WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer collaborative analysis

  1. Comparison of anthropometric measures as predictors of cancer incidence: A pooled collaborative analysis of 11 Australian cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Jessica L; Shaw, Jonathan E; Anstey, Kaarin J; Adams, Robert; Balkau, Beverley; Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L; Briffa, Tom; Davis, Timothy M E; Davis, Wendy A; Dobson, Annette; Flicker, Leon; Giles, Graham; Grant, Janet; Huxley, Rachel; Knuiman, Matthew; Luszcz, Mary; MacInnis, Robert J; Mitchell, Paul; Pasco, Julie A; Reid, Christopher; Simmons, David; Simons, Leon; Tonkin, Andrew; Woodward, Mark; Peeters, Anna; Magliano, Dianna J

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for cancer. However, it is not known if general adiposity, as measured by body mass index (BMI) or central adiposity [e.g., waist circumference (WC)] have stronger associations with cancer, or which anthropometric measure best predicts cancer risk. We included 79,458 men and women from the Australian and New Zealand Diabetes and Cancer Collaboration with complete data on anthropometry [BMI, WC, Hip Circumference (HC), WHR, waist to height ratio (WtHR), A Body Shape Index (ABSI)], linked to the Australian Cancer Database. Cox proportional hazards models assessed the association between each anthropometric marker, per standard deviation and the risk of overall, colorectal, post-menopausal (PM) breast, prostate and obesity-related cancers. We assessed the discriminative ability of models using Harrell's c-statistic. All anthropometric markers were associated with overall, colorectal and obesity-related cancers. BMI, WC and HC were associated with PM breast cancer and no significant associations were seen for prostate cancer. Strongest associations were observed for WC across all outcomes, excluding PM breast cancer for which HC was strongest. WC had greater discrimination compared to BMI for overall and colorectal cancer in men and women with c-statistics ranging from 0.70 to 0.71. We show all anthropometric measures are associated with the overall, colorectal, PM breast and obesity-related cancer in men and women, but not prostate cancer. WC discriminated marginally better than BMI. However, all anthropometric measures were similarly moderately predictive of cancer risk. We do not recommend one anthropometric marker over another for assessing an individuals' risk of cancer.

  2. Evaluation of association of HNF1B variants with diverse cancers: collaborative analysis of data from 19 genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Elliott

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have found type 2 diabetes-associated variants in the HNF1B gene to exhibit reciprocal associations with prostate cancer risk. We aimed to identify whether these variants may have an effect on cancer risk in general versus a specific effect on prostate cancer only.In a collaborative analysis, we collected data from GWAS of cancer phenotypes for the frequently reported variants of HNF1B, rs4430796 and rs7501939, which are in linkage disequilibrium (r(2 = 0.76, HapMap CEU. Overall, the analysis included 16 datasets on rs4430796 with 19,640 cancer cases and 21,929 controls; and 21 datasets on rs7501939 with 26,923 cases and 49,085 controls. Malignancies other than prostate cancer included colorectal, breast, lung and pancreatic cancers, and melanoma. Meta-analysis showed large between-dataset heterogeneity that was driven by different effects in prostate cancer and other cancers. The per-T2D-risk-allele odds ratios (95% confidence intervals for rs4430796 were 0.79 (0.76, 0.83] per G allele for prostate cancer (p<10(-15 for both; and 1.03 (0.99, 1.07 for all other cancers. Similarly for rs7501939 the per-T2D-risk-allele odds ratios (95% confidence intervals were 0.80 (0.77, 0.83 per T allele for prostate cancer (p<10(-15 for both; and 1.00 (0.97, 1.04 for all other cancers. No malignancy other than prostate cancer had a nominally statistically significant association.The examined HNF1B variants have a highly specific effect on prostate cancer risk with no apparent association with any of the other studied cancer types.

  3. Collaborators | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The TARGET initiative is jointly managed within the National Cancer Institute (NCI) by the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG)Opens in a New Tab and the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP)Opens in a New Tab.

  4. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nichols, Hazel B; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Wright, Lauren B

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cancer diagnosis among premenopausal women around the world. Unlike rates in postmenopausal women, incidence rates of advanced breast cancer have increased in recent decades for premenopausal women. Progress in identifying contributors to breast cancer risk among premen...

  5. Ovarian cancer epidemiology in the era of collaborative team science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannioto, Rikki A; Trabert, Britton; Poole, Elizabeth M; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2017-05-01

    Over the past decade, a number of consortia have formed to further investigate genetic associations, pathogenesis, and epidemiologic risk and prognostic factors for ovarian cancer. Here, we review the benefits that ovarian cancer consortia provide as well as challenges that have arisen. Methods for managing key challenges are also discussed. We review the structural organization and some of the milestone epidemiologic publications of five consortia dedicated to the study of ovarian cancer, including the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC), the Ovarian Tumor Tissue Analysis (OTTA) Consortium, the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium (OC3), the Collaborative Group on Epidemiological Studies of Ovarian Cancer (The Oxford Collaborative Group), and the Ovarian Cancer in Women of African Ancestry (OCWAA) consortium. As ovarian cancer is a rare and heterogeneous disease, consortia have made important contributions in the study of risk factors by improving statistical power beyond what any single study, or even a few studies, would provide. Thus, a major accomplishment of consortial research is enhanced characterization of histotype-specific risk factor associations. In addition, consortia have facilitated impressive synergy between researchers across many institutions, spawning new collaborative research. Importantly, through these efforts, many challenges have been met, including difficulties with data harmonization and analysis, laying a road map for future collaborations. While ovarian cancer consortia have made valuable contributions to the ovarian cancer epidemiological literature over the past decade, additional efforts comprising of new, well-designed case-control studies are needed to further elucidate novel, histotype-specific risk, and prognostic factors which are not consistently available in existing studies.

  6. Collaboration Scripts--A Conceptual Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollar, Ingo; Fischer, Frank; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual analysis of collaboration scripts used in face-to-face and computer-mediated collaborative learning. Collaboration scripts are scaffolds that aim to improve collaboration through structuring the interactive processes between two or more learning partners. Collaboration scripts consist of at least five components:…

  7. Analysis and evaluation of collaborative modeling processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ssebuggwawo, D.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis and evaluation of collaborative modeling processes is confronted with many challenges. On the one hand, many systems design and re-engineering projects require collaborative modeling approaches that can enhance their productivity. But, such collaborative efforts, which often consist of the

  8. Social Support, a Mediator in Collaborative Depression Care for Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyunsung; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed whether perceived social support (PSS) is a factor in improving physical and functional well-being observed among cancer patients receiving collaborative depression care. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted of data collected in a randomized clinical trial testing the effectiveness of collaborative depression…

  9. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC.

  10. Surface computing and collaborative analysis work

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Judith; Gossage, Stevenson; Hack, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Large surface computing devices (wall-mounted or tabletop) with touch interfaces and their application to collaborative data analysis, an increasingly important and prevalent activity, is the primary topic of this book. Our goals are to outline the fundamentals of surface computing (a still maturing technology), review relevant work on collaborative data analysis, describe frameworks for understanding collaborative processes, and provide a better understanding of the opportunities for research and development. We describe surfaces as display technologies with which people can interact directly, and emphasize how interaction design changes when designing for large surfaces. We review efforts to use large displays, surfaces or mixed display environments to enable collaborative analytic activity. Collaborative analysis is important in many domains, but to provide concrete examples and a specific focus, we frequently consider analysis work in the security domain, and in particular the challenges security personne...

  11. Behavioural and metabolic risk factors for mortality from colon and rectum cancer: analysis of data from the Asia-Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, David Stewart; Parr, Christine Louise; Lam, Tai Hing; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Jee, Sun Ha; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Giles, Graham; Fang, Xianghua; Barzi, Federica; Batty, George David; Huxley, Rachel Rita; Woodward, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has several modifiable behavioural risk factors but their relationship to the risk of colon and rectum cancer separately and between countries with high and low incidence is not clear. Data from participants in the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration (APCSC) were used to estimate mortality from colon (International Classification of Diseases, revision 9 (ICD-9) 153, ICD-10 C18) and rectum (ICD-9 154, ICD-10 C19-20) cancers. Data on age, body mass index (BMI), serum cholesterol, height, smoking, physical activity, alcohol and diabetes mellitus were entered into Cox proportional hazards models. 600,427 adults contributed 4,281,239 person-years follow-up. The mean ages (SD) for Asian and Australia/New Zealand cohorts were 44.0 (9.5) and 53.4 (14.5) years, respectively. 455 colon and 158 rectum cancer deaths were observed. Increasing age, BMI and attained adult height were associated with increased hazards of death from colorectal cancer, and physical activity was associated with a reduced hazard. After multiple adjustment, any physical activity was associated with a 28% lower hazard of colon cancer mortality (HR 0.72, 95%CI 0.53-0.96) and lower rectum cancer mortality (HR 0.75, 95%CI 0.45-1.27). A 2cm increase in height increased colon and all colorectal cancer mortality by 7% and 6% respectively. Physical inactivity and greater BMI are modifiable risk factors for colon cancer in both Western and Asian populations. Further efforts are needed to promote physical activity and reduce obesity while biological research is needed to understand the mechanisms by which they act to cause cancer mortality.

  12. Analysis of stage and clinical/prognostic factors for colon and rectal cancer from SEER registries: AJCC and collaborative stage data collection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vivien W; Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Charlton, Mary E; Ruiz, Bernardo A; Karlitz, Jordan; Altekruse, Sean F; Ries, Lynn A G; Jessup, J Milburn

    2014-12-01

    The Collaborative Stage (CS) Data Collection System enables multiple cancer registration programs to document anatomic and molecular pathology features that contribute to the Tumor (T), Node (N), Metastasis (M) - TNM - system of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). This article highlights changes in CS for colon and rectal carcinomas as TNM moved from the AJCC 6th to the 7th editions. Data from 18 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based registries were analyzed for the years 2004-2010, which included 191,361colon and 73,341 rectal carcinomas. Overall, the incidence of colon and rectal cancers declined, with the greatest decrease in stage 0. The AJCC's 7th edition introduction of changes in the subcategorization of T4, N1, and N2 caused shifting within stage groups in 25,577 colon and 10,150 rectal cancers diagnosed in 2010. Several site-specific factors (SSFs) introduced in the 7th edition had interesting findings: 1) approximately 10% of colon and rectal cancers had tumor deposits - about 30%-40% occurred without lymph node metastases, which resulted in 2.5% of colon and 3.3% of rectal cases becoming N1c (stage III A/B) in the AJCC 7th edition; 2) 10% of colon and 12% of rectal cases had circumferential radial margins Cancer Society.

  13. International Collaboration Enhances Cancer Screening Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH is working with the International Agency for Research on CancerExit Disclaimer (IARC) and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) on the ESTAMPA Study, a multi-centric study of cervical cancer screening and triage with HPV testing.

  14. Alcohol Consumption and Survival after a Breast Cancer Diagnosis: A Literature-Based Meta-analysis and Collaborative Analysis of Data for 29,239 Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, A.M.; Schmidt, M.K.; Bolla, M.K.; Wang, Q.; Gago-Dominguez, M.; Castelao, J.E.; Carracedo, A.; Garzon, V.M.; Bojesen, S.E.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Flyger, H.; Chang-Claude, J.; Vrieling, A.; Rudolph, A.; Seibold, P.; Nevanlinna, H.; Muranen, T.A.; Aaltonen, K.; Blomqvist, C.; Matsuo, K.; Ito, H.; Iwata, H.; Horio, A.; John, E.M.; Sherman, M.; Lissowska, J.; Figueroa, J.; Garcia-Closas, M.; Anton-Culver, H.; Shah, M.; Hopper, J.L.; Trichopoulou, A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, B.; Krogh, V.; Weiderpass, E.; Andersson, A.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Dossus, L.; Fagherazzi, G.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Olsen, A.; Wishart, G.C.; Easton, D.F.; Borgquist, S.; Overvad, K.; Barricarte, A.; Gonzalez, C.A.; Sanchez, M.J.; Amiano, P.; Riboli, E.; Key, T.; Pharoah, P.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence for an association of alcohol consumption with prognosis after a diagnosis of breast cancer has been inconsistent. We have reviewed and summarized the published evidence and evaluated the association using individual patient data from multiple case cohorts. METHODS: A MEDLINE se

  15. Alcohol Consumption and Survival after a Breast Cancer Diagnosis: A Literature-Based Meta-analysis and Collaborative Analysis of Data for 29,239 Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, A.M.; Schmidt, M.K.; Bolla, M.K.; Wang, Q.; Gago-Dominguez, M.; Castelao, J.E.; Carracedo, A.; Garzon, V.M.; Bojesen, S.E.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Flyger, H.; Chang-Claude, J.; Vrieling, A.; Rudolph, A.; Seibold, P.; Nevanlinna, H.; Muranen, T.A.; Aaltonen, K.; Blomqvist, C.; Matsuo, K.; Ito, H.; Iwata, H.; Horio, A.; John, E.M.; Sherman, M.; Lissowska, J.; Figueroa, J.; Garcia-Closas, M.; Anton-Culver, H.; Shah, M.; Hopper, J.L.; Trichopoulou, A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, B.; Krogh, V.; Weiderpass, E.; Andersson, A.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Dossus, L.; Fagherazzi, G.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Olsen, A.; Wishart, G.C.; Easton, D.F.; Borgquist, S.; Overvad, K.; Barricarte, A.; Gonzalez, C.A.; Sanchez, M.J.; Amiano, P.; Riboli, E.; Key, T.; Pharoah, P.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence for an association of alcohol consumption with prognosis after a diagnosis of breast cancer has been inconsistent. We have reviewed and summarized the published evidence and evaluated the association using individual patient data from multiple case cohorts. METHODS: A MEDLINE se

  16. Collaboration Opportunities with the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB) at NCI | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB) at the National Cancer Institute has developed the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB), which is a unique infrastructure for collecting biospecimens for the purpose of conducting biospecimen research. Biospecimens from the BPV program will be made available to collaborators with the capability to perform molecular analysis as part of a collaborative research agreement with the NCI-BBRB.

  17. Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast cancer: Breast cancer and abortion: collaborative reanalysis of data from 53 epidemiological studies, including 83000 women with breast cancer from 16 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beral, V.; Bull, D.; Doll, R.; Peto, R.; Reeves, G.; van den Brandt, P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer and abortion: collaborative reanalysis of data from 53 epidemiological studies, including 83?000 women with breast cancer from 16 countries. Beral V, Bull D, Doll R, Peto R, Reeves G; Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer. BACKGROUND: The Collaborative Group on Hormo

  18. Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast cancer: Breast cancer and abortion: collaborative reanalysis of data from 53 epidemiological studies, including 83000 women with breast cancer from 16 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beral, V.; Bull, D.; Doll, R.; Peto, R.; Reeves, G.; van den Brandt, P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer and abortion: collaborative reanalysis of data from 53 epidemiological studies, including 83?000 women with breast cancer from 16 countries. Beral V, Bull D, Doll R, Peto R, Reeves G; Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer. BACKGROUND: The Collaborative Group on

  19. Understanding and reducing obstacles in a collaboration between a minority institution and a cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Beti; O'Connell, Mary; Löest, Helena; Anderson, Jennifer; Westcott, Rick

    2013-11-01

    Reducing the cancer incidence and mortality rates of underserved populations will require multidisciplinary efforts involving diverse teams of investigators. We describe a collaborative program between a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center and a minority-serving institution. The organizations worked together to discover institutional and cultural barriers and facilitators to productive collaboration.

  20. Collaborative Research in Childhood Cancer Survivorship: The Current Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Smita; Armenian, Saro H; Armstrong, Gregory T; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Hawkins, Michael M; Kremer, Leontien C M; Kuehni, Claudia E; Olsen, Jørgen H; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M

    2015-09-20

    Survivors of childhood cancer carry a substantial burden of morbidity and are at increased risk for premature death. Furthermore, clear associations exist between specific therapeutic exposures and the risk for a variety of long-term complications. The entire landscape of health issues encountered for decades after successful completion of treatment is currently being explored in various collaborative research settings. These settings include large population-based or multi-institutional cohorts and single-institution studies. The ascertainment of outcomes has depended on self-reporting, linkage to registries, or clinical assessments. Survivorship research in the cooperative group setting, such as the Children's Oncology Group, has leveraged the clinical trials infrastructure to explore the molecular underpinnings of treatment-related adverse events, and to understand specific complications in the setting of randomized risk-reduction strategies. This review highlights the salient findings from these large collaborative initiatives, emphasizing the need for life-long follow-up of survivors of childhood cancer, and describing the development of several guidelines and efforts toward harmonization. Finally, the review reinforces the need to identify populations at highest risk, facilitating the development of risk prediction models that would allow for targeted interventions across the entire trajectory of survivorship.

  1. Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores collaboration between library media educators and regular classroom teachers. The article focuses on the context of the issue, positions on the issue, the impact of collaboration, and how to implement effective collaboration into the school system. Various books and professional journals are used to support conclusions…

  2. Collaborative cancer epidemiology in the 21st century: the model of cancer consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Michael R; Ioannidis, John P A; Kaminski, Brett M; Derycke, Eric; Rogers, Scott; Khoury, Muin J; Seminara, Daniela

    2013-12-01

    During the last two decades, epidemiology has undergone a rapid evolution toward collaborative research. The proliferation of multi-institutional, interdisciplinary consortia has acquired particular prominence in cancer research. Herein, we describe the characteristics of a network of 49 established cancer epidemiology consortia (CEC) currently supported by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). This collection represents the largest disease-based research network for collaborative cancer research established in population sciences. We describe the funding trends, geographic distribution, and areas of research focus. The CEC have been partially supported by 201 grants and yielded 3,876 publications between 1995 and 2011. We describe this output in terms of interdisciplinary collaboration and translational evolution. We discuss challenges and future opportunities in the establishment and conduct of large-scale team science within the framework of CEC, review future prospects for this approach to large-scale, interdisciplinary cancer research, and describe a model for the evolution of an integrated Network of Cancer Consortia optimally suited to address and support 21st-century epidemiology.

  3. Statistical analysis of $k$-nearest neighbor collaborative recommendation

    CERN Document Server

    Biau, Gérard; Rouvière, Laurent; 10.1214/09-AOS759

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative recommendation is an information-filtering technique that attempts to present information items that are likely of interest to an Internet user. Traditionally, collaborative systems deal with situations with two types of variables, users and items. In its most common form, the problem is framed as trying to estimate ratings for items that have not yet been consumed by a user. Despite wide-ranging literature, little is known about the statistical properties of recommendation systems. In fact, no clear probabilistic model even exists which would allow us to precisely describe the mathematical forces driving collaborative filtering. To provide an initial contribution to this, we propose to set out a general sequential stochastic model for collaborative recommendation. We offer an in-depth analysis of the so-called cosine-type nearest neighbor collaborative method, which is one of the most widely used algorithms in collaborative filtering, and analyze its asymptotic performance as the number of user...

