9 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into a broad gene network. We found that somatic mutations of a cancer driver gene may drive cancer genome evolution by inducing mutations in other genes. This functional consequence is often generated by the combined effect of genetic and epigenetic (e.g., chromatin regulation) alterations. By quantifying cancer genome evolution using the gene gravity model, we identified six putative cancer genes (AHNAK, COL11A1, DDX3X, FAT4, STAG2, and SYNE1). The tumor genomes harboring the nonsynonymous somatic mutations in these genes had a higher mutation density at the genome level compared to the wild-type groups. Furthermore, we provided statistical evidence that hypermutation of cancer driver genes on inactive X chromosomes is a general feature in female cancer genomes. In summary, this study sheds light on the functional consequences and evolutionary characteristics of somatic mutations during tumorigenesis by propelling adaptive cancer genome evolution, which would provide new perspectives for cancer research and therapeutics. PMID:26352260

  11. Association of MTHFR gene polymorphisms with breast cancer survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechanic Leah E

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene, C677T and A1298C, lead to decreased enzyme activity and affect chemosensitivity of tumor cells. We investigated whether these MTHFR SNPs were associated with breast cancer survival in African-American and Caucasian women. Methods African-American (n = 143 and Caucasian (n = 105 women, who had incident breast cancer with surgery, were recruited between 1993 and 2003 from the greater Baltimore area, Maryland, USA. Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between MTHFR SNPs and disease-specific survival. Results We observed opposite effects of the MTHFR polymorphisms A1298C and C677T on breast cancer survival. Carriers of the variant allele at codon 1298 (A/C or C/C had reduced survival when compared to homozygous carriers of the common A allele [Hazard ratio (HR = 2.05; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.05–4.00]. In contrast, breast cancer patients with the variant allele at codon 677 (C/T or T/T had improved survival, albeit not statistically significant, when compared to individuals with the common C/C genotype (HR = 0.65; 95% CI, 0.31–1.35. The effects were stronger in patients with estrogen receptor-negative tumors (HR = 2.70; 95% CI, 1.17–6.23 for A/C or C/C versus A/A at codon 1298; HR = 0.36; 95% CI, 0.12–1.04 for C/T or T/T versus C/C at codon 677. Interactions between the two MTHFR genotypes and race/ethnicity on breast cancer survival were also observed (A1298C, pinteraction = 0.088; C677T, pinteraction = 0.026. Conclusion We found that the MTHFR SNPs, C677T and A1298C, were associated with breast cancer survival. The variant alleles had opposite effects on disease outcome in the study population. Race/ethnicity modified the association between the two SNPs and breast cancer survival.

  12. MAP kinase genes and colon and rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L.

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate many cellular functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. We evaluate genetic variation in the c-Jun-N-terminal kinases, p38, and extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 MAPK-signaling pathways and colon and rectal cancer risk using data from population-based case-control studies (colon: n = 1555 cases, 1956 controls; rectal: n = 754 cases, 959 controls). We assess 19 genes (DUSP1, DUSP2, DUSP4, DUSP6, DUSP7, MAP2K1, MAP3K1, MAP3K2, MAP3K3, MAP3K7, MAP3K9, MAP3K10, MAP3K11, MAPK1, MAPK3, MAPK8, MAPK12, MAPK14 and RAF1). MAP2K1 rs8039880 [odds ratio (OR) = 0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.38, 0.83; GG versus AA genotype] and MAP3K9 rs11625206 (OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.14, 1.76; recessive model) were associated with colon cancer (P adj value rectal cancer (P adj cancer risk. Genetic variants had unique associations with KRAS, TP53 and CIMP+ tumors. DUSP2 rs1724120 [hazard rate ratio (HRR) = 0.72, 95%CI = 0.54, 0.96; AA versus GG/GA), MAP3K10 rs112956 (HRR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.10, 1.76; CT/TT versus CC) and MAP3K11 (HRR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.18, 2.62 TT versus GG/GT) influenced survival after diagnosis with colon cancer; MAP2K1 rs8039880 (HRR = 2.53, 95% CI 1.34, 4.79 GG versus AG/GG) and Raf1 rs11923427 (HRR = 0.59 95% CI = 0.40, 0.86; AA versus TT/TA) were associated with rectal cancer survival. These data suggest that genetic variation in the MAPK-signaling pathway influences colorectal cancer risk and survival after diagnosis. Associations may be modified by lifestyle factors that influence inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:23027623

  13. Frequency of Germline Mutations in 25 Cancer Susceptibility Genes in a Sequential Series of Patients With Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Nadine; Lin, Nancy U; Kidd, John; Allen, Brian A; Singh, Nanda; Wenstrup, Richard J; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Winer, Eric P; Garber, Judy E

    2016-05-01

    Testing for germline mutations in BRCA1/2 is standard for select patients with breast cancer to guide clinical management. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) allows testing for mutations in additional breast cancer predisposition genes. The frequency of germline mutations detected by using NGS has been reported in patients with breast cancer who were referred for BRCA1/2 testing or with triple-negative breast cancer. We assessed the frequency and predictors of mutations in 25 cancer predisposition genes, including BRCA1/2, in a sequential series of patients with breast cancer at an academic institution to examine the utility of genetic testing in this population. Patients with stages I to III breast cancer who were seen at a single cancer center between 2010 and 2012, and who agreed to participate in research DNA banking, were included (N = 488). Personal and family cancer histories were collected and germline DNA was sequenced with NGS to identify mutations. Deleterious mutations were identified in 10.7% of women, including 6.1% in BRCA1/2 (5.1% in non-Ashkenazi Jewish patients) and 4.6% in other breast/ovarian cancer predisposition genes including CHEK2 (n = 10), ATM (n = 4), BRIP1 (n = 4), and one each in PALB2, PTEN, NBN, RAD51C, RAD51D, MSH6, and PMS2. Whereas young age (P breast cancer (P = .01), and family history of breast/ovarian cancer (P = .01) predicted for BRCA1/2 mutations, no factors predicted for mutations in other breast cancer predisposition genes. Among sequential patients with breast cancer, 10.7% were found to have a germline mutation in a gene that predisposes women to breast or ovarian cancer, using a panel of 25 predisposition genes. Factors that predict for BRCA1/2 mutations do not predict for mutations in other breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility genes when these genes are analyzed as a single group. Additional cohorts will be helpful to define individuals at higher risk of carrying mutations in genes other than BRCA1/2. © 2016 by American

  14. Identification of gene expression signature modulated by nicotinamide in a mouse bladder cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Kyu Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urinary bladder cancer is often a result of exposure to chemical carcinogens such as cigarette smoking. Because of histological similarity, chemically-induced rodent cancer model was largely used for human bladder cancer studies. Previous investigations have suggested that nicotinamide, water-soluble vitamin B3, may play a key role in cancer prevention through its activities in cellular repair. However, to date, evidence towards identifying the genetic alterations of nicotinamide in cancer prevention has not been provided. Here, we search for the molecular signatures of cancer prevention by nicotinamide using a N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl-nitrosamine (BBN-induced urinary bladder cancer model in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Via microarray gene expression profiling of 20 mice and 233 human bladder samples, we performed various statistical analyses and immunohistochemical staining for validation. The expression patterns of 893 genes associated with nicotinamide activity in cancer prevention were identified by microarray data analysis. Gene network analyses of these 893 genes revealed that the Myc and its associated genes may be the most important regulator of bladder cancer prevention, and the gene expression signature correlated well with protein expression data. Comparison of gene expression between human and mouse revealed that BBN-induced mouse bladder cancers exhibited gene expression profiles that were more similar to those of invasive human bladder cancers than to those of non-invasive human bladder cancers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that nicotinamide plays an important role as a chemo-preventive and therapeutic agent in bladder cancer through the regulation of the Myc oncogenic signature. Nicotinamide may represent a promising therapeutic modality in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  15. Expression levels of resistant genes affect cervical cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fengmei; Gao, Bo; Li, Rui; Li, Wencui; Chen, Wei; Yu, Zongtao; Zhang, Jicai

    2017-05-01

    Tumor cells may develop multidrug resistance (MDR) to various chemotherapy regimens. Such resistance reduces the sensitivity of cells to chemotherapy drugs, leading to the failure of cervical cancer (CC) treatment and disease progression. The present study aimed to investigate the role of MDR1, lung resistance protein (LRP) and placental glutathione S‑transferase π 1 (GSTP1) in CC and MDR, and the prognostic value of these genes. The mRNA expression levels of these resistance‑associated genes were determined in 47 CC and 20 healthy cervical tissue samples. Subsequently, the data was analyzed alongside clinicopathological parameters. The mRNA expression levels of MDR1, LRP and GSTP1 in CC were 0.57±0.32, 0.58±0.29 and 0.44±0.24, respectively, whereas those in healthy cervical tissues were 0.19±0.10, 0.17±0.14 and 0.18±0.10, respectively. Therefore, the expression levels of these genes were significantly greater in CC compared with healthy cervical tissue (PMRD1 were increased in the well differentiated group (0.68±0.27) compared with the poorly differentiated group (0.38±0.33; P0.05). Multivariate logistic regression indicated that the degree of differentiation and the MDR1 gene expression levels were predictors of CC prognosis (P<0.05). The survival rate of patients in the MDR1‑negative group was significantly greater compared with the MDR1‑positive group (P<0.05). The results of the present study therefore suggested that MDR1 gene expression is a predictor of poor survival in CC.

  16. [Association between HLA-DQA1 gene copy number polymorphisms and susceptibility to gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-ming; Cheng, Yan; Yu, Dian-ke; Zhai, Kan; Tan, Wen; Lin, Dong-xin

    2012-04-01

    To explore the association between HLA-DQA1 gene copy number polymorphisms and gastric cancer risk in Chinese population, and the interaction of those genes and environmental factors. The genotype of HLA-DQA1 gene copy number polymorphisms was determined in 343 patients with gastric cancer and 330 controls by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Logistic regression model was used to evaluate the impact of this polymorphism on the risk of developing gastric cancer and the gene-environment interaction. Compared with 0 copy of HLA-DQA1 gene carriers, the 2 copies of HLA-DQA1 gene carriers had a significantly increased risk of gastric cancer (OR = 1.87, 95%CI = 1.15 - 3.06, P = 0.012). Gene-environment interaction of HLA-DQA1 gene copy number polymorphisms and Helicobacter pylori infection significantly increased the risk of gastric cancer in a multiplicative manner, with an OR of 3.89 (95%CI = 1.75 - 8.57, P = 0.001). HLA-DQA1 gene copy number polymorphism is associated with gastric cancer susceptibility, and there is a multiplicative gene-environment interaction between this polymorphism and Hp infection in the development of gastric cancer.

  17. Identification of valid reference genes for gene expression studies of human stomach cancer by reverse transcription-qPCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Byoung-Chan; Choi, Eun-Seok; Choi, Il-Ju; Lee, Yeon-Su; Goh, Sung-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a powerful method for the analysis of gene expression. Target gene expression levels are usually normalized to a consistently expressed reference gene also known as internal standard, in the same sample. However, much effort has not been expended thus far in the search for reference genes suitable for the study of stomach cancer using RT-qPCR, although selection of optimal reference genes is critical for interpretation of results. We assessed the suitability of six possible reference genes, beta-actin (ACTB), glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase 1 (HPRT1), beta-2-microglobulin (B2M), ribosomal subunit L29 (RPL29) and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) in 20 normal and tumor stomach tissue pairs of stomach cancer patients and 6 stomach cancer cell lines, by RT-qPCR. Employing expression stability analyses using NormFinder and geNorm algorithms we determined the order of performance of these reference genes and their variation values. This RT-qPCR study showed that there are statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences in the expression levels of HPRT1 and 18S rRNA in 'normal-' versus 'tumor stomach tissues'. The stability analyses by geNorm suggest B2M-GAPDH, as best reference gene combination for 'stomach cancer cell lines'; RPL29-HPRT1, for 'all stomach tissues'; and ACTB-18S rRNA, for 'all stomach cell lines and tissues'. NormFinder also identified B2M as the best reference gene for 'stomach cancer cell lines', RPL29-B2M for 'all stomach tissues', and 18S rRNA-ACTB for 'all stomach cell lines and tissues'. The comparisons of normalized expression of the target gene, GPNMB, showed different interpretation of target gene expression depend on best single reference gene or combination. This study validated RPL29 and RPL29-B2M as the best single reference

  18. Molecular MR imaging of cancer gene therapy. Ferritin transgene reporter takes the stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imaging using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been actively investigated and made rapid progress in the past decade. Applied to cancer gene therapy, the technique's high spatial resolution allows evaluation of gene delivery into target tissues. Because noninvasive monitoring of the duration, location, and magnitude of transgene expression in tumor tissues or cells provides useful information for assessing therapeutic efficacy and optimizing protocols, molecular imaging is expected to become a critical step in the success of cancer gene therapy in the near future. We present a brief overview of the current status of molecular MR imaging, especially in vivo reporter gene imaging using ferritin and other reporters, discuss its application to cancer gene therapy, and present our research of MR imaging detection of electroporation-mediated cancer gene therapy using the ferritin reporter gene. (author)

  19. The Integrative Method Based on the Module-Network for Identifying Driver Genes in Cancer Subtypes

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    Xinguo Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With advances in next-generation sequencing(NGS technologies, a large number of multiple types of high-throughput genomics data are available. A great challenge in exploring cancer progression is to identify the driver genes from the variant genes by analyzing and integrating multi-types genomics data. Breast cancer is known as a heterogeneous disease. The identification of subtype-specific driver genes is critical to guide the diagnosis, assessment of prognosis and treatment of breast cancer. We developed an integrated frame based on gene expression profiles and copy number variation (CNV data to identify breast cancer subtype-specific driver genes. In this frame, we employed statistical machine-learning method to select gene subsets and utilized an module-network analysis method to identify potential candidate driver genes. The final subtype-specific driver genes were acquired by paired-wise comparison in subtypes. To validate specificity of the driver genes, the gene expression data of these genes were applied to classify the patient samples with 10-fold cross validation and the enrichment analysis were also conducted on the identified driver genes. The experimental results show that the proposed integrative method can identify the potential driver genes and the classifier with these genes acquired better performance than with genes identified by other methods.

  20. Selected Aspects of Molecular Diagnostics of Constitutional Alterations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes Associated with Increased Risk of Breast Cancer in the Polish Population

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    Górski Bohdan

    2006-08-01

    discovered in 8.1% and NBS1 mutation (657del5 in 0.8% of the patients. The changes were more frequent in the study than the control group. However, the risk of breast cancer was significantly higher for only three of them. Two changes, namely 5382insC and C61G of the BRCA1 gene revealed a high penetrance (OR 6.2 and 15.0, respectively, while I157T of the CHEK2 gene was associated with a low risk of breast cancer (OR 1.4. Mutations of the BRCA1, CHEK2 and NSB1 genes were significantly more frequent in patients with breast cancer diagnosed prior to 50 years of age. The mean age at diagnosis was 47.2 years for carriers of the BRCA1 mutation, 50.7 years for NBS1 and 54.2 for CHEK2. The mean age at diagnosis in the group of patients without any if the mutations described above was 56.1 years. When breast cancer patients with the diagnosis before and after 50 years of age were compared, the greatest difference in the frequency of mutation was revealed for the BRCA1 gene (5.5% vs 1.5%. BRCA1 mutations were significantly more frequent I familial aggregates of the tumor (10.8%, but were also present in sporadic cases (1.8%. For the CHEK2 and NBS1 genes, there was no correlation between frequency and family history of cancer in probands. 5. A higher frequency of heterozygous carriers of 5972C/T polymorphism of the BRCA2 gene was demonstrated for breast cancer prior to 50 years of age (OR 1.4. the risk of breast cancer prior to 50 years of age was particularly high in 5972T/T homozygote (OR 4.7. This polymorphism was associated with breast cancer notable for intraductal growth. Conclusions 1. Efficient molecular diagnostics of genetic predisposition to breast/ovarian cancer in Poland could be based on relatively simple tests disclosing some of the most frequent recurrent mutations of the BRCA1 gene. 2. The risk of breast cancer seems to be only slightly higher in carriers of some BRCA1 gene mutations. This finding should be taken into account during work on prevention schemes for

  1. Association genetics of oleoresin flow in loblolly pine: discovering genes and predicting phenotype for improved resistance to bark beetles and bioenergy potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Jared W; Resende, Marcio F R; Munoz, Patricio; Walker, Alejandro R; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Nelson, C Dana; Neale, David B; Kirst, Matias; Huber, Dudley A; Gezan, Salvador A; Peter, Gary F; Davis, John M

    2013-07-01

    Rapidly enhancing oleoresin production in conifer stems through genomic selection and genetic engineering may increase resistance to bark beetles and terpenoid yield for liquid biofuels. We integrated association genetic and genomic prediction analyses of oleoresin flow (g 24 h(-1)) using 4854 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in expressed genes within a pedigreed population of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) that was clonally replicated at three sites in the southeastern United States. Additive genetic variation in oleoresin flow (h(2) ≈ 0.12-0.30) was strongly correlated between years in which precipitation varied (r(a) ≈ 0.95), while the genetic correlation between sites declined from 0.8 to 0.37 with increasing differences in soil and climate among sites. A total of 231 SNPs were significantly associated with oleoresin flow, of which 81% were specific to individual sites. SNPs in sequences similar to ethylene signaling proteins, ABC transporters, and diterpenoid hydroxylases were associated with oleoresin flow across sites. Despite this complex genetic architecture, we developed a genomic prediction model to accelerate breeding for enhanced oleoresin flow that is robust to environmental variation. Results imply that breeding could increase oleoresin flow 1.5- to 2.4-fold in one generation. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. De novo transcriptome sequencing and analysis of freshwater snail (Radix balthica) to discover genes and pathways affected by exposure to oxazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzitelli, Jean-Yves; Bonnafe, Elsa; Klopp, Christophe; Escudier, Frédéric; Geret, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are increasingly found in aquatic ecosystems due to the non-efficiency of waste water treatment plants. Therefore, aquatic organisms are frequently exposed to a broad diversity of pharmaceuticals. Freshwater snail Radix balthica has been chosen as model to study the effects of oxazepam (psychotropic drug) on developmental stages ranging from trochophore to hatching. In order to provide a global insight of these effects, a transcriptome deep sequencing has been performed on exposed embryos. Eighteen libraries were sequenced, six libraries for three conditions: control, exposed to the lowest oxazepam concentration with a phenotypic effect (delayed hatching) (TA) and exposed to oxazepam concentration found in freshwater (TB). A total of 39,759,772 filtered raw reads were assembled into 56,435 contigs having a mean length of 1579.68 bp and mean depth of 378.96 reads. 44.91% of the contigs have at least one annotation. The differential expression analysis between the control condition and the two exposure conditions revealed 146 contigs differentially expressed of which 144 for TA and two for TB. 34.0% were annotated with biological function. There were four mainly impacted processes: two cellular signalling systems (Notch and JNK) and two biosynthesis pathways (Polyamine and Catecholamine pathways). This work reports a large-scale analysis of differentially transcribed genes of R. balthica exposed to oxazepam during egg development until hatching. In addition, these results enriched the de novo database of potential ecotoxicological models.

