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Sample records for cancer control plan

  1. Review of State Comprehensive Cancer Control Plans for Genomics Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Millikan, DVM, PhD

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The goals of this study were to determine U.S. states with Comprehensive Cancer Control plans that include genomics in some capacity and to review successes with and barriers to implementation of genomics-related cancer control initiatives. Methods This study was conducted in two phases. Phase one included a content analysis of written state Comprehensive Cancer Control plans (n = 30 for terms related to genomics, or “genomic components” (n = 18. The second phase involved telephone interviews with the Comprehensive Cancer Control plan coordinators in states with plans that contained genomic components (n = 16. The interview was designed to gather more detailed information about the genomics-related initiatives within the state’s Comprehensive Cancer Control plan and the successes with and barriers to plan implementation, as defined by each state. Results Eighteen of the 30 Comprehensive Cancer Control plans analyzed contained genomics components. We noted a large variability among these 18 plans in the types of genomics components included. Nine (56% of the 16 states interviewed had begun to implement the genomics components in their plan. Most states emphasized educating health care providers and the public about the role of genomics in cancer control. Many states consider awareness of family history to be an important aspect of their Comprehensive Cancer Control plan. Approximately 67% of states with family history components in their plans had begun to implement these goals. Virtually all states reported they would benefit from additional training in cancer genetics and general public health genomics. Conclusion The number of states incorporating genomics into their Comprehensive Cancer Control plans is increasing. Family history is a public health application of genomics that could be implemented more fully into Comprehensive Cancer Control plans.

  2. Review of State Comprehensive Cancer Control Plans for Genomics Content

    OpenAIRE

    Robert C. Millikan, DVM, PhD; Tejinder Rakhra-Burris, MA; Erin Shaughnessy Zuiker, MPH; Debra E. Irwin, PhD, MSPH

    2005-01-01

    Introduction The goals of this study were to determine U.S. states with Comprehensive Cancer Control plans that include genomics in some capacity and to review successes with and barriers to implementation of genomics-related cancer control initiatives. Methods This study was conducted in two phases. Phase one included a content analysis of written state Comprehensive Cancer Control plans (n = 30) for terms related to genomics, or genomic components (n = 18). The second phase involved te...

  3. Radon Control Activities for Lung Cancer Prevention in National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Plans, 2005–2011

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Neri, MD, MPH; Sherri L. Stewart, PhD; William Angell, MS

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer among smokers and the leading cause among nonsmokers. The US Environmental Protection Agency recommends that every home be tested for radon. Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) programs develop cancer coalitions that coordinate funding and resources to focus on cancer activities that are recorded in cancer plans. Radon tests, remediation, and radon mitigation techniques are relatively inexpensive, but it is unclear whether coalition...

  4. Evidence-Based Interventions and Screening Recommendations for Colorectal Cancer in Comprehensive Cancer Control Plans: A Content Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, Julie S.; Richardson, Lisa C.; Steele, C. Brooke; White, Dana E

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in the United States. The extent to which Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) programs in states, tribal governments and organizations, territories, and Pacific Island jurisdictions address evidence-based recommendations and interventions for colorectal cancer in their CCC plans is largely unknown. Methods We downloaded CCC plans posted on the Cancer Control PLANET Web site for re...

  5. A Case Study of the South Puget Intertribal Planning Agency’s Comprehensive Cancer Control Planning and Community Mobilization Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Nass, MPH, CHES

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The high rates of cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives are of growing concern.Context In response to high cancer rates, national, state, and tribal organizations have worked to assess knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and screening practices related to cancer in American Indian and Alaska Native communities and to increase awareness and use of cancer screening. The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is one such effort. NCCCP’s comprehensive cancer control (CCC planning process provides a new approach to planning and implementing cancer control programs. The CCC process and components for American Indians and Alaska Natives are not yet fully understood because this is a fairly new approach for these communities. Therefore, the purpose of our case study was to describe the CCC process and its outcomes and successes as applied to these communities and to identify key components and lessons learned from the South Puget Intertribal Planning Agency’s (SPIPA’s CCC planning and community mobilization process.Methods We used interviews, document reviews, and observations to collect data on SPIPA’s CCC planning and community mobilization process.Consequences We identified the key components of SPIPA’s CCC as funding and hiring key staff, partnering with outside organizations, developing a project management plan and a core planning team, creating community cancer orientations, conducting community cancer surveys, developing a community advisory committee, ongoing training and engaging of the community advisory committee, and supporting the leadership of the communities involved.Interpretation The CCC planning process is a practicable model, even for groups with little experience or few resources. The principles identified in this case study can be applied to the cancer control planning process for other tribes.

  6. The use of quantitative methods in planning national cancer control programmes*: A WHO Meeting1

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    There is a strong need to allocate in a rational and cost-effective way the available resources for cancer control in countries. Continuation of current priorities in resource allocation can only lead to unnecessarily high incidence, morbidity and mortality from cancer. Two cancer control models for cost-effectiveness, which were developed by WHO to help Member States set priorities in national cancer control programmes, have been tested and found useful. This article discusses cost-effective...

  7. A randomised controlled trial of forward-planned radiotherapy (IMRT) for early breast cancer: Baseline characteristics and dosimetry results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: This large trial was designed to investigate whether correction of dose inhomogeneities using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) reduces late toxicity and improves quality of life in patients with early breast cancer. This paper reports baseline characteristics of trial participants and dosimetry results. Materials and methods: Standard tangential plans of 1145 trials were analysed. Patients with inhomogeneous plans, defined by ICRU recommendations, were randomised to forward-planned IMRT or standard radiotherapy. Results: Twenty-nine percentage of patients had adequate dosimetry with standard 2D radiotherapy. In the randomised patients, the decreases in mean volumes receiving greater than 107% (Vol > 107) and less than 95% (Vol 3 (95% CI 26.4-41.6; P 3 (95% CI 34.4-61.9; P 107 > 2 cm3 on standard radiotherapy plans. Conclusion: This large trial, in which patients with all breast sizes were eligible, confirmed that breast dosimetry can be significantly improved with a simple method of forward-planned IMRT and has little impact on radiotherapy resources. It is shown that patients with larger breasts are more likely to have dose inhomogeneities and breast separation gives some indication of this likelihood. Photographic assessment of patients at 2 years after radiotherapy, as the next part of this randomised controlled trial, will show whether these results for IMRT translate into improved cosmetic outcome in patients with early breast cancer. This would provide impetus for the widespread adoption of 3D planning and IMRT.

  8. Quality control in health care: an experiment in radiotherapy planning for breast cancer patients after mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The importance of evaluating and improving quality in clinical practice is now generally acknowledged. In this study we estimated different sources of variation in radiotherapy planning for breast cancer patients after mastectomy and sought to test the applicability of a reproducibility and repeatability (R and R) study in a clinical context. Methods: Eleven radiation oncologists planned radiotherapy three times for three different kinds of breast cancer patients without knowing they were handling the same patient three times. Variation was divided into different components: physicians as operators, patients as parts, and repeated measurements as trials. Variation due to difference across trials (repeatability), that across the physicians (reproducibility), and that across the patients (variability) were estimated, as well as interactions between physicians and patients. Calculation was based on the sum of squares, and analysis was supported by various graphical presentations such as range charts and box plots. Results: Some parts of the planning process were characterized by higher and different kinds of variation than the others. Interphysician variation (i.e., reproducibility) was not high but there were some clearly outlying physicians. The highest variation was in repeatability (intraphysician variation). The major part of the variation was, however, that from patient to patient: 33% of the total in Parameter 1 and 85% of the total in Parameter 2. Conclusions: R and R studies are applicable and are needed to evaluate and improve quality in clinical practice. This kind of analysis provides opportunities to establish which kinds of patients require particularly careful attention, which points in the process are most critical for variation, which are the most difficult aspects for each physician and call for more careful description in documents, and which physicians need further training

  9. Rapid Automated Treatment Planning Process to Select Breast Cancer Patients for Active Breathing Control to Achieve Cardiac Dose Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate a rapid automated treatment planning process for the selection of patients with left-sided breast cancer for a moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) technique using active breathing control (ABC); and to determine the dose reduction to the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and the heart using mDIBH. Method and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using an automated method for patients undergoing left-sided breast radiotherapy (n = 53) with two-field tangential intensity-modulated radiotherapy. All patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, defined as having >10 cm3 of the heart receiving 50% of the prescribed dose (V50) on the free-breathing automated treatment plan, underwent repeat scanning on a protocol using a mDIBH technique and ABC. The doses to the LAD and heart were compared between the free-breathing and mDIBH plans. Results: The automated planning process required approximately 9 min to generate a breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan. Using the dose–volume criteria, 20 of the 53 patients were selected for ABC. Significant differences were found between the free-breathing and mDIBH plans for the heart V50 (29.9 vs. 3.7 cm3), mean heart dose (317 vs. 132 cGy), mean LAD dose (2,047 vs. 594 cGy), and maximal dose to 0.2 cm3 of the LAD (4,155 vs. 1,507 cGy, all p 50 using the mDIBH technique. The 3 patients who had had a breath-hold threshold 50. Conclusions: A rapid automated treatment planning process can be used to select patients who will benefit most from mDIBH. For selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, the mDIBH technique using ABC can significantly reduce the dose to the LAD and heart, potentially reducing the cardiac risks.

  10. Neck control after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of fifty patients with node-positive head and neck cancer who received definitive radiochemotherapy. Twelve patients subsequently underwent neck dissection for suspicious recurrent or persistent disease. A median dose of 70 Gy (range 60-70.6) was delivered to involved nodes. Response evaluation was performed at a median of 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Neck failure was observed in 11 patients and the 3-year regional control (RC) rate was 77.1%. Neck dissection was performed in 10 of the 11 patients; seven of these cases were successfully salvaged, and the ultimate rate of neck control was 92%. The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. On univariate analysis, initial nodal size > 2 cm, a less-than-complete response at the primary site, post-radiotherapy nodal size > 1.5 cm, and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were associated with RC. On multivariate analysis, less-than-complete primary site response and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were identified as independent prognostic factors for RC. The neck failure rate after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection was 22%. Two-thirds of these were successfully salvaged with neck dissection and the ultimate neck control rate was 92%. Our results suggest that planned neck dissection might not be necessary in patients with complete response of primary site, no evidence of residual lesion > 1.5 cm, or no necrotic lymph nodes at the 1-2 months follow-up evaluation after radiotherapy

  11. Role Of Family Planning Practices In The Control And Prevention of Uterine Cervical Cancer- A Multivariate Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma S

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: Does acceptance of family planning reduce the risk of uterine cervical cancer? Objective: To study the association between usage of contraceptive methods and cervical carcinogenesis. Study design: Case control study. Settings: Urban Area â€" Hospital Based. Participants: 160 women having different degrees of dysplasia and 173 women having normal pap smears. Statistical Analysis: Multivariate Analysis. Results: None of the three widely prevalent Family Planning practices viz. IUD condoms and tubectomy turned out to be significant in the development of dysplasia, however, age at consummation of marriage before 18 years and illiteracy were significant. Use of IUD offered protection against carcinoma in situ (CIS and disease of invasive nature. Non- users of condoms were also at risk marginally failing to attain statistical significance.

  12. Randomized Controlled Trial of Forward-Planned Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Interim Results at 2 Years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, Gillian C. [Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Service Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Jennifer S.; Moody, Anne M.; Wilson, Charles B.; Twyman, Nicola [Oncology Centre, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Services Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wishart, Gordon C. [Cambridge Breast Unit, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Burnet, Neil G. [Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Service Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Coles, Charlotte E., E-mail: charlotte.coles@addenbrookes.nhs.uk [Oncology Centre, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Services Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: This single-center randomized trial was designed to investigate whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) reduces late toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The standard tangential plans of 1,145 nonselected patients were analyzed. The patients with inhomogeneous plans were randomized to a simple method of forward-planned IMRT or standard radiotherapy (RT). The primary endpoint was serial photographic assessment of breast shrinkage. Results: At 2 years, no significant difference was found in the development of any photographically assessed breast shrinkage between the patients randomized to the interventional or control group (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.58; p = .41). The patients in the control group were more likely to develop telangiectasia than those in the IMRT group (odds ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.13-2.40; p = .009). Poor baseline surgical cosmesis resulted in poor overall cosmesis at 2 years after RT. In patients who had good surgical cosmesis, those randomized to IMRT were less likely to deteriorate to a moderate or poor overall cosmesis than those in the control group (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-1.03, p = .061). Conclusions: IMRT can lead to a significant reduction in telangiectasia at comparatively early follow-up of only 2 years after RT completion. An important component of breast induration and shrinkage will actually result from the surgery and not from the RT. Surgical cosmesis is an important determinant of overall cosmesis and could partially mask the longer term benefits of IMRT at this early stage.

  13. Randomized Controlled Trial of Forward-Planned Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Interim Results at 2 Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This single-center randomized trial was designed to investigate whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) reduces late toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The standard tangential plans of 1,145 nonselected patients were analyzed. The patients with inhomogeneous plans were randomized to a simple method of forward-planned IMRT or standard radiotherapy (RT). The primary endpoint was serial photographic assessment of breast shrinkage. Results: At 2 years, no significant difference was found in the development of any photographically assessed breast shrinkage between the patients randomized to the interventional or control group (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.83–1.58; p = .41). The patients in the control group were more likely to develop telangiectasia than those in the IMRT group (odds ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.13–2.40; p = .009). Poor baseline surgical cosmesis resulted in poor overall cosmesis at 2 years after RT. In patients who had good surgical cosmesis, those randomized to IMRT were less likely to deteriorate to a moderate or poor overall cosmesis than those in the control group (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.39–1.03, p = .061). Conclusions: IMRT can lead to a significant reduction in telangiectasia at comparatively early follow-up of only 2 years after RT completion. An important component of breast induration and shrinkage will actually result from the surgery and not from the RT. Surgical cosmesis is an important determinant of overall cosmesis and could partially mask the longer term benefits of IMRT at this early stage.

  14. Crowd Control Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Crowd Control Plan for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines operational procedures in the event of a civil disorder on the Refuge. An inventory of...

  15. Planning to Plan-Integrating Control Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In many planning situations, computation itself becomes a resource to be planned and scheduled. We model such computational resources as conventional resources which are used by control-flow actions, e.g., to direct the planning process. Control-flow actions and conventional actions are planned/scheduled in an integrated way and can interact with each other. Control-flow actions are then executed by the planning engine itself. The approach is illustrated by examples, e.g., for hierarchical planning, in which tasks that are temporally still far away impose only rough constraints on the current schedule, and control-flow tasks ensure that these tasks are refined as they approach the current time. Using the same mechanism, anytime algorithms can change appropriate search methods or parameters over time, and problems like scheduling critical time-outs for garbage collection can be made part of the planning itself.

  16. Strategic planning and managerial control

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Ghicajanu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper present relationship among strategic planning and managerial control process. For begin I want present few elements about strategic planning and managerial control in order to identify link inter these elements.

  17. Cancer Care and Control

    OpenAIRE

    Schneidman, Miriam; Jeffers, Joanne; Duncan, Kalina

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, deaths from cancer exceed those caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), tuberculosis, and malaria combined. Seventy percent of deaths due to cancer occur in low-and middle-income countries, which are often poorly prepared to deal with the growing burden of chronic disease. Over a period of 18 months, the cancer care and control...

  18. The role of cancer registries in cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Donald Maxwell

    2008-04-01

    Cancer control aims to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of cancer and to improve the quality of life of cancer patients through the systematic implementation of evidence-based interventions in prevention, early diagnosis, treatment, and palliative care. In the context of a national cancer control program (NCCP), a cancer surveillance program (CSP), built around a population-based cancer registry, is an essential element. Data on the size and evolution of the cancer burden in the population are essential to evaluation of the current situation, to setting objectives for cancer control, and defining priorities. Cancer data are essential in monitoring the progress of the implementation of an NCCP, as well as providing an evaluation of the many individual cancer control activities. In the context of an NCCP, the CSP should provide a focus of epidemiological expertise, not only for providing statistical data on incidence, mortality, stage distribution, treatment patterns, and survival but also for conducting studies into the important causes of cancer in the local situation, and for providing information about the prevalence of exposure to these factors in the population. Cancer surveillance via the population-based registry therefore plays a crucial role in formulating cancer control plans, as well as in monitoring their success. PMID:18463952

  19. Dietary control of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bayoumy, K; Chung, F L; Richie, J; Reddy, B S; Cohen, L; Weisburger, J; Wynder, E L

    1997-11-01

    Many laboratory studies and human epidemiological data suggest that most cancer deaths are attributable to lifestyle, including nutritional factors and tobacco and alcohol consumption. Tobacco consumption is causally related to cancer of the lung, mouth, larynx, esophagus, bladder, kidney, and pancreas. Nutrients and non-nutrient dietary components probably account for cancer of the colon, breast, prostate, and stomach. This report is based on literature and our own data pertaining to the role of dietary fat, calories, and fiber in the development of colon and breast cancer. We also discuss the evidence from epidemiological, mechanistic, and preclinical efficacy studies indicating a protective effect of micronutrients, non-nutrients, and certain antioxidants in food against oral and lung cancers. Given the continuing cancer burden and the relatively slow impact of proven cancer treatment strategies in reducing cancer mortality, it is essential to evaluate promising nutrients and non-nutrients in foods as chemopreventive agents in persons at increased risk for cancer. Development of reliable intermediate biomarkers is valuable for clinical chemoprevention intervention trials. The purpose of this report is to provide the reader with plausible approaches to cancer control. PMID:9349690

  20. Dose Coverage Beyond the Gross Tumor Volume for Various Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Planning Techniques Reporting Similar Control Rates for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the dose falloff region for various stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) planning techniques used in the treatment of Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer reporting similar control rates. Methods and Materials: The SBRT plans were constructed on five patient data sets using seven different planning regimens. These regimens varied in the number of beams, number of fractions, prescription target, and prescribed dose used. For each case all regimens were planned using a common gross tumor volume (GTV). To compare dose falloff for the various regimens, resulting physical dose grids were converted into normalized total dose (NTD) grids. Furthermore, to determine the potential coverage of microscopic extension of the various regimens minimal peripheral NTD (NTD-MP100) were calculated and plotted as a function of incremental volume expansions of the GTV. Results: Average values for NTD-MP100 varied over a range of 174 Gy at the GTV periphery, but this range fell to 10 Gy at a distance of 14 mm from the GTV. Of 35 plans, 23 resulted in potential microscopic extension coverage of 78% to 95%. Averages for five of seven regimens fell within the range of 80% to 85%. Results were negligibly affected when intrafraction motion effects were accounted for. Conclusions: Although average NTD-MP100 varied dramatically at the GTV, periphery values became similar at a distance of 14 mm from the GTV. With the exception of two, potential coverage of microscopic extension was similar for all planning techniques, with averages falling within a 5% range

  1. Models for local implementation of comprehensive cancer control: meeting local cancer control needs through community collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Bruce; Lofton, Staci; Knight, Margaret L

    2010-12-01

    The comprehensive cancer control approach is used by state, tribes, tribal organizations, territorial and Pacific Island Jurisdiction cancer coalitions to spur local implementation of cancer plans to reduce the burden of cancer in jurisdictions across the country. There is a rich diversity of models and approaches to the development of relationships and scope of planning for cancer control activities between coalitions and advocates in local communities. The national comprehensive cancer control philosophy provides an operational framework while support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention enables coalitions to act as catalysts to bring local partners together to combat cancer in communities. This manuscript describes multiple characteristics of cancer coalitions and how they are organized. Two models of how coalitions and local partners collaborate are described. A case study method was used to identify how five different state and tribal coalitions use the two models to organize their collaborations with local communities that result in local implementation of cancer plan priorities. Conclusions support the use of multiple organizing models to ensure involvement of diverse interests and sensitivity to local cancer issues that encourages implementation of cancer control activities. PMID:20938731

  2. A Guided Workbook Intervention (WorkPlan) to Support Work-Related Goals Among Cancer Survivors: Protocol of a Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Pernille Luxhøj; Schumacher, Lauren; Sadhra, Steven S; Sutton, Andrew J; Zarkar, Anjali; Rolf, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Background Returning to and staying at work following illness is associated with better physical and psychological functioning. Not working has been shown to be associated with reduced self-esteem, lowered self-efficacy, and decreased belief in one's ability to return to the workplace. Although there is a growing body of research looking at what predicts return to work following cancer treatment, there are fewer studies examining interventions targeting return to work. Objective The primary objective is to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a theoretically led workbook intervention designed to support cancer patients in returning to work to inform a fully powered randomized controlled trial (RCT). Methods This is a multicenter feasibility RCT where the main analysis uses a qualitative approach. Sixty participants (aged 18-65 years) who have received a diagnosis of cancer and who intend to return to work will be randomized to either the WorkPlan intervention group or a usual care group (ratio 1:1). Participants in the intervention group will receive a guided workbook intervention (which contains activities aimed at eliciting thoughts and beliefs, identifying targets and actions, and concrete steps to achieve goals) and will receive telephone support over a 4-week period. The primary outcome measure is time taken to return to work (in days), and secondary outcome measures include mood, quality of life, illness perceptions, and job satisfaction. Data will be collected through postal questionnaires administered immediately postintervention and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. In addition, interviews will be undertaken immediately postintervention (to explore acceptability of the intervention and materials) and at 12-month follow-up (to explore perceptions of participation in the trial and experiences of returning to work). Results Enrollment for the study will be completed in May 2016. Data analysis will commence in April 2017, and the first results are expected

  3. Effectiveness, Mediators, and Effect Predictors of Internet Interventions for Chronic Cancer-Related Fatigue : The Design and an Analysis Plan of a 3-Armed Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wolvers, Marije DJ; Bruggeman-Everts, Fieke Z; van der Lee, Marije L; van de Schoot, Rens; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam MR

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Internet interventions offer advantages that especially cancer survivors who suffer from fatigue could benefit from. Given the growing number of such patients, Internet interventions could supplement and strengthen currently available health care. OBJECTIVE: This paper describes the design and analysis plan that will be used to study 2 Internet interventions aimed at reducing severe fatigue in cancer survivors: a mobile ambulant activity feedback therapy supported through a weekly...

  4. A Framework for Healthcare Planning and Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Erwin W.; Houdenhoven, van Mark; Hulshof, Peter J.H.; Hall, Randolph

    2012-01-01

    Rising expenditures spur healthcare organizations to organize their processes more efficiently and effectively. Unfortunately, healthcare planning and control lags behind manufacturing planning and control. We analyze existing planning and control concepts or frameworks for healthcare operations man

  5. No benefit for regional control and survival by planned neck dissection in primary irradiated oropharyngeal cancer irrespective of p16 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquieira, R; Haerle, S K; Huber, G F; Soltermann, A; Haile, S R; Stoeckli, S J; Broglie, Martina A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess regional control and survival in primary irradiated oropharyngeal cancer patients with advanced neck disease (≥cN2a) receiving planned neck dissection (PND) irrespective of the nodal response compared to salvage neck dissection (SND) in case of regional persistence or reccurence in relation to tumoral p16 overexpression. 96 consecutive patients treated at the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland were included. Tissue microarray-based scoring of p16 expression was obtained. 5 years overall (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in the PND and SND cohort were 70 vs. 57 % (p = 0.20) and 80 vs. 65 % (p = 0.14), respectively. Regional control in PND and SND achieved 95 vs. 87 % (p = 0.29), respectively. There was no statistically significant impact of neck treatment (PND vs. SND) on regional control or survival among patients with p16-negative tumors (5 years OS 59 vs. 50 %, p = 0.66; 5 years DSS 59 vs. 57 %, p = 0.89) nor among patients with p16-positive tumors (5 years OS 84 vs. 67 %, p = 0.21; 5 years DSS 95 vs. 81 %, p = 0.24). The type of neck dissection after primary intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) had no impact on regional control and survival even in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated disease. Therefore we are convinced that based on the accuracy of newer diagnostic modalities the surveillance of a radiologically negative neck after primary chemoradiation (CRT) is oncologically safe irrespective of p16 expression of the tumor. PMID:26059208

  6. Bifurcation Control, Manufacturing Planning and Formation Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Kang; Mumin Song; Ning Xi

    2005-01-01

    The paper consists of three topics on control theory and engineering applications, namely bifurcation control, manufacturing planning, and formation control. For each topic, we summarize the control problem to be addressed and some key ideas used in our recent research. Interested readers are referred to related publications for more details. Each of the three topics in this paper is technically independent from the other ones. However, all three parts together reflect the recent research activities of the first author, jointly with other researchers in different fields.

  7. Comprehensive cancer control: progress and accomplishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester, Phyllis W; Townsend, Julie S; Given, Leslie; Krebill, Hope; Balderrama, Sandra; Vinson, Cynthia

    2010-12-01

    The potential for Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) across the nation has been realized in the last decade with 69 Coalitions developing and implementing CCC plans. Many partners at all levels--national, state, jurisdictional, tribal and communities--have contributed to this success. This article details the contribution of these partners across these various levels, with a selection of the many activities contributing to this success. Consequently the cancer burden, although still of major importance, continues to be addressed in significant ways. Although there are future challenges, CCC coalitions continue to play an important role in addressing the cancer burden. PMID:21069448

  8. Cancer Control in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Syed Akram; Sullivan, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is predicted to be an increasingly important cause of morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh in the next few decades. The estimated incidence of 12.7 million new cancer cases will rise to 21.4 million by 2030. More than two-thirds of the total expenditure on health is through out-of-pocket payments. According to the Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, cancer is the sixth leading cause of death. International Agency for Research on Cancer has estimated cancer-related death rates in Banglade...

  9. VMAT planning study in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the dosimetric differences among fixed field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (SA-VMAT) and double-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (DA-VMAT) plans in rectal cancer. Fifteen patients with rectal cancer previously treated with IMRT in our institution were selected for this study. For each patient, three plans were generated with the planning CT scan: one using a fixed beam IMRT, and two plans using the VMAT technique: SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT. Dose prescription to the PTV was 50 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction. Dose volume histograms (DVH) for the target volume and the organs at risk (small bowel, bladder, femoral heads and healthy tissue) were compared for these different techniques. Monitor units (MU) and delivery treatment time were also reported. DA-VMAT achieved the highest minimum planning target volume (PTV) dose and the lowest maximal dose, resulting in the most homogeneous PTV dose distribution. DA-VMAT also yielded the best CI, although the difference was not statistically significant. Between SA-VMAT and IMRT, the target dose coverage was largely comparable; however, SA-VMAT was able to achieve a better V95 and V107. VMAT showed to be inferior to IMRT in terms of organ at risk sparing, especially for the small bowel. Compared with IMRT, DA-VMAT increased the V15 of small bowel nearly 55 cc. The MU and treatment delivery time were significantly reduced by the use of VMAT techniques. VMAT is a new radiation technique that combines the ability to achieve highly conformal dose distributions with highly efficient treatment delivery. Considering the inferior role of normal tissue sparing, especially for small bowel, VMAT need further investigation in rectal cancer treatment

  10. Environmental Restoration Program Management Control Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Management Control Plan has been prepared to define the Energy Systems approach to managing its participation in the US DOE's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program in a manner consistent with DOE/ORO 931: Management Plan for the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge, Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; and the Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Contract Management Plan (CMP). This plan discusses the systems, procedures, methodology, and controls to be used by the program management team to attain these objectives

  11. A strategy for cancer control in Ireland / National Cancer Forum

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health and Children

    2006-01-01

    To address the rapidly rising burden of cancer, this second National Cancer Strategy A Strategy for Cancer Control in Ireland 2006 advocates a comprehensive cancer control policy programme. Cancer control is a whole population, integrated and cohesive approach to cancer that involves prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, and supportive and palliative care. It places a major emphasis on measurement of need and on addressing inequalities and implies that we must focus on ensuring that al...

  12. Planning instruments to control urban growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Gertrud; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2010-01-01

    It is challenging to plan and control urban development in peri-urban areas. But if no planning is done, the result will often be unsustainable, including widespread, dispersed and uncoordinated urban growth. Spatial planning based on zoning remains the most important planning instrument and its...... success depend on regional coordination. Incentive based instruments may contrbute to growth management, but only few examples are available and their effects on urban growth patterns yet to be seen....

  13. National Waste Terminal Storage Program: planning and control plan. Volume II. Plan description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective of the NWTS program planning and control plan is to provide the information necessary for timely and effective OWI management decisions. Purpose is to describe the concepts and techniques that will be utilized by OWI to establish structured, completely planned and controlled technical, cost, and schedule NWTS baselines from which performance or progress can be accurately measured

  14. WRAP process area development control work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leist, K.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-27

    This work plan defines the manner in which the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module I Process Area will be maintained under development control status. This status permits resolution of identified design discrepancies, control system changes, as-building of equipment, and perform modifications to increase process operability and maintainability as parallel efforts. This work plan maintains configuration control as these efforts are undertaken. This task will end with system testing and reissue of field verified design drawings.

  15. Apply for Cancer Control Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  16. Checkpoint control and cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medema, R.H.; Macůrek, Libor

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 21 (2012), s. 2601-2613. ISSN 0950-9232 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/10/1525; GA ČR GPP305/10/P420 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DNA damage * checkpoint control * anticancer strategies Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.357, year: 2012

  17. Experience in the treatment of IMRT in prostate cancer. Planning, dosimetry and quality control; Experiencia en el tratamiento de IMRT en cancer de prostata. Planificacion, dosimetria y control de calidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Garcia Vicente, F.; Fernandez Bedoya, V.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Perez Gonzalez, L.; Torres Escobar, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to review the treatment of prostate cancer at our center. A description of the entire procedure, involving clinical dosimetry, and procedures for verification of treatment, including physical dosimetry and parallel computing system MSure (Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton) as part of these procedures. This system is based on the model published by trifuente Yang et al. (Yang et al. 2002) for testing treatments regarding the number of monitor unit (MU) given. In addition, this software has a module for the testing of treatments for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), which will be analyzed in this study.

  18. Upgrade plan for HANARO control computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microprocessor based digital control system, the Multi-Loop Controller (MLC), which was chosen to control HANARO, was introduced to the market in early '80s and it had been used to control petrochemical plant, paper mill and Slowpoke reactor in Canada. Due to the development in computer technology, it has become so outdated model and the production of this model was discontinued a few years ago. Hence difficulty in acquiring the spare parts is expected. To achieve stable reactor control during its lifetime and to avoid possible technical dependency to the manufacturer, a long-term replacement plan for HANARO control computer system is on its way. The plan will include a few steps in its process. This paper briefly introduces the methods of implementation of the process and discusses the engineering activities of the plan

  19. Spent Nuclear Fuel project interface control plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This implementation process philosophy is in keeping with the ongoing reengineering of the WHC Controlled Manuals to achieve interface control within the SNF Project. This plan applies to all SNF Project sub-project to sub-project, and sub-project to exteranl (both on and off the Hanford Site) interfaces

  20. Integrated Instrumentation and Control Upgrade Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the first industry-wide integrated research and development plan to support upgrading instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in nuclear power plants in the United States. The plan encompasses both solving obsolescence problems and introducing modern I ampersand C technology into the industry. Accomplishing this plan will provide the technological base to modernize existing plants, as well as bridge the gap to meet Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) requirements for modern I ampersand C systems. This plan defines Research and Development tasks to meet the identified needs for the following technical elements: Instrumentation, Control and Protection, Man-Machine Support Systems, Maintenance, Communications, Verification and Validation, and Specifications and Standards

  1. Land Management and Means of Planning Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    comprises a finely tuned relationship between a strong national authority and autonomous municipal councils. The purpose is to solve the tasks at the lowest possible level so as to combine responsibility for decision-making with accountability for financial, social, and environmental consequences. To put it...... jurisdiction. The paper then identifies the different means of planning control such as a centralized versus a decentralized approach and planning led versus a market marked led approach. This is presented in a European context through a short overview of the various planning systems that reflect the...

  2. The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. Harris, MD, MPH, MBA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network is a national network recently established to focus on developing new interventions and disseminating and translating proven interventions into practice to reduce cancer burden and disparities, especially among minority and medically underserved populations. Jointly funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute, the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network consists of sites administered through Prevention Research Centers funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The five sites are located in Kentucky, Massachusetts, South Carolina, Texas, Washington State, and West Virginia. The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network’s intervention areas include primary prevention of cancer through healthy eating, physical activity, sun avoidance, tobacco control, and early detection of cancer through screening. The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network uses the methods of community-based participatory research and seeks to build on the cancer-relevant systematic reviews of the Guide to Community Preventive Services. Initial foci for the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network’s research work groups include projects to increase screening for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers; to promote informed decision making for prostate cancer screening; and to validate educational materials developed for low-literacy populations.

  3. Managing Health Care After Cancer Treatment: A Wellness Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Moye, Jennifer; Langdon, Maura; Jones, Janice M.; Haggstrom, David; Naik, Aanand D.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients and health care providers lack awareness of both the existence of, and treatments for, lingering distress and disability after treatment. A cancer survivorship wellness plan can help ensure that any referral needs for psychosocial and other restorative care after cancer treatment are identified.

  4. Emerging roles for cancer registries in cancer control.

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwald, P.; Sondik, E. J.; Young, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Cancer registries are a vital part of the national cancer effort to cut United States cancer mortality rates in half by the year 2000. Registries provide the data to focus programs and monitor progress. Success in meeting the year 2000 goal will require aggressive attention to the opportunities for prevention, early detection, treatment, and applied cancer control research, all of which complement the current emphasis on basic research.

  5. The relationship between the biochemical control outcomes and the quality of planning of high-dose rate brachytherapy as a boost to external beam radiotherapy for locally and locally advanced prostate cancer using the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cassio Assis Pellizzon, João Salvajoli, Paulo Novaes, Maria Maia, Ricardo Fogaroli, Doglas Gides, Rodrigues Horriot

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluated prognostic factors and impact of the quality of planning of high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT for patients with local or locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and HDR-BT. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2005, 209 patients with biopsy proven prostate adenocarcinoma were treated with localized EBRT and HDR-BT at the Department of Radiation-Oncology, Hospital A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Patient's age, Gleason score (GS, clinical stage (CS, initial PSA (iPSA, risk group for biochemical failure (GR, doses of EBRT and HDR-BT, use of three-dimensional planning for HDR-BT (3DHDR and the Biological Effective Dose (BED were evaluated as prognostic factors for biochemical control (bC. Results: Median age and median follow-up time were 68 and 5.3 years, respectively. Median EBRT and HDR-BT doses were 45 Gy and 20 Gy. The crude bC at 3.3 year was 94.2%. For the Low, intermediate and high risk patients the bC rates at 3.3 years were 91.5%, 90.2% and 88.5%, respectively. Overall survival (OS and disease specific survival rates at 3.3 years were 97.8% and 98.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis the prognostic factors related bC were GR (p= 0.040, GS ≤ 6 (p= 0.002, total dose of HDR-BT ≥ 20 Gy (p< 0.001, 3DHDR (p< 0.001, BED-HDR ≥ 99 Gy1.5 (p<0.001 and BED-TT ≥ 185 (p<0.001. On multivariate analysis the statistical significant predictive factors related to bC were RG (p< 0.001, HDR-BT ≥ 20 Gy (p=0.008 and 3DHDR (p<0.001. Conclusions: we observed that the bC rates correlates with the generally accepted risk factors described in the literature. Dose escalation, evaluated through the BED, and the quality of planning of HDR-BT are also important predictive factors when treating prostate cancer.

  6. Test, Control and Monitor System maintenance plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, David P.; Lougheed, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The maintenance requirements for Test, Control, and Monitor System (TCMS) and the method for satisfying these requirements prior to First Need Date (FND) of the last TCMS set are described. The method for satisfying maintenance requirements following FND of the last TCMS set will be addressed by a revision to this plan. This maintenance plan serves as the basic planning document for maintenance of this equipment by the NASA Payloads Directorate (CM) and the Payload Ground Operations Contractor (PGOC) at KSC. The terms TCMS Operations and Maintenance (O&M), Payloads Logistics, TCMS Sustaining Engineering, Payload Communications, and Integrated Network Services refer to the appropriate NASA and PGOC organization. For the duration of their contract, the Core Electronic Contractor (CEC) will provide a Set Support Team (SST). One of the primary purposes of this team is to help NASA and PGOC operate and maintain TCMS. It is assumed that SST is an integral part of TCMS O&M. The purpose of this plan is to describe the maintenance concept for TCMS hardware and system software in order to facilitate activation, transition planning, and continuing operation. When software maintenance is mentioned in this plan, it refers to maintenance of TCMS system software.

  7. Plan para control de malaria en colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, Hernando

    2011-01-01

    Con motivo de la colaboración de la Oficina de Relaciones Interamericanas en la solución de algunos problemas de Higiene pública en Colombia, el Secretario del Ministerio de Trabajo, Higiene y Previsión Social, doctor Alfonso Orozco, me pidió la elaboración de un breve plan para control de Paludismo en Colombia. El Plan fué presentado al Ministerio por una parte y por otra enviado al doctor Mark F. Boyd de la International Health Division de la Fundación Rockefeller.

  8. Helicopter trajectory planning using optimal control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Cheng, V. H. L.; Kim, E.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for optimal trajectory planning, useful in the nap-of-the-earth guidance of helicopters, is presented. This approach uses an adjoint-control transformation along with a one-dimensional search scheme for generating the optimal trajectories. In addition to being useful for helicopter nap-of-the-earth guidance, the trajectory planning solution is of interest in several other contexts, such as robotic vehicle guidance and terrain-following guidance for cruise missiles and aircraft. A distinguishing feature of the present research is that the terrain constraint and the threat envelopes are incorporated in the equations of motion. Second-order necessary conditions are examined.

  9. Socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival in England after the NHS cancer plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachet, B; Ellis, L; Maringe, C; Chu, T; Nur, U; Quaresma, M; Shah, A; Walters, S; Woods, L; Forman, D; Coleman, M P

    2010-01-01

    Background: Socioeconomic inequalities in survival were observed for many cancers in England during 1981–1999. The NHS Cancer Plan (2000) aimed to improve survival and reduce these inequalities. This study examines trends in the deprivation gap in cancer survival after implementation of the Plan. Materials and method: We examined relative survival among adults diagnosed with 1 of 21 common cancers in England during 1996–2006, followed up to 31 December 2007. Three periods were defined: 1996–2000 (before the Cancer Plan), 2001–2003 (initialisation) and 2004–2006 (implementation). We estimated the difference in survival between the most deprived and most affluent groups (deprivation gap) at 1 and 3 years after diagnosis, and the change in the deprivation gap both within and between these periods. Results: Survival improved for most cancers, but inequalities in survival were still wide for many cancers in 2006. Only the deprivation gap in 1-year survival narrowed slightly over time. A majority of the socioeconomic disparities in survival occurred soon after a cancer diagnosis, regardless of the cancer prognosis. Conclusion: The recently observed reduction in the deprivation gap was minor and limited to 1-year survival, suggesting that, so far, the Cancer Plan has little effect on those inequalities. Our findings highlight that earlier diagnosis and rapid access to optimal treatment should be ensured for all socioeconomic groups. PMID:20588275

  10. Pain Control: Support for People with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... talk about your pain with your health care team How to make your pain control plan work for you Pain control medicines and side effects Medicine tolerance is not addiction Other ways to control pain ...

  11. Automated VMAT treatment planning for stage III lung cancer: how does it compare with IMRT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Enzhuo M.; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Xia, Tingyi; Yuan, Zhiyong; Liu, Hui; Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials Two groups of eight patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group I, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group II, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient, a rank of “1” being the best and “3” the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group I, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual-IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group I had 10% higher PTV conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 than the manual-IMRT plans; they also resulted in over 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (p+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual-IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group II, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual-IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual-IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and the auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher p+. Conclusions mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual-IMRT plans could achieve quality similar to auto-IMRT plans if best effort were spent

  12. Breast cancer prevention and theory of planned behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Tsounis A.; Sarafis P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:Breast cancer is considered to be one of the highest of all forms of cancer among women.Understanding the factors that influence the adoption of preventive behaviors in this particular area is very important. Aim:the aim of the present study is to identify the factors associated with mammography screening, according to the theory of the Planned Behavior framework. Method: the methodology which was used included a literature review of Greek and international bibliograp...

  13. Comparing Treatment Plan in All Locations of Esophageal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jang-Chun; Tsai, Jo-Ting; Chang, Chih-Chieh; Jen, Yee-Min; Li, Ming-Hsien; Liu, Wei-Hsiu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare treatment plans of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for all esophageal cancer (EC) tumor locations. This retrospective study from July 2009 to June 2014 included 20 patients with EC who received definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy with radiation doses >50.4 Gy. Version 9.2 of Pinnacle3 with SmartArc was used for treatment planning. Dosimetric quality was evaluated based on doses to several or...

  14. 49 CFR 225.33 - Internal Control Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal Control Plans. 225.33 Section 225.33....33 Internal Control Plans. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with a written Internal Control... official business. Each railroad shall amend its Internal Control Plan, as necessary, to reflect...

  15. 42 CFR 84.41 - Quality control plans; contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality control plans; contents. 84.41 Section 84... AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Quality Control § 84.41 Quality control plans; contents. (a) Each quality control plan shall contain provisions for...

  16. Study on Hierarchical Structure of Detailed Control Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Using case studies,this paper analyzes the characteristics of detailed control planning and its hierarchical controls,the form and composition of plan content,and methodological innovations.It then suggests improvements to the planning structure that are oriented at adaptability,fairness,centrality,and scientific principles with regard to the content,methods,and results of the planning.Regarding the hierarchical control system,the paper suggests that the detailed control plan should be composed of "block planning" and "plot planning".It is believed that through a combination of block and plot planning,the problem of joining long-term and short-term planning will be solved and it will be possible to address the need for adjustment and revision of detailed control plan.

  17. Androgen Control in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelekanou, Vasiliki; Castanas, Elias

    2016-10-01

    Research on prostate cancer has extensively advanced in the past decade, through an improved understanding for its genetic basis and risk-stratification. Molecular classification of prostate cancer into distinct subtypes and the recognition of new histologic entities promise the development of tailored-made management strategies of patients. Nowadays, various alternatives are available for clinical management of localized disease ranging from observation alone through radical prostatectomy. In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer, the approval of new drugs for the management of metastatic disease has offered promising results improving the survival of these patients. In this context, androgen receptors (AR) remain at the epicenter of prostate cancer research holding a prominent role in the biology and therapeutic regimens of prostate cancer. As many of castration-resistant tumors retain hormone-responsiveness, AR is a clinical relevant, druggable target. However, AR paradoxically remains neglected as a prostate cancer biomarker. The great advancements in prostate cancer preclinical and clinical research, imply further improvement in clinical and translational data, for patient selection and treatment optimization. For a precision medicine-guided clinical management of prostate cancer, AR evaluation has to be implemented in companion and complementary diagnostics, as discussed here. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2224-2234, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27104784

  18. Nuisance Animal Control Plan : Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Control Plan will cover control of invasive and nuisance animal species on Muscatatuck NWR. The four species covered within this plan are beaver, muskrat, Mute...

  19. Tobacco control: an issue twinned with oral cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Mohan; Lando, Harry A

    2014-10-01

    Oral cancer is a silent crisis in India. Thirty per cent of all cancers are oral cancer, and approximately 17% of all cancers in men and 10.5% of all cancers in women are oral cancer. Approximately 70,000 new cases are reported annually and 46,000 oral cancer-related deaths occur each year in India; furthermore, the number of cases is rapidly increasing. With this crescendo there may be an estimated 100,000 new cases by 2020, which is insurmountable, especially in emerging economies like India. This astronomical increase is a direct result of tobacco usage. The Global Adult Tobacco Survey performed in 2010 (GATS-2010) reported that approximately 274.5 million people in India use tobacco in various forms. Increasing use of smokeless tobacco, especially by women and children, is of major concern. The World Health Organisation has identified tobacco control and oral cancer control measures as a health priority. However, prevention of tobacco use in India is a great challenge owing to low overall literacy rates and to greater prevalence among people in lower socio-economic strata. Addressing this problem requires a multidisciplinary approach. This paper presents a situational analysis of oral cancer in India and the role of tobacco in making it the epicentre of the disease, and focuses on the role of dental care-givers in influencing and promoting tobacco-control programmes and early detection of oral cancer. PMID:25146242

  20. A framework for health care planning and control

    OpenAIRE

    Hans, Erwin W.; Houdenhoven, van, M.; Hulshof, Peter J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Rising expenditures spur health care organizations to organize their processes more efficiently and effectively. Unfortunately, health care planning and control lags far behind manufacturing planning and control. Successful manufacturing planning and control concepts can not be directly copied, because of the unique nature of health care delivery. We analyze existing planning and control concepts or frameworks for health care operations management, and find that they do not properly address v...

  1. Cancer Control Framework and Synthesis Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer control science is the conduct of basic and applied research in the behavioral, social, and population sciences to create or enhance interventions that, independently or in combination with biomedical approaches, reduce cancer risk, incidence, morbidity and mortality, and improve quality of life.

  2. Evaluation on lung cancer patients' adaptive planning of TomoTherapy utilising radiobiological measures and Planned Adaptive module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fan-Chi; Shi, Chengyu; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive radiation therapy is a promising concept that allows individualised, dynamic treatment planning based on feedback of measurements. The TomoTherapy Planned Adaptive application, integrated to the helical TomoTherapy planning system, enables calculation of actual dose delivered to the patient for each treatment fraction according to the pretreatment megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scan and image registration. As a result, new fractionation treatment plans are available if correction is necessary. In order to evaluate therealclinicaleffect,biologicaldoseis preferred to physical dose. A biological parameter, biologically effective uniform dose ([Formula: see text]), has the advantages of not only reporting delivered dose but also facilitating the analysis of dose-response relations, which link radiation dose to the clinical effect. Therefore, in this study, four lung patients' adaptive plans were evaluated using the [Formula: see text] in addition to physical doses estimated from the TomoTherapy Planned Adaptive module. Higher complication-free tumour control probability (P(+))(of about 8%) was observed in patients treated with larger dose-per-fraction by using the [Formula: see text] in addition to the physical dose. Moreover, a significant increase of 13.2% in the P(+) for the adaptive TomoTherapy plan in one of the lung cancer patients was also observed, which indicates the clinical benefit of adaptive TomoTherapy. PMID:20376282

  3. Pancreatic cancer planning: Complex conformal vs modulated therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Katherine L; Witek, Matthew E; Chen, Hongyu; Showalter, Timothy N; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Harrison, Amy S

    2016-01-01

    To compare the roles of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric- modulated arc therapy (VMAT) therapy as compared to simple and complex 3-dimensional chemoradiotherpy (3DCRT) planning for resectable and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. In all, 12 patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (8) or neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (4) were evaluated retrospectively. Radiotherapy planning was performed for 4 treatment techniques: simple 4-field box, complex 5-field 3DCRT, 5 to 6-field IMRT, and single-arc VMAT. All volumes were approved by a single observer in accordance with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Pancreas Contouring Atlas. Plans included tumor/tumor bed and regional lymph nodes to 45Gy; with tumor/tumor bed boosted to 50.4Gy, at least 95% of planning target volume (PTV) received the prescription dose. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) for multiple end points, treatment planning, and delivery time were assessed. Complex 3DCRT, IMRT, and VMAT plans significantly (p group of patients with cancer. PMID:26831922

  4. Control theoretic splines optimal control, statistical, and path planning

    CERN Document Server

    Egerstedt, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Splines, both interpolatory and smoothing, have a long and rich history that has largely been application driven. This book unifies these constructions in a comprehensive and accessible way, drawing from the latest methods and applications to show how they arise naturally in the theory of linear control systems. Magnus Egerstedt and Clyde Martin are leading innovators in the use of control theoretic splines to bring together many diverse applications within a common framework. In this book, they begin with a series of problems ranging from path planning to statistics to approximation.

  5. Axomparison for treatment planning of tomotherapy and proton therapy in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prostate cancer is the most common malignant tumor in males. Prostate cancer is the most common malignant tumor that occurs in the male in Korea in 2007 to an annual average of 5,292 cases and 3.3% of the total cancer incidence seventh occurred. Our study compared property for tomotherapy and proton therapy in radiotherapy of prostate cancer patients. We analyzed DVH(Dose Volume Histogram) and dose distribution for prostate, bladder and rectum for radiation treatment planning of prostate cancer with 11 patients in Ilsan K cancer hospital from June to November 2011. There was no differences between tomotherapy and proton therapy in the purpose of prostate cancer therapy for PTV. The adjacent organs of bladder and rectum of average dose-volume were 2 port proton therapy that it was low dose treatment comparing with tomotherapy and 5 port proton therapy. H·I of proton therapy was less than H·I of tomotherapy. Also, 5 port was less than 2 port in H·I of proton therapy. However, 2 port proton therapy has more advantage over 5 port proton therapy that the bladder and rectum of average dose-volume and control time of equipment in radiotherapy of prostate cancer

  6. Generic Planning Target Margin for Rectal Cancer Treatment Setup Variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To calculate the generic planning target margin (GPTM) for patients receiving radiation therapy (RT) for rectal cancer placed in a prone position with a customized cradle for small-bowel exclusion. Methods and Materials: A total of 25 consecutive rectal cancer patients were treated for 25 or 28 fractions in a prone position using a cradle to maximize small bowel exclusion. Treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scans were used to create orthogonally digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) for portal image registration, which were compared with daily portal images from an electronic portal-imaging device (EPID). Translation values needed to align the DRRs and EPIDs were recorded for the superior to inferior (SI), right to left (RL), and anterior to posterior (AP) directions, and used to calculate the GPTM using the four-parameter model. Age, weight, and body mass index were tested compared with the setup variation using a Pearson correlation and a t test for significance. Gender versus setup variation was compared with a t test. Results: A total of 1,723 EPID images were reviewed. The GPTM was 10 mm superior, 8 mm inferior, 7 mm RL and 10 mm AP. Age and gender were unrelated to setup variation. Weight was significantly associated with systematic AP variation (p < 0.05). BMI was significantly associated with systematic SI (p < 0.05) and AP (p < 0.01) variation and random RL variation (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The GPTM for rectal cancer is asymmetric with a maximum of 10 mm in the superior, anterior and posterior dimensions. Body mass index may effect setup variation. Research using advanced treatment planning should include these margins in the planning target volume definition.

  7. Phenomenological modelling of second cancer incidence for radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is still an unanswered question whether a relatively low dose of radiation to a large volume or a higher dose to a small volume produces the higher cancer incidence. This is of interest in view of modalities like IMRT or rotation therapy where high conformity to the target volume is achieved at the cost of a large volume of normal tissue exposed to radiation. Knowledge of the shape of the dose response for radiation-induced cancer is essential to answer the question of what risk of second cancer incidence is implied by which treatment modality. This study therefore models the dose response for radiation-induced second cancer after radiation therapy of which the exact mechanisms are still unknown. A second cancer risk estimation tool for treatment planning is presented which has the potential to be used for comparison of different treatment modalities, and risk is estimated on a voxel basis for different organs in two case studies. The presented phenomenological model summarises the impact of microscopic biological processes into effective parameters of mutation and cell sterilisation. In contrast to other models, the effective radiosensitivities of mutated and non-mutated cells are allowed to differ. Based on the number of mutated cells present after irradiation, the model is then linked to macroscopic incidence by summarising model parameters and modifying factors into natural cancer incidence and the dose response in the lower-dose region. It was found that all principal dose-response functions discussed in the literature can be derived from the model. However, from the investigation and due to scarcity of adequate data, rather vague statements about likelihood of dose-response functions can be made than a definite decision for one response. Based on the predicted model parameters, the linear response can probably be rejected using the dynamics described, but both a flattening response and a decrease appear likely, depending strongly on the effective cell

  8. Phenomenological modelling of second cancer incidence for radiation treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfaffenberger, Asja; Oelfke, Uwe [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Medizinische Physik in der Strahlentherapie; Schneider, Uwe [Triemli Hospital and Vetsuisse Faculty, Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine; Poppe, Bjoern [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Medizinische Strahlenphysik

    2009-07-01

    It is still an unanswered question whether a relatively low dose of radiation to a large volume or a higher dose to a small volume produces the higher cancer incidence. This is of interest in view of modalities like IMRT or rotation therapy where high conformity to the target volume is achieved at the cost of a large volume of normal tissue exposed to radiation. Knowledge of the shape of the dose response for radiation-induced cancer is essential to answer the question of what risk of second cancer incidence is implied by which treatment modality. This study therefore models the dose response for radiation-induced second cancer after radiation therapy of which the exact mechanisms are still unknown. A second cancer risk estimation tool for treatment planning is presented which has the potential to be used for comparison of different treatment modalities, and risk is estimated on a voxel basis for different organs in two case studies. The presented phenomenological model summarises the impact of microscopic biological processes into effective parameters of mutation and cell sterilisation. In contrast to other models, the effective radiosensitivities of mutated and non-mutated cells are allowed to differ. Based on the number of mutated cells present after irradiation, the model is then linked to macroscopic incidence by summarising model parameters and modifying factors into natural cancer incidence and the dose response in the lower-dose region. It was found that all principal dose-response functions discussed in the literature can be derived from the model. However, from the investigation and due to scarcity of adequate data, rather vague statements about likelihood of dose-response functions can be made than a definite decision for one response. Based on the predicted model parameters, the linear response can probably be rejected using the dynamics described, but both a flattening response and a decrease appear likely, depending strongly on the effective cell

  9. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training lesson plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume provides lesson plans for training radiological control technicians. Covered here is basic radiological documentation, counting errors, dosimetry, environmental monitoring, and radiation instruments

  10. Station Crowd Control Plan: Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Crowd Control Plan for Shiawassee NWR outlines the operations for crowd control on the Refuge. An inventory of resources, a summary of communications...

  11. Animal Control Management Plan: Parker River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Animal Control Management Plan for Parker River National Wildlife Refuge outlines the procedures for controlling wildlife and fish populations to keep them...