  4. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  5. Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Meme; Pryor, Boori Monty

    2000-01-01

    Describes, in the words of two Australian authors (one Aboriginal and one European-Australian), how they work together when they write books together, and how their collaboration goes beyond the two of them. (SR)

  6. Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroya; Kawado, Miyuki; Aoyama, Norihiro; Hashimoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Koji; Wakai, Kenji; Suzuki, Sadao; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have reported coffee consumption to be associated with various health conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of coffee consumption with colorectal cancer incidence in a large-scale prospective cohort study in Japan. We used data from the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk (JACC Study). Here, we analyzed a total of 58 221 persons (23 607 men, 34 614 women) followed from 1988 to the end of 2009. During 738 669 person-years of follow-up for the analysis of colorectal cancer risk with coffee consumption at baseline, we identified 687 cases of colon cancer (355 males and 332 females) and 314 cases of rectal cancer (202 males and 112 females). We used the Cox proportional-hazard regression model to estimate hazard ratio (HR). Compared to those who consumed less than 1 cup of coffee per day, men who consumed 2-3 cups of coffee per day had an HR of 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93-1.70), and men who consumed more than 4 cups of coffee per day had an HR of 1.79 (95% CI 1.01-3.18). A statistically significant increase in the risk of colon cancer was associated with increasing coffee consumption among men (P for trend = 0.03). On the other hand, coffee consumption in women was not associated with incident risk of colon cancer. Coffee consumption was also not associated with rectal cancer incidence in men or women. This large-scale population-based cohort study showed that coffee consumption increases the risk of colon cancer among Japanese men.

  7. Cancer-associated autoantibodies to MUC1 and MUC4--a blinded case–control study of colorectal cancer in UK collaborative trial of ovarian cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Nøstdal, Alexander;

    2014-01-01

    of colorectal cancer diagnosis and healthy controls. Subsequently, the selected biomarkers were evaluated in a blinded nested case–control study using stored serum samples from among the 50,640 women randomized to the multimodal arm of the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS), where...... women gave annual blood samples for several years. Cases were 97 postmenopausal women who developed colorectal cancer after recruitment and were age-matched to 97 women without any history of cancer. MUC1-STn and MUC1-Core3 IgG autoantibodies identified cases with 8.2 and 13.4% sensitivity, respectively......, at 95% specificity. IgA to MUC4 glycoforms were unable to discriminate between cases and controls in the UKCTOCS sera. Additional analysis was undertaken by combining the data of MUC1-STn and MUC1-Core3 with previously generated data on autoantibodies to p53 peptides, which increased the sensitivity...

  8. Analysis and Assessment of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conversations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trausan-Matu, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Trausan-Matu, S. (2008). Analysis and Assessment of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conversations. Workshop presentation at the symposium Learning networks for professional. November, 14, 2008, Heerlen, Nederland: Open Universiteit Nederland.

  9. Implementing colorectal cancer screening in community health centers: addressing cancer health disparities through a regional cancer collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taplin, Stephen H; Haggstrom, David; Jacobs, Tracy; Determan, Ada; Granger, Jennifer; Montalvo, Wanda; Snyder, William M; Lockhart, Susan; Calvo, Ahmed

    2008-09-01

    The population served by Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) has lower levels of cancer screening compared with the general population and suffers a disproportionate cancer burden. To address these disparities, 3 federal agencies and a primary care association established and tested the feasibility of a Regional Cancer Collaborative (RCC) in 2005. RCC faculty implemented a learning model to improve cancer screening across 4 FQHCs that met explicit organizational readiness criteria. Regional faculty trained "care process leaders," who worked with primary care teams to plan and implement practice changes. FQHCs monitored progress across the following measures of screening implementation: self-management goal-setting; number and percent screened for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer; percent timely results notification; and percent abnormal screens evaluated within 90 days. Progress and plans were reviewed in regular teleconferences. FQHCs were encouraged to create local communities of practice (LCOP) involving community resources to support cancer screening and to participate in a monthly teleconference that linked the LCOPs into a regional community of practice. Summary reports and administrative data facilitated a process evaluation of the RCC. chi test and test of trends compared baseline and follow-up screening rates. The RCC taught the collaborative process using process leader training, teleconferences, 2 regional meetings, and local process improvement efforts. All organizations created clinical tracking capabilities and 3 of the 4 established LCOPs, which met monthly in an regional community of practice. Screening documentation increased for all 3 cancers from 2005 to 2007. Colorectal cancer screening increased from 8.6% to 21.2%. A regional plan to enable collaborative learning for cancer screening implementation is feasible, and improvements in screening rates can occur among carefully selected organizations.

  10. Familial breast cancer: collaborative reanalysis of individual data from 52 epidemiological studies including 58,209 women with breast cancer and 101,986 women without the disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaborative Group on Hormona, l Factors; van den Brandt, P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Familial breast cancer: collaborative reanalysis of individual data from 52 epidemiological studies including 58,209 women with breast cancer and 101,986 women without the disease. Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer. BACKGROUND: Women with a family history of breast cancer are

  11. Familial breast cancer: collaborative reanalysis of individual data from 52 epidemiological studies including 58,209 women with breast cancer and 101,986 women without the disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaborative Group on Hormona, l Factors; van den Brandt, P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Familial breast cancer: collaborative reanalysis of individual data from 52 epidemiological studies including 58,209 women with breast cancer and 101,986 women without the disease. Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer. BACKGROUND: Women with a family history of breast cancer are

  12. Brain Tumor Trials Collaborative | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain Tumor Trials Collaborative In Pursuit of a Cure The mission of the BTTC is to develop and perform state-of-the-art clinical trials in a collaborative and collegial environment, advancing treatments for patients with brain tumors, merging good scientific method with concern for patient well-being and outcome.

  13. CHEK2*1100delC and susceptibility to breast cancer : A collaborative analysis involving 10,860 breast cancer cases and 9,065 controls from 10 studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Easton, D; McGuffog, L; Thompson, D; Dunning, A; Tee, L; Baynes, C; Healey, C; Pharoah, P; Ponder, B; Seal, S; Barfoot, R; Sodha, N; Eeles, R; Stratton, M; Rahman, N; Peto, J; Spurdle, AB; Chen, XQ; Chenevix-Trench, G; Hopper, JL; Giles, GG; McCredie, MRE; Syrjakoski, K; Holli, K; Kallioniemi, O; Eerola, H; Vahteristo, P; Blomqvist, C; Nevanlinna, H; Kataja, Vesa; Mannermaa, A; Dork, T; Bremer, M; Devilee, P; de Bock, GH; Krol-Warmerdam, EMM; Kroese-Jansema, K; Wijers-Koster, P; Cornelisse, CJ; Tollenaar, RAEM; Meijers-Heijboer, H; Berns, E; Nagel, J; Foekens, J; Klijn, JGM; Schutte, M

    Previous studies of families with multiple cases of breast cancer have indicated that a frameshift alteration in the CHEK2 gene, 1100delC, is associated with an elevated frequency of breast cancer in such families, but the risk associated with the variant in other situations is uncertain. To

  14. CHEK2*1100delC and susceptibility to breast cancer : A collaborative analysis involving 10,860 breast cancer cases and 9,065 controls from 10 studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Easton, D; McGuffog, L; Thompson, D; Dunning, A; Tee, L; Baynes, C; Healey, C; Pharoah, P; Ponder, B; Seal, S; Barfoot, R; Sodha, N; Eeles, R; Stratton, M; Rahman, N; Peto, J; Spurdle, AB; Chen, XQ; Chenevix-Trench, G; Hopper, JL; Giles, GG; McCredie, MRE; Syrjakoski, K; Holli, K; Kallioniemi, O; Eerola, H; Vahteristo, P; Blomqvist, C; Nevanlinna, H; Kataja, Vesa; Mannermaa, A; Dork, T; Bremer, M; Devilee, P; de Bock, GH; Krol-Warmerdam, EMM; Kroese-Jansema, K; Wijers-Koster, P; Cornelisse, CJ; Tollenaar, RAEM; Meijers-Heijboer, H; Berns, E; Nagel, J; Foekens, J; Klijn, JGM; Schutte, M

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies of families with multiple cases of breast cancer have indicated that a frameshift alteration in the CHEK2 gene, 1100delC, is associated with an elevated frequency of breast cancer in such families, but the risk associated with the variant in other situations is uncertain. To evaluat

  15. Interprofessional collaborative practice within cancer teams: Translating evidence into action. A mixed methods study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberge Danièle

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A regional integrated cancer network has implemented a program (educational workshops, reflective and mentoring activities designed to support the uptake of evidence-informed interprofessional collaborative practices (referred to in this text as EIPCP within cancer teams. This research project, which relates to the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario (RNAO Best Practice Guidelines and other sources of research evidence, represents a unique opportunity to learn more about the factors and processes involved in the translation of evidence-based recommendations into professional practices. The planned study seeks to address context-specific challenges and the concerns of nurses and other stakeholders regarding the uptake of evidence-based recommendations to effectively promote and support interprofessional collaborative practices. Aim This study aims to examine the uptake of evidence-based recommendations from best practice guidelines intended to enhance interprofessional collaborative practices within cancer teams. Design The planned study constitutes a practical trial, defined as a trial designed to provide comprehensive information that is grounded in real-world healthcare dynamics. An exploratory mixed methods study design will be used. It will involve collecting quantitative data to assess professionals' knowledge and attitudes, as well as practice environment factors associated with effective uptake of evidence-based recommendations. Semi-structured interviews will be conducted concurrently with care providers to gather qualitative data for describing the processes involved in the translation of evidence into action from both the users' (n = 12 and providers' (n = 24 perspectives. The Graham et al. Ottawa Model of Research Use will serve to construct operational definitions of concepts, and to establish the initial coding labels to be used in the thematic analysis of the qualitative data. Quantitative and qualitative

  16. Collaborating to Move Research Forward: Proceedings of the 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ashish M; Agarwal, Piyush; Bivalacqua, Trinity; Chisolm, Stephanie; Daneshmand, Sia; Doroshow, James H; Efstathiou, Jason A; Galsky, Matthew; Iyer, Gopa; Kassouf, Wassim; Shah, Jay; Taylor, John; Williams, Stephen B; Quale, Diane Zipursky; Rosenberg, Jonathan E

    2016-04-27

    The 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank was hosted by the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network and brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, representatives and Industry to advance bladder cancer research efforts. Think Tank expert panels, group discussions, and networking opportunities helped generate ideas and strengthen collaborations between researchers and physicians across disciplines and between institutions. Interactive panel discussions addressed a variety of timely issues: 1) data sharing, privacy and social media; 2) improving patient navigation through therapy; 3) promising developments in immunotherapy; 4) and moving bladder cancer research from bench to bedside. Lastly, early career researchers presented their bladder cancer studies and had opportunities to network with leading experts.

  17. Progress through Collaboration - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the areas of sharing proteomics reagents and protocols and also in regulatory science.

  18. Help Seeking in Online Collaborative Groupwork: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianxia; Xu, Jianzhong; Fan, Xitao

    2015-01-01

    This study examined predictive models for students' help seeking in the context of online collaborative groupwork. Results from multilevel analysis revealed that most of the variance in help seeking was at the individual student level, and multiple variables at the individual level were predictive of help-seeking behaviour. Help seeking was…

  19. Help Seeking in Online Collaborative Groupwork: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianxia; Xu, Jianzhong; Fan, Xitao

    2015-01-01

    This study examined predictive models for students' help seeking in the context of online collaborative groupwork. Results from multilevel analysis revealed that most of the variance in help seeking was at the individual student level, and multiple variables at the individual level were predictive of help-seeking behaviour. Help seeking was…

  20. Towards a Design Theory for Collaborative Qualitative Data Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2016-01-01

    This position paper addresses how to develop a design theory to support the collaborative practice of qualitative data analysis. Qualitative researchers face several challenges in making sense of their empirical data and IS-support for this practice can be found in software applications...... such as NVivo, Atlas.ti, and DeDoose. While these software tools have utility and are valuable, they are also limiting – and they are particularly limiting researchers in their collaborative efforts with their co-researchers. In this paper, we investigate a design theory to extend it to support collaboration....... We use this as a stepping stone to discuss how to use a design theory to problematize existing applications and how to extend a design theory by abduction....

  1. Residential radon and risk of lung cancer - results of a collaborative analysis of 13 European case-control studies; Lungenkrebsrisiko durch Radon in Wohnungen. Ergebnisse der gemeinsamen Auswertung von 13 europaeischen Fall-Kontroll-Studien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, M. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The combined analysis of the individual data from 13 European studies includes 7, 148 lung cancer patients and 14,208 controls. The database is currently the world wide largest database to investigate the association of lung cancer with residential radon. After detailed stratification for smoking, risk analyses showed an approximately linear exposure-response relationship with no evidence of a threshold dose. The excess relative risk was 16% per increase of radon exposure by 100 Bq/m{sup 3}. There was a significant linear exposure-response relationship even for radon concentrations of less than 200 Bq/m{sup 3}. (orig.)

  2. Cancer in inflammatory bowel disease 15 years after diagnosis in a population-based European Collaborative follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Tatsioni, Athina; Pedersen, Natalia;

    2011-01-01

    To determine the occurrence of intestinal and extraintestinal cancers in the 1993-2009 prospective European Collaborative Inflammatory Bowel Disease (EC-IBD) Study Group cohort.......To determine the occurrence of intestinal and extraintestinal cancers in the 1993-2009 prospective European Collaborative Inflammatory Bowel Disease (EC-IBD) Study Group cohort....

  3. Towards a Design Theory for Collaborative Qualitative Data Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2016-01-01

    This position paper addresses how to develop a design theory to support the collaborative practice of qualitative data analysis. Qualitative researchers face several challenges in making sense of their empirical data and IS-support for this practice can be found in software applications such as N....... We use this as a stepping stone to discuss how to use a design theory to problematize existing applications and how to extend a design theory by abduction....

  4. A Collaborative Strategy with Medical Providers to Improve Training for Teachers of Children with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael B.; Bolen, Larry M.; Brinkman, Tara M.; Carreira, Kay; Cole, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to illustrate the collaborative development of a teacher training program for teachers who have a child with cancer in their classroom. Five hundred twenty-eight kindergarten through 12th grade public school teachers were surveyed to identify their training needs. Based on these needs a computer-based training program…

  5. Principles and tools for collaborative entity-based intelligence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Eric A; Card, Stuart K; Bodnar, John W

    2010-01-01

    Software tools that make it easier for analysts to collaborate as a natural part of their work will lead to better analysis that is informed by more perspectives. We are interested to know if software tools can be designed that support collaboration even as they allow analysts to find documents and organize information (including evidence, schemas, and hypotheses). We have modified the Entity Workspace system, described previously, to test such designs. We have evaluated the resulting design in both a laboratory study and a study where it is situated with an analysis team. In both cases, effects on collaboration appear to be positive. Key aspects of the design include an evidence notebook optimized for organizing entities (rather than text characters), information structures that can be collapsed and expanded, visualization of evidence that emphasizes events and documents (rather than emphasizing the entity graph), and a notification system that finds entities of mutual interest to multiple analysts. Long-term tests suggest that this approach can support both top-down and bottom-up styles of analysis.

  6. The value of research collaborations and consortia in rare cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Jean-Yves; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Ducimetière, Françoise; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    Rare cancers are defined by an incidence of less than six per 100,000 people per year. They represent roughly 20% of all human cancers and are associated with worse survival than are so-called frequent tumours, because of delays to accurate diagnosis, inadequate treatments, and fewer opportunities to participate in clinical trials (because of a paucity of dedicated trials from both academic and industrial sponsors). In this Series paper, we discuss how these challenges can be addressed by research consortia and suggest the integration of these consortia with reference networks, which gather multidisciplinary expert centres, for management of rare tumours.

  7. Using Social Network Analysis to Analyze Collaboration in Batik Smes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ade Iriani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As a creative industry, batik industry should always create a breakthrough in the form of innovative batik motifs to attract buyers. Manufacturers of batik in Indonesia are batik SMEs with very simple organization and management. However, they are in a competitive business environment that threatens their survival. In order to continue to create innovative products, collaboration of employees in batik SMEs is absolute important. Collaboration between individuals is more likely to occur in the patterns of informal relationships rather than in formal ways. This article examines and analyses the patterns of informal relations in WindaSari batik. Winda Sari batik SME is one of big SMEs in Sragen. Using Social Network Analysis (SNA for analysis, the results of this study indicate that the relationships between individuals are highly dependent and focused on the specific individuals as intermediaries. In addition, there are patterns of relationships in the subgroups, or cliques, which have only a few numbers of members. In addition, the relationships appear to be one-way relationships than reciprocal relationships. This kind of relationships is less support to collaboration.

  8. Collaborative analysis of multi-gigapixel imaging data using Cytomine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marée, Raphaël; Rollus, Loïc; Stévens, Benjamin; Hoyoux, Renaud; Louppe, Gilles; Vandaele, Rémy; Begon, Jean-Michel; Kainz, Philipp; Geurts, Pierre; Wehenkel, Louis

    2016-05-01

    Collaborative analysis of massive imaging datasets is essential to enable scientific discoveries. We developed Cytomine to foster active and distributed collaboration of multidisciplinary teams for large-scale image-based studies. It uses web development methodologies and machine learning in order to readily organize, explore, share and analyze (semantically and quantitatively) multi-gigapixel imaging data over the internet. We illustrate how it has been used in several biomedical applications. Cytomine (http://www.cytomine.be/) is freely available under an open-source license from http://github.com/cytomine/ A documentation wiki (http://doc.cytomine.be) and a demo server (http://demo.cytomine.be) are also available. info@cytomine.be Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Interdisciplinary patterns of a university: Investigating collaboration using co-publication network analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Obermeier, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    We investigate collaborative and interdisciplinary research features of University College Dublin, using methods from social network analysis to analyze and visualize (co-)publications covered by the Web of Science from 1998 through 2007. We account for the extent of interdisciplinarity in collaborations, distinguishing collaborations between schools within one college ("small interdisciplinarity") from collaborations between schools in different colleges ("big interdisciplinarity"). Based on the interdisciplinary nature, we compare the types of collaboration to a model of random matching across units, observing several marked differences. During the period of consideration, collaborations within UC Dublin nearly doubled, almost entirely due to the increasing level of intra-school collaborations.

  10. Improving Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Related Cancer Outcomes through International Collaboration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa Nokta

    2011-01-01

    @@ The spectrum of cancers seen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)infected individuals is diverse and complex,and reflects an ever-changing HIV epidemic.In parts of the world where combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is available,HIV-infected patients are living longer and are less likely to die of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)defining malignancies within a year or two of developing AIDS.