  3. A case of radiation-induced cutaneous angiosarcoma 15 years after simultaneously occurring uterine cervical and gastric cancers discovered by autopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, T.; Enomoto, Yasunori; Yoshikawa, Takafumi; Nonomura, Akitaka; Ichijima, Kunio

    2005-01-01

    A case of cutaneous angiosarcoma in the skin on the left hip previously irradiated for cervical uterine squamous cell carcinoma is discovered by autopsy. The patient, a 79-year-old woman, at age 64 had been then underwent radiotherapy for the cervical uterine carcinoma. A total dose of 50 Gy was administrated. At 79 years of age, she noticed multiple purple black nodular skin lesions on the left hip and thigh. She was hospitalized for 8 days, but her general condition rapidly deteriorated and she died. An autopsy revealed that the skin lesion was composed of atypical polygonal cell proliferation forming irregularly anastomosing vascularity, together with hemorrhage and necrosis. The tumor cells were positive for both CD34 and factor 8-related antigens. The final diagnosis was angiosarcoma. (author)

  4. Distinguishing between cancer driver and passenger gene alteration candidates via cross-species comparison: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Xinglai; Tang, Jie; Halberg, Richard; Busam, Dana; Ferriera, Steve; Peña, Maria Marjorette O; Venkataramu, Chinnambally; Yeatman, Timothy J; Zhao, Shaying

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a cross-species comparison strategy to distinguish between cancer driver- and passenger gene alteration candidates, by utilizing the difference in genomic location of orthologous genes between the human and other mammals. As an initial test of this strategy, we conducted a pilot study with human colorectal cancer (CRC) and its mouse model C57BL/6J Apc Min/+ , focusing on human 5q22.2 and 18q21.1-q21.2. We first performed bioinformatics analysis on the evolution of 5q22.2 and 18q21.1-q21.2 regions. Then, we performed exon-targeted sequencing, real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and real time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses on a number of genes of both regions with both human and mouse colon tumors. These two regions (5q22.2 and 18q21.1-q21.2) are frequently deleted in human CRCs and encode genuine colorectal tumor suppressors APC and SMAD4. They also encode genes such as MCC (mutated in colorectal cancer) with their role in CRC etiology unknown. We have discovered that both regions are evolutionarily unstable, resulting in genes that are clustered in each human region being found scattered at several distinct loci in the genome of many other species. For instance, APC and MCC are within 200 kb apart in human 5q22.2 but are 10 Mb apart in the mouse genome. Importantly, our analyses revealed that, while known CRC driver genes APC and SMAD4 were disrupted in both human colorectal tumors and tumors from Apc Min/+ mice, the questionable MCC gene was disrupted in human tumors but appeared to be intact in mouse tumors. These results indicate that MCC may not actually play any causative role in early colorectal tumorigenesis. We also hypothesize that its disruption in human CRCs is likely a mere result of its close proximity to APC in the human genome. Expanding this pilot study to the entire genome may identify more questionable genes like MCC, facilitating the discovery of new CRC driver gene candidates

  5. Aberrant gene promoter methylation associated with sporadic multiple colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Gonzalo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC multiplicity has been mainly related to polyposis and non-polyposis hereditary syndromes. In sporadic CRC, aberrant gene promoter methylation has been shown to play a key role in carcinogenesis, although little is known about its involvement in multiplicity. To assess the effect of methylation in tumor multiplicity in sporadic CRC, hypermethylation of key tumor suppressor genes was evaluated in patients with both multiple and solitary tumors, as a proof-of-concept of an underlying epigenetic defect. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined a total of 47 synchronous/metachronous primary CRC from 41 patients, and 41 gender, age (5-year intervals and tumor location-paired patients with solitary tumors. Exclusion criteria were polyposis syndromes, Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. DNA methylation at the promoter region of the MGMT, CDKN2A, SFRP1, TMEFF2, HS3ST2 (3OST2, RASSF1A and GATA4 genes was evaluated by quantitative methylation specific PCR in both tumor and corresponding normal appearing colorectal mucosa samples. Overall, patients with multiple lesions exhibited a higher degree of methylation in tumor samples than those with solitary tumors regarding all evaluated genes. After adjusting for age and gender, binomial logistic regression analysis identified methylation of MGMT2 (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.97; p = 0.008 and RASSF1A (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.01 to 4.13; p = 0.047 as variables independently associated with tumor multiplicity, being the risk related to methylation of any of these two genes 4.57 (95% CI, 1.53 to 13.61; p = 0.006. Moreover, in six patients in whom both tumors were available, we found a correlation in the methylation levels of MGMT2 (r = 0.64, p = 0.17, SFRP1 (r = 0.83, 0.06, HPP1 (r = 0.64, p = 0.17, 3OST2 (r = 0.83, p = 0.06 and GATA4 (r = 0.6, p = 0.24. Methylation in normal appearing colorectal mucosa from patients with multiple and solitary CRC showed no relevant

  6. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1 triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3. Methods We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II, European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, Multiethnic Cohort (MEC, Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Women's Health Study (WHS. Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  7. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canzian, Federico; Calle, Eugenia E; Chanock, Stephen; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Dossus, Laure; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hoover, Robert; Hunter, David J; Isaacs, Claudine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lenner, Per; Lund, Eiliv; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Quiros, Jose R; Riboli, Elio; Stram, Daniel O; Thomas, Gilles; Thun, Michael J; Cox, David G; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Gils, Carla H van; Ziegler, Regina G; Henderson, Katherine D; Henderson, Brian E; Berg, Christine; Bingham, Sheila; Boeing, Heiner; Buring, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1) triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR) in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3). We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS) in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II), European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), Multiethnic Cohort (MEC), Nurses' Health Study (NHS), and Women's Health Study (WHS). Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone) were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians

  8. Investigation of the molecular relationship between breast cancer and obesity by candidate gene prioritization methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Garshasbi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer and obesity are two major public health concerns. More than 12 million cases of cancer are reported annually. Many reports confirmed obesity as a risk factor for cancer. The molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer has not been clear yet. The purpose of this study was to investigate priorities of effective genes in the molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer. Methods: In this study, computer simulation method was used for prioritizing the genes that involved in the molecular links between obesity and breast cancer in laboratory of systems biology and bioinformatics (LBB, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran, from March to July 2014. In this study, ENDEAVOUR software was used for prioritizing the genes and integrating multiple data sources was used for data analysis. Training genes were selected from effective genes in obesity and/or breast cancer. Two groups of candidate genes were selected. The first group was included the existential genes in 5 common region chromosomes (between obesity and breast cancer and the second group was included the results of genes microarray data analysis of research Creighton, et al (In 2012 on patients with breast cancer. The microarray data were analyzed with GER2 software (R online software on GEO website. Finally, both training and candidate genes were entered in ENDEAVOUR software package. Results: The candidate genes were prioritized to four style and five genes in ten of the first priorities were repeated twice. In other word, the outcome of prioritizing of 72 genes (Product of microarray data analysis and genes of 5 common chromosome regions (Between obesity and breast cancer showed, 5 genes (TNFRSF10B, F2, IGFALS, NTRK3 and HSP90B1 were the priorities in the molecular connection between obesity and breast cancer. Conclusion: There are some common genes between breast cancer and obesity. So, molecular relationship is confirmed. In this study the possible effect

  9. Discovering hidden viral piracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eddo; Kliger, Yossef

    2005-12-01

    Viruses and developers of anti-inflammatory therapies share a common interest in proteins that manipulate the immune response. Large double-stranded DNA viruses acquire host proteins to evade host defense mechanisms. Hence, viral pirated proteins may have a therapeutic potential. Although dozens of viral piracy events have already been identified, we hypothesized that sequence divergence impedes the discovery of many others. We developed a method to assess the number of viral/human homologs and discovered that at least 917 highly diverged homologs are hidden in low-similarity alignment hits that are usually ignored. However, these low-similarity homologs are masked by many false alignment hits. We therefore applied a filtering method to increase the proportion of viral/human homologous proteins. The homologous proteins we found may facilitate functional annotation of viral and human proteins. Furthermore, some of these proteins play a key role in immune modulation and are therefore therapeutic protein candidates.

  10. Role of APC and DNA mismatch repair genes in the development of colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Deodutta

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the western hemisphere. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 105,500 new cases of colon cancer with 57,100 deaths will occur in the U.S. in 2003, accounting for about 10% of cancer deaths. Among the colon cancer patients, hereditary risk contributes approximately 20%. The main inherited colorectal cancers are the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP and the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (HNPCC. The FAP and HNPCC are caused due to mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC and DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. The focus of this review is to summarize the functions of APC and MMR gene products in the development of colorectal cancers.

  11. Mutations in the WTX - gene are found in some high-grade microsatellite instable (MSI-H colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheel Silvio K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically, colorectal cancers (CRCs can be subdivided into tumors with chromosomal instability (CIN or microsatellite instability (MSI. In both types of CRCs genes that are involved in the degradation of β-CATENIN are frequently mutated. Whereas in CIN CRCs APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli is affected in most cases, high grade MSI (MSI-H CRCs frequently display mutations in various genes, like the APC-, AXIN2- or CTNNBI (β-CATENIN gene itself. Recently in Wilms tumors, WTX (Wilms tumor gene on the X-chromosome was discovered as another gene involved in the destruction of β-CATENIN. As the WTX-gene harbors a short T6-microsatellite in its N-terminal coding region, we hypothesized that frameshift-mutations might occur in MSI-H CRCs in the WTX gene, thus additionally contributing to the stabilization of β-CATENIN in human CRCs. Methods DNA was extracted from 632 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded metastatic CRCs (UICCIV and analyzed for MSI-H by investigating the stability of the highly sensitive microsatellite markers BAT25 and BAT26 applying fluorescence capillary electrophoresis (FCE. Then, in the MSI-H cases, well described mutational hot spot regions from the APC-, AXIN2- and CTNNBI genes were analyzed for genomic alterations by didesoxy-sequencing while the WTX T6-microsatellite was analyzed by fragment analysis. Additionally, the PCR products of T5-repeats were subcloned and mutations were validated using didesoxy-sequencing. Furthermore, the KRAS and the BRAF proto-oncogenes were analyzed for the most common activating mutations applying pyro-sequencing. mRNA expression of WTX from MSI-H and MSS cases and a panel of colorectal cancer cell lines was investigated using reverse transcription (RT- PCR and FCE. Results In our cohort of 632 metastatic CRCs (UICCIV we identified 41 MSI-H cases (6.5%. Two of the 41 MSI-H cases (4.8% displayed a frameshift mutation in the T6-repeat resulting in a T5 sequence. Only one case, a

  12. PATCHED and p53 gene alterations in sporadic and hereditary basal cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, G.; Ahmadian, A.; Persson, A.; Undén, A. B.; Afink, G.; Williams, C.; Uhlén, M.; Toftgård, R.; Lundeberg, J.; Pontén, F.

    2001-01-01

    It is widely accepted that disruption of the hedgehog-patched pathway is a key event in development of basal cell cancer. In addition to patched gene alterations, p53 gene mutations are also frequent in basal cell cancer. We determined loss of heterozygosity in the patched and p53 loci as well as

  13. TOP1 gene copy numbers are increased in cancers of the bile duct and pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Mie; Calatayud, Dan; Schultz, Nicolai Aa.

    2015-01-01

    ) poison. Top1 protein, TOP1 gene copy number and mRNA expression, respectively, have been proposed as predictive biomarkers of response to irinotecan in other cancers. Here we investigate the occurrence of TOP1 gene aberrations in cancers of the bile ducts and pancreas. Material and methods. TOP1...

  14. Exon expression arrays as a tool to identify new cancer genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schutte (Mieke); F. Elstrodt (Fons); L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); J.H.A. Nagel (Jord); E. Duijm (Elza); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); M.J. Vuerhard (Maartje); M. Wasielewski (Marijke); J.K. Peeters (Justine); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter); P.J. French (Pim)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Identification of genes that are causally implicated in oncogenesis is a major goal in cancer research. An estimated 10-20% of cancer-related gene mutations result in skipping of one or more exons in the encoded transcripts. Here we report on a strategy to screen in a global

  15. Gene-environment interactions in cancer epidemiology: a National Cancer Institute Think Tank report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Carolyn M; Mechanic, Leah E; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Kraft, Peter; Gillanders, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Cancer risk is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common (minor allele frequency [MAF] > 0.05) and less common (0.01 Think Tank" on January 10-11, 2012. The objective of the Think Tank was to facilitate discussions on (1) the state of the science, (2) the goals of G × E interaction studies in cancer epidemiology, and (3) opportunities for developing novel study designs and analysis tools. This report summarizes the Think Tank discussion, with a focus on contemporary approaches to the analysis of G × E interactions. Selecting the appropriate methods requires first identifying the relevant scientific question and rationale, with an important distinction made between analyses aiming to characterize the joint effects of putative or established genetic and environmental factors and analyses aiming to discover novel risk factors or novel interaction effects. Other discussion items include measurement error, statistical power, significance, and replication. Additional designs, exposure assessments, and analytical approaches need to be considered as we move from the current small number of success stories to a fuller understanding of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  16. Stromal Gene Expression is Predictive for Metastatic Primary Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Fan; Lin, Dong; Takhar, Mandeep; Ramnarine, Varune Rohan; Dong, Xin; Bell, Robert H; Volik, Stanislav V; Wang, Kendric; Xue, Hui; Wang, Yuwei; Haegert, Anne; Anderson, Shawn; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Erho, Nicholas; Wang, Xinya; Gout, Peter W; Morris, James; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Den, Robert B; Klein, Eric A; Schaeffer, Edward M; Ross, Ashley; Ren, Shancheng; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Li, Yingrui; Xu, Xun; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Gleave, Martin E; Davicioni, Elai; Sun, Yinghao; Wang, Yuzhuo; Collins, Colin C

    2018-04-01

    Clinical grading systems using clinical features alongside nomograms lack precision in guiding treatment decisions in prostate cancer (PCa). There is a critical need for identification of biomarkers that can more accurately stratify patients with primary PCa. To identify a robust prognostic signature to better distinguish indolent from aggressive prostate cancer (PCa). To develop the signature, whole-genome and whole-transcriptome sequencing was conducted on five PCa patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models collected from independent foci of a single primary tumor and exhibiting variable metastatic phenotypes. Multiple independent clinical cohorts including an intermediate-risk cohort were used to validate the biomarkers. The outcome measurement defining aggressive PCa was metastasis following radical prostatectomy. A generalized linear model with lasso regularization was used to build a 93-gene stroma-derived metastasis signature (SDMS). The SDMS association with metastasis was assessed using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Performance was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) for the receiver operating characteristic, and Kaplan-Meier curves. Univariable and multivariable regression models were used to compare the SDMS alongside clinicopathological variables and reported signatures. AUC was assessed to determine if SDMS is additive or synergistic to previously reported signatures. A close association between stromal gene expression and metastatic phenotype was observed. Accordingly, the SDMS was modeled and validated in multiple independent clinical cohorts. Patients with higher SDMS scores were found to have worse prognosis. Furthermore, SDMS was an independent prognostic factor, can stratify risk in intermediate-risk PCa, and can improve the performance of other previously reported signatures. Profiling of stromal gene expression led to development of an SDMS that was validated as independently prognostic for the metastatic potential of prostate tumors. Our

  17. Identification of valid reference genes for gene expression studies of human stomach cancer by reverse transcription-qPCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yeon-Su

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR is a powerful method for the analysis of gene expression. Target gene expression levels are usually normalized to a consistently expressed reference gene also known as internal standard, in the same sample. However, much effort has not been expended thus far in the search for reference genes suitable for the study of stomach cancer using RT-qPCR, although selection of optimal reference genes is critical for interpretation of results. Methods We assessed the suitability of six possible reference genes, beta-actin (ACTB, glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase 1 (HPRT1, beta-2-microglobulin (B2M, ribosomal subunit L29 (RPL29 and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA in 20 normal and tumor stomach tissue pairs of stomach cancer patients and 6 stomach cancer cell lines, by RT-qPCR. Employing expression stability analyses using NormFinder and geNorm algorithms we determined the order of performance of these reference genes and their variation values. Results This RT-qPCR study showed that there are statistically significant (p Conclusion This study validated RPL29 and RPL29-B2M as the best single reference genes and combination, for RT-qPCR analysis of 'all stomach tissues', and B2M and B2M-GAPDH as the best single reference gene and combination, for 'stomach cancer cell lines'. Use of these validated reference genes should provide more exact interpretation of differential gene expressions at transcription level in stomach cancer.