  12. Adaptive brachytherapy of cervical cancer, comparison of conventional point A and CT based individual treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Locally advanced cervical cancer is commonly treated with external radiation therapy combined with local brachytherapy. The brachytherapy is traditionally given based on standard dose planning with prescription of dose to point A. Dosimetric aspects when changing from former standard treatment to individualized treatment plans based on computed tomography (CT) images are here investigated. Material and methods. Brachytherapy data from 19 patients with a total of 72 individual treatment fractions were retrospectively reviewed. Standard library plans were analyzed with respect to doses to organs at risk (OARs), and the result was compared to corresponding delivered individualized plans. The theoretical potential of further optimization based on prescription to target volumes was investigated. The treatments were performed with a Fletcher applicator. Results. For standard treatment planning, the tolerance dose limits were exceeded in the bladder, rectum and sigmoid in 26%, 4% and 15% of the plans, respectively. This was observed most often for the smallest target volumes. The individualized planning of the delivered treatment gave the possibility of controlling the dose to critical organs to below certain limits. The dose was still prescribed to point A. An increase in target dose coverage was achieved when additional individual optimization was performed, while still keeping the dose to the OARs below predefined limits. Relatively low average target coverage, especially for the largest volumes was however seen. Conclusion. The individualized delivered treatment plans ensured that doses to OARs were within acceptable limits. This was not the case in 42% of the corresponding standard plans. Further optimized treatment plans were found to give an overall better dose coverage. In lack of MR capacity, it may be favorable to use CT for planning due to possible protection of OARs. The CT based target volumes were, however, not equivalent to the volumes described

  13. Reforming Project Management: The Role of Planning, Execution and Controlling

    OpenAIRE

    Koskela, Lauri; Howell, Greg

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the need for reforming the role of plans, execution (or action) and control in project management. We argue that the present style of project management, as described in the Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) of PMI, is based on two underlying theories in this regard: management-as-planning (for planning and execution) and the thermostat model (for control). Unfortunately, both theories can be shown to be heroically simplistic and insuff...

  14. Modeling the Aneuploidy Control of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aneuploidy has long been recognized to be associated with cancer. A growing body of evidence suggests that tumorigenesis, the formation of new tumors, can be attributed to some extent to errors occurring at the mitotic checkpoint, a major cell cycle control mechanism that acts to prevent chromosome missegregation. However, so far no statistical model has been available quantify the role aneuploidy plays in determining cancer. Methods We develop a statistical model for testing the association between aneuploidy loci and cancer risk in a genome-wide association study. The model incorporates quantitative genetic principles into a mixture-model framework in which various genetic effects, including additive, dominant, imprinting, and their interactions, are estimated by implementing the EM algorithm. Results Under the new model, a series of hypotheses tests are formulated to explain the pattern of the genetic control of cancer through aneuploid loci. Simulation studies were performed to investigate the statistical behavior of the model. Conclusions The model will provide a tool for estimating the effects of genetic loci on aneuploidy abnormality in genome-wide studies of cancer cells.

  15. IMRT treatment plans and functional planning with functional lung imaging from 4D-CT for thoracic cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Tzung-Chi; Hsiao Chien-Yi; Chien Chun-Ru; Liang Ji-An; Shih Tzu-Ching; Zhang Geoffrey G

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Currently, the inhomogeneity of the pulmonary function is not considered when treatment plans are generated in thoracic cancer radiotherapy. This study evaluates the dose of treatment plans on highly-functional volumes and performs functional treatment planning by incorporation of ventilation data from 4D-CT. Materials and methods Eleven patients were included in this retrospective study. Ventilation was calculated using 4D-CT. Two treatment plans were generate...

  16. Understanding Cervical Cancer Screening Intentions Among Latinas Using An Expanded Theory of Planned Behavior Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncancio, Angelica M.; Ward, Kristy K.; Fernandez, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the utility of an expanded Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) model in predicting cervical cancer screening intentions among Latinas. The model included acculturation and past cervical cancer screening behavior along with attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control. This cross-sectional study included a sample of 206 Latinas who responded to a self-administered survey. Structural equation modeling was employed to test the expanded TPB model. Acculturation (p= .025) and past screening behavior (p= .001) along with attitude (p= .019), subjective norms (p= .028), and perceived behavioral control (p= .014) predicted the intention to be screened for cervical cancer. Our findings suggest that the TPB is a useful model for understanding cervical cancer screening intentions among Latinas when both past behavior and culture are included. This highlights the importance of culture on behavior and indicates a need to develop culturally sensitive, theory-based interventions to encourage screening and reduce cervical cancer-related health disparities in Latinas. PMID:23930898

  17. Planning evaluation of radiotherapy for complex lung cancer cases using helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Grigorov, Grigor; Yu, Edward; Yartsev, Slav; Chen, Jeff Z.; Wong, Eugene; Rodrigues, George; Trenka, Kris; Coad, Terry; Bauman, Glenn; Van Dyk, Jake

    2004-08-01

    Lung cancer treatment is one of the most challenging fields in radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate what role helical tomotherapy (HT), a novel approach to the delivery of highly conformal dose distributions using intensity-modulated radiation fan beams, can play in difficult cases with large target volumes typical for many of these patients. Tomotherapy plans were developed for 15 patients with stage III inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. While not necessarily clinically indicated, elective nodal irradiation was included for all cases to create the most challenging scenarios with large target volumes. A 2 cm margin was used around the gross tumour volume (GTV) to generate primary planning target volume (PTV2) and 1 cm margin around elective nodes for secondary planning target volume (PTV1) resulting in PTV1 volumes larger than 1000 cm3 in 13 of the 15 patients. Tomotherapy plans were created using an inverse treatment planning system (TomoTherapy Inc.) based on superposition/convolution dose calculation for a fan beam thickness of 25 mm and a pitch factor between 0.3 and 0.8. For comparison, plans were created using an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) approach planned on a commercial treatment planning system (TheraplanPlus, Nucletron). Tomotherapy delivery times for the large target volumes were estimated to be between 4 and 19 min. Using a prescribed dose of 60 Gy to PTV2 and 46 Gy to PTV1, the mean lung dose was 23.8 ± 4.6 Gy. A 'dose quality factor' was introduced to correlate the plan outcome with patient specific parameters. A good correlation was found between the quality of the HT plans and the IMRT plans with HT being slightly better in most cases. The overlap between lung and PTV was found to be a good indicator of plan quality for HT. The mean lung dose was found to increase by approximately 0.9 Gy per percent overlap volume. Helical tomotherapy planning resulted in highly conformal dose distributions. It

  18. Depression and medication adherence among breast cancer survivors: bridging the gap with the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Mark; Bettencourt, B Ann

    2011-09-01

    Evidence suggests that more depressed breast cancer patients will less likely adhere to treatment plans. This study presents evidence that the theory of planned behaviour mediates the relation between depression and intentions to adhere to treatment plans and between depression and lack of adherence to medication regime. Two hundred and thirteen women undergoing breast cancer treatment participated in this study. Measures of depressive symptoms and planned behaviour variables were collected at the first time point; measures of medication adherence were collected at the second time point. Structural equation models were utilised to fit the data to the proposed models. Depressive symptoms were significantly correlated to both intentions and medication adherence. In support of hypotheses, the relation between depressive symptoms and treatment intention was mediated by attitudes towards health maintenance plans. The relation between depressive symptoms and medication adherence was fully mediated by the planned behaviour process. Conditions under which treatment intentions and perceptions of control in adhering to treatment were most related to medication adherence were elucidated. The results point to avenues for interventions to increase medication adherence among breast cancer patients. Manipulating attitudes and perceptions of control towards treatment plans will potentially serve to increase medication adherence. PMID:21929477

  19. Peer-to-Peer Planning for Space Mission Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, Javier; Jones, Grailing, Jr.; Schaffer, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Planning and scheduling for space operations entails the development of applications that embed intimate domain knowledge of distinct areas of mission control, while allowing for significant collaboration among them. The separation is useful because of differences in the planning problem, solution methods, and frequencies of replanning that arise in the different disciplines. For example, planning the activities of human spaceflight crews requires some reasoning about all spacecraft resources at timescales of minutes or seconds, and is subject to considerable volatility. Detailed power planning requires managing the complex interplay of power consumption and production, involves very different classes of constraints and preferences, but once plans are generated they are relatively stable.

  20. Sustainability in a state comprehensive cancer control coalition: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Renee A; Chapman, Kathryn; Graf, Gavin; Stanfield, Bret; Waterbor, John W

    2014-03-01

    The Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalition (ACCCC) has developed an integrated and coordinated approach to reducing cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, and to improving the quality of life for cancer survivors, their families, and their caregivers. The ACCCC is currently in a maintenance phase and a formal plan for sustainability of the coalition was needed to keep the members engaged and productive. A training session in coalition sustainability conducted in 2013 identified the following elements as essential to success: (1) increased marketing of the coalition by simplifying its mission; (2) improved networking including flexibility in coalition meeting location and attendance; (3) increased membership satisfaction through transformational leadership; (4) revision of the working structure of committees and improved accountability; and (5) enhancement of partner satisfaction with coalition activities designed to recruit and retain new partners. A self-administered membership satisfaction survey was given to assess coalition mission, meeting logistics, organization, capacity building, and coalition goals. Results indicated that the subcategories of communication, mission, and meeting logistics were rated satisfied to very satisfied on a five-point scale. Although the ACCCC had clearly written goals, improvement could be made in leadership participation and new member orientation could be improved. Most members rated their parent organization as highly involved with the ACCCC and many offered suggestions on capacity building. Results of the sustainability training have clarified the ACCCC's plans to ensure coalition viability and improve strategies to inform stakeholders of the benefits of participation in the coalition. PMID:24132542

  1. Development of the planning and control segment, CRWMS Transportation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the current plans for the development of the Planning and Control segment of the CRWMS Transportation System. Each of the four Planning and Control subsystems are described. It is assumed that the CRWMS will be managed by a single management structure reporting directly to the OCRWM. The Transportation System will operate under this management, with each segment of the Transportation System reporting to a Transportation System Manager. Also described are the support activities essential for the Transportation System, the requirements for and the use of the planning documentation, their interactions, and the steps necessary to prepare for shipping campaigns, and the role of Traffic Management

  2. Form planning Control to growth management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2016-01-01

    light, Danish spatial planning continues to align with prevailing neo-liberal minded government agendas and thereby ends up reflecting the ideologies and interests of the government in place. In contrast with the social welfarist objectives of the 1970s, these governmental preferences have indirectly...

  3. Colon cancer controls versus population controls in case-control studies of occupational risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabroe Svend

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since updated population registers do not exist in many countries it is often difficult to sample valid population controls from the study base to a case-control study. Use of patient controls is an alternative option if the exposure experience under study for these patients are interchangeable with the experience for population controls. Patient controls may even be preferable from population controls under certain conditions. In this study we examine if colon cancer patients can serve as surrogates for proper population controls in case-control studies of occupational risk factors. Methods The study was conducted from 1995 to 1997. Incident colon cancer controls (N = 428 aged 35–69 years with a histological verified diagnosis and population controls (N = 583 were selected. Altogether 254 (59% of the colon cancer controls and 320 (55% of the population controls were interviewed about occupational, medical and life style conditions. Results No statistical significant difference for educational level, medical history or smoking status was seen between the two control groups. There was evidence of a higher alcohol intake, less frequent work as a farmer and less exposure to pesticides among colon cancer controls. Conclusions Use of colon cancer controls may provide valid exposure estimates in studies of many occupational risk factors for cancer, but not for studies on exposure related to farming.

  4. The role of PET/CT in radiation treatment planning for cancer patient treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and, more recently, integrated positron emission tomography/X ray computed tomography (PET/CT) have appeared as significant diagnostic imaging systems in clinical medicine. Accurate recognition of cancers in patients by means of PET scanning with Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has illustrated a need to determine a mode of therapy to achieve better prognoses. The clinical management of cancer patients has improved dramatically with the introduction of clinical PET. For treatment of cancer patients, on the other hand, radiation therapy (RT) plays an important role as a non-invasive therapy. It is crucial that cancers are encompassed by high dose irradiation, particularly in cases of curative RT. Irradiation should precisely target the entire tumour and aim to minimise the size of microscopic extensions of the cancer, as well as minimize radiation damage to normal tissues. A new imaging technique has therefore been sought to allow precise delineation of the cancer target to be irradiated. Clinical PET, combined with utilization of 18F-FDG, may have an important role in radiation treatment planning (RTP) in lung cancer. In addition to determining if RT is appropriate and whether therapy will be given with curative or palliative intent, 18F-FDG-PET is useful for determining therapy ports. It can be used both to limit ports to spare normal tissue and to include additional involved regions. Several studies have shown that PET has an impact on RTP in an important proportion of patients. It is to be hoped that treatment plans that include all the 18F-FDG-avid lesions or the 18F-FDG-avid portions of a complex mass will result in more effective local control with less unnecessary tissue being treated. The IAEA has placed emphasis on the issue of application of clinical PET for radiation treatment planning in various cancer patients. Two consultants meetings were held in 2006 and their results are summarized into this IAEA

  5. Legal and planning framework for the control of noise emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An examination of the statutory basis for the control of noise emissions is presented. Principal pieces of United Kingdom legislation and some advisory notes have been produced within 6 extensive appendices. The paper briefly examines the controls in other EC countries before discussing the way in which planning controls in the United Kingdom relate to the jurisdiction of the court. (author)

  6. Legal and planning framework for the control of noise emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An examination is offered of the statutory basis for the control of noise emissions. Principal pieces of legislation and some advisory notes have been produced within appendices. The paper briefly examines the controls in other EC countries before discussing the way in which planning controls relate to the jurisdiction of the court. (author)

  7. Motion planning and control problems for underactuated robots

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Sonia; Cortes, Jorge; Bullo, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Motion planning and control are key problems in a collection of robotic applications including the design of autonomous agile vehicles and of minimalist manipulators. These problems can be accurately formalized within the language of affine connections and of geometric control theory. In this paper we overview recent results on kinematic controllability and on oscillatory controls. Furthermore, we discuss theoretical and practical open problems as well as we suggest control theoretical approa...

  8. Cost accounting, management control, and planning in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, R B; Blish, C S

    1988-02-01

    Advantages and pharmacy applications of computerized hospital management-control and planning systems are described. Hospitals must define their product lines; patient cases, not tests or procedures, are the end product. Management involves operational control, management control, and strategic planning. Operational control deals with day-to-day management on the task level. Management control involves ensuring that managers use resources effectively and efficiently to accomplish the organization's objectives. Management control includes both control of unit costs of intermediate products, which are procedures and services used to treat patients and are managed by hospital department heads, and control of intermediate product use per case (managed by the clinician). Information from the operation and management levels feeds into the strategic plan; conversely, the management level controls the plan and the operational level carries it out. In the system developed at New England Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, the intermediate product-management system enables managers to identify intermediate products, develop standard costs, simulate changes in departmental costs, and perform variance analysis. The end-product management system creates a patient-level data-base, identifies end products (patient-care groupings), develops standard resource protocols, models alternative assumptions, performs variance analysis, and provides concurrent reporting. Examples are given of pharmacy managers' use of such systems to answer questions in the areas of product costing, product pricing, variance analysis, productivity monitoring, flexible budgeting, modeling and planning, and comparative analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3284338

  9. NIF Projects Controls and Information Systems Software Quality Assurance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality achievement for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) is the responsibility of the NIF Projects line organization as described in the NIF and Photon Science Directorate Quality Assurance Plan (NIF QA Plan). This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) is subordinate to the NIF QA Plan and establishes quality assurance (QA) activities for the software subsystems within Controls and Information Systems (CIS). This SQAP implements an activity level software quality assurance plan for NIF Projects as required by the LLNL Institutional Software Quality Assurance Program (ISQAP). Planned QA activities help achieve, assess, and maintain appropriate quality of software developed and/or acquired for control systems, shot data systems, laser performance modeling systems, business applications, industrial control and safety systems, and information technology systems. The objective of this SQAP is to ensure that appropriate controls are developed and implemented for management planning, work execution, and quality assessment of the CIS organization's software activities. The CIS line organization places special QA emphasis on rigorous configuration control, change management, testing, and issue tracking to help achieve its quality goals.

  10. NIF Projects Controls and Information Systems Software Quality Assurance Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishler, B

    2011-03-18

    Quality achievement for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) is the responsibility of the NIF Projects line organization as described in the NIF and Photon Science Directorate Quality Assurance Plan (NIF QA Plan). This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) is subordinate to the NIF QA Plan and establishes quality assurance (QA) activities for the software subsystems within Controls and Information Systems (CIS). This SQAP implements an activity level software quality assurance plan for NIF Projects as required by the LLNL Institutional Software Quality Assurance Program (ISQAP). Planned QA activities help achieve, assess, and maintain appropriate quality of software developed and/or acquired for control systems, shot data systems, laser performance modeling systems, business applications, industrial control and safety systems, and information technology systems. The objective of this SQAP is to ensure that appropriate controls are developed and implemented for management planning, work execution, and quality assessment of the CIS organization's software activities. The CIS line organization places special QA emphasis on rigorous configuration control, change management, testing, and issue tracking to help achieve its quality goals.

  11. Animal Control Plan for St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan is developed as the general policy to govern future control efforts of feral hog, beaver, and raccoon populations on the St. Vincent National Wildlife...

  12. Animal Control Plan for Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan for Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge in 2000 describes animal control priorities and objectives. Target species include, beaver, nutria, raccoon,...

  13. Animal Control Plan for St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan is developed as the general policy to govern future control efforts of feral hog, beaver, and raccoon populations on the St. Marks National Wildlife...

  14. Mingo National Wildlife Refuge : Station Crowd Control Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Crowd Control Plan for Mingo NWR outlines operational procedures in the event of a civil disorder on the Refuge. An inventory of resources is provided, along...

  15. Animal Control Plan Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains a discussion of programs of the refuge as they relate to animal control and plans for managing these resources at Prime Hook National...

  16. Second primary cancers after radiation for prostate cancer: a review of data from planning studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of planning studies was undertaken to evaluate estimated risks of radiation induced second primary cancers (RISPC) associated with different prostate radiotherapy techniques for localised prostate cancer. A total of 83 publications were identified which employed a variety of methods to estimate RISPC risk. Of these, the 16 planning studies which specifically addressed absolute or relative second cancer risk using dose–response models were selected for inclusion within this review. There are uncertainties and limitations related to all the different methods for estimating RISPC risk. Whether or not dose models include the effects of the primary radiation beam, as well as out-of-field regions, influences estimated risks. Regarding the impact of IMRT compared to 3D-CRT, at equivalent energies, several studies suggest an increase in risk related to increased leakage contributing to out-of-field RISPC risk, although in absolute terms this increase in risk may be very small. IMRT also results in increased low dose normal tissue irradiation, but the extent to which this has been estimated to contribute to RISPC risk is variable, and may also be very small. IMRT is often delivered using 6MV photons while conventional radiotherapy often requires higher energies to achieve adequate tissue penetration, and so comparisons between IMRT and older techniques should not be restricted to equivalent energies. Proton and brachytherapy planning studies suggest very low RISPC risks associated with these techniques. Until there is sufficient clinical evidence regarding RISPC risks associated with modern irradiation techniques, the data produced from planning studies is relevant when considering which patients to irradiate, and which technique to employ

  17. IMRT treatment plans and functional planning with functional lung imaging from 4D-CT for thoracic cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Tzung-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Currently, the inhomogeneity of the pulmonary function is not considered when treatment plans are generated in thoracic cancer radiotherapy. This study evaluates the dose of treatment plans on highly-functional volumes and performs functional treatment planning by incorporation of ventilation data from 4D-CT. Materials and methods Eleven patients were included in this retrospective study. Ventilation was calculated using 4D-CT. Two treatment plans were generated for each case, the first one without the incorporation of the ventilation and the second with it. The dose of the first plans was overlapped with the ventilation and analyzed. Highly-functional regions were avoided in the second treatment plans. Results For small targets in the first plans (PTV  Conclusion Radiation treatments affect functional lung more seriously in large tumor cases. With compromise of dose to other critical organs, functional treatment planning to reduce dose in highly-functional lung volumes can be achieved

  18. Hybrid Planning: Task-Space Control and Sampling-Based Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Haschke, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We propose a hybrid approach to motion planning for redundant robots, which combines a powerful control framework with a sampling-based planner. We argue that a suitably chosen task controller already manages a huge amount of trajectory planning work. However, due to its local approach to obstacle avoidance, it may get stuck in local minima. Therefore we augment it with a globally acting planner, which operates in a lower-dimensional search space, thus circumventing the curse of dimensionalit...

  19. 3-Dimentional radiotherapy versus conventional treatment plans for gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghili M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: The current standard of adjuvant management for gastric cancer after curative resection based on the results of intergroup 0116 is concurrent chemoradiation. Current guidelines for designing these challenging fields still include two-dimensional simulation with simple AP-PA parallel opposed design. However, the implementation of radiotherapy (RT remains a concern. Our objective was to compare three-dimensional (3D techniques to the more commonly used AP-PA technique."n"nMethods: A total of 24 patients with stages II-IV adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation with simple AP-PA technique, using Cobalt-60. Total radiation dose was 50.4Gy. Landmark-based fields were simulated to assess PTV coverage. For each patient, three additional radiotherapy treatment plans were generated using three-dimensional (3D technique. The four treatment plans were then compared for target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues (liver, spinal cord, kidneys using dose volume histogram (DVH analysis."n"nResults: The three-dimensional planning techniques provided 10% superior PTV coverage compared to conventional AP-PA fields (p<0.001. Comparative DVHs for the right kidney, left kidney

  20. Residuals Management and Water Pollution Control Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Public Affairs.

    This pamphlet addresses the problems associated with residuals and water quality especially as it relates to the National Water Pollution Control Program. The types of residuals and appropriate management systems are discussed. Additionally, one section is devoted to the role of citizen participation in developing management programs. (CS)

  1. Planning and control of maintenance systems modelling and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Duffuaa, Salih O

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing maintenance as an integrated system with objectives, strategies and processes that need to be planned, designed, engineered, and controlled using statistical and optimization techniques, the theme of this book is the strategic holistic system approach for maintenance. This approach enables maintenance decision makers to view maintenance as a provider of a competitive edge not a necessary evil. Encompassing maintenance systems; maintenance strategic and capacity planning, planned and preventive maintenance, work measurements and standards, material (spares) control, maintenance operations and control, planning and scheduling, maintenance quality, training, and others, this book gives readers an understanding of the relevant methodology and how to apply it to real-world problems in industry. Each chapter includes a number exercises and is suitable as a textbook or a reference for a professionals and practitioners whilst being of interest to industrial engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical en...

  2. Standard Practice for Preparation of Aerospace Contamination Control Plans

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice is intended to assist in the preparation of formal plans for contamination control, especially of aerospace critical surfaces. Requirements may be established at the systems level, either by the customer or the systems integrator, or at the subsystem level. Subsystem requirements may be imposed by the responsible subsystem supplier or they may be flowed down from the systems organization (4.7). The extent of detail and level of cleanliness required can vary with the particular application and type of hardware being built, but all aspects of contamination control must be included in a final plan. Therefore, each of the following elements must be considered for inclusion in a contamination control plan (CCP): 1.1.1 Cleanliness requirements for deliverable hardware addressing particulate, molecular, or biological contaminants or combination thereof. Specify contamination limits and any budget allocations. 1.1.2 Implementation plans to achieve, verify, and maintain the specified cleanliness re...

  3. SP-100 Control Drive Assembly Development Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuth, Scott F.

    1994-07-01

    The Control Drive Assemblies are the only active components in the entire SP-100 system. Consequently, the design challenges dealing with self-welding, wear, and misalignment in the high temperature and high radiation environment are significant. Because of the harsh environment, it has been necessary to test a variety of materials for such components as bearings, electromagnetic coils, clutches, brakes, and gears. The current Control Drive Assembly technology status is adequate for the 20-KWe design with a five-year life, but has not yet been completely demonstrated for the 100-KWe design with a full ten-year life. The difference in technology status for the 20-KWe and 100-KWe designs is due to the shorter lifetime requirement of the 20-KWe system.

  4. 300 Area Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, G.W.

    1990-11-01

    This Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan is designed to describe measures that must be taken to prevent, control, and handle spills of bulk storage chemicals or oils at Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) facilities located in the Hanford Site 300 Area. The SPCC Plan is designed to satisfy the requirement from US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` which is intended to minimize risk to the environment or public health, and to anticipate and address potential environmental problems before they pose a threat to the quality of the environment or the public welfare. The SPCC Plan identifies practices employed by Westinghouse Hanford to prevent a reportable quantity (RQ) of a hazardous substance [as defined in Title 40, Code of Federal regulations, Part 302 (40 CFR 302)] from being released to the environment. This SPCC Plan fulfills the requirement cited in WHC-CM-7-5, Part T, which establishes Westinghouse Hanford policy for required SPCC Plans, and references 40 CFR 112, ``Environmental Protection Agency Regulations on Oil Pollution Prevention,`` as a basis for contents of the SPCC Plan. Upon completion of the SPCC Plan, a copy will be kept on file at all 300 Area facilities described in the SPCC Plan. Additional copies will also be placed with the 300 Area Industrial Safety and Fire Protection management, and with other environmental oversight, and emergency preparedness, and response personnel as necessary. 1 fig.

  5. Oxycodone controlled release in cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancofiore, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    Oral opioids are the treatment of choice for chronic cancer pain. Morphine is the strong opioid of choice for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain according to guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO). This recommendation by the WHO was derived from availability, familiarity to clinicians, established effectiveness, simplicity of administration, and relative inexpensive cost. It was not based on proven therapeutic superiority over other options. Patients who experience inadequate pain relief or intolerable side effects with one opioid may often be successfully treated with another agent or with the same agent administered by a different route. Opioid rotation, or switching to an alternative opioid, helps some patients achieve better pain control with fewer associated adverse effects. Oxycodone is a mu-opioid receptor specific ligand, with clear agonist properties. It is an active potent opioid, which is in part a kappa-receptor agonist. Like morphine and other pure agonists, there is no known ceiling to the analgesic effects of oxycodone. The active metabolites of oxycodone (eg, oxymorphone) could be important in oxycodone-mediated analgesia. The main pharmacokinetic difference between oxycodone and morphine is in oral bioavailability. The bioavailability of oxycodone is >60% and the bioavailability of morphine is 20%. Controlled-release oxycodone is absorbed in a bi-exponential fashion. There is a rapid phase with a mean half-life of 37 min, accounting for 38% of the dose, and a slow phase with a half-life of 6.2 h, which accounts for the residual 62%. Oxycodone elimination is impaired by renal failure because there are both an increased volume of distribution and reduced clearance. A lot of studies prove that the efficacy of controlled-release oxycodone in cancer-pain control is at least the same as morphine, immediate-release oxycodone and hydromorphone. Its toxicity profile seems better than that of morphine. There are actually several

  6. ITER Instrumentation and Control - Status and Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER Instrumentation and Control (IC) System is the term encompassing all hardware and software required to operate ITER. It has two levels of hierarchy; the Central IC Systems and the Plant Systems IC. The Central IC Systems comprise CODAC (Control, Data Access and Communication), the Central Interlock System (CIS) and the Central Safety Systems (CSS). The Central IC Systems are 'in-fund', i.e. procured by ITER International Organization, while Plant Systems IC are 'in-kind', i.e. procured by the seven ITER Domestic Agencies. This procurement model, together with the current estimate of 165 Plant Systems IC, poses a major challenge for the realization and integration of the ITER IC System. To address this challenge a main strategic focus of the CODAC group, formed in 2008, has been to establish good relations with the Domestic Agencies. By distributing the required research and development tasks and contracts fairly between the Domestic Agencies we build collaborations for the future at the same time as technical work proceed. The primary goal of ITER IC System is to provide a fully integrated and automated control system for ITER. Standardization of Plant Systems IC is of primary importance and has been the highest priority task during the last year. The target of associated research and development activities is to survey, benchmark and prototype main stream technologies, in order to choose the best and most widely used technology standards for Plant Systems IC. In this paper we elaborate on our approach, both from a technical and a non technical perspective, explain technology evaluation and decisions and finally present the way forward to ensure ITER IC System will contribute and be instrumental in making ITER a success. This document is composed of an abstract followed by the presentation slides. (authors)

  7. ITER Instrumentation and Control - Status and Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER Instrumentation and Control (IC) System is the term encompassing all hardware and software required to operate ITER. It has two levels of hierarchy; the Central IC Systems and the Plant Systems IC. The Central IC Systems comprise CODAC (Control, Data Access and Communication), the Central Interlock System (CIS) and the Central Safety Systems (CSS). The Central IC Systems are 'in-fund', i.e. procured by ITER International Organization, while Plant Systems IC are 'in-kind', i.e. procured by the seven ITER Domestic Agencies. This procurement model, together with the current estimate of 165 Plant Systems IC, poses a major challenge for the realization and integration of the ITER IC System. To address this challenge a main strategic focus of the CODAC group, formed in 2008, has been to establish good relations with the Domestic Agencies. By distributing the required Research and development tasks and contracts fairly between the Domestic Agencies we build collaborations for the future at the same time as technical work proceed. The primary goal of ITER IC System is to provide a fully integrated and automated control system for ITER. Standardization of Plant Systems IC is of primary importance and has been the highest priority task during the last year. The target of associated Research and Development activities is to survey, benchmark and prototype main stream technologies, in order to choose the best and most widely used technology standards for Plant Systems IC. In this paper we elaborate on our approach, both from a technical and a non technical perspective, explain technology evaluation and decisions and finally present the way forward to ensure ITER IC System will contribute and be instrumental in making ITER a success. This document is composed of an abstract followed by the presentation transparencies. (authors)

  8. Promoting action control and coping planning to improve hand hygiene

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes Fernández, Benjamín; Lippke, Sonia; Knoll, Nina; Blanca Moya, Emanuel; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined a brief educational intervention addressing hand hygiene self-regulatory mechanisms, and evaluated which psychological mechanisms may lead to hand hygiene behaviours. Methods Two hundred forty two students (mean age = 21 years, SD = 3.9) received either an experimental (n = 149) or a control condition on action control and planning (n = 93). Hand hygiene, coping planning, and action control were measured at baseline and six weeks later. By applying repeated measures ANO...

  9. Optimal control of multiplicative control systems arising from cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, K.; Kim, M.

    1975-01-01

    This study deals with ways of curtailing the rapid growth of cancer cell populations. The performance functional that measures the size of the population at the terminal time as well as the control effort is devised. With use of the discrete maximum principle, the Hamiltonian for this problem is determined and the condition for optimal solutions are developed. The optimal strategy is shown to be a bang-bang control. It is shown that the optimal control for this problem must be on the vertices of an N-dimensional cube contained in the N-dimensional Euclidean space. An algorithm for obtaining a local minimum of the performance function in an orderly fashion is developed. Application of the algorithm to the design of antitumor drug and X-irradiation schedule is discussed.

  10. A Comprehensive Comparison of IMRT and VMAT Plan Quality for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We performed a comprehensive comparative study of the plan quality between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with prostate cancer treated at our institution were randomly selected for this study. For each patient, a VMAT plan and a series of IMRT plans using an increasing number of beams (8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 beams) were examined. All plans were generated using our in-house–developed automatic inverse planning (AIP) algorithm. An existing eight-beam clinical IMRT plan, which was used to treat the patient, was used as the reference plan. For each patient, all AIP-generated plans were optimized to achieve the same level of planning target volume (PTV) coverage as the reference plan. Plan quality was evaluated by measuring mean dose to and dose–volume statistics of the organs at risk, especially the rectum, from each type of plan. Results: For the same PTV coverage, the AIP-generated VMAT plans had significantly better plan quality in terms of rectum sparing than the eight-beam clinical and AIP-generated IMRT plans (p < 0.0001). However, the differences between the IMRT and VMAT plans in all the dosimetric indices decreased as the number of beams used in IMRT increased. IMRT plan quality was similar or superior to that of VMAT when the number of beams in IMRT was increased to a certain number, which ranged from 12 to 24 for the set of patients studied. The superior VMAT plan quality resulted in approximately 30% more monitor units than the eight-beam IMRT plans, but the delivery time was still less than 3 min. Conclusions: Considering the superior plan quality as well as the delivery efficiency of VMAT compared with that of IMRT, VMAT may be the preferred modality for treating prostate cancer.

  11. The National LGBT Cancer Action Plan: A White Paper of the 2014 National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolies, Liz; Sigurdsson, Hrafn Oli; Walland, Jonathan; Radix, Asa; Rice, David; Buchting, Francisco O.; Sanchez, Nelson F.; Bare, Michael G.; Boehmer, Ulrike; Cahill, Sean; Griebling, Tomas L.; Bruessow, Diane; Maingi, Shail

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite growing social acceptance of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender (LGBT) persons and the extension of marriage rights for same-sex couples, LGBT persons experience stigma and discrimination, including within the healthcare system. Each population within the LGBT umbrella term is likely at elevated risk for cancer due to prevalent, significant cancer risk factors, such as tobacco use and human immunodeficiency virus infection; however, cancer incidence and mortality data among LGBT persons are lacking. This absence of cancer incidence data impedes research and policy development, LGBT communities' awareness and activation, and interventions to address cancer disparities. In this context, in 2014, a 2-day National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities was convened by a planning committee for the purpose of accelerating progress in identifying and addressing the LGBT communities' concerns and needs in the spheres of cancer research, clinical cancer care, healthcare policy, and advocacy for cancer survivorship and LGBT health equity. Summit participants were 56 invited persons from the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada, representatives of diverse identities, experiences, and knowledge about LGBT communities and cancer. Participants shared lessons learned and identified gaps and remedies regarding LGBT cancer concerns across the cancer care continuum from prevention to survivorship. This white paper presents background on each of the Summit themes and 16 recommendations covering the following: sexual orientation and gender identity data collection in national and state health surveys and research on LGBT communities and cancer, the clinical care of LGBT persons, and the education and training of healthcare providers.

  12. A methodology for automatic intensity-modulated radiation treatment planning for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Pan, Xiaoning; Li, Yupeng

    2011-07-01

    In intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the quality of the treatment plan, which is highly dependent upon the treatment planner's level of experience, greatly affects the potential benefits of the radiotherapy (RT). Furthermore, the planning process is complicated and requires a great deal of iteration, and is often the most time-consuming aspect of the RT process. In this paper, we describe a methodology to automate the IMRT planning process in lung cancer cases, the goal being to improve the quality and consistency of treatment planning. This methodology (1) automatically sets beam angles based on a beam angle automation algorithm, (2) judiciously designs the planning structures, which were shown to be effective for all the lung cancer cases we studied, and (3) automatically adjusts the objectives of the objective function based on a parameter automation algorithm. We compared treatment plans created in this system (mdaccAutoPlan) based on the overall methodology with plans from a clinical trial of IMRT for lung cancer run at our institution. The 'autoplans' were consistently better, or no worse, than the plans produced by experienced medical dosimetrists in terms of tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing. We conclude that the mdaccAutoPlan system can potentially improve the quality and consistency of treatment planning for lung cancer.

  13. A case control study of risk factors associated with female breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To find the association of various risk factors with breast cancer. Study Design: It was a case-control study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out in NORI Hospital Islamabad and Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi between August, 2013 and February, 2014. Material and Methods: Two hundred breast cancer patients and 200 control subjects were inducted. A short approved and planned questionnaire was used to collect data regarding basic demographic, menstrual and reproductive characteristics of participating females. Cases and controls were then interviewed after taking written consent. Results: Breast cancer patients and control subjects did not differ regarding age (p = 0.15), early menarche (OR for menarche at <13 years vs. ?13=1.3, 95% CI = 0.84 - 2.02), and history of breast cancer in 1st degree relatives did not increase breast cancer risk (OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.57 - 1.74). Nulliparous women had significantly higher risk than parous women (OR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.22 - 4.84) and women with late menopause compared to women with early onset of menopause were also at higher risk for breast cancer (OR for menopause at ? 50 vs. < 50 = 5.16, 95% CI = 2.59 - 10.29). Conclusion: Nulliparity and menopausal age of more than 50 years was associated with increased breast cancer risk. Breast feeding and age less than 25 years at first live birth was not protective against breast cancer. (author)

  14. A layered architecture using schematic plans for controlling mobile robots

    OpenAIRE

    Tucat, Mariano; Gottifredi, Sebastián; Vidaurreta, Federico; García, Alejandro Javier; Simari, Guillermo Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Robotic soccer is a way of putting different developments in intelligent agents into practice, including not only problems such as multi-agent planning and coordination, but also physical problems related to vision and communication subsystems. In this work, we present the design used as the basis for a multi-agent system, implemented for controlling a team of robots, having as main goal to facilitate the testing of new theories developed on reasoning, knowledge representation, planning, agen...

  15. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. L. Jolley

    2006-07-27

    On November 9, 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality approved the Record of Decision Experimental Breeder Reactor-I/Boiling Water Reactor Experiment Area and Miscellaneous Sites, which requires a Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan for the then Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory). This document, first issued in June 2004, fulfilled that requirement. The revision is needed to provide an update as remedial actions are completed and new areas of concern are found. This Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan is based on guidance in the May 3, 1999, EPA Region 10 Final Policy on the Use of Institutional Controls at Federal Facilities; the September 29, 2000, EPA guidance Institutional Controls: A Site Manager's Guide to Identifying, Evaluating, and Selecting Institutional Controls at Superfund and RCRA Corrective Action Cleanups; and the April 9, 2003, DOE Policy 454.1, "Use of Institutional Controls." These policies establish measures that ensure short- and long-term effectiveness of institutional controls that protect human health and the environment at federal facility sites undergoing remedial action pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and/or corrective action pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The site-specific institutional controls currently in place at the Idaho National Laboratory are documented in this Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan. This plan is being updated, along with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Comprehensive Facilities and Land Use Plan, to reflect the progress of remedial activities and changes in CERCLA sites.

  16. A practical receding horizon control framework for path planning and control of autonomous vtol vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Chen, W.-H.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes an integrated path planning and tracking control framework for autonomous vertical-take-off-and-landing (VTOL) vehicles, particularly quadrotors. The path planning adopts a receding horizon strategy to repeatedly plan a local trajectory that satisfies both the vehicle dynamics and obstacle-free requirement. A tracking controller is then designed to track the planned path. The differential flatness property of the quadrotor is exploited in both path planner and tracking controller designs. The proposed framework is verified by real-time simulations incorporating online optimization.

  17. Control plan as a part of quality assurance plan on the constructing site

    OpenAIRE

    Hribar, Janez

    2005-01-01

    This bachelor thesis presents us problems we run into when assuring quality and controlling quality of the working performance on the constructing site. The thesis consists of five parts of one thematic integrity. Throughtout the thesis one gets to know to general facts about the quality control and the quality itself, and also to the planning of the controlling and inspecting on the constructing site. At the beginning there is a presentation of the purpose and aims that lead me when writing ...

  18. Hybrid control and motion planning of dynamical legged locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    "This book provides a comprehensive presentation of issues and challenges faced by researchers and practicing engineers in motion planning and hybrid control of dynamical legged locomotion. The major features range from offline and online motion planning algorithms to generate desired feasible periodic walking and running motions and tow-level control schemes, including within-stride feedback laws, continuous time update laws and event-based update laws, to asymptotically stabilize the generated desired periodic orbits. This book describes the current state of the art and future directions across all domains of dynamical legged locomotion so that readers can extend proposed motion planning algorithms and control methodologies to other types of planar and 3D legged robots".

  19. Predictive control of redundant parallel robots and trajectory planning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Belda, Květoslav; Böhm, Josef

    Chemnitz: IWU, 2006 - (Neugebauer, R.), s. 497-513 ISBN 3-937524-40-1. [Chemnitz Parallel Kinematics Seminar /5./. Chemnitz (DE), 25.04.2006-26.04.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP102/06/P275; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0271 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : predictive control * redundant parallel robot s * trajectory planning Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/historie/belda-0032166.pdf

  20. The effect of photon energy on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Wonmo; Park, Jong Min; Choi, Chang Heon; Ha, Sung Whan; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of common three photon energies (6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans to treat prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with prostate cancer treated locally to 81.0 Gy were retrospectively studied. 6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV IMRT plans for each patient were generated using suitable planning objectives, dose constraints, and 8-field setting. The plans were analyzed in terms of dose-volume histogram for t...

  1. Exploration on Detailed Control Planning Under Urban-Rural Planning Law:A Case Study on Wuhan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the planning practice in Wuhan after the Urban-Rural Planning Law was implemented in 2008,this paper reviews the evolution of detailed control planning in China,and addresses its main problems and conflicts.The innovation of the hierarchical planning and administration system is discussed,and the administrative measures for the transition period in which the detailed control plans have not yet been made for all the urban areas is proposed.

  2. Report of a study on IMRT planning strategies for ethmoid sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: This communication reviews the planning strategies and dose statistics of nine IMRT plans generated for a complex head and neck case. Patient and method: An ethmoid sinus cancer case was sent as an IMRT planning task to all participants of the ESTRO course on 'IMRT and Other Conformal Techniques in Practice', held in Amsterdam in June 2001. Results: Nine IMRT plans were generated for the case, the majority of the plans generated with commercial planning systems. The number of beam incidences ranged between four and eleven, while five of the nine beam setups were coplanar. The planning target volume dose homogeneity was inversely correlated with the degree of sparing of the surrounding organs at risk. Conclusion: IMRT strategies for complex head and neck cases, such as ethmoid sinus cancer, can be striklingly different in various aspects, such as beam setup, total number of segments, PTV dose coverage and dose statistics for organs at risks. (orig.)

  3. PET/CT planning during chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for field modification during radiotherapy in esophageal cancer. We conducted a retrospective study on 33 patients that underwent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Pathologic findings were squamous cell carcinoma in 32 patients and adenocarcinoma in 1 patient. All patients underwent PET/CT scans before and during CRT (after receiving 40 Gy and before a 20 Gy boost dose). Response evaluation was determined by PET/CT using metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total glycolytic activity (TGA), MTV ratio (rMTV) and TGA ratio (rTGA), or determined by CT. rMTV and rTGA were reduction ratio of MTV and TGA between before and during CRT, respectively. Significant decreases in MTV (MTV2.5: mean 70.09%, p 2.5: mean 79.08%, p2.5 was 0.299 (range, 0 to 0.98) and median rTGA2.5 was 0.209 (range, 0 to 0.92). During CRT, PET/CT detected newly developed distant metastasis in 1 patient, and this resulted in a treatment strategy change. At a median 4 months (range, 0 to 12 months) after completion of CRT, 8 patients (24.2%) achieved clinically complete response, 11 (33.3%) partial response, 5 (15.2%) stable disease, and 9 (27.3%) disease progression. SUVmax (p = 0.029), rMTV50% (p = 0.016), rMTV75% (p = 0.023) on intra-treatment PET were found to correlate with complete clinical response. PET/CT during CRT can provide additional information useful for radiotherapy planning and offer the potential for tumor response evaluation during CRT. rMTV50% during CRT was found to be a useful predictor of clinical response.

  4. Acceptance test plan for the Waste Information Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, D.F.

    1994-09-14

    This document describes the acceptance test plan for the WICS system. The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Hazardous Material Control Group (HMC) of the 222-S Laboratory has requested the development of a system to help resolve many of the difficulties associated with tracking and data collection of containers and drums of waste. This system has been identified as Waste Information and Control System (WICS). The request for developing and implementing WICS has been made to the Automation and Simulation Engineering Group (ASE).

  5. Management Planning and Control: Supporting Knowledge-Intensive Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herremans, Irene M.; Isaac, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop propositions for empirical validation regarding appropriate management planning and control systems (MPACS) in knowledge-intensive organizations. Design/methodology/approach: The propositions were developed from interviews with members of a knowledge-intensive virtual organization that is known for…

  6. Environmental Control Plan for the Industrial Hygiene Field Services Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This environmental control plan is for the Hanford Site's Industrial Hygiene Field Services Facility, located in the 100-N Area. This facility is used for the maintenance and storage of respirators, respiratory equipment and testing, calibration and testing of industrial hygiene equipment, and asbestos fiber counting

  7. Animal Control Plan for Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge - 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — For the purposes of this control plan, the term feral hog shall be used to refer to both domestic pigs which are now free living and not under the ownership of...

  8. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Cervical Cancer Screening among Latinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncancio, Angelica M.; Ward, Kristy K.; Sanchez, Ingrid A.; Cano, Miguel A.; Byrd, Theresa L.; Vernon, Sally W.; Fernandez-Esquer, Maria Eugenia; Fernandez, Maria E.

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the high incidence of cervical cancer among Latinas in the United States it is important to understand factors that predict screening behavior. The aim of this study was to test the utility of theory of planned behavior in predicting cervical cancer screening among a group of Latinas. A sample of Latinas (N = 614) completed a baseline…

  9. SU-E-J-193: Feasibility of MRI-Only Based IMRT Planning for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, P; Botros, M; Chen, X; Paulson, E; Erickson, B; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: With the increasing use of MRI simulation and the advent of MRI-guided delivery, it is desirable to use MRI only for treatment planning. In this study, we assess the dosimetric difference between MRI- and CTbased IMRT planning for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Planning CTs and MRIs acquired for a representative pancreatic cancer patient were used. MRI-based planning utilized forced relative electron density (rED) assignment of organ specific values from IRCU report 46, where rED = 1.029 for PTV and a rED = 1.036 for non-specified tissue (NST). Six IMRT plans were generated with clinical dose-volume (DV) constraints using a research Monaco planning system employing Monte Carlo dose calculation with optional perpendicular magnetic field (MF) of 1.5T. The following five plans were generated and compared with the planning CT: 1.) CT plan with MF and dose recalculation without optimization; 2.) MRI (T2) plan with target and OARs redrawn based on MRI, forced rED, no MF, and recalculation without optimization; 3.) Similar as in 2 but with MF; 4.) MRI plan with MF but without optimization; and 5.) Similar as in 4 but with optimization. Results: Generally, noticeable differences in PTV point doses and DV parameters (DVPs) between the CT-and MRI-based plans with and without the MF were observed. These differences between the optimized plans were generally small, mostly within 2%. Larger differences were observed in point doses and mean doses for certain OARs between the CT and MRI plan, mostly due to differences between image acquisition times. Conclusion: MRI only based IMRT planning for pancreatic cancer is feasible. The differences observed between the optimized CT and MRI plans with or without the MF were practically negligible if excluding the differences between MRI and CT defined structures.

  10. Risk factors for ovarian cancer: a case-control study.

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, M.; Beral, V; SMITH, P.

    1989-01-01

    A hospital-based case-control study of ovarian cancer was conducted in London and Oxford between October 1978 and February 1983. Menstrual characteristics, reproductive and contraceptive history and history of exposure to various environmental factors were compared between 235 women with histologically diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer and 451 controls. High gravidity, hysterectomy, female sterilisation and oral contraceptive use were associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Infert...

  11. NCI Approves Funding Plan for NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    On June 24, 2014, the Scientific Program Leaders (SPL) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) approved the funding plan for the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP will conduct multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States. The program will receive $93 million a year for five years. |

  12. Control in gazelle organizations : Research on management systems, enterprise resource planning systems and strategic planning

    OpenAIRE

    Rosengren, Alexandra; Standoft, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background - Not all companies choose or are able to grow, especially not in an unstable economic climate. However, fast growing organizations (gazelles) have managed to grow with a significant pace. As researchers claim control to be one factor in developing an organization, this lead the authors to question whether these gazelle organizations perceive control systems to contribute to their rapid growth. Purpose - The authors wish to investigate whether strategic planning, enterpris...

  13. CANCER CONTROL AND POPULATION SCIENCES FAST STATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast Stats links to tables, charts, and graphs of cancer statistics for all major cancer sites by age, sex, race, and geographic area. The statistics include incidence, mortality, prevalence, and the probability of developing or dying from cancer. A large set of statistics is ava...

  14. Plan for pollution control in the Kiiminkijoki river system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general plan for pollution control in the River Kiiminkijoki includes descriptions of the system and its use for various purposes and an examination of the activities which cause changes in it. General objectives for the use, condition and protection of various parts of the water system are presented in the chapters dealing with the actual planning work. The final chapter includes recommendations for measures to achieve the objectives set, and means and methods for their implementation. Account was taken of the requirements imposed upon the condition of the water system by plans drawn up in the area aimed at promoting its use in the context of a natural economy. Previous reports and investigations carried out for the planning purposes have dealt with trends in water quality and factors affecting it, the condition of the rivers and lakes and the trout and grayling brooks, assessment of the proportions and the significance of the sources of loading in the water system by means of an application of the water quality model, the effects of peat production and lowered lake surfaces. Data from a number of earlier investigations were also available in the planning work. The recommendations also take account of the aims presented in the government statement on 'Objectives of water pollution control up to 1995', as applied to this region

  15. IMRT treatment plans and functional planning with functional lung imaging from 4D-CT for thoracic cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, the inhomogeneity of the pulmonary function is not considered when treatment plans are generated in thoracic cancer radiotherapy. This study evaluates the dose of treatment plans on highly-functional volumes and performs functional treatment planning by incorporation of ventilation data from 4D-CT. Eleven patients were included in this retrospective study. Ventilation was calculated using 4D-CT. Two treatment plans were generated for each case, the first one without the incorporation of the ventilation and the second with it. The dose of the first plans was overlapped with the ventilation and analyzed. Highly-functional regions were avoided in the second treatment plans. For small targets in the first plans (PTV < 400 cc, 6 cases), all V5, V20 and the mean lung dose values for the highly-functional regions were lower than that of the total lung. For large targets, two out of five cases had higher V5 and V20 values for the highly-functional regions. All the second plans were within constraints. Radiation treatments affect functional lung more seriously in large tumor cases. With compromise of dose to other critical organs, functional treatment planning to reduce dose in highly-functional lung volumes can be achieved

  16. Endometrial cancer following treatment for breast cancer: a case-control study in Denmark.

    OpenAIRE

    Ewertz, M.; S.G. Machado; Boice, J. D.; Jensen, O M

    1984-01-01

    To evaluate the risk of endometrial cancer subsequent to breast cancer, a case-control study was carried out in Denmark. Between 1943-1977, 115 cases of histologically confirmed endometrial carcinoma developed more than 3 months after the diagnosis of a primary breast cancer in 51,638 women. A total of 235 breast cancer patients with no second primary cancer were matched to the cases on age, calendar year of diagnosis, and survival with an intact uterus. Identification of cases and controls r...

  17. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino J. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Li, Yupeng [Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment.

  18. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhua Cao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment.

  19. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment

  20. Automated generation of IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses: Comparison of different planning strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voet, Peter W. J.; Dirkx, Maarten L. P.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J. M. [Erasmus MC - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To compare IMRT planning strategies for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses.Methods: All plans were generated fully automatically (i.e., no human trial-and-error interactions) using iCycle, the authors' in-house developed algorithm for multicriterial selection of beam angles and optimization of fluence profiles, allowing objective comparison of planning strategies. For 18 prostate cancer patients (eight with bilateral hip prostheses, ten with a right-sided unilateral prosthesis), two planning strategies were evaluated: (i) full exclusion of beams containing beamlets that would deliver dose to the target after passing a prosthesis (IMRT{sub remove}) and (ii) exclusion of those beamlets only (IMRT{sub cut}). Plans with optimized coplanar and noncoplanar beam arrangements were generated. Differences in PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) were quantified. The impact of beam number on plan quality was evaluated.Results: Especially for patients with bilateral hip prostheses, IMRT{sub cut} significantly improved rectum and bladder sparing compared to IMRT{sub remove}. For 9-beam coplanar plans, rectum V{sub 60Gy} reduced by 17.5%{+-} 15.0% (maximum 37.4%, p= 0.036) and rectum D{sub mean} by 9.4%{+-} 7.8% (maximum 19.8%, p= 0.036). Further improvements in OAR sparing were achievable by using noncoplanar beam setups, reducing rectum V{sub 60Gy} by another 4.6%{+-} 4.9% (p= 0.012) for noncoplanar 9-beam IMRT{sub cut} plans. Large reductions in rectum dose delivery were also observed when increasing the number of beam directions in the plans. For bilateral implants, the rectum V{sub 60Gy} was 37.3%{+-} 12.1% for coplanar 7-beam plans and reduced on average by 13.5% (maximum 30.1%, p= 0.012) for 15 directions.Conclusions: iCycle was able to automatically generate high quality plans for prostate cancer patients with prostheses. Excluding only beamlets that passed through the prostheses (IMRT{sub cut} strategy) significantly improved

  1. On feasibility of regional frequency-based emergency control plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevrani, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj, P.O. Box 416 (Iran); Ledwich, G.; Ford, J.J. [School of Engineering Systems, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld 4001 (Australia); Dong, Z.Y. [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (China)

    2009-07-15

    Decentralized and regional load-frequency control of power systems operating in normal and near-normal conditions has been well studied; and several analysis/synthesis approaches have been developed during the last few decades. However in contingency and off-normal conditions, the existing emergency control plans, such as under-frequency load shedding, are usually applied in a centralized structure using a different analysis model. This paper discusses the feasibility of using frequency-based emergency control schemes based on tie-line measurements and local information available within a control area. The conventional load-frequency control model is generalized by considering the dynamics of emergency control/protection schemes and an analytic approach to analyze the regional frequency response under normal and emergency conditions is presented. (author)

  2. Inverse Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: 4-Year Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Lee-May [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Littell, Ramey [Gynecologic Oncology, The Permanente Medical Group, San Francisco, California (United States); Cunha, J. Adam M.; Sethi, Rajni A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chan, John K. [Gynecologic Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I-Chow, E-mail: ichow.hsu@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of image guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 2003 through September 2009, 111 patients with primary cervical cancer were treated definitively with IPSA-planned HDRB boost (28 Gy in 4 fractions) after external radiation at our institution. We performed a retrospective review of our experience using image guided brachytherapy. Of the patients, 70% had a tumor size >4 cm, 38% had regional nodal disease, and 15% had clinically evident distant metastasis, including nonregional nodal disease, at the time of diagnosis. Surgical staging involving pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 15% of patients, and 93% received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Toxicities are reported according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 guidelines. Results: With a median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 3-84 months), no acute or late toxicities of grade 4 or higher were observed, and grade 3 toxicities (both acute and late) developed in 8 patients (1 constitutional, 1 hematologic, 2 genitourinary, 4 gastrointestinal). The 4-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of late grade 3 toxicity was 8%. Local recurrence developed in 5 patients (4 to 9 months after HDRB), regional recurrence in 3 (6, 16, and 72 months after HDRB), and locoregional recurrence in 1 (4 months after HDR boost). The 4-year estimates of local, locoregional, and distant control of disease were 94.0%, 91.9%, and 69.1%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 4 years were 64.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] of 54%-73%) and 61.0% (95% CI, 51%-70%), respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDRB boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease. However, overall

  3. Impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections in stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Herman Tania De; Gabrish Heather; Herman Terence; Vlachaki Maria; Ahmad Salahuddin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections on dosimetry of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Four-dimensional computed tomography data from 15 low stage non-small cell lung cancer patients was used. Treatment planning and dose calculations were done using pencil beam convolution algorithm of Varian Eclipse system with Modified Batho Power Law for tissue heterogeneity. Patient plans were generated with 6 MV co-planar non-opposing four to six...