  11. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    with  high   mitotic   indices   such   as   cancer,   and   are   overexpressed   in   head   and   neck,   lung...threonine  kinases  comprised  of  Aurora  A,   B,   and   C   which   execute   critical   steps   in   mitotic   and

  12. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    receive salvage therapy that results in only a few weeks of disease stability. We have proposed to employ a team science , systems biology based approach...Pertea, G., Mortazavi, A., Kwan, G., van Baren, M.J., Salzberg, S.L., Wold , B.J., and Pachter, L. 2010. Transcript assembly and quantification by...tumor xenografts (PDTX) have been widely used in predictive biomarker development and pathway modeling in cancer research. However, it has not been

  13. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaboration: A Pooling Project of Studies Participating in the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Hazel B; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Wright, Lauren B; McGowan, Craig; Brook, Mark N; McClain, Kathleen M; Jones, Michael E; Adami, Hans-Olov; Agnoli, Claudia; Baglietto, Laura; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Blot, William J; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Butler, Lesley; Chen, Yu; Doody, Michele M; Dossus, Laure; Eliassen, A Heather; Giles, Graham G; Gram, Inger T; Hankinson, Susan E; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J; Kirsh, Victoria A; Kitahara, Cari M; Koh, Woon-Puay; Larsson, Susanna C; Lund, Eiliv; Ma, Huiyan; Merritt, Melissa A; Milne, Roger L; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Ozasa, Kotaro; Palmer, Julie R; Peeters, Petra H; Riboli, Elio; Rohan, Thomas E; Sadakane, Atsuko; Sund, Malin; Tamimi, Rulla M; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Vatten, Lars; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Willett, Walter C; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Sandler, Dale P; Swerdlow, Anthony J

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cancer diagnosis among premenopausal women around the world. Unlike rates in postmenopausal women, incidence rates of advanced breast cancer have increased in recent decades for premenopausal women. Progress in identifying contributors to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women has been constrained by the limited numbers of premenopausal breast cancer cases in individual studies and resulting low statistical power to subcategorize exposures or to study specific subtypes. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaborative Group was established to facilitate cohort-based analyses of risk factors for premenopausal breast cancer by pooling individual-level data from studies participating in the United States National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium. This article describes the Group, including the rationale for its initial aims related to pregnancy, obesity, and physical activity. We also describe the 20 cohort studies with data submitted to the Group by June 2016. The infrastructure developed for this work can be leveraged to support additional investigations. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1360-9. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Collaborating to Move Research Forward: Proceedings of the 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ashish M.; Agarwal, Piyush; Bivalacqua, Trinity; Chisolm, Stephanie; Daneshmand, Sia; Doroshow, James H.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Galsky, Matthew; Iyer, Gopa; Kassouf, Wassim; Shah, Jay; Taylor, John; Williams, Stephen B.; Quale, Diane Zipursky; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-01

    The 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank was hosted by the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network and brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, representatives and Industry to advance bladder cancer research efforts. Think Tank expert panels, group discussions, and networking opportunities helped generate ideas and strengthen collaborations between researchers and physicians across disciplines and between institutions. Interactive panel discussions addressed a variety of timely issues: 1) data sharing, privacy and social media; 2) improving patient navigation through therapy; 3) promising developments in immunotherapy; 4) and moving bladder cancer research from bench to bedside. Lastly, early career researchers presented their bladder cancer studies and had opportunities to network with leading experts. PMID:27376139

  15. Collaboration, collegiality, and cooperation: consumer health library services and the American Cancer Society navigator role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, Carol Ann; Wellik, Kay E

    2012-10-01

    Patients and family members are overwhelmed by the diagnosis of cancer and often do not know where to look for answers, information on the treatment options, or community resources for support during the cancer journey. A unique relationship was forged with a patient and health education librarian at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an American Cancer Society navigator, which encouraged collaboration to better meet the informational and supportive healthcare needs of patients. This article addresses the background of the project, the steps taken to establish the relationship, space allocation, and need for confidentiality. The innovations produced by this partnership also are discussed, including development of cancer pathfinders and cancer communication blogs for patients, as well as comarketing of services.

  16. Collaborative arrangements for Australian nurse practitioners: a policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashin, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    In Australia in 2010, nurse practitioners (NPs) were granted legislated access to the Medical Benefits Scheme (MBS) and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) as providers. These schemes are the federal schemes for third-party reimbursement for health care and medications. As a condition of access to the schemes, it was determined that collaborative arrangements needed to be in place as part of eligibility criteria for NPs. This article is the first published policy analysis of this determination. Published literature and available grey literature (including meeting minutes), and media content, was accessed and analyzed. The policy that was the National Health Collaborative arrangements for Nurse Practitioners Determination to amend the Australian National Health Act 1953 was a success. The policy led to NP access as providers to the MBS and PBS in Australia. Understanding the policy process as it relates to the determination of the need for collaborative arrangements demystifies the process and origins of the policy for NPs in Australia. Understanding the determination means NPs in Australia will not artificially reduce scope of practice based on recommendations from the medical lobby. Clear research direction is provided that may inform the next policy cycle. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. A 7-Year Retrospective Multisource Analysis on the Incidence of Anesthesia Awareness With Recall in Cancer Patients: A Chance of Collaboration Between Anesthesiologists and Psycho-Oncologists for Awareness Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Marco; Viscardi, Daniela; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Mehrabmi-Kermani, Farrokh; Muzio, Maria Rosaria; Forte, Cira Antonietta; De Falco, Francesco; Barberio, Daniela; Cuomo, Arturo

    2016-02-01

    Although randomized controlled studies reported an incidence of anesthesia awareness with recall ∼1 to 2 per 1000 (0.1-0.2%), recent data from the NAP5 study showed an incidence of only 1:19,600. Although in a prospective study many tools for anesthesia awareness detection can be used, a retrospective analysis requires a careful collection of information.The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of anesthesia awareness with recall in a cohort of cancer patients through a multisource retrospective analysis, and the clinical description, including the psychological outcome, of the cases detected. We also tested whether our retrospective analysis would be improved by a routinely psycho-oncological assessment. As secondary endpoints we evaluated the use of depth of anesthesia monitoring over a large cohort of patients, and the correlation between the brain monitoring and the incidence of awareness.We have carried out a 7-year retrospective analysis in a large cohort of cancer patients on the incidence of awareness with recall during general anesthesia. Of 35,595 patients assessed for eligibility, 21,099 were studied. We analyzed all data from the operative rooms' database, the anesthesia records, and from the database of the surgical divisions. In addition we examined reports from psychologists and spontaneous reports to the quality team of the hospital.Two certain cases of awareness were detected, with an incidence of 1:10,550 (0.0095%). They occurred during elective surgery, in female patients without other risk factors. One case came from the report of a psychologist. In both episodes, brain monitoring was not applied and no long-term psychological sequelae were reported.Despite the limitations, our investigation suggests that the incidence of anesthesia awareness is very low, also in a specific cohort of patients, such as the cancer patients, and even when the depth of anesthesia monitoring is rarely used. The limitations caused by both the retrospective

  18. A Web-Based Collaborative System for Remote Monitoring and Analysis of Livestock Farm Odours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, R.; Pan, L. L.; Yang, S. X.

    Monitoring and analysis of livestock farm environments require collection and management of large amount of data from distributed farms. There is an increasing demand for collaboration among livestock producers, environment agencies and governments. This paper presents a collaborative system for

  19. Perceived Stress and Colorectal Cancer Incidence: The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Norimasa; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Sawada, Takayuki; Wang, Chaochen; Lin, Yingsong; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kikuchi, Shogo

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide, and many risk factors for colorectal cancer have been established. However, it remains uncertain whether psychological stress contributes to the onset of colorectal cancer. Therefore, we conducted a large-scale prospective cohort study to confirm the association between perceived stress and colorectal cancer incidence. We identified 680 cases of colon cancer and 330 cases of rectal cancer during a maximum of 21-year follow-up of 61,563 Japanese men and women. Cox regression analysis adjusted for potential confounders revealed a significant association of perceived stress with rectal cancer incidence but not with colon cancer incidence. This finding is partly consistent with that from only one previous study that addressed an association between perceived stress and the risk of colorectal cancer. However, studies on this topic are sparse and warrant further exploration. PMID:28091607

  20. Collaborative Rhetorical Structure: A Discourse Analysis Method for Analyzing Student Collaborative Inquiry via Computer Conferencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xiaojing

    2011-01-01

    Various formats of online discussion have proven valuable for enhancing learning and collaboration in distance and blended learning contexts. However, despite their capacity to reveal essential processes in collaborative inquiry, current mainstream analytical frameworks, such as the cognitive presence framework (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer,…

  1. Improvement in clinical TNM staging documentation within a prostate cancer quality improvement collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filson, Christopher P; Boer, Brooke; Curry, Jon; Linsell, Susan; Ye, Zaojun; Montie, James E; Miller, David C

    2014-04-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a feedback and educational intervention to increase documentation of clinical tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage among urologists in a statewide quality improvement collaborative. The Michigan Urological Surgery Improvement Collaborative (MUSIC) is a consortium of urology practices that aims to improve the quality and cost-efficiency of prostate cancer care. In pilot data collection activities, trained abstractors recorded medical record documentation of clinical TNM stage by participating urologists. We compared levels of TNM stage documentation in 12 MUSIC practices at baseline and after performance feedback and a collaborative-wide educational intervention. We examined patient and practice characteristics associated with documentation of TNM stage. We accrued 491 and 581 men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer during the baseline and postfeedback phases of data collection, respectively. At baseline, 58% of patients had clinical TNM staging in the medical record, ranging from 19% to 96% across 12 practices (P TNM stage. This finding underscores the behavioral change possible with the collaborative quality improvement model and ensures the necessary risk stratification data for our ongoing efforts to improve care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multidisciplinary collaborative gross tumour volume definition for lung cancer radiotherapy: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingdale, Abigail E; Roques, Tom W; Curtin, John; Martin, W M Craig; Horan, Gail; Barrett, Ann

    2011-12-07

    Variability in gross tumour volume (GTV) definition is a major source of systematic error in conformal radiotherapy. This prospective study assesses the role of multidisciplinary collaboration between oncologists and radiologists in defining lung cancer volumes. Twenty patients with non-small cell lung cancer due to receive three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy formed the study population. GTVs were defined by a radiologist (GTVrad) and an oncologist (GTVonc) using available clinical information and imaging. A collaborative meeting was then held to agree on a final, common GTV (GTVfin) to be used for treatment planning, and differences analysed. The collaboration changed the GTV in 19/20 patients with a total of 50 regions being edited. Changes made were categorized as (a) differentiation of tumour from atelectasis or ground glass shadowing, (b) separation of tumour from vasculature, and (c) defining mediastinal extent of tumour. Oncologists were more confident in the GTVfin than the GTVonc. The radiologist took longer to define the GTV than the oncologist. Real-time collaborative GTV definition by a radiologist and oncologist is practical and feasible. This approach allows specific areas of uncertainty to be categorized and focussed on, reducing systematic error in GTV definition. The physician's approach to risk and decision making for each patient may also play a role.

  3. Documenting women's postoperative bodies: Knowing Stephanie and "Remembering Stephanie" as collaborative cancer narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeShazer, Mary K

    2014-12-01

    Photographic representations of women living with or beyond breast cancer have gained prominence in recent decades. Postmillennial visual narratives are both documentary projects and dialogic sites of self-construction and reader-viewer witness. After a brief overview of 30 years of breast cancer photography, this essay analyzes a collaborative photo-documentary by Stephanie Byram and Charlee Brodsky, Knowing Stephanie (2003), and a memorial photographic essay by Brodsky written ten years after Byram's death, "Remembering Stephanie" (2014). The ethics of representing women's postsurgical bodies and opportunities for reader-viewers to engage in "productive looking" (Kaja Silverman's concept) are the focal issues under consideration.

  4. Collaborative human-machine nuclear non-proliferation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, F.L.; Badalamente, R.V.; Stewart, T.S.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of a project investigating support concepts for the information treatment needs of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, also referred to as the Agency) and its attempts to strengthen international safeguards. The aim of the research was to define user/computer interface concepts and intelligent support features that will enhance the analyst`s access to voluminous and diverse information, the ability to recognize and evaluate uncertain data, and the capability to make decisions and recommendations. The objective was to explore techniques for enhancing safeguards analysis through application of (1) more effective user-computer interface designs and (2) advanced concepts involving human/system collaboration. The approach was to identify opportunities for human/system collaboration that would capitalize on human strengths and still accommodate human limitations. This paper documents the findings and describes a concept prototype, Proliferation Analysis Support System (PASS), developed for demonstration purposes. The research complements current and future efforts to enhance the information systems used by the IAEA, but has application elsewhere, as well.

  5. Collaborative human-machine nuclear non-proliferation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, F.L.; Badalamente, R.V.; Stewart, T.S.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of a project investigating support concepts for the information treatment needs of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, also referred to as the Agency) and its attempts to strengthen international safeguards. The aim of the research was to define user/computer interface concepts and intelligent support features that will enhance the analyst`s access to voluminous and diverse information, the ability to recognize and evaluate uncertain data, and the capability to make decisions and recommendations. The objective was to explore techniques for enhancing safeguards analysis through application of (1) more effective user-computer interface designs and (2) advanced concepts involving human/system collaboration. The approach was to identify opportunities for human/system collaboration that would capitalize on human strengths and still accommodate human limitations. This paper documents the findings and describes a concept prototype, Proliferation Analysis Support System (PASS), developed for demonstration purposes. The research complements current and future efforts to enhance the information systems used by the IAEA, but has application elsewhere, as well.

  6. The cutting edge of skin cancer in transplant recipients: scientific retreat of international transplant Skin Cancer Collaborative and Skin Cancer in Organ Transplant Patients Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, A; Colegio, O R

    2014-05-01

    The International Transplant Skin Cancer Collaborative (ITSCC) is an organization of more than 300 physicians and scientists focused on the study of dermatologic changes following solid organ transplantation. Transplant patients have a 100-fold increased risk of developing skin cancer. In October 2012, ITSCC and its European counterpart Skin Cancer in Organ Transplant Patients Europe held a joint biennial retreat in Essex, MA to discuss novel findings in the pathogenesis and management of skin cancer in solid organ transplant recipients. This meeting report is a summary of the novel findings discussed.

  7. Collaborative modeling of the benefits and harms associated with different U.S. Breast cancer screening strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. Mandelblatt (Jeanne); N.K. Stout (Natasha); C.B. Schechter (Clyde); J.J. Van Den Broek (Jeroen J.); D.L. Miglioretti (Diana); M. Krapcho (Martin); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); D. Munoz (Diego); S.J. Lee (Sandra J.); D.A. Berry (Donald); N.T. van Ravesteyn (Nicolien); O. Alagoz (Oguzhan); K. Kerlikowske (Karla); A.N.A. Tosteson (Anna N.A.); A.M. Near (Aimee); A. Hoeffken (Amanda); Y. Chang (Yaojen); E.A.M. Heijnsdijk (Eveline); G. Chisholm (Gary); X. Huang (Xuelin); H. Huang (Hailiang); M.A. Ergun (Mehmet Ali); R. Gangnon (Ronald); B.L. Sprague (Brian L.); S. Plevritis (Sylvia); E. Feuer (Eric); H.J. de Koning (Harry); K.A. Cronin (Kathleen)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Controversy persists about optimal mammography screening strategies. Objective: To evaluate screening outcomes, taking into account advances in mammography and treatment of breast cancer. Design: Collaboration of 6 simulation models using national data on incidence, digital

  8. Collaboration Levels in Asynchronous Discussion Forums: A Social Network Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhrs, Cecilia; McAnally-Salas, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    Computer Supported Collaborative Learning literature relates high levels of collaboration to enhanced learning outcomes. However, an agreement on what is considered a high level of collaboration is unclear, especially if a qualitative approach is taken. This study describes how methods of Social Network Analysis were used to design a collaboration…

  9. Collaborative human-machine analysis using a controlled natural language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, David H.; Shemanski, Donald R.; Giammanco, Cheryl; Braines, Dave

    2015-05-01

    A key aspect of an analyst's task in providing relevant information from data is the reasoning about the implications of that data, in order to build a picture of the real world situation. This requires human cognition, based upon domain knowledge about individuals, events and environmental conditions. For a computer system to collaborate with an analyst, it must be capable of following a similar reasoning process to that of the analyst. We describe ITA Controlled English (CE), a subset of English to represent analyst's domain knowledge and reasoning, in a form that it is understandable by both analyst and machine. CE can be used to express domain rules, background data, assumptions and inferred conclusions, thus supporting human-machine interaction. A CE reasoning and modeling system can perform inferences from the data and provide the user with conclusions together with their rationale. We present a logical problem called the "Analysis Game", used for training analysts, which presents "analytic pitfalls" inherent in many problems. We explore an iterative approach to its representation in CE, where a person can develop an understanding of the problem solution by incremental construction of relevant concepts and rules. We discuss how such interactions might occur, and propose that such techniques could lead to better collaborative tools to assist the analyst and avoid the "pitfalls".

  10. Pilot analysis of the Motivation Assessment for Team Readiness, Integration, and Collaboration (MATRICx) using Rasch analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinson, Trudy; Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R; Schwartz, Lisa S; Furniss, Jeremy; Leblanc-Beaudoin, Tommy; Lazar, Danielle; Falk-Krzesinski, Holly J

    2016-10-01

    Healthcare services and the production of healthcare knowledge are increasingly dependent on highly functioning, multidisciplinary teams, requiring greater awareness of individuals' readiness to collaborate in translational science teams. Yet, there is no comprehensive tool of individual motivations and threats to collaboration that can guide preparation of individuals for work on well-functioning teams. This prospective pilot study evaluated the preliminary psychometric properties of the Motivation Assessment for Team Readiness, Integration, and Collaboration (MATRICx). We examined 55 items of the MATRICx in a sample of 125 faculty, students and researchers, using contemporary psychometric methods (Rasch analysis). We found that the motivator and threat items formed separate constructs relative to collaboration readiness. Further, respondents who identified themselves as inexperienced at working on collaborative projects defined the motivation construct differently from experienced respondents. These results are consistent with differences in strategic alliances described in the literature-for example, inexperienced respondents reflected features of cooperation and coordination, such as concern with sharing information and compatibility of goals. In contrast, the more experienced respondents were concerned with issues that reflected a collective purpose, more typical of collaborative alliances. While these different types of alliances are usually described as representing varying aspects along a continuum, our findings suggest that collaboration might be better thought of as a qualitatively different state than cooperation or coordination. These results need to be replicated in larger samples, but the findings have implications for the development and design of educational interventions that aim to ready scientists and clinicians for greater interdisciplinary work.

  11. A Web-Based Development Environment for Collaborative Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Glaser, C.; Klingebiel, D.; Komm, M.; Müller, G.; Rieger, M.; Steggemann, J.; Urban, M.; Winchen, T.

    2014-06-01

    Visual Physics Analysis (VISPA) is a web-based development environment addressing high energy and astroparticle physics. It covers the entire analysis spectrum from the design and validation phase to the execution of analyses and the visualization of results. VISPA provides a graphical steering of the analysis flow, which consists of self-written, re-usable Python and C++ modules for more demanding tasks. All common operating systems are supported since a standard internet browser is the only software requirement for users. Even access via mobile and touch-compatible devices is possible. In this contribution, we present the most recent developments of our web application concerning technical, state-of-the-art approaches as well as practical experiences. One of the key features is the use of workspaces, i.e. user-configurable connections to remote machines supplying resources and local file access. Thereby, workspaces enable the management of data, computing resources (e.g. remote clusters or computing grids), and additional software either centralized or individually. We further report on the results of an application with more than 100 third-year students using VISPA for their regular particle physics exercises during the winter term 2012/13. Besides the ambition to support and simplify the development cycle of physics analyses, new use cases such as fast, location-independent status queries, the validation of results, and the ability to share analyses within worldwide collaborations with a single click become conceivable.

  12. Usability Analysis within The DataONE Network of Collaborators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budden, A. E.; Frame, M. T.; Tenopir, C.; Volentine, R.

    2014-12-01

    DataONE was conceived as a 10-year project to enable new science and knowledge creation through universal access to data about life on Earth and the environment that sustains it. In Phase I (2009-2014) more than 300 DataONE participants designed, developed and deployed a robust cyberinfrastructure (CI) with innovative services, and directly engaged and educated a broad stakeholder community. DataONE provides a resilient, scalable infrastructure using Member Nodes (data repositories), Coordinating Nodes, and an Investigator Toolkit to support the data access and data management needs of biological, Earth, and environmental science researchers in the U.S. and across the globe. DataONE collaborators, such as the U.S. Geological Survey, University of New Mexico, and the University of Tennessee, perform research to measure both the current data practices and opinions of DataONE stakeholders and the usability of DataONE for these stakeholders. Stakeholders include scientists, data managers, librarians, and educators among others. The DataONE Usability and Assessment Working Group, which includes members from multiple sectors, does research, development, and implementation projects on DataONE processes, systems, and methods. These projects are essential to insure that DataONE products and services meet network goals, include appropriate community involvement, and demonstrate progress and achievements of DataONE. This poster will provide an overview of DataONE's usability analysis and assessment methodologies, benefits to DataONE and its collaborators, and current tools/techniques being utilized by the participants.