  18. Significances of RET Fusion Gene in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing LIU

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, molecular target therapy has become a hot research direction of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment. RET fusion gene with an identifiable clinical pathological features, is present in some subsets of lung cancer, and its treatment is effective by RET inhibitor, suggesting that RET fusion gene may be a new target for individualized treatment to the subgroup of NSCLC. This article reviews the structural characteristics of RET fusion gene and expression model in clinical samples, and treatment of NSCLC.

  19. Molecular studies on the function of tumor suppressor gene in gastrointestinal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Cheoul

    1993-01-01

    Cancer of stomach, colon and liver are a group of the most common cancer in Korea. However, results with current therapeutic modalities are still unsatisfactory. The intensive efforts have been made to understand basic pathogenesis and to find better therapeutic tools for the treatment of this miserable disease. We studies the alteration of tumor suppressor gene in various Gastrointestinal cancer in Korea. Results showed that genetic alteration of Rb gene was in 83% of colorectal cancer. Our results suggest that genetic alteration of Rb gene is crucially involved in the tumorigenesis of colorectum in Korea. (Author)

  20. Prevalence and Penetrance of Major Genes and Polygenes for Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark A.; Dowty, James G.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Lee, Andrew; Giles, Graham G.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Haile, Robert W.; Potter, John D.; Zheng, Yingye; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hopper, John L.; MacInnis, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background While high-risk mutations in identified major susceptibility genes (DNA mismatch repair genes and MUTYH) account for some familial aggregation of colorectal cancer, their population prevalence and the causes of the remaining familial aggregation are not known. Methods We studied the families of 5,744 colorectal cancer cases (probands) recruited from population cancer registries in the USA, Canada and Australia and screened probands for mutations in mismatch repair genes and MUTYH. We conducted modified segregation analyses using the cancer history of first-degree relatives, conditional on the proband’s age at diagnosis. We estimated the prevalence of mutations in the identified genes, the prevalence of and hazard ratio for unidentified major gene mutations, and the variance of the residual polygenic component. Results We estimated that 1 in 279 of the population carry mutations in mismatch repair genes (MLH1= 1 in 1946, MSH2= 1 in 2841, MSH6= 1 in 758, PMS2= 1 in 714), 1 in 45 carry mutations in MUTYH, and 1 in 504 carry mutations associated with an average 31-fold increased risk of colorectal cancer in unidentified major genes. The estimated polygenic variance was reduced by 30–50% after allowing for unidentified major genes and decreased from 3.3 for age colorectal cancer. Impact Our findings could aid gene discovery and development of better colorectal cancer risk prediction models. PMID:27799157

  1. Gene signature of the post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handkiewicz-Junak, Daria; Rusinek, Dagmara; Oczko-Wojciechowska, Malgorzata; Kowalska, Malgorzata; Jarzab, Barbara [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Gliwice (Poland); Swierniak, Michal [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Gliwice (Poland); Medical University of Warsaw, Genomic Medicine, Department of General, Transplant and Liver Surgery, Warsaw (Poland); Dom, Genevieve; Maenhaut, Carine; Detours, Vincent [Universite libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Institute of Interdisciplinary Research, Bruxelles (Belgium); Unger, Kristian [Imperial College London Hammersmith Hospital, Human Cancer Studies Group, Division of Surgery and Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Helmholtz-Zentrum, Research Unit Radiation Cytogenetics, Munich (Germany); Bogdanova, Tetiana [Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kiev (Ukraine); Thomas, Geraldine [Imperial College London Hammersmith Hospital, Human Cancer Studies Group, Division of Surgery and Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Likhtarov, Ilya [Academy of Technological Sciences of Ukraine, Radiation Protection Institute, Kiev (Ukraine); Jaksik, Roman [Silesian University of Technology, Systems Engineering Group, Faculty of Automatic Control, Electronics and Informatics, Gliwice (Poland); Chmielik, Ewa [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Department of Tumour Pathology, Gliwice (Poland); Jarzab, Michal [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, IIIrd Department of Radiation Therapy, Gliwice (Poland); Swierniak, Andrzej [Silesian University of Technology, Department of Automatic Control, Gliwice (Poland)

    2016-07-15

    Following the nuclear accidents in Chernobyl and later in Fukushima, the nuclear community has been faced with important issues concerning how to search for and diagnose biological consequences of low-dose internal radiation contamination. Although after the Chernobyl accident an increase in childhood papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) was observed, it is still not clear whether the molecular biology of PTCs associated with low-dose radiation exposure differs from that of sporadic PTC. We investigated tissue samples from 65 children/young adults with PTC using DNA microarray (Affymetrix, Human Genome U133 2.0 Plus) with the aim of identifying molecular differences between radiation-induced (exposed to Chernobyl radiation, ECR) and sporadic PTC. All participants were resident in the same region so that confounding factors related to genetics or environment were minimized. There were small but significant differences in the gene expression profiles between ECR and non-ECR PTC (global test, p < 0.01), with 300 differently expressed probe sets (p < 0.001) corresponding to 239 genes. Multifactorial analysis of variance showed that besides radiation exposure history, the BRAF mutation exhibited independent effects on the PTC expression profile; the histological subset and patient age at diagnosis had negligible effects. Ten genes (PPME1, HDAC11, SOCS7, CIC, THRA, ERBB2, PPP1R9A, HDGF, RAD51AP1, and CDK1) from the 19 investigated with quantitative RT-PCR were confirmed as being associated with radiation exposure in an independent, validation set of samples. Significant, but subtle, differences in gene expression in the post-Chernobyl PTC are associated with previous low-dose radiation exposure. (orig.)

  2. Identification of germline alterations in breast cancer predisposition genes among Malaysian breast cancer patients using panel testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, P S; Wen, W X; Fadlullah, M Z H; Yoon, S Y; Lee, S Y; Thong, M K; Yip, C H; Mohd Taib, N A; Teo, S H

    2016-10-01

    Although an association between protein-truncating variants and breast cancer risk has been established for 11 genes, only alterations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and PALB2 have been reported in Asian populations. Given that the age of onset of breast cancer is lower in Asians, it is estimated that inherited predisposition to breast cancer may be more significant. To determine the potential utility of panel testing, we investigated the prevalence of germline alterations in 11 established and 4 likely breast cancer genes in a cross-sectional hospital-based cohort of 108 moderate to high-risk breast cancer patients using targeted next generation sequencing. Twenty patients (19%) were identified to carry deleterious mutations, of whom 13 (12%) were in the BRCA1 or BRCA2, 6 (6%) were in five other known breast cancer predisposition genes and 1 patient had a mutation in both BRCA2 and BARD1. Our study shows that BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for the majority of genetic predisposition to breast cancer in our cohort of Asian women. Although mutations in other known breast cancer genes are found, the functional significance and breast cancer risk have not yet been determined, thus limiting the clinical utility of panel testing in Asian populations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Pan-Cancer Analysis of lncRNA Regulation Supports Their Targeting of Cancer Genes in Each Tumor Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Sheng Chiu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are commonly dysregulated in tumors, but only a handful are known to play pathophysiological roles in cancer. We inferred lncRNAs that dysregulate cancer pathways, oncogenes, and tumor suppressors (cancer genes by modeling their effects on the activity of transcription factors, RNA-binding proteins, and microRNAs in 5,185 TCGA tumors and 1,019 ENCODE assays. Our predictions included hundreds of candidate onco- and tumor-suppressor lncRNAs (cancer lncRNAs whose somatic alterations account for the dysregulation of dozens of cancer genes and pathways in each of 14 tumor contexts. To demonstrate proof of concept, we showed that perturbations targeting OIP5-AS1 (an inferred tumor suppressor and TUG1 and WT1-AS (inferred onco-lncRNAs dysregulated cancer genes and altered proliferation of breast and gynecologic cancer cells. Our analysis indicates that, although most lncRNAs are dysregulated in a tumor-specific manner, some, including OIP5-AS1, TUG1, NEAT1, MEG3, and TSIX, synergistically dysregulate cancer pathways in multiple tumor contexts. : Chiu et al. present a pan-cancer analysis of lncRNA regulatory interactions. They suggest that the dysregulation of hundreds of lncRNAs target and alter the expression of cancer genes and pathways in each tumor context. This implies that hundreds of lncRNAs can alter tumor phenotypes in each tumor context. Keywords: lncRNA, regulation, modulation, cancer gene, pan-cancer, noncoding RNA, microRNA, RNA-binding proteins, interactome

  4. Two mismatch repair gene mutations found in a colon cancer patient - which one is pathogenic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kariola, R; Otway, R; Lonnqvist, KE; Raevaara, TE; Macrae, F; Vos, YJ; Kohonen-Corish, M; Hofstra, RMW; Nystrom-Lahti, M

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a dominantly inherited cancer syndrome. Germline mutations in five different mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MSH2, MSH6, MLHI, MLH3, and PMS2 are linked to HNPCC. Here, we describe two colon cancer families in which the index patients carry missense

  5. The Nuclear Death Domain Protein p84N5; a Candidate Breast Cancer Susceptibility Gene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Godwin, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    ...% of all cases of breast cancer exhibit a familial pattern of incidence. Efforts to identify the genetic basis of familial breast cancer reached fruition some years ago, when the breast-cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were identified...

  6. Multiple loci with different cancer specificities within the 8q24 gene desert

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoussaini, M.; Song, H.; Koessler, T.

    2008-01-01

    at its centromeric end by FAM84B and at its telomeric end by c-MYC, two candidate cancer susceptibility genes. To investigate the associations of specific loci within 8q24 with specific cancers, we genotyped the nine previously reported cancer-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms across the region...

  7. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  8. Molecular Effects of 13C/DIM in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2007-01-01

    To discover the mechanisms of 13C/DIM action on prostate cancer cells, we have investigated the molecular effects of 13C/DIM on Akt and NF- B pathways and their downstream genes which play critical...

  9. Identification of cancer/testis-antigen genes by massively parallel signature sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Tseng; Scanlan, Matthew J; Venditti, Charis A; Chua, Ramon; Theiler, Gregory; Stevenson, Brian J; Iseli, Christian; Gure, Ali O; Vasicek, Tom; Strausberg, Robert L; Jongeneel, C Victor; Old, Lloyd J; Simpson, Andrew J G

    2005-05-31

    Massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) generates millions of short sequence tags corresponding to transcripts from a single RNA preparation. Most MPSS tags can be unambiguously assigned to genes, thereby generating a comprehensive expression profile of the tissue of origin. From the comparison of MPSS data from 32 normal human tissues, we identified 1,056 genes that are predominantly expressed in the testis. Further evaluation by using MPSS tags from cancer cell lines and EST data from a wide variety of tumors identified 202 of these genes as candidates for encoding cancer/testis (CT) antigens. Of these genes, the expression in normal tissues was assessed by RT-PCR in a subset of 166 intron-containing genes, and those with confirmed testis-predominant expression were further evaluated for their expression in 21 cancer cell lines. Thus, 20 CT or CT-like genes were identified, with several exhibiting expression in five or more of the cancer cell lines examined. One of these genes is a member of a CT gene family that we designated as CT45. The CT45 family comprises six highly similar (>98% cDNA identity) genes that are clustered in tandem within a 125-kb region on Xq26.3. CT45 was found to be frequently expressed in both cancer cell lines and lung cancer specimens. Thus, MPSS analysis has resulted in a significant extension of our knowledge of CT antigens, leading to the discovery of a distinctive X-linked CT-antigen gene family.

  10. Corruption of the intra-gene DNA methylation architecture is a hallmark of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Bartlett

    Full Text Available Epigenetic processes--including DNA methylation--are increasingly seen as having a fundamental role in chronic diseases like cancer. It is well known that methylation levels at particular genes or loci differ between normal and diseased tissue. Here we investigate whether the intra-gene methylation architecture is corrupted in cancer and whether the variability of levels of methylation of individual CpGs within a defined gene is able to discriminate cancerous from normal tissue, and is associated with heterogeneous tumour phenotype, as defined by gene expression. We analysed 270985 CpGs annotated to 18272 genes, in 3284 cancerous and 681 normal samples, corresponding to 14 different cancer types. In doing so, we found novel differences in intra-gene methylation pattern across phenotypes, particularly in those genes which are crucial for stem cell biology; our measures of intra-gene methylation architecture are a better determinant of phenotype than measures based on mean methylation level alone (K-S test [Formula: see text] in all 14 diseases tested. These per-gene methylation measures also represent a considerable reduction in complexity, compared to conventional per-CpG beta-values. Our findings strongly support the view that intra-gene methylation architecture has great clinical potential for the development of DNA-based cancer biomarkers.

  11. Does risk of endometrial cancer for women without a germline mutation in a DNA mismatch repair gene depend on family history of endometrial cancer or colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharati, Rajani; Jenkins, Mark A.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Marchand, Loïc Le; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hopper, John L.; Win, Aung Ko

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether risk of endometrial cancer for women without a germline mutation in a DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene depends on family history of endometrial or colorectal cancer. Methods We retrospectively followed a cohort of 79,166 women who were recruited to the Colon Cancer Family Registry, after exclusion of women who were relatives of a carrier of a MMR gene mutation. The Kaplan-Meier failure method was used to estimate the cumulative risk of endometrial cancer. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for association between family history of endometrial or colorectal cancer and risk of endometrial cancer. Results A total of 628 endometrial cancer cases were observed, with mean age at diagnosis of 54.4 (standard deviation 15.7) years. The cumulative risk of endometrial cancer to age 70 years was estimated to be 0.94% (95% CI 0.83–1.05) for women with no family history of endometrial cancer, and 3.80% (95% CI 2.75–4.98) for women with at least one first- or second-degree relative with endometrial cancer. Compared with women without family history, we found an increased risk of endometrial cancer for women with at least one first-or second-degree relative with endometrial cancer (HR 3.66, 95% CI 2.63–5.08), and for women with one first-degree relative with colorectal cancer diagnosed at age <50 years (HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.15–1.91). Conclusion An increased risk of endometrial cancer is associated with a family history of endometrial cancer or early-onset colorectal cancer for women without a MMR gene mutation; indicating for potential underlying genetic and environmental factors shared by colorectal and endometrial cancers other than caused by MMR gene mutations. PMID:24631449

  12. Identifying the Gene Signatures from Gene-Pathway Bipartite Network Guarantees the Robust Model Performance on Predicting the Cancer Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of improving the prediction of cancer prognosis in the clinical researches, various algorithms have been developed to construct the predictive models with the gene signatures detected by DNA microarrays. Due to the heterogeneity of the clinical samples, the list of differentially expressed genes (DEGs generated by the statistical methods or the machine learning algorithms often involves a number of false positive genes, which are not associated with the phenotypic differences between the compared clinical conditions, and subsequently impacts the reliability of the predictive models. In this study, we proposed a strategy, which combined the statistical algorithm with the gene-pathway bipartite networks, to generate the reliable lists of cancer-related DEGs and constructed the models by using support vector machine for predicting the prognosis of three types of cancers, namely, breast cancer, acute myeloma leukemia, and glioblastoma. Our results demonstrated that, combined with the gene-pathway bipartite networks, our proposed strategy can efficiently generate the reliable cancer-related DEG lists for constructing the predictive models. In addition, the model performance in the swap analysis was similar to that in the original analysis, indicating the robustness of the models in predicting the cancer outcomes.

  13. Common Genetic Variation In Cellular Transport Genes and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Chornokur, Ganna; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Amankwah, Ernest K.; Qu, Xiaotao; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Jim, Heather S. L.; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja KH.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Background\\ud \\ud Defective cellular transport processes can lead to aberrant accumulation of trace elements, iron, small molecules and hormones in the cell, which in turn may promote the formation of reactive oxygen species, promoting DNA damage and aberrant expression of key regulatory cancer genes. As DNA damage and uncontrolled proliferation are hallmarks of cancer, including epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), we hypothesized that inherited variation in the cellular transport genes contribu...