  4. Prostate Cancer Disparities throughout the Cancer Control Continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle J. Dalton

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimates that 238,590 U.S. men will develop PCa and 29,720 men will die from the disease in 2013. PCa exhibits the most profound racial disparities of all cancers with African American men having a 70% higher incidence rate and more than two times higher mortality rate than Caucasian men. Published research on PCa disparities focuses on singular outcomes such as incidence, mortality or quality of life. The objective of this paper is to provide a comprehensive summary of the racial disparities found at each stage of the PCa Care Continuum which includes prevention, detection, treatments, and outcomes and survival. It focuses primarily on disparities among Caucasian (white and African American men.

  5. Mitotic Control of Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Venere, Monica; Miller, Tyler E.; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are self-renewing, tumorigenic cells at the apex of tumor hierarchies, and postulated to be quiescent in many tumor types. This issue of Cancer Discovery highlights a study that links the presentation of kinetochores within mitosis to an essential requirement for BUB1B/BubR1, broadening our understanding of the cell-cycle machinery in cancer stem cells.

  6. Program planning for large-scale control system upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce Power has been planning to replace the Bruce A Fuel Handling (FH) computer systems including the Controller and Protective computers for many years. This is a complex project, requiring an extended FH outage. To minimize operational disruption and fully identify associated project risks, Bruce Power is executing the project in phases starting with the Protective Computer replacement. GEH-C is collaborating with Bruce Power in a Preliminary Engineering (PE) phase to generate a project plan including specifications, budgetary cost, schedule, risks for the Protective computer replacement project. To assist Bruce Power in its evaluation, GEH-C's is using 6-Sigma methodologies to identify and rank Critical to Quality (CTQ) requirements in collaboration with Bruce Power Maintenance, Operations, Plant Design and FH Engineering teams. PE phase established the project scope, hardware and software specifications, material requirements and finally concluded with a recommended hardware platform and approved controls architecture.

  7. Local implementation of cancer control activities in rural Appalachia, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Bruce; Mabe, Karen Harrell; Dorgan, Kelly A; Hutson, Sadie P

    2009-01-01

    Underserved communities with high cancer rates often are not involved in implementing state cancer control activities locally. An East Tennessee State University research team formed 2 Appalachian Community Cancer Research Review Work Groups, 1 in northeast Tennessee and 1 in southwest Virginia. During 4 sessions, the research team presented regional cancer data to the work groups. Work group participants explored research from a lay perspective and identified possible reasons for cancer disparities in central Appalachia. The fifth session was a community dissemination activity in which work group participants engaged in cancer education and action by presenting the research to their local communities in unique ways. During a sixth session, both work groups discussed these interventions and further attempted to answer the question, "What makes the experience of cancer unique in Appalachia?" This article describes the key steps of this community-based participatory research process. PMID:19080040

  8. 242-A Campaign 99-1 process control plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LE, E.Q.

    1999-08-25

    242-A Evaporator 99-1 will process approximately one million gallons of waste from tank 102-AW in June 1999. The process control Plan provides a general description of activities, which will occur during 242-A Evaporator Campaign 99-1 and to document analyses conducted to demonstrate that 102-AW waste is acceptable for processing. Predict is a registered trademark of Risk Decisions England Corporation, United Kingdom.

  9. Process control plan for 242-A Campaign 99-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    242-A Evaporator 99-1 will process approximately one million gallons of waste from tank 102-AW in June 1999. The process control Plan provides a general description of activities, which will occur during 242-A Evaporator Campaign 99-1 and to document analyses conducted to demonstrate that 102-AW waste is acceptable for processing. Predict is a registered trademark of Risk Decisions England Corporation, United Kingdom

  10. TARGET COST – TOOL FOR PLANNING, MANAGING AND CONTROLLING COSTS

    OpenAIRE

    Emilia VASILE; Croitoru, Ion

    2013-01-01

    The target costing method involves implementing a homogeneous set of tools on cost planning, cost management and cost control. This method aims to reduce costs by knowing the different stages of a product cycle, analyzing the costs of each phase and improving the technologies and manufacturing processes. The managers of economic organizations are using the target costing method to determine with certainty the limit cost of their new products and to set a target price of the product in order t...

  11. Comparison of forward planning with automated inverse planning for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer without IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Ruheena; Lavrenkov, Konstantin; Bedford, James L; Henrys, Anthony; Ashley, Sue; Brada, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The forward and inverse treatment plans of 10 patients with lung cancer were compared in terms of PTV coverage, sparing of normal lung and time required to generate a plan. The inverse planning produced as good treatment plans as an experienced dosimetrist with considerable reduction in staff time. When translated to other complex sites, inverse non-IMRT planning may have considerable impact on manpower requirements. PMID:16564591

  12. Comparison of forward planning with automated inverse planning for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer without IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The forward and inverse treatment plans of 10 patients with lung cancer were compared in terms of PTV coverage, sparing of normal lung and time required to generate a plan. The inverse planning produced as good treatment plans as an experienced dosimetrist with considerable reduction in staff time. When translated to other complex sites, inverse non-IMRT planning may have considerable impact on manpower requirements

  13. Forward versus inverse planning in oropharyngeal cancer: A comparative study using physical and biological indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Sundaram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Possible benefits of inverse planning. Aims: To analyze possible benefits of inverse planning intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT over field-in-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (FIF-3DCRT and to evaluate the differences if any, between low (6 Million Volts and high energy (15 Million Volts IMRT plans. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oropharynx, previously treated with 6 MV step and shoot IMRT were studied. V 100 , V 33 , V 66 , mean dose and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP were evaluated for parotid glands. Maximum dose and NTCP were the parameters for spinal cord. Statistical Analysis Used: A two-tailed t-test was applied to analyze statistical significance between the different techniques. Results: For combined parotid gland, a reduction of 4.374 Gy, 9.343 Gy and 7.883 Gy were achieved for D 100 , D 66 and D 33 , respectively in 6 MV-IMRT when compared with FIF-3DCRT. Spinal cord sparing was better in 6 MV-IMRT (40.963 ± 2.650, with an average reduction of maximum spinal cord dose by 7.355 Gy from that using the FIF-3DCRT technique. The uncomplicated tumor control probabilities values were higher in IMRT plans thus leading to a possibility of dose escalation. Conclusions: Though low-energy IMRT is the preferred choice for treatment of oropharyngeal cancers, FIF-3DCRT must be given due consideration as a second choice for its well established advantages over traditional conventioan technique.

  14. Thrombosis in ovarian cancer: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Metcalf, R L; Fry, D J; Swindell, R.; McGurk, A; Clamp, A R; Jayson, G C; Hasan, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Thrombotic events are common in cancer patients and have been associated with an adverse prognosis in large registry-based studies. Methods: A retrospective cohort of 417 patients with ovarian cancer treated at a tertiary cancer centre between 2006 and 2009 was studied to identify the incidence and risk factors for thrombotic events and the prognostic impact of thrombosis. Patient outcomes were evaluated against a matched control group without thrombosis. Results: Ninety-nine thro...

  15. Distributed Planning and Control for Teams of Cooperating Mobile Robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, L.E.

    2004-06-15

    This CRADA project involved the cooperative research of investigators in ORNL's Center for Engineering Science Advanced Research (CESAR) with researchers at Caterpillar, Inc. The subject of the research was the development of cooperative control strategies for autonomous vehicles performing applications of interest to Caterpillar customers. The project involved three Phases of research, conducted over the time period of November 1998 through December 2001. This project led to the successful development of several technologies and demonstrations in realistic simulation that illustrated the effectiveness of the control approaches for distributed planning and cooperation in multi-robot teams.

  16. Construction CAE; Integration of CAD, simulation, planning and cost control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickard, D.A. (Bechtel Power Corp., Los Angeles, CA (USA)); Bill, R.D.; Gates, K.H.; Yoshinaga, T.; Ohcoshi, S. (Nuclear Engineering and Construction Dept., Hitachi Works, Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi (JP))

    1989-01-01

    Construction CAE is a simulation, planning, scheduling, and cost control tool that is integrated with a computer aided design (CAD) system. The system uses a CAD model and allows the user to perform construction simulation on objects defined within the model. Initial cost/schedule reports as well as those required for project chronicling are supported through an interface to a work breakdown structure (WBS) and a client's existing schedule reporting system. By integrating currently available project control tools with a simulation system, Construction CAE is more effective than its individual components.

  17. Chemical Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Plan: 100 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Chemical Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan is to identify the chemical spill control practices, procedures, and containment devices Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) employs to prevent a reportable quantity (RQ) of a hazardous substance (as defined in 40 CFR Part 302) from being released to the environment. The chemical systems and chemical storage facilities in the 100 Areas are described. This document traces the ultimate fate of accidental chemical spills at the 100 Areas. Also included in the document destinations, spill containment devices, and systems surveillance frequencies. 2 tabs

  18. My Cancer Care Plan as a Web-Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Bodil; Cornelius, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    The Swedish National Cancerplan states that patients should be offered an Individual Care Plan (ICP) for the treatment and survivorship care and rehabilitation planning. As there is no web-solution for ICP available, the project aim is to develop a non-commercial web-solution based on communication between the contact nurse and the patient. PMID:27332410

  19. Human interface, automatic planning, and control of a humanoid robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Y.K. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kang, S.C.; Lee, S.; Cho, K.R.; Kim, H.S.; Lee, C.W. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, S.M. [Jeonju Technical Coll. (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-11-01

    This paper presents an integrated robotic system consisting of human interfaces, motion- and grasp-planning algorithms, a controller, a graphical simulator, and a humanoid robot with over 60 joints. All of these subsystems are integrated in a coordinated fashion to enable the robot to perform a commanded task with as much autonomy as possible. The highest level of the system is the human interfaces, which enable a user to specify tasks conveniently and efficiently. At the mid-level, several planning algorithms generate motions of the robot body, arms, and hands automatically. At the lowest level, the motor controllers are equipped with both a position controller and a compliant motion controller to execute gross motions and contact motions, respectively. The main contributions of the work are the large-scale integration and the development of the motion planners for a humanoid robot. A hierarchical integration scheme that preserves the modularities of the human interfaces, the motion planners, and the controller has been the key for the successful integration. The set of motion planners is developed systematically so as to coordinate the motions of the body, arms, and hands to perform a large variety of tasks.

  20. Promoting cancer control training in resource limited environments: Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwogu, C; Mahoney, M; George, S; Dy, G; Hartman, H; Animashaun, M; Popoola, A; Michalek, A

    2014-03-01

    In resource limited nations, cancer control is often a lower priority issue creating challenges for the prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. Training and education are vital components of efforts to tackle this problem. A 3-day cancer control workshop was conducted at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Nigeria, in 2013. The curriculum included didactic lectures, panel discussions, and interactive sessions on local cancer statistics, preventive strategies, cancer registries, screening and diagnostic options, and treatment approaches with limited resources (chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, and palliative care) and several site-specific (breast, lung, cervical, prostate, and colon) topics. Pre-workshop and post-workshop questionnaires were completed by participants. Eighty-six percent of the 50 workshop participants completed at least one questionnaire. Participants were mainly nurses and physicians (89% of responders), and 40% reported >25 years of practice experience. The more common local needs identified were professional education (65%) and increasing public cancer awareness (63%). The greatest interest for future programs was on research collaborations (70%). An immediate impact of the workshop was the commencement of monthly tumor board conferences and a review of the current cancer registry data. Capacity building is critical for the execution of effective cancer control strategies. Conducting collaborative workshops represents a cost-effective means of launching programs and energizing the medical community to pursue ongoing education and research addressing the anticipated cancer epidemic on the African continent. PMID:24243400

  1. The ITER safety control systems-Status and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of a complex experimental machine like ITER will involve a number of potential hazards to personnel, the environment, and to the machine itself. While some protections are usually embedded within the overall control system, when it comes to the protection of people, the environment or the safe operation of the machine, dedicated systems are required. At ITER, the safety control systems are dedicated to the protection of people and the environment. These systems represents one of the three independent tiers on which the ITER Instrumentation and Control is based. They have to respect stringent requirements in terms of reliability, availability, safety and maintainability for operation, security and national and/or international safety regulations. This paper describes the current status and plans of the safety control systems, the functions to be performed, the envisaged architecture and the main design options including the principles of separation and independence between the three tiers.

  2. Human movement data for malaria control and elimination strategic planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindolia, Deepa K; Garcia, Andres J; Wesolowski, Amy; Smith, David L; Buckee, Caroline O; Noor, Abdisalan M; Snow, Robert W; Tatem, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Recent increases in funding for malaria control have led to the reduction in transmission in many malaria endemic countries, prompting the national control programmes of 36 malaria endemic countries to set elimination targets. Accounting for human population movement (HPM) in planning for control, elimination and post-elimination surveillance is important, as evidenced by previous elimination attempts that were undermined by the reintroduction of malaria through HPM. Strategic control and elimination planning, therefore, requires quantitative information on HPM patterns and the translation of these into parasite dispersion. HPM patterns and the risk of malaria vary substantially across spatial and temporal scales, demographic and socioeconomic sub-groups, and motivation for travel, so multiple data sets are likely required for quantification of movement. While existing studies based on mobile phone call record data combined with malaria transmission maps have begun to address within-country HPM patterns, other aspects remain poorly quantified despite their importance in accurately gauging malaria movement patterns and building control and detection strategies, such as cross-border HPM, demographic and socioeconomic stratification of HPM patterns, forms of transport, personal malaria protection and other factors that modify malaria risk. A wealth of data exist to aid filling these gaps, which, when combined with spatial data on transport infrastructure, traffic and malaria transmission, can answer relevant questions to guide strategic planning. This review aims to (i) discuss relevant types of HPM across spatial and temporal scales, (ii) document where datasets exist to quantify HPM, (iii) highlight where data gaps remain and (iv) briefly put forward methods for integrating these datasets in a Geographic Information System (GIS) framework for analysing and modelling human population and Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection movements. PMID:22703541

  3. Human movement data for malaria control and elimination strategic planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pindolia Deepa K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent increases in funding for malaria control have led to the reduction in transmission in many malaria endemic countries, prompting the national control programmes of 36 malaria endemic countries to set elimination targets. Accounting for human population movement (HPM in planning for control, elimination and post-elimination surveillance is important, as evidenced by previous elimination attempts that were undermined by the reintroduction of malaria through HPM. Strategic control and elimination planning, therefore, requires quantitative information on HPM patterns and the translation of these into parasite dispersion. HPM patterns and the risk of malaria vary substantially across spatial and temporal scales, demographic and socioeconomic sub-groups, and motivation for travel, so multiple data sets are likely required for quantification of movement. While existing studies based on mobile phone call record data combined with malaria transmission maps have begun to address within-country HPM patterns, other aspects remain poorly quantified despite their importance in accurately gauging malaria movement patterns and building control and detection strategies, such as cross-border HPM, demographic and socioeconomic stratification of HPM patterns, forms of transport, personal malaria protection and other factors that modify malaria risk. A wealth of data exist to aid filling these gaps, which, when combined with spatial data on transport infrastructure, traffic and malaria transmission, can answer relevant questions to guide strategic planning. This review aims to (i discuss relevant types of HPM across spatial and temporal scales, (ii document where datasets exist to quantify HPM, (iii highlight where data gaps remain and (iv briefly put forward methods for integrating these datasets in a Geographic Information System (GIS framework for analysing and modelling human population and Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection movements.

  4. Experience on IMRT treatment for prostate cancer. Planning, dosimetry and quality assurance; Experiencia en el tratamiento de IMRT en cancer de prostata. Planificacion, dosimetria y garantia de calidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Garcia Vicente, F.; Fernandez Bedoya, V.; Zapatero Laborda, A.; Fernandez, I.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Perez Gonzalez, L.; Torres Escobar, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    In this study a revision concerning the treatment of prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is performed. Planning and verification of treatments involving dose calculations and image positioning are considered. A set of 110 patients is analysed concerning dosimetry and 92 considering image verification. Dose calculation is verified both experimentally and by means of a monitor unit (MU) calculation system. Positioning control of the prostate is achieved using intraprostatic fiducial markers and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) as well as a home-made software. All patients studied were consistent with the specifications of the treatment protocol regarding dose prescription in planning target volume (PTV), organ at risk (OAR) dose limitations, dosimetric quality assurance and positioning control. The procedure includes a learning curve considering every aspect of the treatment. The MU calculation system itself has been proved as an effective and functional tool for treatment verification. (Author) 12 refs.

  5. Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality

  6. Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Enzhuo M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xia Tingyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beijing 301 Hospital, Beijing (China); Yuan Zhiyong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Tianjin (China); Liu Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan University Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program A Reference Plan for Control Room Modernization: Planning and Analysis Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques Hugo; Ronald Boring; Lew Hanes; Kenneth Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is collaborating with a U.S. nuclear utility to bring about a systematic fleet-wide control room modernization. To facilitate this upgrade, a new distributed control system (DCS) is being introduced into the control rooms of these plants. The DCS will upgrade the legacy plant process computer and emergency response facility information system. In addition, the DCS will replace an existing analog turbine control system with a display-based system. With technology upgrades comes the opportunity to improve the overall human-system interaction between the operators and the control room. To optimize operator performance, the LWRS Control Room Modernization research team followed a human-centered approach published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-0711, Rev. 3, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (O’Hara et al., 2012), prescribes four phases for human factors engineering. This report provides examples of the first phase, Planning and Analysis. The three elements of Planning and Analysis in NUREG-0711 that are most crucial to initiating control room upgrades are: • Operating Experience Review: Identifies opportunities for improvement in the existing system and provides lessons learned from implemented systems. • Function Analysis and Allocation: Identifies which functions at the plant may be optimally handled by the DCS vs. the operators. • Task Analysis: Identifies how tasks might be optimized for the operators. Each of these elements is covered in a separate chapter. Examples are drawn from workshops with reactor operators that were conducted at the LWRS Human System Simulation Laboratory HSSL and at the respective plants. The findings in this report represent generalized accounts of more detailed proprietary reports produced for the utility for each plant. The goal of this LWRS report is to disseminate the technique and provide examples sufficient to

  8. Circadian clock manipulation for cancer prevention and control and the relief of cancer symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrushesky, William J M; Grutsch, James; Wood, Patricia; Yang, Xiaoming; Oh, Eun-Young; Ansell, Christine; Kidder, Stephanie; Ferrans, Carol; Quiton, Dinah Faith T; Reynolds, Justin; Du-Quiton, Jovelyn; Levin, Robert; Lis, Christopher; Braun, Donald

    2009-12-01

    Life has evolved on this planet with regular daily spans of direct solar energy availability alternating with nocturnal spans of dark. Virtually every earth-borne life form has factored this circadian pattern into its biology to ensure the temporal coordination with its resonating environment, a task essential for its individual survival and that of its species. The first whole genome inspections of mutations in human colon and breast cancer have observed specific retained clock gene mutations. Single nucleotide polymorphisms within the genes of clock, clock-controlled, and melatonin pathways have been found to confer excess cancer risk or protection from cancer. Experimental studies have shown that specific core clock genes (Per2 and Per1) are tumor suppressors because their genetic absence doubles tumor numbers, and decreasing their expression in cancer cells doubles cancer growth rate, whereas their overexpression decreases cancer growth rate and diminishes tumor numbers. Experimental interference with circadian clock function increases cancer growth rate, and clinical circadian disruption is associated with higher cancer incidence, faster cancer progression, and shorter cancer patient survival. Patients with advanced lung cancer suffering greater circadian activity/sleep cycle disruption suffer greater interference with function, greater anxiety and depression, poorer nighttime sleep, greater daytime fatigue, and poorer quality of life than comparable patients who maintain good circadian integration. We must now determine whether strategies known to help synchronize the circadian clocks of normal individuals can do so in advanced cancer patients and whether doing so allows cancer patients to feel better and/or live longer. Several academic laboratories and at least 2 large pharmaceutical firms are screening for small molecules targeting the circadian clock to stabilize its phase and enhance its amplitude and thereby consolidate and coordinate circadian

  9. The effect of photon energy on the intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan for prostate cancer: a planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, In-Ah [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Woo [Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Woong; Suh, Tae-Suk [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    In this study, the effect of the beam energy on the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan for prostate cancer was studied for competing IMRT plans optimized for delivery with either 6- or 15-MV photons. This retrospective planning study included 10 patients treated for localized prostate cancer at the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. A dose of 66 Gy was prescribed in 33 daily fractions of 2 Gy. For inverse IMRT treatment planning, we used a 7-coplanar non-opposed beam arrangement at 0, 50, 100, 150, 210, 260, and 310 degree angles. To ensure that differences among the plans were due only to energy selection, the beam arrangement, number of beam, and dose constraints were kept constant for all plans. The dose volume histograms (DVHs) for the 6- and 15-MV plans were compared for the planning target volume (PTV) and for organs at risk (OAR), such as the rectum, bladder and both femoral heads. The conformal index was defined as the ratio of the 95% isodose volume divided by the PTV volume enclosed by the 95% isodose line, because we selected the 95% isodose line as our reference. Doses received by the 95% and 5% volume of the PTV were less than or equal to 1% for 6-MV compared to the 15-MV IMRT plan for 10 patients. Percentage of doses received by the 10% volume of the bladder and rectum were less than or equal to 1%. Percentage of doses received by the 30 and 50% volume of bladder and rectum were 1 {approx} 2% higher for 6-MV photons. Also, percentage of dose received by the 10% and 50% volume of the right and the left femur heads were 4 {approx} 5% higher for 6-MV photons. The mean homogeneity index for the 6-MV and 15-MV photon plans was 1.06. The mean conformity index of 95% was 1.04 {+-} 0.01 and 1.12 {+-} 0.02 for 6-MV and 15-MV, respectively, but this difference was not statistically significant. The mean monitor unit was 812 {+-} 40 and 716 {+-} 33 for the 6-MV and the 15-MV photon plans, respectively. The 6-MV photon plan delivers 13

  10. A test of the claim that plan rankings are determined by relative complication and tumor-control probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study tests an accepted claim regarding tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication (NTCP) probability functions. The claim is that treatment plans can be ranked using relative probabilities, even when the absolute probabilities are unknown. The assumption supports the use of probability models for plan optimization and the comparison of treatment techniques. Methods: The claim was tested using a hypothetical model consisting of two tissues, and illustrated with clinical data. Plans were scored using the probability of uncomplicated tumor control. The scores of different plans were compared by fixing their relative risks for an individual tissue complication, but adjusting the absolute probability levels up or down. The tested claim is that the plan rankings should not change. Results: In the two-tissue model, the rankings of competing plans were reversed by doubling all the probabilities. The preference ordering of lung cancer plans changed after the risk of pulmonary complication was reduced by 3-fold. In another site, the ranking of plans by overall complication-free probability was disturbed by errors that preserved the ordering of plans with respect to any individual complication. An adjustment of ± 2.5% in the initial NTCP values for two tissues changed the direction in which a plan score moved in response to a fixed tradeoff in complication risk in an optimization search. Conclusions: Contrary to claims, plan rankings are not determined by the relative probabilities of adverse events. The effect on plan scores of trading one complication for another depends on the absolute levels of risk. Absolute errors in NTCP and TCP functions result in the wrong ranking of plans, even when relative probabilities are correct. An optimization routine based on TCP and NTCP calculations may be forced in the wrong direction by small errors in the probability estimates

  11. PLANNING AND CONTROL OF 3-D NANO-MANIPULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guangyong; Xi Ning; Wang Yuechao; Yu Mengmeng; Fung Wai-Keung

    2004-01-01

    The use of atomic force microscope (AFM) as a nanomanipulator has been evolving for various kinds of nano-manipulation tasks. Due to the bow effect of the piezo scanner of the AFM,the AFM space is different from the Cartesian space. Traditional nanomanipulation based on AFM is only a 2-D operation and does not consider the bow effect of the piezotube. In this paper, different 3-D nanomanipulation tasks using AFM such as nanolithography, pushing and cutting have been discussed.3-D path planning is performed directly in the AFM space and the 3-D paths are generated based on the 3-D topography information of the surface represented in the AFM space. This approach can avoid the mappings between the AFM space and Cartesian space in planning. By following the generated motion paths, the tip can either follow the topography of the surface or move across the surface by avoiding collision with bumps. Nanomanipulation using this method can be considered as the "true"3-D operations since the cantilever tip can be controlled to follow any desired 3-D trajectory within the range of AFM space. The experimental study shows the effectiveness of the planning and control scheme.

  12. Comparative accuracy of different techniques in planning radiation therapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the results of the analysis of several factors contributing to the accuracy of treatment planning in the radiation therapy of breast cancer. Different techniques (non-radiological vs CT-based) were used for the acquisition of patients' data; different methods (manual vs computerized) were employed for dose calculation. As for geometric parameters describing the external outline and target volume, mean differences were lower than 4%. Switching from a completely manual method to a CT-based one with computerized calculation, a 3.56% mean decrease in the value of reference isodose (p<0.01) was observed, togheter with a 3.87% mean increase in the estimated inhomogeneity (p<0.001). The non-CT-based outline of target volume exhibited geographic missing of inner portions of the target in 8/16 patients. Our results demonstarte that treatment planning procedures can be a significant source of clinically relevant inaccuracy, which may affect treatment outcome and tumor control

  13. Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Yujiao [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Zhang, Fan [Occupational and Environmental Safety Office, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (P{sub NON}) and adaptive plan (P{sub ADP}), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between P{sub NON} and P{sub ADP} for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (d{sub T-OAR}), initial internal target volume (ITV{sub 1}), ITV change (ΔITV), and effective ITV diameter change (Δd{sub ITV}). Results: 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from −59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of −21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, P{sub ADP} resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (ΔD5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (ΔD30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} and ΔD30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment.

  14. Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Control through Continuing Education

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Sol; Rankin, K. Vendrell

    2010-01-01

    A standardized continuing education course was developed to determine if behavior in dental practices could be modified to improve office participation in oral and pharyngeal cancer control through early detection and tobacco-use cessation.

  15. Risk Factors for Pancreatic Cancer in China: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaoxu Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite having one of the highest mortality rates of all cancers, the risk factors of pancreatic cancer remain unclear. We assessed risk factors of pancreatic cancer in China. Methods: A case-control study design was conducted using data from four hospital-based cancer registries (Henan Provincial Cancer Hospital, Beijing Cancer Hospital, Hebei Provincial Cancer Hospital, and Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences). Controls were equally matched and selected fro...

  16. Nutrient menu planning for clinical research centers. Control by computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, M L; Wheeler, L A

    1975-10-01

    A computer program has been developed for the dietetic service of the Clinical Research Center at the University of Florida. Presently, it is used in menu planning and nutrient analysis for selective, controlled-nutrient diets and for constant diets. The program is able to compute food weights for a patient-selected daily menu which would satisfy up to twenty-three nutrient constraints and which may be optimized with respect to one or more of these. The principal benefit of the program is a saving in the dietetian's time in calculating the nutrient content of the diet and in planning diets with several constrained nutrients. It is also being used as a teaching resource for dietetic interns and dietetic trainees. PMID:1159257

  17. Repetitive motion planning and control of redundant robot manipulators

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunong

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive Motion Planning and Control of Redundant Robot Manipulators presents four typical motion planning schemes based on optimization techniques, including the fundamental RMP scheme and its extensions. These schemes are unified as quadratic programs (QPs), which are solved by neural networks or numerical algorithms. The RMP schemes are demonstrated effectively by the simulation results based on various robotic models; the experiments applying the fundamental RMP scheme to a physical robot manipulator are also presented. As the schemes and the corresponding solvers presented in the book have solved the non-repetitive motion problems existing in redundant robot manipulators, it is of particular use in applying theoretical research based on the quadratic program for redundant robot manipulators in industrial situations. This book will be a valuable reference work for engineers, researchers, advanced undergraduate and graduate students in robotics fields. Yunong Zhang is a professor at The School of Informa...

  18. Can the National Health Service Cancer Plan timeline be applied to colorectal hepatic metastases?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Claire

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The National Health Service (NHS) Cancer Plan guidelines recommend a maximum 2-week wait from referral to first appointment, and 2 months from referral to treatment for primary cancers. However, there are currently no guidelines available for metastatic disease. In the UK, nearly half of all colorectal cancer patients develop hepatic metastases. Timely, surgical resection offers the potential for cure. The aim of this study was to audit current practice for colorectal liver metastases in a regional hepatobiliary unit, and compare this to the NHS Cancer Plan standards for primary disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of the unit\\'s database was performed for all hepatic metastases referrals from January 2006 to December 2008. The dates of referral, first appointment, investigations and initiation of treatment, along with patient\\'s age and sex, were recorded on Microsoft Excel and analysed. Time was expressed as mean +\\/- SD in days. RESULTS: A total of 102 patients with hepatic metastases were identified. Five were excluded due to incomplete data. The average time from referral to first appointment was 10.6 +\\/- 9.4 days and the average time from referral to treatment was 38.5 +\\/- 28.6 days. Seventy-five (72.7%) had surgical intervention, of whom 37 also had chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: The data compare favourably to the NHS Cancer Plan guidelines for primary malignancy, demonstrating that a regional hepatobiliary unit is capable of delivering a service for colorectal liver metastases that adheres to the NHS Cancer Plan. Therefore, the NHS Cancer Plan can be applied to this cohort.

  19. Adaptive radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer: optimisation of plan sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plan-of-the-day adaptive radiotherapy (ART) that has not been optimally designed may result in inefficient plan sizes. This can lead to unused plans, which may potentially reduce overall conformality. We compared two methods of individualising ART plan sizes for muscle-invasive bladder cancer to determine which provides a more balanced distribution of plan selections. Twenty-seven previously treated patients had small, medium and large ART plans generated from CTV contours on the simulation CT and initial cone beam CTs (CBCT). In the original clinical method, the smallest plan was based on the smallest CTV, while the experimental method used the Boolean summation of the two smallest CTVs. The large plan was identical in both methods. The medium plans were created midway between small and large CTVs. Credentialed treatment staff performed plan selection clinically for the original plans and retrospectively for the experimental plans. A total of 646 CBCTs from 26 patients were included. The small, medium and large adaptive CTVs, and the conventional CTV, were used 29.7%, 45.4%, 22.0% and 2.9% of the time, respectively, compared to the previous 9.8%, 49.2%, 39.5% and 1.5%. The differences were significant between previous and new CTV (small), and CTV (large). The new design method resulted in the three adaptive CTV choices being selected more evenly, however, a reduction in a surrogate for normal tissue irradiation was not observed.

  20. Gait Planning and Stability Control of a Quadruped Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junmin; Wang, Jinge; Yang, Simon X.; Zhou, Kedong; Tang, Huijuan

    2016-01-01

    In order to realize smooth gait planning and stability control of a quadruped robot, a new controller algorithm based on CPG-ZMP (central pattern generator-zero moment point) is put forward in this paper. To generate smooth gait and shorten the adjusting time of the model oscillation system, a new CPG model controller and its gait switching strategy based on Wilson-Cowan model are presented in the paper. The control signals of knee-hip joints are obtained by the improved multi-DOF reduced order control theory. To realize stability control, the adaptive speed adjustment and gait switch are completed by the real-time computing of ZMP. Experiment results show that the quadruped robot's gaits are efficiently generated and the gait switch is smooth in the CPG control algorithm. Meanwhile, the stability of robot's movement is improved greatly with the CPG-ZMP algorithm. The algorithm in this paper has good practicability, which lays a foundation for the production of the robot prototype. PMID:27143959

  1. An in silico comparison between margin-based and probabilistic target-planning approaches in head and neck cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanarosa, Davide; van der Laan, Hans Paul; Witte, Marnix; Shakirin, Georgy; Roelofs, Erik; Langendijk, Johannes; Larnbin, Philippe; van Herk, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To apply target probabilistic planning (TPP) approach to intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Material and methods: Twenty plans of HNC patients were re-planned replacing the simultaneous integrated boost IMRT optimization obj

  2. Optimized planning target volume margin in helical tomotherapy for prostate cancer: Is there a preferred method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan Jie; Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Jang, Min Sun; Yoon, Won Sup; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-07-01

    We compare the dosimetrical differences between plans generated for helical tomotherapy by using the 2D or 3D the margining technique for the treatment of prostate cancer. Ten prostate cancer patients were included in this study. For 2D plans, the planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding 5 mm (lateral/anterior-posterior) to the clinical target volume (CTV). For 3D plans, a 5-mm margin was added not only lateral/anterior-posterior, but also superior-inferior, to the CTV. Various dosimetrical indices, including the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Differences between the 2D and the 3D PTV indices were not significant except for the CI (p = 0.023). 3D margin plans (11195 MUs) resulted in higher (13.0%) monitor units than 2D margin plans (9728 MUs). There were no significant differences in any organs at risk (OARs) between the 2D and the 3D plans. Overall, the average dose for the 2D plan was slightly lower than that for the 3D plan dose. Compared to the 2D plan, the 3D plan increased the average treatment time by 1.5 minutes; however, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.082). We confirmed that the 2D and the 3D margin plans were not significantly different with regard to various dosimetric indices such as the PITV, CI, and HI for PTV and the OARs with tomotherapy.

  3. A national agenda for Latino cancer prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Gallion, Kipling J; Suarez, Lucina; Giachello, Aida L; Marti, Jose R; Medrano, Martha A; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Talavera, Gregory A; Trapido, Edward J

    2005-06-01

    Although cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and premature death among Latinos, there is limited knowledge of cancer-related issues and priorities of greatest significance to the Latino population, the largest minority group in the nation. This information is vital in helping to guide Latino cancer research, training, and awareness efforts at national, regional, and local levels. To help identify cancer issues of greatest relevance to Latinos, Redes En Accion, The National Hispanic/Latino Cancer Network, a major network among the National Cancer Institute's Special Populations Networks, conducted a survey of 624 key opinion leaders from around the country. Respondents were asked to rank the three cancer sites most important to Latinos in their region and the five issues of greatest significance for this population's cancer prevention and control. Recommendations were prioritized for three specific areas: 1) research, 2) training and/or professional education, and 3) awareness and/or public education. Among cancers, breast carcinoma was ranked number one, followed in order by cervical and lung carcinomas. The issues of greatest significance to Latinos were 1) access to cancer screening and care, 2) tobacco use, 3) patient-doctor communication, 4) nutrition, and 5) risk communication. This survey solicited information from scientists, health care professionals, leaders of government agencies, professional and community-based organizations, and other stakeholders in Latino health. The results laid the foundation for a national Redes En Accion Latino cancer agenda, thus providing a useful tool for individuals and organizations engaged in cancer prevention and control efforts among the Hispanic-Latino population. PMID:15822119

  4. First-of-A-Kind Control Room Modernization Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Kenneth David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This project plan describes a comprehensive approach to the design of an end-state concept for a modernized control room for Palo Verde. It describes the collaboration arrangement between the DOE LWRS Program Control Room Modernization Project and the APS Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. It further describes the role of other collaborators, including the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). It combines advanced tools, methodologies, and facilities to enable a science-based approach to the validation of applicable engineering and human factors principles for nuclear plant control rooms. It addresses the required project results and documentation to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. It describes the project tasks that will be conducted in the project, and the deliverable reports that will be developed through these tasks. This project plan will be updated as new tasks are added and as project milestones are completed. It will serve as an ongoing description on the project both for project participants and for industry stakeholders.

  5. Implementation Science in Cancer Prevention and Control: A framework for research and programs in low and middle-income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaram, Sudha; Sanchez, Michael A; Rimer, Barbara K.; Jonathan M. Samet; Glasgow, Russell E.

    2014-01-01

    Implementation Science is a set of tools, principles and methodologies that can be used to bring scientific evidence into action, improve health care quality and delivery and improve public health. As the burden of cancer increases in low- and middle-income countries, it is important to plan cancer control programs that are both evidence-based and delivered in ways that are feasible, cost-effective, contextually appropriate and sustainable. This review presents a framework for using implement...

  6. Use of health plan data to estimate cost and outcomes of a breast cancer population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To compare insurance billing data with tumor registry data for estimating date of diagnosis and date of recurrence. To collect and estimate cost of treatment from billing data as a step towards performing cost-effective or cost-utility analysis. To correlate first year treatment cost first year with overall cost to enable the former to serve as a proxy for the latter for patients migrating out of insurance plans. Materials and Methods: Billing data for patients(pts.) diagnosed with breast cancer between 1990-1992 was obtained from Paramount Health Plans, a NCQA accredited health plan in Northwest Ohio. Tumor registry and hospital records were surveyed for the clinical data. Total cost of care received by pts., cost of care associated with treatment of breast cancer, and cost of care billed as breast cancer care was collected for each 12 month period from the date of diagnosis. Costs were measured from a payers, i.e. health plans, perspective. Net present value (NPV) costs discounted at a rate of 3% to the year of diagnosis are reported. Pts. were considered in the plan for the entire duration of the study if they were in the plan from the time of diagnosis to the end of the analysis, (12(96)). Students t-test was used to determined statistical differences between groups analyzed. Results: Paramount Health Plan was a small health plan with approximately 10,000-13,000 female enrolees during the study period. Breast cancer was diagnosed in 21 women during 1990-1992 with 18 pts. diagnosed while in the insurance plan and 3 diagnosed prior to entry into the plan. (12(18)) pts. were in the plan for the entire duration of the study. The mean deviation for the date of diagnosis as recorded from tumor registry data, compared to the first date that a diagnosis of breast cancer appears on the billing record is 18 days (range:0-158). Four pts. experienced a recurrence. A determination of a recurrence from insurance records was only possible in (1(4)) pts. who

  7. Human Systems Integration: Unmanned Aircraft Control Station Certification Plan Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This document provides guidance to the FAA on important human factors considerations that can be used to support the certification of a UAS Aircraft Control Station (ACS). This document provides a synopsis of the human factors analysis, design and test activities to be performed to provide a basis for FAA certification. The data from these analyses, design activities, and tests, along with data from certification/qualification tests of other key components should be used to establish the ACS certification basis. It is expected that this information will be useful to manufacturers in developing the ACS Certification Plan,, and in supporting the design of their ACS.

  8. Use of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Radiation Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kezban Berberoğlu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays an important role in the treatment of lung cancer. Accurate diagnosis and staging are crucial in the delivery of RT with curative intent. Target miss can be prevented by accurate determination of tumor contours during RT planning. Currently, tumor contours are determined manually by computed tomography (CT) during RT planning. This method leads to differences in delineation of tumor volume between users. Given the change in RT tools and methods due to rapidly ...

  9. The impact of preoperative breast MRI on surgical planning in women with incident breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Aðalheiður Jónsdóttir 1973

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Routine breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has recently been introduced in Iceland as a preoperative examination of patients with incident breast cancer. Previous studies report that additional lesions not detected on mammography can be identified with MRI, which may result in revised surgical planning. Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine if additional findings on preoperative breast MRI changed the planned surgical treatment. Methods: This is a descript...

  10. Functional image-based radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer: a simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, E.L.; Bragg, C.M.; Wild, J. M.; Hatton, M.Q.F.; Ireland, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the incorporation of data from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (He-3-MRI) into intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods: Seven scenarios were simulated that represent cases of NSCLC with significant functional lung defects. Two independent IMRT plans were produced for each scenario; one to minimise total lung vo...

  11. New Cancer Prevention and Control Central Institutional Review Board Established | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Central Institutional Review Board (CIRB) Initiative announced the establishment of the Cancer Prevention and Control (CPC) CIRB January 14, extending the benefits of centralized review to investigators participating in clinical trials sponsored by the Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP). |

  12. CPFP Summer Curriculum: Principles and Practices of Cancer Prevention and Control Course | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program four-week summer course provides specialized instruction in the principles and practice of cancer prevention and control. Participants will gain a broad-based perspective on concepts, issues, and applications related to this field. The course typically covers the following topics: |

  13. Maximizing dosimetric benefits of IMRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer through multicriteria optimization planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Craft, David [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Paly, Jon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason, E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We examine the quality of plans created using multicriteria optimization (MCO) treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in treatment of localized prostate cancer. Nine random cases of patients receiving IMRT to the prostate were selected. Each case was associated with a clinically approved plan created using Corvus. The cases were replanned using MCO-based planning in RayStation. Dose-volume histogram data from both planning systems were presented to 2 radiation oncologists in a blinded evaluation, and were compared at a number of dose-volume points. Both physicians rated all 9 MCO plans as superior to the clinically approved plans (p<10{sup −5}). Target coverage was equivalent (p = 0.81). Maximum doses to the prostate and bladder and the V50 and V70 to the anterior rectum were reduced in all MCO plans (p<0.05). Treatment planning time with MCO took approximately 60 minutes per case. MCO-based planning for prostate IMRT is efficient and produces high-quality plans with good target homogeneity and sparing of the anterior rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, without sacrificing target coverage.

  14. Improved robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy plan quality and planning efficacy for organ-confined prostate cancer utilizing overlap-volume histogram-driven planning methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: This study is to determine if the overlap-volume histogram (OVH)-driven planning methodology can be adapted to robotic SBRT (CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System) to further minimize the bladder and rectal doses achieved in plans manually-created by clinical planners. Methods and materials: A database containing clinically-delivered, robotic SBRT plans (7.25 Gy/fraction in 36.25 Gy) of 425 patients with localized prostate cancer was used as a cohort to establish an organ’s distance-to-dose model. The OVH-driven planning methodology was refined by adding the PTV volume factor to counter the target’s dose fall-off effect and incorporated into Multiplan to automate SBRT planning. For validation, automated plans (APs) for 12 new patients were generated, and their achieved dose/volume values were compared to the corresponding manually-created, clinically-delivered plans (CPs). A two-sided, Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used for statistical comparison with a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: PTV’s V(36.25 Gy) was comparable: 95.6% in CPs comparing to 95.1% in APs (p = 0.2). On average, the refined approach lowered V(18.12 Gy) to the bladder and rectum by 8.2% (p < 0.05) and 6.4% (p = 0.14). A physician confirmed APs were clinically acceptable. Conclusions: The improvements in APs could further reduce toxicities observed in SBRT for organ-confined prostate cancer

  15. Adaptive plan selection vs. re-optimisation in radiotherapy for bladder cancer: A dose accumulation comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Patients with urinary bladder cancer are obvious candidates for adaptive radiotherapy (ART) due to large inter-fractional variation in bladder volumes. In this study we have compared the normal tissue sparing potential of two ART strategies: daily plan selection (PlanSelect) and daily plan re-optimisation (ReOpt). Materials and methods: Seven patients with bladder cancer were included in the study. For the PlanSelect strategy, a patient-specific library of three plans was generated, and the most suitable plan based on the pre-treatment cone beam CT (CBCT) was selected. For the daily ReOpt strategy, plans were re-optimised based on the CBCT from each daily fraction. Bladder contours were propagated to the CBCT scan using deformable image registration (DIR). Accumulated dose distributions for the ART strategies as well as the non-adaptive RT were calculated. Results: A considerable sparing of normal tissue was achieved with both ART approaches, with ReOpt being the superior technique. Compared to non-adaptive RT, the volume receiving more than 57 Gy (corresponding to 95% of the prescribed dose) was reduced to 66% (range 48–100%) for PlanSelect and to 41% (range 33–50%) for ReOpt. Conclusion: This study demonstrated a considerable normal tissue sparing potential of ART for bladder irradiation, with clearly superior results by daily adaptive re-optimisation

  16. PET/CT planning during chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Seol, Ki Ho; Jeong Eun LEE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for field modification during radiotherapy in esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective study on 33 patients that underwent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Pathologic findings were squamous cell carcinoma in 32 patients and adenocarcinoma in 1 patient. All patients underwent PET/CT scans before and during CRT (after receiving 40 Gy and before a 20 Gy boost dose). Response evalu...

  17. Treatment plan comparison of Linac step and shoot,Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton therapy for prostate cancer using dosimetrical and biological index

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cho, Sam Ju; Lee, Sang Hoon; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Huh, Hyun Do; Lim, Sangwook; Shin, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use various dosimetrical indices to determine the best IMRT modality technique for treating patients with prostate cancer. Ten patients with prostate cancer were included in this study. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to include different modalities, including the linac step and shoot, Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton systems. Various dosimetrical indices, like the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Biological indices such as the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD), based tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were also calculated and used to compare the treatment plans. The RapidArc plan attained better PTV coverage, as evidenc...

  18. Predictors of physical activity among rural and small town breast cancer survivors: an application of the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Jeff K; Lavallee, Celeste; Culos-Reed, Nicole S; Trudeau, Marc G

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the utility of the two-component theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in understanding physical activity intentions and behaviour in rural and small town breast cancer survivors. The secondary objective was to elicit the most common behavioural, normative and control beliefs of rural and small town survivors regarding physical activity. Using a cross-sectional survey design, 524 rural and small town breast cancer survivors completed a mailed survey that assessed physical activity and TPB variables. Physical activity intention explained 12% of the variance in physical activity behaviour (p < 0.01) while the TPB constructs together explained 43% of the variance in physical activity intention (p < 0.01). Unique behavioural, normative and control beliefs were elicited from the sample. The two-component TPB framework appears to be a suitable model to initiate an understanding of physical activity determinants among rural and small town breast cancer survivors. These data can be used in the development and establishment of physical activity behaviour interventions and health promotion materials designed to facilitate physical activity behaviour among rural and small town breast cancer survivors. PMID:22409699

  19. Advantages and limitations of navigation-based multicriteria optimization (MCO) for localized prostate cancer IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficacy of inverse planning is becoming increasingly important for advanced radiotherapy techniques. This study’s aims were to validate multicriteria optimization (MCO) in RayStation (v2.4, RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) against standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization in Oncentra (v4.1, Nucletron BV, the Netherlands) and characterize dose differences due to conversion of navigated MCO plans into deliverable multileaf collimator apertures. Step-and-shoot IMRT plans were created for 10 patients with localized prostate cancer using both standard optimization and MCO. Acceptable standard IMRT plans with minimal average rectal dose were chosen for comparison with deliverable MCO plans. The trade-off was, for the MCO plans, managed through a user interface that permits continuous navigation between fluence-based plans. Navigated MCO plans were made deliverable at incremental steps along a trajectory between maximal target homogeneity and maximal rectal sparing. Dosimetric differences between navigated and deliverable MCO plans were also quantified. MCO plans, chosen as acceptable under navigated and deliverable conditions resulted in similar rectal sparing compared with standard optimization (33.7 ± 1.8 Gy vs 35.5 ± 4.2 Gy, p = 0.117). The dose differences between navigated and deliverable MCO plans increased as higher priority was placed on rectal avoidance. If the best possible deliverable MCO was chosen, a significant reduction in rectal dose was observed in comparison with standard optimization (30.6 ± 1.4 Gy vs 35.5 ± 4.2 Gy, p = 0.047). Improvements were, however, to some extent, at the expense of less conformal dose distributions, which resulted in significantly higher doses to the bladder for 2 of the 3 tolerance levels. In conclusion, similar IMRT plans can be created for patients with prostate cancer using MCO compared with standard optimization. Limitations exist within MCO regarding conversion of navigated plans to

  20. Advantages and limitations of navigation-based multicriteria optimization (MCO) for localized prostate cancer IMRT planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGarry, Conor K., E-mail: conor.mcgarry@belfasttrust.hscni.net [Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Bokrantz, Rasmus [Optimization and Systems Theory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm (Sweden); O’Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Efficacy of inverse planning is becoming increasingly important for advanced radiotherapy techniques. This study’s aims were to validate multicriteria optimization (MCO) in RayStation (v2.4, RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) against standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization in Oncentra (v4.1, Nucletron BV, the Netherlands) and characterize dose differences due to conversion of navigated MCO plans into deliverable multileaf collimator apertures. Step-and-shoot IMRT plans were created for 10 patients with localized prostate cancer using both standard optimization and MCO. Acceptable standard IMRT plans with minimal average rectal dose were chosen for comparison with deliverable MCO plans. The trade-off was, for the MCO plans, managed through a user interface that permits continuous navigation between fluence-based plans. Navigated MCO plans were made deliverable at incremental steps along a trajectory between maximal target homogeneity and maximal rectal sparing. Dosimetric differences between navigated and deliverable MCO plans were also quantified. MCO plans, chosen as acceptable under navigated and deliverable conditions resulted in similar rectal sparing compared with standard optimization (33.7 ± 1.8 Gy vs 35.5 ± 4.2 Gy, p = 0.117). The dose differences between navigated and deliverable MCO plans increased as higher priority was placed on rectal avoidance. If the best possible deliverable MCO was chosen, a significant reduction in rectal dose was observed in comparison with standard optimization (30.6 ± 1.4 Gy vs 35.5 ± 4.2 Gy, p = 0.047). Improvements were, however, to some extent, at the expense of less conformal dose distributions, which resulted in significantly higher doses to the bladder for 2 of the 3 tolerance levels. In conclusion, similar IMRT plans can be created for patients with prostate cancer using MCO compared with standard optimization. Limitations exist within MCO regarding conversion of navigated plans to

  1. Comparison of CT based-CTV plan and CT based-ICRU38 plan in brachytherapy planning of uterine cervix cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jung Keun; Han, Tae Jong [Jeonju Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    Purpose : In spite of recent remarkable improvement of diagnostic imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, and PET and radiation therapy planing systems, ICR plan of uterine cervix cancer, based on recommendation of ICRU38(2D film-based) such as point A, is still used widely. A 3-dimensional ICR plan based on CT image provides Dose-Volume Histogram(DVH) information of the tumor and normal tissue. In this study, we compared tumor-dose, rectal-dose and bladder-dose through an analysis of DVH between CTV plan and ICRU38 plan based on CT image. Method and Material : We analyzed 11 patients with a cervix cancer who received the ICR of Ir-192 HDR. After 40Gy of external beam radiation therapy, ICR plan was established using PLATO(Nucletron) v.14.2 planning system. CT scan was done to all the patients using CT-simulator(Ultra Z, Philips). We contoured CTV, rectum and bladder on the CT image and established CTV plan which delivers the 100% dose to CTV and ICRU plan which delivers the 100% dose to the point A. Result : The volume(average{+-}SD) of CTV, rectum and bladder in all of 11 patients is 21.8{+-}6.6cm{sup 3}, 60.9{+-}25.0cm{sup 3}, 111.6{+-}40.1cm{sup 3} respectively. The volume covered by 100% isodose curve is 126.7{+-}18.9cm{sup 3} in ICRU plan and 98.2{+-}74.5cm{sup 3} in CTV plan(p=0.0001), respectively. In (On) ICRU planning 22.0cm{sup 3} of CTV volume was not covered by 100% isodose curve in one patient whose residual tumor size is greater than 4cm, while more than 100% dose was irradiated unnecessarily to the normal organ of 62.2{+-}4.8cm{sup 3} other than the tumor in the remaining 10 patients with a residual tumor less than 4cm in size. Bladder dose recommended by ICRU 38 was 90.1{+-}21.3% and 68.7{+-}26.6% in ICRU plan and in CTV plan respectively(p=0.001) while rectal dose recommended by ICRU 38 was 86.4{+-}18.3% and 76.9{+-}15.6% in ICRU plan and in CTV plan, respectively(p=0.08). Bladder and rectum maximum dose was 137.2{+-}50.1%, 101.1{+-}41.8% in ICRU plan

  2. Distributed autonomous systems: resource management, planning, and control algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James F., III; Nguyen, ThanhVu H.

    2005-05-01

    Distributed autonomous systems, i.e., systems that have separated distributed components, each of which, exhibit some degree of autonomy are increasingly providing solutions to naval and other DoD problems. Recently developed control, planning and resource allocation algorithms for two types of distributed autonomous systems will be discussed. The first distributed autonomous system (DAS) to be discussed consists of a collection of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that are under fuzzy logic control. The UAVs fly and conduct meteorological sampling in a coordinated fashion determined by their fuzzy logic controllers to determine the atmospheric index of refraction. Once in flight no human intervention is required. A fuzzy planning algorithm determines the optimal trajectory, sampling rate and pattern for the UAVs and an interferometer platform while taking into account risk, reliability, priority for sampling in certain regions, fuel limitations, mission cost, and related uncertainties. The real-time fuzzy control algorithm running on each UAV will give the UAV limited autonomy allowing it to change course immediately without consulting with any commander, request other UAVs to help it, alter its sampling pattern and rate when observing interesting phenomena, or to terminate the mission and return to base. The algorithms developed will be compared to a resource manager (RM) developed for another DAS problem related to electronic attack (EA). This RM is based on fuzzy logic and optimized by evolutionary algorithms. It allows a group of dissimilar platforms to use EA resources distributed throughout the group. For both DAS types significant theoretical and simulation results will be presented.