  13. Collaborative for Historical Information and Analysis: Vision and Work Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Zadorozhny

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article conveys the vision of a world-historical dataset, constructed in order to provide data on human social affairs at the global level over the past several centuries. The construction of this dataset will allow the routine application of tools developed for analyzing “Big Data” to global, historical analysis. The work is conducted by the Collaborative for Historical Information and Analysis (CHIA. This association of groups at universities and research institutes in the U.S. and Europe includes five groups funded by the National Science Foundation for work to construct infrastructure for collecting and archiving data on a global level. The article identifies the elements of infrastructure-building, shows how they are connected, and sets the project in the context of previous and current efforts to build large-scale historical datasets. The project is developing a crowd-sourcing application for ingesting and documenting data, a broad and flexible archive, and a “data hoover” process to locate and gather historical datasets for inclusion. In addition, the article identifies four types of data and analytical questions to be explored through this data resource, addressing development, governance, social structure, and the interaction of social and natural variables.

  14. Clinical and genetic features of International Collaborative Group-hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families and suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁瑛; 叶俊; 郑树

    2004-01-01

    Background Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPPC) is one of the most common genetic syndrome related with mutation of human mismatch repair genes. This study was to evaluate the clinical significance of suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (sHNPCC) criteria I and the clinical and genetic features of International Collaborative Group-HNPCC (ICG-HNPCC) and sHNPCC families.Methods Twenty-nine ICG-HNPCC families fulfilling the Amsterdam criteria and 34 sHNPCC families fulfilling the sHNPCC criteria I were collected. PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing analysis were employed to screen the germline mutations of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes in these families.Results The ICG group had more colorectal cancer (CRC) patients per family than did the suspected group (P0.05), mutation type, and mutation distribution. Comparison of the families with and without mutation showed no significant difference in CRC patients per family, Lynch classification, and tumor spectrum.Conclusions ICG-HNPCC and sHNPCC families that have similar clinical manifestations and genetic basis indicate a similar nature for cancer development. The application of sHNPCC criteria I will facilitate clinical diagnosis and treatment of small families.

  15. Visualizing and evaluating the growth of multi-institutional collaboration based on research network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jake; Pelfrey, Clara; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Research collaboration plays an important role in scientific productivity and academic innovation. Multi-institutional collaboration has become a vital approach for integrating multidisciplinary resources and expertise to enhance biomedical research. There is an increasing need for analyzing the effect of multi-institutional research collaboration. In this paper, we present a collaboration analysis pipeline based on research networks constructed from publication co-authorship relationship. Such research networks can be effectively used to render and analyze large-scale institutional collaboration. The co-authorship networks of the Cleveland Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative (CTSC) were visualized and analyzed. SciVal Expert™ was used to extract publication data of the CTSC members. The network was presented in informative and aesthetically appealing diagrams using the open source visualization package Gephi. The analytic result demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, and it also indicates the substantial growth of research collaboration among the CTSC members crossing its partner institutions.

  16. Structuring successful collaboration: a longitudinal social network analysis of a translational research network

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Janet C; Hibbert, Peter; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2012 and 2013, we conducted a social network survey of a new translational research network (TRN) designed to deliver better care to cancer patients. Results of these two surveys showed that silos of researchers and clinicians existed before the TRN was established but that the network had mediated collaborative relationships. This paper reports on a third social network survey of the TRN and focusses on the structure of the collaborative arrangements among members. Methods Memb...

  17. The 15-Country Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardis, E; Vrijheid, M; Blettner, M

    2007-01-01

    A 15-Country collaborative cohort study was conducted to provide direct estimates of cancer risk following protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. Analyses included 407,391 nuclear industry workers monitored individually for external radiation and 5.2 million person-years of follow...... deaths). Stratification on duration of employment had a large effect on the ERR/Sv, reflecting a strong healthy worker survivor effect in these cohorts. This is the largest analytical epidemiological study of the effects of low-dose protracted exposures to ionizing radiation to date. Further studies......-up. A significant association was seen between radiation dose and all-cause mortality [excess relative risk (ERR) 0.42 per Sv, 90% CI 0.07, 0.79; 18,993 deaths]. This was mainly attributable to a dose-related increase in all cancer mortality (ERR/Sv 0.97, 90% CI 0.28, 1.77; 5233 deaths). Among 31 specific types...

  18. Implementation of cancer clinical care pathways: a successful model of collaboration between payers and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Bruce A; Lang, James; Grzegorczyk, James; Stark, Donna; Rybarczyk, Thomas; Leyden, Thomas; Cooper, Joseph; Ruane, Thomas; Milligan, Scott; Stella, Philip; Scott, Jeffrey A

    2012-05-01

    Despite rising medical costs within the US health care system, quality and outcomes are not improving. Without significant policy reform, the cost-quality imbalance will reach unsustainable proportions in the foreseeable future. The rising cost of health care in part results from an expanding aging population with an increasing number of life-threatening diseases. This is further compounded by a growing arsenal of high-cost therapies. In no medical specialty is this more apparent than in the area of oncology. Numerous attempts to reduce costs have been attempted, often with limited benefit and brief duration. Because physicians directly or indirectly control or influence the majority of medical care costs, physician behavioral changes must occur to bend the health care cost curve in a sustainable fashion. Experts within academia, health policy, and business agree that a significant paradigm change in stakeholder collaboration will be necessary to accomplish behavioral change. Such a collaboration has been pioneered by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and Physician Resource Management, a highly specialized oncology health care consulting firm with developmental and ongoing technical, analytic, and consultative support from Cardinal Health Specialty Solutions, a division of Cardinal Health. We describe a successful statewide collaboration between payers and providers to create a cancer clinical care pathways program. We show that aligned stakeholder incentives can drive high levels of provider participation and compliance in the pathways that lead to physician behavioral changes. In addition, claims-based data can be collected, analyzed, and used to create and maintain such a program.

  19. Implementation of cancer clinical care pathways: s successful model of collaboration between payers and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Bruce A; Lang, James; Grzegorczyk, James; Stark, Donna; Rybarczyk, Thomas; Leyden, Thomas; Cooper, Joseph; Ruane, Thomas; Milligan, Scott; Stella, Phillip; Scott, Jeffrey A

    2012-05-01

    Despite rising medical costs within the US healthcare system, quality and outcomes are not improving. Without significant policy reform, the cost-quality imbalance will reach unsustainable proportions in the foreseeable future. The rising cost of healthcare in part results from an expanding aging population with an increasing number of life-threatening diseases. This is further compounded by a growing arsenal of high-cost therapies. In no medical specialty is this more apparent than in the area of oncology. Numerous attempts to reduce costs have been attempted, often with limited benefit and brief duration. Because physicians directly or indirectly control or influence the majority of medical care costs, physician behavioral changes must occur to bend the healthcare cost curve in a sustainable fashion. Experts within academia, health policy, and business agree that a significant paradigm change in stakeholder collaboration will be necessary to accomplish behavioral change. Such a collaboration has been pioneered by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and Physician Resource Management, a highly specialized oncology healthcare consulting firm with developmental and ongoing technical, analytic, and consultative support from Cardinal Health Specialty Solutions, a division of Cardinal Health. We describe a successful statewide collaboration between payers and providers to create a cancer clinical care pathways program. We show that aligned stakeholder incentives can drive high levels of provider participation and compliance in the pathways that lead to physician behavioral changes. In addition, claims-based data can be collected, analyzed, and used to create and maintain such a program.

  20. Analyzing collaboration networks and developmental patterns of nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD) for brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Ma, Jing; Porter, Alan L; Kwon, Seokbeom; Zhu, Donghua

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of new and emerging science & technologies (NESTs) brings unprecedented challenges, but also opportunities. In this paper, we use bibliometric and social network analyses, at country, institution, and individual levels, to explore the patterns of scientific networking for a key nano area - nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD). NEDD has successfully been used clinically to modulate drug release and to target particular diseased tissues. The data for this research come from a global compilation of research publication information on NEDD directed at brain cancer. We derive a family of indicators that address multiple facets of research collaboration and knowledge transfer patterns. Results show that: (1) international cooperation is increasing, but networking characteristics change over time; (2) highly productive institutions also lead in influence, as measured by citation to their work, with American institutes leading; (3) research collaboration is dominated by local relationships, with interesting information available from authorship patterns that go well beyond journal impact factors. Results offer useful technical intelligence to help researchers identify potential collaborators and to help inform R&D management and science & innovation policy for such nanotechnologies.

  1. Analyzing collaboration networks and developmental patterns of nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD for brain cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of new and emerging science & technologies (NESTs brings unprecedented challenges, but also opportunities. In this paper, we use bibliometric and social network analyses, at country, institution, and individual levels, to explore the patterns of scientific networking for a key nano area – nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD. NEDD has successfully been used clinically to modulate drug release and to target particular diseased tissues. The data for this research come from a global compilation of research publication information on NEDD directed at brain cancer. We derive a family of indicators that address multiple facets of research collaboration and knowledge transfer patterns. Results show that: (1 international cooperation is increasing, but networking characteristics change over time; (2 highly productive institutions also lead in influence, as measured by citation to their work, with American institutes leading; (3 research collaboration is dominated by local relationships, with interesting information available from authorship patterns that go well beyond journal impact factors. Results offer useful technical intelligence to help researchers identify potential collaborators and to help inform R&D management and science & innovation policy for such nanotechnologies.

  2. Genetic analysis in the Collaborative Cross breeding population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Vivek M; Sokoloff, Greta; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Striz, Martin; Branstetter, Lisa; Beckmann, Melissa A; Spence, Jason S; Jackson, Barbara L; Galloway, Leslie D; Barker, Paul; Wymore, Ann M; Hunsicker, Patricia R; Durtschi, David C; Shaw, Ginger S; Shinpock, Sarah; Manly, Kenneth F; Miller, Darla R; Donohue, Kevin D; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Churchill, Gary A; Lariviere, William R; Palmer, Abraham A; O'Hara, Bruce F; Voy, Brynn H; Chesler, Elissa J

    2011-08-01

    Genetic reference populations in model organisms are critical resources for systems genetic analysis of disease related phenotypes. The breeding history of these inbred panels may influence detectable allelic and phenotypic diversity. The existing panel of common inbred strains reflects historical selection biases, and existing recombinant inbred panels have low allelic diversity. All such populations may be subject to consequences of inbreeding depression. The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a mouse reference population with high allelic diversity that is being constructed using a randomized breeding design that systematically outcrosses eight founder strains, followed by inbreeding to obtain new recombinant inbred strains. Five of the eight founders are common laboratory strains, and three are wild-derived. Since its inception, the partially inbred CC has been characterized for physiological, morphological, and behavioral traits. The construction of this population provided a unique opportunity to observe phenotypic variation as new allelic combinations arose through intercrossing and inbreeding to create new stable genetic combinations. Processes including inbreeding depression and its impact on allelic and phenotypic diversity were assessed. Phenotypic variation in the CC breeding population exceeds that of existing mouse genetic reference populations due to both high founder genetic diversity and novel epistatic combinations. However, some focal evidence of allele purging was detected including a suggestive QTL for litter size in a location of changing allele frequency. Despite these inescapable pressures, high diversity and precision for genetic mapping remain. These results demonstrate the potential of the CC population once completed and highlight implications for development of related populations.

  3. Addressing the Growing Cancer Burden in the Wake of the AIDS Epidemic in Botswana: The BOTSOGO Collaborative Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bvochora-Nsingo, Memory [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Gierga, David P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Alphonse Kayembe, Mukendi K. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, National Health Laboratory, Gaborone (Botswana); Department of Pathology, University of Botswana School of Medicine, Gaborone (Botswana); Mmalane, Mompati [Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute, Gaborone (Botswana); Russell, Anthony H.; Paly, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brown, Carolyn [Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute, Gaborone (Botswana); Musimar, Zola [Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Abramson, Jeremy S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bruce, Kathy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Karumekayi, Talkmore [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Clayman, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hodgeman, Ryan [Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute, Gaborone (Botswana); Kasese, Joseph [Bokamoso Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Makufa, Remigio [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Bigger, Elizabeth [Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Suneja, Gita [Department of Radiation Oncology and Leonard David Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Busse, Paul M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); and others

    2014-07-01

    Botswana has experienced a dramatic increase in HIV-related malignancies over the past decade. The BOTSOGO collaboration sought to establish a sustainable partnership with the Botswana oncology community to improve cancer care. This collaboration is anchored by regular tumor boards and on-site visits that have resulted in the introduction of new approaches to treatment and perceived improvements in care, providing a model for partnership between academic oncology centers and high-burden countries with limited resources.

  4. Crosstalk of the Androgen Receptor with Transcriptional Collaborators: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Obinata

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among males in Western countries. It is also the most commonly diagnosed male cancer in Japan. The progression of prostate cancer is mainly influenced by androgens and the androgen receptor (AR. Androgen deprivation therapy is an established therapy for advanced prostate cancer; however, prostate cancers frequently develop resistance to low testosterone levels and progress to the fatal stage called castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Surprisingly, AR and the AR signaling pathway are still activated in most CRPC cases. To overcome this problem, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide were introduced for the treatment of CRPC. Despite the impact of these drugs on prolonged survival, CRPC acquires further resistance to keep the AR pathway activated. Functional molecular studies have shown that some of the AR collaborative transcription factors (TFs, including octamer transcription factor (OCT1, GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2 and forkhead box A1 (FOXA1, still stimulate AR activity in the castration-resistant state. Therefore, elucidating the crosstalk between the AR and collaborative TFs on the AR pathway is critical for developing new strategies for the treatment of CRPC. Recently, many compounds targeting this pathway have been developed for treating CRPC. In this review, we summarize the AR signaling pathway in terms of AR collaborators and focus on pyrrole-imidazole (PI polyamide as a candidate compound for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  5. Scientific Visualization for Atmospheric Data Analysis in Collaborative Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Wito; Flatken, Markus; Garcia, Arturo S.; Bar, Christian; Gerndt, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    1 INTRODUCTION The three year European research project CROSS DRIVE (Collaborative Rover Operations and Planetary Science Analysis System based on Distributed Remote and Interactive Virtual Environments) started in January 2014. The research and development within this project is motivated by three use case studies: landing site characterization, atmospheric science and rover target selection [1]. Currently the implementation for the second use case is in its final phase [2]. Here, the requirements were generated based on the domain experts input and lead to development and integration of appropriate methods for visualization and analysis of atmospheric data. The methods range from volume rendering, interactive slicing, iso-surface techniques to interactive probing. All visualization methods are integrated in DLR's Terrain Rendering application. With this, the high resolution surface data visualization can be enriched with additional methods appropriate for atmospheric data sets. This results in an integrated virtual environment where the scientist has the possibility to interactively explore his data sets directly within the correct context. The data sets include volumetric data of the martian atmosphere, precomputed two dimensional maps and vertical profiles. In most cases the surface data as well as the atmospheric data has global coverage and is of time dependent nature. Furthermore, all interaction is synchronized between different connected application instances, allowing for collaborative sessions between distant experts. 2 VISUALIZATION TECHNIQUES Also the application is currently used for visualization of data sets related to Mars the techniques can be used for other data sets as well. Currently the prototype is capable of handling 2 and 2.5D surface data as well as 4D atmospheric data. Specifically, the surface data is presented using an LoD approach which is based on the HEALPix tessellation of a sphere [3, 4, 5] and can handle data sets in the order of

  6. Epoch-based Application Collaboration for Sensing Data Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Kan; LIU Yun-sheng; WEN Bing

    2008-01-01

    The application collaboration was addressed to provide energy-efficient data services for distributed sensing applications to collaboratively interacting to achieve a desired global objective not detectable by any single cluster. An epoch-based transaction model was proposed by using the concept of sphere of control (SoC), and a collaborative sensing application can be dynamically formed as a nested architecture composed of time-synchronized applications. By loosening the rigid constraints of ACID to adapt the requirements of sensor networks, the submission, rollback and consistency rules ware educed and a two-phrase submission protocol was designed. Finally, it was illustrated that the model is capable of providing an adaptive formal template for sensing application collaboration. Our performance evaluations show that by applying the two-phrase submission protocol, we can significantly improve the number of reported answers and response time, raise resource utilization, and reduce the energyconsumption and data loss.

  7. Adult height and cancer mortality: The Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, G. David; Barzi, Federica; Woodward, Mark; Jamrozik, Konrad; Woo, Jean; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Huxley, Rachel R.