  14. Cancer Evolution Is Associated with Pervasive Positive Selection on Globally Expressed Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrow, Sheli L.; Barshir, Ruth; DeGregori, James; Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Hershberg, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is an evolutionary process in which cells acquire new transformative, proliferative and metastatic capabilities. A full understanding of cancer requires learning the dynamics of the cancer evolutionary process. We present here a large-scale analysis of the dynamics of this evolutionary process within tumors, with a focus on breast cancer. We show that the cancer evolutionary process differs greatly from organismal (germline) evolution. Organismal evolution is dominated by purifying selection (that removes mutations that are harmful to fitness). In contrast, in the cancer evolutionary process the dominance of purifying selection is much reduced, allowing for a much easier detection of the signals of positive selection (adaptation). We further show that, as a group, genes that are globally expressed across human tissues show a very strong signal of positive selection within tumors. Indeed, known cancer genes are enriched for global expression patterns. Yet, positive selection is prevalent even on globally expressed genes that have not yet been associated with cancer, suggesting that globally expressed genes are enriched for yet undiscovered cancer related functions. We find that the increased positive selection on globally expressed genes within tumors is not due to their expression in the tissue relevant to the cancer. Rather, such increased adaptation is likely due to globally expressed genes being enriched in important housekeeping and essential functions. Thus, our results suggest that tumor adaptation is most often mediated through somatic changes to those genes that are important for the most basic cellular functions. Together, our analysis reveals the uniqueness of the cancer evolutionary process and the particular importance of globally expressed genes in driving cancer initiation and progression. PMID:24603726

  15. Sleeping Beauty transposon system for genetic etiological research and gene therapy of cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaomei; Du, Yan; Deng, Yang; Wu, Jianfeng; Cao, Guangwen

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is etiologically associated with somatic mutations of critical genes. Recently, a number of somatic mutations and key molecules have been found to be involved in functional networks affecting cancer progression. Suitable animal models are required to validate cancer-promoting or -inhibiting capacities of these mutants and molecules. Sleeping Beauty transposon system consists of a transposon that carries gene(s) of interest and a transposase that recognizes, excises, and reinserts genes in given location of the genome. It can create both gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations, thus being frequently chosen to investigate the etiological mechanisms and gene therapy for cancers in animal models. In this review, we summarized current advances of Sleeping Beauty transposon system in revealing molecular mechanism of cancers and improving gene therapy. Understanding molecular mechanisms by which driver mutations contribute to carcinogenesis and metastasis may pave the way for the development of innovative prophylactic and therapeutic strategies against malignant diseases.

  16. Gene expression profiling in lymph node-positive and lymph node-negative colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Chan; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Roh, Mee-Sook; Kim, Jae-Seok; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Hong-Jo; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Hwang, Tae-Ho

    2004-02-01

    To identify the genes involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of colorectal cancer, we analyzed the gene-expression profiles of colorectal cancer cells from 12 tumors with corresponding noncancerous colonic epithelia using a cDNA microarray representing 4,08 genes. We classified both samples and genes by using a two-way clustering analysis and identified genes that were differentially expressed in the cancerous and noncancerous tissues. Genes associated with lymph node metastasis were identified by means of the supervised learning technique. Differentially expressed genes (77 up-regulated and 45 down-regulated genes) were identified in more than 75 percent of the tumors. The functional categories of these genes belonged to signal transduction (19 percent), metabolism (17 percent), cell structure/motility (14 percent), cell cycle (13 percent), and gene protein expression (13 percent). The gene expression pattern of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results from randomly selected genes shows a pattern similar to that of cDNA microarray. Moreover, the gene expression patterns observed were similar to those reported previously, suggesting rare racial differences. Sixty genes possibly associated with lymph node metastasis in colorectal cancer were selected on the basis of clinicopathological data obtained by performing signal-to-noise calculations. "Leave-one-out" cross-validation testing correctly classified 10 of 12 patients (83.3 percent) as having colorectal cancer with lymph node metastasis vs. those without metastasis. These results provide not only a new molecular basis for understanding the biologic properties of colorectal cancer, including lymph node metastasis, but also provide a resource for future development of therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers for colorectal cancer.

  17. Discovering Host Genes Involved in the Infection by the Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Complex and in the Establishment of Resistance to the Virus Using Tobacco Rattle Virus-based Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czosnek, Henryk; Eybishtz, Assaf; Sade, Dagan; Gorovits, Rena; Sobol, Iris; Bejarano, Eduardo; Rosas-Díaz, Tábata; Lozano-Durán, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    The development of high-throughput technologies allows for evaluating gene expression at the whole-genome level. Together with proteomic and metabolomic studies, these analyses have resulted in the identification of plant genes whose function or expression is altered as a consequence of pathogen attacks. Members of the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) complex are among the most important pathogens impairing production of agricultural crops worldwide. To understand how these geminiviruses subjugate plant defenses, and to devise counter-measures, it is essential to identify the host genes affected by infection and to determine their role in susceptible and resistant plants. We have used a reverse genetics approach based on Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing (TRV-VIGS) to uncover genes involved in viral infection of susceptible plants, and to identify genes underlying virus resistance. To identify host genes with a role in geminivirus infection, we have engineered a Nicotiana benthamiana line, coined 2IRGFP, which over-expresses GFP upon virus infection. With this system, we have achieved an accurate description of the dynamics of virus replication in space and time. Upon silencing selected N. benthamiana genes previously shown to be related to host response to geminivirus infection, we have identified eighteen genes involved in a wide array of cellular processes. Plant genes involved in geminivirus resistance were studied by comparing two tomato lines: one resistant (R), the other susceptible (S) to the virus. Sixty-nine genes preferentially expressed in R tomatoes were identified by screening cDNA libraries from infected and uninfected R and S genotypes. Out of the 25 genes studied so far, the silencing of five led to the total collapse of resistance, suggesting their involvement in the resistance gene network. This review of our results indicates that TRV-VIGS is an exquisite reverse genetics tool that may provide new insights into the molecular

  18. Investigation of Interleukin-17 gene polymorphism on DAP-Kinase gene promoter methylation in Patients with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Naeimi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women . Studies have shown that increased in methylation of CpG islands (CpG island hyper methylation, CIHM, is one of the important mechanisms in gene down regulation. DAP-Kinase protein plays an important role in the process of Apoptosis. Interleukin-17 is an proinflammatory cytokine and inflammation,is one of the factors  that affect on gene methylation . the purpose of this study was to evaluate the polymorphism of the IL-17 gene promoter methylation Dap-kinase and its relationship to breast cancer. Methods: In this case - control study, A total of 40 Women with Breast cancer and 40 healthy women in Iran were examined.DNA was extracted by saluting out method and Single nucleotide Polymorphisms of the IL-17 gene were analyzed by the PCR-RFLP method and To study gene promoter methylation Dap-kinase, MSPCR method was used.data were compared in both groups by using Pearson’s chi-square and Hardy-weinberg equilibrium test. RESULTS: Results confirm the fact that, there is a relationship between DAP-kinase gene promoter methylation and breast cancer disease So that the promoter of this gene in patients than in healthy individuals was much more methylated( p0.05 Conclusion: Due to the fact, that promoter genes methylation is one of the mechanisms of epigenetic genes silencing, it seems that DAP-kinase gene promoter methylation increases is associated with the risk of breast cancer in women.

  19. Mucin 1 Gene (MUC1 and Gastric-Cancer Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihisa Saeki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC is one of the major malignant diseases worldwide, especially in Asia. It is classified into intestinal and diffuse types. While the intestinal-type GC (IGC is almost certainly caused by Helicobacter pylori (HP infection, its role in the diffuse-type GC (DGC appears limited. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS on Japanese and Chinese populations identified chromosome 1q22 as a GC susceptibility locus which harbors mucin 1 gene (MUC1 encoding a cell membrane-bound mucin protein. MUC1 has been known as an oncogene with an anti-apoptotic function in cancer cells; however, in normal gastric mucosa, it is anticipated that the mucin 1 protein has a role in protecting gastric epithelial cells from a variety of external insults which cause inflammation and carcinogenesis. HP infection is the most definite insult leading to GC, and a protective function of mucin 1 protein has been suggested by studies on Muc1 knocked-out mice.

  20. Integrative analysis of survival-associated gene sets in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varn, Frederick S; Ung, Matthew H; Lou, Shao Ke; Cheng, Chao

    2015-03-12

    Patient gene expression information has recently become a clinical feature used to evaluate breast cancer prognosis. The emergence of prognostic gene sets that take advantage of these data has led to a rich library of information that can be used to characterize the molecular nature of a patient's cancer. Identifying robust gene sets that are consistently predictive of a patient's clinical outcome has become one of the main challenges in the field. We inputted our previously established BASE algorithm with patient gene expression data and gene sets from MSigDB to develop the gene set activity score (GSAS), a metric that quantitatively assesses a gene set's activity level in a given patient. We utilized this metric, along with patient time-to-event data, to perform survival analyses to identify the gene sets that were significantly correlated with patient survival. We then performed cross-dataset analyses to identify robust prognostic gene sets and to classify patients by metastasis status. Additionally, we created a gene set network based on component gene overlap to explore the relationship between gene sets derived from MSigDB. We developed a novel gene set based on this network's topology and applied the GSAS metric to characterize its role in patient survival. Using the GSAS metric, we identified 120 gene sets that were significantly associated with patient survival in all datasets tested. The gene overlap network analysis yielded a novel gene set enriched in genes shared by the robustly predictive gene sets. This gene set was highly correlated to patient survival when used alone. Most interestingly, removal of the genes in this gene set from the gene pool on MSigDB resulted in a large reduction in the number of predictive gene sets, suggesting a prominent role for these genes in breast cancer progression. The GSAS metric provided a useful medium by which we systematically investigated how gene sets from MSigDB relate to breast cancer patient survival. We used

  1. Classification and diagnostic prediction of cancers using gene expression profiling and artificial neural networks | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method of classifying cancers to specific diagnostic categories based on their gene expression signatures using artificial neural networks (ANNs). We trained the ANNs using the small, round blue-cell tumors (SRBCTs) as a model. These cancers belong to four distinct diagnostic categories and often present diagnostic dilemmas in clinical practice. The ANNs correctly classified all samples and identified the genes most relevant to the classification.

  2. Dual-therapeutic reporter genes fusion for enhanced cancer gene therapy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, T V; Foygel, K; Willmann, J K; Paulmurugan, R

    2013-05-01

    Two of the successful gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies include herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) enzyme-ganciclovir prodrug and the Escherichia coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme-CB1954 prodrug strategies; these enzyme-prodrug combinations produce activated cytotoxic metabolites of the prodrugs capable of tumor cell death by inhibiting DNA synthesis and killing quiescent cells, respectively. Both these strategies also affect significant bystander cell killing of neighboring tumor cells that do not express these enzymes. We have developed a dual-combination gene strategy, where we identified HSV1-TK and NTR fused in a particular orientation can effectively kill tumor cells when the tumor cells are treated with a fusion HSV1-TK-NTR gene- along with a prodrug combination of GCV and CB1954. In order to determine whether the dual-system demonstrate superior therapeutic efficacy than either HSV1-TK or NTR systems alone, we conducted both in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft studies using triple negative SUM159 breast cancer cells, by evaluating the efficacy of cell death by apoptosis and necrosis upon treatment with the dual HSV1-TK genes-GCV-CB1954 prodrugs system, and compared the efficiency to HSV1-TK-GCV and NTR-CB1954. Our cell-based studies, tumor regression studies in xenograft mice, histological analyses of treated tumors and bystander studies indicate that the dual HSV1-TK-NTR-prodrug system is two times more efficient even with half the doses of both prodrugs than the respective single gene-prodrug system, as evidenced by enhanced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells in vitro in culture and xenograft of tumor tissues in animals.

  3. Interleukin genes and associations with colon and rectal cancer risk and overall survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondurant, Kristina L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Kadlubar, Susan; Wolff, Roger K.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2012-01-01

    Interleukins are a group of cytokines that contribute to growth and differentiation, cell migration, and inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses by the immune system. In this study we examined genetic variation in genes from various anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory interleukins to determine association with colon and rectal cancer risk and overall survival. Data from two population-based incident studies of colon cancer (1555 cases and 1956 controls) and rectal cancer (754 cases and 954 controls) were utilized. After controlling for multiple comparisons, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from four genes, IL3, IL6R, IL8, IL15, were associated with increased colon cancer risk and CXCR1, and CXCR2 were significantly associated with increased rectal cancer risk. Only SNPs from genes within the IL-8 pathway (IL8, CXCR1, and CXCR2) showed a significant association with both colon and rectal cancer risk. Several SNPs interacted significantly with IL8 and IFNG SNPs and with aspirin/NSAID, cigarette smoking, estrogen use and BMI. For both colon and rectal cancer, increasing numbers of risk alleles were associated with increased hazard of death from cancer; the estimated hazard of death for colon cancer for the highest category of risk alleles was 1.74 (95% CI 1.18–2.56) and 1.96 (95% CI 1.28–2.99) for rectal cancer. These data suggest interleukin genes play a role in risk and overall survival for colon and rectal cancer. PMID:22674296

  4. Distinctions in gastric cancer gene expression signatures derived from laser capture microdissection versus histologic macrodissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Il

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric cancer samples obtained by histologic macrodissection contain a relatively high stromal content that may significantly influence gene expression profiles. Differences between the gene expression signature derived from macrodissected gastric cancer samples and the signature obtained from isolated gastric cancer epithelial cells from the same biopsies using laser-capture microdissection (LCM were evaluated for their potential experimental biases. Methods RNA was isolated from frozen tissue samples of gastric cancer biopsies from 20 patients using both histologic macrodissection and LCM techniques. RNA from LCM was subject to an additional round of T7 RNA amplification. Expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix HG-U133A arrays. Genes identified in the expression signatures from each tissue processing method were compared to the set of genes contained within chromosomal regions found to harbor copy number aberrations in the tumor samples by array CGH and to proteins previously identified as being overexpressed in gastric cancer. Results Genes shown to have increased copy number in gastric cancer were also found to be overexpressed in samples obtained by macrodissection (LS P value -5, but not in array data generated using microdissection. A set of 58 previously identified genes overexpressed in gastric cancer was also enriched in the gene signature identified by macrodissection (LS P -5, but not in the signature identified by microdissection (LS P = 0.013. In contrast, 66 genes previously reported to be underexpressed in gastric cancer were enriched in the gene signature identified by microdissection (LS P -5, but not in the signature identified by macrodissection (LS P = 0.89. Conclusions The tumor sampling technique biases the microarray results. LCM may be a more sensitive collection and processing method for the identification of potential tumor suppressor gene candidates in gastric cancer using expression

  5. Prevalence and Penetrance of Major Genes and Polygenes for Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark A; Dowty, James G; Antoniou, Antonis C; Lee, Andrew; Giles, Graham G; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Ahnen, Dennis J; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Haile, Robert W; Potter, John D; Zheng, Yingye; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Hopper, John L; MacInnis, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Background: Although high-risk mutations in identified major susceptibility genes (DNA mismatch repair genes and MUTYH ) account for some familial aggregation of colorectal cancer, their population prevalence and the causes of the remaining familial aggregation are not known. Methods: We studied the families of 5,744 colorectal cancer cases (probands) recruited from population cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia and screened probands for mutations in mismatch repair genes and MUTYH We conducted modified segregation analyses using the cancer history of first-degree relatives, conditional on the proband's age at diagnosis. We estimated the prevalence of mutations in the identified genes, the prevalence of HR for unidentified major gene mutations, and the variance of the residual polygenic component. Results: We estimated that 1 in 279 of the population carry mutations in mismatch repair genes ( MLH1 = 1 in 1,946, MSH2 = 1 in 2,841, MSH6 = 1 in 758, PMS2 = 1 in 714), 1 in 45 carry mutations in MUTYH , and 1 in 504 carry mutations associated with an average 31-fold increased risk of colorectal cancer in unidentified major genes. The estimated polygenic variance was reduced by 30% to 50% after allowing for unidentified major genes and decreased from 3.3 for age <40 years to 0.5 for age ≥70 years (equivalent to sibling relative risks of 5.1 to 1.3, respectively). Conclusions: Unidentified major genes might explain one third to one half of the missing heritability of colorectal cancer. Impact: Our findings could aid gene discovery and development of better colorectal cancer risk prediction models. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 404-12. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Stromal Gene Expression and Function in Primary Breast Tumors that Metastasize to Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    significantly altered gene ontology categories were 7 Description Common Function stefin A1 stfa1 cystatin , cathepsin inhibitor breast cancer ... cancer . Breast Cancer Res, 7: 33-36, 2005. 5. Alcaraz, J., Nelson, C . M., and Bissell, M. J. Biomechanical approaches for studying integration of...analysis of fibroblastic stromagenesis in breast cancer progression. J Mammary Gland Biol Neoplasia, 9: 311-324, 2004. 7. Kuperwasser, C ., Chavarria, T

  7. A strategy to identify housekeeping genes suitable for analysis in breast cancer diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilli, Tatiana M; Castro, Cláudio da Silva; Tuszynski, Jack A; Carels, Nicolas

    2016-08-15

    The selection of suitable internal control genes is crucial for proper interpretation of real-time PCR data. Here we outline a strategy to identify housekeeping genes that could serve as suitable internal control for comparative analyses of gene expression data in breast cancer cell lines and tissues obtained by high throughput sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The strategy proposed includes the large-scale screening of potential candidate reference genes from RNA-seq data as well as their validation by qRT-PCR, and careful examination of reference data from the International Cancer Genome Consortium, The Cancer Genome Atlas and Gene Expression Omnibus repositories. The identified set of reference genes, also called novel housekeeping genes that includes CCSER2, SYMPK, ANKRD17 and PUM1, proved to be less variable and thus potentially more accurate for research and clinical analyses of breast cell lines and tissue samples compared to the traditional housekeeping genes used to this end. These results highlight the importance of a massive evaluation of housekeeping genes for their relevance as internal control for optimized intra- and inter-assay comparison of gene expression. We developed a strategy to identify and evaluate the significance of housekeeping genes as internal control for the intra- and inter-assay comparison of gene expression in breast cancer that could be applied to other tumor types and diseases.