  3. Waste acceptability and quality control for the planned Konrad repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Federal Republic of Germany, it is intended to dispose of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation in the planned Konrad repository near Braunschweig. According to the Atomic Energy Act the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is responsible for the construction and operation of this facility. The PTB has demonstrated the safe operation of the planned Konrad repository by means of a site specific safety assessment. As a result, on the basis of the planning and safety related work, preliminary waste acceptance requirements have been compiled. The waste packages intended for disposal are examined, i.e. the disposability of individual waste packages and of their annual total is assessed on the basis of model data. For the assessment of the annual total the year 2000 was taken as a reference. This assessment of the suitability for disposal shows that almost all waste packages intended for disposal can, in principle, be emplaced in the Konrad repository. Some particular requirements on the disposal of waste packages resulting from this examination are discussed in detail. For radioactive wastes to be disposed of, compliance with the waste acceptance requirements must be demonstrated within the scope of the waste package quality control. The waste producer is responsible for and must demonstrate compliance with these requirements. On behalf of the PTB, on the basis of the documents submitted the Produktkontrollstelle (PKS) examines whether proof has been established by the waste producer, and usually performs additional sampling inspections of waste packages. Alternatively, the waste producer may have a qualification and inspection of the conditioning process carried out by the PKS on behalf of the PTB. A survey of the status of the waste package quality control is given. 13 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  4. Optimal Control Approaches to the Aggregate Production Planning Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser A. Davizón

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the area of production planning and control, the aggregate production planning (APP problem represents a great challenge for decision makers in production-inventory systems. Tradeoff between inventory-capacity is known as the APP problem. To address it, static and dynamic models have been proposed, which in general have several shortcomings. It is the premise of this paper that the main drawback of these proposals is, that they do not take into account the dynamic nature of the APP. For this reason, we propose the use of an Optimal Control (OC formulation via the approach of energy-based and Hamiltonian-present value. The main contribution of this paper is the mathematical model which integrates a second order dynamical system coupled with a first order system, incorporating production rate, inventory level, and capacity as well with the associated cost by work force in the same formulation. Also, a novel result in relation with the Hamiltonian-present value in the OC formulation is that it reduces the inventory level compared with the pure energy based approach for APP. A set of simulations are provided which verifies the theoretical contribution of this work.

  5. Quality control for cervical cancer treatments on Hdr brachytherapy with Ir-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work, developed at the National Cancer Institute in partnership with Universidad Nacional de Colombia located in Bogota, Colombia, presents the results of simulations of cervical cancer treatments, on Hdr brachytherapy with Ir-192, using as a physical simulator a natural female pelvis bone with soft tissue elaborated with the experimental material JJT. The doses were measured experimentally, prior to dosimetric characterization, with crystal thermoluminescence 100 LiF: Mg, Ti, located in the organs at risk: rectum and bladder. On the other hand, these treatments were planned and calculated theoretically by the system Micro-Selectron Hdr, with Plato brachytherapy software V 14.1 from the Netherlands Nucletron, and doses obtained in the same organs were compared with experimental results using dosimeters. The comparison of these results shows the correlation degree between the planning of dosimetric treatments and the experimental results, making the process in a form of quality control in vivo, of this type of procedure. (Author)

  6. Case-control study of fetal microchimerism and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakrishna K Gadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prior pregnancy is known to protect against development of breast cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated that pregnancy has the capacity to establish small numbers of immunologically active fetal-derived cells in the mother, a phenomenon known as fetal microchimerism (FMc. We asked whether presence of FMc, routinely acquired during pregnancy, is a protective factor for breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DNA extracts from peripheral blood specimens were obtained from a population-based case-control study of risk factors for breast cancer in women 21 to 45 years old. Specimens were tested with quantitative PCR for presence and concentrations of male DNA presumed to derive from prior pregnancies with a male fetus. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated with consideration of multiple established reproductive and environmental risk factors for breast cancer. FMc results were generated on 99 parous women, 54 with primary invasive breast cancer and 45 general population controls. FMc prevalence was 56% (25/45 and 26% (14/54 in controls and cases, respectively. Women harboring FMc were less likely to have had breast cancer (OR = 0.29, 95% CI 0.11-0.83; p = 0.02, adjusting for age, number of children, birth of a son, history of miscarriage, and total DNA tested. In addition, FMc concentrations were higher in controls versus cases (p = 0.01. Median concentrations were 2 (0-78 and 0 (0-374 fetal genomes/10(6 maternal genomes in controls and cases, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that the enigma of why some parous women are not afforded protection from breast cancer by pregnancy might in part be explained by differences in FMc. Mechanistic studies of FMc-derived protection against breast cancer are warranted.

  7. Serum Antibodies against Genitourinary Infectious Agents in Prostate Cancer and Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Patients: A Case-Control Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrbáček, J.; Urban, M.; Hamšíková, E.; Tachezy, R.; Eisenbruk, V.; Brabec, Marek; Heráček, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, Art.no. 53 (2011), s. 1-10. ISSN 1471-2407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : serum antibodies * prostate cancer * case-control study * logistic regression, calibration Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 3.011, year: 2011

  8. Optimized planning target volume margin in helical tomotherapy for prostate cancer: is there a preferred method?

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Yuan Jie; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Jang, Min Sun; Yoon, Won Sup; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-01-01

    To compare the dosimetrical differences between plans generated by helical tomotherapy using 2D or 3D margining technique in in prostate cancer. Ten prostate cancer patients were included in this study. For 2D plans, planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding 5 mm (lateral/anterior-posterior) to clinical target volume (CTV). For 3D plans, 5 mm margin was added not only in lateral/anterior-posterior, but also in superior-inferior to CTV. Various dosimetrical indices, including the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Differences between 2D and 3D PTV indices were not significant except for CI (p = 0.023). 3D margin plans (11195 MUs) resulted in higher (13.0%) monitor units than 2D margin plans (9728 MUs). There were no significant d...

  9. The ITER Safety Control Systems - Status and Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of a complex experimental machine like ITER will involve a number of potential hazards to personnel, the environment, and to the machine itself. While some protections are usually embedded within the overall control system, when it comes to the protection of people, the environment or the safe operation of the machine, dedicated systems are required. At ITER, the Safety Control Systems are dedicated to the protection of people and the environment. These systems represents one of the three independent tiers on which the ITER Instrumentation and Control is based. They have to respect stringent requirements in terms of reliability, availability, safety and maintainability for operation, security and national and/or international safety regulations. This document describes the current status and plans of the Safety Control Systems, the functions to be performed, the envisaged architecture and the main design options including the principles of separation - independence between the three tiers. This document is composed of an abstract followed by the presentation slides. (authors)

  10. Distributing Planning and Control for Teams of Cooperating Mobile Robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, L.E.

    2004-07-19

    This CRADA project involved the cooperative research of investigators in ORNL's Center for Engineering Science Advanced Research (CESAR) with researchers at Caterpillar, Inc. The subject of the research was the development of cooperative control strategies for autonomous vehicles performing applications of interest to Caterpillar customers. The project involved three Phases of research, conducted over the time period of November 1998 through December 2001. This project led to the successful development of several technologies and demonstrations in realistic simulation that illustrated the effectiveness of our control approaches for distributed planning and cooperation in multi-robot teams. The primary objectives of this research project were to: (1) Develop autonomous control technologies to enable multiple vehicles to work together cooperatively, (2) Provide the foundational capabilities for a human operator to exercise oversight and guidance during the multi-vehicle task execution, and (3) Integrate these capabilities to the ALLIANCE-based autonomous control approach for multi-robot teams. These objectives have been successfully met with the results implemented and demonstrated in a near real-time multi-vehicle simulation of up to four vehicles performing mission-relevant tasks.

  11. Breast cancer therapy planning - a novel support concept for a sequential decision making problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Alexander; Schwidde, Ilka; Dinges, Andreas; Rüdiger, Patrick; Kümmel, Sherko; Küfer, Karl-Heinz

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common carcinosis with the largest number of mortalities in women. Its therapy comprises a wide spectrum of different treatment modalities a breast oncologist decides about for the individual patient case. These decisions happen according to medical guide lines, current scientific publications and experiences acquired in former cases. Clinical decision making therefore involves the time-consuming search for possible therapy options and their thorough testing for applicability to the current patient case.This research work addresses breast cancer therapy planning as a multi-criteria sequential decision making problem. The approach is based on a data model for patient cases with therapy descriptions and a mathematical notion for therapeutic relevance of medical information. This formulation allows for a novel decision support concept, which targets at eliminating observed weaknesses in clinical routine of breast cancer therapy planning. PMID:25315184

  12. Cancer Pain Control for Advanced Cancer Patients by Using Autonomic Nerve Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwi-joong Kang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to report a case series of advanced cancer patients whose cancer pain was relieved by using autonomic nerve pharmacopuncture (ANP treatment. ANP is a subcutaneous injection therapy of mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP along the acupoints on the spine (Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue; 0.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous processes of vertebrae to enhance the immune system and to balance autonomic nerve function. Methods: Patients with three different types of cancer (gastric cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer with distant metastases with cancer pain were treated with ANP. 1 mL of MGP was injected into the bilateral Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue on the T1-L5 sites (total 12 ─ 20 mL injection of each patient’s dorsum by using the principle of symptom differentiation. During ANP treatment, the visual analogue scale (VAS for pain was used to assess their levels of cancer pain; also, the dosage and the frequency of analgesic use were measured. Results: The cancer pain levels of all three patients improved with treatment using ANP. The VAS scores of the three patients decreased as the treatment progressed. The dosage and the frequency of analgesics also gradually decreased during the treatment period. Significantly, no related adverse events were found. Conclusion: ANP has shown benefit in controlling cancer pain for the three different types of cancer investigated in this study and in reducing the dosage and the frequency of analgesics. ANP is expected to be beneficial for reducing cancer pain and, thus, to be a promising new treatment for cancer pain.

  13. Yield of claims data and surveys for determining colon cancer screening among health plan members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignone, Michael; Scott, Tracy L; Schild, Laura A; Lewis, Carmen; Vázquez, Raquel; Glanz, Karen

    2009-03-01

    Screening can reduce incidence and mortality from colorectal cancer but has been underutilized. Efforts to increase screening depend on accurate data about screening status. We sought to evaluate the independent and combined yield of claims and direct survey for identifying colorectal cancer screening among average-risk health plan beneficiaries. Participants were Aetna members ages between 52 and 80 years from 32 primary care practices in Florida and Georgia participating in the Communicating Health Options through Information and Cancer Education study. Main outcomes were the proportion of average-risk patients who were up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening based on claims data and the estimated additional yield of survey data for patients with no evidence of screening in their claims history. Of 4,020 average-risk members identified, claims data indicated that 1,066 (27%) had recent colorectal cancer screening. Among the 1,269 average-risk members with no evidence of screening by claims data who returned surveys, 498 (39%) reported being up-to-date with screening. Combining claims data and survey data and accounting for survey nonresponse, we estimate that 47% to 59% of member patients were actually up-to-date with screening, an additional yield of 20 to 32 percentage points. We conclude that, among health plan members, the combination of claims data and survey information had substantially higher yield than claims data alone for identifying colorectal cancer screening. PMID:19273480

  14. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient’s unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient’s geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control. (paper)

  15. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ting; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B.; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-11-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient’s unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient’s geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control.

  16. SU-E-T-460: Comparison of Proton and IMRT Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A retrospective study comparing proton and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer Methods: This study consists of six H and N cancer patients that underwent proton as well as IMRT planning. Patients analyzed had unilateral target volumes, one had prior RT. 3D-conformal proton therapy (3D-CPT) plans with multiple field uniform scanning were generated for delivery on the inclined beam line. IMRT was planned using fixed field sliding window. Final plan evaluations were performed by a radiation oncologist and a physicist. Metrics for comparison included tumor coverage, organ sparing with respect to spinal cord, brainstem, parotids, submandibulars, oral cavity, larynx, brachial plexus, cochleas, normal brain tissue, and skin using relevant indices for these structures. Dose volume histograms were generated as well as a qualitative comparison of isodose distributions between the two modalities. Planning and treatment delivery times were compared. Results: Results showed that IMRT plans offered better conformality in the high dose region as demonstrated by the conformality index for each plan. Ipsilateral cochlea, submandibular gland, and skin doses were lower with IMRT than proton therapy. There was significant sparing of larynx, oral cavity, and brainstem with proton therapy compared to IMRT. This translated into direct patient benefit with no evidence of hoarseness, mucositis, or nausea. Contralateral parotid and submandibular glands were equally spared. IMRT had shorter planning/parts fabrication and treatment times which needs to be taken into account when deciding modality. Conclusion: Sparing of clinically significant normal tissue structures such as oral cavity and larynx for unilateral H and N cancers was seen with 3D-CPT versus IMRT. However, this is at the expense of less conformality at the high dose region and higher skin dose. Future studies are needed with full gantry systems and pencil beam scanning as these

  17. SU-E-T-460: Comparison of Proton and IMRT Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontenla, S; Zhou, Y; Kowalski, A [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States); Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Leven, T [Procure Proton Therapy Cneter, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Cahlon, O [ProCure Proton Therapy, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Lee, N [Memorial Sloan Kettering cancer center, NY, NY (United States); Hunt, M [Mem Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr, NY, NY (United States); Mechalakos, J [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study comparing proton and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer Methods: This study consists of six H and N cancer patients that underwent proton as well as IMRT planning. Patients analyzed had unilateral target volumes, one had prior RT. 3D-conformal proton therapy (3D-CPT) plans with multiple field uniform scanning were generated for delivery on the inclined beam line. IMRT was planned using fixed field sliding window. Final plan evaluations were performed by a radiation oncologist and a physicist. Metrics for comparison included tumor coverage, organ sparing with respect to spinal cord, brainstem, parotids, submandibulars, oral cavity, larynx, brachial plexus, cochleas, normal brain tissue, and skin using relevant indices for these structures. Dose volume histograms were generated as well as a qualitative comparison of isodose distributions between the two modalities. Planning and treatment delivery times were compared. Results: Results showed that IMRT plans offered better conformality in the high dose region as demonstrated by the conformality index for each plan. Ipsilateral cochlea, submandibular gland, and skin doses were lower with IMRT than proton therapy. There was significant sparing of larynx, oral cavity, and brainstem with proton therapy compared to IMRT. This translated into direct patient benefit with no evidence of hoarseness, mucositis, or nausea. Contralateral parotid and submandibular glands were equally spared. IMRT had shorter planning/parts fabrication and treatment times which needs to be taken into account when deciding modality. Conclusion: Sparing of clinically significant normal tissue structures such as oral cavity and larynx for unilateral H and N cancers was seen with 3D-CPT versus IMRT. However, this is at the expense of less conformality at the high dose region and higher skin dose. Future studies are needed with full gantry systems and pencil beam scanning as these

  18. Asthma Control in Asthmatic Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsing Hsieh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The balance of the Th1 and Th2 immune response plays an important role inthe regulation of the immune system and in general health. Tumor bearinghosts are supposed to have a balance shifting to the Th2 pathway, while afavorable Th1 anti-tumor pathway is induced in tumor-resected hosts. Theclinical impacts of a tumor-related Th2 environment have not been clearlystudied. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that nonsmallcell lung cancer (NSCLC has an impact on control of asthma, a wellknownTh2-predominant inflammatory disease.Method: Thirty-eight patients with the diagnoses of both asthma and lung cancer wereretrospectively enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups according totheir response to lung cancer treatment, the responder group (completeregression, partial regression and stable disease and non-responder group(progression of disease. Asthma control test (ACT scores were analyzedone year before diagnosis, at the time of diagnosis of lung cancer, and at thetime of re-staging after cancer treatment.Results: All the asthmatics with lung cancer had worsening of their symptomsaccording to their ACT scores at the time of diagnosis of lung cancer comparedto scores in the preceding year (21.6

  19. Science and society: the communications revolution and cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, K

    2005-10-01

    Advances in communications technology, particularly with regards to computer-based media, have opened up exciting possibilities to intervene and influence the trajectory of cancer control, from disease prevention to survivorship, and to reduce the cancer burden. The resulting explosion in cancer information in the mass media and on the Internet, however, also offers challenges in terms of equality in access to information and the ability to act on it, as well as in making sure that it is accurate, readily available and easy to use. PMID:16195753

  20. Simultaneous cancer control and diagnosis with magnetic nanohybrid materials

    OpenAIRE

    Saadat, Reza; Renz, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Coated magnetite nanoparticles were linked to 68Ga complexes used in the positron emission tomography (PET) for a new technical approach to detect cancer tissue with radiopharmaceuticals. By substitution of the Ga isotope with an alpha emitter the same compound could be used for cancer treatment. Furthermore the nanoparticles were connected to pH-sensitive complexes, enabling a pH-controlled assembly/disassembly and therefore the spreading of the particles in the tissue. With this novel metho...

  1. Impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections in stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at evaluating the impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections on dosimetry of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Four-dimensional computed tomography data from 15 low stage non-small cell lung cancer patients was used. Treatment planning and dose calculations were done using pencil beam convolution algorithm of Varian Eclipse system with Modified Batho Power Law for tissue heterogeneity. Patient plans were generated with 6 MV co-planar non-opposing four to six field beams optimized with tissue heterogeneity corrections to deliver a prescribed dose of 60 Gy in three fractions to at least 95% of the planning target volume, keeping spinal cord dose < 10 Gy. The same plans were then regenerated without heterogeneity correction by recalculating previously optimized treatment plans keeping identical beam arrangements, field fluences and monitor units. Compared with heterogeneity corrected plans, the non-corrected plans had lower average minimum, mean, and maximum tumor doses by 13%, 8% and 6% respectively. The results indicate that tissue heterogeneity is an important determinant of dosimetric optimization of SBRT plans. (author)

  2. Impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections in stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Tania De

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at evaluating the impact of tissue heterogeneity corrections on dosimetry of stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Four-dimensional computed tomography data from 15 low stage non-small cell lung cancer patients was used. Treatment planning and dose calculations were done using pencil beam convolution algorithm of Varian Eclipse system with Modified Batho Power Law for tissue heterogeneity. Patient plans were generated with 6 MV co-planar non-opposing four to six field beams optimized with tissue heterogeneity corrections to deliver a prescribed dose of 60 Gy in three fractions to at least 95% of the planning target volume, keeping spinal cord dose <10 Gy. The same plans were then regenerated without heterogeneity correction by recalculating previously optimized treatment plans keeping identical beam arrangements, field fluences and monitor units. Compared with heterogeneity corrected plans, the non-corrected plans had lower average minimum, mean, and maximum tumor doses by 13%, 8%, and 6% respectively. The results indicate that tissue heterogeneity is an important determinant of dosimetric optimization of SBRT plans.

  3. DNA damage among thyroid cancer and multiple cancer cases, controls, and long-lived individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigurdson, A J; Hauptmann, M; Alexander, B J; Doody, M M; Thomas, C B; Struewing, J P; Jones, I M

    2004-08-24

    Variation in the detection, signaling, and repair of DNA damage contributes to human cancer risk. To assess capacity to modulate endogenous DNA damage among radiologic technologists who had been diagnosed with breast cancer and another malignancy (breast-other; n=42), early-onset breast cancer (early-onset, age {<=} 35; n=38), thyroid cancer (n=68), long-lived cancer-free individuals (hyper-normals; n=20) and cancer-free controls (n=49) we quantified DNA damage (single strand breaks and abasic sites) in untreated lymphoblastoid cell lines using the alkaline comet assay. Komet{trademark} software provided comet tail length, % DNA in tail (tail DNA), comet distributed moment (CDM), and Olive tail moment (OTM) summarized as the geometric mean of 100 cells. Category cut-points (median and 75th percentile) were determined from the distribution among controls. Tail length (for {>=} 75% vs. below the median, age adjusted) was most consistently associated with the highest odds ratios in the breast-other, early-onset, and thyroid cancer groups (with risk increased 10-, 5- or 19-fold, respectively, with wide confidence intervals) and decreased risk among the hyper-normal group. For the other three Comet measures, risk of breast-other was elevated approximately three-fold. Risk of early-onset breast cancer was mixed and risk of thyroid cancer ranged from null to a two-fold increase. The hyper-normal group showed decreased odds ratios for tail DNA and OTM, but not CDM. DNA damage, as estimated by all Comet measures, was relatively unaffected by survival time, reproductive factors, and prior radiation treatment. We detected a continuum of endogenous DNA damage that was highest among cancer cases, less in controls, and suggestively lowest in hyper-normal individuals. Measuring this DNA damage phenotype may contribute to the identification of susceptible sub-groups. Our observations require replication in a prospective study with a large number of pre-diagnostic samples.

  4. Implementation of Logic Flow in Planning and Production Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulewicz Robert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of analysis, the use of continuous flow of logic at the stage of production planning and control of the company producing furniture. The concept of continuous flow tends to regulate the flow of materials in a manner that provides the shortest flow path without unnecessary activities (Muda is a Japanese word meaning waste, a constant takt and defined throughput at constant resource requirements for the so-called transfer of material through the whole process. In the study Glenday’d sieve method was used to identify the correct area, which requires the value stream mapping, and areas called excessive complexity, which do not provide added value. The use of Glenday’s sieve method made it possible to identify areas in which it must be improve production capacity.

  5. Hanford Site surface soil radioactive contamination control plan, March 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Program is responsible to the US Department of Energy Richland Field Office, for the safe and cost-effective surveillance, maintenance, and decommissioning of surplus facilities and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 closures at the Hanford Site. This program also manages the Radiation Area Remedial Action that includes the surveillance, maintenance, decontamination, and/or interim stabilization of inactive burial grounds, cribs, ponds, trenches, and unplanned release sites. This plan addresses only the Radiation Area Remedial Action activity requirements for managing and controlling the contaminated surface soil areas associated with these inactive sites until they are remediated as part of the Hanford Site environmental restoration process. All officially numbered Radiation Area Remedial Action and non-Radiation Area Remedial Action contaminated surface soil areas are listed in this document so that a complete list of the sites requiring remediation is contained in one document

  6. Planning and control in fresh food supply chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Cecilie Maria; Chabada, Lukas; Dukovska-Popovska, Iskra;

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine the current state of research in the planning and control (P&C) literature in regards to fresh food supply chains (FFSC). Based on the literature review, important research areas are identified and serve as guidelines for defining future research...... directions. Design/methodology/approach The paper is based on a structured literature review of articles with the main focus on P&C of fresh food products. The review is based on a range of published works from main journals on supply chain management over the last 10 years. The gaps and challenges...... directions in this area. Practical implications The paper enhances the focus on P&C in FFSC in practice, and defines important implications for why and how P&C should be practiced from a supply chain perspective. Original/value The paper presents an overview of the literature on P&C issues of fresh food...

  7. Mammographic density and breast cancer: a comparison of related and unrelated controls in the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Linton, Linda; Martin, Lisa J.; Li, Qing; Huszti, Ella; Minkin, Salomon; John, Esther M.; Rommens, Johanna; Paterson, Andrew D.; Boyd, Norman F

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Percent mammographic density (PMD) is a strong and highly heritable risk factor for breast cancer. Studies of the role of PMD in familial breast cancer may require controls, such as the sisters of cases, selected from the same 'risk set' as the cases. The use of sister controls would allow control for factors that have been shown to influence risk of breast cancer such as race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status and a family history of breast cancer, but may introduce 'overmatching' ...

  8. A 4D treatment planning tool for the evaluation of motion effects on lung cancer treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a 4D treatment planning tool using an analytical model accounting for breathing motion is investigated to evaluate the motion effect on delivered dose for lung cancer treatments with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). The Monte Carlo EGS4/MCDOSE user code is used in the treatment planning dose calculation, and the patient CT data are converted into respective patient geometry files for Monte Carlo dose calculation. The model interpolates CT images at different phases of the breathing cycle from patient CT scans taken at end inspiration and end expiration phases and the chest wall position. Correlation between the voxels in a reference CT dataset and the voxels in the interpolated CT datasets at any breathing phases is established so that the dose to a voxel can be accumulated through the entire breathing cycle. Simulated lung tumors at different locations are used to demonstrate our model in 3DCRT for lung cancer treatments. We demonstrated the use of a 4D treatment planning tool in evaluating the breathing motion effect on delivered dose for different planning margins. Further studies are being conducted to use this tool to study the lung motion effect through large-scale analysis and to implement this useful tool for treatment planning dose calculation and plan evaluation for 4D radiotherapy

  9. Cancer control in developing countries: using health data and health services research to measure and improve access, quality and efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangolle Alfred CT

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is a rapidly increasing problem in developing countries. Access, quality and efficiency of cancer services in developing countries must be understood to advance effective cancer control programs. Health services research can provide insights into these areas. Discussion This article provides an overview of oncology health services in developing countries. We use selected examples from peer-reviewed literature in health services research and relevant publicly available documents. In spite of significant limitations in the available data, it is clear there are substantial barriers to access to cancer control in developing countries. This includes prevention, early detection, diagnosis/treatment and palliation. There are also substantial limitations in the quality of cancer control and a great need to improve economic efficiency. We describe how the application of health data may assist in optimizing (1 Structure: strengthening planning, collaboration, transparency, research development, education and capacity building. (2 Process: enabling follow-up, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality assurance. (3 Outcome: facilitating evaluation, monitoring and improvement of national cancer control efforts. There is currently limited data and capacity to use this data in developing countries for these purposes. Summary There is an urgent need to improve health services for cancer control in developing countries. Current resources and much-needed investments must be optimally managed. To achieve this, we would recommend investment in four key priorities: (1 Capacity building in oncology health services research, policy and planning relevant to developing countries. (2 Development of high-quality health data sources. (3 More oncology-related economic evaluations in developing countries. (4 Exploration of high-quality models of cancer control in developing countries. Meeting these needs will require national, regional and

  10. Cancer and polluted work places: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjuus, H; Lislerud, A; Lyngdal, P T; Omland, H; Stave, O; Langård, S

    1982-02-01

    The possible association between selected cancers and polluted work places has been studied in a hospital-based, case-control study. By dividing all jobs in the participants working career into "polluted" and "clean", a crude measure for the total industrial exposure a worker experiences throughout his life was established. Among 103 age-matched, case-control pairs the overall estimated relative risk (RR) for exposed subjects (greater than or equal to 10 years in a polluted work place) of developing cancer compared to nonexposed (less than 10 years in a polluted work place) was 1.1. The only subgroup where a significant difference was found between the cases and the controls was the lung cancer subgroup (RR = 4.0, p = 0.02, two-tailed). When the 30 lung cancer cases were compared to an alternative control group consisting of 60 subjects matched for age and smoking habits, an estimated RR of 4.5 was found. A moderate, but not significant association between lung cancer and definite asbestos exposure was also found (RR: 2.3). As most workers are exposed to a variety of industrial agents throughout their working careers, further development of methods for characterizing combined exposures are needed, both for retrospective and prospective purposes. PMID:7068240

  11. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 ± 0.80 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 ± 1.22 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy

  12. The effect of photon energy on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Won Mo; Park, Jong Min; Choi, Chang Heon; Ha, Sung Whan; Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate the effect of common three photon energies (6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans to treat prostate cancer patients. Twenty patients with prostate cancer treated locally to 81.0 Gy were retrospectively studied. 6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV IMRT plans for each patient were generated using suitable planning objectives, dose constraints, and 8-field setting. The plans were analyzed in terms of dose-volume histogram for the target coverage, dose conformity, organs at risk (OAR) sparing, and normal tissue integral dose. Regardless of the energies chosen at the plans, the target coverage, conformity, and homogeneity of the plans were similar. However, there was a significant dose increase in rectal wall and femoral heads for 6-MV compared to those for 10-MV and 15-MV. The V20 Gy of rectal wall with 6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV were 95.6%, 88.4%, and 89.4% while the mean dose to femoral heads were 31.7, 25.9, and 26.3 Gy, respectively. Integral doses to the normal tissues in higher energy (10-MV and 15-MV) plans were reduced by about 7%. Overall, integral doses in mid and low dose regions in 6-MV plans were increased by up to 13%. In this study, 10-MV prostate IMRT plans showed better OAR sparing and less integral doses than the 6-MV. The biological and clinical significance of this finding remains to be determined afterward, considering neutron dose contribution.

  13. Current concepts in F18 FDG PET/CT-based Radiation Therapy planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy eLee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer therapy for early stage as well as locally advanced lung cancer. The use of F18 FDG PET/CT has come to the forefront of lung cancer staging and overall treatment decision-making. FDG PET/CT parameters such as standard uptake value and metabolic tumor volume provide important prognostic and predictive information in lung cancer. Importantly, FDG PET/CT for radiation planning has added biological information in defining the gross tumor volume as well as involved nodal disease. For example, accurate target delineation between tumor and atelectasis is facilitated by utilizing PET and CT imaging. Furthermore, there has been meaningful progress in incorporating metabolic information from FDG PET/CT imaging in radiation treatment planning strategies such as radiation dose escalation based on standard uptake value thresholds as well as using respiratory gated PET and CT planning for improved target delineation of moving targets. In addition, PET/CT based follow-up after radiation therapy has provided the possibility of early detection of local as well as distant recurrences after treatment. More research is needed to incorporate other biomarkers such as proliferative and hypoxia biomarkers in PET as well as integrating metabolic information in adaptive, patient-centered, tailored radiation therapy.

  14. Use of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Radiation Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezban Berberoğlu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy (RT plays an important role in the treatment of lung cancer. Accurate diagnosis and staging are crucial in the delivery of RT with curative intent. Target miss can be prevented by accurate determination of tumor contours during RT planning. Currently, tumor contours are determined manually by computed tomography (CT during RT planning. This method leads to differences in delineation of tumor volume between users. Given the change in RT tools and methods due to rapidly developing technology, it is now more significant to accurately delineate the tumor tissue. F18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (F18 FDG PET/CT has been established as an accurate method in correctly staging and detecting tumor dissemination in lung cancer. Since it provides both anatomic and biologic information, F18 FDG PET decreases interuser variability in tumor delineation. For instance, tumor volumes may be decreased as atelectasis and malignant tissue can be more accurately differentiated, as well as better evaluation of benign and malignant lymph nodes given the difference in FDG uptake. Using F18 FDG PET/CT, the radiation dose can be escalated without serious adverse effects in lung cancer. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of F18 FDG PET/CT for RT planning in lung cancer.

  15. SU-E-T-170: Evaluation of Rotational Errors in Proton Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, S; Zhao, L; Ramirez, E; Singh, H; Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of rotational (roll, yaw, and pitch) errors in proton therapy planning of lung cancer. Methods: A lung cancer case treated at our center was used in this retrospective study. The original plan was generated using two proton fields (posterior-anterior and left-lateral) with XiO treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using uniform scanning proton therapy system. First, the computed tomography (CT) set of original lung treatment plan was re-sampled for rotational (roll, yaw, and pitch) angles ranged from −5° to +5°, with an increment of 2.5°. Second, 12 new proton plans were generated in XiO using the 12 re-sampled CT datasets. The same beam conditions, isocenter, and devices were used in new treatment plans as in the original plan. All 12 new proton plans were compared with original plan for planning target volume (PTV) coverage and maximum dose to spinal cord (cord Dmax). Results: PTV coverage was reduced in all 12 new proton plans when compared to that of original plan. Specifically, PTV coverage was reduced by 0.03% to 1.22% for roll, by 0.05% to 1.14% for yaw, and by 0.10% to 3.22% for pitch errors. In comparison to original plan, the cord Dmax in new proton plans was reduced by 8.21% to 25.81% for +2.5° to +5° pitch, by 5.28% to 20.71% for +2.5° to +5° yaw, and by 5.28% to 14.47% for −2.5° to −5° roll. In contrast, cord Dmax was increased by 3.80% to 3.86% for −2.5° to −5° pitch, by 0.63% to 3.25% for −2.5° to −5° yaw, and by 3.75% to 4.54% for +2.5° to +5° roll. Conclusion: PTV coverage was reduced by up to 3.22% for rotational error of 5°. The cord Dmax could increase or decrease depending on the direction of rotational error, beam angles, and the location of lung tumor.

  16. SU-E-T-170: Evaluation of Rotational Errors in Proton Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of rotational (roll, yaw, and pitch) errors in proton therapy planning of lung cancer. Methods: A lung cancer case treated at our center was used in this retrospective study. The original plan was generated using two proton fields (posterior-anterior and left-lateral) with XiO treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using uniform scanning proton therapy system. First, the computed tomography (CT) set of original lung treatment plan was re-sampled for rotational (roll, yaw, and pitch) angles ranged from −5° to +5°, with an increment of 2.5°. Second, 12 new proton plans were generated in XiO using the 12 re-sampled CT datasets. The same beam conditions, isocenter, and devices were used in new treatment plans as in the original plan. All 12 new proton plans were compared with original plan for planning target volume (PTV) coverage and maximum dose to spinal cord (cord Dmax). Results: PTV coverage was reduced in all 12 new proton plans when compared to that of original plan. Specifically, PTV coverage was reduced by 0.03% to 1.22% for roll, by 0.05% to 1.14% for yaw, and by 0.10% to 3.22% for pitch errors. In comparison to original plan, the cord Dmax in new proton plans was reduced by 8.21% to 25.81% for +2.5° to +5° pitch, by 5.28% to 20.71% for +2.5° to +5° yaw, and by 5.28% to 14.47% for −2.5° to −5° roll. In contrast, cord Dmax was increased by 3.80% to 3.86% for −2.5° to −5° pitch, by 0.63% to 3.25% for −2.5° to −5° yaw, and by 3.75% to 4.54% for +2.5° to +5° roll. Conclusion: PTV coverage was reduced by up to 3.22% for rotational error of 5°. The cord Dmax could increase or decrease depending on the direction of rotational error, beam angles, and the location of lung tumor

  17. 30 CFR 71.301 - Respirable dust control plan; approval by District Manager and posting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... District Manager and posting. 71.301 Section 71.301 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... plan; approval by District Manager and posting. (a) The District Manager will approve respirable dust control plans on a mine-by-mine basis. When approving respirable dust control plans, the District...

  18. Advancing cancer control research in an emerging news media environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine C; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Blake, Kelly D; Cappella, Joseph N

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is both highly feared and highly newsworthy, and there is a robust body of research documenting the content and effects of cancer news coverage on health behaviors and policy. Recent years have witnessed ongoing, transformative shifts in American journalism alongside rapid advances in communication technology and the public information environment. These changes create a pressing need to consider a new set of research questions, sampling strategies, measurement techniques, and theories of media effects to ensure continued relevance and adaptation of communication research to address critical cancer control concerns. This paper begins by briefly reviewing what we know about the role of cancer news in shaping cancer-related beliefs, attitudes, behaviors, and policies. We then outline challenges and opportunities, both theoretical and methodological, posed by the rapidly changing news media environment and the nature of audience engagement. We organize our discussion around three major shifts associated with the emerging news media environment as it relates to health communication: 1) speed and dynamism of news diffusion, 2) increased narrowcasting of media content for specialized audiences, and 3) broadened participation in shaping media content. In so doing, we articulate a set of questions for future theory and research, in an effort to catalyze innovative communication scholarship to improve cancer prevention and control. PMID:24395988

  19. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 6: Controls and guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings from the Space Systems and Technology Advisory Committee (SSTAC)/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on controls and guidance are included. Topics covered include: strategic avionics technology planning and bridging programs; avionics technology plan; vehicle health management; spacecraft guidance research; autonomous rendezvous and docking; autonomous landing; computational control; fiberoptic rotation sensors; precision instrument and telescope pointing; microsensors and microinstruments; micro guidance and control initiative; and earth-orbiting platforms controls-structures interaction.

  20. [On some theoretic issues about planned control of population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q

    1981-01-01

    There are basic differences between Marxian and Malthusian population thought: 1) For Marx, population is a social phenomenon--human reproduction belongs to social production and population laws are social laws influenced by the means of production. Marx recognized that human reproduction had both a natural and a social relationship, but Malthus population theory only acknowledges the natural relationship of human reproduction. Malthus believed that if population grows without interference, it will double every 25 years, or geometrically. It is evident Malthus substituted biological possibilities for the objective inevitability of population evolution, and natural population laws for social population laws. 2) Marx believed that social production is the unification of material production and human reproduction. Material production is controlled and necessitates control of human reproduction. For Malthus, the growth of the means of subsistence never catches up with the growth of the population, but Marx said that even though land is limited, the development of production forces is limitless. Marxist theory postulates that man is basically a producer, but that population must be planned because not everyone is a producer (e.g., children and the unskilled). 3) Malthus believed that in capitalistic countries unemployment, famine, and poverty stem from too many births by the laboring class, i.e., population determines the economy. The only solution to population problems is to have fewer children. For Marx, economics determines population problems. PMID:12159326

  1. Improving Construction Workflow- The Role of Production Planning and Control

    OpenAIRE

    Hamzeh, Farook

    2009-01-01

    The Last PlannerTM System (LPS) has been implemented on construction projects to increase work flow reliability, a precondition for project performance against productivity and progress targets. The LPS encompasses four tiers of planning processes: master scheduling, phase scheduling, lookahead planning, and commitment / weekly work planning. This research highlights deficiencies in the current implementation of LPS including poor lookahead planning which results in poor linkage between weekl...

  2. Comparison of the dose distribution obtained from dosimetric systems with intensity modulated radiotherapy planning system in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, M.; Uslu, D. Koçyiǧit; Ertunç, C.; Karalı, T.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) plan of prostate cancer patients with different dose verification systems in dosimetric aspects and to compare these systems with each other in terms of reliability, applicability and application time. Dosimetric control processes of IMRT plan of three prostate cancer patients were carried out using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), ion chamber (IC) and 2D Array detector systems. The difference between the dose values obtained from the dosimetric systems and treatment planning system (TPS) were found to be about % 5. For the measured (TLD) and calculated (TPS) doses %3 percentage differences were obtained for the points close to center while percentage differences increased at the field edges. It was found that TLD and IC measurements will increase the precision and reliability of the results of 2D Array.

  3. 76 FR 27622 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption of Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption of Control Techniques Guidelines for...

  4. Environmental Control Plan for the 100 Area Reactor Standing Legacy Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Environmental Control Plan is for the standing legacy waste removal activities at the 100-D, -H, -KE, and -KW reactors. The purpose of this plan is to establish requirements for the specific project or functional activity

  5. CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kavoussi

    1973-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many carcinogenetic elements in industry and it is for this reason that study and research concerning the effect of these materials is carried out on a national and international level. The establishment and growth of cancer are affected by different factors in two main areas:-1 The nature of the human or animal including sex, age, point and method of entry, fat metabolism, place of agglomeration of carcinogenetic material, amount of material absorbed by the body and the immunity of the body.2 The different nature of the carcinogenetic material e.g. physical, chemical quality, degree of solvency in fat and purity of impurity of the element. As the development of cancer is dependent upon so many factors, it is extremely difficult to determine whether a causative element is principle or contributory. Some materials are not carcinogenetic when they are pure but become so when they combine with other elements. All of this creates an industrial health problem in that it is almost impossible to plan an adequate prevention and safety program. The body through its system of immunity protects itself against small amounts of carcinogens but when this amount increases and reaches a certain level the body is not longer able to defend itself. ILO advises an effective protection campaign against cancer based on the Well –equipped laboratories, Well-educated personnel, the establishment of industrial hygiene within factories, the regular control of safety systems, and the implementation of industrial health principles and research programs.

  6. [Monitoring of a HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) plan for Listeria monocytogenes control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoni, G B; Apraiz, P M

    2003-01-01

    The monitoring of a HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) plan for the Listeria monocytogenes control in the cooked and frozen meat section of a thermo-processing meat plant was evaluated. Seventy "non-product-contact" surface samples and fourteen finished product samples were examined. Thirty eight positive sites for the presence of Listeria sp. were obtained. Twenty-two isolates were identified as L. monocytogenes, two as L. seeligeri and fourteen as L. innocua. Non isolates were obtained from finished product samples. The detection of L. monocytogenes in cooked and frozen meat section environment showed the need for the HACCP plan to eliminate or prevent product contamination in the post-thermal step. PMID:14976876

  7. Prioritizing strategies for comprehensive liver cancer control in Asia: a conjoint analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridges John FP

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver cancer is a complex and burdensome disease, with Asia accounting for 75% of known cases. Comprehensive cancer control requires the use of multiple strategies, but various stakeholders may have different views as to which strategies should have the highest priority. This study identified priorities across multiple strategies for comprehensive liver cancer control (CLCC from the perspective of liver cancer clinical, policy, and advocacy stakeholders in China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. Concordance of priorities was assessed across the region and across respondent roles. Methods Priorities for CLCC were examined as part of a cross-sectional survey of liver cancer experts. Respondents completed several conjoint-analysis choice tasks to prioritize 11 strategies. In each task, respondents judged which of two competing CLCC plans, consisting of mutually exclusive and exhaustive subsets of the strategies, would have the greatest impact. The dependent variable was the chosen plan, which was then regressed on the strategies of different plans. The restricted least squares (RLS method was utilized to compare aggregate and stratified models, and t-tests and Wald tests were used to test for significance and concordance, respectively. Results Eighty respondents (69.6% were eligible and completed the survey. Their primary interests were hepatitis (26%, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC (58%, metastatic liver cancer (10% and transplantation (6%. The most preferred strategies were monitoring at-risk populations (pclinician education (pnational guidelines (ptransplantation infrastructure (p=0.009 was valued lower in China, measuring social burden (p=0.037 was valued higher in Taiwan, and national guidelines (p=0.025 was valued higher in China. Priorities did not differ across stakeholder groups (p=0.438. Conclusions Priorities for CLCC in Asia include monitoring at-risk populations, clinician education, national guidelines

  8. Lung Cancer Patients’ Decisions About Clinical Trials and the Theory of Planned Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Pratt, Christie L.; Bryant-George, Kathy; Caraway, Vicki D.; Roldan, Tere; Shaffer, Andrea; Shimizu, Cynthia O.; Vaughn, Elizabeth J.; Williams, Charles; Bepler, Gerold

    2011-01-01

    The theory of planned behavior explores the relationship between behavior, beliefs, attitudes, and intentions presupposing that behavioral intention is influenced by a person’s attitude about the behavior and beliefs about whether individuals, who are important to them, approve or disapprove of the behavior (subjective norm). An added dimension to the theory is the idea of perceived behavioral control, or the belief that one has control over performing the behavior. The theory of planned beha...

  9. RapidArc volumetric modulated therapy planning for prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming; Ohlhues, Lars; Medin, Joakim;

    2009-01-01

    clinical practice in May 2008 for treatment of prostate cancer patients. We report here our experiences with performing treatment planning using the Eclipse RapidArc optimization software for this patient group. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A stand-alone installation of Eclipse 8.5 with RapidArc optimization...... capability was performed at Rigshospitalet. Patient data for 8 prostate cancer patients were imported, most of whom were previously treated at Rigshospitalet using IMRT. Three of the patients were treated at Rigshospitalet using the RapidArc technique. Treatment plans were optimized using objectives as given......PURPOSE: Recently, Varian Medical Systems have announced the introduction of a new treatment technique, RapidArc, in which dose is delivered over a single gantry rotation with dynamically variable MLC positions, dose rate and gantry speed. At Rigshospitalet, the RapidArc technique was brought into...

  10. 76 FR 19257 - National Cancer Control Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-8381 Filed 4-5-11; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... disease. During National Cancer Control Month, we renew our commitment to increasing awareness about... from occasional smoking or secondhand smoke, is particularly harmful. Americans striving to quit...

  11. Serum estrogen levels and prostate cancer risk in the prostate cancer prevention trial: a nested case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Song; Till, Cathee; Kristal, Alan R.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Hsing, Ann W.; Tangen, Catherine M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Reichardt, Juergen K. V.; Tang, Li; Neuhouser, Marian L; Santella, Regina M.; William D Figg; Price, Douglas K.; Parnes, Howard L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Finasteride reduces prostate cancer risk by blocking the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. However, whether finasteride affects estrogens levels or change in estrogens affects prostate cancer risk is unknown. Methods These questions were investigated in a case–control study nested within the prostate cancer prevention trial (PCPT) with 1,798 biopsy-proven prostate cancer cases and 1,798 matched controls. Results Among men on placebo, no relationship of serum estroge...

  12. TWO OPTIMAL CONTROL PROBLEMS IN CANCER CHEMOTHERAPY WITH DRUG RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Krabs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate two well-known basic optimal control problems forchemotherapeutic cancer treatment modified by introducing a timedependent “resistance factor”. This factor should be responsible for the effect of the drug resistance of tumor cells on the dynamical growth for the tumor. Both optimal control problems have common pointwise but different integral constraints on the control. We show that in both models the usually practised bang-bang control is optimal if the resistance is sufficiently strong. Further, we discuss different optimal strategies in both models for general resistance.

  13. Meta-Analysis of a Multi-Ethnic, Breast Cancer Case-Control Targeted Sequencing Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ablorh, Akweley

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer in American women, is a heritable disease with nearly one hundred known genetic risk factors. Using next generation sequencing, we explored the contribution of genetics at 12 GWAS-identified loci to breast cancer susceptibility in a multi-ethnic breast cancer case-control study. Methods: The study population consists of 4,611 breast cancer cases and controls (2,316 cases and 2,295 controls) from four mutually exclusive ethnicities: Africa...

  14. [Occupational risks for laryngeal cancer: a case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, Sergio Guerra; Eluf-Neto, José; Travier, Noemie; Wünsch Filho, Victor; Arcuri, Arline Sydneia Abel; Kowalski, Luís Paulo; Boffetta, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    The most solidly established risk factors for laryngeal cancer are tobacco and alcohol. As for occupational factors, the only established carcinogen is exposure to strong inorganic acid mists. However, asbestos, pesticides, paints, gasoline, diesel engine emissions, dusts, and other factors have been reported in the literature as occupational agents that increase the risk of laryngeal cancer. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted to investigate occupational risk factors for laryngeal cancer. Detailed data on smoking, alcohol consumption, and occupational history were collected for 122 laryngeal cancers and 187 controls matched by frequency (according to sex and age). Laryngeal cancer was associated with exposure to respirable free crystalline silica (OR = 1.83; 95%CI: 1.00-3.36), soot (from coal, coke, fuel oil, or wood) (odds ratio - OR = 1.78; 95% confidence interval - 95%CI: 1.03-3.03), fumes (OR = 2.55; 95%CI: 1.14-5.67), and live animals (OR = 1.80; 95%CI: 1.02-3.19). PMID:17546338

  15. REPRODUCTIVE FACTORS AND COLORECTAL CANCER RISK. Case - control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ruseva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. The role of the female sex hormones in the etiology of the disease is very intriguing. Reproductive factors are surrogate measure of lifetime exposition to the sex hormones. Purpose: Our aim is to investigate the association between the reproductive factors and colorectal carcinoma risk. Materials and methods: We include 234 Bulgarian women in our study – 117 cases with colorectal cancer and the same number of healthy controls. Cases are divided into three groups according to the localization of the tumor. We conduct case-control study, using questionnaires about reproductive factors. We use the following statistical methods – descriptive, variational analysis, binary logistic regression. Results: We observed that only the age at menopause is associated with colorectal cancer risk, and this factor has strongest protective effect in the proximal colon (95% CI - 0,051-0,781, OR – 0,200, p – 0,021. Conclusion: Analyzing our data we observed that among Bulgarian women the only reproductive factor that show association with the risk of colorectal cancer is the age at menopause.

  16. Spatial analysis of childhood cancer: a case/control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Ramis

    Full Text Available Childhood cancer was the leading cause of death among children aged 1-14 years for 2012 in Spain. Leukemia has the highest incidence, followed by tumors of the central nervous system (CNS and lymphomas (Hodgkin lymphoma, HL, and Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, NHL. Spatial distribution of childhood cancer cases has been under concern with the aim of identifying potential risk factors.The two objectives are to study overall spatial clustering and cluster detection of cases of the three main childhood cancer causes, looking to increase etiological knowledge.We ran a case-control study. The cases were children aged 0 to 14 diagnosed with leukemia, lymphomas (HL and NHL or CNS neoplasm in five Spanish regions for the period 1996-2011. As a control group, we used a sample from the Birth Registry matching every case by year of birth, autonomous region of residence and sex with six controls. We geocoded and validated the address of the cases and controls. For our two objectives we used two different methodologies. For the first, for overall spatial clustering detection, we used the differences of K functions from the spatial point patterns perspective proposed by Diggle and Chetwynd and the second, for cluster detection, we used the spatial scan statistic proposed by Kulldorff with a level for statistical significance of 0.05.We had 1062 cases of leukemia, 714 cases of CNS, 92 of HL and 246 of NHL. Accordingly we had 6 times the number of controls, 6372 controls for leukemia, 4284 controls for CNS, 552 controls for HL and 1476 controls for NHL. We found variations in the estimated empirical D(s for the different regions and cancers, including some overall spatial clustering for specific regions and distances. We did not find statistically significant clusters.The variations in the estimated empirical D(s for the different regions and cancers could be partially explained by the differences in the spatial distribution of the population; however, according to the

  17. Radiation therapy planning with photons and protons for early and advanced breast cancer: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomax Antony J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Postoperative radiation therapy substantially decreases local relapse and moderately reduces breast cancer mortality, but can be associated with increased late mortality due to cardiovascular morbidity and secondary malignancies. Sophistication of breast irradiation techniques, including conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy, has been shown to markedly reduce cardiac and lung irradiation. The delivery of more conformal treatment can also be achieved with particle beam therapy using protons. Protons have superior dose distributional qualities compared to photons, as dose deposition occurs in a modulated narrow zone, called the Bragg peak. As a result, further dose optimization in breast cancer treatment can be reasonably expected with protons. In this review, we outline the potential indications and benefits of breast cancer radiotherapy with protons. Comparative planning studies and preliminary clinical data are detailed and future developments are considered.

  18. Street canyon ventilation control by proper planning and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakin Vladimir Vasil'evich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of street canyon ventilation control in major streets is a tool of air pollution prevention in them, protection of housing areas from excessive wind or preservation and intensification of existing wind speed in case of insufficient ventilation. The maximum permissible concentration of car exhaust pollutants with wind speed within comfortable and permissible values by physiological and hygienic criteria, are ensured as from 40 to 70 % of thoroughfares in major cities. The dependence of air pollution level on wind speed is comparable to its dependence on traffic intensity and ratio of buildings height (H to street width. But one has to take into account that, if the wind blows across the street, vortices form within the street canyon, which results in higher concentration of car exhaust pollutants near the downwind buildings. The objective of this work is to find the functional dependences of wind speed in a major street on its width and density of buildings, and also to find out which street configurations are favorable for formation of closed air circulation within it, resulting in insufficient aeration. The experimental research was done on a site for large-scale modeling of built-up urban territory, using cup anemometers. The coefficients of dependence of wind speed within a street on the types of buildings and on the street width were obtained. Characteristics of street layouts for control of aeration were determined. Building density rates for maximizing or optimizing the wind speed were determined. Street layouts are considered where stable vortices form between the buildings. For example, vortices within the street canyon’s cross-section appear when buildings squarish in ground plan situated far apart are replaced by oblong ones with the minimum allowed intervals of 15 meters between them (for 5-storeyed buildings; or intervals equal to the buildings’ height, or where the buildings are long and close together. With

  19. 42 CFR 84.42 - Proposed quality control plans; approval by the Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Proposed quality control plans; approval by the Institute. 84.42 Section 84.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Quality Control § 84.42 Proposed quality control plans; approval by the Institute. (a) Each...

  20. 75 FR 59180 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control Technique...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control... and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control Technique Guidelines for Paper... adopting the requirements of EPA's Control Technique Guidelines (CTG) for paper, film, and foil...

  1. Survivorship care planning in a comprehensive cancer center using an implementation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sofia F; Kircher, Sheetal M; Oden, Megan; Veneruso, Aubri; McKoy, June M; Pearman, Timothy; Penedo, Frank J

    2016-05-01

    Cancer survivorship care plans (SCPs) have been recommended to improve clinical care and patient outcomes. Research is needed to establish their efficacy and identify best practices. Starting in 2015, centers accredited by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer must deliver SCPs to patients completing primary cancer treatment with curative intent. We describe how we established routine SCP delivery at the Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chicago, Illinois, using the Quality Implementation Framework. We evaluated local practices, gathered clinician and patient stakeholder input, developed customized SCP templates within the electronic health record (EHR), and implemented 2 complementary delivery models. Clinician interviews (n = 41) and survey responses (n = 12), along with input from patients (n = 68) and a patient advisory board (n = 15), indicated support for SCPs and survivorship services. To promote feasible implementation and leverage existing workflows, we harmonized 2 SCP delivery models: integrated care within clinics where patients received treatment, and referral to a centralized survivorship clinic. We are implementing SCP delivery with prominent disease sites and will extend services to survivors of other cancers in the future. We developed four electronic disease-specific SCP templates for breast, colorectal, lung, and prostate cancers and a fifth, generic template that can be used for other malignancies. The templates reduced free-text clinician entry by auto-populating 20% of the fields from existing EHR data, and using drop-down menus for another 65%. Mean SCP completion time is 12 minutes (range, 10-15; n = 64). We designed our framework to facilitate ongoing evaluation of implementation and quality improvement. Funding/sponsorship Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Coleman Foundation, and the Lynn Sage Cancer Research Foundation. PMID:27258051

  2. Deformable planning CT to cone-beam CT image registration in head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to implement and validate a deformable CT to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image registration method in head-and-neck cancer to eventually facilitate automatic target delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twelve head-and-neck cancer patients underwent a planning CT and weekly CBCT during the 5-7 week treatment period. The 12 planning CT images (moving images) of these patients were registered to their weekly CBCT images (fixed images) via the symmetric force Demons algorithm and using a multiresolution scheme. Histogram matching was used to compensate for the intensity difference between the two types of images. Using nine known anatomic points as registration targets, the accuracy of the registration was evaluated using the target registration error (TRE). In addition, region-of-interest (ROI) contours drawn on the planning CT were morphed to the CBCT images and the volume overlap index (VOI) between registered contours and manually delineated contours was evaluated. Results: The mean TRE value of the nine target points was less than 3.0 mm, the slice thickness of the planning CT. Of the 369 target points evaluated for registration accuracy, the average TRE value was 2.6±0.6 mm. The mean TRE for bony tissue targets was 2.4±0.2 mm, while the mean TRE for soft tissue targets was 2.8±0.2 mm. The average VOI between the registered and manually delineated ROI contours was 76.2±4.6%, which is consistent with that reported in previous studies. Conclusions: The authors have implemented and validated a deformable image registration method to register planning CT images to weekly CBCT images in head-and-neck cancer cases. The accuracy of the TRE values suggests that they can be used as a promising tool for automatic target delineation on CBCT.