    2014-01-01

    Background The observation that taller people experience an increased risk of selected cancers is largely restricted to Caucasian cohorts. These associations may plausibly differ in Asian populations. For the first time, we make direct comparison of the associations between height and a series of malignancies in Australasian (Caucasian) and Asian populations. Methods Analyses were based on the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration of 506, 648 male and female study participants (408,381 Asia, 98267 Australasia) drawn from 38 population-based cohort studies. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the relationship between height and cancer rates. Results A total of 3,272,600 person years of follow-up gave rise to 7497 cancer deaths (5232 in men, 2265 in women). After multiple adjustments and left censoring, taller individuals experienced increased rates of carcinoma of the intestine (men and women); all cancers, liver, lung, breast, ‘other’ malignancies (all women); and prostate and bladder (men). No consistent regional (Asia vs. Australasia) or sex-differences were observed. Conclusions In the present study, taller men and women had an elevated risk of selected malignancies. These associations did not differ appreciably between Asian and Caucasian populations. PMID:19889610

  8. ACCISS study rationale and design: activating collaborative cancer information service support for cervical cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bullard Emily

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-quality cancer information resources are available but underutilized by the public. Despite greater awareness of the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service among low-income African Americans and Hispanics compared with Caucasians, actual Cancer Information Service usage is lower than expected, paralleling excess cancer-related morbidity and mortality for these subgroups. The proposed research examines how to connect the Cancer Information Service to low-income African-American and Hispanic women and their health care providers. The study will examine whether targeted physician mailing to women scheduled for colposcopy to follow up an abnormal Pap test can increase calls to the Cancer Information Service, enhance appropriate medical follow-up, and improve satisfaction with provider-patient communication. Methods/Design The study will be conducted in two clinics in ethnically diverse low-income communities in Chicago. During the formative phase, patients and providers will provide input regarding materials planned for use in the experimental phase of the study. The experimental phase will use a two-group prospective randomized controlled trial design. African American and Hispanic women with an abnormal Pap test will be randomized to Usual Care (routine colposcopy reminder letter or Intervention (reminder plus provider recommendation to call the Cancer Information Service and sample questions to ask. Primary outcomes will be: 1 calls to the Cancer Information Service; 2 timely medical follow-up, operationalized by whether the patient keeps her colposcopy appointment within six months of the abnormal Pap; and 3 patient satisfaction with provider-patient communication at follow-up. Discussion The study examines the effectiveness of a feasible, sustainable, and culturally sensitive strategy to increase awareness and use of the Cancer Information Service among an underserved population. The goal of linking a

  9. A Web-Based Collaborative System for Remote Monitoring and Analysis of Livestock Farm Odours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, R.; Pan, L. L.; Yang, S. X.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring and analysis of livestock farm environments require collection and management of large amount of data from distributed farms. There is an increasing demand for collaboration among livestock producers, environment agencies and governments. This paper presents a collaborative system for mon

  10. A Discourse Analysis of Collaboration between Academic and Student Affairs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Needham Yancey

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the nature of collaboration between academic affairs and student affairs units in the community college context from a qualitative perspective. A discourse analysis study was conducted to explore the ways in which collaborative practice was discussed and understood by chief and midlevel academic and…

  11. Beyond Needs Analysis: Soft Systems Methodology for Meaningful Collaboration in EAP Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajino, Akira; James, Robert; Kijima, Kyoichi

    2005-01-01

    Designing an EAP course requires collaboration among various concerned stakeholders, including students, subject teachers, institutional administrators and EAP teachers themselves. While needs analysis is often considered fundamental to EAP, alternative research methodologies may be required to facilitate meaningful collaboration between these…

  12. Subtyping of breast cancer by immunohistochemistry to investigate a relationship between subtype and short and long term survival: a collaborative analysis of data for 10,159 cases from 12 studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona M Blows

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immunohistochemical markers are often used to classify breast cancer into subtypes that are biologically distinct and behave differently. The aim of this study was to estimate mortality for patients with the major subtypes of breast cancer as classified using five immunohistochemical markers, to investigate patterns of mortality over time, and to test for heterogeneity by subtype. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We pooled data from more than 10,000 cases of invasive breast cancer from 12 studies that had collected information on hormone receptor status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2 status, and at least one basal marker (cytokeratin [CK]5/6 or epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR] together with survival time data. Tumours were classified as luminal and nonluminal tumours according to hormone receptor expression. These two groups were further subdivided according to expression of HER2, and finally, the luminal and nonluminal HER2-negative tumours were categorised according to expression of basal markers. Changes in mortality rates over time differed by subtype. In women with luminal HER2-negative subtypes, mortality rates were constant over time, whereas mortality rates associated with the luminal HER2-positive and nonluminal subtypes tended to peak within 5 y of diagnosis and then decline over time. In the first 5 y after diagnosis the nonluminal tumours were associated with a poorer prognosis, but over longer follow-up times the prognosis was poorer in the luminal subtypes, with the worst prognosis at 15 y being in the luminal HER2-positive tumours. Basal marker expression distinguished the HER2-negative luminal and nonluminal tumours into different subtypes. These patterns were independent of any systemic adjuvant therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The six subtypes of breast cancer defined by expression of five markers show distinct behaviours with important differences in short term and long term prognosis. Application of these

  13. Bibliometric Analysis of International Collaboration in Wind and Solar Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Sakata

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern technology is increasingly complex and demands an ever-widening range of knowledge and skills. No single country will possess all the knowledge and skills required for addressing global issues such as climate change. Technology collaboration between leading countries is important to promptly and efficiently address the problem. Previous studies have shown that a high level of collaboration is correlated with high paper productivity. This paper first aims to use objective data and create maps that enable us to see both the distribution of worldwide research competency and the relationship of international collaboration in clean energy research. In the international research network of wind power and solar cell, 4,189 institutions located in 121 countries and 6,600 institutions located in 125 countries are included respectively. This paper discusses various factors that would have an impact on research capability and support strong international relationships. With respect to research capability, governmental policies, stability of governmental commitment, natural conditions and historical and institutional differences have a significant impact on it. For research collaborations, factors such as geographical proximity, international science and technology policy, and developmental stage of technology have been brought to attention. This study demonstrates that bibliometrics is a methodology that is capable of providing a knowledge base that is useful in the development of the international science and technology policy and technological management strategy.

  14. Using Social Network Analysis to Evaluate Research Productivity and Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth D.; Akers, Kathryn S.; Lybarger, Melanie A.; Zakrajsek, Todd D.

    2014-01-01

    Research productivity and collaborations are essential aspects of advancing academia. Publishing is a critical mechanism in higher education to allow faculty members to share new information in all disciplinary fields. Due to its importance, scholarly work is often heavily considered for promotion, tenure, compensation, and other merit decisions.…

  15. The 15-Country Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk Among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrijheid, M; Cardis, E; Blettner, M

    2007-01-01

    Radiation protection standards are based mainly on risk estimates from studies of atomic bomb survivors in Japan. The validity of extrapolations from the relatively high-dose acute exposures in this population to the low-dose, protracted or fractionated environmental and occupational exposures...... effect was observed in most countries. This study provides the largest body of direct evidence to date on the effects of low-dose protracted exposures to external photon radiation....... of primary public health concern has long been the subject of controversy. A collaborative retrospective cohort study was conducted to provide direct estimates of cancer risk after low-dose protracted exposures. The study included nearly 600,000 workers employed in 154 facilities in 15 countries. This paper...

  16. An exploratory analysis of network characteristics and quality of interactions among public health collaboratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle M. Varda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available While the benefits of collaboration have become widely accepted and the practice of collaboration is growing within the public health system, a paucity of research exists that examines factors and mechanisms related to effective collaboration between public health and their partner organizations. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap by exploring the structural and organizational characteristics of public health collaboratives. Design and Methods. Using both social network analysis and traditional statistical methods, we conduct an exploratory secondary data analysis of 11 public health collaboratives chosen from across the United States. All collaboratives are part of the PARTNER (www.partnertool.net database. We analyze data to identify relational patterns by exploring the structure (the way that organizations connect and exchange relationships, in relation to perceptions of value and trust, explanations for varying reports of success, and factors related to outcomes. We describe the characteristics of the collaboratives, types of resource contributions, outcomes of the collaboratives, perceptions of success, and reasons for success. We found high variation and significant differences within and between these collaboratives including perceptions of success. There were significant relationships among various factors such as resource contributions, reasons cited for success, and trust and value perceived by organizations. We find that although the unique structure of each collaborative makes it challenging to identify a specific set of factors to determine when a collaborative will be successful, the organizational characteristics and interorganizational dynamics do appear to impact outcomes. We recommend a quality improvement process that suggests matching assessment to goals and developing action steps for performance improvement.

  17. An Exploratory Analysis of Network Characteristics and Quality of Interactions among Public Health Collaboratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varda, Danielle M; Retrum, Jessica H

    2012-06-15

    While the benefits of collaboration have become widely accepted and the practice of collaboration is growing within the public health system, a paucity of research exists that examines factors and mechanisms related to effective collaboration between public health and their partner organizations. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap by exploring the structural and organizational characteristics of public health collaboratives. Design and Methods. Using both social network analysis and traditional statistical methods, we conduct an exploratory secondary data analysis of 11 public health collaboratives chosen from across the United States. All collaboratives are part of the PARTNER (www.partnertool.net) database. We analyze data to identify relational patterns by exploring the structure (the way that organizations connect and exchange relationships), in relation to perceptions of value and trust, explanations for varying reports of success, and factors related to outcomes. We describe the characteristics of the collaboratives, types of resource contributions, outcomes of the collaboratives, perceptions of success, and reasons for success. We found high variation and significant differences within and between these collaboratives including perceptions of success. There were significant relationships among various factors such as resource contributions, reasons cited for success, and trust and value perceived by organizations. We find that although the unique structure of each collaborative makes it challenging to identify a specific set of factors to determine when a collaborative will be successful, the organizational characteristics and interorganizational dynamics do appear to impact outcomes. We recommend a quality improvement process that suggests matching assessment to goals and developing action steps for performance improvement. the authors would like to thank the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Public Health Program for funding for this research.

  18. A Game Theoretic Analysis of Collaboration in Wikipedia

    OpenAIRE

    S Anand; Arazy, Ofer; Mandayam, Narayan; Nov, Oded

    2014-01-01

    Peer production projects such as Wikipedia or open-source software development allow volunteers to collectively create knowledge based products. The inclusive nature of such projects poses difficult challenges for ensuring trustworthiness and combating vandalism. Prior studies in the area deal with descriptive aspects of peer production, failing to capture the idea that while contributors collaborate, they also compete for status in the community and for imposing their views on the product. I...

  19. Single cancer cell analysis on a chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Yoon Sun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells in blood may represent “a real time liquid biopsy” through the interrogation of single cancer cells thereby determining the outspread of their heterogeneity and guiding therapy. In this thesis, we focused on single cancer cell analysis downstream of the isolation of cancer cells from

  20. The complexity of cancer in multiple family members: dynamics of social work collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Alison; Gilbertson, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a case study of one family affected by a cancer diagnosis in both the father and the daughter, who were diagnosed within the same time interval and who underwent treatment at the same time. The article examines the relationship between the caregivers and the oncology patient as well as with one another when the stress of diagnosis is compounded by multiple, simultaneous, and similar diagnoses in a highly condensed period of time. A thorough examination of the literature reveals that there are significant gaps regarding how multiple cancer diagnoses in one family affect the family dynamic, individual and collective coping styles, and caregiver burden. The diagnoses can also dramatically exacerbate economic stressors in a family. The coordination of psychosocial care from the perspectives of the adult and pediatric oncology social workers at an urban academic medical center will be discussed. The social work role, importance of collaboration, and family centered care perspective will be discussed as a method of easing the treatment experience for families in psychosocial distress.

  1. What do children aged 5 to 11 years old know about the sun and skin cancer? The practical difficulties of international collaborative research when analysis of language is involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton Bishop, J A; Collins, M; Hughes, B R; Altman, D G; Bergman, W; Breitbart, E W; de Stavola, B; Elvers, H; Gylling, F; Koopman, M; Marks, R; Martin, M; Martin, M; Murphy, G; Osterlind, A; Wetton, N

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the perceptions of primary school children about sun exposure and skin cancer, and the language they use about these issues, as a basis for the design of health promotional materials. In all, 2857 children in five European countries took part in the study and were compared with 641 Australian children participating in a similar study, since the latter have been exposed to more intensive health education about the sun. The 'draw and write' technique was used. In Europe the level of awareness about the risks of excessive sun exposure and the need to protect the skin was considerably lower than in Australia, although there was some variation within northern Europe. Amongst the European children acknowledging a need to protect the skin, the principal means of protection quoted was the use of suncreams, with inadequate awareness of the value of clothing, hats and shade. European children expressed greater approval of suntans than did the Australian children. Some methodological problems were encountered as a result of nuances in the languages involved, emphasizing difficulties in international research of this type.

  2. Accelerating cancer therapy development: the importance of combination strategies and collaboration. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRusso, Patricia M; Canetta, Renzo; Wagner, John A; Balogh, Erin P; Nass, Sharyl J; Boerner, Scott A; Hohneker, John

    2012-11-15

    Cancer cells contain multiple genetic changes in cell signaling pathways that drive abnormal cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Unfortunately, patients treated with single agents inhibiting only one of these pathways--even if showing an initial response--often develop resistance with subsequent relapse or progression of their cancer, typically via the activation of an alternative uninhibited pathway. Combination therapies offer the potential for inhibiting multiple targets and pathways simultaneously to more effectively kill cancer cells and prevent or delay the emergence of drug resistance. However, there are many unique challenges to developing combination therapies, including devising and applying appropriate preclinical tests and clinical trial designs, prioritizing which combination therapies to test, avoiding overlapping toxicity of multiple agents, and overcoming legal, cultural, and regulatory barriers that impede collaboration among multiple companies, organizations, and/or institutions. More effective strategies to efficiently develop combination cancer therapies are urgently needed. Thus, the Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop with the goal of identifying barriers that may be impeding the development of combination investigational cancer therapies, as well as potential solutions to overcome those barriers, improve collaboration, and ultimately accelerate the development of promising combinations of investigational cancer therapies. ©2012 AACR.

  3. Error-analysis and comparison to analytical models of numerical waveforms produced by the NRAR Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Hinder, Ian; Boyle, Michael; Etienne, Zachariah B; Healy, James; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K; Nagar, Alessandro; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Pan, Yi; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Pürrer, Michael; Reisswig, Christian; Scheel, Mark A; Sperhake, Ulrich; Szilágyi, Bela; Tichy, Wolfgang; Wardell, Barry; Zenginoglu, Anıl; Alic, Daniela; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Bode, Tanja; Brügmann, Bernd; Buchman, Luisa T; Campanelli, Manuela; Chu, Tony; Damour, Thibault; Grigsby, Jason D; Hannam, Mark; Haas, Roland; Hemberger, Daniel A; Husa, Sascha; Kidder, Lawrence E; Laguna, Pablo; London, Lionel; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Lousto, Carlos O; Marronetti, Pedro; Matzner, Richard A; Mösta, Philipp; Mroué, Abdul; Müller, Doreen; Mundim, Bruno C; Nerozzi, Andrea; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Pollney, Denis; Reifenberger, George; Rezzolla, Luciano; Shapiro, Stuart L; Shoemaker, Deirdre; Taracchini, Andrea; Taylor, Nicholas W; Teukolsky, Saul A; Thierfelder, Marcus; Witek, Helvi; Zlochower, Yosef

    2014-01-01

    The Numerical-Relativity-Analytical-Relativity (NRAR) collaboration is a joint effort between members of the numerical relativity, analytical relativity and gravitational-wave data analysis communities. The goal of the NRAR collaboration is to produce numerical-relativity simulations of compact binaries and use them to develop accurate analytical templates for the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration to use in detecting gravitational-wave signals and extracting astrophysical information from them. We describe the results of the first stage of the NRAR project, which focused on producing an initial set of numerical waveforms from binary black holes with moderate mass ratios and spins, as well as one non-spinning binary configuration which has a mass ratio of 10. All of the numerical waveforms are analysed in a uniform and consistent manner, with numerical errors evaluated using an analysis code created by members of the NRAR collaboration. We compare previously-calibrated, non-precessing analytical waveforms, notably the ...

  4. Strengthening cancer biology research, prevention, and control while reducing cancer disparities: student perceptions of a collaborative master's degree program in cancer biology, preventions, and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillson, I A; Cousin, C E; Blancato, J K

    2013-09-01

    This article provides the findings of a survey of previous and current students in the UDC/GU-LCCC master's degree program. This master's degree program, Cancer Biology, Prevention, and Control is administered and taught jointly by faculty of a Minority Serving Institution, the University of the District of Columbia, and the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center to incorporate the strengths of a community-based school with a research intensive medical center. The program was initiated in 2008 through agreements with both University administrations and funding from the National Cancer Institute. The master's degree program is 36 credits with a focus on coursework in biostatistics, epidemiology, tumor biology, cancer prevention, medical ethics, and cancer outreach program design. For two semesters during the second year, students work full-time with a faculty person on a laboratory or outreach project that is a requirement for graduation. Students are supported and encouraged to transition to a doctoral degree after they obtain the master's and many of them are currently in doctorate programs. Since the inception of the program, 45 students have initiated the course of study, 28 have completed the program, and 13 are currently enrolled in the program. The survey was designed to track the students in their current activities, as well as determine which courses, program enhancements, and research experiences were the least and most useful, and to discern students' perceptions of knowledge acquired on various aspects of Cancer Biology Prevention, and Control Master's Program. Thirty of the 35 individuals to whom email requests were sent responded to the survey, for a response rate of 85.7%. The results of this study will inform the strengthening of the Cancer Biology program by the Education Advisory Committee. They can also be used in the development of comparable collaborative master's degree programs designed to address the significant disparities in prevalence of

  5. Collaboration: a SWOT analysis of the process of conducting a review of nursing workforce policies in five European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Lakanmaa, Riitta-Liisa; Flinkman, Mervi; Basto, Marta Lima; Attree, Moira

    2014-05-01

    This paper critically reviews the literature on international collaboration and analyses the collaborative process involved in producing a nursing workforce policy analysis. Collaboration is increasingly promoted as a means of solving shared problems and achieving common goals; however, collaboration creates its own opportunities and challenges. Evidence about the collaboration process, its outcomes and critical success factors is lacking. A literature review and content analysis of data collected from six participants (from five European countries) members of the European Academy of Nursing Science Scholar Collaborative Workforce Workgroup, using a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis template. Two major factors affecting scholarly collaboration were identified: Facilitators, which incorporated personal attributes and enabling contexts/mechanisms, including individual commitment, responsibility and teamwork, facilitative supportive structures and processes. The second, Barriers, incorporated unmet needs for funding; time; communication and impeding contexts/mechanisms, including workload and insufficient support/mentorship. The literature review identified a low level of evidence on collaboration processes, outcomes, opportunities and challenges. The SWOT analysis identified critical success factors, planning strategies and resources of effective international collaboration. Collaboration is an important concept for management. Evidence-based knowledge of the critical success factors facilitating and impeding collaboration could help managers make collaboration more effective. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Drawbacks and benefits associated with inter-organizational collaboration along the discovery-development-delivery continuum: a cancer research network case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The scientific process around cancer research begins with scientific discovery, followed by development of interventions, and finally delivery of needed interventions to people with cancer. Numerous studies have identified substantial gaps between discovery and delivery in health research. Team science has been identified as a possible solution for closing the discovery to delivery gap; however, little is known about effective ways of collaborating within teams and across organizations. The purpose of this study was to determine benefits and drawbacks associated with organizational collaboration across the discovery-development-delivery research continuum. Methods Representatives of organizations working on cancer research across a state answered a survey about how they collaborated with other cancer research organizations in the state and what benefits and drawbacks they experienced while collaborating. We used exponential random graph modeling to determine the association between these benefits and drawbacks and the presence of a collaboration tie between any two network members. Results Different drawbacks and benefits were associated with discovery, development, and delivery collaborations. The only consistent association across all three was with the drawback of difficulty due to geographic differences, which was negatively associated with collaboration, indicating that those organizations that had collaborated were less likely to perceive a barrier related to geography. The benefit, enhanced access to other knowledge, was positive and significant in the development and delivery networks, indicating that collaborating organizations viewed improved knowledge exchange as a benefit of collaboration. ‘Acquisition of additional funding or other resources’ and ‘development of new tools and methods’ were negatively significantly related to collaboration in these networks. So, although improved knowledge access was an outcome of collaboration, more

  7. Drawbacks and benefits associated with inter-organizational collaboration along the discovery-development-delivery continuum: a cancer research network case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Jenine K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The scientific process around cancer research begins with scientific discovery, followed by development of interventions, and finally delivery of needed interventions to people with cancer. Numerous studies have identified substantial gaps between discovery and delivery in health research. Team science has been identified as a possible solution for closing the discovery to delivery gap; however, little is known about effective ways of collaborating within teams and across organizations. The purpose of this study was to determine benefits and drawbacks associated with organizational collaboration across the discovery-development-delivery research continuum. Methods Representatives of organizations working on cancer research across a state answered a survey about how they collaborated with other cancer research organizations in the state and what benefits and drawbacks they experienced while collaborating. We used exponential random graph modeling to determine the association between these benefits and drawbacks and the presence of a collaboration tie between any two network members. Results Different drawbacks and benefits were associated with discovery, development, and delivery collaborations. The only consistent association across all three was with the drawback of difficulty due to geographic differences, which was negatively associated with collaboration, indicating that those organizations that had collaborated were less likely to perceive a barrier related to geography. The benefit, enhanced access to other knowledge, was positive and significant in the development and delivery networks, indicating that collaborating organizations viewed improved knowledge exchange as a benefit of collaboration. ‘Acquisition of additional funding or other resources’ and ‘development of new tools and methods’ were negatively significantly related to collaboration in these networks. So, although improved knowledge access was an

  8. Drawbacks and benefits associated with inter-organizational collaboration along the discovery-development-delivery continuum: a cancer research network case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jenine K; Provan, Keith G; Johnson, Kimberly J; Leischow, Scott J

    2012-07-25

    The scientific process around cancer research begins with scientific discovery, followed by development of interventions, and finally delivery of needed interventions to people with cancer. Numerous studies have identified substantial gaps between discovery and delivery in health research. Team science has been identified as a possible solution for closing the discovery to delivery gap; however, little is known about effective ways of collaborating within teams and across organizations. The purpose of this study was to determine benefits and drawbacks associated with organizational collaboration across the discovery-development-delivery research continuum. Representatives of organizations working on cancer research across a state answered a survey about how they collaborated with other cancer research organizations in the state and what benefits and drawbacks they experienced while collaborating. We used exponential random graph modeling to determine the association between these benefits and drawbacks and the presence of a collaboration tie between any two network members. Different drawbacks and benefits were associated with discovery, development, and delivery collaborations. The only consistent association across all three was with the drawback of difficulty due to geographic differences, which was negatively associated with collaboration, indicating that those organizations that had collaborated were less likely to perceive a barrier related to geography. The benefit, enhanced access to other knowledge, was positive and significant in the development and delivery networks, indicating that collaborating organizations viewed improved knowledge exchange as a benefit of collaboration. 'Acquisition of additional funding or other resources' and 'development of new tools and methods' were negatively significantly related to collaboration in these networks. So, although improved knowledge access was an outcome of collaboration, more tangible outcomes were not being

  9. Scientific collaboration and endorsement: Network analysis of coauthorship and citation networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Scientific collaboration and endorsement are well-established research topics which utilize three kinds of methods: survey/questionnaire, bibliometrics, and complex network analysis. This paper combines topic modeling and path-finding algorithms to determine whether productive authors tend to collaborate with or cite researchers with the same or different interests, and whether highly cited authors tend to collaborate with or cite each other. Taking information retrieval as a test field, the results show that productive authors tend to directly coauthor with and closely cite colleagues sharing the same research interests; they do not generally collaborate directly with colleagues having different research topics, but instead directly or indirectly cite them; and highly cited authors do not generally coauthor with each other, but closely cite each other.