  8. Combining biological gene expression signatures in predicting outcome in breast cancer: An alternative to supervised classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuyten, Dimitry S. A.; Hastie, Trevor; Chi, Jen-Tsan Ashley; Chang, Howard Y.; van de Vijver, Marc J.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Gene expression profiling has been extensively used to predict outcome in breast cancer patients. We have previously reported on biological hypothesis-driven analysis of gene expression profiling data and we wished to extend this approach through the combinations of various gene

  9. Efficacy of laser capture microdissection plus RT-PCR technique in analyzing gene expression levels in human gastric cancer and colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Hiroshi; Uetake, Hiroyuki; Danenberg, Kathleen; Danenberg, Peter V; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2008-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, thymidine phosphorylase, and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase gene expressions are reported to be valid predictive markers for 5-fluorouracil sensitivity to gastrointestinal cancer. For more reliable predictability, their expressions in cancer cells and stromal cells in the cancerous tissue (cancerous stroma) have been separately investigated using laser capture microdissection. Thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, thymidine phosphorylase, and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase mRNA in cancer cells and cancerous stroma from samples of 47 gastric and 43 colon cancers were separately quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction after laser capture microdissection. In both gastric and colon cancers, thymidylate synthase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase mRNA expressions were higher (p < 0.0001, p <0.0001 respectively in gastric cancer and P = 0.0002, p < 0.0001 respectively in colon cancer) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase mRNA expressions were lower in cancer cells than in cancerous stroma (P = 0.0136 in gastric cancer and p < 0.0001 in colon cancer). In contrast, thymidine phosphorylase mRNA was higher in cancer cells than in cancerous stroma in gastric cancer (p < 0.0001) and lower in cancer cells than in cancerous stroma in colon cancer (P = 0.0055). By using this method, we could estimate gene expressions separately in cancer cells and stromal cells from colon and gastric cancers, in spite of the amount of stromal tissue. Our method is thought to be useful for accurately evaluating intratumoral gene expressions

  10. RNA-seq reveals more consistent reference genes for gene expression studies in human non-melanoma skin cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van L.T. Hoang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Identification of appropriate reference genes (RGs is critical to accurate data interpretation in quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR experiments. In this study, we have utilised next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq to analyse the transcriptome of a panel of non-melanoma skin cancer lesions, identifying genes that are consistently expressed across all samples. Genes encoding ribosomal proteins were amongst the most stable in this dataset. Validation of this RNA-seq data was examined using qPCR to confirm the suitability of a set of highly stable genes for use as qPCR RGs. These genes will provide a valuable resource for the normalisation of qPCR data for the analysis of non-melanoma skin cancer.

  11. A meta analysis of pancreatic microarray datasets yields new targets as cancer genes and biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalin C W Goonesekere

    Full Text Available The lack of specific symptoms at early tumor stages, together with a high biological aggressiveness of the tumor contribute to the high mortality rate for pancreatic cancer (PC, which has a five year survival rate of less than 5%. Improved screening for earlier diagnosis, through the detection of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers provides the best hope of increasing the rate of curatively resectable carcinomas. Though many serum markers have been reported to be elevated in patients with PC, so far, most of these markers have not been implemented into clinical routine due to low sensitivity or specificity. In this study, we have identified genes that are significantly upregulated in PC, through a meta-analysis of large number of microarray datasets. We demonstrate that the biological functions ascribed to these genes are clearly associated with PC and metastasis, and that that these genes exhibit a strong link to pathways involved with inflammation and the immune response. This investigation has yielded new targets for cancer genes, and potential biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. The candidate list of cancer genes includes protein kinase genes, new members of gene families currently associated with PC, as well as genes not previously linked to PC. In this study, we are also able to move towards developing a signature for hypomethylated genes, which could be useful for early detection of PC. We also show that the significantly upregulated 800+ genes in our analysis can serve as an enriched pool for tissue and serum protein biomarkers in pancreatic cancer.

  12. Chandra Discovers Cosmic Cannonball

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    One of the fastest moving stars ever seen has been discovered with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This cosmic cannonball is challenging theories to explain its blistering speed. Astronomers used Chandra to observe a neutron star, known as RX J0822-4300, over a period of about five years. During that span, three Chandra observations clearly show the neutron star moving away from the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. This remnant is the stellar debris field created during the same explosion in which the neutron star was created about 3700 years ago. Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A By combining how far it has moved across the sky with its distance from Earth, astronomers determined the neutron star is moving at over 3 million miles per hour. At this rate, RX J0822-4300 is destined to escape from the Milky Way after millions of years, even though it has only traveled about 20 light years so far. "This star is moving at 3 million miles an hour, but it's so far away that the apparent motion we see in five years is less than the height of the numerals in the date on a penny, seen from the length of a football field," said Frank Winkler of Middlebury College in Vermont. "It's remarkable, and a real testament to the power of Chandra, that such a tiny motion can be measured." Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A "Just after it was born, this neutron star got a one-way ticket out of the Galaxy," said co-author Robert Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Astronomers have seen other stars being flung out of the Milky Way, but few as fast as this." So-called hypervelocity stars have been previously discovered shooting out of the Milky Way with speeds around one million miles per hour. One key difference between RX J0822-4300 and these other reported galactic escapees is the source of their speed. The hypervelocity stars are

  13. Towards prostate cancer gene therapy: Development of a chlorotoxin-targeted nanovector for toxic (melittin) gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarokh, Zahra; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Nazari, Mahboobeh

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death due to cancer in men. Owing to shortcomings in the current treatments, other therapies are being considered. Toxic gene delivery is one of the most effective methods for cancer therapy. Cationic polymers are able to form stable nanoparticles via interaction with nucleic acids electrostatically. Branched polyethylenimine that contains amine groups has notable buffering capacity and the ability to escape from endosome through the proton sponge effect. However, the cytotoxicity of this polymer is high, and modification is one of the applicable strategies to overcome this problem. In this study, PEI was targeted with chlorotoxin (CTX) via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP) cross-linker. CTX can bind specifically to matrix metalloproteinase-2 that is overexpressed in certain cancers. Melittin as the major component of bee venom has been reported to have anti-cancer activity. This was thus selected to deliver to PC3 cell line. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that transfection efficiency of targeted nanoparticles is significantly higher compared to non-targeted nanoparticles. Targeted nanoparticles carrying the melittin gene also decreased cell viability of PC3 cells significantly while no toxic effects were observed on NIH3T3 cell line. Therefore, CTX-targeted nanoparticles carrying the melittin gene could serve as an appropriate gene delivery system for prostate and other MMP-2 positive cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Contribution of germline mutations in cancer predisposition genes to tumor etiology in young women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Seth K; Lovejoy, Leann; Shriver, Craig D; Ellsworth, Rachel E

    2017-08-01

    Although breast cancer in young women accounts for cancer predisposition genes is needed to improve the understanding of breast cancer etiology in young women. All female patients enrolled in the Clinical Breast Cancer Project between 2001 and 2015 and diagnosed with invasive breast cancer before age 40 were included in this study. Family history was classified using the NCCN Familial Risk Assessment guidelines. Targeted sequencing of 94 cancer predisposition genes was performed using peripheral blood DNA. Variants were detected using VariantStudio and classified using ClinVar. Seven percent (141/1980) of patients were young women and 44 had a significant family history. Sequencing was completed for 118 women with genomic DNA. Pathogenic mutations were present in 27 patients: BRCA1 (n = 10), BRCA2 (n = 12), TP53 (n = 1), and CHEK2 (n = 4). Mutations classified as pathogenic were also detected in APC (n = 1) and MUTYH (n = 2). Variants of uncertain significance (VUS) were detected in an additional 17 patients in ten genes. Pathogenic mutations in high- and moderate-risk breast cancer genes were detected in 23% of young women with an additional 3% having pathogenic mutations in colon cancer predisposition genes. VUS were observed in 14% of women in genes such as ATM, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, and PALB2. Identification of those non-genetic factors is critical to reduce the burden of breast cancer in this population.

  15. Association between pepsinogen C gene polymorphism and genetic predisposition to gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-Jie; Guo, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Ming; Wang, Lan; Yuan, Yuan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To identify a molecular marker for gastric cancer, and to investigate the relationship between the polymorphism of pepsinogen C (PGC) gene and the genetic predisposition to gastric cancer. METHODS: A total of 289 cases were involved in this study. 115 cases came from Shenyang area, a low risk area of gastric cancer, including 42 unrelated controls and 73 patients with gastric cancer. 174 cases came from Zhuanghe area, a high-risk area of gastric cancer, including 113 unrelated controls, and 61 cases from gastric cancer kindred families. The polymorphism of PGC gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the relation between the genetic polymorphism of PGC and gastric cancer was examined. RESULTS: Four alleles, 310 bp (allele 1), 400 bp (allele 2), 450 bp (allele 3), and 480 bp (allele 4) were detected by PCR. The frequency of allele 1 was higher in patients with gastric cancer than that in controls. Genotypes containing homogenous allele 1 were significantly more frequent in patients with gastric cancer than that in controls (0.33, 0.14, χ2 = 3.86, P genetic predisposition to gastric cancer. The distribution of pepsinogen C gene polymorphism in Zhuanghe, a high-risk area of gastric cancer, is different from that in Shenyang, a low risk area of gastric cancer. PMID:12508350

  16. Genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes and breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Jieping; Rudolph, Anja; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression plays a pivotal role in assisting tumors to evade immune destruction and promoting tumor development. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes may be implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. We included 42,510 female breast cancer cases...... and 40,577 controls of European ancestry from 37 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (2015) with available genotype data for 3595 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 candidate genes. Associations between genotyped SNPs and overall breast cancer risk, and secondarily according...... to estrogen receptor (ER) status, were assessed using multiple logistic regression models. Gene-level associations were assessed based on principal component analysis. Gene expression analyses were conducted using RNA sequencing level 3 data from The Cancer Genome Atlas for 989 breast tumor samples and 113...

  17. Discretization of Gene Expression Data Unmasks Molecular Subgroups Recurring in Different Human Cancer Types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Beleut

    Full Text Available Despite the individually different molecular alterations in tumors, the malignancy associated biological traits are strikingly similar. Results of a previous study using renal cell carcinoma (RCC as a model pointed towards cancer-related features, which could be visualized as three groups by microarray based gene expression analysis. In this study, we used a mathematic model to verify the presence of these groups in RCC as well as in other cancer types. We developed an algorithm for gene-expression deviation profiling for analyzing gene expression data of a total of 8397 patients with 13 different cancer types and normal tissues. We revealed three common Cancer Transcriptomic Profiles (CTPs which recurred in all investigated tumors. Additionally, CTPs remained robust regardless of the functions or numbers of genes analyzed. CTPs may represent common genetic fingerprints, which potentially reflect the closely related biological traits of human cancers.

  18. Polymorphisms of Selected DNA Repair Genes and Lung Cancer in Chromium Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasova, E; Matakova, T; Skerenova, M; Krutakova, M; Slovakova, P; Dzian, A; Javorkova, S; Pec, M; Kypusova, K; Hamzik, J

    2016-01-01

    Chromium is a well-known mutagen and carcinogen involved in lung cancer development. DNA repair genes play an important role in the elimination of genetic changes caused by chromium exposure. In the present study, we investigated the polymorphisms of the following DNA repair genes: XRCC3, participating in the homologous recombination repair, and hMLH1 and hMSH2, functioning in the mismatch repair. We focused on the risk the polymorphisms present in the development of lung cancer regarding the exposure to chromium. We analyzed 106 individuals; 45 patients exposed to chromium with diagnosed lung cancer and 61 healthy controls. Genotypes were determined by a PCR-RFLP method. We unravelled a potential for increased risk of lung cancer development in the hMLH1 (rs1800734) AA genotype in the recessive model. In conclusion, gene polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes underscores the risk of lung cancer development in chromium exposed individuals.

  19. Polymorphic variation of genes in the fibrinolytic system and the risk of ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov Bentov

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The etiology of ovarian cancer is largely unknown. One hypothesis is that the inefficient removal of the blood clots and fibrin products which are deposited in the vicinity of the ovary by retrograde menstruation might be associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms within genes which comprise the fibrinolytic system have been shown to have functional effects on the rate of blood clot degradation. These were considered to be candidate genes in the present study. AIM: We studied the genotype distributions of 12 functional SNPs of four genes (tPA, uPA PAI1 and TAFI among 775 ovarian cancer cases and 889 controls. RESULTS: No significant associations were seen between any of the ten SNPs and the risk of ovarian cancer as a whole, or in any histologic subgroup. DISCUSSION: Germline known functional variants of genes in the fibrinolytic system are not associated with risk of ovarian cancer.

  20. A Gene Module-Based eQTL Analysis Prioritizing Disease Genes and Pathways in Kidney Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Qu Yang

    Full Text Available Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC is the most common and most aggressive form of renal cell cancer (RCC. The incidence of RCC has increased steadily in recent years. The pathogenesis of renal cell cancer remains poorly understood. Many of the tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and dysregulated pathways in ccRCC need to be revealed for improvement of the overall clinical outlook of the disease. Here, we developed a systems biology approach to prioritize the somatic mutated genes that lead to dysregulation of pathways in ccRCC. The method integrated multi-layer information to infer causative mutations and disease genes. First, we identified differential gene modules in ccRCC by coupling transcriptome and protein-protein interactions. Each of these modules consisted of interacting genes that were involved in similar biological processes and their combined expression alterations were significantly associated with disease type. Then, subsequent gene module-based eQTL analysis revealed somatic mutated genes that had driven the expression alterations of differential gene modules. Our study yielded a list of candidate disease genes, including several known ccRCC causative genes such as BAP1 and PBRM1, as well as novel genes such as NOD2, RRM1, CSRNP1, SLC4A2, TTLL1 and CNTN1. The differential gene modules and their driver genes revealed by our study provided a new perspective for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Moreover, we validated the results in independent ccRCC patient datasets. Our study provided a new method for prioritizing disease genes and pathways. Keywords: ccRCC, Causative mutation, Pathways, Protein-protein interaction, Gene module, eQTL

  1. Integrative analysis of genome-wide gene copy number changes and gene expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Jabs

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents a genomically unstable cancer type with extensive copy number aberrations. The relationship of gene copy number alterations and subsequent mRNA levels has only fragmentarily been described. The aim of this study was to conduct a genome-wide analysis of gene copy number gains and corresponding gene expression levels in a clinically well annotated NSCLC patient cohort (n = 190 and their association with survival. While more than half of all analyzed gene copy number-gene expression pairs showed statistically significant correlations (10,296 of 18,756 genes, high correlations, with a correlation coefficient >0.7, were obtained only in a subset of 301 genes (1.6%, including KRAS, EGFR and MDM2. Higher correlation coefficients were associated with higher copy number and expression levels. Strong correlations were frequently based on few tumors with high copy number gains and correspondingly increased mRNA expression. Among the highly correlating genes, GO groups associated with posttranslational protein modifications were particularly frequent, including ubiquitination and neddylation. In a meta-analysis including 1,779 patients we found that survival associated genes were overrepresented among highly correlating genes (61 of the 301 highly correlating genes, FDR adjusted p<0.05. Among them are the chaperone CCT2, the core complex protein NUP107 and the ubiquitination and neddylation associated protein CAND1. In conclusion, in a comprehensive analysis we described a distinct set of highly correlating genes. These genes were found to be overrepresented among survival-associated genes based on gene expression in a large collection of publicly available datasets.

  2. Current status of gene therapy for breast cancer: progress and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCrudden CM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cian M McCrudden, Helen O McCarthySchool of Pharmacy, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UKAbstract: Breast cancer is characterized by a series of genetic mutations and is therefore ideally placed for gene therapy intervention. The aim of gene therapy is to deliver a nucleic acid-based drug to either correct or destroy the cells harboring the genetic aberration. More recently, cancer gene therapy has evolved to also encompass delivery of RNA interference technologies, as well as cancer DNA vaccines. However, the bottleneck in creating such nucleic acid pharmaceuticals lies in the delivery. Deliverability of DNA is limited as it is prone to circulating nucleases; therefore, numerous strategies have been employed to aid with biological transport. This review will discuss some of the viral and nonviral approaches to breast cancer gene therapy, and present the findings of clinical trials of these therapies in breast cancer patients. Also detailed are some of the most recent developments in nonviral approaches to targeting in breast cancer gene therapy, including transcriptional control, and the development of recombinant, multifunctional bio-inspired systems. Lastly, DNA vaccines for breast cancer are documented, with comment on requirements for successful pharmaceutical product development.Keywords: breast cancer, gene therapy, nonviral, clinical trial

  3. A case of familial breast cancer with double heterozygosity for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomizu, Tadashi; Matsuzaki, Masami; Katagata, Naoto; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Sakuma, Takeshi; Monma, Tomoyuki; Saito, Motonobu; Watanabe, Fumiaki; Midorikawa, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiko

    2015-09-01

    We report an extremely rare case of familial breast cancer with deleterious germline mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, of which, to date, no such case has been reported among Japanese breast/ovarian cancer patients. Genetic testing of the family members indicated that the same double heterozygosity for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes was transmitted to the paternal cousin, and the same BRCA2 mutation to the younger sister with bilateral breast cancer, younger brother with stomach cancer, and proband's son and daughter without cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of BRCA protein expression was performed using breast cancer tissues from the proband with double heterozygosity for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and from her sibling without BRCA1 mutation but with BRCA2 mutation. There was no staining of either BRCA in the proband and no staining of BRCA2 in the sibling.

  4. Identification of genes with altered expression in medullary breast cancer vs. ductal breast cancer and normal breast epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Benoit, Vivian; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2006-01-01

    ) gene families, Vav1, monoglyceride lipase and NADP+-dependent malic enzyme, exhibited altered expression in MCB vs. ductal breast cancer, and the differences for some of these genes were confirmed on an extended panel of cell lines by quantitative PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis further established...