  3. Derivation of Simplified Models of Plan View Pattern Control Function for Plate Mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Zhi-jie; HU Xian-lei; ZHAO Zhong; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2007-01-01

    The plan view pattern control theoretical models were simplified. Under the condition of constant volume for the plan view pattern compensation, the relation between the thickness and the length can be simplified to the linearity in the segment for the plan view pattern control function. The compensation volume can be dispersed for easy calculation. By comparing the model calculation result with the actual result, it was concluded that the simplified model can be used for the online control process.

  4. Planning and control of automated material handling systems: The merge module

    OpenAIRE

    Haneyah, Sameh; Hurink, Johann; Schutten, Marco; Zijm, Henk; Schuur, Peter; Hu, Bo; Morasch, Karl; Stefan PICKL; Siegle, Markus

    2011-01-01

    We address the field of internal logistics, embodied in Automated Material Handling Systems (AMHSs), which are complex installations employed in sectors such as Baggage Handling, Physical Distribution, and Parcel & Postal. We work on designing an integral planning and real-time control architecture, and a set of generic algorithms for AMHSs. Planning and control of these systems need to be robust, and to yield close-to-optimal system performance. Currently, planning and control of AMHSs is hi...

  5. Negotiating Planning Gains through the British Development Control System

    OpenAIRE

    Jim Claydon; Bryan Smith

    1997-01-01

    The British planning system provides for the exercise of discretion in the interpretation of policy and at the operational level processing planning applications. That discretionary space is utilised to negotiate, often over the provision of planning gains. Three applications for commercial uses drawn from different parts of England are taken as case study examples. They are examined within the context of an analytical framework which identifies the activity of negotiation, the influences on ...

  6. Cancer care. Cancer plan--progress report: must try even harder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Rebecca

    2004-11-25

    Despite progress in some areas, major obstacle achieving a uniformly good service for cancer patients remain. PCTs' lack of expertise is holding back progress ending delays in diagnosis and treatment. SHAs need to be clearer with PCTs about the importance of meeting national targets. PMID:15597927

  7. A treatment planning approach to spatially fractionated megavoltage grid therapy for bulky lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to explore the treatment planning methods of spatially fractionated megavoltage grid therapy for treating bulky lung tumors using multileaf collimator (MLC). A total of 5 patients with lung cancer who had gross tumor volumes ranging from 277 to 635 cm3 were retrospectively chosen for this study. The tumors were from 6.5 to 9.6 cm at shortest dimension. Several techniques using either electronic compensation or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were used to create a variety of grid therapy plans on the Eclipse treatment planning system. The dose prescription point was calculated to the volume, and a dose of 20 Gy with 6-MV/15-MV beams was used in each plan. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) curves were obtained to evaluate dosimetric characteristics. In addition, DVH curves from a commercially available cerrobend grid collimator were also used for comparison. The linear-quadratic radiobiological response model was used to assess therapeutic ratios (TRs) and equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for all generated plans. A total of 6 different grid therapy plans were created for each patient. Overall, 4 plans had different electronic compensation techniques: Ecomps-Tubes, Ecomps-Circles, Ecomps-Squares, and Ecomps-Weave; the other 2 plans used IMRT and IMRT-Weave techniques. The DVH curves and TRs demonstrated that these MLC-based grid therapy plans can achieve dosimetric properties very similar to those of the cerrobend grid collimator. However, the MLC-based plans have larger EUDs than those with the cerrobend grid collimator. In addition, the field shaping can be performed for targets of any shape in MLC-based plans. Thus, they can deliver a more conformal dose to the targets and spare normal structures better than the cerrobend grid collimator can. The plans generated by the MLC technique demonstrated the advantage over the standard cerrobend grid collimator on accommodating targets and sparing normal structures. Overall, 6

  8. A treatment planning approach to spatially fractionated megavoltage grid therapy for bulky lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costlow, Heather N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zhang, Hualin, E-mail: hzhang@nmh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the treatment planning methods of spatially fractionated megavoltage grid therapy for treating bulky lung tumors using multileaf collimator (MLC). A total of 5 patients with lung cancer who had gross tumor volumes ranging from 277 to 635 cm{sup 3} were retrospectively chosen for this study. The tumors were from 6.5 to 9.6 cm at shortest dimension. Several techniques using either electronic compensation or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were used to create a variety of grid therapy plans on the Eclipse treatment planning system. The dose prescription point was calculated to the volume, and a dose of 20 Gy with 6-MV/15-MV beams was used in each plan. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) curves were obtained to evaluate dosimetric characteristics. In addition, DVH curves from a commercially available cerrobend grid collimator were also used for comparison. The linear-quadratic radiobiological response model was used to assess therapeutic ratios (TRs) and equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for all generated plans. A total of 6 different grid therapy plans were created for each patient. Overall, 4 plans had different electronic compensation techniques: Ecomps-Tubes, Ecomps-Circles, Ecomps-Squares, and Ecomps-Weave; the other 2 plans used IMRT and IMRT-Weave techniques. The DVH curves and TRs demonstrated that these MLC-based grid therapy plans can achieve dosimetric properties very similar to those of the cerrobend grid collimator. However, the MLC-based plans have larger EUDs than those with the cerrobend grid collimator. In addition, the field shaping can be performed for targets of any shape in MLC-based plans. Thus, they can deliver a more conformal dose to the targets and spare normal structures better than the cerrobend grid collimator can. The plans generated by the MLC technique demonstrated the advantage over the standard cerrobend grid collimator on accommodating targets and sparing normal structures. Overall, 6

  9. Pain Control In Cancer Patients By Opiate Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohagheghi M A

    2003-07-01

    current barriers, WHO stepwise model for cancer pain control and palliative care is recommended. Publishing Standard Treatment Guidelines for different levels of health care system is another recommended approach to optimize cancer pain."n 

  10. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy isocentric field plans and field in field (FIF) forward plans in the treatment of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rahbi, Zakiya Salem; Al Mandhari, Zahid; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al-Kindi, Fatma; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Anthony; Bhasi, Saju; Satyapal, Namrata; Rajan, Balakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed at comparing the planning and delivery efficiency between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), field-in-field, forward planned, intensity modulated radiotherapy (FIF-FP-IMRT), and inverse planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IP-IMRT). Treatment plans of 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer, 10 post-mastectomy treated to a prescribed dose of 45 Gy to the chest wall in 20 fractions, and 10 post-breast-conserving surgery to a prescribed dose of ...

  11. 76 FR 52917 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Adoption of Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ...; Adoption of Control Techniques Guidelines for Large Appliance and Metal Furniture Coatings AGENCY... same title, ``Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Adoption...

  12. Integrated Motion Planning and Autonomous Control Technology for Autonomous ISR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSCI and MIT propose to design, implement and test a comprehensive Integrated Mission Planning & Autonomous Control Technology (IMPACT) for Autonomous ISR...

  13. Dose planning objectives in anal canal cancer IMRT: the TROG ANROTAT experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Elizabeth, E-mail: elizabeth@mebrown.net [Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Cray, Alison [Peter MacCallum Cancer Cancer Centre, Box Hill, Victoria (Australia); Haworth, Annette [Peter MacCallum Cancer Cancer Centre, Box Hill, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Chander, Sarat [Peter MacCallum Cancer Cancer Centre, Box Hill, Victoria (Australia); Lin, Robert [Medica Oncology, Hurstville, New South Wales (Australia); Subramanian, Brindha; Ng, Michael [Radiation Oncology Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is ideal for anal canal cancer (ACC), delivering high doses to irregular tumour volumes whilst minimising dose to surrounding normal tissues. Establishing achievable dose objectives is a challenge. The purpose of this paper was to utilise data collected in the Assessment of New Radiation Oncology Treatments and Technologies (ANROTAT) project to evaluate the feasibility of ACC IMRT dose planning objectives employed in the Australian situation. Ten Australian centres were randomly allocated three data sets from 15 non-identifiable computed tomography data sets representing a range of disease stages and gender. Each data set was planned by two different centres, producing 30 plans. All tumour and organ at risk (OAR) contours, prescription and dose constraint details were provided. Dose–volume histograms (DVHs) for each plan were analysed to evaluate the feasibility of dose planning objectives provided. All dose planning objectives for the bone marrow (BM) and femoral heads were achieved. Median planned doses exceeded one or more objectives for bowel, external genitalia and bladder. This reached statistical significance for bowel V30 (P = 0.04), V45 (P < 0.001), V50 (P < 0.001), external genitalia V20 (P < 0.001) and bladder V35 (P < 0.001), V40 (P = 0.01). Gender was found to be the only significant factor in the likelihood of achieving the bowel V50 (P = 0.03) and BM V30 constraints (P = 0.04). The dose planning objectives used in the ANROTAT project provide a good starting point for ACC IMRT planning. To facilitate clinical implementation, it is important to prioritise OAR objectives and recognise factors that affect the achievability of these objectives.

  14. Dose planning objectives in anal canal cancer IMRT: the TROG ANROTAT experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is ideal for anal canal cancer (ACC), delivering high doses to irregular tumour volumes whilst minimising dose to surrounding normal tissues. Establishing achievable dose objectives is a challenge. The purpose of this paper was to utilise data collected in the Assessment of New Radiation Oncology Treatments and Technologies (ANROTAT) project to evaluate the feasibility of ACC IMRT dose planning objectives employed in the Australian situation. Ten Australian centres were randomly allocated three data sets from 15 non-identifiable computed tomography data sets representing a range of disease stages and gender. Each data set was planned by two different centres, producing 30 plans. All tumour and organ at risk (OAR) contours, prescription and dose constraint details were provided. Dose–volume histograms (DVHs) for each plan were analysed to evaluate the feasibility of dose planning objectives provided. All dose planning objectives for the bone marrow (BM) and femoral heads were achieved. Median planned doses exceeded one or more objectives for bowel, external genitalia and bladder. This reached statistical significance for bowel V30 (P = 0.04), V45 (P < 0.001), V50 (P < 0.001), external genitalia V20 (P < 0.001) and bladder V35 (P < 0.001), V40 (P = 0.01). Gender was found to be the only significant factor in the likelihood of achieving the bowel V50 (P = 0.03) and BM V30 constraints (P = 0.04). The dose planning objectives used in the ANROTAT project provide a good starting point for ACC IMRT planning. To facilitate clinical implementation, it is important to prioritise OAR objectives and recognise factors that affect the achievability of these objectives

  15. Survivorship Care Planning in Improving Quality of Life in Survivors of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Cancer Survivor; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  16. Enhancing a cancer prevention and control curriculum through interactive group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, L P; Gadalla, S M; Hamilton, J G; Heckman-Stoddard, B M; Kent, E E; Lai, G Y; Lin, S W; Luhn, P; Faupel-Badger, J M

    2012-06-01

    The Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course (Principles course) is offered annually by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. This 4-week postgraduate course covers the spectrum of cancer prevention and control research (e.g., epidemiology, laboratory, clinical, social, and behavioral sciences) and is open to attendees from medical, academic, government, and related institutions across the world. In this report, we describe a new addition to the Principles course syllabus, which was exclusively a lecture-based format for over 20 years. In 2011, cancer prevention fellows and staff designed and implemented small group discussion sessions as part of the curriculum. The goals of these sessions were to foster an interactive environment, discuss concepts presented during the Principles course, exchange ideas, and enhance networking among the course participants and provide a teaching and leadership opportunity to current cancer prevention fellows. Overall, both the participants and facilitators who returned the evaluation forms (n=61/87 and 8/10, respectively) reported a high satisfaction with the experience for providing both an opportunity to explore course concepts in a greater detail and to network with colleagues. Participants (93%) and facilitators (100%) stated that they would like to see this component remain a part of the Principles course curriculum, and both groups provided recommendations for the 2012 program. The design, implementation, and evaluation of this initial discussion group component of the Principles course are described herein. The findings in this report will not only inform future discussion group sessions in the Principles course but may also be useful to others planning to incorporate group learning into large primarily lecture-based courses. PMID:22661264

  17. Radiotherapy and subsequent thyroid cancer in German childhood cancer survivors: a nested case–control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is associated with a risk of subsequent neoplasms (SN) in childhood cancer survivors. It has been shown that children’s thyroid glands are especially susceptible. The aim is to quantify the risk of a second neck neoplasm after primary cancer radiotherapy with emphasis on thyroid cancer. We performed a nested case–control study: 29 individuals, diagnosed with a solid SN in the neck region, including 17 with thyroid cancer, in 1980–2002 and 57 matched controls with single neoplasms were selected from the database of the German Childhood Cancer Registry. We investigated the risk associated with radiotherapy exposure given per body region, adjusted for chemotherapy. 16/17 (94.1 %) thyroid SN cases, 9/12 (75 %) other neck SN cases and 34/57 (59.6 %) controls received radiotherapy, with median doses of 27.8, 25 and 24 Gy, respectively. Radiotherapy exposure to the neck region increased the risk of the other neck SNs by 4.2 % (OR = 1.042/Gy (95 %-CI 0.980-1.109)) and of thyroid SN by 5.1 % (OR = 1.051/Gy (95 %-CI 0.984-1.123)), and radiotherapy to the neck or spine region increased the thyroid risk by 6.6 % (OR = 1.066/Gy (95 %-CI 1.010-1.125)). Chemotherapy was not a confounder. Exposure to other body regions was not associated with increased risk. Radiotherapy in the neck or spine region increases the risk of thyroid cancer, while neck exposure increases the risk of any other solid SN to a similar extent. Other studies showed a decreasing risk of subsequent thyroid cancer for very high doses; we cannot confirm this

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Talking about Advanced Cancer Coping with Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer and Caregivers Questions ... Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer ...

  19. Evaluation of delivered dose for a clinical daily adaptive plan selection strategy for bladder cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To account for variable bladder size during bladder cancer radiotherapy, a daily plan selection strategy was implemented. The aim of this study was to calculate the actually delivered dose using an adaptive strategy, compared to a non-adaptive approach. Material and methods: Ten patients were treated to the bladder and lymph nodes with an adaptive full bladder strategy. Interpolated delineations of bladder and tumor on a full and empty bladder CT scan resulted in five PTVs for which VMAT plans were created. Daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scans were used for plan selection. Bowel, rectum and target volumes were delineated on these CBCTs, and delivered dose for these was calculated using both the adaptive plan, and a non-adaptive plan. Results: Target coverage for lymph nodes improved using an adaptive strategy. The full bladder strategy spared the healthy part of the bladder from a high dose. Average bowel cavity V30Gy and V40Gy significantly reduced with 60 and 69 ml, respectively (p < 0.01). Other parameters for bowel and rectum remained unchanged. Conclusions: Daily plan selection compared to a non-adaptive strategy yielded similar bladder coverage and improved coverage for lymph nodes, with a significant reduction in bowel cavity V30Gy and V40Gy only, while other sparing was limited

  20. Quality control in screening programs for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The malignancy of the cervix is one of the few locations avoidable cancers, if detected before it progresses to the infiltration. The most efficient way of early detection is through a screening program to provide women undertaking a regular and quality Pap smear. If this test results abnormal, the program offers easier access to specialized care, effective treatment, and follow-up. The objective of this article is to present usefulness of methods for quality control used in screening programs for cervical cancer to detect their inadequacies. Here are some factors and conditions that must be considered in each of the steps to take, for a cervical cancer screening program to be successful and to meet the objectives proposed in reducing mortality due to this cause. This document contains some useful indexes calculated to ensure quality throughout the process. There should be the measurement of quality throughout the screening process that allows collecting of reliable data as well as correcting deficiencies

  1. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy planning using multicriteria optimization for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandour, Sarah; Matzinger, Oscar; Pachoud, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) multicriteria optimization (MCO) algorithm clinically available in the RayStation treatment planning system (TPS) and its ability to reduce treatment planning time while providing high dosimetric plan quality. Nine patients with localized prostate cancer who were previously treated with 78 Gy in 39 fractions using VMAT plans and rayArc system based on the direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO) algorithm were selected and replanned using the VMAT-MCO system. First, the dosimetric quality of the plans was evaluated using multiple conformity metrics that account for target coverage and sparing of healthy tissue, used in our departmental clinical protocols. The conformity and homogeneity index, number of monitor units, and treatment planning time for both modalities were assessed. Next, the effects of the technical plan parameters, such as constraint leaf motion CLM (cm/°) and maximum arc delivery time T (s), on the accuracy of delivered dose were evaluated using quality assurance passing rates (QAs) measured using the Delta4 phantom from ScandiDos. For the dosimetric plan's quality analysis, the results show that the VMAT-MCO system provides plans comparable to the rayArc system with no statistical difference for V95% (p < 0.01), D1% (p < 0.01), CI (p < 0.01), and HI (p < 0.01) of the PTV, bladder (p < 0.01), and rectum (p < 0.01) constraints, except for the femoral heads and healthy tissues, for which a dose reduction was observed using MCO compared with rayArc (p < 0.01). The technical parameter study showed that a combination of CLM equal to 0.5 cm/degree and a maximum delivery time of 72 s allowed the accurate delivery of the VMAT-MCO plan on the Elekta Versa HD linear accelerator. Planning evaluation and dosimetric measurements showed that VMAT-MCO can be used clinically with the advantage of enhanced planning process efficiency by reducing the treatment planning time

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Computed Tomography–Based Volumetric Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Daniel R., E-mail: drsimpson@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Carmona, Ruben; McMurtrie, Riley M.; Einck, John; Mell, Loren K. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Harrison, Terry [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Mundt, Arno J.; Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose/Objectives: A report of clinical outcomes of a computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) technique for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six women with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB to IVA cervical carcinoma diagnosed between 2007 and 2014 were treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy followed by high-dose-rate (HDR) IGBT. All patients underwent planning CT simulation at each implantation. A high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) encompassing any visible tumor and the entire cervix was contoured on the simulation CT. When available, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at implantation to assist with tumor delineation. The prescription dose was prescribed to the HRCTV. Results: The median follow-up time was 17 months. Thirteen patients (17%) had an MRI done before brachytherapy, and 16 patients (21%) were treated without MRI guidance. The mean EBRT/IGBT sum 2-Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) delivered to the 90% volume of the HRCTV was 86.3 Gy. The mean maximum EQD2s delivered to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectum, sigmoid, and bladder were 67.5 Gy, 66.2 Gy, and 75.3 Gy, respectively. The 2-year cumulative incidences of local, locoregional, and distant failure were 5.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4%-14.8%), 15.1% (95% CI: 5.4%-29.4%), and 24.3% (95% CI: 12.1%-38.9%), respectively. The 2-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 75% (95% CI, 61%-91%) and 73% (95% CI, 60%-90%), respectively. Twenty-nine patients (38%) experienced grade ≥2 acute toxicity, with 5 cases of acute grade 3 toxicity and no grade ≥4 toxicities. One patient experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. No other late grade ≥3 events were observed. Conclusions: This is the largest report to date of CT/MRI-based IGBT for the treatment of cervical cancer. The results are promising, with excellent local control and acceptable

  3. Clinical validation of FDG-PET/CT in the radiation treatment planning for patients with oesophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijs, Christina T.; Beukema, Jannet C.; Woutersen, Dankert; Mul, Veronique E.; Berveling, Maaike J.; Pruim, Jan; van der Jagt, Eric J.; Hospers, Geke A. P.; Groen, Henk; Plukker, John Th.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to determine the proportion of locoregional recurrences (LRRs) that could have been prevented if radiotherapy treatment planning for oesophageal cancer was based on PET/CT instead of CT. Materials and methods: Ninety oesophageal cancer patients, elig

  4. Cancer Control Planners’ Perceptions and Use of Evidence-Based Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Hannon, Peggy A.; Maria E. Fernandez; Williams, Rebecca; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Escoffery, Cam; Kreuter, Matthew W.; Pfeiffer, Debra; Kegler, Michelle C.; Reese, LeRoy; Mistry, Ritesh; Bowen, Deborah J.

    2010-01-01

    The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (CPCRN) surveyed 282 cancer control planners to inform its efforts to increase the use of evidence-based cancer control programs (EBPs; programs that have been scientifically tested and successfully changed behavior). Respondents included planners from organizations in state Comprehensive Cancer Control coalitions as well as other governmental and non-governmental organizations, and community-based coalitions. Respondents provided information...

  5. Role of spiral computed Tomography in the diagnosis and treatment planning of patients with colorectal cancer and peritoneal carcinomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of CT of the abdomen and pelvis in 21 patients with colorectal cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis were analysed. The study was compared with data obtained at surgical exploration. Location and size of peritoneal implants were evaluated according to peritoneal cancer index. The study shows a lack of sensitivity of single slice spiral CT for peritoneal carcinomatosis detection in patients with colorectal cancer and limited value of the method in planning of surgical treatment

  6. Cancer control and the communication innovation in South Korea: implications for cancer disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, the number of cancer survivors in South Korea has reached nearly one million with a survival rate of 49.4%. However, integrated supportive care for cancer survivors is lagging. One area in which the current cancer control policy needs updating is in the utilization of information and communication technology (ICT). The remarkable progress in the field of ICT over the past 10 years presents exciting new opportunities for health promotion. Recent communication innovations are conducive to the exchange of meta-information, giving rise to a new service area and transforming patients into active medical consumers. Consequently, such innovations encourage active participation in the mutual utilization and sharing of high-quality information. However, these benefits from new ICTs will almost certainly not be equally available to all, leading to so-called communication inequalities where cancer survivors from lower socioeconomic classes will likely have more limited access to the best means of making use of the health information. Therefore, most essentially, emphasis must be placed on helping cancer survivors and their caregivers utilize such advances in ICT to create a more efficient flow of health information, thereby reducing communication inequalities and expanding social support. Once we enhance access to health information and better manage the quality of information, as a matter of fact, we can expect an alleviation of the health inequalities faced by cancer survivors. PMID:23886120

  7. TRIANA. A control strategy for Smart Grids. Forecasting, planning and real-time control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing demand, extra fluctuation and a large share of distributed electricity generation will put more stress on the electricity supply chain. Therefore, changes are required in the supply chain to maintain a properly functioning, stable and affordable grid. Currently the supply chain is completely driven by demand by constantly adapting the production to the demand. The exploitation of flexibility on the demand side of the supply chain allows for a more efficient and sustainable electricity production. Techniques like controllable distributed generation, distributed storage, and smart appliances can introduce this required flexibility. To exploit the new flexibility, the grid has to become more intelligent, i.e. become a Smart Grid. In this thesis TRIANA, a three step control strategy for the Smart Grid is presented. In the first step of TRIANA, the forecasting step, the scheduling freedom (flexibility) of a device is determined for each individual device by a local controller. In the second step, a (central) planner tries to exploit the freedom of the devices determined in the first step for his objective. The last step of TRIANA is the real-time control step performed by the local controller achieving the planning in the best possible way. In order to analyze the impact of control methodologies for Smart Grid, a simulator based on an energy model has been built. The basic elements of the model are individual devices and between devices energy streams are defined. The energy streams are connected via so called pools, which represent the physical connections between the devices. To study the effectiveness of the control methodology and study the most economic use of the flexibility of devices, multiple scenarios have been simulated. Simulations show that TRIANA can optimize the energy flows and can control the operation of the domestic devices in an economic manner without discomfort for the residents. TRIANA is a methodology capable of adjusting the energy

  8. Effect of heterogeneity correction on dosimetric parameters of radiotherapy planning for thoracic esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Masao, E-mail: naka2008@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Yoshida, Kenji; Nishimura, Hideki; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Okayama, Takanobu [Radiology Department, Kobe University Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Sasaki, Ryohei [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of heterogeneity correction (HC) on dosimetric parameters in 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for patients with thoracic esophageal cancer. We retrospectively analyzed 20 patients. Two treatment plans were generated for each patient using a superposition algorithm on the Xio radiotherapy planning system. The first plan was calculated without HC. The second was a new plan calculated with HC, using identical beam geometries and maintaining the same number of monitor units as the first. With regard to the planning target volume (PTV), the overall mean differences in the prescription dose, maximum dose, mean dose, and dose that covers 95% of the PTV between the first and second plans were 1.10 Gy (1.8%), 1.35 Gy (2.2%), 1.10 Gy (1.9%), and 0.56 Gy (1.0%), respectively. With regard to parameters related to the organs at risk (OARs), the mean differences in the absolute percentages of lung volume receiving greater than 5, 10, 20, and 30 Gy (lung V{sub 5}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, and V{sub 30}) between the first and second plans were 7.1%, 2.7%, 0.4%, and 0.5%, respectively. These results suggest that HC might have a more pronounced effect on the percentages of lung volume receiving lower doses (e.g., V{sub 5} and V{sub 10}) than on the dosimetric parameters related to the PTV and other OARs.

  9. A comparison of different three-dimensional treatment planning techniques for localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Four different three-dimensional planning techniques for localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer were compared with regard to dose homogeneity within the target volume and dose to organs at risk, dependent upon tumor stage. Patients and Methods: Six patients with stage T1, 7 patients with stage T2 and 4 patients with stage T3 were included in this study. Four different 3D treatment plans (rotation, 4-field, 5-field and 6-field technique) were calculated for each patient. Dose was calculated with the reference point at the isocenter (100%). The planning target volume was encompassed within the 95% isodose surface. All the techniques used different shaped portal for each beam. Dose volume histograms were created and compared for the planning target volume and the organs at risk (33%, 50%, 66% volume level) in all techniques. Results: The 4 different three-dimensional planning techniques revealed no differences concerning dose homogeneity within the planning target volume. The dose volume distribution at organs at risk show differences between the calculated techniques. In our study the best protection for bladder and rectum in stage T1 and T2 was achieved by the 6-field technique. A significant difference was achieved between 6-field and 4-field technique only in the 50% volume of the bladder (p=0.034), between the 6-field and rotation technique (all volume levels) and between 5-field and rotation technique (all volume levels). In stage T1, T2 6-field and 4-field technique in 50% (p-0.033) and 66% (p=0.011) of the rectum volume. In stage T3 a significant difference was not observed between the 4 techniques. The best protection of head of the femur was achieved by the rotation technique. Conclusion: In the localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer in stage T1 or T2 the best protection for bladder and rectum was achieved by a 3D-planned conformal 6-field technique. If the seminal vesicles have been included in the target volume and in the case of large

  10. Investigating dosimetric effect of rotational setup errors in IMPT planning of synchronous bilateral lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric effect of rotational setup errors on the synchronous bi-lateral lung cancer plans generated by the intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT technique.Methods: The original IMPT plans were generated in for the left planning target volume (PTV and right PTV of the left lung and right lung, respectively. Each plan was generated using two beams (lateral and posterior-anterior with an isocenter placed at the center of the corresponding PTV. The IMPT plans were optimized for a total dose of 74 Gy[RBE] prescribed to each PTV with 2 Gy(RBE per fraction. Original plans were recalculated by introducing simulated rotational errors. For each PTV, 18 rotational plans (±1⁰, ±2⁰, and ±3⁰ for each of the yaw, roll, and pitch rotations were generated. Results: Rotational errors caused the reduction in the clinical target volume (CTV and PTV coverage in new rotational IMPT plans when compared to the original IMPT lung plans. The CTV D99 was reduced by up to 13.3%, 9.1%, and 5.9% for the yaw (+3⁰, roll (-3⁰, and pitch (+3⁰, respectively. The PTV D95 was reduced by up to 8.7%, 7.3%, and 4.6% for the yaw (+3⁰, roll (-3⁰, and pitch (+3⁰, respectively. The PTV V100 showed the highest deviation with a reduction of dose coverage by up to 40.1%, 31.8%, and 33.9% for the yaw (-3⁰, roll (-3⁰, and pitch (+3⁰ respectively. Conclusion: The rotational setup errors with magnitude of ≥2⁰ can produce a significant loss of dose coverage to the target volume in the IMPT of a synchronous bi-lateral lung cancer. The yaw had the most severe impact on the dosimetric results when compared to other two rotational errors (roll and pitch.

  11. 77 FR 66469 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... meeting of the aforementioned committee: Name: Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control..., regarding the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes...

  12. UNIFORM-1 Ground System: Mission Planning, Scheduling, Control, and Data Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Yamaura, Shusaku; Otani, Tomomi; SATO, Naoko; Morita, Katsumi; Koyama, Toru; Miyata, Kikuko

    2014-01-01

    Mission planning and scheduling is an essential part of satellite operations, and traditional satellites have a big, complex ground system which takes care of their operations planning, resource allocation, scheduling, and so on. As small satellites become more and more complex, their capability have been increased and so has the need of proper planning and control; it is necessary to have a good planning system in order to maximize the functionality of a small satellite by effectively and ef...

  13. Dietary calcium intake and the risk of colorectal cancer: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Changwoo; Shin, Aesun; Lee, Jeonghee; Lee, Jeeyoo; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Jeongseon

    2015-01-01

    Background High intake of dietary calcium has been thought to be a protective factor against colorectal cancer. To explore the dose-response relationship in the associations between dietary calcium intake and colorectal cancer risk by cancer location, we conducted a case-control study among Korean population, whose dietary calcium intake levels are relatively low. Methods The colorectal cancer cases and controls were recruited from the National Cancer Center in Korea between August 2010 and A...

  14. Interim animal control plan Modoc National Wildlife refuge Alturas California May 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Management plan to reduce predation impact on refuge bird species. Document includes bird predator control, burrowing mammal control, purpose, species to be...

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of planning target volume margin reduction for prostate cancer via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively estimate the dosimetric benefits of the image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system for the prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery. The cases of eleven patients who underwent IMRT for prostate cancer without a prostatectomy at our institution between October 2012 and April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. For every patient, clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins were uniformly used: 3 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, and 15 mm. For each margin size, the IMRT plans were independently optimized by one medical physicist using Pinnalce3 (ver. 8.0.d, Philips Medical System, Madison, WI) in order to maintain the plan quality. The maximum geometrical margin (MGM) for every CT image set, defined as the smallest margin encompassing the rectum at least at one slice, was between 13 mm and 26 mm. The percentage rectum overlapping PTV (%V ROV ), the rectal normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and the mean rectal dose (%RD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. However the bladder NTCP remained around zero to some extent regardless of the increase of PTV margin while the percentage bladder overlapping PTV (%V BOV ) and the mean bladder dose (%BD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. Without relatively large rectum or small bladder, the increase observed for rectal NTCP, %RDmean and %BD mean per 1-mm PTV margin size were 1.84%, 2.44% and 2.90%, respectively. Unlike the behavior of the rectum or the bladder, the maximum dose on each femoral head had little effect on PTV margin. This quantitative study of the PTV margin reduction supported that IG-IMRT has enhanced the clinical effects over prostate cancer with the reduction of normal organ complications under the similar level of PTV control.

  16. Predictive Control, Competitive Model Business Planning, and Innovation ERP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nourani, Cyrus F.; Lauth, Codrina

    2015-01-01

    New optimality principles are put forth based on competitive model business planning. A Generalized MinMax local optimum dynamic programming algorithm is presented and applied to business model computing where predictive techniques can determine local optima. Based on a systems model an enterprise...... is not viewed as the sum of its component elements, but the product of their interactions. The paper starts with introducing a systems approach to business modeling. A competitive business modeling technique, based on the author's planning techniques is applied. Systemic decisions are based on common...... organizational goals, and as such business planning and resource assignments should strive to satisfy higher organizational goals. It is critical to understand how different decisions affect and influence one another. Here, a business planning example is presented where systems thinking technique, using Causal...

  17. Disease Prevention and Control Plan: Seney National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Disease Contingency Plan for Seney NWR provides background information on disease surveillance; an inventory of Refuge personnel, equipment, and resources; and...

  18. Animal Control Plan Iroquois National Wildlife refuge 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Waterfowl production objectives, according to the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge Master Plan, are to create habitat supporting the production of 8,000 ducks and...

  19. SU-E-T-266: Proton PBS Plan Design and Robustness Evaluation for Head and Neck Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe a newly designed proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) planning technique for radiotherapy of patients with bilateral oropharyngeal cancer, and to assess plan robustness. Methods: We treated 10 patients with proton PBS plans using 2 posterior oblique field (2F PBS) comprised of 80% single-field uniform dose (SFUD) and 20% intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). All patients underwent weekly CT scans for verification. Using dosimetric indicators for both targets and organs at risk (OARs), we quantitatively compared initial plans and verification plans using student t-tests. We created a second proton PBS plan for each patient using 2 posterior oblique plus 1 anterior field comprised of 100% SFUD (3F PBS). We assessed plan robustness for both proton plan groups, as well as a photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plan group by comparing initial and verification plans. Results: The 2F PBS plans were not robust in target coverage. D98% for clinical target volume (CTV) degraded from 100% to 96% on average, with maximum change Δ D98% of −24%. Two patients were moved to photon VMAT treatment due to insufficient CTV coverage on verification plans. Plan robustness was especially weak in the low-anterior neck. The 3F PBS plans, however, demonstrated robust target coverage, which was comparable to the VMAT photon plan group. Doses to oral cavity were lower in the Proton PBS plans compared to photon VMAT plans due to no lower exit dose to the oral cavity. Conclusion: Proton PBS plans using 2 posterior oblique fields were not robust for CTV coverage, due to variable positioning of redundant soft tissue in the posterior neck. We designed 3-field proton PBS plans using an anterior field to avoid long heterogeneous paths in the low neck. These 3-field proton PBS plans had significantly improved plan robustness, and the robustness is comparable to VMAT photon plans

  20. Analysis of CBCT image registration methods and the planning target volume margins for liver cancers using lipiodol as a direct surrogate for target localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the transitional shifts between with different sets of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the planning CT for liver cancer patients, and calculate the margins from clinical target volume (CTV) to the planning target volume (PTV) with and without image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Methods: Five liver cancer patients received radiotherapy after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). The first CBCT images (CBCT1) were obtained with Elekta CBCT plus active breathing control (ABC) system before treatment. The second CBCT images (CBCT2) were obtained after correcting the set-up errors and the third CBCT images (CBCT3) were obtained after treatment. The CBCT images were registered and matched with the planning CT images using lipiodol as a direct surrogate for target localization. The PTV margins were calculated by comparing the shift between planning CT and CBCT according to formula M =2.5 (Σ doctor2 + Σ set-up2 + Σ transter2 )1/2. Paired t-test was used to compare the differences between the results from CBCT1, CBCT2 and CBCT3. Results: The average transition shifts in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were 0.254, -0.612, 0.314 cm between planning CT and CBCT1; were 0.020, 0.014, -0.064 cm between planning CT and CBCT2; and they were -0.004, 0.042, -0.040 cm between planning CT and CBCT3. The PTV margins were LR 0.96 cm, SI 0.96 cm and AP 0.83 cm without IGRT, and LR 0.67 cm, SI 0.68 cm and AP 0.58 cm with IGRT. Conclusions: The PTV margins can be reduced by 3 mm with IGRT for liver cancer using lipiodol as a direct surrogate for target localization. (authors)

  1. Responsiveness of the planning control system in Hong Kong : the case of hotel development application

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Pok-shaan; 黃博栓

    2014-01-01

    Under the background of the perceived supply inelasticity of hotel property, the study seeks to examine the role of the planning control system in this perceived supply inelasticity through analysing the responsiveness of the planning control system to hotel property development. Based on the premises that a responsive planning system should(1) allocate land in right amount and good quality, (2) provide certainty to developers as to what is permissible, and (3) provide flexibility under chang...

  2. Strategic Planning in Air Traffic Control as a Multi-objective Stochastic Optimization Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Marceau, Gaétan; Savéant, Pierre; Schoenauer, Marc

    2013-01-01

    With the objective of handling the airspace sector congestion subject to continuously growing air traffic, we suggest to create a collaborative working plan during the strategic phase of air traffic control. The plan obtained via a new decision support tool presented in this article consists in a schedule for controllers, which specifies time of overflight on the different waypoints of the flight plans. In order to do it, we believe that the decision-support tool shall model directly the unce...

  3. Comparative research of spatial control in urban detailed planning in China and Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Chengzhi

    2008-01-01

    China is in a process of high-speed urbanization and industrialization which leads to increasingly serious environmental, cultural, and urban problems. Most of the existing problems are related with the spatial control factors in the urban detailed planning. Through a comparative research of spatial control in urban detailed planning in China and Germany, the dissertation is intended to identify the limitations of the Chinese regulatory planning and present a solution to the existing problems...

  4. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Planning for Primary Prostate Cancer With Selective Intraprostatic Boost Determined by {sup 18}F-Choline PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Yu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Wu, Lili [Department of Medical Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Hirata, Emily; Miyazaki, Kyle; Sato, Miles [Hamamatsu/Queen' s PET Imaging Center and Departments of Radiation Oncology and Oncology Research, The Queen' s Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States); Kwee, Sandi A., E-mail: kwee@hawaii.edu [Hamamatsu/Queen' s PET Imaging Center and Departments of Radiation Oncology and Oncology Research, The Queen' s Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States); John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated expected tumor control and normal tissue toxicity for prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with and without radiation boosts to an intraprostatically dominant lesion (IDL), defined by {sup 18}F-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with localized prostate cancer underwent {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT before treatment. Two VMAT plans, plan{sub 79} {sub Gy} and plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy}, were compared for each patient. The whole-prostate planning target volume (PTV{sub prostate}) prescription was 79 Gy in both plans, but plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy} added simultaneous boost doses of 100 Gy and 105 Gy to the IDL, defined by 60% and 70% of maximum prostatic uptake on {sup 18}F-choline PET (IDL{sub suv60%} and IDL{sub suv70%}, respectively, with IDL{sub suv70%} nested inside IDL{sub suv60%} to potentially enhance tumor specificity of the maximum point dose). Plan evaluations included histopathological correspondence, isodose distributions, dose-volume histograms, tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: Planning objectives and dose constraints proved feasible in 30 of 30 cases. Prostate sextant histopathology was available for 28 cases, confirming that IDL{sub suv60%} adequately covered all tumor-bearing prostate sextants in 27 cases and provided partial coverage in 1 case. Plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy} had significantly higher TCP than plan{sub 79} {sub Gy} across all prostate regions for α/β ratios ranging from 1.5 Gy to 10 Gy (P<.001 for each case). There were no significant differences in bladder and femoral head NTCP between plans and slightly lower rectal NTCP (endpoint: grade ≥ 2 late toxicity or rectal bleeding) was found for plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy}. Conclusions: VMAT can potentially increase the likelihood of tumor control in primary prostate cancer while observing normal tissue tolerances through

  5. Evaluation of a Knowledge-Based Planning Solution for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Automated and knowledge-based planning techniques aim to reduce variations in plan quality. RapidPlan uses a library consisting of different patient plans to make a model that can predict achievable dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for new patients and uses those models for setting optimization objectives. We benchmarked RapidPlan versus clinical plans for 2 patient groups, using 3 different libraries. Methods and Materials: Volumetric modulated arc therapy plans of 60 recent head and neck cancer patients that included sparing of the salivary glands, swallowing muscles, and oral cavity were evenly divided between 2 models, Model30A and Model30B, and were combined in a third model, Model60. Knowledge-based plans were created for 2 evaluation groups: evaluation group 1 (EG1), consisting of 15 recent patients, and evaluation group 2 (EG2), consisting of 15 older patients in whom only the salivary glands were spared. RapidPlan results were compared with clinical plans (CP) for boost and/or elective planning target volume homogeneity index, using HIB/HIE = 100 × (D2% − D98%)/D50%, and mean dose to composite salivary glands, swallowing muscles, and oral cavity (Dsal, Dswal, and Doc, respectively). Results: For EG1, RapidPlan improved HIB and HIE values compared with CP by 1.0% to 1.3% and 1.0% to 0.6%, respectively. Comparable Dsal and Dswal values were seen in Model30A, Model30B, and Model60, decreasing by an average of 0.1, 1.0, and 0.8 Gy and 4.8, 3.7, and 4.4 Gy, respectively. However, differences were noted between individual organs at risk (OARs), with Model30B increasing Doc by 0.1, 3.2, and 2.8 Gy compared with CP, Model30A, and Model60. Plan quality was less consistent when the patient was flagged as an outlier. For EG2, RapidPlan decreased Dsal by 4.1 to 4.9 Gy on average, whereas HIB and HIE decreased by 1.1% to 1.5% and 2.3% to 1.9%, respectively. Conclusions: RapidPlan knowledge-based treatment plans were comparable to CP if the patient

  6. Evaluation of a Knowledge-Based Planning Solution for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tol, Jim P., E-mail: j.tol@vumc.nl; Delaney, Alexander R.; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Automated and knowledge-based planning techniques aim to reduce variations in plan quality. RapidPlan uses a library consisting of different patient plans to make a model that can predict achievable dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for new patients and uses those models for setting optimization objectives. We benchmarked RapidPlan versus clinical plans for 2 patient groups, using 3 different libraries. Methods and Materials: Volumetric modulated arc therapy plans of 60 recent head and neck cancer patients that included sparing of the salivary glands, swallowing muscles, and oral cavity were evenly divided between 2 models, Model{sub 30A} and Model{sub 30B}, and were combined in a third model, Model{sub 60}. Knowledge-based plans were created for 2 evaluation groups: evaluation group 1 (EG1), consisting of 15 recent patients, and evaluation group 2 (EG2), consisting of 15 older patients in whom only the salivary glands were spared. RapidPlan results were compared with clinical plans (CP) for boost and/or elective planning target volume homogeneity index, using HI{sub B}/HI{sub E} = 100 × (D2% − D98%)/D50%, and mean dose to composite salivary glands, swallowing muscles, and oral cavity (D{sub sal}, D{sub swal}, and D{sub oc}, respectively). Results: For EG1, RapidPlan improved HI{sub B} and HI{sub E} values compared with CP by 1.0% to 1.3% and 1.0% to 0.6%, respectively. Comparable D{sub sal} and D{sub swal} values were seen in Model{sub 30A}, Model{sub 30B}, and Model{sub 60}, decreasing by an average of 0.1, 1.0, and 0.8 Gy and 4.8, 3.7, and 4.4 Gy, respectively. However, differences were noted between individual organs at risk (OARs), with Model{sub 30B} increasing D{sub oc} by 0.1, 3.2, and 2.8 Gy compared with CP, Model{sub 30A}, and Model{sub 60}. Plan quality was less consistent when the patient was flagged as an outlier. For EG2, RapidPlan decreased D{sub sal} by 4.1 to 4.9 Gy on average, whereas HI{sub B} and HI{sub E} decreased by 1.1% to

  7. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge : Law Enforcement Plan and Station Crowd Control Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge Law Enforcement Plan clarifies U.S. Fish and Wildlife enforcement policies as they apply to the Refuge. It provides...

  8. Cancer treatment as a game: integrating evolutionary game theory into the optimal control of chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemotherapy for metastatic cancer commonly fails due to evolution of drug resistance in tumor cells. Here, we view cancer treatment as a game in which the oncologists choose a therapy and tumors ‘choose’ an adaptive strategy. We propose the oncologist can gain an upper hand in the game by choosing treatment strategies that anticipate the adaptations of the tumor. In particular, we examine the potential benefit of exploiting evolutionary tradeoffs in tumor adaptations to therapy. We analyze a math model where cancer cells face tradeoffs in allocation of resistance to two drugs. The tumor ‘chooses’ its strategy by natural selection and the oncologist chooses her strategy by solving a control problem. We find that when tumor cells perform best by investing resources to maximize response to one drug the optimal therapy is a time-invariant delivery of both drugs simultaneously. However, if cancer cells perform better using a generalist strategy allowing resistance to both drugs simultaneously, then the optimal protocol is a time varying solution in which the two drug concentrations negatively covary. However, drug interactions can significantly alter these results. We conclude that knowledge of both evolutionary tradeoffs and drug interactions is crucial in planning optimal chemotherapy schedules for individual patients. (paper)

  9. Cancer treatment as a game: integrating evolutionary game theory into the optimal control of chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Paul A.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Brown, Joel S.

    2012-12-01

    Chemotherapy for metastatic cancer commonly fails due to evolution of drug resistance in tumor cells. Here, we view cancer treatment as a game in which the oncologists choose a therapy and tumors ‘choose’ an adaptive strategy. We propose the oncologist can gain an upper hand in the game by choosing treatment strategies that anticipate the adaptations of the tumor. In particular, we examine the potential benefit of exploiting evolutionary tradeoffs in tumor adaptations to therapy. We analyze a math model where cancer cells face tradeoffs in allocation of resistance to two drugs. The tumor ‘chooses’ its strategy by natural selection and the oncologist chooses her strategy by solving a control problem. We find that when tumor cells perform best by investing resources to maximize response to one drug the optimal therapy is a time-invariant delivery of both drugs simultaneously. However, if cancer cells perform better using a generalist strategy allowing resistance to both drugs simultaneously, then the optimal protocol is a time varying solution in which the two drug concentrations negatively covary. However, drug interactions can significantly alter these results. We conclude that knowledge of both evolutionary tradeoffs and drug interactions is crucial in planning optimal chemotherapy schedules for individual patients.

  10. 4D FDG-PET based treatment planning for IGRT in the treatment of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlexanderChi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available 18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET has changed the staging of, and the treatment response assessment for lung cancer over the past decades dramatically. The improved accuracy in tumor identification with FDG-PET has led to its increased utilization in target volume delineation for radiotherapy treatment planning in the treatment of lung cancer. Despite the increased ability to distinguish tumor and normal tissue with the help of PET/CT registration, how to best delineate the PET avid tumor volume continues to be controversial as the PET intensity can be influenced by multiple machine and patient related factors. One major factor influencing the PET intensity and image resolution in the thorax is respiratory motion. This problem may be minimized by 4D FDG-PET based treatment planning, which can further improve the resolution of tumor extent, and the delineation of the internal target volume. Here, we offer our perspectives on the utilization of 4D FDG-PET based treatment planning for thoracic image-guided radiotherapy.

  11. Forward Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning in Breast Cancer to Improve Dose Homogeneity: Feasibility of Class Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To explore forward planning methods for breast cancer treatment to obtain homogeneous dose distributions (using International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements criteria) within normal tissue constraints and to determine the feasibility of class solutions. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were optimized in a stepwise procedure for 60 patients referred for postlumpectomy irradiation using strict dose constraints: planning target volume (PTV)95% of >99%; V107% of 5Gy of 10Gy of 23.6 cm, additional beams were always required.

  12. A case study of radiotherapy planning for a bilateral metal hip prosthesis prostate cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to communicate the observed advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in a patient with bilateral metallic hip prostheses. In this patient with early-stage low-risk disease, a dose of 74 Gy was planned in two phases-an initial 50 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles and an additional 24 Gy to the prostate alone. Each coplanar beam avoided the prosthesis in the beam's eye view. Using the same target expansions for each phase, IMRT and 3D-conformal radiotherapy (CRT) plans were compared for target coverage and inhomogeneity as well as dose to the bladder and rectum. The results of the analysis demonstrated that IMRT provided superior target coverage with reduced dose to normal tissues for both individual phases of the treatment plan as well as for the composite treatment plan. The dose to the rectum was significantly reduced with the IMRT technique, with a composite V80 of 35% for the IMRT plan versus 70% for 3D-CRT plan. Similarly, the dose to the bladder was significantly reduced with a V80 of 9% versus 20%. Overall, various dosimetric parameters revealed the corresponding 3D-CRT plan would not have been acceptable. The results indicate significant success with IMRT in a clinical scenario where there were no curative alternatives for local treatment other than external beam radiotherapy. Therefore, definitive external beam radiation of prostate cancer patients with bilateral prosthesis is made feasible with IMRT. The work described herein may also have applicability to other groups of patients, such as those with gynecological or other pelvic malignancies

  13. Feasibility of the partial-single arc technique in RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suresh Rana; ChihYao Cheng

    2013-01-01

    The volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique, in the form of RapidArc, is widely used to treat prostate cancer. The full-single arc (f-SA) technique in RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment provides efficient treatment, but it also delivers a higher radiation dose to the rectum. This study aimed to compare the dosimetric results from the new partial-single arc (p-SA) technique with those from the f-SA technique in RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment. In this study, 10 patients with low-risk prostate cancer were selected. For each patient, two sets of RapidArc plans (f-SA and p-SA) were created in the Eclipse treatment planning system. The f-SA plan was created using one ful arc, and the p-SA plan was created using planning parameters identical to those of the f-SA plan but with anterior and posterior avoidance sectors. Various dosimetric parameters of the f-SA and p-SA plans were evaluated and compared for the same target coverage and identical plan optimization parameters. The f-SA and p-SA plans showed an average difference of ±1% for the doses to the planning target volume (PTV), and there were no clear differences in dose homogeneity or plan conformity. In comparison to the f-SA technique, the p-SA technique reduced the doses to the rectum by approximately 6.1% to 21.2%, to the bladder by approximately 10.3%to 29.5%, and to the penile bulb by approximately 2.2%. In contrast, the dose to the femoral heads, the integral dose, and the number of monitor units were higher in the p-SA plans by approximately 34.4%, 7.7%, and 9.2%, respectively. In conclusion, it is feasible to use the p-SA technique for RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment. For the same PTV coverage and identical plan optimization parameters, the p-SA technique is better in sparing the rectum and bladder without compromising plan conformity or target homogeneity when compared to the f-SA technique.

  14. P27 in cell cycle control and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe

    In order to survive, cells need tight control of cell cycle progression. The control mechanisms are often lost in human cancer cells. The cell cycle is driven forward by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The CDK inhibitors (CKIs) are important regulators of the CDKs. As the name implies, CKIs were...... distinct NHL entities however, shortened survival seems to correlate with high expression of p27. For definitive assessment of the role played by p27 in lymphomagenesis, and the prognostic value of p27 in these tumors, further studies of distinct NHL entities are needed. This review addresses the function...

  15. 75 FR 7282 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... Force guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening; Impact of the revised clinical screening recommendations for both breast and cervical cancer on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection...

  16. 76 FR 30723 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... for breast and cervical cancer screening; updates on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations regarding national program goals and...

  17. Comparisons of food intake between breast cancer patients and controls in Korean women

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Young; Hong, Yeong-Seon; Jeon, Hae-Myung; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Sung, Chung-Ja

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare food intakes between Korean breast cancer patients and a healthy control group. We compared the intake of nutrients of 117 food items between Korean breast cancer patients (n=97) and age matched healthy controls (n=97). Nutrient intake was estimated using a quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The mean caloric intake of breast cancer patients and healthy controls was not significantly different. Breast cancer patients consumed significantly less ...

  18. EtoPlan: a concept for concurrent manufacturing planning and control - Building holarchies for manufacture-to-order environments

    OpenAIRE

    Giebels, Mark Mathieu Theodorus

    2000-01-01

    An essential demand for future manufacturing control systems is the ability to deal with the increased complexity due to a higher product variety, smaller batches and shorter throughput times. In particular for manufacture-to-order (i.e. make- or engineer-to-order) environments it is generally recognised that future manufacturing planning and control systems have to become more flexible and integrative compared to the currently existing systems. The versatility in order characteristics calls ...

  19. Total antioxidant intake and prostate cancer in the Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS) study. A case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Russnes, Kjell M; Möller, Elisabeth; Wilson, Kathryn M.; Carlsen,Monica; Blomhoff, Rune; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Adami, Hans-Olov; Grönberg, Henrik; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Bälter, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    Background The total intake of dietary antioxidants may reduce prostate cancer risk but available data are sparse and the possible role of supplements unclear. We investigated the potential association between total and dietary antioxidant intake and prostate cancer in a Swedish population. Methods We used FFQ data from 1499 cases and 1112 controls in the population based case–control study Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS). The ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) assay was use...

  20. MRI-assisted cervix cancer brachytherapy pre-planning, based on application in paracervical anaesthesia: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimal applicator insertion is a precondition for the success of cervix cancer brachytherapy (BT). We aimed to assess feasibility and efficacy of MRI-assisted pre-planning, based on applicator insertion in para-cervical anaesthesia (PCA). Five days prior to BT, the pre-planning procedure was performed in 18 cervix cancer patients: tandem-ring applicator was inserted under PCA, pelvic MRI obtained and applicator removed. Procedure tolerability was assessed. High risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) and organs at risk were delineated on the pre-planning MRI, virtual needles placed at optimal positions, and dose planning performed. At BT, insertion was carried out in subarachnoidal anaesthesia according to pre-planned geometry. Pre-planned and actual treatment parameters were compared. Pre-planning procedure was well tolerated. Median difference between the pre-planned and actual needle insertion depth and position were 2 (0–10) mm and 4 (0–30) degrees, respectively. The differences between the pre-planned and actual geometric and dosimetric parameters were statistically non-significant. All actual needles were positioned inside the HR CTV and outside the organs at risk (OAR). Our pre-planning approach is well tolerated and effective. Pre-planned geometry and dose distribution can be reproduced at BT

  1. Informal work and formal plans: Articulating the active role of patients in cancer trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsted, R.; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Kousgaard, MB; Andersen, John Sahl

    2013-01-01

    Formal pathways models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer trajectories....... participation. When looking at integrated care from the perspective of patients, the development of a more holistic and personalized approach is needed....... patients' requests were not sufficiently supported in the professional organisation of work or formal planning. Patients' insertion and use of information in their trajectories challenged professional views and working processes. And the design of the formal pathway models limits the patients' active...