  10. Immersive Collaborative Analysis of Network Connectivity: CAVE-style or Head-Mounted Display?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeil, Maxime; Dwyer, Tim; Klein, Karsten; Laha, Bireswar; Marriott, Kim; Thomas, Bruce H

    2017-01-01

    High-quality immersive display technologies are becoming mainstream with the release of head-mounted displays (HMDs) such as the Oculus Rift. These devices potentially represent an affordable alternative to the more traditional, centralised CAVE-style immersive environments. One driver for the development of CAVE-style immersive environments has been collaborative sense-making. Despite this, there has been little research on the effectiveness of collaborative visualisation in CAVE-style facilities, especially with respect to abstract data visualisation tasks. Indeed, very few studies have focused on the use of these displays to explore and analyse abstract data such as networks and there have been no formal user studies investigating collaborative visualisation of abstract data in immersive environments. In this paper we present the results of the first such study. It explores the relative merits of HMD and CAVE-style immersive environments for collaborative analysis of network connectivity, a common and important task involving abstract data. We find significant differences between the two conditions in task completion time and the physical movements of the participants within the space: participants using the HMD were faster while the CAVE2 condition introduced an asymmetry in movement between collaborators. Otherwise, affordances for collaborative data analysis offered by the low-cost HMD condition were not found to be different for accuracy and communication with the CAVE2. These results are notable, given that the latest HMDs will soon be accessible (in terms of cost and potentially ubiquity) to a massive audience.

  11. Development and validation of a staging system for HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer by the International Collaboration on Oropharyngeal cancer Network for Staging (ICON-S)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Sullivan, Brian; Huang, Shao Hui; Su, Jie

    2016-01-01

    . The International Collaboration on Oropharyngeal cancer Network for Staging (ICON-S) aimed to develop a TNM classification specific to HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer. METHODS: The ICON-S study included patients with non-metastatic oropharyngeal cancer from seven cancer centres located across Europe and North America......; one centre comprised the training cohort and six formed the validation cohorts. We ascertained patients' HPV status with p16 staining or in-situ hybridisation. We compared overall survival at 5 years between training and validation cohorts according to 7th edition TNM classifications and HPV status...... training cohort to assess relevance within the ICON-S classification. FINDINGS: Of 1907 patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer, 661 (35%) were recruited at the training centre and 1246 (65%) were enrolled at the validation centres. 5-year overall survival was similar for 7th edition TNM stage I, II, III...

  12. Marital status and having children and mortality in the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer (JACC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakauchi, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    Marital status has been identified as an important social factor associated with mortality. Interesting results were obtained in the present analyses of the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study. Death of spouse was positively associated with risks of male death from all causes, all cancers, and ischemic heart diseases, compared with married status. Divorce or separation was positively associated with risks from all causes among men and women, all cancers among women, and single status was also positively associated with risks from all causes among men and women, and ischemic heart diseases among men. Having large numbers of children was also found to be a risk factor.

  13. Collaboration in sensor network research: an in-depth longitudinal analysis of assortative mixing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Alberto; Rodriguez, Marko A

    2010-09-01

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on statistical analyses of large networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustrate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a relatively small network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research centerin the development and application of wireless and sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortative mixing of selected node characteristics, unveiling the researchers' propensity to collaborate preferentially with others with a similar academic profile. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

  14. Toward the Cure of All Children With Cancer Through Collaborative Efforts: Pediatric Oncology As a Global Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Friedrich, Paola; Alcasabas, Patricia; Antillon, Federico; Banavali, Shripad; Castillo, Luis; Israels, Trijn; Jeha, Sima; Harif, Mhammed; Sullivan, Michael J.; Quah, Thuan Chong; Patte, Catherine; Pui, Ching-Hon; Barr, Ronald; Gross, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of childhood cancers have resulted in part from the development of national and international collaborative initiatives that have defined biologic determinants and generated risk-adapted therapies that maximize cure while minimizing acute and long-term effects. Currently, more than 80% of children with cancer who are treated with modern multidisciplinary treatments in developed countries are cured; however, of the approximately 160,000 children and adolescents who are diagnosed with cancer every year worldwide, 80% live in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where access to quality care is limited and chances of cure are low. In addition, the disease burden is not fully known because of the lack of population-based cancer registries in low-resource countries. Regional and ethnic variations in the incidence of the different childhood cancers suggest unique interactions between genetic and environmental factors that could provide opportunities for etiologic research. Regional collaborative initiatives have been developed in Central and South America and the Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Oceania. These initiatives integrate regional capacity building, education of health care providers, implementation of intensity-graduated treatments, and establishment of research programs that are adjusted to local capacity and local needs. Together, the existing consortia and regional networks operating in LMICs have the potential to reach out to almost 60% of all children with cancer worldwide. In summary, childhood cancer burden has been shifted toward LMICs and, for that reason, global initiatives directed at pediatric cancer care and control are needed. Regional networks aiming to build capacity while incorporating research on epidemiology, health services, and outcomes should be supported. PMID:26304881

  15. Utilizing Collaborative Analysis of Student Learning in Educator Preparation Programs for Continuous Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Colby

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this results-oriented era of accountability, educator preparation programs are called upon to provide comprehensive data related to student and program outcomes while also providing evidence of continuous improvement. Collaborative Analysis of Student Learning (CASL is one approach for fostering critical inquiry about student learning. Graduate educator preparation programs in our university used collaborative analysis as the basis for continuous improvement during an accreditation cycle. As authors of this study, we sought to better understand how graduate program directors and faculty used collaborative analysis to inform practice and improve programs. Our findings suggested that CASL has the potential to foster collective responsibility for student learning, but only with a strong commitment from administrators and faculty, purposefully designed protocols and processes, fidelity to the CASL method, and a focus on professional development. Through CASL, programs have the ability to produce meaningful data related to student and program outcomes and meet the requirements for accreditation.

  16. An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network

    CERN Document Server

    Pepe, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on statistical analyses of large networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustrate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a fairly small network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin, unveiling ...

  17. Semantic Analysis of Tag Similarity Measures in Collaborative Tagging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cattuto, Ciro; Hotho, Andreas; Stumme, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Social bookmarking systems allow users to organise collections of resources on the Web in a collaborative fashion. The increasing popularity of these systems as well as first insights into their emergent semantics have made them relevant to disciplines like knowledge extraction and ontology learning. The problem of devising methods to measure the semantic relatedness between tags and characterizing it semantically is still largely open. Here we analyze three measures of tag relatedness: tag co-occurrence, cosine similarity of co-occurrence distributions, and FolkRank, an adaptation of the PageRank algorithm to folksonomies. Each measure is computed on tags from a large-scale dataset crawled from the social bookmarking system del.icio.us. To provide a semantic grounding of our findings, a connection to WordNet (a semantic lexicon for the English language) is established by mapping tags into synonym sets of WordNet, and applying there well-known metrics of semantic similarity. Our results clearly expose differe...

  18. Collaboration in air particulate analysis through sharing of regional resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Flora L. [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Diliman, Quezon (Philippines)

    2003-03-01

    The air pollution research program of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute is being pursued in support of the 1999 Clean Air Act. This is being undertaken as part of the RCA/IAEA subproject, 'Air Pollution and Its Trends'. Since the PNRI research reactor (PRR-I) has been on extended shut down for the past 18 years, the PNRI depends solely on X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry for elemental characterization of air particulate samples. NAA is a powerful and efficient tool in air particulate characterization and is used in many national programs in the region. Collaboration in air pollution studies through exchange of samples between XRF and NAA groups will widen the range of elements that could be detected by one group. In the RCA/IAEA RAS/4/020, 'Improvement of Research Reactor Operation and Utilization' sharing of research reactor facilities is encouraged. Working out of mechanisms for such sharing will be advantageous to research groups without operational research reactors. This could take the form of exchange of samples or fellowship at a regional host institution. This will allow training of technical staff from countries without research reactors, thus ensuring continuing expertise in NAA even after long periods of reactor shutdown. (author)

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of esophageal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caygill, Christine P J; Gatenby, Piers A C; Herceg, Zdenko; Lima, Sheila C S; Pinto, Luis F R; Watson, Anthony; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2014-09-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on comparative genomic analysis of esophageal cancers: genomic polymorphisms, the genetic and epigenetic drivers in esophageal cancers, and the collection of data in the UK Barrett's Oesophagus Registry.

  20. Concept analysis of collaboration in implementing problem-based learning in nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahlasela A. Rakhudu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this concept analysis was to better understand and define collaboration as it relates to the implementation of problem-based learning (PBL.Methods: The process of concept analysis was conducted in three phases; namely, theoretical or literature review, empirical or fieldwork; and analysis phases. Rodgers’ evolutionary approach was used to clarify the attributes, antecedents, surrogate, related terms and consequences of collaboration in implementing PBL. The search key terms were ‘collaboration’, ‘problem-based learning’, ‘nursing’ and ‘nursing education’. The search was performed in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, Medline and PsycINFO databases. The articles were reviewed for trends that would reflect the current knowledge for collaboration as a concept. Descriptive qualitative study was used to collect data purposively from participants of three universities offering PBL in Republic of South Africa and three hospitals where PBL students are placed.Results: Collaboration in implementing PBL is described as using the following terms: interpersonal, interactive and personal process, shared goal and governance. The antecedents of collaboration include commitment and support; common goal; formal agreement; training and development; and monitoring and evaluation of tools and mechanisms. Consequences of collaboration in implementing PBL are as follows: information, resource and expertise sharing; personal development and mentoring; creation of supportive and nurturing environment; professional socialisation; improved students’ outcomes; and effective utilisation of resources.Conclusion: Effective collaboration within nursing education and with other healthcare professionals to achieve quality outcomes in an increasingly interdependent higher education system continues to grow in importance.

  1. A SWOT Analysis of Collaborative Strategies between Engineering Universities and Industry in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki Rashidi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration among academia and industry is a long aspiring vision of every country to promote innovation and commercialization. A deeper analysis of collaborative efforts among this triad may reveal significant aspects to look for well informed decision making. The purpose of this research is to conduct the SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats analysis of collaboration in engineering education, research and practices in Pakistan. The study attempts to identify strengths and weaknesses of the current collaborative strategies; opportunities for establishing strong and rewarding relationships, and threats that may hinder development of this association. It further provides practical schema to establish productive association between the two partners through creative leadership, effective strategic partnership, and systematic modus operandi to way forward with implications for academics, researchers, and industry. The research is qualitative in nature, based on interpretivist approach. The data is collected by using focus group and semi-structured interviews of experts in industry and academia; primary data obtained by these tools is analyzed by using thematic analysis through open and axial coding. The study identifies the barriers in collaborative efforts, and delineates the roles of industry and academia to overcome these barriers along with SWOT matrix in the context of Pakistan

  2. Empirical analysis of university-industry R&D collaboration: Evidence from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saqib Mehmood Afzal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available University-industry collaboration plays a vital role in nation’s innovation system. This study presents an empirical analysis of R&D collaboration between university and industry. The literature focused on the all those factors including firm size, firm’s innovation activity and openness of the firm affecting university-industry collaboration. Primary data is used and sample contains 15 industrial sectors of Pakistan according to market capitalization at the time of data collection. The empirical results of the study suggest that firm’s size, number of employees and openness of the firm have positive impact on uni-industry collaboration for R&D projects. Whilst annual budget of the firms is found to have negative relationship with R&D collaborations and larger firms are found to be less efficient in taking advantages of R&D collaboration with universities because larger firms have more spending on their fixed costs as they have participated in so many R&D activities.

  3. [An analysis of Spanish scientific productivity in substance abuse according to disciplinary collaboration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Alcaide, Gregorio; Bolaños Pizarro, Maxima; Navarro Molina, Carolina; de Granda Orive, Jose Ignacio; Aleixandre Benavent, Rafael; Valderrama Zurian, Juan Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of productivity and disciplinary collaboration patterns for Spanish published scientific research in the field of Substance Abuse (2001-2005). From institutional affiliations we identified and quantified disciplinary participation in papers indexed in the IME/Indice Medico Español, ISOC/Indice Español de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades, SCI-Expanded/Science Citation Index-Expanded and SSCI/Social Sciences Citation Index databases. A total of 31 disciplines and specialities were identified in ISOC, with 8.6% of documents in collaboration between them; 55 medical specialities were identified in IME, with 10.89% of documents in collaboration between them; and 62 specialities were identified in SCI-Expanded, with 41.68% of documents in collaboration between them. a) Substance Abuse, Psychology, Psychiatry, Epidemiology-Preventive Medicine and Public Health and Pharmacology are the disciplines and specialities that present the highest productivity. To these can be added, in papers published in foreign journals, specialities such as Biochemistry-Molecular Biology, Neurology and Neuroscience; b) Papers published in Spanish journals indexed in SCI-Expanded and in papers published in foreign journals present much higher collaboration indexes between disciplines and specialities; c) The main collaborations between specialities are those between Substance Abuse, Psychiatry and Psychology. To these can be added, in the case of journals indexed in SCI-Expanded, those between these specialities and Pharmacology, Neurology and Neuroscience.

  4. A Framework for Collaborative Networked Learning in Higher Education: Design & Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan F. Issa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive framework for building collaborative learning networks within higher educational institutions. This framework focuses on systems design and implementation issues in addition to a complete set of evaluation, and analysis tools. The objective of this project is to improve the standards of higher education in Jordan through the implementation of transparent, collaborative, innovative, and modern quality educational programs. The framework highlights the major steps required to plan, design, and implement collaborative learning systems. Several issues are discussed such as unification of courses and program of studies, using appropriate learning management system, software design development using Agile methodology, infrastructure design, access issues, proprietary data storage, and social network analysis (SNA techniques.

  5. Ovarian cancer screening and mortality in the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS): a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ian J; Menon, Usha; Ryan, Andy; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Burnell, Matthew; Kalsi, Jatinderpal K; Amso, Nazar N; Apostolidou, Sophia; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Cruickshank, Derek; Crump, Danielle N; Davies, Susan K; Dawnay, Anne; Dobbs, Stephen; Fletcher, Gwendolen; Ford, Jeremy; Godfrey, Keith; Gunu, Richard; Habib, Mariam; Hallett, Rachel; Herod, Jonathan; Jenkins, Howard; Karpinskyj, Chloe; Leeson, Simon; Lewis, Sara J; Liston, William R; Lopes, Alberto; Mould, Tim; Murdoch, John; Oram, David; Rabideau, Dustin J; Reynolds, Karina; Scott, Ian; Seif, Mourad W; Sharma, Aarti; Singh, Naveena; Taylor, Julie; Warburton, Fiona; Widschwendter, Martin; Williamson, Karin; Woolas, Robert; Fallowfield, Lesley; McGuire, Alistair J; Campbell, Stuart; Parmar, Mahesh; Skates, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis, with just 40% of patients surviving 5 years. We designed this trial to establish the effect of early detection by screening on ovarian cancer mortality. Methods In this randomised controlled trial, we recruited postmenopausal women aged 50–74 years from 13 centres in National Health Service Trusts in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Exclusion criteria were previous bilateral oophorectomy or ovarian malignancy, increased risk of familial ovarian cancer, and active non-ovarian malignancy. The trial management system confirmed eligibility and randomly allocated participants in blocks of 32 using computer-generated random numbers to annual multimodal screening (MMS) with serum CA125 interpreted with use of the risk of ovarian cancer algorithm, annual transvaginal ultrasound screening (USS), or no screening, in a 1:1:2 ratio. The primary outcome was death due to ovarian cancer by Dec 31, 2014, comparing MMS and USS separately with no screening, ascertained by an outcomes committee masked to randomisation group. All analyses were by modified intention to screen, excluding the small number of women we discovered after randomisation to have a bilateral oophorectomy, have ovarian cancer, or had exited the registry before recruitment. Investigators and participants were aware of screening type. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00058032. Findings Between June 1, 2001, and Oct 21, 2005, we randomly allocated 202 638 women: 50 640 (25·0%) to MMS, 50 639 (25·0%) to USS, and 101 359 (50·0%) to no screening. 202 546 (>99·9%) women were eligible for analysis: 50 624 (>99·9%) women in the MMS group, 50 623 (>99·9%) in the USS group, and 101 299 (>99·9%) in the no screening group. Screening ended on Dec 31, 2011, and included 345 570 MMS and 327 775 USS annual screening episodes. At a median follow-up of 11·1 years (IQR 10·0–12·0), we diagnosed ovarian cancer in

  6. Measuring user similarity using electric circuit analysis: application to collaborative filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Joonhyuk; Kim, Jinwook; Kim, Wonjoon; Kim, Young Hwan

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new technique of measuring user similarity in collaborative filtering using electric circuit analysis. Electric circuit analysis is used to measure the potential differences between nodes on an electric circuit. In this paper, by applying this method to transaction networks comprising users and items, i.e., user-item matrix, and by using the full information about the relationship structure of users in the perspective of item adoption, we overcome the limitations of one-to-one similarity calculation approach, such as the Pearson correlation, Tanimoto coefficient, and Hamming distance, in collaborative filtering. We found that electric circuit analysis can be successfully incorporated into recommender systems and has the potential to significantly enhance predictability, especially when combined with user-based collaborative filtering. We also propose four types of hybrid algorithms that combine the Pearson correlation method and electric circuit analysis. One of the algorithms exceeds the performance of the traditional collaborative filtering by 37.5% at most. This work opens new opportunities for interdisciplinary research between physics and computer science and the development of new recommendation systems.