  5. Integrative gene network construction to analyze cancer recurrence using semi-supervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chihyun; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Kim, Hyunjin; Park, Sanghyun

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis of cancer recurrence is an important research area in bioinformatics and is challenging due to the small sample sizes compared to the vast number of genes. There have been several attempts to predict cancer recurrence. Most studies employed a supervised approach, which uses only a few labeled samples. Semi-supervised learning can be a great alternative to solve this problem. There have been few attempts based on manifold assumptions to reveal the detailed roles of identified cancer genes in recurrence. In order to predict cancer recurrence, we proposed a novel semi-supervised learning algorithm based on a graph regularization approach. We transformed the gene expression data into a graph structure for semi-supervised learning and integrated protein interaction data with the gene expression data to select functionally-related gene pairs. Then, we predicted the recurrence of cancer by applying a regularization approach to the constructed graph containing both labeled and unlabeled nodes. The average improvement rate of accuracy for three different cancer datasets was 24.9% compared to existing supervised and semi-supervised methods. We performed functional enrichment on the gene networks used for learning. We identified that those gene networks are significantly associated with cancer-recurrence-related biological functions. Our algorithm was developed with standard C++ and is available in Linux and MS Windows formats in the STL library. The executable program is freely available at: http://embio.yonsei.ac.kr/~Park/ssl.php.

  6. Integrative gene network construction to analyze cancer recurrence using semi-supervised learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihyun Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prognosis of cancer recurrence is an important research area in bioinformatics and is challenging due to the small sample sizes compared to the vast number of genes. There have been several attempts to predict cancer recurrence. Most studies employed a supervised approach, which uses only a few labeled samples. Semi-supervised learning can be a great alternative to solve this problem. There have been few attempts based on manifold assumptions to reveal the detailed roles of identified cancer genes in recurrence. RESULTS: In order to predict cancer recurrence, we proposed a novel semi-supervised learning algorithm based on a graph regularization approach. We transformed the gene expression data into a graph structure for semi-supervised learning and integrated protein interaction data with the gene expression data to select functionally-related gene pairs. Then, we predicted the recurrence of cancer by applying a regularization approach to the constructed graph containing both labeled and unlabeled nodes. CONCLUSIONS: The average improvement rate of accuracy for three different cancer datasets was 24.9% compared to existing supervised and semi-supervised methods. We performed functional enrichment on the gene networks used for learning. We identified that those gene networks are significantly associated with cancer-recurrence-related biological functions. Our algorithm was developed with standard C++ and is available in Linux and MS Windows formats in the STL library. The executable program is freely available at: http://embio.yonsei.ac.kr/~Park/ssl.php.

  7. Fingerprints in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, K.

    1994-01-01

    Gene research has shown that factors causing cancer, or carcinogens, may leave marks typical of each particular carcinogen (fingerprints) in the genotype of the cell. Radiation, for instance, may leave such fingerprints in a cancer cell. In particular, the discovery of a gene called p53 has yielded much new information on fingerprints. It has been discovered, for example, that toxic fungus and UV-radiation each leave fingerprints in the p53 gene. Based on the detection of fingerprints, it may be possible in the future to tell a cancer patient what factor had trigged the maglinancy

  8. Comparing the DNA hypermethylome with gene mutations in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornel E Schuebel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we estimate that nearly 5% or more of all known genes may be promoter methylated in an individual tumor. When directly compared to gene mutations, we find larger numbers of genes hypermethylated in individual tumors, and a higher frequency of hypermethylation within individual genes harboring either genetic or epigenetic changes. Thus, to enumerate the full spectrum of alterations in the human cancer genome, and to facilitate the most efficacious grouping of tumors to identify cancer biomarkers and tailor therapeutic approaches, both genetic and epigenetic screens should be undertaken.

  9. Bayesian logistic regression in detection of gene-steroid interaction for cancer at PDLIM5 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Sheng; Owusu, Daniel; Pan, Yue; Xie, Changchun

    2016-06-01

    The PDZ and LIM domain 5 (PDLIM5) gene may play a role in cancer, bipolar disorder, major depression, alcohol dependence and schizophrenia; however, little is known about the interaction effect of steroid and PDLIM5 gene on cancer. This study examined 47 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the PDLIM5 gene in the Marshfield sample with 716 cancer patients (any diagnosed cancer, excluding minor skin cancer) and 2848 noncancer controls. Multiple logistic regression model in PLINK software was used to examine the association of each SNP with cancer. Bayesian logistic regression in PROC GENMOD in SAS statistical software, ver. 9.4 was used to detect gene- steroid interactions influencing cancer. Single marker analysis using PLINK identified 12 SNPs associated with cancer (Plogistic regression in PROC GENMOD showed that both rs6532496 and rs951613 revealed strong gene-steroid interaction effects (OR=2.18, 95% CI=1.31-3.63 with P = 2.9 × 10⁻³ for rs6532496 and OR=2.07, 95% CI=1.24-3.45 with P = 5.43 × 10⁻³ for rs951613, respectively). Results from Bayesian logistic regression showed stronger interaction effects (OR=2.26, 95% CI=1.2-3.38 for rs6532496 and OR=2.14, 95% CI=1.14-3.2 for rs951613, respectively). All the 12 SNPs associated with cancer revealed significant gene-steroid interaction effects (P logistic regression and OR=2.59, 95% CI=1.4-3.97 from Bayesian logistic regression; respectively). This study provides evidence of common genetic variants within the PDLIM5 gene and interactions between PLDIM5 gene polymorphisms and steroid use influencing cancer.

  10. Psychological impact of multi-gene cancer panel testing in patients with a clinical suspicion of hereditary cancer across Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, I; Vilaró, M; Adrover, E; Angulo, N; Carrasco, E; Gadea, N; Sánchez, A; Ocaña, T; Llort, G; Jover, R; Cubiella, J; Servitja, S; Herráiz, M; Cid, L; Martínez, S; Oruezábal-Moreno, M J; Garau, I; Khorrami, S; Herreros de Tejada, A; Morales, R; Cano, J M; Serrano, R; López-Ceballos, M H; González-Santiago, S; Juan-Fita, M J; Alonso-Cerezo, C; Casas, A; Graña-Suarez, B; Teulé, A; Alba, E; Antón, A; Guillén-Ponce, C; Sánchez-Heras, A B; Alés-Martínez, J E; Brunet, J; Balaguer, F; Balmaña, J

    2018-03-02

    Patients' psychological reactions to multi-gene cancer panel testing might differ compared with the single-gene testing reactions due to the complexity and uncertainty associated with the different possible results. Understanding patients' preferences and psychological impact of multi-gene panel testing is important to adapt the genetic counselling model. One hundred and eighty-seven unrelated patients with clinical suspicion of hereditary cancer undergoing a 25-gene panel test completed questionnaires after pre-test genetic counseling and at one week, three months and twelve months after results to elicit their preferences regarding results disclosure and to measure their cancer worry and testing-specific distress and uncertainty. A pathogenic variant was identified in 38 patients (34 high penetrance and 4 moderate penetrance variants) and 54 patients had at least one VUS. Overall, cancer panel testing was not associated with an increase in cancer worry after results disclosure (p value=0.87). Twelve months after results, carriers of a moderate penetrance variant had higher distress and uncertainty scores compared to carriers of high penetrance variants. Cancer worry prior to genetic testing predicted genetic testing specific distress after results, especially at long-term (p valuetesting, but distress and uncertainty observed in carriers of moderate penetrance cancer variants in this cohort warrants further research. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Engineering and Functional Characterization of Fusion Genes Identifies Novel Oncogenic Drivers of Cancer. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncogenic gene fusions drive many human cancers, but tools to more quickly unravel their functional contributions are needed. Here we describe methodology permitting fusion gene construction for functional evaluation. Using this strategy, we engineered the known fusion oncogenes, BCR-ABL1, EML4-ALK, and ETV6-NTRK3, as well as 20 previously uncharacterized fusion genes identified in TCGA datasets.

  12. Differential expression of ZFX gene in gastric cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-08

    Jan 8, 2012 ... 1Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan. University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, ... Gastric cancer accounts for 8% of the total cancer cases and 10% of total cancer deaths worldwide. In Iran, gastric cancer is the ... 2003), lung (Kim et al. 2005), head and neck (Prince et ...

  13. Lightest exoplanet yet discovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Well-known exoplanet researcher Michel Mayor today announced the discovery of the lightest exoplanet found so far. The planet, "e", in the famous system Gliese 581, is only about twice the mass of our Earth. The team also refined the orbit of the planet Gliese 581 d, first discovered in 2007, placing it well within the habitable zone, where liquid water oceans could exist. These amazing discoveries are the outcome of more than four years of observations using the most successful low-mass-exoplanet hunter in the world, the HARPS spectrograph attached to the 3.6-metre ESO telescope at La Silla, Chile. ESO PR Photo 15a/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Photo 15b/09 A planet in the habitable zone ESO PR Video 15a/09 ESOcast 6 ESO PR Video 15b/09 VNR A-roll ESO PR Video 15c/09 Zoom-in on Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15d/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15e/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 d ESO PR Video 15f/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 system ESO PR Video 15g/09 The radial velocity method ESO PR Video 15h/09 Statement in English ESO PR Video 15i/09 Statement in French ESO PR Video 15j/09 La Silla Observatory "The holy grail of current exoplanet research is the detection of a rocky, Earth-like planet in the ‘habitable zone' -- a region around the host star with the right conditions for water to be liquid on a planet's surface", says Michel Mayor from the Geneva Observatory, who led the European team to this stunning breakthrough. Planet Gliese 581 e orbits its host star - located only 20.5 light-years away in the constellation Libra ("the Scales") -- in just 3.15 days. "With only 1.9 Earth-masses, it is the least massive exoplanet ever detected and is, very likely, a rocky planet", says co-author Xavier Bonfils from Grenoble Observatory. Being so close to its host star, the planet is not in the habitable zone. But another planet in this system appears to be. From previous observations -- also obtained with the HARPS spectrograph

  14. Progress in nonviral gene therapy for breast cancer and what comes next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottai, Giulia; Truffi, Marta; Corsi, Fabio; Santarpia, Libero

    2017-05-01

    The possibility of correcting defective genes and modulating gene expression through gene therapy has emerged as a promising treatment strategy for breast cancer. Furthermore, the relevance of tumor immune microenvironment in supporting the oncogenic process has paved the way for novel immunomodulatory applications of gene therapy. Areas covered: In this review, the authors describe the most relevant delivery systems, focusing on nonviral vectors, along with the description of the major approaches used to modify target cells, including gene transfer, RNA interference (RNAi), and epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, they highlight innovative therapeutic strategies and the application of gene therapy in clinical trials for breast cancer. Expert opinion: Gene therapy has the potential to impact breast cancer research. Further efforts are required to increase the clinical application of RNAi-based therapeutics, especially in combination with conventional treatments. Innovative strategies, including genome editing and stem cell-based systems, may contribute to translate gene therapy into clinical practice. Immune-based approaches have emerged as an attractive therapeutic opportunity for selected breast cancer patients. However, several challenges need to be addressed before considering gene therapy as an actual option for the treatment of breast cancer.

  15. A stochastic model for identifying differential gene pair co-expression patterns in prostate cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Yu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of gene differential co-expression patterns between cancer stages is a newly developing method to reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Most researches of this subject lack an algorithm useful for performing a statistical significance assessment involving cancer progression. Lacking this specific algorithm is apparently absent in identifying precise gene pairs correlating to cancer progression. Results In this investigation we studied gene pair co-expression change by using a stochastic process model for approximating the underlying dynamic procedure of the co-expression change during cancer progression. Also, we presented a novel analytical method named 'Stochastic process model for Identifying differentially co-expressed Gene pair' (SIG method. This method has been applied to two well known prostate cancer data sets: hormone sensitive versus hormone resistant, and healthy versus cancerous. From these data sets, 428,582 gene pairs and 303,992 gene pairs were identified respectively. Afterwards, we used two different current statistical methods to the same data sets, which were developed to identify gene pair differential co-expression and did not consider cancer progression in algorithm. We then compared these results from three different perspectives: progression analysis, gene pair identification effectiveness analysis, and pathway enrichment analysis. Statistical methods were used to quantify the quality and performance of these different perspectives. They included: Re-identification Scale (RS and Progression Score (PS in progression analysis, True Positive Rate (TPR in gene pair analysis, and Pathway Enrichment Score (PES in pathway analysis. Our results show small values of RS and large values of PS, TPR, and PES; thus, suggesting that gene pairs identified by the SIG method are highly correlated with cancer progression, and highly enriched in disease-specific pathways. From

  16. Pan-Cancer Analysis of lncRNA Regulation Supports Their Targeting of Cancer Genes in Each Tumor Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hua-Sheng; Somvanshi, Sonal; Patel, Ektaben; Chen, Ting-Wen; Singh, Vivek P; Zorman, Barry; Patil, Sagar L; Pan, Yinghong; Chatterjee, Sujash S; Sood, Anil K; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Sumazin, Pavel

    2018-04-03

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are commonly dysregulated in tumors, but only a handful are known to play pathophysiological roles in cancer. We inferred lncRNAs that dysregulate cancer pathways, oncogenes, and tumor suppressors (cancer genes) by modeling their effects on the activity of transcription factors, RNA-binding proteins, and microRNAs in 5,185 TCGA tumors and 1,019 ENCODE assays. Our predictions included hundreds of candidate onco- and tumor-suppressor lncRNAs (cancer lncRNAs) whose somatic alterations account for the dysregulation of dozens of cancer genes and pathways in each of 14 tumor contexts. To demonstrate proof of concept, we showed that perturbations targeting OIP5-AS1 (an inferred tumor suppressor) and TUG1 and WT1-AS (inferred onco-lncRNAs) dysregulated cancer genes and altered proliferation of breast and gynecologic cancer cells. Our analysis indicates that, although most lncRNAs are dysregulated in a tumor-specific manner, some, including OIP5-AS1, TUG1, NEAT1, MEG3, and TSIX, synergistically dysregulate cancer pathways in multiple tumor contexts. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. ABERRANT METHYLATION OF THE PROMOTER OF APC, CDH13 AND MGMT GENES IN COLORECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Kit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant methylation of gene promoter regions is the main epigenetic change characterizing colorectal cancer. Methylation levels of 42 CpG-sites of promoter regions of the MGMT, APC and CDH13 genes in colorectal cancer were studied in comparison with methylation levels of the adjacent normal tissue in 25 patients. Pyrosequencing showed an increase in methylation levels of promoter regions of the MGMT, APC and CDH13 genes in tumor samples by 3 to 5 times. These tumor samples were screened for activating SNP-mutations in the KRAS (40 %, NRAS (0 % and BRAF (0 % oncogenes. SNP-mutations in the KRAS gene were accompanied by hypermethylation of one or more promoters of the studied genes. Association of this epigenetic index with tumor metastasis was proved. The data on an increase in methylation of the promoter regions of oncosupressor genes can be used as sensitive prognostic markers of progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer.

  18. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in Wnt signaling pathway genes with breast cancer in Saudi patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saud Alanazi

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease involving genetic and epigenetic alterations in genes encoding proteins that are components of various signaling pathways. Candidate gene approach have identified association of genetic variants in the Wnt signaling pathway genes and increased susceptibility to several diseases including breast cancer. Due to the rarity of somatic mutations in key genes of Wnt pathway, we investigated the association of genetic variants in these genes with predisposition to breast cancers. We performed a case-control study to identify risk variants by examining 15 SNPs located in 8 genes associated with Wnt signaling. Genotypic analysis of individual locus showed statistically significant association of five SNPs located in β-catenin, AXIN2, DKK3, SFRP3 and TCF7L2 with breast cancers. Increased risk was observed only with the SNP in β-catenin while the other four SNPs conferred protection against breast cancers. Majority of these associations persisted after stratification of the cases based on estrogen receptor status and age of on-set of breast cancer. The rs7775 SNP in exon 6 of SFRP3 gene that codes for either arginine or glycine exhibited very strong association with breast cancer, even after Bonferroni's correction. Apart from these five variants, rs3923086 in AXIN2 and rs3763511 in DKK4 that did not show any association in the overall population were significantly associated with early on-set and estrogen receptor negative breast cancers, respectively. This is the first study to utilize pathway based approach to identify association of risk variants in the Wnt signaling pathway genes with breast cancers. Confirmation of our findings in larger populations of different ethnicities would provide evidence for the role of Wnt pathway as well as screening markers for early detection of breast carcinomas.