  2. Individualized margins in 3D conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer: analysis of physiological movements and their dosimetric impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, François; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, André

    2008-01-01

    In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage. PMID:18262123

  3. Individualized Margins in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy Planning for Lung Cancer: Analysis of Physiological Movements and Their Dosimetric Impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage

  4. Plans for the CIT Instrumentation and Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive experience with previous fusion experiments (TFTR, MFTF-B and others) is driving the design of the Instrumentation and Control System (I ampersand C) for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) to be built at Princeton. The new design will reuse much equipment from TFTR and will be subdivided into six major parts: machine control, machine data acquisition, plasma diagnostic instrument control and instrument data acquisition, the database, shot sequencing and safety interlocks. In a major departure from previous fusion experiment control systems, the CIT machine control system will be a commercial process control system. Since the machine control system will be purchased as a completely functional product, the authors will be able to concentrate development manpower in plasma diagnostic instrument control, data acquisition, data processing and analysis, and database systems. They will discuss the issues driving the design, give a design overview and state the requirements upon any prospective commercial process control system

  5. Radiological control FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1995 Site Support Program Plan (SSPP) brings year planning and execution year planning into a single document. The plan presented consists of the following four major sections: Overview and Introduction - Health physics has been renamed Radiological Control (RadCon) with the role of protecting workers, the public and the environment from the harmful effects of radiation resulting from the DOE Hanford Site Operations; Cost Baselines which contains cost, technical and schedule baselines; Execution Year work Plan - cost summaries and detailed descriptions of the work to be done; Appendix - including brief description of other project activities directly coupled to RadCon

  6. Prospective study evaluating the use of IV contrast on IMRT treatment planning for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Bottani, Beth; DeWees, Todd; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of exclusively using intravenous (IV) contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans on lung cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Methods: Eight patients with lung cancer (one small cell, seven nonsmall cell) scheduled to receive IMRT consented to acquisition of simulation CT scans with and without IV contrast. Clinical treatment plans optimized on the noncontrast scans were recomputed on contrast scans and dose coverage was compared, along with the γ passing rates. Results: IV contrast enhanced scans provided better target and critical structure conspicuity than the noncontrast scans. Using noncontrast scan as a reference, the median absolute/relative differences in mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the planning target volume (PTV) were −4.5 cGy/−0.09%, 41.1 cGy/0.62%, and −19.7 cGy/−0.50%, respectively. Regarding organs-at-risk (OARs), the median absolute/relative differences of maximum dose to heart was −13.3 cGy/−0.32%, to esophagus was −63.4 cGy/−0.89%, and to spinal cord was −16.3 cGy/−0.46%. The median heart region of interest CT Hounsfield Unit (HU) number difference between noncontrast and contrast scans was 136.4 HU (range, 94.2–161.8 HU). Subjectively, the regions with absolute dose differences greater than 3% of the prescription dose were small and typically located at the patient periphery and/or at the beam edges. The median γ passing rate was 0.9981 (range, 0.9654–0.9999) using 3% absolute dose difference/3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. Overall, all evaluated cases were found to be clinically equivalent. Conclusions: PTV and OARs dose differences between noncontrast and contrast scans appear to be minimal for lung cancer patients undergoing IMRT. Using IV contrast scans as the primary simulation dataset could increase treatment planning efficiency and accuracy by avoiding unnecessary scans, manually region overriding, and planning errors caused by

  7. Prospective study evaluating the use of IV contrast on IMRT treatment planning for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of exclusively using intravenous (IV) contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans on lung cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Methods: Eight patients with lung cancer (one small cell, seven nonsmall cell) scheduled to receive IMRT consented to acquisition of simulation CT scans with and without IV contrast. Clinical treatment plans optimized on the noncontrast scans were recomputed on contrast scans and dose coverage was compared, along with the γ passing rates. Results: IV contrast enhanced scans provided better target and critical structure conspicuity than the noncontrast scans. Using noncontrast scan as a reference, the median absolute/relative differences in mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the planning target volume (PTV) were −4.5 cGy/−0.09%, 41.1 cGy/0.62%, and −19.7 cGy/−0.50%, respectively. Regarding organs-at-risk (OARs), the median absolute/relative differences of maximum dose to heart was −13.3 cGy/−0.32%, to esophagus was −63.4 cGy/−0.89%, and to spinal cord was −16.3 cGy/−0.46%. The median heart region of interest CT Hounsfield Unit (HU) number difference between noncontrast and contrast scans was 136.4 HU (range, 94.2–161.8 HU). Subjectively, the regions with absolute dose differences greater than 3% of the prescription dose were small and typically located at the patient periphery and/or at the beam edges. The median γ passing rate was 0.9981 (range, 0.9654–0.9999) using 3% absolute dose difference/3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. Overall, all evaluated cases were found to be clinically equivalent. Conclusions: PTV and OARs dose differences between noncontrast and contrast scans appear to be minimal for lung cancer patients undergoing IMRT. Using IV contrast scans as the primary simulation dataset could increase treatment planning efficiency and accuracy by avoiding unnecessary scans, manually region overriding, and planning errors caused by

  8. The Value of Accuracy in Information for Planning and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The author discusses some approaches to assessing the impact of inaccurate information when the planning system involves formulae of the management accounting type or models of the operational research variety. The most appropriate method for quantifying information value in management information systems is through Bayesian analysis and decision…

  9. Ozone-depleting-substance control and phase-out plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Title VI of the Federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 requires regulation of the use and disposal of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) (e.g., Halon, Freon). Several important federal regulations have been promulgated that affect the use of such substances at the Hanford Site. On April 23, 1993, Executive Order (EO) 12843, Procurement Requirements and Policies for Federal Agencies for Ozone-Depleting Substances (EPA 1993) was issued for Federal facilities to conform to the new US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations implementing the Clean Air Act of 1963 (CAA), Section 613, as amended. To implement the requirements of Title VI the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), issued a directive to the Hanford Site contractors on May 25, 1994 (Wisness 1994). The directive assigns Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) the lead in coordinating the development of a sitewide comprehensive implementation plan to be drafted by July 29, 1994 and completed by September 30, 1994. The implementation plan will address several areas where immediate compliance action is required. It will identify all current uses of ODSs and inventories, document the remaining useful life of equipment that contains ODS chemicals, provide a phase-out schedule, and provide a strategy that will be implemented consistently by all the Hanford Site contractors. This plan also addresses the critical and required elements of Federal regulations, the EO, and US Department of Energy (DOE) guidance. This plan is intended to establish a sitewide management system to address the clean air requirements

  10. National Tuberculosis Control Plan 2016-2020 : Towards elimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries G; Riesmeijer R; RGI; I& V

    2016-01-01

    Het Nationaal plan tuberculosebestrijding 2016-2020 geeft aan welke maatregelen de komende vijf jaar nodig zijn om de tuberculosebestrijding in Nederland verder te verbeteren. Het doel is om de overdracht van tuberculose en het aantal patiënten de komende vijf jaar met 25 procent terug te dringen. D

  11. Lower Breast Cancer Risk among Women following the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research Lifestyle Recommendations: EpiGEICAM Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Adela Castelló; Miguel Martín; Amparo Ruiz; Casas, Ana M.; Baena-Cañada, Jose M; Virginia Lope; Silvia Antolín; Pedro Sánchez; Manuel Ramos; Antonio Antón; Montserrat Muñoz; Begoña Bermejo; Ana De Juan-Ferré; Carlos Jara; José I Chacón

    2015-01-01

    Background According to the “World Cancer Research Fund” and the “American Institute of Cancer Research” (WCRF/AICR) one in four cancer cases could be prevented through a healthy diet, weight control and physical activity. Objective To explore the association between the WCRF/AICR recommendations and risk of breast cancer. Methods During the period 2006 to 2011 we recruited 973 incident cases of breast cancer and 973 controls from 17 Spanish Regions. We constructed a score based on 9 of the W...

  12. Retrospective Estimation of the Quality of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans for Lung Cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, Jihye; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    This study estimated the planning quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 42 lung cancer cases to provide preliminary data for the development of a planning quality assurance algorithm. Organs in or near the thoracic cavity (ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, liver, esophagus, spinal cord, and bronchus) were selected as organs at risk (OARs). Radiotherapy plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), OAR-PTV distance and OAR-PTV overlap volume, and the V10Gy, V20Gy, and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of the OARs. The CI, CVI, and HI of the PTV were 0.54 - 0.89 , 0.90 - 1.00 , and 0.11 - 0.41, respectively. The mean EUDs (V10Gy, V20Gy) of the ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, esophagus, cord, liver, heart, and bronchus were 8.07 Gy (28.06, 13.17), 2.59 Gy (6.53, 1.18), 7.02 Gy (26.17, 12.32), 3.56 Gy (13.56, 4.48), 0.72 Gy (2.15, 0.91), 5.14 Gy (19.68, 8.62), and 10.56 Gy (36.08, 19.79), respectivel...

  13. Retrospective estimate of the quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jihye; Yoon, Myonggeun; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-07-01

    This study estimated the planning quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 42 lung cancer cases to provide preliminary data for the development of a planning quality assurance algorithm. Organs in or near the thoracic cavity (ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, liver, esophagus, spinal cord, and bronchus) were selected as organs at risk (OARs). Radiotherapy plans were compared by using the conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), the OAR-PTV distance and the OAR-PTV overlap volume, and the V10 Gy , V20 Gy , and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of the OARs. The CI, CVI, and HI of the PTV were 0.54-0.89 (0.77 ± 0.08), 0.90-1.00 (0.98 ± 0.02), and 0.11-0.41, (0.15 ± 0.05), respectively. The mean EUDs (V10 Gy , V20 Gy ) of the ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, esophagus, cord, liver, heart, and bronchus were 8.07 Gy (28.06, 13.17), 2.59 Gy (6.53, 1.18), 7.02 Gy (26.17, 12.32), 3.56 Gy (13.56, 4.48), 0.72 Gy (2.15, 0.91), 5.14 Gy (19.68, 8.62), and 10.56 Gy (36.08, 19.79), respectively. EUDs tended to decrease as the OAR-PTV distance increased and the OAR-PTV overlap volume decreased. Because the plans in this study were from a single department, relatively few people were involved in treatment planning. Differences in treatment results for a given patient would be much more pronounced if many departments were involved.

  14. Model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yusheng; Fuentes, David

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the major idea and mathematical aspects of model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) are presented. In particular, a computational framework and its major components developed by authors in recent years are reviewed. The framework provides the backbone for not only treatment planning but also real-time surgical monitoring and control with a focus on MR thermometry enabled predictive control and applications to image-guided ...

  15. A software architecture for hard real-time execution of automatically synthesized plans or control laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoppers, Marcel

    1994-01-01

    The design of a flexible, real-time software architecture for trajectory planning and automatic control of redundant manipulators is described. Emphasis is placed on a technique of designing control systems that are both flexible and robust yet have good real-time performance. The solution presented involves an artificial intelligence algorithm that dynamically reprograms the real-time control system while planning system behavior.

  16. Dose, volume, and tumor control prediction in primary radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: To evaluate the influence of total dose and tumor volume on local control and survival in primary radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical course and CT-derived pre- and post-therapeutic tumor volume data of 135 patients with NSCLC undergoing primary radiotherapy at our department between 1989 and 1996. Among these, a total of 192 spatially separated tumor volumes (135 primary tumors, 1 additional intrapulmonary tumor, and 56 involved lymph nodes) were available for analysis. In all patients, treatment was planned using CT-based three-dimensional treatment planning. The dose to each tumor volume was derived from the individual dose plans. Mean total dose was 59.9 Gy (range: 30-80 Gy). All but 3 patients were followed until death. For local control analysis, each tumor was analyzed separately, and its remission status was determined in serial follow-up CT scans. A total of 784 CT scans were analyzed. Actuarial local control analysis was performed for the 192 separated tumor volumes, and survival analysis was performed for the 135 patients. Tumor control probability was calculated using a Poisson statistical model. Results: Overall 1- and 2-year local control rate was 50% and 37%, respectively. The 2-year local control rate for tumors 200 ccm was 51%, 22%, and 10%, respectively (p=0.02). The 2-year local control rate for dose levels ≤60 Gy and >60 Gy was 28% and 43% (p100 ccm were controlled more than 2 years. Multivariate analysis revealed tumor volume, total dose, histopathologic type, and grading as significant and independent prognostic factors for local control. The number of delay days by split course (if used) and application of chemotherapy was not found to influence local control. Overall 1- and 2-year survival rate was 42% and 13%. Total radiation dose, chemotherapy, and T and N stage--but not tumor volume--were found to be independent and significant prognostic factors

  17. A case-control study of asthma and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmasri, Wafic M; Tran, Therese H; Mulla, Zuber D

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have found inverse associations between allergy and the development of certain tumors. The authors sought to determine if there was an association between asthma and ovarian cancer. A case-control study was conducted using Florida hospital data (year 2001). Discharge diagnoses were coded using the ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification). Cases were 1,582 women whose principal discharge diagnosis was a malignant neoplasm of the ovary. Two control series were used: 4,744 women whose principal diagnosis was an upper limb bone fracture, and 21,830 women whose principal diagnosis was an acute myocardial infarction. Odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for age, race-ethnicity, Medicaid status, obesity, and smoking were calculated. Cases were 30% less likely than fracture control to be asthmatics (adjusted OR = 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.49-0.99, p = .04). Similarly, cases when compared to acute myocardial infarction controls were significantly less likely to have asthma (adjusted OR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.45-0.87, p = .005). The results of this statewide exploratory study suggest that individuals with asthma may have a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer than nonasthmatics. PMID:20439229

  18. Breast cancer risk associated with different HRT formulations: a register-based case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Thai Do; Möhner Sabine; Heinemann Lothar AJ; Dinger Juergen C; Assmann Anita

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous epidemiological studies have inconsistently shown a modestly increased breast cancer risk associated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Limited information is available about different formulations – particularly concerning different progestins. Methods A case-control study was performed within Germany in collaboration with regional cancer registries and tumor centers. Up to 5 controls were matched breast cancer cases. Conditional logistic regression analysis...

  19. Opportunity for Collaboration: A Conceptual Model of Success in Tobacco Control and Cancer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Frances A Stillman; Schmitt, Carol L.; Rosas, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Collaborations between cancer prevention and tobacco control programs can leverage scarce resources to address noncommunicable diseases globally, but barriers to cooperation and actual collaboration are substantial. To foster collaboration between cancer prevention and tobacco control programs, the Global Health Partnership conducted research to identify similarities and differences in how the 2 programs viewed program success. Methods Using concept mapping, cancer prevention and...

  20. Simultaneous cancer control and diagnosis with magnetic nanohybrid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renz, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Summary Coated magnetite nanoparticles were linked to 68Ga complexes used in the positron emission tomography (PET) for a new technical approach to detect cancer tissue with radiopharmaceuticals. By substitution of the Ga isotope with an alpha emitter the same compound could be used for cancer treatment. Furthermore the nanoparticles were connected to pH-sensitive complexes, enabling a pH-controlled assembly/disassembly and therefore the spreading of the particles in the tissue. With this novel method of combining detection and treatment simultaneously, the amount of medical exposure could be minimized for the patient. The results demonstrate that magnetite nanoparticles can effectively be functionalized with PET isotopes and pH sensitive complexes in order to use them as a new type of radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:26925360

  1. Control Concepts in Educational Planning. Bulletin No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, N. D.

    The educational system is characterized by a vector matrix differential equation, and it is shown that the concepts of modern control theory such as observability, controllability, and optimal control can give deeper insight into the behavior of the educational system. The identification of the system dynamics and the definition of a realistic…

  2. Patient-centered cancer treatment planning: improving the quality of oncology care. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Erin P; Ganz, Patricia A; Murphy, Sharon B; Nass, Sharyl J; Ferrell, Betty R; Stovall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop on patient-centered cancer treatment planning, with the aim of raising awareness about this important but often overlooked aspect of cancer treatment. A primary goal of patient-centered treatment planning is to engage patients and their families in meaningful, thorough interactions with their health care providers to develop an accurate, well-conceived treatment plan, using all available medical information appropriately while also considering the medical, social, and cultural needs and desires of the patient and family. A cancer treatment plan can be shared among the patient, family, and care team in order to facilitate care coordination and provide a roadmap to help patients navigate the path of cancer treatment. There are numerous obstacles to achieving patient-centered cancer treatment planning in practice. Some of these challenges stem from the patient and include patients' lack of assertiveness, health literacy, and numeracy, and their emotional state and concurrent illnesses. Others are a result of physician limitations, such as a lack of time to explain complex information and a lack of tools to facilitate treatment planning, as well as insensitivity to patients' informational, cultural, and emotional needs. Potential solutions to address these obstacles include better training of health care providers and patients in optimal communication and shared decision making, and greater use of support services and tools such as patient navigation and electronic health records. Other options include greater use of quality metrics and reimbursement for the time it takes to develop, discuss, and document a treatment plan. PMID:22128118

  3. Project Planning and Control in a Developing Economy: Implementation and Realisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Abdul-Rahman

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In the competitive and uncertain environment of the construction industry, the ability to deliver end products with the required quality, schedule and budget is vital to the survival of any construction-related firm. Before embarking on any project, realistic planning and, consequently, a control procedure must be in place to enable the parties to manage the project with sufficient degree of authority and certainty. This paper addresses issues associated with the implementation of project planning and control, identificati on of impacts in the implementation of project planning and the critical success factors of project planning. A questionnaire survey was conducted on construction professionals and contractors involved in the running of construction projects. The survey results showed that common problems associated with the project planning and control are the lack of experienced staff and poor coordination by the contractor. During site operation, a delay in decision making aggravates the effect of poor planning and control and much of the effect of project planning rests on the pro-activeness of experienced staff. The positive impact associated with proper planning and control is the high probability of finishing the project on time while the negative impact is that it is a time-consuming and costly process. The critical success factors identified from the survey are Excellent Teamwork and Experienced Team.

  4. Superiority of conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy over helical tomotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A comparative plan analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C. [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of). Proton Therapy Center; Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Pyo, H.; Kim, J. [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Lim, Y.K.; Kim, D.W.; Cho, K.H. [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of). Proton Therapy Center; Kim, W.C. [Inha Univ. School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kim, H.J. [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare helical tomotherapy (HT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using a variety of dosimetric and radiobiologic indexes in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Patients and methods: A total of 20 patients with LA-NSCLC were enrolled. IMRT plans with 4-6 coplanar beams and HT plans were generated for each patient. Dose distributions and dosimetric indexes for the tumors and critical structures were computed for both plans and compared. Results: Both modalities created highly conformal plans. They did not differ in the volumes of lung exposed to > 20 Gy of radiation. The average mean lung dose, volume receiving {>=} 30 Gy, and volume receiving {>=} 10 Gy in HT planning were 18.3 Gy, 18.5%, and 57.1%, respectively, compared to 19.4 Gy, 25.4%, and 48.9%, respectively, with IMRT (p = 0.004, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001). The differences between HT and IMRT in lung volume receiving {>=} 10-20 Gy increased significantly as the planning target volume (PTV) increased. For 6 patients who had PTV greater than 700 cm{sup 3}, IMRT was superior to HT for 5 patients in terms of lung volume receiving {>=} 5-20 Gy. The integral dose to the entire thorax in HT plans was significantly higher than in IMRT plans. Conclusion: HT gave significantly better control of mean lung dose and volume receiving {>=} 30-40 Gy, whereas IMRT provided better control of the lung volume receiving {>=} 5-15 Gy and the integral dose to entire thorax. In most patients with PTV greater than 700 cm{sup 3}, IMRT was superior to HT in terms of lung volume receiving {>=} 5-20 Gy. It is therefore advised that caution should be exercised when planning LA-NSCLC using HT. (orig.)

  5. Change of mammographic density predicts the risk of contralateral breast cancer - a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Sandberg, Maria EC; Li, Jingmei; Hall, Per; Hartman, Mikael; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Humphreys, Keith; Czene, Kamila

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, but it is unknown whether density at first breast cancer diagnosis and changes during follow-up influences risk of non-simultaneous contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Methods We collected mammograms for CBC-patients (cases, N = 211) and unilateral breast cancer patients (controls, N = 211), individually matched on age and calendar period of first breast cancer diagnosis, type of adjuvant therapy and length of follow-...

  6. Clinical dosimetric impact of Acuros XB and analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA on real lung cancer treatment plans : review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Photon dose calculation algorithms in treatment planning system could affect the accuracy of dose delivery when tissue heterogeneity is involved along the beam path. Treatment planning for lung cancer is challenging, especially in the case of treatment plan involving small fields. The combination of low-density (air medium and small fields cause charge particle disequilibrium nears the air/tissue interface. Beam modeling within the dose calculation algorithms must also employ an accurate method of accounting tissue heterogeneity corrections in order to avoid dose overestimation or underestimation. Analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA is one of the widely tested and validated dose calculation algorithms in external beam photon radiation therapy. Recently, Acuros XB (AXB was made available for photon dose calculations, and several studies have demonstrated better dose prediction accuracy of the AXB over AAA. This article reviews the results from the treatment planning studies, which have investigated the clinical dosimetric impact of the AXB and AAA on real lung cancer treatment plans.--------------------------------------Cite this article as: Rana S. Clinical dosimetric impact of Acuros XB and analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA on real lung cancer treatment plans: review. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(1:02019.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0201.9

  7. Cooperative Planning, Uncertainty, and Managerial Control in Concurrent Design

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria L. Mitchell; Barrie R. Nault

    2007-01-01

    We examine whether cooperative planning and uncertainty affect the magnitude of rework in concurrent engineering projects with upstream and downstream operations, and explore the impact of such rework on project delays. Using survey data from a sample of 120 business process (BP) redesign and related information technology (IT) development projects in healthcare and telecommunications, our results indicate that upstream (BP) rework and downstream (IT) rework is mediated and mitigated by coope...

  8. Computer-assisted planning and dosimetry for radiation treatment of head and neck cancer in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This evaluation was part of a multicenter, multinational study sponsored by the International Agency for Atomic Energy (Vienna) to investigate a simple, reliable computer-assisted planning and dosimetry system for radiation treatment of head and neck cancers in developing countries. Over a 13-month period (April 1992-April 1993), 120 patients with histologically-proven head or neck cancer were included in the evaluation. In each patient, planning and dosimetry were done both manually and using the computer-assisted system. The manual and computerized systems were compared on the basis of accuracy of determination of the outer contour, target volume, and critical organs; volume inequality resolution; structure heterogeneity correction; selection of the number, angle, and size of beams; treatment time calculation; availability of dosimetry predictions; and duration and cost of the procedure. Results demonstrated that the computer-assisted procedure was superior over the manual procedure, despite less than optimal software. The accuracy provided by the completely computerized procedure is indispensable for Level II radiation therapy, which is particularly useful in tumors of the sensitive, complex structures in the head and neck. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  9. An adaptive radiotherapy planning strategy for bladder cancer using deformation vector fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has considerable potential in treatment of bladder cancer due to large inter-fractional changes in shape and size of the target. The aim of this study was to compare our clinically applied method for plan library creation that involves manual bladder delineations (Clin-ART) with a method using the deformation vector fields (DVFs) resulting from intensity-based deformable image registrations (DVF-based ART). Materials and methods: The study included thirteen patients with urinary bladder cancer who had daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) acquired for set-up. In both ART strategies investigated, three plan selection volumes were generated using the CBCTs from the first four fractions; in Clin-ART boolean combinations of delineated bladders were used, while the DVF-based strategy applied combinations of the mean and standard deviation of patient-specific DVFs. The volume ratios (VRs) of the course-averaged PTV for the two ART strategies relative the non-adaptive PTV were calculated. Results: Both Clin-ART and DVF-based ART considerably reduced the course-averaged PTV, compared to non-adaptive RT. The VR for DVF-based ART was lower than for Clin-ART (0.65 vs. 0.73; p < 0.01). Conclusions: DVF-based ART for bladder irradiation has a considerable normal tissue sparing potential surpassing our already highly conformal clinically applied ART strategy

  10. Predictors of breast radiotherapy plan modifications: Quality assurance rounds in a large cancer centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: This study describes the process and outcomes of breast radiotherapy (RT) quality assurance (QA) rounds, seeking to identify variables associated with plan modifications. Materials and methods: Real-time data were prospectively collected over 2 years. Descriptive statistics determined the proportion of cases requiring no (A), minor (B), or major (C) modifications, which were then subjected to univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: A total of 2223 breast cancer QA cases were reviewed; 47 cases (2.1%) underwent a minor, and 52 cases (2.3%) required a major modification. Common changes included boost, volume, seroma, and bolus. On univariate analysis, regional nodal irradiation (RNI), tumour size, and axillary node dissection were significantly associated with major modifications. Upon multivariate analysis, the only independent predictor was RNI (OR 2.12, p = 0.0075). For patients with no RNI, <2 cm tumours, no axillary lymph node dissection, and no boosts (n = 420); the likelihood of category C was only 1.4%. Conclusions: It is feasible to conduct QA review for all breast cancer cases prior to commencing RT. Patients undergoing RNI had a higher likelihood of plan modifications; a group with low risk of modification was identified, which could direct future re-structuring of QA rounds

  11. Light Duty Utility Arm interface control document plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the interface control documents that will be used to identify and control interface features throughout all phases of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) development and design. After the system is built, delivered and installed in the Cold Test Facility and later at the tank farm, the Interface Control Documents can be used in maintaining the configuration control process. The Interface Control Document will consist of Interface Control Drawings and a data base directly tied to the Interface Control Drawings. The data base can be used as an index to conveniently find interface information. Design drawings and other text documents that contain interface information will appear in the database. The Interface Control Drawings will be used to document and control the data and information that define the interface boundaries between systems, subsystems and equipment. Also, the interface boundaries will define the areas of responsibility for systems and subsystems. The drawing will delineate and identify all the physical and functional interfaces that required coordination to establish and maintain compatibility between the co-functioning equipment, computer software, and the tank farm facilities. An appendix contains the Engineering interface control database system riser manual

  12. Software quality assurance plan for the National Ignition Facility integrated computer control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) applies to the activities of the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) organization and its subcontractors. The Plan describes the activities implemented by the ICCS section to achieve quality in the NIF Project's controls software and implements the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, NIF-95-499, L-15958-2) and the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Order 5700.6C. This SQAP governs the quality affecting activities associated with developing and deploying all control system software during the life cycle of the NIF Project

  13. Dietary Screener Questionnaire in the National Health Interview Survey Cancer Control Supplement 2010: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Cancer Control Supplement (CCS) is administered every five years and focuses on knowledge, attitudes, and practices in cancer-related health behaviors, screening, and risk assessment.

  14. Early rehabilitation of cancer patients – a randomized controlled intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arving Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Faced with a life-threatening illness, such as cancer, many patients develop stress symptoms, i.e. avoidance behaviour, intrusive thoughts and worry. Stress management interventions have proven to be effective; however, they are mostly performed in group settings and it is commonly breast cancer patients who are studied. We hereby present the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an individual stress-management intervention with a stepped-care approach in several cancer diagnoses. Method Patients (≥ 18 years with a recent diagnosis of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, prostate cancer or testicle cancer and scheduled for adjuvant/curative oncology treatment, will consecutively be included in the study. In this prospective longitudinal intervention study with a stepped-care approach, patients will be randomized to control, treatment as usual, or an individual stress-management intervention in two steps. The first step is a low-intensity stress-management intervention, given to all patients randomized to intervention. Patients who continue to report stress symptoms after the first step will thereafter be given more intensive treatment at the second step of the programme. In the intervention patients will also be motivated to be physically active. Avoidance and intrusion are the primary outcomes. According to the power analyses, 300 patients are planned to be included in the study and will be followed for two years. Other outcomes are physical activity level, sleep duration and quality recorded objectively, and anxiety, depression, quality of life, fatigue, stress in daily living, and patient satisfaction assessed using valid and standardized psychometric tested questionnaires. Utilization of hospital services will be derived from the computerized patient administration systems used by the hospital. The cost-effectiveness of the intervention will be

  15. Creating Consistency and Control Out of Chaos: A Qualitative View of Planned Pregnancy during Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Kristen S.

    2000-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy can have devastating effects for both mother and child. However, little is known about the experience of planned pregnancy among adolescents. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of themes identified in a previous study of the experience of planned adolescent pregnancy. The experience of planning a pregnancy during adolescence consists of typical adolescent behavior in that these girls demonstrated the need for control, invulnerability, and a present focus to their li...

  16. Development and validation of a treatment planning model for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigliano, Robert Vincent

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) to induce local hyperthermia has been emerging in recent years as a promising cancer therapy, in both a stand-alone and combination treatment setting, including surgery radiation and chemotherapy. The mNP solution can be injected either directly into the tumor, or administered intravenously. Studies have shown that some cancer cells associate with, internalize, and aggregate mNPs more preferentially than normal cells, with and without antibody targeting. Once the mNPs are delivered inside the cells, a low frequency (30-300kHz) alternating electromagnetic field is used to activate the mNPs. The nanoparticles absorb the applied field and provide localized heat generation at nano-micron scales. Treatment planning models have been shown to improve treatment efficacy in radiation therapy by limiting normal tissue damage while maximizing dose to the tumor. To date, there does not exist a clinical treatment planning model for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia which is robust, validated, and commercially available. The focus of this research is on the development and experimental validation of a treatment planning model, consisting of a coupled electromagnetic and thermal model that predicts dynamic thermal distributions during treatment. When allowed to incubate, the mNPs are often sequestered by cancer cells and packed into endosomes. The proximity of the mNPs has a strong influence on their ability to heat due to interparticle magnetic interaction effects. A model of mNP heating which takes into account the effects of magnetic interaction was developed, and validated against experimental data. An animal study in mice was conducted to determine the effects of mNP solution injection duration and PEGylation on macroscale mNP distribution within the tumor, in order to further inform the treatment planning model and future experimental technique. In clinical applications, a critical limiting factor for the maximum applied field is

  17. The Missing Pieces in Reporting of Randomized Controlled Trials of External Beam Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Egleston, Brian L; Horwitz, Eric M; Dicker, Adam P; Nguyen, Paul L; Showalter, Timothy N; Den, Robert B

    2016-08-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the most rigorous way of determining whether a cause-effect relation exists between treatment and outcome and for assessing the cost-effectiveness of a treatment. For many patients, cancer is a chronic illness; RCTs evaluating treatments for indolent cancers must evolve to facilitate medical decision-making, as "concrete" patient outcomes (eg, survival) will likely be excellent independent of the intervention, and detecting a difference between trial arms may be impossible. In this commentary, we articulate 9 recommendations that we hope future clinical trialists and funding agencies (including those under the National Cancer Institute) will take into consideration when planning RCTs to help guide subsequent interpretation of results and clinical decision making, based on RCTs of external beam radiation therapy dose escalation for the most common indolent cancer in men, that is, prostate cancer. We recommend routinely reporting: (1) race; (2) medical comorbidities; (3) psychiatric comorbidities; (4) insurance status; (5) education; (6) marital status; (7) income; (8) sexual orientation; and (9) facility-related characteristics (eg, number of centers involved, type of facilities, yearly hospital volumes). We discuss how these factors independently affect patient outcomes and toxicities; future clinicians and governing organizations should consider this information to plan RCTs accordingly (to maximize patient accrual and total n), select appropriate endpoints (eg, toxicity, quality of life, sexual function), actively monitor RCTs, and report results so as to identify the optimal treatment among subpopulations. PMID:27322694

  18. Enhancing a Cancer Prevention and Control Curriculum through Interactive Group Discussions

    OpenAIRE

    Forsythe, L.P.; Gadalla, S M; Hamilton, J. G.; Heckman-Stoddard, B.M.; Kent, E.E.; Lai, G Y; Lin, S. W.; Luhn, P.; Faupel-Badger, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course (Principles course) is offered annually by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. This four-week post-graduate course covers the spectrum of cancer prevention and control research (e.g. epidemiology, laboratory, clinical, social, and behavioral sciences) and is open to attendees from medical, academic, government, and related institutions across the world. In this report, we describe a new additio...

  19. Cancer clustering around point sources of pollution: assessment by a case-control methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case-control method is proposed to test clustering of cancers near point sources of air pollution. The techniques for applying the method are described and applied to two sources of pollution: a coke oven associated with a steel mill, and a large uranium tailing dump. In neither situation was a significant excess of the cancer of interest found when compared to control cancers, though a slight excess of lung cancer was found near the coke ovens

  20. Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Is Cancer? Cancer Statistics Cancer Disparities Cancer Statistics Cancer has a major impact on society in ... success of efforts to control and manage cancer. Statistics at a Glance: The Burden of Cancer in ...

  1. Tank monitor and control system (TMACS) software configuration management plan; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the methodology for control of computer software developed and supported by the Systems Development and Integration (SD and I) organization of Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. (LMSI) for the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). This plan controls changes to the software and configuration files used by TMACS. The controlled software includes the Gensym software package, Gensym knowledge base files developed for TMACS, C-language programs used by TMACS, the operating system on the production machine, language compilers, and all Windows NT commands and functions which affect the operating environment. The configuration files controlled include the files downloaded to the Acromag and Westronic field instruments

  2. Iterative reconstruction of volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy plans using control point basis vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiere, Joseph C.; Kapulsky, Alexander; Ndlovu, Alois

    2014-03-01

    Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy is an innovative technique currently utilized to efficiently deliver complex treatments. Dose rate, speed of rotation, and field shape are continuously varied as the radiation source rotates about the patient. Patient specific quality assurance is performed to verify that the delivered dose distribution is consistent with the plan formulated in a treatment planning system. The purpose of this work is to present novel methodology using a Gafchromic EBT3 film image of a patient plan in a cylindrical phantom and calculating the delivered MU per control point. Images of two dimensional plan dose matrices and film scans are analyzed using MATLAB with the imaging toolbox. Dose profiles in a ring corresponding to the film position are extracted from the plan matrices for comparison with the corresponding measured film dose. The plan is made up of a series of individual static Control Points. If we consider these Control Points a set of basis vectors, then variations in the plan can be represented as the weighted sum of the basis. The weighing coefficients representing the actual delivered MU can be determined by any available optimization tool, such as downhill simplex or non-linear programming. In essence we reconstruct an image of the delivered dose. Clinical quality assurance is performed with this technique by computing a patient plan with the measured monitor units and standard plan evaluation tools such as Dose Volume Histograms. Testing of the algorithm with known changes in the reference images indicated a correlation coefficient greater than 0.99.

  3. A case study using the United Republic of Tanzania: costing nationwide HPV vaccine delivery using the WHO Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Hutubessy, Raymond; Levin, Ann; Wang, Susan; Morgan, Winthrop; Ally, Mariam; John, Theopista; Broutet, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose, methods, data sources and assumptions behind the World Health Organization (WHO) Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing (C4P) tool that was developed to assist low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with planning and costing their nationwide human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program are presented. Tanzania is presented as a case study where the WHO C4P tool was used to cost and plan the roll-out of HPV vaccines nationwide as part of the national comprehe...

  4. A case study using the United Republic of Tanzania: costing nationwide HPV vaccine delivery using the WHO Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Hutubessy Raymond; Levin Ann; Wang Susan; Morgan Winthrop; Ally Mariam; John Theopista; Broutet Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose, methods, data sources and assumptions behind the World Health Organization (WHO) Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing (C4P) tool that was developed to assist low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with planning and costing their nationwide human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program are presented. Tanzania is presented as a case study where the WHO C4P tool was used to cost and plan the roll-out of HPV vaccines nationwide as part of the national...

  5. Adverse effect of a distended rectum in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The retrospective planning study for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer evaluated whether proximal rectum and supra-anal rectum/anal canal should be delineated as separated organs-at-risk (OARs) to achieve optimal dose distributions to the anorectal region. Patients and methods: For 10 patients with localized prostate cancer IMRT plans were generated with the rectum and anal canal as separated OARs (Rec-sep) and as one single OAR (Rec-tot). Two different treatment planning systems (TPS) were utilized. Influence on dose distributions to target and OARs was analyzed. Results: Results from both TPS showed significantly increased doses to the distal rectum/anal canal for plans Rec-tot compared with Rec-sep in case of a distended rectum in the planning CT study: doses were increased by up to mean 31% (P=0.02) and 18% (P=0.03), respectively, in both TPS. For the patient with the largest rectum, the maximum dose increase was 61%. No significant differences in doses to target, bladder, femoral head and proximal rectum were seen. Conclusions: For patients with a distended rectum in the planning CT, delineation of separated OARs for proximal rectum and distal rectum/anal canal resulted in superior dose distributions to the anorectal region and therefore, we recommend this as standard procedure for IMRT planning of prostate cancer

  6. LAZIO REGION: DEVELOPMENT OF A SAMPLING PLAN FOR OFFICIAL CONTROL OF FOODSTUFFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saccares

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the criteria and methodologies that have been used for the planning of microbiological checks on food in the context of the wider plan of Integrated Controls (PRIC Lazio Region as set by Regulation 882/2004 (EC.

  7. Barriers to colorectal cancer screening: A case-control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-Rong Cai; Su-Zhan Zhang; Shu Zheng; Hong-Hong Zhu

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To investigate barriers to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in a community population. METHODS:We conducted a community-based case-control study in an urban Chinese population by questionnaire. Cases were selected from those completing both a fecal occult blood test (FOBT) case and colonoscopy in a CRC screening program in 2004. Control groups were matched by gender, age group and community. Control 1 included those having a positive FOBT but refusing a colonoscopy. Control 2 included those who refused both an FOBT and colonoscopy. RESULTS:The impact of occupation on willingness to attend a colorectal screening program differed by gender. P for heterogeneity was 0.009 for case vs control group 1, 0.01 for case versus control group 2, and 0.80 for control group 1 vs 2. Poor awareness of CRC and its screening program, characteristics of screening tests, and lack of time affected the screening rate. Financial support, fear of pain and bowel preparation were barriers to a colonoscopy as a screening test. Eighty-two percent of control group 1 and 87.1% of control group 2 were willing attend if the colonoscopy was free, but only 56.3% and 53.1%,respectively, if it was self-paid. Multivariate odds ratios for case vs control group 1 were 0.10 among those unwilling to attend a free colonoscopy and 0.50 among those unwilling to attend a self-paid colonoscopy. CONCLUSION:Raising the public awareness of CRC and its screening, integrating CRC screening into the health care system, and using a painless colonoscopy would increase its screening rate.

  8. Multi-assortment rhythmic production planning and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolud, B.; Krenczyk, D.; Zemczak, M.

    2015-11-01

    A method for production planning in a repetitive manufacturing system which allows for estimating the possibility of processing work orders in due time is presented. The difference between two approaches are presented; the first one one-piece flow elaborated in Toyota and the second one elaborated by authors that consists in defining sufficient conditions to filter all solutions and providing a set of admissible solutions for both the client and the producer. In the paper attention is focused on the buffer allocation. Illustrative examples are presented.

  9. Treatment plan comparison of linac step and shoot, tomotherapy, rapidarc, and proton therapy for prostate cancer by using the dosimetrical and the biological indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk; Cao, Yuan Jie; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cho, Sam Ju; Lee, Sang Hoon; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Huh, Hyun Do; Lim, Sangwook; Shin, Dongho

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to use various dosimetrical indices to determine the best intensitymodulated radiation therapy (IMRT) modality - for treating patients with prostate cancer. Ten patients with prostate cancer were included in this study. IMRT plans were designed to include different modalities, including the linac step and shoot, tomotherapy, RapidArc, and proton systems. Various dosimetrical indices, like the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF), were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Biological indices, such as the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) based the tumor control probability (TCP), and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), were also calculated and used to compare the treatment plans. The RapidArc plan attained better PTV coverage, as evidenced by its superior PITV, CI, TCI, MHI, and CN values. Regarding organ at risks (OARs), proton therapy exhibited superior dose sparing for the rectum and the bowel in low dose volumes, whereas the tomotherapy and RapidArc plans achieved better dose sparing in high dose volumes. The QF scores showed no significant difference among these plans (p = 0.701). The average TCPs for prostate tumors in the RapidArc, linac and proton plans were higher than the average TCP for Tomotherapy (98.79%, 98.76%, and 98.75% vs. 98.70%, respectively). Regarding the rectum NTCP, RapidArc showed the most favorable result (0.09%) whereas linac resulted in the best bladder NTCP (0.08%).

  10. Strategies for cancer control on an organ-site basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Malcolm A; Sobue, Tomotaka

    2010-01-01

    A great deal of research information has been generated regarding cancer incidence rates and underlying risk factors. Since incidence:mortality ratios are generally less than 2:1 and often approach equivalence there clearly is a need for particular emphasis on preventive measures and early detection. Whether the latter should be through screening or education for improved awareness will depend on the socioeconomic conditions and the organ site. The location within the body, physiological factors and the cell type, whether essentially glandular or squamous, and the particular risk and protective factors operating in the particular social context will all impact on what measures can be recommended. Here the focus is on primary and secondary prevention of cancers in the various regions of Asia, taking into account similarities and differences in etiology for organs/tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, the respiratory tract, the urinary system, the reproductive system, the nervous system, the thyroid and non-Hogkins lymphomas and leukemias. Globocan 2002 data on incidence and mortality and all of the findings reviewed in the Regional Reviews were taken into account in compiling this overview. The chief recommendations are education in the developing world, to overcome the problem of late presentation at hospital (reflected by high mortality/incidence ratios), betel and tobacco control for the oral cavity and pharynx, reduce salt intake and targeting of Helicobacter pylori for the stomach, reduction in food intake, improvement in the diet and more exercise for the colorectum, kidney, prostate, breast, ovary and endometrium, reduction in smoking and exposure to other fumes for the lung, increase in water intake, particularly for the urinary bladder, and avoidance of parasites for the special cases of the urinary bladder and intrahepatic bile ducts. The cancer registry could be a major resource for development of further research capacity, with selection of suitable

  11. Fast Helical Tomotherapy in a head and neck cancer planning study: is time priceless?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last few years, in radiotherapy there has been a growing focus on speed of treatment delivery (largely driven by economical and commercial interests). This study investigates the influence of treatment time on plan quality for helical tomotherapy (HT), using delivery times with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT; Rapid Arc [RA]) as reference. In a previous study, double arc RA (Eclipse) and standard HT plans (TomoHD™) were created for five oropharyngeal cancer patients and reported according to ICRU 83 guidelines. By modifying the beam width from 2.5 to 5.0 cm, elevating the pitch and lowering the modulation factor, “TomoFast” (TF) plans were generated with treatment times equal to RA plans. To quantify the impact of TF’s craniocaudal gradient, similar plans were generated on TomoEdgeTM (TomoEdgeFast;TEF). The homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), mean dose, Dnear-max (D2) and Dnear-min (D98) of the PTVs were analyzed as well as the mean dose, specific critical doses and volumes of 26 organs at risk (OARs). Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. With a mean treatment time of 3.05 min (RA), 2.89 min (TF) and 2.95 min (TEF), PTVtherapeutic coverage was more homogeneous with TF (HI.07;SE.01) and TEF (HI.08;SE.01) compared to RA (HI.10;SE.01), while PTVprophylactic was most homogeneous with RA. Mean doses to parotid glands were comparable for RA, TF, TEF: 25.62, 25.34, 23.09 Gy for contralateral and 32.02, 31.96, 30.01 Gy for ipsilateral glands, respectively. OARs’ mean doses varied between different approaches not favoring a particular technique. TF’s higher dose to OARs at the cranial-caudal edges of the PTVs and its higher integral dose, both due to the extended cranial-caudal gradient, seems to be solved by the new TomoEdge™ software. However, all these faster techniques lose part of standard TomoHD’s OAR sparing capacity It is possible to treat oropharyngeal cancer patients using HT (TF/TEF) within time-frames observed

  12. An Assessment to Inform Pediatric Cancer Provider Development and Delivery of Survivor Care Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Echo L; Wu, Yelena P; Hacking, Claire C; Wright, Jennifer; Spraker-Perlman, Holly L; Gardner, Emmie; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2015-12-01

    Current guidelines recommend all pediatric cancer survivors receive a survivor care plan (SCP) for optimal health management, yet clinical delivery of SCPs varies. We evaluated oncology providers' familiarity with and preferences for delivering SCPs to inform the implementation of a future SCP program at our institution. From November 2013 to April 2014, oncology providers from the Primary Children's Hospital in Salt Lake City, UT, completed a survey (n=41) and a 45-min focus group (n=18). Participants reported their familiarity with and training in SCP guidelines, opinions on SCPs, and barriers to delivering SCPs. As a secondary analysis, we examined differences in survey responses between physicians and nurses with Fisher's exact tests. Focus group transcripts and open-ended survey responses were content analyzed. Participants reported high familiarity with late effects of cancer treatment (87.8%) and follow-up care that cancer survivors should receive (82.5%). Few providers had delivered an SCP (oncologists 35.3% and nurses 5.0%; p=0.03). Barriers to providing SCPs included lack of knowledge (66.7%), SCP delivery is not expected in their clinic (53.9%), and no champion (48.7%). In qualitative comments, providers expressed that patient age variation complicated SCP delivery. Participants supported testing an SCP intervention program (95.1%) and felt this should be a team-based approach. Strategies for optimal delivery of SCPs are needed. Participants supported testing an SCP program to improve the quality of patient care. Team-based approaches, including nurses and physicians, that incorporate provider training on and support for SCP delivery are needed to improve pediatric cancer care. PMID:25893925

  13. Nuisance Animal Control Plan for St. Catherine Creek NWR and Cat Island NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A plan describing methods to be used for controling the populations and associated negative habitat impacts of nuisance animals on St. Catherine Creek NWR and Cat...

  14. Traffic Control Plan : DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge, DeSoto Visitor Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Traffic Control Plan for DeSoto NWR outlines objectives for solving the traffic problems on the Refuge by implementing a patrol schedule, restricting visitor...

  15. ORGANIZATION OF OPERATIONAL PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT CONTROL IN THE ANIMAL BREEDING

    OpenAIRE

    Chernyavskaya S. A.; Nebavskaya T. V.

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with aspects of the organization of operational planning and management control in the animal breeding branch of an agricultural company. We have also formulated proposals to improve the efficiency of cost management for production and sales

  16. Hepatic arterial phase and portal venous phase computed tomography for dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy plans in liver cancer: a dosimetric comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the effect of computed tomography (CT) using hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and portal venous phase (PVP) contrast on dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver cancer. Twenty-one patients with liver cancer were studied. HAP, PVP and non-enhanced CTs were performed on subjects scanned in identical positions under active breathing control (ABC). SBRT plans were generated using seven-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (7 F-3D-CRT), seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7 F-IMRT) and single-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) based on the PVP CT. Plans were copied to the HAP and non-enhanced CTs. Radiation doses calculated from the three phases of CTs were compared with respect to the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OAR) using the Friedman test and the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. SBRT plans calculated from either PVP or HAP CT, including 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT plans, demonstrated significantly lower (p <0.05) minimum absorbed doses covering 98%, 95%, 50% and 2% of PTV (D98%, D95%, D50% and D2%) than those calculated from non-enhanced CT. The mean differences between PVP or HAP CT and non-enhanced CT were less than 2% and 1% respectively. All mean dose differences between the three phases of CTs for OARs were less than 2%. Our data indicate that though the differences in dose calculation between contrast phases are not clinically relevant, dose underestimation (IE, delivery of higher-than-intended doses) resulting from CT using PVP contrast is larger than that resulting from CT using HAP contrast when compared against doses based upon non-contrast CT in SBRT treatment of liver cancer using VMAT, IMRT or 3D-CRT

  17. Comparison of three IMRT inverse planning techniques that allow for partial esophagus sparing in patients receiving thoracic radiation therapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Michalski, D; Houser, C; Bednarz, G; Curran, W; Galvin, James

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare 3 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) inverse treatment planning techniques as applied to locally-advanced lung cancer. This study evaluates whether sufficient radiotherapy (RT) dose is given for durable control of tumors while sparing a portion of the esophagus, and whether large number of segments and monitor units are required. We selected 5 cases of locally-advanced lung cancer with large central tumor, abutting the esophagus. To ensure that no more than half of the esophagus circumference at any level received the specified dose limit, it was divided into disk-like sections and dose limits were imposed on each. Two sets of dose objectives were specified for tumor and other critical structures for standard dose RT and for dose escalation RT. Plans were generated using an aperture-based inverse planning (ABIP) technique with the Cimmino algorithm for optimization. Beamlet-based inverse treatment planning was carried out with a commercial simulated annealing package (CORVUS) and with an in-house system that used the Cimmino projection algorithm (CIMM). For 3 of the 5 cases, results met all of the constraints from the 3 techniques for the 2 sets of dose objectives. The CORVUS system without delivery efficiency consideration required the most segments and monitor units. The CIMM system reduced the number while the ABIP techniques showed a further reduction, although for one of the cases, a solution was not readily obtained using the ABIP technique for dose escalation objectives. PMID:15324918

  18. Animal Control Chapter Management Plans: Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document will define station scope, objectives, and procedures for animal control activities specific to the overall station Objectives and Management Strategy...

  19. Whitetop control with planned grazing [Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report concerns a cattle grazing program initiated in 1987 on Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge to control tall whitetop lepedium latifolium with a major goal...

  20. Intention, perceived control, and weight loss: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifter, D E; Ajzen, I

    1985-09-01

    Success at attempted weight reduction among college women was predicted on the basis of a theory of planned behavior. At the beginning of a 6-week period, participants expressed their attitudes, subjective norms, perceived control, and intentions with respect to losing weight. In addition, the extent to which they had made detailed weight reduction plans was assessed, as were a number of general attitudes and personality factors. In support of the theory, intentions to lose weight were accurately predicted on the basis of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control; perceived control and intentions were together moderately successful in predicting the amount of weight that participants actually lost over the 6-week period. Actual weight loss was also found to increase with development of a plan and with ego strength, factors that were assumed to increase control over goal attainment. Other factors, such as health locus of control, perceived competence, and action control, were found to be unrelated to weight reduction. PMID:4045706

  1. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Hallbert

    2012-09-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  2. Motion Planning Based Coordinated Control for Hydraulic Excavators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yingjie; JIN Yanchao; ZHANG Qin

    2009-01-01

    Hydraulic excavator is one type of the most widely applied construction equipment for various applications mainly because of its versatility and mobility. Among the tasks performed by a hydraulic excavator, repeatable level digging or flat surface finishing may take a large percentage. Using automated functions to perform such repeatable and tedious jobs will not only greatly increase the overall productivity but more importantly also improve the operation safety. For the purpose of investigating the technology without loss of generality, this research is conducted to create a coordinate control method for the boom, arm and bucket cylinders on a hydraulic excavator to perform accurate and effective works. On the basis of the kinematic analysis of the excavator linkage system, the tip trajectory of the end-effector can be determined in terms of three hydraulic cylinders coordinated motion with a visualized method. The coordination of those hydraulic cylinders is realized by controlling three electro-hydranlic proportional valves coordinately. Therefore,the complex control algorithm of a hydraulic excavator can be simplified into coordinated motion control of three individual systems.This coordinate control algorithm was validated on a wheeled hydraulic excavator, and the validation results indicated that this developed control method could satisfaetorily accomplish the auto-digging function for level digging or flat surface finishing.

  3. Is the planning dosimetry accurate to estimate the Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT)?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prediction of toxicity is crucial to manage prostate cancer radiotherapy. This prediction is classically based on the dose volume histogram (DVH) calculated at the planning time and using the mathematical Lyman NTCP (Normal Tissue Complication Probability) model. However, anatomical deformations occur during the 8 weeks of radiotherapy and consequently the planned dose does not correspond to the actual delivered dose, leading to uncertainties in NTCP calculation. The objective of this study was to compare the planned DVH-based rectal NTCP with a cumulative DVH-based rectal NTCP, in one case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. The average difference between planning DVH-based NTCP and cumulative-based DVH NTCP was 14% and the standard deviation 10.7%. We showed the impact of organ deformation on NTCP calculation, which leads to significant uncertainties in toxicity prediction. Cumulative DVH, being more representative of the actual received dose, should lead to a more reliable NTCP model

  4. Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann;

    2013-01-01

    Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil......Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil...

  5. Controls on plan-form evolution of submarine channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, J.; Mohrig, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Vertically aggrading sinuous channels constitute a basic building block of modern submarine fans and the greater continental slope. Interpretation of seismically imaged channels reveals a significant diversity in internal architecture, as well as important similarities and differences in the evolution of submarine channels relative to better studied rivers. Many submarine channel cross sections possess a 'gull wing' shape. Successive stacking of such channels demonstrates that systematic bank erosion is not required in order for lateral migration to occur. The lateral shift of such aggrading channels, however, is expected to be much less dynamic than in the case of terrestrial rivers. Recent high-resolution 3D seismic data from offshore Angola and an upstream segment of the Bengal Submarine Fan show intensely meandering channels that experience considerable lateral shifting during periods of active migration within submarine valleys. The cross sections of the actively migrating channels are similar to meandering river channels characterized by an outer cut-bank and inner-bank accretion. In submarine channels, the orientation of the secondary flow can be river-like or river-reverse depending on the channel gradient, cross sectional shape, and the adaptation length of the channel bend. In river channels, a single circulation cell commonly occupies the entire channel relief, redistributing the bed-load sediment across the channel, and influencing the thread of high velocity and thus the plan-form evolution of the channel. In submarine environments, the height of the circulation cell will be significantly smaller than channel relief, thus leading to development of lower relief point bars from bed-load transport. Nevertheless these "underfit" bars may play an important role in plan-form evolution of submarine channels. In rivers and submarine channels, the inclined surface accretion can be constructed via pure bed-load, suspended-load, or a combination of both transport

  6. Evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with Oncentra MasterPlan® for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several comparison studies have shown the capability of VMAT to achieve similar or better plan quality as IMRT, while reducing the treatment time. The experience of VMAT in a multi vendor environment is limited. We compared the plan quality and performance of VMAT to IMRT and we investigate the effects of varying various user-selectable parameters. IMRT, single arc VMAT and dual arc VMAT were compared for four different head-and-neck tumors. For VMAT, the effect of varying gantry angle spacing and treatment time on the plan quality was investigated. A comparison of monitor units and treatment time was performed. IMRT and dual arc VMAT achieved a similar plan quality, while single arc could not provide an acceptable plan quality. Increasing the number of control points does not improve the plan quality. Dual arc VMAT delivery time is about 30% of IMRT delivery time. Dual arc VMAT is a fast and accurate technique for the treatment of head and neck cancer. It applies similar number of MUs as IMRT, but the treatment time is strongly reduced, maintaining similar or better dose conformity to the PTV and OAR sparing

  7. Rac and Rho GTPases in cancer cell motility control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parri Matteo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases represent a family of small GTP-binding proteins involved in cell cytoskeleton organization, migration, transcription, and proliferation. A common theme of these processes is a dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton which has now emerged as a major switch control mainly carried out by Rho and Rac GTPase subfamilies, playing an acknowledged role in adaptation of cell motility to the microenvironment. Cells exhibit three distinct modes of migration when invading the 3 D environment. Collective motility leads to movement of cohorts of cells which maintain the adherens junctions and move by photolytic degradation of matrix barriers. Single cell mesenchymal-type movement is characterized by an elongated cellular shape and again requires extracellular proteolysis and integrin engagement. In addition it depends on Rac1-mediated cell polarization and lamellipodia formation. Conversely, in amoeboid movement cells have a rounded morphology, the movement is independent from proteases but requires high Rho GTPase to drive elevated levels of actomyosin contractility. These two modes of cell movement are interconvertible and several moving cells, including tumor cells, show an high degree of plasticity in motility styles shifting ad hoc between mesenchymal or amoeboid movements. This review will focus on the role of Rac and Rho small GTPases in cell motility and in the complex relationship driving the reciprocal control between Rac and Rho granting for the opportunistic motile behaviour of aggressive cancer cells. In addition we analyse the role of these GTPases in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination.