  7. An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

    2009-01-01

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on large-scale statistical analyses of networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a small-scale network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin of the individuals in the network. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

  8. Analysis of Research Collaboration between Universities and Private Companies in Spain Based on Joint Scientific Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmeda-Gómez, Carlos; Ovalle-Perandones, María Antonia; de Moya-Anegón, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The article presents the results of a study on scientific collaboration between Spanish universities and private enterprise, measured in terms of the co-authorship of papers published in international journals. Method: Bibliometric analysis of papers published in journals listed in Scopus in 2003-2011. Indicators were calculated for…

  9. Organizational Learning for Library Enhancements: A Collaborative, Research-Driven Analysis of Academic Department Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Jeffery L.; Dupuis, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a qualitative evaluation methodology of academic departments for library organizational learning and library enhancement planning. This evaluation used campus units' academic program review reports as a data source and employed collaborative content analysis by library liaisons to extract departmental strengths, weaknesses,…

  10. The Campbell Collaboration's Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Online Training Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanin, Joshua R.; Pigott, Terri D.

    2013-01-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analysis are techniques for synthesizing primary empirical studies to produce a summary of effects. To facilitate this goal, the Campbell Collaboration (C2) supports reviews within the disciplines of crime and justice, education, international development, and social welfare. At the annual Campbell Colloquium, experts…

  11. The Campbell Collaboration's Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Online Training Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanin, Joshua R.; Pigott, Terri D.

    2013-01-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analysis are techniques for synthesizing primary empirical studies to produce a summary of effects. To facilitate this goal, the Campbell Collaboration (C2) supports reviews within the disciplines of crime and justice, education, international development, and social welfare. At the annual Campbell Colloquium, experts…

  12. A Social Network Analysis of Teaching and Research Collaboration in a Teachers' Virtual Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaofan; Hu, Xiaoyong; Hu, Qintai; Liu, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Analysing the structure of a social network can help us understand the key factors influencing interaction and collaboration in a virtual learning community (VLC). Here, we describe the mechanisms used in social network analysis (SNA) to analyse the social network structure of a VLC for teachers and discuss the relationship between face-to-face…

  13. An Approach Based on Social Network Analysis Applied to a Collaborative Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claros, Iván; Cobos, Ruth; Collazos, César A.

    2016-01-01

    The Social Network Analysis (SNA) techniques allow modelling and analysing the interaction among individuals based on their attributes and relationships. This approach has been used by several researchers in order to measure the social processes in collaborative learning experiences. But oftentimes such measures were calculated at the final state…

  14. Organizational Learning for Library Enhancements: A Collaborative, Research-Driven Analysis of Academic Department Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Loo, Jeffery L.; Dupuis, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a qualitative evaluation methodology of academic departments for library organizational learning and library enhancement planning. This evaluation used campus units’ academic program review reports as a data source and employed collaborative content analysis by library liaisons to extract departmental strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats, and priorities. We illustrate how a systematic review of internal planning documents facilitates the understanding of program...

  15. Collaborative Teaching, Genre Analysis, and Cognitive Apprenticeship: Engineering a Linked Writing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Angela

    2004-01-01

    This article recounts how a communications and an engineering department developed a collaborative teaching venture--a linked writing course--to provide mentorship for students learning how to write lab reports. According to faculty and student feedback, and to analysis of pre- and post-course writing samples, the students' writing did show…

  16. A collaborative study of the EDNAP group regarding Y-chromosome binary polymorphism analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brion, María; Dupuy, Berit M; Heinrich, Marielle

    2005-01-01

    A collaborative study was carried out by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) in order to evaluate the performance of Y-chromosome binary polymorphism analysis in different European laboratories. Four blood samples were sent to the laboratories, to be analysed for 11 Y-chromosome single nucle...

  17. Spectrum-Based and Collaborative Network Topology Analysis and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xianlin

    2013-01-01

    Networks are of significant importance in many application domains, such as World Wide Web and social networks, which often embed rich topological information. Since network topology captures the organization of network nodes and links, studying network topology is very important to network analysis. In this dissertation, we study networks by…

  18. Modelling and analysis of inventory replenishment for perishable agricultural products with buyer-seller collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dongjie; Lai, K. K.; Leung, Stephen C. H.; Liang, Liang

    2011-07-01

    In this article, we study the inventory replenishment model for perishable agricultural products in a simple two-level supply chain. Collaborative forecasting is introduced into the inventory replenishment decisions to avoid overstocking and understocking of agricultural products, and to maximise profits. We analyse the model with ordering cost, holding cost, shortage cost, deterioration cost and opportunity lost cost of perishable agricultural products. Extensive numerical analysis is carried out to study the performance of the inventory policy. The optimal replenishment policy that minimises the total cost can be obtained from the model. It has demonstrated that the supply chain cost decreases with supplier and retailer's collaborative forecasting.

  19. A Web-Based Development Environment for Collaborative Data Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmann, M; Glaser, C; Klingebiel, D; Komm, M; Müller, G; Rieger, M; Steggemann, J; Urban, M; Winchen, T

    2014-01-01

    Visual Physics Analysis (VISPA) is a web-based development environment addressing high energy and astroparticle physics. It covers the entire analysis spectrum from the design and validation phase to the execution of analyses and the visualization of results. VISPA provides a graphical steering of the analysis ow, which consists of self-written, re-usable Python and C++ modules for more demanding tasks. All common operating systems are supported since a standard internet browser is the only software requirement for users. Even access via mobile and touch-compatible devices is possible. In this contribution, we present the most recent developments of our web application concerning technical, state-of-the-art approaches as well as practical experiences. One of the key features is the use of workspaces, i.e. user-congurable connections to remote machines supplying resources and local le access. Thereby, workspaces enable the management of data, computing resources (e.g. remote clusters or computing grids), and a...

  20. 76 FR 66728 - Government-Owned Inventions; Licensing and Collaborative Research Opportunity for PANVAC-Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... the Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, NCI. The CRADA partner... Research Opportunity for PANVAC--Cancer Vaccine for the Prevention and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer... Technology Transfer Center, National Cancer Institute, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Suite 450, Rockville,...

  1. Ciência & Saúde Coletiva: scientific production analysis and collaborative research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Norma; Provedel, Attilio; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this metric and descriptive study was to identify the most productive authors and their collaborative research networks from articles published in Ciência & Saúde Coletiva between, 2005, and 2014. Authors meeting the cutoff criteria of at least 10 articles were considered the most productive authors. VOSviewer and Network Workbench technologies were applied for visual representations of collaborative research networks involving the most productive authors in the period. Initial analysis recovered 2511 distinct articles, with 8920 total authors with an average of 3.55 authors per article. Author analysis revealed 6288 distinct authors, 24 of these authors were identified as the most productive. These 24 authors generated 287 articles with an average of 4.31 authors per article, and represented 8 separate collaborative partnerships, the largest of which had 14 authors, indicating a significant degree of collaboration among these authors. This analysis provides a visual representation of networks of knowledge development in public health and demonstrates the usefulness of VOSviewer and Network Workbench technologies in future research.

  2. The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership: an international collaboration to inform cancer policy in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John; Foot, Catherine; Bomb, Martine; Hiom, Sara; Coleman, Michel; Bryant, Heather; Vedsted, Peter; Hanson, Jane; Richards, Mike

    2013-09-01

    The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP) was initiated by the Department of Health in England to study international variation in cancer survival, and to inform policy to improve cancer survival. It is a research collaboration between twelve jurisdictions in six countries: Australia (New South Wales, Victoria), Canada (Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario), Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom (England, Northern Ireland, Wales). Leadership is provided by policymakers, with academics, clinicians and cancer registries forming an international network to conduct the research. The project currently has five modules examining: (1) cancer survival, (2) population awareness and beliefs about cancer, (3) attitudes, behaviours and systems in primary care, (4) delays in diagnosis and treatment, and their causes, and (5) treatment, co-morbidities and other factors. These modules employ a range of methodologies including epidemiological and statistical analyses, surveys and clinical record audit. The first publications have already been used to inform and develop cancer policies in participating countries, and a further series of publications is under way. The module design, governance structure, funding arrangements and management approach to the partnership provide a case study in conducting international comparisons of health systems that are both academically and clinically robust and of immediate relevance to policymakers.

  3. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS ANALYSIS FOR STAGEⅠ RECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武爱文; 顾晋; 薛钟麒; 王怡; 徐光炜

    2001-01-01

    To explore the death-related factors of stageⅠrectal cancer patients. Methods: 89 cases of stage I rectal cancer patients between 1985 and 2000 were retrospectively studied for prognostic factors. Factors including age, gender, tumor size, circumferential occupation, gross type, pathological type, depth of tumor invasion, surgical procedure, adjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative complication were chosen for cox multivariate analysis (forward procedure) using Spss software (10.0 version). Results: multivariate analysis demonstrated that muscular invasion was an independent negative prognostic factor for stageⅠrectal cancer patients (P=0.003). Conclusion: Muscular invasion is a negative prognostic factor for stage I rectal cancer patients.

  4. Results from the MILC collaboration's SU(3) chiral perturbation theory analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bazavov, A; DeTar, C; Du, X; Freeman, W; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M; Hetrick, J E; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Oktay, M B; Osborn, J; Sugar, R; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S

    2009-01-01

    We present the status of the MILC collaboration's analysis of the light pseudoscalar meson sector with SU(3) chiral fits. The analysis includes data from new ensembles with smaller lattice spacing, smaller light quark masses and lighter than physical strange quark masses. Our fits include the NNLO chiral logarithms. We present results for decay constants, quark masses, Gasser-Leutwyler low energy constants, and condensates in the two- and three-flavor chiral limits.

  5. [Scientific production and cancer-related collaboration networks in Peru 2000-2011: a bibliometric study in Scopus and Science Citation Index].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayta-Tristán, Percy; Huamaní, Charles; Montenegro-Idrogo, Juan José; Samanez-Figari, César; González-Alcaide, Gregorio

    2013-03-01

    A bibliometric study was carried out to describe the scientific production on cancer written by Peruvians and published in international health journals, as well as to assess the scientific collaboration networks. It included articles on cancer written in Peru between the years 2000 and 2011 and published in health journals indexed in SCOPUS or Science Citation Index Expanded. In the 358 articles identified, an increase in the production was seen, from 4 articles in 2000 to 57 in 2011.The most studied types were cervical cancer (77 publications); breast cancer (53), and gastric cancer (37). The National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN) was the most productive institution (121 articles) and had the highest number of collaborations (180 different institutions). 52 clinical trials were identified, 29 of which had at least one author from INEN. We can conclude that, cancer research is increasing in Peru, the INEN being the most productive institution, with an important participation in clinical trials.

  6. Mapping an Experiment-Based Assessment of Collaborative Behavior onto Collaborative Problem Solving in PISA 2015: A Cluster Analysis Approach for Collaborator Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herborn, Katharina; Mustafic, Maida; Greiff, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Collaborative problem solving (CPS) assessment is a new academic research field with a number of educational implications. In 2015, the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) assessed CPS with a computer-simulated human-agent (H-A) approach that claimed to measure 12 individual CPS skills for the first time. After reviewing the…

  7. Advancing Collaborative Climate Studies through Globally Distributed Geospatial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Percivall, G.

    2009-12-01

    Infrastructure and the broader GEOSS architecture. Of specific interest to this session is the work on geospatial workflows and geo-processing and data discovery and access. CCIP demonstrates standards-based interoperability between geospatial applications in the service of Climate Change analysis. CCIP is planned to be a yearly exercise. It consists of a network of online data services (WCS, WFS, SOS), analysis services (WPS, WCPS, WMS), and clients that exercise those services. In 2009, CCIP focuses on Australia, and the initial application of existing OGC services to climate studies. The results of the 2009 CCIP will serve as requirements for more complex geo-processing services to be developed for CCIP 2010. The benefits of CCIP include accelerating the implementation of the GCOS, and building confidence that implementations using multi-vendor interoperable technologies can help resolve vexing climate change questions. AIP-2: Architecture Implementation Pilot, Phase 2 CCIP: Climate Challenge Integration Plugfest GEO: Group on Earth Observations GEOSS: Global Earth Observing System of Systems GCOS: Global Climate Observing System OGC: Open Geospatial Consortium SOS: Sensor Observation Service WCS: Web Coverage Service WCPS: Web Coverage Processing Service WFS: Web Feature Service WMS: Web Mapping Service

  8. Coauthorship and institutional collaborations on cost-effectiveness analyses: a systematic network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrán Catalá-López

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA has been promoted as an important research methodology for determining the efficiency of healthcare technology and guiding medical decision-making. Our aim was to characterize the collaborative patterns of CEA conducted over the past two decades in Spain. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A systematic analysis was carried out with the information obtained through an updated comprehensive literature review and from reports of health technology assessment agencies. We identified CEAs with outcomes expressed as a time-based summary measure of population health (e.g. quality-adjusted life-years or disability-adjusted life-years, conducted in Spain and published between 1989 and 2011. Networks of coauthorship and institutional collaboration were produced using PAJEK software. One-hundred and thirty-one papers were analyzed, in which 526 authors and 230 institutions participated. The overall signatures per paper index was 5.4. Six major groups (one with 14 members, three with 7 members and two with 6 members were identified. The most prolific authors were generally affiliated with the private-for-profit sector (e.g. consulting firms and the pharmaceutical industry. The private-for-profit sector maintains profuse collaborative networks including public hospitals and academia. Collaboration within the public sector (e.g. healthcare administration and primary care was weak and fragmented. CONCLUSIONS: This empirical analysis reflects critical practices among collaborative networks that contributed substantially to the production of CEA, raises challenges for redesigning future policies and provides a framework for similar analyses in other regions.

  9. Rectal cancer : developments in multidisciplinary treatment, quality control and European collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijn, Willem van

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, treatment of rectal cancer has considerably improved in Europe. Although this applies to most solid malignancies, improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of rectal cancer surpass virtually all others. In the early 1990s, outcome after rectal cancer treatment was poor,

  10. Lung cancer in pregnancy: Report of nine cases from an international collaborative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boussios, S.; Han, S.N.; Fruscio, R.; Halaska, M.J.; Ottevanger, P.B.; Peccatori, F.A.; Koubkova, L.; Pavlidis, N.; Amant, F.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lung cancer is an uncommon diagnosis during pregnancy. The combination of smoking in young women, increased maternal age during pregnancy, and increasing incidence of lung cancer worldwide may cause an increase of pregnancy associated lung cancer. The aim of this study was to describe all

  11. Canonical correlation analysis between collaborative networks and innovation: A case study in information technology companies in province of Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Jafar Nejad

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The increase competitions as well as technological advancements have created motivation among business owners to look for more innovative ideas from outside their organizations. Many enterprises collaborate with other organizations to empower themselves through innovative ideas. These kinds of collaborations can be observed as a concept called Regional Innovation System. These collaborations include inter-firm collaborations, research organizations, intermediary institutions and governmental agencies. The primary objective of this paper is to evaluate relationships between Collaborative Networks and Innovation in information technology business units located in province of Tehran, Iran. The research method utilized for the present study is descriptive-correlation. To evaluate the relationships between independent and dependent variables, canonical correlation analysis (CCA is used. The results confirm the previous findings regarding the relationship between Collaborative Networks and Innovation. Among various dimensions of Collaboration, Collaboration with governmental agencies had a very small impact on the relationship between collaboration networks and innovation. In addition, the results show that in addition to affecting product innovation and process innovation, collaboration networks also affected management innovation.

  12. Collaboration and competition in a children's health initiative coalition: a network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Thomas W; Coronges, Kathryn A; Stevens, Gregory D; Cousineau, Michael R

    2008-11-01

    Activating communities to achieve public health change and initiate policy reform usually requires collective action from many entities. This case study analyzes inter-organizational networks among members of a coalition created to expand health insurance coverage to uninsured children in a large metropolitan area. Six networks were measured: collaboration, competition, formal agreements, receive funding from, send funding to, and greater communication. The response rate was 65.8% (50 of the 76 active members). Positive network questions such as "who do you collaborate with" elicited many network choices whereas negative ones such as "who do you compete with" elicited few. The collaboration network had a core-periphery structure and analysis showed that a large network can be reduced to a small set of core organizations one-sixth the size of the whole. Centrality (out- and in-degree) was associated with perceived organizational function and perceived barriers to success. For example, organizations that received many choices as collaboration partners were more likely to perceive the coalition functioned well than those who received few choices. The study suggests that perceptions of organizational performance are associated with position in the network, central members are more likely to perceive the organization performs well than those on the periphery.

  13. An Examination of Tri-Level Collaboration around Student Achievement Using the Gap Analysis Approach: Teacher Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Anthony Steven

    2013-01-01

    Using the Gap Analysis problem-solving framework (Clark & Estes, 2008), this project examined collaboration around student achievement in the Pasadena Unified School District (PUSD) from the teacher perspective. As part of a tri-level study, two other projects examined collaboration around student achievement in PUSD from the perspectives of…

  14. High-priority topics for cancer quality measure development: results of the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology Collaborative Cancer Measure Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Michael J; McNiff, Kristen K; Dicker, Adam P; Gilligan, Timothy; Hendricks, Carolyn B; Lennes, Inga; Murray, Thomas; Krzyzanowska, Monika K

    2014-05-01

    Most cancer quality measures focus on individual cancers, assess specific providers, and evaluate processes of care. Although important, these efforts are not sufficient. A more comprehensive measure set is needed to address gaps in care, focus on patients rather than providers, and assess the cross-cutting aspects of care that are relevant to all patients with cancer throughout the trajectory of their illness. With the long-term goal of developing a more comprehensive oncology measure set, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) organized a collaborative measure summit that used an iterative consensus approach to identify priorities for the development of new cancer quality measures. The summit, which included professional societies and patient/consumer advocacy organizations, was held during the ASCO Quality Care Symposium in December 2012. This effort, which brought together 12 diverse stakeholders, identified 10 high-priority topics for cancer quality measure development that cross-cut cancer diagnoses and care settings and addressed patient-centered concerns. Topics of particular interest included planning and counseling before therapy, interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary coordinated care, comprehensive symptom assessment, patient experience of care, and use of palliative care and hospice services. This is an important first step in the development of patient-centered, cross-cutting cancer quality measures. Addressing the high-priority topics identified by this effort will help fill the gaps left by existing cancer quality measures, including care coordination and transitions, quality of life, safety, experience of care, and outcomes. More work will be needed to specify, implement, and validate measures based on these topics. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Results of Nucleon Resonance Extraction via Dynamical Coupled-Channels Analysis from Collaboration @ EBAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroyuki Kamano

    2012-04-01

    We review a global analysis of meson production reactions off the nucleons by a collaboration at Excited Baryon Analysis Center of Jefferson Lab. The analysis is pursued with a dynamical coupled-channels approach, within which the dynamics of multi-channel reaction processes are taken into account in a fully consistent way with the two-body as well as three-body unitarity of the S-matrix. With this approach, new features of nucleon excitations are revealed as resonant particles originating from the non-trivial multi-channel reaction dynamics, which cannot be addressed by static hadron models where the nucleon excitations are treated as stable particles.