  19. Similarity in gene-regulatory networks suggests that cancer cells share characteristics of embryonic neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zan; Lei, Anhua; Xu, Liyang; Chen, Lu; Chen, Yonglong; Zhang, Xuena; Gao, Yan; Yang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Min; Cao, Ying

    2017-08-04

    Cancer cells are immature cells resulting from cellular reprogramming by gene misregulation, and redifferentiation is expected to reduce malignancy. It is unclear, however, whether cancer cells can undergo terminal differentiation. Here, we show that inhibition of the epigenetic modification enzyme enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), histone deacetylases 1 and 3 (HDAC1 and -3), lysine demethylase 1A (LSD1), or DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), which all promote cancer development and progression, leads to postmitotic neuron-like differentiation with loss of malignant features in distinct solid cancer cell lines. The regulatory effect of these enzymes in neuronal differentiation resided in their intrinsic activity in embryonic neural precursor/progenitor cells. We further found that a major part of pan-cancer-promoting genes and the signal transducers of the pan-cancer-promoting signaling pathways, including the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) mesenchymal marker genes, display neural specific expression during embryonic neurulation. In contrast, many tumor suppressor genes, including the EMT epithelial marker gene that encodes cadherin 1 ( CDH1 ), exhibited non-neural or no expression. This correlation indicated that cancer cells and embryonic neural cells share a regulatory network, mediating both tumorigenesis and neural development. This observed similarity in regulatory mechanisms suggests that cancer cells might share characteristics of embryonic neural cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Prevalence and Spectrum of Germline Cancer Susceptibility Gene Mutations Among Patients With Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Rachel; Frankel, Wendy L.; Swanson, Benjamin; Zhao, Weiqiang; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Miller, Kristin; Bacher, Jason; Bigley, Christopher; Nelsen, Lori; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Paskett, Electra; Shields, Peter G.; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Stanich, Peter P; Lattimer, Ilene; Arnold, Mark; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Kalady, Matthew; Heald, Brandie; Greenwood, Carla; Paquette, Ian; Prues, Marla; Draper, David J.; Lindeman, Carolyn; Kuebler, J. Philip; Reynolds, Kelly; Brell, Joanna M.; Shaper, Amy A.; Mahesh, Sameer; Buie, Nicole; Weeman, Kisa; Shine, Kristin; Haut, Mitchell; Edwards, Joan; Bastola, Shyamal; Wickham, Karen; Khanduja, Karamjit S.; Zacks, Rosemary; Pritchard, Colin C.; Shirts, Brian H.; Jacobson, Angela; Allen, Brian; de la Chapelle, Albert; Hampel, Heather

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Hereditary cancer syndromes infer high cancer risks and require intensive cancer surveillance, yet the prevalence and spectrum of these conditions among unselected patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) is largely undetermined. OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and spectrum of cancer susceptibility gene mutations among patients with early-onset CRC. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Overall, 450 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer younger than 50 years were prospectively accrued from 51 hospitals into the Ohio Colorectal Cancer Prevention Initiative from January 1, 2013, to June 20, 2016. Mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency was determined by microsatellite instability and/or immunohistochemistry. Germline DNA was tested for mutations in 25 cancer susceptibility genes using next-generation sequencing. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Mutation prevalence and spectrum in patients with early-onset CRC was determined. Clinical characteristics were assessed by mutation status. RESULTS In total 450 patients younger than 50 years were included in the study, and 75 gene mutations were found in 72 patients (16%). Forty-eight patients (10.7%) had MMR-deficient tumors, and 40 patients (83.3%) had at least 1 gene mutation: 37 had Lynch syndrome (13, MLH1 [including one with constitutional MLH1 methylation]; 16, MSH2; 1, MSH2/monoallelic MUTYH; 2, MSH6; 5, PMS2); 1 patient had the APC c.3920T>A, p.I1307K mutation and a PMS2 variant; 9 patients (18.8%) had double somatic MMR mutations (including 2 with germline biallelic MUTYH mutations); and 1 patient had somatic MLH1 methylation. Four hundred two patients (89.3%) had MMR-proficient tumors, and 32 patients (8%) had at least 1 gene mutation: 9 had mutations in high-penetrance CRC genes (5, APC; 1, APC/PMS2; 2, biallelic MUTYH; 1, SMAD4); 13 patients had mutations in high- or moderate-penetrance genes not traditionally associated with CRC (3, ATM; 1, ATM/CHEK2; 2, BRCA1; 4, BRCA2; 1, CDKN2A; 2, PALB2); 10

  1. CAsubtype: An R Package to Identify Gene Sets Predictive of Cancer Subtypes and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hualei; Tong, Pan; Zhao, Xiaodong; Sun, Jielin; Li, Hua

    2018-03-01

    In the past decade, molecular classification of cancer has gained high popularity owing to its high predictive power on clinical outcomes as compared with traditional methods commonly used in clinical practice. In particular, using gene expression profiles, recent studies have successfully identified a number of gene sets for the delineation of cancer subtypes that are associated with distinct prognosis. However, identification of such gene sets remains a laborious task due to the lack of tools with flexibility, integration and ease of use. To reduce the burden, we have developed an R package, CAsubtype, to efficiently identify gene sets predictive of cancer subtypes and clinical outcomes. By integrating more than 13,000 annotated gene sets, CAsubtype provides a comprehensive repertoire of candidates for new cancer subtype identification. For easy data access, CAsubtype further includes the gene expression and clinical data of more than 2000 cancer patients from TCGA. CAsubtype first employs principal component analysis to identify gene sets (from user-provided or package-integrated ones) with robust principal components representing significantly large variation between cancer samples. Based on these principal components, CAsubtype visualizes the sample distribution in low-dimensional space for better understanding of the distinction between samples and classifies samples into subgroups with prevalent clustering algorithms. Finally, CAsubtype performs survival analysis to compare the clinical outcomes between the identified subgroups, assessing their clinical value as potentially novel cancer subtypes. In conclusion, CAsubtype is a flexible and well-integrated tool in the R environment to identify gene sets for cancer subtype identification and clinical outcome prediction. Its simple R commands and comprehensive data sets enable efficient examination of the clinical value of any given gene set, thus facilitating hypothesis generating and testing in biological and

  2. Shared Gene Expression Alterations in Nasal and Bronchial Epithelium for Lung Cancer Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    We previously derived and validated a bronchial epithelial gene expression biomarker to detect lung cancer in current and former smokers. Given that bronchial and nasal epithelial gene expression are similarly altered by cigarette smoke exposure, we sought to determine if cancer-associated gene expression might also be detectable in the more readily accessible nasal epithelium. Nasal epithelial brushings were prospectively collected from current and former smokers undergoing diagnostic evaluation for pulmonary lesions suspicious for lung cancer in the AEGIS-1 (n = 375) and AEGIS-2 (n = 130) clinical trials and gene expression profiled using microarrays. All statistical tests were two-sided. We identified 535 genes that were differentially expressed in the nasal epithelium of AEGIS-1 patients diagnosed with lung cancer vs those with benign disease after one year of follow-up ( P  cancer-associated gene expression alterations between the two airway sites ( P  lung cancer classifier derived in the AEGIS-1 cohort that combined clinical factors (age, smoking status, time since quit, mass size) and nasal gene expression (30 genes) had statistically significantly higher area under the curve (0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.74 to 0.89, P  = .01) and sensitivity (0.91; 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.97, P  = .03) than a clinical-factor only model in independent samples from the AEGIS-2 cohort. These results support that the airway epithelial field of lung cancer-associated injury in ever smokers extends to the nose and demonstrates the potential of using nasal gene expression as a noninvasive biomarker for lung cancer detection. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Risk of ovarian cancer and inherited variants in relapse-associated genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Peedicayil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously identified a panel of genes associated with outcome of ovarian cancer. The purpose of the current study was to assess whether variants in these genes correlated with ovarian cancer risk.Women with and without invasive ovarian cancer (749 cases, 1,041 controls were genotyped at 136 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within 13 candidate genes. Risk was estimated for each SNP and for overall variation within each gene. At the gene-level, variation within MSL1 (male-specific lethal-1 homolog was associated with risk of serous cancer (p = 0.03; haplotypes within PRPF31 (PRP31 pre-mRNA processing factor 31 homolog were associated with risk of invasive disease (p = 0.03. MSL1 rs7211770 was associated with decreased risk of serous disease (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.66-0.98; p = 0.03. SNPs in MFSD7, BTN3A3, ZNF200, PTPRS, and CCND1A were inversely associated with risk (p<0.05, and there was increased risk at HEXIM1 rs1053578 (p = 0.04, OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.02-1.91.Tumor studies can reveal novel genes worthy of follow-up for cancer susceptibility. Here, we found that inherited markers in the gene encoding MSL1, part of a complex that modifies the histone H4, may decrease risk of invasive serous ovarian cancer.

  4. Gene expression profiling revealed novel mechanism of action of Taxotere and Furtulon in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both Taxotere and Capecitabine have shown anti-cancer activity against various cancers including prostate cancer. In combination, Taxotere plus Capecitabine has demonstrated higher anti-cancer activity in advanced breast cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of action of Taxotere and Capecitabine have not been fully elucidated in prostate cancer. Methods The total RNA from PC3 and LNCaP prostate cells untreated and treated with 2 nM Taxotere, 110 μM Furtulon (active metabolite of Capecitabine, or 1 nM Taxotere plus 50 μM Furtulon for 6, 36, and 72 hours, was subjected to Affymetrix Human Genome U133A Array analysis. Real-time PCR and Western Blot analysis were conducted to confirm microarray data. Results Taxotere and Furtulon down-regulated some genes critical for cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, transcription factor, cell signaling, and oncogenesis, and up-regulated some genes related to the induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and differentiation in both cell lines. Taxotere and Furtulon also up-regulated some genes responsible for chemotherapeutic resistance, suggesting the induction of cancer cell resistance to these agents. Conclusions Taxotere and Furtulon caused the alternation of a large number of genes, many of which may contribute to the molecular mechanisms by which Taxotere and Furtulon inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells. This information could be utilized for further mechanistic research and for devising optimized therapeutic strategies against prostate cancer.

  5. Wip1 gene silencing enhances the chemosensitivity of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Wu, Di; Zhong, Wa; Lu, Xi-Ji; Yu, Tao; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2017-08-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Multidrug resistance is one of the main reasons for failure of therapy in patients with advanced colon cancer. In previous studies, multiple methods were investigated to reverse the multidrug resistance of colon cancer cells. However, to date, no clinical method has been identified to be satisfactory. Therefore, successful reversal of drug resistance in colon cancer cells still requires new therapeutic strategies or pharmaceuticals. Wild-type p53-induced phosphatase (Wip1), a member of the 2C type serine/threonine protein phosphatase family, is closely associated with the p53 gene, which is the most important tumor-suppressor gene. Wip1 was reported to be associated with the chemosensitivity of breast cancer cells. However, the correlation between the expression of Wip1 gene and the chemosensitivity of colon cancer cells has not been reported yet. In the present study, Wip1-811 small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Wip1 was investigated to reverse the multidrug resistance of colon cancer cells. The siRNA duplexes were transfected into RKO colon cancer cells. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of Wip1 was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The protein level of Wip1 was detected by western blotting. The cell viability was measured by MTS assay. The cell apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by flow cytometry. Intracellular adriamycin cumulative concentration was determined using flow cytometry. Wip1-811 siRNA efficiently inhibited the expression of Wip1 at the mRNA and protein levels, and enhanced the sensitivity of RKO colon cancer cells towards chemotherapy, which was accompanied by increased cell apoptosis, following the inhibition of Wip1 gene expression. These results indicate that Wip1 gene silencing could enhance the chemosensitivity of colon cancer cells, which may provide a new potential approach for the reversal of multidrug resistance in colon cancer

  6. Gene expression analysis in prostate cancer: the importance of the endogenous control.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vajda, Alice

    2013-03-01

    Aberrant gene expression is a hallmark of cancer. Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is the gold-standard for quantifying gene expression, and commonly employs a house-keeping gene (HKG) as an endogenous control to normalize results; the choice of which is critical for accurate data interpretation. Many factors, including sample type, pathological state, and oxygen levels influence gene expression including putative HKGs. The aim of this study was to determine the suitability of commonly used HKGs for qRT-PCR in prostate cancer.

  7. The frequency of cancer predisposition gene mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in Taiwan: From BRCA1/2 to multi-gene panels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi-Lin Sung

    Full Text Available An important role of genetic factors in the development of breast cancer (BC or ovarian cancer (OC in Taiwanese (ethnic Chinese patients has been suggested. However, other than germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, which are related to hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC, cancer-predisposition genes have not been well studied in this population. The aim of the present study was to more accurately summarize the prevalence of genetic mutations in HBOC patients using various gene panels ranging in size from BRCA1/2 alone to multi-gene panels. Among 272 HBOC patients analyzed, the prevalence of BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations was 7.7% (21/272, 6.8% (16/236 and 8.2% (13/159, respectively. The total mutation rate was 18.4% (50/272. Although no founder mutations were identified in this study, two recurrent mutations, BRCA1 (c.3607C>T and BRCA2 (c.5164_5165 delAG, were found. The main pathogenic/likely pathogenic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes included ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUYTH, RAD50, RAD51C and TP53. The prevalence rate of gene mutations in HBOC patients did not differ with respect to whether BC or OC was the first diagnosis or they presented a family history of the disease or their age at diagnosis. HBOC patients with both BC and OC exhibited a higher prevalence rate of mutations (50.0% than patients with OC (25.0% or BC (8.6% alone. In conclusion, evaluation of hereditary cancer risk in Taiwan HBOC patients, particularly individuals with double cancer, is strongly encouraged. Panel testing can yield additional genomic information, and widespread and well-designed panel testing will help in assessing more accurate mutational prevalence of risk genes.

  8. A comparison of 12-gene colon cancer assay gene expression in African American and Caucasian patients with stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Rangaswamy; Posey, James; Chao, Calvin Y; Lu, Ruixiao; Jadhav, Trafina; Javed, Ahmed Y; Javed, Awais; Mahmoud, Fade A; Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Manne, Upender

    2016-06-18

    African American (AA) colon cancer patients have a worse prognosis than Caucasian (CA) colon cancer patients, however, reasons for this disparity are not well understood. To determine if tumor biology might contribute to differential prognosis, we measured recurrence risk and gene expression using the Oncotype DX® Colon Cancer Assay (12-gene assay) and compared the Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles between AA patients and CA patients with stage II colon cancer. We retrieved demographic, clinical, and archived tumor tissues from stage II colon cancer patients at four institutions. The 12-gene assay and mismatch repair (MMR) status were performed by Genomic Health (Redwood City, California). Student's t-test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to compare Recurrence Score data and gene expression data from AA and CA patients (SAS Enterprise Guide 5.1). Samples from 122 AA and 122 CA patients were analyzed. There were 118 women (63 AA, 55 CA) and 126 men (59 AA, 67 CA). Median age was 66 years for AA patients and 68 for CA patients. Age, gender, year of surgery, pathologic T-stage, tumor location, the number of lymph nodes examined, lymphovascular invasion, and MMR status were not significantly different between groups (p = 0.93). The mean Recurrence Score result for AA patients (27.9 ± 12.8) and CA patients (28.1 ± 11.8) was not significantly different and the proportions of patients with high Recurrence Score values (≥41) were similar between the groups (17/122 AA; 15/122 CA). None of the gene expression variables, either single genes or gene groups (cell cycle group, stromal group, BGN1, FAP, INHBA1, Ki67, MYBL2, cMYC and GADD45B), was significantly different between the racial groups. After controlling for clinical and pathologic covariates, the means and distributions of Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles showed no statistically significant difference between patient groups. The distribution of

  9. A comparison of 12-gene colon cancer assay gene expression in African American and Caucasian patients with stage II colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindarajan, Rangaswamy; Posey, James; Chao, Calvin Y.; Lu, Ruixiao; Jadhav, Trafina; Javed, Ahmed Y.; Javed, Awais; Mahmoud, Fade A.; Osarogiagbon, Raymond University; Manne, Upender

    2016-01-01

    African American (AA) colon cancer patients have a worse prognosis than Caucasian (CA) colon cancer patients, however, reasons for this disparity are not well understood. To determine if tumor biology might contribute to differential prognosis, we measured recurrence risk and gene expression using the Oncotype DX® Colon Cancer Assay (12-gene assay) and compared the Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles between AA patients and CA patients with stage II colon cancer. We retrieved demographic, clinical, and archived tumor tissues from stage II colon cancer patients at four institutions. The 12-gene assay and mismatch repair (MMR) status were performed by Genomic Health (Redwood City, California). Student’s t-test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to compare Recurrence Score data and gene expression data from AA and CA patients (SAS Enterprise Guide 5.1). Samples from 122 AA and 122 CA patients were analyzed. There were 118 women (63 AA, 55 CA) and 126 men (59 AA, 67 CA). Median age was 66 years for AA patients and 68 for CA patients. Age, gender, year of surgery, pathologic T-stage, tumor location, the number of lymph nodes examined, lymphovascular invasion, and MMR status were not significantly different between groups (p = 0.93). The mean Recurrence Score result for AA patients (27.9 ± 12.8) and CA patients (28.1 ± 11.8) was not significantly different and the proportions of patients with high Recurrence Score values (≥41) were similar between the groups (17/122 AA; 15/122 CA). None of the gene expression variables, either single genes or gene groups (cell cycle group, stromal group, BGN1, FAP, INHBA1, Ki67, MYBL2, cMYC and GADD45B), was significantly different between the racial groups. After controlling for clinical and pathologic covariates, the means and distributions of Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles showed no statistically significant difference between patient groups. The distribution of Recurrence Score

  10. Analysis of breast cancer metastasis candidate genes from next generation-sequencing via systematic functional genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomstrøm, Monica Marie

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer remains an incurable disease accounting for the vast majority of deaths from breast cancer. Understanding the molecular mechanisms for metastatic spread is important to improve diagnosis and for generating starting points for novel treatment strategies. Inhibition...... advantage of mutations is that they are most likely stable in the metastatic cancer cell population, whereas miRNA, mRNA and protein expression profiles may change substantially prior to, throughout, or after the complex metastatic process as well as between subpopulations such as cancer stem cells (CSCs......) and non-CSCs. The main goal of this project was to functionally characterize a set of candidate genes recovered from next-generation sequencing analysis for their role in breast cancer metastasis formation. The starting gene set comprised 104 gene variants; i.e. 57 wildtype and 47 mutated variants. During...