  8. Effect of pamidronate on pain control in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: One of the common complaints in advanced breast cancer is pain. This is due to osseous metastasis. Analgesics, along with chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, are the mainstay of treatment. Multifocal bone disease that is refractory to above routine treatments can benefit from a series of agents like Pamidronate. Design: Prospective comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Study was carried out from February 1998 to January 2001 in the Department of Radiotherapy / Oncology, Services Hospital, Lahore. Subjects and Methods: Sixty patients suffering from metastatic breast cancer (mainly to bones) initially treated with chemotherapy or hormonal therapy and analgesics were treated with 60-90 mg of injection Pamidronate by 4-hour intravenous infusion once a month for three or more months. The intensity of pain was assessed by the memorial symptom assessment scale and marked on the pain control performa according to frequency of pain, severity of pain or interference in daily activities due to pain at the start and after six months time of inclusion in the study. Difference in frequency of pain, severity or interference in daily routine was measured for each patient individually. Results: Marked pain relief was reported by 60% of patients who were additionally taking Pamidronate as compared to 43.3% patients who were not taking Pamidronate. Reduction in pain and analgesic demand is noted more in chemotherapy group with Pamidronate as compared to hormonal therapy group. Conclusion: Pamidronate can be additionally used in resistant cases for pain control. (author)

  9. Physical and biological pretreatment quality assurance of the head and neck cancer plan with the volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Soo; Lee, Yun-Hee; Lee, Seu-Ran; Kim, Min-Ju; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate both the physical and the biological quality assurance (QA) aspects as pretreatment QA of the head and neck (H&N) cancer plan for the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Ten H&N plans were studied. The COMPASS® dosimetry analysis system and the tumor control probability (TCP) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculation free program were used as the respective measurement and calculation tools. The reliability of these tools was verified by a benchmark study in accordance with the TG-166 report. For the physical component of QA, the gamma passing rates and the false negative cases between the calculated and the measured data were evaluated. The biological component of QA was performed based on the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), TCP and NTCP values. The evaluation was performed for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and the organs at risks (OARs), including the eyes, the lens, the parotid glands, the esophagus, the spinal cord, and the brainstem. All cases had gamma passing rates above 95% at an acceptance tolerance level with the 3%/3 mm criteria. In addition, the false negative instances were presented for the PTVs and OARs. The gamma passing rates exhibited a weak correlation with false negative cases. For the biological QA, the physical dose errors affect the EUD and the TCP for the PTVs, but no linear correlation existed between them. The EUD and NTCP for the OARs were shown the random differences that could not be attributed to the dose errors from the physical QA. The differences in the EUD and NTCP between the calculated and the measured results were mainly demonstrated for the parotid glands. This study describes the importance and the necessity of improved QA to accompany both the physical and the biological aspects for accurate radiation treatment.

  10. Daily CT planning during boost irradiation of prostate cancer. Feasibility and time requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geinitz, H.; Zimmermann, F.B.; Kuzmany, A.; Kneschaurek, P. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie

    2000-09-01

    Background: In the irradiation of prostate cancer internal organ movement leads to uncertainties in the daily localization of the clinical target volume. Therefore more or less large safety margins are added when designing the treatment portals. With daily CT planning internal organ movement can be compensated to some extent, safety margins can be reduced and irradiated normal tissue can be spared. The feasibility of daily CT-based 3D treatment planning is studied in a patient with localized prostate carcinoma using a new patient positioning system. Methods: Daily CT planning was applied during boost irradiation of a patient with prostate cancer: After patient immobilization the pelvis was scanned in 3 mm CT slices. Planning was done with the BrainSCAN planning system for stereotactic body irradiation. The prostate was contoured in all slices and the safety margins of the micromultileafs were automatically set to the distance chosen by the physician (0.8 cm). Patient positioning was done with the BrainLAB ExacTrac positioning system on the basis of skin attached stereotactic body markers. Before each treatment verification images of the isocenter were taken. Results: The total time requirement for planning and irradiation was about 1 hour 15 minutes. Patient positioning on the treatment couch took about 10 minutes. The accuracy of the positioning system was good (75% of the deviations were smaller than 3 mm). The shift of the single markers from CT scan to CT scan was more extensive than those of the center of all 7 markers combined (47% of the deviations were smaller than 3 mm). The location of the markers seems to influence the magnitude of their dislocation. Conclusion: Daily CT planning is feasible but time consuming. The new patient positioning system ExacTrac is an interesting tool especially for daily CT planning since conventional simulation can be omitted. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Bei der Bestrahlung der Prostata kommt es aufgrund der Organbewegung zu

  11. Questionnaire for the contents of cancer professional training plan by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Questionnaire for the contents of cancer professional training plan by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology Japan were widely assessed and introduced in the 4th Japanese Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JASTRO) Future Planning Seminar held on March 8, 2008 in Tokyo, Japan. From the assessment, small number of instructors for medical physicists was elucidated as the most important problem for the future of fields of radiation oncology in Japan. (author)

  12. Coordinating robot motion, sensing, and control in plans. LDRD project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, P.G.; Brown, R.G.; Watterberg, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center

    1997-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a framework for robotic planning and execution that provides a continuum of adaptability with respect to model incompleteness, model error, and sensing error. For example, dividing robot motion into gross-motion planning, fine-motion planning, and sensor-augmented control had yielded productive research and solutions to individual problems. Unfortunately, these techniques could only be combined by hand with ad hoc methods and were restricted to systems where all kinematics are completely modeled in planning. The original intent was to develop methods for understanding and autonomously synthesizing plans that coordinate motion, sensing, and control. The project considered this problem from several perspectives. Results included (1) theoretical methods to combine and extend gross-motion and fine-motion planning; (2) preliminary work in flexible-object manipulation and an implementable algorithm for planning shortest paths through obstacles for the free-end of an anchored cable; (3) development and implementation of a fast swept-body distance algorithm; and (4) integration of Sandia`s C-Space Toolkit geometry engine and SANDROS motion planer and improvements, which yielded a system practical for everyday motion planning, with path-segment planning at interactive speeds. Results (3) and (4) have either led to follow-on work or are being used in current projects, and they believe that (2) will eventually be also.

  13. Maneuver Planning for Conjunction Risk Mitigation with Ground-track Control Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, David

    2008-01-01

    The planning of conjunction Risk Mitigation Maneuvers (RMM) in the presence of ground-track control requirements is analyzed. Past RMM planning efforts on the Aqua, Aura, and Terra spacecraft have demonstrated that only small maneuvers are available when ground-track control requirements are maintained. Assuming small maneuvers, analytical expressions for the effect of a given maneuver on conjunction geometry are derived. The analytical expressions are used to generate a large trade space for initial RMM design. This trade space represents a significant improvement in initial maneuver planning over existing methods that employ high fidelity maneuver models and propagation.

  14. Electric vehicle charge planning using Economic Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvgaard, Rasmus; Poulsen, Niels K.; Madsen, Henrik;

    2012-01-01

    Economic Model Predictive Control (MPC) is very well suited for controlling smart energy systems since electricity price and demand forecasts are easily integrated in the controller. Electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to play a large role in the future Smart Grid. They are expected to provide...... grid services, both for peak reduction and for ancillary services, by absorbing short term variations in the electricity production. In this paper the Economic MPC minimizes the cost of electricity consumption for a single EV. Simulations show savings of 50–60% of the electricity costs compared to...... should be consumed as soon as it is produced to avoid the need for energy storage as this is expensive, limited and introduces efficiency losses. The Economic MPC for EVs described in this paper may contribute to facilitating transition to a fossil free energy system....

  15. IXTET-EXEC: planning, plan repair and execution control with time and resource management

    OpenAIRE

    Lemai, Solange

    2004-01-01

    Augmenter l'autonomie décisionnelle des systèmes spatiaux (satellites, sondes et rovers) soulève de nouveaux problèmes tels que la planification des activités pour accomplir un but, le contrôle de l'exécution du plan, et la surveillance et le diagnostic du système. Nous nous intéressons plus particulièrement à la planification d'une mission et au contrôle de son exécution dans le cadre d'une application avec des contraintes temporelles (rendez-vous avec des fenêtres de visibilité&) et la gest...

  16. Randomized controlled trial on effectiveness of ultrasonography screening for breast cancer in women aged 40-49 (J-START). Research design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cancer screening, it is essential to undertake effective screening with appropriate methodology, which should be supported by evidence of a reduced mortality rate. At present, mammography is the only method for breast cancer screening with such evidence. However, mammography does not achieve sufficient accuracy in breasts with high density at ages below 50. Although ultrasonography achieves better accuracy in Breast Cancer detection even in dense breasts, the effectiveness has not been verified. We have planned a randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of ultrasonography in women aged 40-49, with a design to study 50,000 women with mammography and ultrasonography (intervention group), and 50,000 controls with mammography only (control group). The participants are scheduled to take second round screening with the same modality 2 years on. The primary endpoints are sensitivity and specificity, and the secondary endpoint is the rate of advanced breast cancers. (author)

  17. Personal control after a breast cancer diagnosis : stability and adaptive value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henselmans, Inge; Sanderman, Robbert; Baas, Peter C.; Smink, Ans; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This longitudinal study aims to gain more insight in both the changes in personal control due to a breast cancer diagnosis, as well as in the stress-buffering effect of personal control. Methods: Personal control and distress were assessed in breast cancer patients not treated with chemot

  18. Traditional Chinese Medicine in Cancer Care: A Review of Controlled Clinical Studies Published in Chinese

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xun; Yang, Guoyan; Li, Xinxue; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Jingli; Chang, Jiu; Sun, Xiaoxuan; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Guo, Yu; Xu, Yue; Liu, Jianping; Bensoussan, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been widely applied for cancer care in China. There have been a large number of controlled clinical studies published in Chinese literature, yet no systematic searching and analysis has been done. This study summarizes the current evidence of controlled clinical studies of TCM for cancer. Methods We searched all the controlled clinical studies of TCM therapies for all kinds of cancers published in Chinese in four main Chinese electronic databa...

  19. Dietary Calcium and Risk for Prostate Cancer: A Case-Control Study Among US Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Christina D.; Whitley, Brian M.; Hoyo, Cathrine; Grant, Delores J.; Schwartz, Gary G; Presti, Joseph C.; Iraggi, Jared D.; Newman, Kathryn A.; Gerber, Leah; Taylor, Loretta A.; McKeever, Madeline G.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to examine the association between calcium intake and prostate cancer risk. We hypothesized that calcium intake would be positively associated with lower risk for prostate cancer. Methods We used data from a case-control study conducted among veterans between 2007 and 2010 at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The study consisted of 108 biopsy-positive prostate cancer cases, 161 biopsy-negative controls, and 237 healthy controls. We also d...

  20. Recommended Practice: Creating Cyber Forensics Plans for Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Cornelius; Mark Fabro

    2008-08-01

    Cyber forensics has been in the popular mainstream for some time, and has matured into an information-technology capability that is very common among modern information security programs. The goal of cyber forensics is to support the elements of troubleshooting, monitoring, recovery, and the protection of sensitive data. Moreover, in the event of a crime being committed, cyber forensics is also the approach to collecting, analyzing, and archiving data as evidence in a court of law. Although scalable to many information technology domains, especially modern corporate architectures, cyber forensics can be challenging when being applied to non-traditional environments, which are not comprised of current information technologies or are designed with technologies that do not provide adequate data storage or audit capabilities. In addition, further complexity is introduced if the environments are designed using proprietary solutions and protocols, thus limiting the ease of which modern forensic methods can be utilized. The legacy nature and somewhat diverse or disparate component aspects of control systems environments can often prohibit the smooth translation of modern forensics analysis into the control systems domain. Compounded by a wide variety of proprietary technologies and protocols, as well as critical system technologies with no capability to store significant amounts of event information, the task of creating a ubiquitous and unified strategy for technical cyber forensics on a control systems device or computing resource is far from trivial. To date, no direction regarding cyber forensics as it relates to control systems has been produced other than what might be privately available from commercial vendors. Current materials have been designed to support event recreation (event-based), and although important, these requirements do not always satisfy the needs associated with incident response or forensics that are driven by cyber incidents. To address these

  1. Recruitment for 'A pilot study of randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of lung cancer screening by thoracic CT'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of lung cancer screening by thoracic computed tomography (CT), a randomized controlled trial was planned in Japan. The randomized trial was designed as follows: participants were randomly assigned into 2 groups, CT group and XP group; XP group would receive 10 times of lung cancer screening by chest x-ray annually for 10 years; smokers in CT group would receive 10 times of lung cancer screening by thoracic CT annually for 10 years; non-smokers in CT group would receive 3 times of lung cancer screening by thoracic CT and 7 times of chest x-ray during 10 years. A pilot study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of the trial. A letter for recruitment to participate in the above trial was mailed to the citizens in Hakui City, who were 50-64 years old and underwent regular lung cancer screening using chest x-ray this year. In the letter we explained that the efficacy of lung cancer screening by thoracic CT had not been proved yet; only half of the participants could undergo thoracic CT screening; thoracic CT screening might cause unfavorable consequences like radiation exposure, false positives or overdiagnosis. Of 329 persons who received the letter of recruitment, 117 replied. After meeting with us for detailed explanation, 111 persons participated in the above randomized trial. The compliance of recruitment is high (approximately one third) and the above trial may be feasible. (author)

  2. Development of a dosimetric system for the quality control of breast cancer treatments; Desenvolvimento de um sistema dosimetrico para o controle de qualidade nos tratamentos de cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaves, Roberio C.; Crispim, Verginia R., E-mail: rchaves@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: verginia@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/lUFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Nuclear; Rosa, Luiz A.R. da, E-mail: Irosa@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Delano B.V., E-mail: delano@inca.gov.br [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCA/MS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    A system for evaluating the values of absorbed dose in breast teletherapy was developed, using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100), to compare them to those provided by Therapy planning system. A breast phantom was made to distribute the dosimeters TL shaped chip in breast volume and irradiate it under the same conditions of planning. Three different techniques of teletherapy were considered: one with irradiation from a therapy unit of {sup 60}Co and two with an X-ray beam coming from a 6 MV linear accelerator. Doses measures allowed checking that the performance of the quality control system used in breast cancer treatment is appropriate, since the planned doses differed about 1.5% of the responses provided by TL dosimeters.

  3. Recommendations for dose calculations of lung cancer treatment plans treated with stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate dose distributions computed with 5 different dose algorithms for patients with lung cancers treated using stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). Treatment plans for 133 lung cancer patients, initially computed with a 1D-pencil beam (equivalent-path-length, EPL-1D) algorithm, were recalculated with 4 other algorithms commissioned for treatment planning, including 3-D pencil-beam (EPL-3D), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), collapsed cone convolution superposition (CCC), and Monte Carlo (MC). The plan prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions normalized to the 95% isodose line. Tumors were classified according to location: peripheral tumors surrounded by lung (lung-island, N=39), peripheral tumors attached to the rib-cage or chest wall (lung-wall, N=44), and centrally-located tumors (lung-central, N=50). Relative to the EPL-1D algorithm, PTV D95 and mean dose values computed with the other 4 algorithms were lowest for 'lung-island' tumors with smallest field sizes (3-5 cm). On the other hand, the smallest differences were noted for lung-central tumors treated with largest field widths (7-10 cm). Amongst all locations, dose distribution differences were most strongly correlated with tumor size for lung-island tumors. For most cases, convolution/superposition and MC algorithms were in good agreement. Mean lung dose (MLD) values computed with the EPL-1D algorithm were highly correlated with that of the other algorithms (correlation coefficient =0.99). The MLD values were found to be ∼10% lower for small lung-island tumors with the model-based (conv/superposition and MC) vs. the correction-based (pencil-beam) algorithms with the model-based algorithms predicting greater low dose spread within the lungs. This study suggests that pencil beam algorithms should be avoided for lung SABR planning. For the most challenging cases, small tumors surrounded entirely by lung tissue (lung-island type

  4. Recommendations for dose calculations of lung cancer treatment plans treated with stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devpura, S.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chen, D.; Liu, D.; Li, H.; Kumar, S.; Gordon, J.; Ajlouni, M.; Movsas, B.; Chetty, I. J.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate dose distributions computed with 5 different dose algorithms for patients with lung cancers treated using stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). Treatment plans for 133 lung cancer patients, initially computed with a 1D-pencil beam (equivalent-path-length, EPL-1D) algorithm, were recalculated with 4 other algorithms commissioned for treatment planning, including 3-D pencil-beam (EPL-3D), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), collapsed cone convolution superposition (CCC), and Monte Carlo (MC). The plan prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions normalized to the 95% isodose line. Tumors were classified according to location: peripheral tumors surrounded by lung (lung-island, N=39), peripheral tumors attached to the rib-cage or chest wall (lung-wall, N=44), and centrally-located tumors (lung-central, N=50). Relative to the EPL-1D algorithm, PTV D95 and mean dose values computed with the other 4 algorithms were lowest for "lung-island" tumors with smallest field sizes (3-5 cm). On the other hand, the smallest differences were noted for lung-central tumors treated with largest field widths (7-10 cm). Amongst all locations, dose distribution differences were most strongly correlated with tumor size for lung-island tumors. For most cases, convolution/superposition and MC algorithms were in good agreement. Mean lung dose (MLD) values computed with the EPL-1D algorithm were highly correlated with that of the other algorithms (correlation coefficient =0.99). The MLD values were found to be ~10% lower for small lung-island tumors with the model-based (conv/superposition and MC) vs. the correction-based (pencil-beam) algorithms with the model-based algorithms predicting greater low dose spread within the lungs. This study suggests that pencil beam algorithms should be avoided for lung SABR planning. For the most challenging cases, small tumors surrounded entirely by lung tissue (lung-island type), a Monte

  5. Noise and Sound Control in Open Plan Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Ben

    This annotated bibliography includes summaries of 19 articles and reports dealing with noise control and acoustical design in school buildings. A brief introduction discusses the need for careful attention to acoustics in any school construction or remodeling project, with particular emphasis on the need for special acoustical measures in an open…

  6. Breast cancer in Mexican women: an epidemiological study with cervical cancer control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Tovar-Guzmán

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In Mexico, breast cancer (BC is one of the main causes of cancer deaths in women, with increasing incidence and mortality in recent years. Therefore, the aim of the study is identify possible risk factors related to BC. METHODS: An epidemiological study of hospital cases of BC and controls with cervical uterine cancer (CUCA was carried out at eight third level concentration hospitals in Mexico City. The total of 353 incident cases of BC and 630 controls with CUCA were identified among women younger than 75 years who had been residents of the metropolitan area of Mexico City for at least one year. Diagnosis was confirmed histologically in both groups. Variables were analyzed according to biological and statistical plausibility criteria. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Cases and controls were stratified according to the menopausal hormonal status (pre and post menopause. RESULTS: The factors associated with BC were: higher socioeconomic level (OR= 2.77; 95%CI = 1.77 - 4.35; early menarche (OR= 1.32; 95%CI= 0.88 - 2.00; old age at first pregnancy (>31 years: OR= 5.49; 95%CI= 2.16 - 13.98 and a family history of BC (OR= 4.76; 95% CI= 2.10 - 10.79. In contrast, an increase in the duration of the breastfeeding period was a protective factor (>25 months: OR= 0.38; 95%CI= 0.20 - 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes to the identification of risk factors for BC described in the international literature, in the population of Mexican women. Breastfeeding appears to play an important role in protecting women from BC. Because of changes in women`s lifestyles, lactation is decreasing in Mexico, and young women tend not to breastfeed or to shorten the duration of lactation.

  7. Breast cancer in Mexican women: an epidemiological study with cervical cancer control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tovar-Guzmán Víctor

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In Mexico, breast cancer (BC is one of the main causes of cancer deaths in women, with increasing incidence and mortality in recent years. Therefore, the aim of the study is identify possible risk factors related to BC. METHODS: An epidemiological study of hospital cases of BC and controls with cervical uterine cancer (CUCA was carried out at eight third level concentration hospitals in Mexico City. The total of 353 incident cases of BC and 630 controls with CUCA were identified among women younger than 75 years who had been residents of the metropolitan area of Mexico City for at least one year. Diagnosis was confirmed histologically in both groups. Variables were analyzed according to biological and statistical plausibility criteria. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Cases and controls were stratified according to the menopausal hormonal status (pre and post menopause. RESULTS: The factors associated with BC were: higher socioeconomic level (OR= 2.77; 95%CI = 1.77 - 4.35; early menarche (OR= 1.32; 95%CI= 0.88 - 2.00; old age at first pregnancy (>31 years: OR= 5.49; 95%CI= 2.16 - 13.98 and a family history of BC (OR= 4.76; 95% CI= 2.10 - 10.79. In contrast, an increase in the duration of the breastfeeding period was a protective factor (>25 months: OR= 0.38; 95%CI= 0.20 - 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes to the identification of risk factors for BC described in the international literature, in the population of Mexican women. Breastfeeding appears to play an important role in protecting women from BC. Because of changes in women`s lifestyles, lactation is decreasing in Mexico, and young women tend not to breastfeed or to shorten the duration of lactation.

  8. Pathologic analysis of control plans for air pollution management in tehran metropolis: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Salehi Shahrabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regarding the importance of air pollution issue for large cities, as Tehran metropolis, many plans, programs, projects and regulations have been developed to manage urban air pollution. However, most of them failed to decline the pollution. The purpose of this study is to pathologically analyze air-pollution control plans in order to offer effective solutions for Tehran metropolis. Methods: A qualitative content analysis and a semi-structured interview with 14 practicing professionals were used to identify key causes and sources of Tehran′s air pollution, to recognize challenges and obstacles towards effective performance of air-pollution control plans in this metropolitan area, and to suggest the most effective controlling solutions. Results: Challenges related to air-pollution control plans can be divided into two major categories: Firstly lack of integrated and organized stewardship and secondly those related to political, economical, social and technical environmental abbreviated as PEST, challenges. For effective control of the Tehran air pollution, the following eight controlling alternatives were identified: Systematization of plan preparation process, organizing the stewardship, standardization and utilization of new technologies and professional experts, cultural and infrastructural development, realization of social justice, developing coordination and controlling mechanisms, improving citizen′s participatory capacity, and focusing on effective management of fuel and energy. Conclusions: Controlling air pollution in Tehran should be considered as a priority for policymakers to make enforcements through applying a systemic cycle of preparation effective and comprehensive plans. Further, implement the enforcements and evaluate the environmental impact of the plans through involving all stakeholders.

  9. Exercise habit strength, planning and the theory of planned behaviour: an action control approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.-J. de Bruijn

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Action control refers to the successful translation of intention into behaviour. The purpose of this study was to explore the potential usefulness of extending intention-exercise profiles with past exercise behaviour and exercise habit strength and the potential discriminative effect of a

  10. Body image in cancer survivors : a systematic review of case-control studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, Vicky; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Tuinman, Marrit A

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is common consensus that cancer and its treatment can impair the body, but combined evidence of the previous literature in cancer survivors is missing. Therefore, we reviewed body image in cancer survivors and focused on case-control studies, in order to draw conclusions as to whether

  11. Body image in cancer survivors : a systematic review of case-control studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, Vicky; Hagedoorn, Mariet; Tuinman, Marrit A.

    2015-01-01

    There is common consensus that cancer and its treatment can impair the body, but combined evidence of the previous literature in cancer survivors is missing. Therefore, we reviewed body image in cancer survivors and focused on case-control studies, in order to draw conclusions as to whether body ima

  12. Comparison of three radiotherapy technics in three-dimensional dosimetric planning for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess and delineate the dosimetric shortcomings of conventional radiotherapy planning, as compared with the three-dimensional treatment planning system, and to obtain a better technique in the treatment of lung cancers. Methods: Thirteen patients with stage III A-III B non-small cell lung cancer were chosen in the present study. Using the Cadplan 6.0.8 treatment planning system, three different methods of radiotherapy planning: conventional planning, conventional and conformal planning, and conformal planning were designed for each patient. The total radiation dose was 66 Gy and DVHs were used to assess the dosimetric distribution in the gross tumor volume and the surrounding organs at risk. Results: No significant dosimetric disparity in the target volume was found among the three designs, according to anticipated therapeutic requirements. The conformity indices were 0.13, 0.24 and 0.35 for these three radiotherapy designs. The mean lung volumes which received radiation dose of ≥20 Gy were 32%, 26% and 25%. The mean maximum dose at the spinal cord were 42 Gy, 49 Gy and 33 Gy. The mean esophageal volume which received radiation of ≥50 Gy were 32%, 34% and 22%, and the mean radiation dose to the heart were 18 Gy, 15 Gy and 12 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Conventional radiotherapy planning is able to meet the demands of dosimetric requirements for radiation treatment of lung cancers. The three dimensional conformal radiation therapy planning system is able to provide superior delivery of high dose to the target volume without inflicting too high a risk to the surrounding normal tissues and organs

  13. Symbolic Planning and Control Using Game Theory and Grammatical Inference

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Jie; Tanner, Herbert G.; Heinz, Jeffrey; Chandlee, Jane; Karydis, Konstantinos; Koirala, Cesar

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an approach that brings together game theory with grammatical inference and discrete abstractions in order to synthesize control strategies for hybrid dynamical systems performing tasks in partially unknown but rule-governed adversarial environments. The combined formulation guarantees that a system specification is met if (a) the true model of the environment is in the class of models inferable from a positive presentation, (b) a characteristic sample is observed, and (c)...

  14. Effect of CT contrast on volumetric arc therapy planning (RapidArc and helical tomotherapy) for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast in the dosimetry of helical tomotherapy and RapidArc treatment for head and neck cancer and determine if it is acceptable during the computed tomography (CT) simulation to acquire only CT with contrast for treatment planning of head and neck cancer. Overall, 5 patients with head and neck cancer (4 men and 1 woman) treated on helical tomotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. For each patient, 2 consecutive CT scans were performed. The first CT set was scanned before the contrast injection and secondary study set was scanned 45 seconds after contrast. The 2 CTs were autoregistered using the same Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine coordinates. Tomotherapy and RapidArc plans were generated on 1 CT data set and subsequently copied to the second CT set. Dose calculation was performed, and dose difference was analyzed to evaluate the influence of intravenous contrast media. The dose matrix used for comparison included mean, minimum and maximum doses of planning target volume (PTV), PTV dose coverage, and V45 Gy, V30 Gy, and V20 Gy organ doses. Treatment planning on contrasted images generally showed a lower dose to both organs and target than plans on noncontrasted images. The doses for the points of interest placed in the organs and target rarely changed more than 2% in any patient. In conclusion, treatment planning using a contrasted image had insignificant effect on the dose to the organs and targets. In our opinion, only CT with contrast needs to be acquired during the CT simulation for head and neck cancer. Dose calculations performed on contrasted images can potentially underestimate the delivery dose slightly. However, the errors of planning on a contrasted image should not affect the result in clinically significant way

  15. Dosimetric impact of mixed-energy volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for high-risk prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shyam Pokharel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the dosimetric impact of mixing low and high energy treatment plans for prostate cancer treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique in the form of RapidArc.Methods: A cohort of 12 prostate cases involving proximal seminal vesicles and lymph nodes was selected for this retrospective study. For each prostate case, the single-energy plans (SEPs) and mixed-energy plans (MEPs) were generated.  First, the SEPs were created using 6 mega-voltage (MV...

  16. Rectum separation in patients with cervical cancer for treatment planning in primary chemo-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To proof feasibility of hydrogel application in patients with advanced cervical cancer undergoing chemo-radiation in order to reduce rectal toxicity from external beam radiation as well as brachytherapy. Under transrectal sonographic guidance five patients with proven cervical cancer underwent hydro gel (20 cc) instillation into the tip of rectovaginal septum adherent to posterior part of the visible cervical tumor. Five days after this procedure all patients underwent T2 weighted transversal and sagittal MRI for brachytherapy planning. MRI protocol included T2 weighted fast spin echo (FSE) imaging in sagittal, coronal and para-axial orientation using an 1.5 Tesla MRI. Separation of anterior rectal wall and cervix was documented. Hydrogel application was uneventful in all patients and no toxicity was reported. Separation ranged from 7 to 26 mm in width (median 10 mm). The length of the separation varied between 18 and 38 mm (median 32 mm). In all patients displacement was seen in the posterior vaginal fornix, and/or at the deepest part of uterine cervix depending on the extension of the cul-de-sac in correlation to the posterior wall of the uterus. In patients with bulky tumor and/or deep (vaginal) extend of peritoneal cavity tumour was seen mainly cranial from the rectovaginal space and therefore above the hydrogeI application. Only in the extra-peritoneal (lower) part of the cervix a good separation could be achieved between the rectum and cervix. Hydrgel instillation in patients with cervial cancer undergoing chemoradiation is safe and feasible. Because of the loose tissue of the cul-de-sac and its intra- and extraperitoneal part, hydrogel instillation of 20 cc did not result in a sufficient separation of the cervix from anterior wall

  17. Environmental and occupational cancer in Argentina: a case-control lung cancer study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matos Elena

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to analyze the risks for lung cancer associated with occupational exposures in a developing country where lung cancer is the first cause of mortality from cancer in men. The study involved 200 men with lung cancer and 397 hospital controls. The OR for current smokers was 8.5, whereas former smokers displayed an OR of 5.3. The fraction attributable to smoking was 85%. Statistically significant high ORs were observed for employment in the alcoholic beverages industry (4.5, 95% CI:1.02-20.2, sawmills and wood mills (4.6, 95% CI:1.1-18.4, chemicals/plastics (1.8, 95% CI:1.04-3.2, and pottery, glass, or mineral manufactures (3.4, 95% CI:1.1-10.6. Other high, but not statistically significant, risks were observed for employment in leather shoe industry and repair (2.1, 95% CI:0.8-5.4, rubber industries (3.4, 95% CI:0.9-12.4, metal workers, including welders (1.9, 95% CI:0.8-4.4, motor vehicle mechanics (2.0, 95% CI:0.9-4.2, workers in cleaning services (1.9, 95% CI:0.8-4.5, and for workers in agriculture (2.4, 95% CI:0.9-6.0. Although some of the present results may be due to chance, most are consistent with those of previous investigations in other countries.

  18. Forecasting Model of Risk of Cancer in Lung Cancer Pedigree in a Case-control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan LIN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Annual lung screening using spiral computed tomography (CT, has a high sensitivity of detecting early lung cancer (LC, but its high rates of false-positive often lead to unnecessary surgery. The aim of this study is to create a forecasting model of high risk individuals to lung cancer. Methods The pathologic diagnoses of LC in Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute were consecutively chosen as the probands. All the members of the first-degree relatives of probands' and their spouses' were enrolled in this study. These pedigrees consisted of 633 probands' pedigrees and 565 spouses' pedigrees. Unless otherwise stated, analyses were performed using the SPSS 17.0 statistical software package. Results Compared with the control, a family history of carcinoma in first-degree relatives was significantly associated with LC risk (OR=1.71, P<0.001, the sub-group of either one infected individual or more than two infected individuals in first-degree relatives showed significantly statistical differences (P=0.005, P=0.002. In the forecasting model, the risk compared to that in Chinese population was from 0.38 to 63.08 folds. In the population whose risk was more than 10 times to the Chinese population, the accuracy rate of prediction was 88.1%. Conclusion A family history of carcinoma in first-degree relatives was significantly associated with increased LC risk. The more infected individuals exist in first-degree relatives, the more risk was showed. In the forecasting model, smokers especially heavy ones whose risk were more than 10 times to the Chinese population should be receive annual screening. The population are positive at least any two conditions which including male, lung disease history, occupation expose and history of cancer in first-degree relative.

  19. Evaluation of plan quality assurance models for prostate cancer patients based on fully automatically generated Pareto-optimal treatment plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibing; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben; Petit, Steven F.

    2016-06-01

    IMRT planning with commercial Treatment Planning Systems (TPSs) is a trial-and-error process. Consequently, the quality of treatment plans may not be consistent among patients, planners and institutions. Recently, different plan quality assurance (QA) models have been proposed, that could flag and guide improvement of suboptimal treatment plans. However, the performance of these models was validated using plans that were created using the conventional trail-and-error treatment planning process. Consequently, it is challenging to assess and compare quantitatively the accuracy of different treatment planning QA models. Therefore, we created a golden standard dataset of consistently planned Pareto-optimal IMRT plans for 115 prostate patients. Next, the dataset was used to assess the performance of a treatment planning QA model that uses the overlap volume histogram (OVH). 115 prostate IMRT plans were fully automatically planned using our in-house developed TPS Erasmus-iCycle. An existing OVH model was trained on the plans of 58 of the patients. Next it was applied to predict DVHs of the rectum, bladder and anus of the remaining 57 patients. The predictions were compared with the achieved values of the golden standard plans for the rectum D mean, V 65, and V 75, and D mean of the anus and the bladder. For the rectum, the prediction errors (predicted–achieved) were only  ‑0.2  ±  0.9 Gy (mean  ±  1 SD) for D mean,‑1.0  ±  1.6% for V 65, and  ‑0.4  ±  1.1% for V 75. For D mean of the anus and the bladder, the prediction error was 0.1  ±  1.6 Gy and 4.8  ±  4.1 Gy, respectively. Increasing the training cohort to 114 patients only led to minor improvements. A dataset of consistently planned Pareto-optimal prostate IMRT plans was generated. This dataset can be used to train new, and validate and compare existing treatment planning QA models, and has been made publicly available. The OVH model was highly

  20. Evaluation of plan quality assurance models for prostate cancer patients based on fully automatically generated Pareto-optimal treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibing; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben; Petit, Steven F

    2016-06-01

    IMRT planning with commercial Treatment Planning Systems (TPSs) is a trial-and-error process. Consequently, the quality of treatment plans may not be consistent among patients, planners and institutions. Recently, different plan quality assurance (QA) models have been proposed, that could flag and guide improvement of suboptimal treatment plans. However, the performance of these models was validated using plans that were created using the conventional trail-and-error treatment planning process. Consequently, it is challenging to assess and compare quantitatively the accuracy of different treatment planning QA models. Therefore, we created a golden standard dataset of consistently planned Pareto-optimal IMRT plans for 115 prostate patients. Next, the dataset was used to assess the performance of a treatment planning QA model that uses the overlap volume histogram (OVH). 115 prostate IMRT plans were fully automatically planned using our in-house developed TPS Erasmus-iCycle. An existing OVH model was trained on the plans of 58 of the patients. Next it was applied to predict DVHs of the rectum, bladder and anus of the remaining 57 patients. The predictions were compared with the achieved values of the golden standard plans for the rectum D mean, V 65, and V 75, and D mean of the anus and the bladder. For the rectum, the prediction errors (predicted-achieved) were only  -0.2  ±  0.9 Gy (mean  ±  1 SD) for D mean,-1.0  ±  1.6% for V 65, and  -0.4  ±  1.1% for V 75. For D mean of the anus and the bladder, the prediction error was 0.1  ±  1.6 Gy and 4.8  ±  4.1 Gy, respectively. Increasing the training cohort to 114 patients only led to minor improvements. A dataset of consistently planned Pareto-optimal prostate IMRT plans was generated. This dataset can be used to train new, and validate and compare existing treatment planning QA models, and has been made publicly available. The OVH model was highly accurate

  1. Tumor recurrence and in-field control after multimodality treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is used prior to surgery in curative treatment of esophageal cancer (EC). We evaluated the in-field control of this multimodal treatment by extraction of radiation dose parameters and determination of the spatial relation between tumor recurrence location(s) and radiation target volume (RTV). Methods and materials: Treatment consisted of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (5-FU and cisplatin) and radiotherapy (36 Gy) followed by Ivor–Lewis esophagectomy. For patients with locoregional recurrence(s), image fusion was performed between radiotherapy planning CT and follow-up CT(s). A region-of-interest was contoured on the planning CT around each locoregional recurrence. Mean and maximum radiation doses were then extracted to classify recurrences as out-of-field, marginal or in-field. Results: Eighty patients were included. The median follow-up duration was 19 months. Fifteen of 95 locoregional recurrences were detected in the RTV. These in-field relapses occurred in only 6 patients (7.8%) on 12 different anatomical locations. None of the patients with in-field failure had a pCR and all had concurrent distant failure on multiple anatomical sites. Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by Ivor–Lewis esophagectomy yields excellent in-field control, as only a clear minority (7.8%) of patients developed a relapse in the RTV. In-field recurrence is associated with widespread tumor dissemination and poor pathological response to neoadjuvant treatment

  2. Multicriteria optimization enables less experienced planners to efficiently produce high quality treatment plans in head and neck cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate that novice dosimetry planners efficiently create clinically acceptable IMRT plans for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients using a commercially available multicriteria optimization (MCO) system. Twenty HNC patients were enrolled in this in-silico comparative planning study. Per patient, novice planners with less experience in dosimetry planning created an IMRT plan using an MCO system (RayStation). Furthermore, a conventionally planned clinical IMRT plan was available (Pinnacle3). All conventional IMRT and MCO-plans were blind-rated by two expert radiation-oncologists in HNC, using a 5-point scale (1–5 with 5 the highest score) assessment form comprising 10 questions. Additionally, plan quality was reported in terms of planning time, dosimetric and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) comparisons. Inter-rater reliability was derived using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In total, the radiation-oncologists rated 800 items on plan quality. The overall plan score indicated no differences between both planning techniques (conventional IMRT: 3.8 ± 1.2 vs. MCO: 3.6 ± 1.1, p = 0.29). The inter-rater reliability of all ratings was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.57–0.71), indicating substantial agreement between the radiation-oncologists. In 93% of cases, the scoring difference of the conventional IMRT and MCO-plans was one point or less. Furthermore, MCO-plans led to slightly higher dose uniformity in the therapeutic planning target volume, to a lower integral body dose (13.9 ± 4.5 Gy vs. 12.9 ± 4.0 Gy, p < 0.001), and to reduced dose to the contra-lateral parotid gland (28.1 ± 11.8 Gy vs. 23.0 ± 11.2 Gy, p < 0.002). Consequently, NTCP estimates for xerostomia reduced by 8.4 ± 7.4% (p < 0.003). The hands-on time of the conventional IMRT planning was approximately 205 min. The time to create an MCO-plan was on average 43 ± 12 min. MCO planning enables novice treatment planners to create high quality IMRT plans for HNC patients. Plans were

  3. A treatment planning study of the potential of geometrical tracking for intensity modulated proton therapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Aznar, Marianne C; Nygaard, Ditte E;

    2010-01-01

    Proton therapy of lung cancer holds the potential for a reduction of the volume of irradiated normal lung tissue. In this work we investigate the robustness of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans to motion, and evaluate a geometrical tumour tracking method to compensate for tumour...

  4. A treatment planning study of the potential of geometrical tracking for intensity modulated proton therapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Aznar, Marianne; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund;

    2010-01-01

    Proton therapy of lung cancer holds the potential for a reduction of the volume of irradiated normal lung tissue. In this work we investigate the robustness of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans to motion, and evaluate a geometrical tumour tracking method to compensate for tumour mot...

  5. MRI-assisted cervix cancer brachytherapy pre-planning, based on application in paracervical anaesthesia: final report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petric Primoz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Optimal applicator insertion is a precondition for the success of cervix cancer brachytherapy (BT. We aimed to assess feasibility and efficacy of MRI-assisted pre-planning, based on applicator insertion in para-cervical anaesthesia (PCA.

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Lung ... Advisory Board Meetings Cancer Currents Blog Research Findings Drug Approvals Precision Medicine Leadership Views 2017 Annual Plan & ...

  7. An ongoing case–control study to evaluate the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Massat, Nathalie J; Sasieni, Peter D; Parmar, Dharmishta; Duffy, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer death in both males and females in England. A national bowel cancer screening programme was rolled out in England between 2006 and 2010. In the post-randomised controlled trials epoch, assessment of the impact of the programme using observational studies is needed. This study protocol was set up at the request of the UK Policy Research Unit in Cancer Awareness, Screening and Early Diagnosis to evaluate the effect of the cur...

  8. Dietary patterns and risk of colorectal cancer in Tehran Province: a case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Safari, Akram; Shariff, Zalilah Mohd; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Rashidkhani, Bahram; Fereidooni, Foroozandeh

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third and fourth leading cause of cancer incidence and mortality among men and women, respectively in Iran. However, the role of dietary factors that could contribute to this high cancer incidence remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine major dietary patterns and its relationship with colorectal cancer. Methods This case–control study was conducted in four hospitals in Tehran city of Iran. A total of 71 patients (35 men and 36 women, aged 40...

  9. Association of the California tobacco control program with declines in lung cancer incidence

    OpenAIRE

    Barnoya, J; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The California tobacco control program enacted in 1988 has been associated with declines in smoking and heart disease mortality. Since smoking also causes lung cancer, we investigated whether the program was associated with a decline in lung and other cancer incidence. Methods: Age-adjusted incidence rates of lung and bladder cancer (which are caused by smoking) and prostate and brain cancer (which are not) in the San Francisco-Oakland (SFO) Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (S...

  10. Risk Factors for Pancreatic Cancer in China: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxu Zheng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite having one of the highest mortality rates of all cancers, the risk factors of pancreatic cancer remain unclear. We assessed risk factors of pancreatic cancer in China. Methods: A case-control study design was conducted using data from four hospital-based cancer registries (Henan Provincial Cancer Hospital, Beijing Cancer Hospital, Hebei Provincial Cancer Hospital, and Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. Controls were equally matched and selected from family members of non-pancreatic cancer patients in the same hospitals. Face-to-face interviews were conducted by trained staff using questionnaires. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess odd ratios (ORs and 95% confident intervals (CIs. Results: Among 646 recruited participants, 323 were pancreatic cancer patients and 323 were controls. Multivariate logistic analysis suggested that pancreatic cancer family history (adjusted OR 1.23; 95% CI, 1.11–3.70, obesity (adjusted OR 1.77; 95% CI, 1.22–2.57, diabetes (adjusted OR 2.96; 95% CI, 1.48–5.92 and smoking (adjusted OR 1.78; 95% CI, 1.02–3.10 were risk factors for pancreatic cancer, but that drinking tea (adjusted OR 0.49; 95% CI, 0.25–0.84 was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Conclusions: Cigarette smoking, family history, obesity, and diabetes are risk factors of pancreatic cancer, which is important information for designing early intervention and preventive strategies for pancreatic cancer and may be beneficial to pancreatic cancer control in China.

  11. Reproductive factors related to the risk of colorectal cancer by subsite: a case-control analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, K-Y; Tajima, K.; M. Inoue; Takezaki, T.; Hirose, K.; Hamajima, N; Park, S.K.; Kang, D. H.; Kato, T; Hirai, T

    1999-01-01

    The authors hypothesized that reproductive factors of colorectal cancer, which are probably mediated by endogenous hormones, would differ according to colonic subsite. Information on reproductive factors was obtained from 372 female colorectal cancer cases (113 proximal colon, 126 distal colon, 133 rectum) and 31 061 cancer-free controls at the Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Japan, between 1988 and 1995. Multiple logistic analysis showed that late age at interview, family history of colorectal...

  12. VMAT and step-and-shoot IMRT in head and neck cancer. A comparative plan analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotational IMRT is a new technique, whose value still has to be assessed. We evaluated its adequacy for the treatment of head and neck (H and N) cancer compared to the well-established step-and-shoot IMRT. A total of 15 patients, who were treated with either IMRT (13 patients) or VMAT (2 patients) in the H and N region, were chosen. For each patient, a treatment plan with the respective other technique was calculated. To compare the resulting dose distributions, the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were evaluated. To quantify the differences, a new quality index (QI) was introduced, as a measure of the planning target volume (PTV) coverage and homogeneity. A conformity function (CF) was defined to estimate normal tissue sparing. The QI for VMAT amounts to 36.3, whereas for IMRT the mean value is 66.5, indicating better PTV coverage as well as less overdosage for the rotational technique. While the sparing of organs at risk (OAR) was similar for both techniques, the CF shows a significantly better sparing of healthy tissue for all doses with VMAT treatment. VMAT results in dose distributions for H and N patients that are at least comparable with treatments performed with step-and-shoot IMRT. Two new tools to quantify the quality of dose distributions are presented and have proven to be useful.

  13. Quantitative MR imaging in planning and assessing novel cancer treatments Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Baustert, I C

    2001-01-01

    Novel treatments in cancer, like conformal radiotherapy and anticancer drugs, require new MRI techniques to assess their benefits and potential. In conformal radiotherapy, MRI can be used to measure the shape and dose of the conformed radiation field in dose sensitive gel test-objects thus validating the predicted dose computed by complex programs. In antiangiogenic drug treatment, the vascular dysfunction of the tumour can be assessed by MRI prior to treatment. Response to treatment may also be monitored by measuring the changes in vascular function. In this thesis, MRI of polyacrylamide gels is investigated as a 3D dosimeter for conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Quantitative MRI sequences capable of measuring the wide range of T2 values typically expected in gel dosimetry, are identified. Different T2 measurement methods are compared in terms of accuracy, signal to noise ratio and acquisition time. Examples of a complex dose distribution in 2D and 3D are presented and compared to the planned dose p...

  14. Personalized treatment planning with a model of radiation therapy outcomes for use in multiobjective optimization of IMRT plans for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To build a new treatment planning approach that extends beyond radiation transport and IMRT optimization by modeling the radiation therapy process and prognostic indicators for more outcome-focused decision making. An in-house treatment planning system was modified to include multiobjective inverse planning, a probabilistic outcome model, and a multi-attribute decision aid. A genetic algorithm generated a set of plans embodying trade-offs between the separate objectives. An influence diagram network modeled the radiation therapy process of prostate cancer using expert opinion, results of clinical trials, and published research. A Markov model calculated a quality adjusted life expectancy (QALE), which was the endpoint for ranking plans. The Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm (MOEA) was designed to produce an approximation of the Pareto Front representing optimal tradeoffs for IMRT plans. Prognostic information from the dosimetrics of the plans, and from patient-specific clinical variables were combined by the influence diagram. QALEs were calculated for each plan for each set of patient characteristics. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to explore changes in outcomes for variations in patient characteristics and dosimetric variables. The model calculated life expectancies that were in agreement with an independent clinical study. The radiation therapy model proposed has integrated a number of different physical, biological and clinical models into a more comprehensive model. It illustrates a number of the critical aspects of treatment planning that can be improved and represents a more detailed description of the therapy process. A Markov model was implemented to provide a stronger connection between dosimetric variables and clinical outcomes and could provide a practical, quantitative method for making difficult clinical decisions

  15. 75 FR 56942 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Diego Air Pollution Control District...

  16. 77 FR 73392 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control...

  17. 75 FR 6337 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control of Carbon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control of... submitted by the State of Maryland for the purpose of replacing the existing requirements for the control...

  18. 76 FR 10295 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Revisions To Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Revisions To Control Volatile Organic Compound Emissions From Consumer Related Sources AGENCY: Environmental Protection..., Control of Air Pollution from Volatile Organic Compounds. The State submitted these revisions on March...

  19. Planning of work of on-board systems of spacecrafts using the coordinate control methods

    OpenAIRE

    Ожінський, Віктор Васильович; Парфенюк, Василь Григорович

    2016-01-01

    The approaches to develop the tasks of planning the work of on-board systems of spacecrafts (IS) of Earth observation using the coordinate control methods by on-board and ground-based equipment are considered. The new methods of functioning of on-board control complex in the autonomous flight suggested.

  20. Business Planning as Pedagogy: Language and Control in a Changing Institutional Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Leslie S.; Townley, Barbara; Cooper, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Based on Pierre Bourdieu's work on power as symbolic violence, examines business planning's pedagogical function in Alberta, Canada's museum and cultural heritage sites. Control involves redirecting work and changing producers' identity and work understandings via construction of markets, consumers, and products. Control was achieved by pedagogic…

  1. Production planning and control of less emitting production systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haasis, H.D. [Bremen Univ. (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    The concept of integral environmental protection has been growing in importance within Western Europe in recent years. Increasingly, it has come to be recognized that no one part of the environment is separate from any other, it functions as a whole. Yet, pollution control was until recently, usually based on an approach which considers emissions to air, water, and land separately. That has begun to change, particularly since the 1987 report by the World Commission on Environment and Development. This can be recognized, for example, within the proposal for a Directive of the Council of the European Union on Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control. By this, the environmental media are placed on an equal legislative footing so that the final result will be that the way in which an installation is operated will be better for the whole environment. In other words, less emission production systems are obtained. Realization of an integral concept or of less emission production systems initially requires technical measures for the avoidance and the minimization of emissions, as well as recovery and recycling of materials and substances

  2. Multi-Objective Hybrid Optimal Control for Interplanetary Mission Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary design of low-thrust interplanetary missions is a highly complex process. The mission designer must choose discrete parameters such as the number of flybys, the bodies at which those flybys are performed, and in some cases the final destination. Because low-thrust trajectory design is tightly coupled with systems design, power and propulsion characteristics must be chosen as well. In addition, a time-history of control variables must be chosen which defines the trajectory. There are often many thousands, if not millions, of possible trajectories to be evaluated. The customer who commissions a trajectory design is not usually interested in a point solution, but rather the exploration of the trade space of trajectories between several different objective functions. This can be very expensive process in terms of the number of human analyst hours required. An automated approach is therefore very desirable. This work presents such an approach by posing the mission design problem as a multi-objective hybrid optimal control problem. The methods is demonstrated on hypothetical mission to the main asteroid belt and to Deimos.

  3. Hierarchical robot control structure and Newton's divided difference approach to robot path planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A hierarchical robot control is proposed for robot soccer system. The Newton' s divided difference is utilized in robot path planning. This paper describes the problems encoutered, software design considerations, vision algorithm and controls of individual robots. The solutions.to the problems implemented are simple and di rect. It is observed that many of the ideas and solutions can be evolved based on simple theories and concepts. This paper focuses on software structure of multi-agent controls, vision algorithm and simple path planning method.

  4. Concepts of Model-Based Control and Trajectory Planning for Parallel Robots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Belda, Květoslav; Böhm, Josef; Píša, P.

    Zurich: Acta Press, 2007 - (Schilling, K.), s. 15-20 ISBN 978-0-88986-685-0; ISBN 978-0-88986-686-7. [The 13th IASTED International Conference on Robotics and Applications. Würzburg (DE), 29.08.2007-31.08.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP102/06/P275; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0271 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Multi-level control * predictive control * trajectory planning Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/historie/belda-0085224.pdf

  5. Efficacy of an educational material on second primary cancer screening practice for cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wook Shin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer surivors have limited knowledge about second primary cancer (SPC screening and suboptimal rates of completion of screening practices for SPC. Our objective was to test the efficacy of an educational material on the knowledge, attitudes, and screening practices for SPC among cancer survivors. METHODS: Randomized, controlled trial among 326 cancer survivors from 6 oncology care outpatient clinics in Korea. Patients were randomized to an intervention or an attention control group. The intervention was a photo-novel, culturally tailored to increase knowledge about SPC screening. Knowledge and attitudes regarding SPC screening were assessed two weeks after the intervention, and screening practices were assessed after one year. RESULTS: At two weeks post-intervention, the average knowledge score was significantly higher in the intervention compared to the control group (0.81 vs. 0.75, P<0.01, with no significant difference in their attitude scores (2.64 vs. 2.57, P = 0.18. After 1 year of follow-up, the completion rate of all appropriate cancer screening was 47.2% in both intervention and control groups. CONCLUSION: While the educational material was effective for increasing knowledge of SPC screening, it did not promote cancer screening practice among cancer survivors. More effective interventions are needed to increase SPC screening rates in this population. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrial.gov NCT00948337.