  11. The Role of the Prohibition Gene in Apoptosis of Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kinkade, Rebecca; Chellappan, Srikumar P

    2004-01-01

    .... Mutations in the prohibitin gene were subsequently found in sporadic breast tumors. Our experiments in B cells and breast cancer cells suggest that prohibitin protects against apoptosis induced by camptothecin, a topoisomerase 1 inhibitor...

  12. The Role of the Prohibitin Gene in Apoptosis of Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kinkade, Rebecca; Chellappan, Srikumar P

    2005-01-01

    .... Mutations in the prohibitin gene were subsequently found in sporadic breast tumors. Our experiments in B cells and breast cancer cells suggest that prohibitin protects against apoptosis induced by camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor...

  13. Prediction of metastasis from low-malignant breast cancer by gene expression profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Eiriksdottir, Freyja

    2007-01-01

    demonstrated high cross-platform consistency of the classifiers. Higher performance of HUMAC32 was demonstrated among the low-malignant cancers compared with the 70-gene classifier. This suggests that although the metastatic potential to some extend is determined by the same genes in groups of tumors......Promising results for prediction of outcome in breast cancer have been obtained by genome wide gene expression profiling. Some studies have suggested that an extensive overtreatment of breast cancer patients might be reduced by risk assessment with gene expression profiling. A patient group hardly...... examined in these studies is the low-risk patients for whom outcome is very difficult to predict with currently used methods. These patients do not receive adjuvant treatment according to the guidelines of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG). In this study, 26 tumors from low-risk patients...

  14. Identification of Candidate Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes Using a cDNA Microarray/CGH Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Godwin, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    ...; the most notorious are the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. However, it has become evident that not all (or even the majority) of familial breast cancer families can be attributed to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2...

  15. Identification of Candidate Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes Using a cDNA Microarray/CGH Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Godwin, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    ...; the most notorious are the BRCAl and BRCA2 genes. However, it has become evident that not all (or even the majority) of familial breast cancer families can be attributed to mutations in BRCAl and BRCA2...

  16. RAPTOR gene polymorphism is independently correlated with urothelial cancer susceptibility compared with environmental toxin exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Lun Luo

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: RAPTOR gene polymorphisms are important SNPs with significantly association with the risk of urothelial cancer in Taiwan. Further researches about raptor-mTOR complex interfering malignant transformation of urothelium is worthy of further investigation.

  17. Role of TLR4 gene polymorphisms in the colorectal cancer risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Role of TLR4 gene polymorphisms in the colorectal cancer risk modulation in ethnic Kashmiri population – A case–control study. Saniya Nissar, Aga Syed Sameer, Roohi Rasool, Qurteeba Qadri, Nissar A. Chowdri, Fouzia Rashid ...

  18. Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer Radiosensitization Using Mutant Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soldatenkov, Viatcheslav

    2003-01-01

    ...) under the control of the 5'-flanking sequences of the human prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene, and demonstrated that PARP-DBD sensitized prostate cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents in vitro...

  19. Cloning and Characterization of Genes that Inhibit TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis of Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shu, Hong-Bing

    2003-01-01

    ...). However, some cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis (3, 4, 6-13). The purpose of this proposed study is to clone and characterize such inhibitory genes of TRAIL-induced apoptosis...

  20. Gene expression profiling of circulating tumor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hensler, M.; Vancurova, I.; Becht, E.; Palata, O.; Strnad, P.; Tesarova, P.; Cabinakova, M.; Švec, David; Kubista, Mikael; Bartunkova, J.; Spisek, R.; Sojka, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2016), e1102827 ISSN 2162-402X Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Breast cancer * gene expression profiling * circulating tumor cells Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 7.719, year: 2016

  1. Localization of a breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, to chromosome 13q12-13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooster, R.; Mangion, J.; Quirk, Y.; Collins, N.; Seal, S.; Ford, D.; Averill, D. (Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom)); Neuhausen, S.L.; Nguyen, K.; Tran, T. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)) (and others)

    1994-09-30

    A small proportion of breast cancer, in particular those cases arising at a young age, is due to the inheritance of dominant susceptibility genes conferring a high risk of the disease. A genomic linkage search was performed with 15 high-risk breast cancer families that were unlinked to the BRCA1 locus on chromosome 17q21. This analysis localized a second breast cancer susceptibility locus, BRCA2, to a 6-centimorgan interval on chromosome 13q12-13. Preliminary, evidence suggests that BRCA2 confers a high risk of breast cancer but, unlike BRCA1, does not confer a substantially elevated risk of ovarian cancer.

  2. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, Variation in Inflammatory Genes, and Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Witte

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that prostatic inflammation plays a key role in the development of prostate cancer. It remains controversial whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Here, we investigate how a previously reported inverse association between NSAID use and the risk of aggressive prostate cancer is modulated by variants in several inflammatory genes. We found that NSAIDs may have differential effects on prostate cancer development, depending on one’s genetic makeup. Further study of these inflammatory pathways may clarify the mechanisms through which NSAIDs impact prostate cancer risk.

  3. Stem cells’ guided gene therapy of cancer: New frontier in personalized and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavroudi M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and therapy of cancer remain to be the greatest challenges for all physicians working in clinical oncology and molecular medicine. The grim statistics speak for themselves with reports of 1,638,910 men and women diagnosed with cancer and nearly 577,190 patients passed away due to cancer in the USA in 2012. For practicing clinicians, who treat patients suffering from advanced cancers with contemporary systemic therapies, the main challenge is to attain therapeutic efficacy, while minimizing side effects. Unfortunately, all contemporary systemic therapies cause side effects. In treated patients, these side effects may range from nausea to damaged tissues. In cancer survivors, the iatrogenic outcomes of systemic therapies may include genomic mutations and their consequences. Therefore, there is an urgent need for personalized and targeted therapies. Recently, we reviewed the current status of suicide gene therapy for cancer. Herein, we discuss the novel strategy: genetically engineered stem guided gene therapy. Stem cells have the unique potential for self-renewal and differentiation. This potential is the primary reason for introducing them into medicine to regenerate injured or degenerated organs, as well as to rejuvenate aging tissues. Recent advances in genetic engineering and stem cell research have created the foundations for genetic engineering of stem cells as the vectors for delivery of therapeutic transgenes. Specifically in oncology, the stem cells are genetically engineered to deliver the cell suicide inducing genes selectively to the cancer cells. Expression of the transgenes kills the cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Herein, we present various strategies to bioengineer suicide inducing genes and stem cell vectors. Moreover, we review results of the main preclinical studies and clinical trials. However, the main risk for therapeutic use of stem cells is their cancerous transformation. Therefore, we

  4. Google goes cancer: improving outcome prediction for cancer patients by network-based ranking of marker genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Winter

    Full Text Available Predicting the clinical outcome of cancer patients based on the expression of marker genes in their tumors has received increasing interest in the past decade. Accurate predictors of outcome and response to therapy could be used to personalize and thereby improve therapy. However, state of the art methods used so far often found marker genes with limited prediction accuracy, limited reproducibility, and unclear biological relevance. To address this problem, we developed a novel computational approach to identify genes prognostic for outcome that couples gene expression measurements from primary tumor samples with a network of known relationships between the genes. Our approach ranks genes according to their prognostic relevance using both expression and network information in a manner similar to Google's PageRank. We applied this method to gene expression profiles which we obtained from 30 patients with pancreatic cancer, and identified seven candidate marker genes prognostic for outcome. Compared to genes found with state of the art methods, such as Pearson correlation of gene expression with survival time, we improve the prediction accuracy by up to 7%. Accuracies were assessed using support vector machine classifiers and Monte Carlo cross-validation. We then validated the prognostic value of our seven candidate markers using immunohistochemistry on an independent set of 412 pancreatic cancer samples. Notably, signatures derived from our candidate markers were independently predictive of outcome and superior to established clinical prognostic factors such as grade, tumor size, and nodal status. As the amount of genomic data of individual tumors grows rapidly, our algorithm meets the need for powerful computational approaches that are key to exploit these data for personalized cancer therapies in clinical practice.

  5. Identification of 5 novel genes methylated in breast and other epithelial cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Robyn L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several high throughput approaches to identify methylated genes in cancer. We utilized one such recently developed approach, MIRA (methylated-CpG island recovery assay combined with CpG island arrays to identify novel genes that are epigenetically inactivated in breast cancer. Results Using this approach we identified numerous CpG islands that demonstrated aberrant DNA methylation in breast cancer cell lines. Using a combination of COBRA and sequencing of bisulphite modified DNA, we confirmed 5 novel genes frequently methylated in breast tumours; EMILIN2, SALL1, DBC1, FBLN2 and CIDE-A. Methylation frequencies ranged from between 25% and 63% in primary breast tumours, whilst matched normal breast tissue DNA was either unmethylated or demonstrated a much lower frequency of methylation compared to malignant breast tissue DNA. Furthermore expression of the above 5 genes was shown to be restored following treatment with a demethylating agent in methylated breast cancer cell lines. We have expanded this analysis across three other common epithelial cancers (lung, colorectal, prostate. We demonstrate that the above genes show varying levels of methylation in these cancers. Lastly and most importantly methylation of EMILIN2 was associated with poorer clinical outcome in breast cancer and was strongly associated with estrogen receptor as well as progesterone receptor positive breast cancers. Conclusion The combination of the MIRA assay with CpG island arrays is a very useful technique for identifying epigenetically inactivated genes in cancer genomes and can provide molecular markers for early cancer diagnosis, prognosis and epigenetic therapy.

  6. Microarray based analysis of gene regulation by mesenchymal stem cells in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ming; Gao, Chang E.; Li, Wen Hui; Yang, Yi; Chang, Li; Dong, Jian; Ren, Yan Xin; Chen, De Dian

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors with a high case-fatality rate among women. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on breast cancer by exploring the potential underlying molecular mechanisms. The expression profile of GSE43306, which refers to MDA-MB-231 cells with or without a 1:1 ratio of MSCs, was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database for differentially expressed gene (DEG) screening. The Database for Annotati...

  7. Tumor Restrictive Gene Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    ...) to specifically target and lyse cells of an androgen independent prostate cancer osseous metastasis, which account for a majority of the morbidity and mortality experience by men with prostate cancer...

  8. Tumor Restrictive Gene Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    ...) to specifically target and lyse cells of an androgen independent prostate cancer osseous metastasis, which account for a majority of the morbidity and mortality experience by men with prostate cancer...

  9. Rrp1b, a new candidate susceptibility gene for breast cancer progression and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel P S Crawford

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel candidate metastasis modifier, ribosomal RNA processing 1 homolog B (Rrp1b, was identified through two independent approaches. First, yeast two-hybrid, immunoprecipitation, and functional assays demonstrated a physical and functional interaction between Rrp1b and the previous identified metastasis modifier Sipa1. In parallel, using mouse and human metastasis gene expression data it was observed that extracellular matrix (ECM genes are common components of metastasis predictive signatures, suggesting that ECM genes are either important markers or causal factors in metastasis. To investigate the relationship between ECM genes and poor prognosis in breast cancer, expression quantitative trait locus analysis of polyoma middle-T transgene-induced mammary tumor was performed. ECM gene expression was found to be consistently associated with Rrp1b expression. In vitro expression of Rrp1b significantly altered ECM gene expression, tumor growth, and dissemination in metastasis assays. Furthermore, a gene signature induced by ectopic expression of Rrp1b in tumor cells predicted survival in a human breast cancer gene expression dataset. Finally, constitutional polymorphism within RRP1B was found to be significantly associated with tumor progression in two independent breast cancer cohorts. These data suggest that RRP1B may be a novel susceptibility gene for breast cancer progression and metastasis.

  10. An Entropy-based gene selection method for cancer classification using microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Arun

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate diagnosis of cancer subtypes remains a challenging problem. Building classifiers based on gene expression data is a promising approach; yet the selection of non-redundant but relevant genes is difficult. The selected gene set should be small enough to allow diagnosis even in regular clinical laboratories and ideally identify genes involved in cancer-specific regulatory pathways. Here an entropy-based method is proposed that selects genes related to the different cancer classes while at the same time reducing the redundancy among the genes. Results The present study identifies a subset of features by maximizing the relevance and minimizing the redundancy of the selected genes. A merit called normalized mutual information is employed to measure the relevance and the redundancy of the genes. In order to find a more representative subset of features, an iterative procedure is adopted that incorporates an initial clustering followed by data partitioning and the application of the algorithm to each of the partitions. A leave-one-out approach then selects the most commonly selected genes across all the different runs and the gene selection algorithm is applied again to pare down the list of selected genes until a minimal subset is obtained that gives a satisfactory accuracy of classification. The algorithm was applied to three different data sets and the results obtained were compared to work done by others using the same data sets Conclusion This study presents an entropy-based iterative algorithm for selecting genes from microarray data that are able to classify various cancer sub-types with high accuracy. In addition, the feature set obtained is very compact, that is, the redundancy between genes is reduced to a large extent. This implies that classifiers can be built with a smaller subset of genes.

  11. H-RAS, K-RAS, and N-RAS gene activation in human bladder cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybojewska, B; Jagiello, A; Jalmuzna, P

    2000-08-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in most developed countries. In this work, 19 bladder cancer specimens, along with their infiltrations of the urinary bladder wall from the same patients, were examined for the presence of H-RAS, K-RAS, and N-RAS activation using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. The H-RAS activation was found in 15 (about 84%) of the 19 bladder cancers studied. The same results were obtained in the infiltrating urinary bladder wall samples. N-RAS gene mutations were observed in all cases (except 1) in which H-RAS gene mutations were detected. The results suggest a strong relationship between H-RAS and N-RAS gene activation in bladder cancer. Changes in the K-RAS gene in bladder cancers seem to be a rare event; this is in agreement with findings of other authors. We found activation of the gene in one specimen of bladder cancer and its infiltration of the urinary bladder wall in the same patient.

  12. Variation in genes required for normal mitosis and risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, J E; Wang, X; Goode, E L; Pankratz, V S; Fredericksen, Z S; Vierkant, R A; Pharoah, P D P; Cerhan, J R; Couch, F J

    2010-01-01

    The down-regulation of genes involved in normal cell division can cause aberrant mitoses and increased cell death. Surviving cells exhibit aneuploidy and/or polyploidy. Since mitotic disruption has been linked with tumor development and progression, alterations in the expression or activity of these mitotic regulators may contribute to breast tumor formation. We evaluated associations between common inherited variation in these genes and breast cancer risk. Two hundred and five tagging and candidate functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in 30 genes required for normal cell division were genotyped in 798 breast cancer cases and 843 controls from the Mayo Clinic breast cancer study. Two variants in EIF3A (rs10787899 and rs3824830; P cancer along with single variants in RRM2, PSCD3, C11orf51, CDC16, SNW1, MFAP1, and CDC2 (P cancer. The observed associations between breast cancer risk and genetic variation in the SART1 and EIF3A genes that are required for maintenance of normal mitosis suggest a direct role for these genes in the development of breast cancer.

  13. Prognostic significance of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) gene expression in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saigusa, Susumu; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Kohei; Uchida, Keiichi; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Most cancer cells exhibit increased glycolysis. The elevated glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) expression has been reported to be associated with resistance to therapeutic agents and a poor prognosis. We wondered whether GLUT1 expression was associated with the clinical outcome in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and whether glycolysis inhibition could represent a novel anticancer treatment. We obtained total RNA from residual cancer cells using microdissection from a total of 52 rectal cancer specimens from patients who underwent preoperative CRT. We performed transcriptional analyzes, and studied the association of the GLUT1 gene expression levels with the clinical outcomes. In addition, we examined each proliferative response of three selected colorectal cancer cell lines to a glycolysis inhibitor, 3-bromopyruvic acid (3-BrPA), with regard to their expression of the GLUT1 gene. An elevated GLUT1 gene expression was associated with a high postoperative stage, the presence of lymph node metastasis, and distant recurrence. Moreover, elevated GLUT1 gene expression independently predicted both the recurrence-free and overall survival. In the in vitro studies, we observed that 3-BrPA significantly suppressed the proliferation of colon cancer cells with high GLUT1 gene expression, compared with those with low expression. An elevated GLUT1 expression may be a useful predictor of distant recurrence and poor prognosis in rectal cancer patients after preoperative CRT. (author)

  14. Differential expression of ZFX gene in gastric cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-08

    Jan 8, 2012 ... survival benefit (Malekzadeh et al. 2009). Therefore, early cancer detection is a significant way to reduce gastric cancer mortality. Most human cancers show substantial heterogeneity in immunological and genetic profiles, proliferation potentials and differentiation capacities (Visvader and Lindeman. 2008).

  15. Genes that mediate breast cancer metastasis to the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Paula D.; Zhang, Xiang H.-F.; Nadal, Cristina; Shu, Weiping; Gomis, Roger R.; Nguyen, Don X.; Minn, Andy J.; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Gerald, William L.; Foekens, John A.; Massagué, Joan

    2009-01-01

    The molecular basis for breast cancer metastasis to the brain is largely unknown(1,2). Brain relapse typically occurs years after the removal of a breast tumour(2-4), suggesting that disseminated cancer cells must acquire specialized functions to take over this organ. Here we show that breast cancer

  16. Ovarian Cancer: The Interplay of Lifestyle and Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braem, M.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a highly lethal disease that is mostly diagnosed at an advanced stage. In Europe, only 36% of women with ovarian cancer can expect to survive 5 years. While our knowledge of ovarian cancer has changed substantially throughout the years, our understanding of its etiology still lacks

  17. Differential expression of ZFX gene in gastric cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cancer stem cell; gastric cancer; ZFX ... The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis has been proposed to reconcile this heterogeneity. ... Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; Department of Genetics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Shahrekord ...