  6. Comparison of dose-volume histograms of IMRT treatment plans for ethmoid sinus cancer computed by advanced treatment planning systems including Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To recompute clinical intensity-modulated treatment plans for ethmoid sinus cancer and to compare quantitatively the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the planning target volume (PTV) and the optic organs at risk. Material and methods: Ten step-and-shoot intensity-modulated treatment plans were enrolled in this study. Large natural and surgical air cavities challenged the calculation systems. Each optimized treatment plan was recalculated by two superposition convolution (TMS and Pinnacle) and a Monte Carlo system (MCDE). To compare the resulting DVHs, a one-way ANOVA for repeated measurements was performed and multiple pairwise comparisons were made. Results: The tails of the PTV-DVHs were significantly higher for the Monte Carlo system. The DVHs of the critical organs displayed some statistically but not always clinically significant differences. For the individual patients, the three planning systems sometimes reproduced clinically discrepant DVHs that were not significantly different when averaged over all patients. Conclusions: Dose to air cavities contains computational uncertainty. As this dose is clinically irrelevant and optimizing it is meaningless, we recommended extracting the air from the PTV when constructing the PTV-DVH. The planning systems considered reproduce DVHs that are significantly different, especially in the tail region of PTV-DVHs

  7. Controlled clinical trial in the advanced primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a controlled clinical trial in the treatment of advanced primary lung cancer are presented. There were 39 patients who entered the present study that was conducted at the Thoracic Surgery Departament of the A.C. Camargo Hospital of the Antonio Prudente Foundation of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The patients were divided in two groups 1) - Radiotherapy with Cobalt 60 plus Chemotherapy. 2) - Chemotherapy only. The radiotherapy was provided by the split dose technic (6.000 rads in 3 cycles of 2.000 rads each). The chemotherapy consisted of the following drugs (5 FU, Metil hidrazina, Methotrexate, Actinomycin D, Oncovin, Cytoxan) administered in 16 cycles, aiming the synchronous funtional blockade. There was no statistically significant difference in survival of the two groups, ie, the first with 19,3 weeks and the second group with 14,6 weeks. (Author)

  8. Dosimetric effects of endorectal balloons on intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, In-Ah; Eom, Keun-Yong

    2013-10-01

    We used an endorectal balloon (ERB) for prostate immobilization during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer treatment. To investigate the dosimetric effects of ERB-filling materials, we changed the ERB Hounsfield unit (HU) from 0 to 1000 HU in 200-HU intervals to simulate the various ERB fillings; 0 HU simulated a water-filled ERB, and 1000 HU simulated the densest material-filled ERB. Dosimetric data (coverage, homogeneity, conformity, maximal dose, and typical volume dose) for the tumor and the organs at risk (OARs) were evaluated in prostate IMRT treatment plans with 6-MV and 15-MV beams. The tumor coverage appeared to differ by approximately 1%, except for the clinical target volume (CTV) V100% and the planning target volume (PTV) V100%. The largest difference for the various ERB fillings was observed in the PTV V100%. In spite of increasing HU, the prostate IMRT plans at both energies had relatively low dosimetric effects on the PTV and the CTV. However, the maximal and the typical volume doses (D25%, D30%, and D50%) to the rectal wall and the bladder increased with increasing HU. For an air-filled ERB, the maximal doses to the rectal wall and the monitor units were lower than the corresponding values for the water-filled and the densest material-filled ERBs. An air-filled ERB spared the rectal wall because of its dosimetric effect. Thus, we conclude that the use of an air-filled ERB provides a dosimetric benefit to the rectal wall without a loss of target coverage and is an effective option for prostate IMRT treatment.

  9. Attitude-Tracking Control with Path Planning for Agile Satellite Using Double-Gimbal Control Moment Gyros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiling Cui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the issue of rapid attitude maneuver control of agile satellite, this paper presents an attitude-tracking control algorithm with path planning based on the improved genetic algorithm, adaptive backstepping control as well as sliding mode control. The satellite applies double gimbal control moment gyro as actuator and is subjected to the external disturbance and uncertain inertia properties. Firstly, considering the comprehensive mathematical model of the agile satellite and the double gimbal control moment gyro, an improved genetic algorithm is proposed to solve the attitude path-planning problem. The goal is to find an energy optimal path which satisfies certain maneuverability under the constraints of the input saturation, actuator saturation, slew rate limit and singularity measurement limit. Then, the adaptive backstepping control and sliding mode control are adopted in the design of the attitude-tracking controller to track accurately the desired path comprised of the satellite attitude quaternion and velocity. Finally, simulation results indicate the robustness and good tracking performance of the derived controller as well as its ability to avert the singularity of double gimbal control moment gyro.

  10. The Addition of SPECT/CT Lymphoscintigraphy to Breast Cancer Radiation Planning Spares Lymph Nodes Critical for Arm Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: This prospective cohort study was designed to determine whether the amount of radiation delivered to the nonpathological lymph nodes (LNs) that drain the arm can be significantly reduced by integrating single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) scans into radiation treatment planning. Methods: SPECT-CT scans were acquired for the 28 patients with stage I or II breast cancer and fused with the routinely obtained radiation oncology planning CT scans. Arm-draining LNs were contoured with 0.5-cm margins automatically using a threshold of 50% maximum intensity. Two treatment plans were generated: 1 per routine clinical practice (standard; STD) and the second (modified; MOD) with treatment fields modified to minimize dose to the arm-draining LNs visible on SPECT/CT images without interfering with the dosage delivered to target tissues. Participants were treated per the MOD plans. Arm volumes were measured prior to radiation and thereafter at least three subsequent 6-month intervals. Results: Sixty-eight level I-III arm-draining LNs were identified, 57% of which were inside the STD plan fields but could be blocked in the MOD plan fields. Sixty-five percent of arm-draining LNs in the STD versus 16% in the MOD plans received a mean of ≥10 Gy, and 26% in the STD versus 4% in the MOD plans received a mean of ≥40 Gy. Mean LN radiation exposure was 23.6 Gy (standard deviation 18.2) with the STD and 7.7 Gy (standard deviation 11.3) with the MOD plans (P<.001). No participant developed lymphedema. Conclusions: The integration of SPECT/CT scans into breast cancer radiation treatment planning reduces unnecessary arm-draining LN radiation exposure and may lessen the risk of lymphedema

  11. The Addition of SPECT/CT Lymphoscintigraphy to Breast Cancer Radiation Planning Spares Lymph Nodes Critical for Arm Drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheville, Andrea L., E-mail: Cheville.andrea@mayo.edu [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Brinkmann, Debra H.; Ward, Shelly B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Durski, Jolanta [Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Laack, Nadia N.; Yan, Elizabeth; Schomberg, Paula J.; Garces, Yolanda I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Suman, Vera J. [Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Background: This prospective cohort study was designed to determine whether the amount of radiation delivered to the nonpathological lymph nodes (LNs) that drain the arm can be significantly reduced by integrating single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) scans into radiation treatment planning. Methods: SPECT-CT scans were acquired for the 28 patients with stage I or II breast cancer and fused with the routinely obtained radiation oncology planning CT scans. Arm-draining LNs were contoured with 0.5-cm margins automatically using a threshold of 50% maximum intensity. Two treatment plans were generated: 1 per routine clinical practice (standard; STD) and the second (modified; MOD) with treatment fields modified to minimize dose to the arm-draining LNs visible on SPECT/CT images without interfering with the dosage delivered to target tissues. Participants were treated per the MOD plans. Arm volumes were measured prior to radiation and thereafter at least three subsequent 6-month intervals. Results: Sixty-eight level I-III arm-draining LNs were identified, 57% of which were inside the STD plan fields but could be blocked in the MOD plan fields. Sixty-five percent of arm-draining LNs in the STD versus 16% in the MOD plans received a mean of ≥10 Gy, and 26% in the STD versus 4% in the MOD plans received a mean of ≥40 Gy. Mean LN radiation exposure was 23.6 Gy (standard deviation 18.2) with the STD and 7.7 Gy (standard deviation 11.3) with the MOD plans (P<.001). No participant developed lymphedema. Conclusions: The integration of SPECT/CT scans into breast cancer radiation treatment planning reduces unnecessary arm-draining LN radiation exposure and may lessen the risk of lymphedema.

  12. A Case-Control Study of Oral Contraceptive Use and Incident Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Lynn; Zhang, Yuqing; Coogan, Patricia F.; Strom, Brian L; Palmer, Julie R

    2008-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) use has been linked to increased risk of breast cancer, largely on the basis of studies conducted before 1990. In the Case-Control Surveillance Study, a US hospital-based case-control study of medication use and cancer, the authors assessed the relation of OC use to breast cancer risk among 907 case women with incident invasive breast cancer (731 white, 176 black) and 1,711 controls (1,152 white, 559 black) interviewed from 1993 to 2007. They evaluated whether the asso...

  13. Spot Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Treatment Planning Technique and Analysis of Consequences of Rotational and Translational Alignment Errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Conventional proton therapy with passively scattered beams is used to treat a number of tumor sites, including prostate cancer. Spot scanning proton therapy is a treatment delivery means that improves conformal coverage of the clinical target volume (CTV). Placement of individual spots within a target is dependent on traversed tissue density. Errors in patient alignment perturb dose distributions. Moreover, there is a need for a rational planning approach that can mitigate the dosimetric effect of random alignment errors. We propose a treatment planning approach and then analyze the consequences of various simulated alignment errors on prostate treatments. Methods and Materials: Ten control patients with localized prostate cancer underwent treatment planning for spot scanning proton therapy. After delineation of the clinical target volume, a scanning target volume (STV) was created to guide dose coverage. Errors in patient alignment in two axes (rotational and yaw) as well as translational errors in the anteroposterior direction were then simulated, and dose to the CTV and normal tissues were reanalyzed. Results: Coverage of the CTV remained high even in the setting of extreme rotational and yaw misalignments. Changes in the rectum and bladder V45 and V70 were similarly minimal, except in the case of translational errors, where, as a result of opposed lateral beam arrangements, much larger dosimetric perturbations were observed. Conclusions: The concept of the STV as applied to spot scanning radiation therapy and as presented in this report leads to robust coverage of the CTV even in the setting of extreme patient misalignments.

  14. Impact of Integration of Manufacturaing Planning and Control Systems on Supply Chain Management

    OpenAIRE

    Kawai, Ayako; Sato, Ryo

    2009-01-01

    Manufacturing planning and control systems (MPCSs, for short) are an essentialelement for supply chain processes today. However, there are few researches whichinclude planning information systems in supply chain models and optimize the wholestructure holistically in spite of the social importance of MPCSs for supply chainmanagement. At present, we do not have any ideas even about process behaviorwhen organizations which have MPCSs are linked in a supply chain. To clarifyfundamental properties...

  15. Protocol for quality control of scanners used in the simulation of radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed Tomography (CT) has become the tool fundamental imaging of modern radiation therapy, to locate targets and critical organs and dose planning. Tomographs used for these purposes require strict assurance program quality, which differs in many aspects of monitoring required for diagnostic use only with intention. The aim of this work has been the design and validation of a quality control protocol applicable to any TAC used for simulation, radiotherapy planning. (author)

  16. Pathologic Analysis of Control Plans for Air Pollution Management in Tehran Metropolis: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrabi, Narges Salehi; Pourezzat, Aliasghar; Fayaz-Bakhsh, Ahmad; Mafimoradi, Shiva; Poursafa, Parinaz

    2013-01-01

    Background: Regarding the importance of air pollution issue for large cities, as Tehran metropolis, many plans, programs, projects and regulations have been developed to manage urban air pollution. However, most of them failed to decline the pollution. The purpose of this study is to pathologically analyze air-pollution control plans in order to offer effective solutions for Tehran metropolis. Methods: A qualitative content analysis and a semi-structured interview with 14 practicing professio...

  17. Pathologic analysis of control plans for air pollution management in tehran metropolis: A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Narges Salehi Shahrabi; Aliasghar Pourezzat; Fayaz-Bakhsh Ahmad; Shiva Mafimoradi; Parinaz Poursafa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Regarding the importance of air pollution issue for large cities, as Tehran metropolis, many plans, programs, projects and regulations have been developed to manage urban air pollution. However, most of them failed to decline the pollution. The purpose of this study is to pathologically analyze air-pollution control plans in order to offer effective solutions for Tehran metropolis. Methods: A qualitative content analysis and a semi-structured interview with 14 practicing profe...

  18. MObile Technology for Improved Family Planning Services (MOTIF): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, C.; Vannak, U; Sokhey, L; Ngo, TD; Gold, J; Khut, K; Edwards, P.; Rathavy, T; Free, C

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Providing women with contraceptive methods following abortion is important to reduce repeat abortion rates, yet evidence for effective post-abortion family planning interventions are limited. This protocol outlines the evaluation of a mobile phone-based intervention using voice messages to support post-abortion family planning in Cambodia. METHODS/DESIGN A single blind randomised controlled trial of 500 participants. Clients aged 18 or over, attending for abortion at four Mari...

  19. Thematic Plan for Fruit Fly Control Using the Sterile Insect Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thematic plan for fruit flies is the summation of ideas and recommendations put forth by a group of experts composed of fruit fly program managers and workers, stakeholders from the affected industry, a commodity specialist from the FAO, and technical, planning and policy specialists from the IAEA and the FAO. This document provides strategic guidance and direction on how and where the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) can most effectively be applied to control or eradicate fruit flies in the future.

  20. Organizational, systems and human issues in production planning, scheduling and control

    OpenAIRE

    MacCarthy, Bart L.

    2006-01-01

    With global markets and global competition, pressures are placed on manufacturing organizations to compress order fulfillment times, meet delivery commitments consistently and also maintain efficiency in operations to address cost issues. This chapter argues for a process perspective on planning, scheduling and control that integrates organizational planning structures, information systems as well as human decision makers. The chapter begins with a reconsideration of the gap between theory an...

  1. Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) program computer software test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the information and guidelines necessary to conduct all the required testing of the Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) system. The strategy and essential components for testing the WinCal System Project are described in this test plan. The purpose of this test plan is to provide the customer and performing organizations with specific procedures for testing the specified system's functions

  2. Antioxidants and breast cancer risk- a population-based case-control study in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison Howard; Gibbons Laurie; Zhou Jia; Pan Sai Yi; Wen Shi Wu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The effect of antioxidants on breast cancer is still controversial. Our objective was to assess the association between antioxidants and breast cancer risk in a large population-based case-control study. Methods The study population included 2,362 cases with pathologically confirmed incident breast cancer (866 premenopausal and 1,496 postmenopausal) and 2,462 controls in Canada. Intakes of antioxidants from diet and from supplementation as well as other potential risk fact...

  3. Probiotic Beverage with Soy Isoflavone Consumption for Breast Cancer Prevention: A Case-control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Toi, Masakazu; Hirota, Saya; Tomotaki, Ai; Sato, Nobuaki; Hozumi, Yasuo; Anan, Keisei; Nagashima, Takeshi; Tokuda, Yutaka; Masuda, Norikazu; Ohsumi, Shozo; Ohno, Shinji; Takahashi, Masato; Hayashi, Hironori; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate how beverages containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota (BLS) and soy isoflavone consumption since adolescence affected the incidence of breast cancer. In a population-based case-control study, three hundred and six cases with breast cancer and 662 controls aged 40 to 55 were matched for age and residential area and included in the analyses. Diet, lifestyle and other breast cancer risk factors were investigated using the self-administered questionnaire an...

  4. Case-control study of prostatic cancer in employees of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority.

    OpenAIRE

    Rooney, C.; Beral, V; Maconochie, N.; P. Fraser; Davies, G.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the relation between risk of prostatic cancer and occupational exposures, especially to radionuclides, in employees of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. DESIGN--Case-control study of men with prostatic cancer and matched controls. Information about sociodemographic factors and exposures to radionuclides and other substances was abstracted and classified for each subject from United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority records without knowledge of who had cancer....

  5. Population-based case-control study of breast cancer in Albania

    OpenAIRE

    Pajenga E.; Rexha T.; Çeliku S.; Mariani E.

    2013-01-01

    In Albania, breast cancer is an important cause of death among women, with increasing incidence from 65 cases in 1970, to 400 cases in 2007. This is the first study concerning breast cancer risk factors in Albania. We used a population-based case-control study of 948 women with breast cancer compared with 1019 controls recruited from other hospitals through random selection. Early age at menarche was found to be a significantly strong risk factor during the pre- and postmenopausal group...

  6. A case–control study of reproductive factors, female hormone use, and risk of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yuqing; Coogan, Patricia F.; Palmer, Julie R; Strom, Brian L.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Findings from several previous studies that have assessed the relation of reproductive factors and female hormone use to the risk of pancreatic cancer are inconclusive. The authors examined the association between reproductive factors and the use of oral contraceptives and postmenopausal hormone therapy to the risk of pancreatic cancer among 284 patients with pancreatic cancer and 1,096 controls using data from the hospital-based Case–Control Surveillance Study. Older age at first pregnancy a...

  7. Breast cancer in the Thai Cohort Study: An exploratory case-control analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Susan; Lim, Lynette; Vilainerun, Duangkae; Banks, Emily; Sripaiboonkij, Nintita; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Sleigh, Adrian; Bain, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer incidence may be increasing in Thailand but very little research has assessed core breast cancer risk factors in this country. We used baseline questionnaire data from a national cohort study of Thai Open University students in an exploratory case-control study of breast cancer. The study included 43 female cases and 860 age-matched controls selected from the remaining 47,271 female cohort participants. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using conditional l...

  8. Trajectory planning and control of a 6 DOF manipulator with Stewart platform-based mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Antrazi, Sami

    1990-01-01

    The trajectory planning and control was studied of a robot manipulator that has 6 degrees of freedom and was designed based on the mechanism of the Stewart Platform. First the main components of the manipulator is described along with its operation. The solutions are briefly prescribed for the forward and inverse kinematics of the manipulator. After that, two trajectory planning schemes are developed using the manipulator inverse kinematics to track straight lines and circular paths. Finally experiments conducted to study the performance of the developed planning schemes in tracking a straight line and a circle are presented and discussed.

  9. Representation and Integration: Combining Robot Control, High-Level Planning, and Action Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrick, Ronald; Kraft, Dirk; Mourao, Kira; Geib, Christopher; Pugeault, Nicolas; Krüger, Norbert; Steedman, Mark

    We describe an approach to integrated robot control, high-level planning, and action effect learning that attempts to overcome the representational difficulties that exist between these diverse areas. Our approach combines ideas from robot vision, knowledgelevel planning, and connectionist machine......-level action specifications, suitable for planning, from a robot’s interactions with the world. We present a detailed overview of our approach and show how it supports the learning of certain aspects of a high-level lepresentation from low-level world state information....

  10. Protection of lung function by introducing single photon emission computed tomography lung perfusion image into radiotherapy plan of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yong; CHEN Jin-hu; LI Bao-sheng; LIU Tong-hai; LU jie; BAI Tong; DONG Xiao-ling; YU Jin-ming

    2009-01-01

    Background The lung functional status could be displayed on lung perfusion images. With the images, the radiotherapy plans of lung cancer could be guided to more optimized. This study aimed to assess quantitatively the impact of incorporating functional lung imaging into 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).Methods Ten patients with NSCLC who had undergone radiotherapy were included in this study. Before radiotherapy,each patient underwent CT simulation and lung perfusion imaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The SPECT images were registered with simulation planning CT and used to contour functional lung (lung-F) and non-functional lung (lung-NF). Two 3DCRT plans and two IMRT plans were designed and compared in each patient:two anatomic plans using simulation CT alone and two functional plans using SPECT-CT in addition to the simulation CT.Dosimetric parameters of the four types of plans were compared in terms of tumor coverage and avoidance of normal tissues. Total radiation dose was set at 66 Gy (2 Gy×33 fractions).Results In incorporating perfusion information in 3DCRT and IMRT planning, the reductions on average in the mean doses to the functional lung in the functional plan were 168 cGy and 89 cGy, respectively, compared with those in the anatomic plans. The median reductions in the percentage of volume irradiated with >5 Gy, >10 Gy, >20 Gy, >30 Gy and >40 Gy for functional lung in the functional plans were 6.50%, 10.21%, 14.02%, 22.30% and 23.46% in 3DCRT planning,respectively, and 3.05%, 15.52%, 14.16%, 4.87%, and 3.33% in IMRT planning, respectively. No greater degree of sparing of the functional lung was achieved in functional IMRT than in 3DCRT.Conclusion Function-guided 3DCRT and IMRT plannings both appear to be effective in preserving functional lung in NSCLC patients.

  11. Comparison of CT based-CTV plan and CT based-ICRU38 plan in brachytherapy planning of uterine cervix cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Jin Sup; Jo, Jung Kun; Si, Chang Keun; Lee, Ki Ho; Lee, Du Hyun; Choi, Kye Suk [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-15

    Although Improve of CT, MRI Radio-diagnosis and Radiation Therapy Planing, but we still use ICRU38 Planning system(2D film-based) broadly. 3-Dimensional ICR plan(CT image based) is not only offer tumor and normal tissue dose but also support DVH information. On this study, we plan irradiation-goal dose on CTV(CTV plan) and irradiation-goal dose on ICRU 38 point(ICRU38 plan) by use CT image. And compare with tumor-dose, rectal-dose, bladder-dose on both planning, and analysis DVH Sample 11 patients who treated by Ir-192 HDR. After 40 Gy external radiation therapy, ICR plan established. All the patients carry out CT-image scanned by CT-simulator. And we use PLATO(Nucletron) v.14.2 planing system. We draw CTV, rectum, bladder on the CT image. And establish plan irradiation- dose on CTV(CTV plan) and irradiation- dose on A-point(ICRU38 plan) CTV volume(average{+-}SD) is 21.8{+-}26.6 cm{sup 3}, rectum volume(average{+-}SD) is 60.9{+-}25.0 cm{sup 3}, bladder volume(average{+-}SD) is 116.1{+-}40.1cm{sup 3} sampled 11 patients. The volume including 100% dose is 126.7{+-}18.9 cm{sup 3} on ICRU plan and 98.2{+-}74.5 cm{sup 3} on CTV plan. On ICRU planning, the other one's 22.0 cm{sup 3} CTV volume who residual tumor size excess 4cm is not including 100% isodose. 8 patient's 12.9{+-}5.9 cm{sup 3} tumor volume who residual tumor size below 4 cm irradiated 100% dose. Bladder dose(recommended by ICRU 38) is 90.1{+-}21.3 % on ICRU plan, 68.7{+-}26.6% on CTV plan, and rectal dose is 86.4{+-}18.3%, 76.9{+-}15.6%. Bladder and Rectum maximum dose is 137.2{+-}5.9%, 101.1{+-}41.8% on ICRU plan, 107.6{+-}47.9%, 86.9{+-}30.8% on CTV plan. Therefore CTV plan more less normal issue-irradiated dose than ICRU plan. But one patient case who residual tumor size excess 4 cm, Normal tissue dose more higher than critical dose remarkably on CTV plan. 80% over-Irradiated rectal dose(V80rec) is 1.8{+-}2.4 cm{sup 3} on ICRU plan, 0.7{+-}1.0 cm{sup 3} on CTV plan. 80% over-Irradiated bladder

  12. UAV path planning using artificial potential field method updated by optimal control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-bo; Luo, Guan-chen; Mei, Yue-song; Yu, Jian-qiao; Su, Xiao-long

    2016-04-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) path planning problem is an important assignment in the UAV mission planning. Based on the artificial potential field (APF) UAV path planning method, it is reconstructed into the constrained optimisation problem by introducing an additional control force. The constrained optimisation problem is translated into the unconstrained optimisation problem with the help of slack variables in this paper. The functional optimisation method is applied to reform this problem into an optimal control problem. The whole transformation process is deduced in detail, based on a discrete UAV dynamic model. Then, the path planning problem is solved with the help of the optimal control method. The path following process based on the six degrees of freedom simulation model of the quadrotor helicopters is introduced to verify the practicability of this method. Finally, the simulation results show that the improved method is more effective in planning path. In the planning space, the length of the calculated path is shorter and smoother than that using traditional APF method. In addition, the improved method can solve the dead point problem effectively.

  13. Epidemiology of Oral Cavity Cancers in a Country Located in the Esophageal Cancer Belt: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Saedi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As one of the most common cancers among head and neck malignancies, cancer of the oral cavity probably has some variations in countries with a high prevalence of esophageal cancer.  Materials and Methods: Patients with oral cavity cancer who were treated at two tertiary referral centers from January 1999 to January 2009 were included in this study. In addition to demographic data, information regarding personal and family history of head and neck cancer, use of dentures, presence of immune deficiency, consumption of alcohol, and incidence of cigarette smoking was collected. Additionally, a history of opium usage was obtained from the participants in this study. Moreover, an appropriately matched control group was selected for comparisons between the risk factors.   Results: A total of 557 patients were entered into this study over a 10-year period, of whom 219 (39.3% were female and the remaining 338 (60.7% were male. The tongue was the most common site of cancer and 9% of the patients had a history of opium abuse, but more than half of the patients did not have any recognized risk factors. The incidence and stage of cancer had a significant relationship with cigarette smoking (P= 0.013.   Conclusion: Tongue cancer in non-smokers is the predominant pattern of oral cavity cancer in Iran.

  14. Dosimetric comparison of different multileaf collimator leaves in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths (standard MLC [sMLC] width of 10 mm and micro-MLC [mMLC] width of 4 mm) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer. Between January 2010 and August 2010, a retrospective analysis was conducted on 12 patients with cervical cancer. The treatment plans for all patients were generated with the same machine setup parameters and optimization methods in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on 2 commercial Elekta MLC devices. The dose distribution for the planning tumor volume (PTV), the dose sparing for organs at risk (OARs), the monitor units (MUs), and the number of IMRT segments were evaluated. For the delivery efficiency, the MUs were significantly higher in the sMLC-IMRT plan than in the mMLC-IMRT plan (802 ± 56.9 vs 702 ± 56.7; p 0.05). For the planning quality, the conformity index (CI) between the 2 paired IMRT plans with the mMLC and the sMLC did not differ significantly (average: 0.817 ± 0.024 vs 0.810 ± 0.028; p > 0.05). The differences of the homogeneity index (HI) between the 2 paired plans were statistically significant (average: 1.122 ± 0.010 vs 1.132 ± 0.014; p 10, V20, V30, and V40, percentage of contoured OAR volumes receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, and the mean dose (Dmean) received. The IMRT plans with the mMLC protected the OARs better than the plans with the sMLC. There were significant differences (p 30 and V40 of the rectum and V10, V20, V40, and Dmean of the bladder. IMRT plans with the mMLC showed advantages over the plans with the sMLC in dose homogeneity for targets, dose sparing of OARs, and fewer MUs in cervical cancer

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of a simple planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Lin, Zhu; Zheng, Jing; Lin, Pei-Xian; Cheung, Michael Lok-Man; Huang, Bao-Tian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the dosimetric outcomes of a base-dose-plan-compensation (BDPC) planning method for improving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for stage III lung cancer. For each of the thirteen included patients, three types of planning methods were applied to obtain clinically acceptable plans: (1) the conventional optimization method (CO); (2) a split-target optimization method (STO), in which the optimization objectives were set higher dose for the target with lung density; (3) the BDPC method, which compensated for the optimization-convergence error by further optimization based on the CO plan. The CO, STO and BDPC methods were then compared regarding conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of the target, organs at risk (OARs) sparing and monitor units (MUs). The BDPC method provided better HI/CI by 54%/7% on average compared to the CO method and by 38%/3% compared to the STO method. The BDPC method also spared most of the OARs by up to 9%. The average MUs of the CO, STO and BDPC plans were 890, 937 and 1023, respectively. Our results indicated that the BDPC method can effectively improve the dose distribution in IMRT for stage III lung cancer, at the expense of more MUs. PMID:27009235

  16. A technique using 99mTc-mebrofenin SPECT for radiotherapy treatment planning for liver cancers or metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) requires a sufficient functional liver volume to tolerate the treatment. The current study extended the work of de Graaf et al. (2010) [3] on the use of 99mTc-mebrofenin imaging for presurgery planning to radiotherapy planning for liver cancer or metastases. Patient was immobilized and imaged in an identical position on a single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT-CT) system and a radiotherapy simulation CT system. 99mTc-mebrofenin SPECT was registered to the planning CT through image registration of noncontrast CT from SPECT-CT system to the radiotherapy planning CT. The voxels with higher uptake of 99mTc-mebrofenin were transferred to the planning CT as an avoidance structure in optimizing a 2-arc RapidArc plan for SBRT delivery. Excellent dose coverage to the target and sparing of the healthy remnant liver volume was achieved. This report illustrated a procedure for the use of 99mTc-mebrofenin SPECT for optimizing radiotherapy for liver cancers and metastases

  17. Correlates of exercise motivation and behavior in a population-based sample of endometrial cancer survivors: an application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Dundas George; Pearcey Robert G; Campbell Kristin L; Courneya Kerry S; Karvinen Kristina H; Capstick Valerie; Tonkin Katia S

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite evidence of the benefits of exercise in cancer survivors, exercise participation rates tend to decline after treatments. Few studies have examined the determinants of exercise in less common cancer sites. In this study, we examined medical, demographic, and social cognitive correlates of exercise in endometrial cancer survivors using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Methods A mailed survey was completed by 354 endometrial cancer survivors (1 to 10 years postdi...

  18. Knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) treatment planning versus planning by experts: validation of a KBRT algorithm for prostate cancer treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) treatment planning algorithm was recently developed. The purpose of this work is to investigate how plans that are generated with the objective KBRT approach compare to those that rely on the judgment of the experienced planner. Thirty volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were randomly selected from a database of prostate plans that were generated by experienced planners (expert plans). The anatomical data (CT scan and delineation of organs) of these patients and the KBRT algorithm were given to a novice with no prior treatment planning experience. The inexperienced planner used the knowledge-based algorithm to predict the dose that the OARs receive based on their proximity to the treated volume. The population-based OAR constraints were changed to the predicted doses. A KBRT plan was subsequently generated. The KBRT and expert plans were compared for the achieved target coverage and OAR sparing. The target coverages were compared using the Uniformity Index (UI), while 5 dose-volume points (D10, D30, D50, D70 and D90) were used to compare the OARs (bladder and rectum) doses. Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test was used to check for significant differences (p < 0.05) between both datasets. The KBRT and expert plans achieved mean UI values of 1.10 ± 0.03 and 1.10 ± 0.04, respectively. The Wilcoxon test showed no statistically significant difference between both results. The D90, D70, D50, D30 and D10 values of the two planning strategies, and the Wilcoxon test results suggests that the KBRT plans achieved a statistically significant lower bladder dose (at D30), while the expert plans achieved a statistically significant lower rectal dose (at D10 and D30). The results of this study show that the KBRT treatment planning approach is a promising method to objectively incorporate patient anatomical variations in radiotherapy treatment planning

  19. Software quality assurance plan for the National Ignition Facility integrated computer control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, J.

    1996-11-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) applies to the activities of the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) organization and its subcontractors. The Plan describes the activities implemented by the ICCS section to achieve quality in the NIF Project`s controls software and implements the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, NIF-95-499, L-15958-2) and the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Order 5700.6C. This SQAP governs the quality affecting activities associated with developing and deploying all control system software during the life cycle of the NIF Project.

  20. Process for planning and control of software projects using XedroGESPRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Marín-Sánchez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The software project management in Cuba has become a key area for improving production processes and decisionmaking in organizations. Several models and standards for process improvement, related with project management, proposed best practices on issues of planning and control of projects. However, they are generic guidelines that describe only those activities to execute, leaving the responsibility for implementing to organizations, using sometimes , expensive proprietary informatics tools to achieve these goals. This research proposes a process for planning and control of software projects using Xedro-GESPRO: an open-source software tool for project management domestically implemented. The proposal is successfully being applied by the network of production centers of the Informatic Sciences University of Cuba, observing greater efficiency and effectiveness in the planning and control of their projects.

  1. Planning Principles and Control Mechanisms of New Town Development in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasimah Bt Omar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available There is no clear-cut definition of constitutes new towns. The notion of self-containment is rightly seen as central to many new towns and often been one of the underlying objectives. References on planning principles and control mechanisms regarding new town development in Malaysia are very limited. Therefore, the perception survey is to identify the planning principles and control mechanisms of new town development in Malaysia from the perspective of two different groups of professional town planners. The findings showed that there is an urgent need to properly define new town and to clearly spell out the planning principles and control mechanisms as to the requirements of new town development. There is a strong need for an integrated national policy, strong need for special development control mechanisms, moderately strong need for a separate format for preparing the Development Proposal Report, a moderate need for special planning standards and some support for revising the present Town and Country Planning Act so as to satisfy the new town development.

  2. Project W-211, initial tank retrieval systems, retrieval control system software configuration management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) provides the instructions for change control of the W-211 Project, Retrieval Control System (RCS) software after initial approval/release but prior to the transfer of custody to the waste tank operations contractor. This plan applies to the W-211 system software developed by the project, consisting of the computer human-machine interface (HMI) and programmable logic controller (PLC) software source and executable code, for production use by the waste tank operations contractor. The plan encompasses that portion of the W-211 RCS software represented on project-specific AUTOCAD drawings that are released as part of the C1 definitive design package (these drawings are identified on the drawing list associated with each C-1 package), and the associated software code. Implementation of the plan is required for formal acceptance testing and production release. The software configuration management plan does not apply to reports and data generated by the software except where specifically identified. Control of information produced by the software once it has been transferred for operation is the responsibility of the receiving organization

  3. Intensive glucose control and risk of cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansdottir, G; Zoungas, S; Chalmers, J;

    2011-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Type 2 diabetes has been associated with an increased risk of cancer. This study examines the effect of more vs less intensive glucose control on the risk of cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: All 11,140 participants from the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease......: Preterax and Diamicron-MR Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00145925) were studied. Cancer incidence and cancer mortality was compared in groups randomised to intensive or standard glucose control. Information on events during follow-up was obtained from serious adverse event...... death) [corrected].Across all the major organ systems studied, no significant differences in the cancer incidences were observed in the intensive and standard control groups. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATIONS: More intensive glucose control achieved with a regimen that included greater use of gliclazide...

  4. Cancer control in the Asia Pacific region--the next lap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, P B

    1996-02-01

    Cancer control in any part of the world has to be a multi-directional effort addressed in a holistic manner. The general impression that cancer control means only collation of epidemiological data and efforts at primary prevention needs to be redefined because preventive and educative oncology, though an important component of cancer control, can achieve long-term goals only after 20 years or more. Along with such long-term objectives, methodology needs to be developed which takes care of immediate and recent needs in early diagnosis, effective treatment, and appropriate basic research for the ultimate control and cure of cancer. A holistic approach to the cancer control effort will, therefore, need the combined skills of many different specialists. PMID:8979633

  5. Medullary thyroid cancer: the role of radiotherapy in local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-one patients were treated with radiotherapy for loco-regional medullary thyroid cancer between 1960-1992. The actuarial overall survival at 5, 10 and 20 years was 69%, 52% and 30%, respectively. Patients were classified according to clinical stage (node-positive or -negative), post-operative histological residual disease status (none, microscopic or macroscopic) and dose of radiotherapy received. By univariate analysis, loco-regional recurrence-free survival was significantly longer for node-negative patients (P = 0.03). Patients who received at least 60 Gy over 6 weeks showed a trend towards improved local control (P = 0.23). The only significant variable by multivariate analysis for local recurrence-free-survival was post-operative residual disease status (P = 0.0005). The local control rate at 5 years was 100% for patients with no residual disease, 65% for those with microscopic tumour, and 24% for those with macroscopic residual disease. We conclude that there is a valuable role for radiotherapy in the management of patients with residual microscopic or macroscopic disease following surgery, as well as in those with inoperable disease. (author)

  6. Influence of postsurgical residual tumor volume on local control in radiotherapy for maxillary sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim was to study the influence of postsurgical gross residual tumor volume on local control of maxillary sinus cancer treated with radiotherapy combined with debulking surgery. Forty-three patients who underwent combined surgery and radiotherapy (50-72 Gy, median 60 Gy) for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus were reviewed. Gross residual tumor volume (GRTV) after surgery was measured on computed tomograms obtained during the radiotherapy planning. Patients were classified according to GRTV as follows: group AA, GRTV=0 (microscopic residual, n=2); group A, GRTV 3 (n=24); group B, 10-40 cm3 (n=9); and group C, ≥40 cm3 (n=8). The relationship between local control and GRTV was analyzed using univariate and multivariate analysis. The 2-year local control rate for all patients was 62%. The differences in local control rates between groups AA, A and B were not significant (P<0.05), but the rate was significantly lower in group C than in the other groups (69% at 2 years vs 31% at 1 year, P<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that GRTV (P=0.002) and histological differentiation (poorly differentiated histology was favorable, P=0.035) were independent prognostic factors and that intraarterial chemotherapy and administered total dose were not. Local control in groups A and B significantly depended on the total dose of radiotherapy, with 2-year control rates of patients receiving 50 Gy (n=6) and ≥60 Gy (n=27) of 17% vs 79%, respectively (P<0.001). Our data suggest that adequate, not complete, debulking associated with a total radiotherapy dose of ≥60 Gy can provide satisfactory local control for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. (author)

  7. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs c-IMRT in esophageal cancer: A treatment planning comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yin; Bo Xu; Guang-Ying Zhu; Hao Wu; Jian Gong; Jian-Hao Geng; Fan Jiang; An-Hui Shi; Rong Yu; Yong-Heng Li; Shu-Kui Han

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To compare the volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with conventional sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (c-IMRT) plans in esophageal cancer (EC).METHODS:Twenty patients with EC were selected,including 5 cases located in the cervical,the upper,the middle and the lower thorax,respectively.Five plans were generated with the eclipse planning system:three using c-IMRT with 5 fields (5F),7 fields (7F) and 9 fields (9F),and two using VMAT with a single arc (1A) and double arcs (2A).The treatment plans were designed to deliver a dose of 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) with the same constrains in a 2.0 Gy daily fraction,5 d a week.Plans were normalized to 95% of the PTV that received 100% of the prescribed dose.We examined the dose-volume histogram parameters of PTV and the organs at risk (OAR) such as lungs,spinal cord and heart.Monitor units (MU) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of OAR were also reported.RESULTS:Both c-IMRT and VMAT plans resulted in abundant dose coverage of PTV for EC of different locations.The dose conformity to PTV was improved as the number of field in c-IMRT or rotating arc in VMAT was increased.The doses to PTV and OAR in VMAT plans were not statistically different in comparison with c-IMRT plans,with the following exceptions:in cervical and upper thoracic EC,the conformity index (CI) was higher in VMAT (1A 0.78 and 2A 0.8) than in c-IMRT (SF 0.62,7F 0.66 and 9F 0.73) and homogeneity was slightly better in c-IMRT (7F 1.09 and 9F 1.07) than in VMAT (1A 1.1 and 2A 1.09).Lung V30 was lower in VMAT (1A 12.52 and 2A 12.29) than in c-IMRT (7F 14.35 and 9F 14.81).The humeral head doses were significantly increased in VMAT as against c-IMRT.In the middle and lower thoracic EC,CI in VMAT (1A 0.76 and 2A 0.74) was higher than in c-IMRT (5F 0.63 Gy and 7F 0.67 Gy),and homogeneity was almost similar between VMAT and c-IMRT.V20 (2A 21.49 Gy vs 7F 24.59 Gy and 9F 24.16 Gy) and V30 (2A 9.73 Gy vs 5F 12

  8. Control Rod Pattern Planning of a BWR using Enhanced Nelder-Mead Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new optimization algorithm for the short-term planning of control rod patterns in an operating BWR. This algorithm is based on the enhanced Nelder-Mead simplex method in which convergence ability is improved for constrained problems in several ways. The main characteristic of this approach is it uses continuous values for the axial positions of control rods. Through calculations in an actual BWR plant, we showed that the new algorithm is effective for automation of short-term planning and reduction of the engineer's workload. (authors)

  9. Production planning and control for semiconductor wafer fabrication facilities modeling, analysis, and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mönch, Lars; Mason, Scott J

    2012-01-01

    Over the last fifty-plus years, the increased complexity and speed of integrated circuits have radically changed our world. Today, semiconductor manufacturing is perhaps the most important segment of the global manufacturing sector. As the semiconductor industry has become more competitive, improving planning and control has become a key factor for business success. This book is devoted to production planning and control problems in semiconductor wafer fabrication facilities. It is the first book that takes a comprehensive look at the role of modeling, analysis, and related information systems

  10. SU-E-J-125: A Novel IMRT Planning Technique to Spare Sacral Bone Marrow in Pelvic Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Develop an IMRT planning technique that can preferentially spare sacral bone marrow for pelvic cancer patients. Methods: Six pelvic cancer patients (two each with anal, cervical, and rectal cancer) were enrolled in an IRB approved protocol to obtain FLT PET images at simulation, during, and post chemoradiation therapy. Initially, conventional IMRT plans were created to maintain target coverage and reduce dose to OARs such as bladder, bowel, rectum, and femoral heads. Simulation FLT PET images were used to create IMRT plans to spare bone marrow identified as regions with SUV of 2 or greater (IMRT-BMS) within the pelvic bones from top of L3 to 5mm below the greater trochanter without compromising PTV coverage or OAR sparing when compared to the initial IMRT plan. IMRT-BMS plans used 8–10 beam angles that surrounded the subject. These plans were used for treatment. Retrospectively, the same simulation FLT PET images were used to create IMRT plans that spared bone marrow located in the sacral pelvic bone region (IMRT-FAN) also without compromising PTV coverage or OAR sparing. IMRT-FAN plans used 16 beam angles every 12° anteriorly from 90° – 270°. Optimization objectives for the sacral bone marrow avoidance region were weighted to reduce ≥V10. Results: IMRT-FAN reduced dose to the sacral bone marrow for all six subjects. The average V5, V10, V20, and V30 differences from the IMRT-BMS plan were −2.2 ± 1.7%, −11.4 ± 3.6%, −17.6 ± 5.1%, and −19.1 ± 8.1% respectively. Average PTV coverage change was 0.5% ± 0.8% from the conventional IMRT plan. Conclusion: An IMRT planning technique that uses beams from the anterior and lateral directions reduced the volume of sacral bone marrow that receives ≤10Gy while maintaining PTV coverage and OAR sparing. Additionally, the volume of sacral bone marrow that received 20 or 30 Gy was also reduced

  11. SU-E-J-125: A Novel IMRT Planning Technique to Spare Sacral Bone Marrow in Pelvic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S; Bhatia, S; Sun, W; Menda, Y; Ponto, L; Gross, B; Buatti, J [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Develop an IMRT planning technique that can preferentially spare sacral bone marrow for pelvic cancer patients. Methods: Six pelvic cancer patients (two each with anal, cervical, and rectal cancer) were enrolled in an IRB approved protocol to obtain FLT PET images at simulation, during, and post chemoradiation therapy. Initially, conventional IMRT plans were created to maintain target coverage and reduce dose to OARs such as bladder, bowel, rectum, and femoral heads. Simulation FLT PET images were used to create IMRT plans to spare bone marrow identified as regions with SUV of 2 or greater (IMRT-BMS) within the pelvic bones from top of L3 to 5mm below the greater trochanter without compromising PTV coverage or OAR sparing when compared to the initial IMRT plan. IMRT-BMS plans used 8–10 beam angles that surrounded the subject. These plans were used for treatment. Retrospectively, the same simulation FLT PET images were used to create IMRT plans that spared bone marrow located in the sacral pelvic bone region (IMRT-FAN) also without compromising PTV coverage or OAR sparing. IMRT-FAN plans used 16 beam angles every 12° anteriorly from 90° – 270°. Optimization objectives for the sacral bone marrow avoidance region were weighted to reduce ≥V10. Results: IMRT-FAN reduced dose to the sacral bone marrow for all six subjects. The average V5, V10, V20, and V30 differences from the IMRT-BMS plan were −2.2 ± 1.7%, −11.4 ± 3.6%, −17.6 ± 5.1%, and −19.1 ± 8.1% respectively. Average PTV coverage change was 0.5% ± 0.8% from the conventional IMRT plan. Conclusion: An IMRT planning technique that uses beams from the anterior and lateral directions reduced the volume of sacral bone marrow that receives ≤10Gy while maintaining PTV coverage and OAR sparing. Additionally, the volume of sacral bone marrow that received 20 or 30 Gy was also reduced.

  12. Dosimetric impact of applicator displacement during high dose rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A planning study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, J. S.; Ung, N. M.; Jamalludin, Z.; Malik, R. A.; Wong, J. H. D.; Liew, Y. M.; Ng, K. H.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the dosimetric impact of applicator displacement on dose specification during high dose rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 (Co-60) brachytherapy for cervical cancer through a planning study. Eighteen randomly selected HDR full insertion plans were restrospectively studied. The tandem and ovoids were virtually shifted translationally and rotationally in the x-, y- and z-axis directions on the treatment planning system. Doses to reference points and volumes of interest in the plans with shifted applicators were compared with the original plans. The impact of dose displacement on 2D (point-based) and 3D (volume-based) treatment planning techniques was also assessed. A ±2 mm translational y-axis applicator shift and ±4° rotational x-axis applicator shift resulted in dosimetric changes of more than 5% to organs at risk (OAR) reference points. Changes to the maximum doses to 2 cc of the organ (D2cc) in 3D planning were statistically significant and higher than the reference points in 2D planning for both the rectum and bladder (pbrachytherapy.

  13. Dosimetric impact of applicator displacement during high dose rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A planning study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, J. S.; Ung, N. M.; Jamalludin, Z.; Malik, R. A.; Wong, J. H. D.; Liew, Y. M.; Ng, K. H.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the dosimetric impact of applicator displacement on dose specification during high dose rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 (Co-60) brachytherapy for cervical cancer through a planning study. Eighteen randomly selected HDR full insertion plans were restrospectively studied. The tandem and ovoids were virtually shifted translationally and rotationally in the x-, y- and z-axis directions on the treatment planning system. Doses to reference points and volumes of interest in the plans with shifted applicators were compared with the original plans. The impact of dose displacement on 2D (point-based) and 3D (volume-based) treatment planning techniques was also assessed. A ±2 mm translational y-axis applicator shift and ±4° rotational x-axis applicator shift resulted in dosimetric changes of more than 5% to organs at risk (OAR) reference points. Changes to the maximum doses to 2 cc of the organ (D2cc) in 3D planning were statistically significant and higher than the reference points in 2D planning for both the rectum and bladder (p<0.05). Rectal D2cc was observed to be the most sensitive to applicator displacement among all dose metrics. Applicator displacement that is greater than ±2 mm translational y-axis and ±4° rotational x-axis resulted in significant dose changes to the OAR. Thus, steps must be taken to minimize the possibility of applicator displacement during brachytherapy.

  14. Dosimetric impact of mixed-energy volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Pokharel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study investigated the dosimetric impact of mixing low and high energy treatment plans for prostate cancer treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT technique in the form of RapidArc.Methods: A cohort of 12 prostate cases involving proximal seminal vesicles and lymph nodes was selected for this retrospective study. For each prostate case, the single-energy plans (SEPs and mixed-energy plans (MEPs were generated.  First, the SEPs were created using 6 mega-voltage (MV energy for both the primary and boost plans. Second, the MEPs were created using 16 MV energy for the primary plan and 6 MV energy for the boost plan. The primary and boost MEPs used identical beam parameters and same dose optimization values as in the primary and boost SEPs for the corresponding case. The dosimetric parameters from the composite plans (SEPs and MEPs were evaluated. Results: The dose to the target volume was slightly higher (on average <1% in the SEPs than in the MEPs. The conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI values between the SEPs and MEPs were comparable. The dose to rectum and bladder was always higher in the SEPs (average difference up to 3.7% for the rectum and up to 8.4% for the bladder than in the MEPs. The mean dose to femoral heads was higher by about 0.8% (on average in the MEPs than in the SEPs. The number of monitor units and integral dose were higher in the SEPs compared to the MEPs by average differences of 9.1% and 5.5%, respectively.Conclusion: The preliminary results from this study suggest that use of mixed-energy VMAT plan for high-risk prostate cancer could potentially reduce the integral dose and minimize the dose to rectum and bladder, but for the higher femoral head dose.-----------------------------------------------Cite this article as:Pokharel S. Dosimetric impact of mixed-energy volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for high-risk prostate cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013;1(1:01011.DOI: http

  15. Progress and remaining challenges for cancer control in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Chavarri-Guerra, Yanin; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Bychkovsky, Brittany L; Debiasi, Marcio; Liedke, Pedro E R; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Dizon, Don; Cazap, Eduardo; de Lima Lopes, Gilberto; Touya, Diego; Nunes, Joāo Soares; St Louis, Jessica; Vail, Caroline; Bukowski, Alexandra; Ramos-Elias, Pier; Unger-Saldaña, Karla; Brandao, Denise Froes; Ferreyra, Mayra E; Luciani, Silvana; Nogueira-Rodrigues, Angelica; de Carvalho Calabrich, Aknar Freire; Del Carmen, Marcela G; Rauh-Hain, Jose Alejandro; Schmeler, Kathleen; Sala, Raúl; Goss, Paul E

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide, and an increasing threat in low-income and middle-income countries. Our findings in the 2013 Commission in The Lancet Oncology showed several discrepancies between the cancer landscape in Latin America and more developed countries. We reported that funding for health care was a small percentage of national gross domestic product and the percentage of health-care funds diverted to cancer care was even lower. Funds, insurance coverage, doctors, health-care workers, resources, and equipment were also very inequitably distributed between and within countries. We reported that a scarcity of cancer registries hampered the design of credible cancer plans, including initiatives for primary prevention. When we were commissioned by The Lancet Oncology to write an update to our report, we were sceptical that we would uncover much change. To our surprise and gratification much progress has been made in this short time. We are pleased to highlight structural reforms in health-care systems, new programmes for disenfranchised populations, expansion of cancer registries and cancer plans, and implementation of policies to improve primary cancer prevention. PMID:26522157

  16. The National LGBT Cancer Action Plan: A White Paper of the 2014 National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhalter, Jack E.; Margolies, Liz; Sigurdsson, Hrafn Oli; Walland, Jonathan; Radix, Asa; Rice, David; Buchting, Francisco O.; Sanchez, Nelson F.; Bare, Michael G; Boehmer, Ulrike; Cahill, Sean; Griebling, Tomas L; Bruessow, Diane; Maingi, Shail

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite growing social acceptance of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender (LGBT) persons and the extension of marriage rights for same-sex couples, LGBT persons experience stigma and discrimination, including within the healthcare system. Each population within the LGBT umbrella term is likely at elevated risk for cancer due to prevalent, significant cancer risk factors, such as tobacco use and human immunodeficiency virus infection; however, cancer incidence and mortality d...

  17. Inversely planned intensity modulated radiotheraphy for irradiation of a woman with breast cancer and funnel chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: A 44-year old woman with breast cancer was transferred to our institution for irradiation. Due to a pronounced funnel chest no satisfying dose distribution was obtained by conventional techniques. Thus an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) based on inverse optimisation was carried out. IMRT was compared to conventional techniques regarding dose distribution and feasibility. Patient and Methods: Tumor site was in the right middle lower quadrant. Target volume included the right breast and the parasternal lymph nodes. Target dose was 50.4 Gy. Based on inverse optimisation irradiation was carried out in 'step-and-short'-technique with twelve intensity modulated beams with six intensity steps. Additionally, treatment plans were calculated using conventional techniques (technique A with two tangential wedged 6-MV photon beams, technique B with additional oblique 15-MeV electron portal). We analysed conformality and homogeneity of target volume and dose distribution within normal tissue. Results: Dose conformality was substantially improved by IMRT. Dose homogeneity was slightly decreased compared to technique A. Lung volume irradiated with a dose higher than 20 Gy was reduced from 56.8% with technique A and 40.1% with technique B, respectively to 22.1% with IMRT. Treatment was tolerated well by the patient without relevant side effects. Mean treatment time was 19.5 min. Conclusion: The inversely planned IMRT using multiple beam directions is suitable for breast irradiation following breast conserving surgery. In the present case of a woman with funnel chest lung dose was substantially reduced without reduction of target dose. In which way the complex treatment technique leads to a clinically detectable advantage is examined at present, in the context of a study. (orig.)

  18. SU-E-J-52: Dosimetric Benefit of Adaptive Re-Planning in Lung Cancer Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric benefit of adaptive re-planning for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy(SBRT). Methods: Five lung cancer patients with SBRT treatment were retrospectively investigated. Our in-house supercomputing online re-planning environment (SCORE) was used to realize the re-planning process. First a deformable image registration was carried out to transfer contours from treatment planning CT to each treatment CBCT. Then an automatic re-planning using original plan DVH guided fluence-map optimization is performed to get a new plan for the up-to-date patient geometry. We compared the re-optimized plan to the original plan projected on the up-to-date patient geometry in critical dosimetric parameters, such as PTV coverage, spinal cord maximum and volumetric constraint dose, esophagus maximum and volumetric constraint dose. Results: The average volume of PTV covered by prescription dose for all patients was improved by 7.56% after the adaptive re-planning. The volume of the spinal cord receiving 14.5Gy and 23Gy (V14.5, V23) decreased by 1.48% and 0.68%, respectively. For the esophagus, the volume receiving 19.5Gy (V19.5) reduced by 1.37%. Meanwhile, the maximum dose dropped off by 2.87% for spinal cord and 4.80% for esophagus. Conclusion: Our experimental results demonstrate that adaptive re-planning for lung SBRT has the potential to minimize the dosimetric effect of inter-fraction deformation and thus improve target coverage while reducing the risk of toxicity to nearby normal tissues

  19. Pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in two large pooled case–control studies

    OpenAIRE

    Bracci, Paige M.; Wang, Furong; Hassan, Manal M.; Gupta, Samir; Li, Donghui; Holly, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The association between duration of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has not been well characterized in large population-based studies. We conducted detailed analyses to determine the association between pancreatitis onset and pancreatic cancer risk. Methods Data from two case–control studies of pancreatic cancer (n = 4515) in the San Francisco Bay Area and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center were pooled for analysis (1,663 cases, 2,852 frequency-matched controls). Adjusted odds ratio...

  20. Pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in two large pooled case–control studies

    OpenAIRE

    Bracci, Paige M.; Wang, Furong; Hassan, Manal M.; Gupta, Samir; Li, Donghui; Holly, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    The association between duration of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has not been well characterized in large population-based studies. We conducted detailed analyses to determine the association between pancreatitis onset and pancreatic cancer risk. Data from two case–control studies of pancreatic cancer (n = 4515) in the San Francisco Bay Area and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center were pooled for analysis (1,663 cases, 2,852 frequency-matched controls). Adjusted odds ratios (OR) were est...