  16. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation for fertility preservation in cancer patients: successful establishment and feasibility of a multidisciplinary collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, Clarisa R; Chang, Jeff; Kondapalli, Laxmi; Prewitt, Maureen; Carlson, Claire A; Mattei, Peter; Jeffers, Shanaye; Ginsberg, Jill P

    2012-06-01

    As advancements in cancer therapies have led to dramatic improvements in long term survival, there has been increasing interest in methods to expand fertility preservation options for cancer patients. An experimental protocol for ovarian tissue cryopreservation was developed at the University of Pennsylvania for patients requiring gonadotoxic therapies. The protocol for adults was implemented at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and for children at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in collaboration with the Oncofertility Consortium and the National Physicians Cooperative (NPC). A total of twenty-one patients (age range: 8-36 years) have cryopreserved ovarian tissue as part of this study. While patients had a variety of diagnoses and treatment exposures, 10/21 (48 %) patients suffered from hematologic disorders and 43 % were anticipating stem cell transplantation. No patients have requested that the tissue be used for clinical purposes. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation protocols can be implemented at pediatric and adult institutions through multi-disciplinary collaboration. While more research is needed to determine the safety and efficacy of ovarian tissue cryopreservation, this procedure provides hope for preserving the ability to have biological offspring to patients facing gonadotoxic therapies for a variety of medical conditions.

  17. A Collaborative Step-Wise Process to Implementing an Innovative Clinic for Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Wendy; Fulbright, Joy M; Doolittle, Gary C; Alsman, Kyla; Klemp, Jennifer R; Ryan, Robin; Nelson, Eve-Lynn; Stegenga, Kristin; Krebill, Hope; Al-hihi, Eyad M; Schuetz, Nik; Heiman, Ashley; Lowry, Becky

    2015-01-01

    With a 5 year survival rate of approximately 80%, there is an increasing number of childhood cancer survivors in the United States. Childhood cancer survivors are at an increased risk for physical and psychosocial health problems many years after treatment. Long-term follow-up care should include education, development of individualized follow up plans and screening for health problems in accordance with the Children's Oncology Group survivor guidelines. Due to survivor, provider and healthcare system related barriers, adult survivors of childhood cancer (ASCC) infrequently are receiving care in accordance to these guidelines. In this paper we describe the stepwise process and collaboration between a children's hospital and an adult academic medical center that was implemented to develop the Survivorship Transition Clinic and address the needs of ASCC in our region. In the clinic model that we designed ASCC follow-up with a primary care physician in the adult setting who is knowledgeable about late effects of childhood cancer treatment and are provided transition support and education by a transition nurse navigator. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Scientific collaboration between Istituto Superiore di Sanità and Italian Association of Cancer Registries for the study of cancer incidence in Italian polluted sites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comba, P; Crocetti, E; Buzzoni, C; Fazzo, L; Ferretti, S; Fusco, M; Iavarone, I; Pirastu, R; Ricci, P

    2011-01-01

    The collaborative study between Istituto superiore di sanità and Associazione italiana registri tumori (ISS-AIRTUM) aims at investigating cancer incidence in polluted sites for adults and for children (0-14 years) and adolescents (15-19 years) to comment the study results in the light of a set of a priori hypotheses. On the whole, 141 out of 298 municipalities included in SENTIERI Project are served by a Cancer Register participating to the AIRTUM network. For a description of SENTIERI, refer to the 2010 Supplement of Epidemiology & Prevention devoted to SENTIERI Project. The time window of the study is the period 1996-2005. The number of expected cases in each polluted site will be estimated by applying incidence rates of the national pool of cancer registries and of the pool of the geographic macroarea in which each site is located: Northern, Central, Southern Italy and Islands. Cancer incidence in children and adolescents is one of the main priorities of international public health institutions, because of the need to protect childhood health from involuntary exposure to environmental risk factors. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) will be computed using expected figures derived from the national pool of cancer registries.

  19. Meta-analysis of intraperitoneal chemotherapy for gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Zhi Xu; You-Qing Zhan; Xiao-Wei Sun; Su-Mei Cao; Qi-Rong Geng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of intraperitoneal chemotherapy in patients undergoing curative resection for gastric cancer through literature review. METHODS: Medline (PubMed) (1980-2003/1), Embase (1980-2003/1), Cancerlit Database (1983-2003/1) and Chinese Biomedicine Database (1990-2003/1) were searched. Language was restricted to Chinese and English. The statistical analysis was performed by RevMan4.2 software provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. The results were expressed with odds ratio for the categorical variables. RESULTS: Eleven trials involving 1 161 cases were included. The pooled odds ratio was 0.51, with a 95% confidence interval (0.40-0.65). Intraperitoneal chemotherapy may benefit the patients after curative resection for locally advanced gastric cancer, and the combination of intraperitoneal chemotherapy with hyperthermia or activated carbon particles may provide more benefits to patients due to the enhanced antitumor activity of drugs. Sensitivity analysis and fail-safe number suggested that the result was comparatively reliable. However, of 11 trials, only 3 studies were of high quality. CONCLUSION: Intraperitoneal chemotherapy after curative resection for locally advanced gastric cancer may be beneficial to patients. Continuous multicenter, randomized, double blind, rigorously designed trials should be conducted to draw definitive conclusions.

  20. Project INSPIRE-HBCU Undergraduate Collaborative Summer Training Program to Inspire Students in Prostate Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    in cancer cells without adversely affecting normal cells (2, 3, 4, and 8). It is now widely appreciated that agents capable of inducing apoptosis in...Sci., 63, 1397-1403. 9. Sarkar FH and Yiwei Li. (2006). Using chemopreventive agents to enhance the efficacy of cancer therapy. Cancer Res., 66...and Blackburn GL. (2003). Soy phytochemicals and tea bioactive components synergistically inhibit androgen-sensitive human prostate tumors in

  1. 75 FR 17412 - Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... Section B Inventions to a regulatory authority when seeking marketing authorization of the Agent, or (b... having obtained marketing authorization from a regulatory authority. Collaborator will notify Institution... not only from NCI CTEP funding recipients, but from the full range of academic, not-for-profit...

  2. Web-based collaborative care intervention to manage cancer-related symptoms in the palliative care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Jennifer L; Geller, David A; Kim, Kevin H; Butterfield, Lisa H; Spring, Michael; Grady, Jonathan; Sun, Weiing; Marsh, Wallis; Antoni, Michael; Dew, Mary Amanda; Helgeson, Vicki; Schulz, Richard; Tsung, Allan

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of a collaborative care intervention in reducing depression, pain, and fatigue and improve quality of life. A total of 261 patients with advanced cancer and 179 family caregivers were randomized to a web-based collaborative care intervention or enhanced usual care. The intervention included the following: 1) a web site with written and audiovisual self-management strategies, a bulletin board, and other resources; 2) visits with a care coordinator during a physician's appointment every 2 months; and 3) telephone follow-up every 2 weeks. Primary patient outcomes included measures of depression, pain, fatigue, and health-related quality of life. Secondary outcomes included Interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 levels, Natural Killer (NK) cell numbers, and caregiver stress and depression. At the baseline, 51% of the patients reported 1 or more symptoms in the clinical range. For patients who presented with clinical levels of symptoms and were randomized to the intervention, reductions in depression (Cohen's d = 0.71), pain (Cohen's d = 0.62), and fatigue (Cohen's d = 0.26) and improvements in quality of life (Cohen's d = 0.99) were observed when compared to those in the enhanced usual car arm at 6 months. Reductions in IL-6 (φ = 0.18), IL-1β (φ = 0.35), IL-1α (φ = 0.19), and IL-8 (φ = 0.15) and increases in NK cell numbers (φ = 0.23) were observed in comparison with enhanced usual care arm at 6 months. Reductions in caregiver stress (Cohen's d = 0.75) and depression (Cohen's d = 0.37) were observed at 6 months for caregivers whose loved ones were randomized to the intervention arm. The integration of screening and symptom management into cancer care is recommended. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  4. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Gearbox 1 Failure Analysis Report: December 2010 - January 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errichello, R.; Muller, J.

    2012-02-01

    Unintended gearbox failures have a significant impact on the cost of wind farm operations. In 2007, NREL initiated the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC). The project combines analysis, field testing, dynamometer testing, condition monitoring, and the development and population of a gearbox failure database in a multi-pronged approach to determine why wind turbine gearboxes do not achieve their expected design life. The collaborative of manufacturers, owners, researchers, and consultants focuses on gearbox testing and modeling and the development of a gearbox failure database. Collaborative members also investigate gearbox condition monitoring techniques. Data gained from the GRC will enable designers, developers, and manufacturers to improve gearbox designs and testing standards and create more robust modeling tools. GRC project essentials include the development of two identical, heavily instrumented representative gearbox designs. Knowledge gained from the field and dynamometer tests conducted on these gearboxes builds an understanding of how the selected loads and events translate into bearing and gear response. This report contains the analysis of the first gearbox design.

  5. Retrospective Analysis of Communication Events - Understanding the Dynamics of Collaborative Multi-Party Discourse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Haack, Jereme N.; McColgin, Dave W.

    2006-06-08

    This research is aimed at understanding the dynamics of collaborative multi-party discourse across multiple communication modalities. Before we can truly make sig-nificant strides in devising collaborative communication systems, there is a need to understand how typical users utilize com-putationally supported communications mechanisms such as email, instant mes-saging, video conferencing, chat rooms, etc., both singularly and in conjunction with traditional means of communication such as face-to-face meetings, telephone calls and postal mail. Attempting to un-derstand an individual’s communications profile with access to only a single modal-ity is challenging at best and often futile. Here, we discuss the development of RACE – Retrospective Analysis of Com-munications Events – a test-bed prototype to investigate issues relating to multi-modal multi-party discourse.

  6. China-Africa and China-Asia Collaboration on Schistosomiasis Control: A SWOT Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Bergquist, R; Qian, Y-J; Wang, Q; Yu, Q; Peeling, R; Croft, S; Guo, J-G; Zhou, X-N

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, a disease caused by a trematode, parasitic worm, is a worldwide public health problem. In spite of great progress with regard to morbidity control, even elimination of this infection in recent decades, there are still challenges to overcome in sub-Saharan Africa and endemic areas in Southeast Asia. Regarded as one of the most successful countries with respect to schistosomiasis control, The People's Republic of China has accumulated considerable experience and learnt important lessons in various local settings that could benefit schistosomiasis control in other endemic countries. Based on an analysis of conceived strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) of potential collaborative activities with regard to schistosomiasis in Africa and Asia, this article addresses the importance of collaborative efforts and explores the priorities that would be expected to facilitate the transfer of Chinese experience to low- and middle-income countries in Africa and Asia.

  7. Architecture of Collaborating Frameworks:Simulation,Visualisation,User Interface and Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Pfeiffer; R.Giannitrapani; 等

    2001-01-01

    In modern high energy and astrophysics experiments the variety of user requirements and the complexity of the problem domain often involve the collaboration of several software frameworks,and different components are responsible for providing the functionalities related to each domain.For instance,a common use case consists in studying the physics effects and the detector performance,resulting from primary events,in a given detector configuration,to evaluate the physics reach of the experiment or optimise the detector design,Such a study typically involves various components:simulation,Visualisation,Analysis and (interactive)User Interface.We focus on the design aspects of the collaboration of these frameworks and on the technologies that help to simplify the complex process of software design.

  8. Epistemological development and collaborative learning: a hermeneutic analysis of music therapy students' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, David W

    2008-01-01

    Undergraduate education must address student's developmental needs, as well as their learning needs. Yet, there has been little discussion regarding music therapy students' epistemological development, how that influences their education and clinical training, and how that understanding can inform educators and clinical supervisors. As part of an introductory music therapy course that was taught using collaborative learning consensus groups, students provided written and verbal comments about their experience and some students agreed to a series of interviews (Luce, 2002). This hermeneutic analysis of that data was based upon Perry's Scheme and Women's Ways of Knowing suggested that (a) the students' comments reflected the various perspectives or positions within the models, (b) the collaborative learning consensus groups facilitated transitions and movement within the models, and (c) there was a need for more research to understand music therapy students' developmental needs, to enhance teaching methods and pedagogy, and to address students' developmental needs as they prepare to enter the profession.

  9. Collaborative knowledge networks emergence for innovation: Factors of success analysis and comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Perry, Nicolas; Corne, Schutte

    2012-01-01

    New product development needs new engineering approaches. Knowledge is a key resource that impacts traditional, organisational, economic and innovative models. Through NICT (New Information and Communication Technologies), globalisation encourages the emergence of networks that overcome traditional organisation boundaries. International enterprises, European-Community Networks of Excellence or Clusters (competitiveness poles) indicate the need to define a new way of thinking. This new way moves towards an agile, continuous innovative use of knowledge. Based on an epistemic study of knowledge management best practices, four examples show the barriers that can be encountered today. This paper aims defining the key elements that enhance collaborative networks. The analysis of best practices from collaborative environments enables the design of high standard information systems and initiate knowledge ecosystems. A balance between formalism required to share knowledge and fuzziness of social networks triggers new ...

  10. When fat becomes an ally of the enemy: adipose tissue as collaborator in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeire, Lore; Denys, Hannelore; Cocquyt, Véronique; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Since the discovery of leptin in 1994, our vision of adipose tissue as a static organ regulating mainly lipid storage and release has been completely overthrown, and adipose tissue is now seen as an active and integral organ in human physiology. In the past years, extensive research has tremendously given us more insights in the mechanisms and pathways involved not only in normal but also in 'sick' adipose tissue, for example, in obesity and lipodystrophy. With growing evidence of a link between obesity and several types of cancer, research focusing on the interaction between adipose tissue and cancer has begun to unravel the interesting but complex multi-lateral communication between the different players. With breast cancer as one of the first cancer types where a positive correlation between obesity and breast cancer incidence and prognosis in post-menopausal women was found, we have focused this review on the paracrine and endocrine role of adipose tissue in breast cancer initiation and progression. As important inter-species differences in adipose tissue occur, we mainly selected human adipose tissue- and breast cancer-based studies with a short reflection on therapeutic possibilities. This review is part of the special issue on "Adiposopathy in Cancer and (Cardio)Metabolic Diseases".

  11. Performance Analysis Model of ManufacturingSystem under Collaborative Product Commerce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁建厦; 竺炯林; 陈勇; 兰秀菊; 叶艳

    2004-01-01

    Based on an analysis of the relationship between electronic business (EB) and collaborative product commerce (CPC), the conception of CPC is illustrated rigorously. Development and classification of manufacturing systems are summarized. System features and goals on each stage of a manufacturing system are investigated. In particular, goals and feature characteristics of CPC manufacturing system are discussed. A figure of relationship between the feature and goal ofa CPC manufacturing system is given. A model of CPC manufacturing systems based on a set of five elements including goal, feature, topology, view, and process is proposed. Furthermore, four models of 3D function analysis for PFV, PTV, PTG, and PFG are established.

  12. Cutaneous paraneoplastic disorders in stomach cancer: Collaboration between oncologically active dermatologists and clinical oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejna, Michael; Wöll, Ewald; Tschandl, Philipp; Raderer, Markus

    2016-07-01

    To our knowledge this is the first systemic review that provides an overview of the cutaneous paraneoplastic syndromes (CPS) (i.e., clinical manifestations, pathomechanisms, and treatment modalities) occurring in stomach cancer. CPS are caused by substances produced by stomach cancer and may precede, coincide with, or follow the diagnosis of this malignancy. More than 20 possible CPS in association with stomach cancer have been identified. CPS mostly compromises the patient's quality of life by skin impairment plus discomfort and are often associated with a dismal prognosis on survival. Studies of these CPS not only in stomach cancer have partially contributed to the understanding of pathomechanism and since CPS may be the presenting sign of an occult cancer, cognizance of their features and clinical implications are of considerable importance. Patients with these syndromes should have an appropriate work-up for a possibly occult malignancy with consecutive successful early treatment.

  13. HIV and cancer in Africa: mutual collaboration between HIV and cancer programs may provide timely research and public health data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbulaiteye Sam M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The eruption of Kaposi sarcoma (KS and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL in young homosexual men in 1981 in the West heralded the onset of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection epidemic, which remains one of the biggest challenges to global public health and science ever. Because KS and NHL were increased >10,000 and 50-600 times, respectively, with HIV, they were designated AIDS defining cancers (ADC. Cervical cancer (CC, increased 5-10 times was also designated as an ADC. A few other cancers are elevated with HIV, including Hodgkin lymphoma (10 times, anal cancer (15-30 times, and lung cancer (4 times are designated as non-AIDS defining cancers (NADCs. Since 1996 when combination antiretroviral therapy (cART became widely available in the West, dramatic decreases in HIV mortality have been observed and substantial decrease in the incidence of ADCs. Coincidentally, the burden of NADCs has increased as people with HIV age with chronic HIV infection. The impact of HIV infection on cancer in sub-Saharan Africa, where two thirds of the epidemic is concentrated, remains poorly understood. The few studies conducted indicate that risks for ADCs are also increased, but quantitatively less so than in the West. The risks for many cancers with established viral associations, including liver and nasopharynx, which are found in Africa, do not appear to be increased. These data are limited because of competing mortality, and cancer is under diagnosed, pathological confirmation is rare, and cancer registration not widely practiced. The expansion of access to life-extending cART in sub-Saharan Africa, through programs such as the Global Fund for AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis and the US President's Emergency Program for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR, is leading to dramatic lengthening of life of HIV patients, which will likely influence the spectrum and burden of cancer in patients with HIV. In this paper, we review current literature and explore

  14. SOUTH AMERICAN COLLABORATION IN SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS ON LEISHMANIASIS: BIBLIOMETRIC ANALYSIS IN SCOPUS (2000-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huamaní, Charles; Romaní, Franco; González-Alcaide, Gregorio; Mejia, Miluska O.; Ramos, José Manuel; Espinoza, Manuel; Cabezas, César

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluate the production and the research collaborative network on Leishmaniasis in South America. Methods: A bibliometric research was carried out using SCOPUS database. The analysis unit was original research articles published from 2000 to 2011, that dealt with leishmaniasis and that included at least one South American author. The following items were obtained for each article: journal name, language, year of publication, number of authors, institutions, countries, and others variables. Results: 3,174 articles were published, 2,272 of them were original articles. 1,160 different institutional signatures, 58 different countries and 398 scientific journals were identified. Brazil was the country with more articles (60.7%) and Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ) had 18% of Brazilian production, which is the South American nucleus of the major scientific network in Leishmaniasis. Conclusions: South American scientific production on Leishmaniasis published in journals indexed in SCOPUS is focused on Brazilian research activity. It is necessary to strengthen the collaboration networks. The first step is to identify the institutions with higher production, in order to perform collaborative research according to the priorities of each country. PMID:25229217

  15. South American collaboration in scientific publications on leishmaniasis: bibliometric analysis in SCOPUS (2000-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huamaní, Charles; Romaní, Franco; González-Alcaide, Gregorio; Mejia, Miluska O; Ramos, José Manuel; Espinoza, Manuel; Cabezas, César

    2014-01-01

    Evaluate the production and the research collaborative network on Leishmaniasis in South America. A bibliometric research was carried out using SCOPUS database. The analysis unit was original research articles published from 2000 to 2011, that dealt with leishmaniasis and that included at least one South American author. The following items were obtained for each article: journal name, language, year of publication, number of authors, institutions, countries, and others variables. 3,174 articles were published, 2,272 of them were original articles. 1,160 different institutional signatures, 58 different countries and 398 scientific journals were identified. Brazil was the country with more articles (60.7%) and Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ) had 18% of Brazilian production, which is the South American nucleus of the major scientific network in Leishmaniasis. South American scientific production on Leishmaniasis published in journals indexed in SCOPUS is focused on Brazilian research activity. It is necessary to strengthen the collaboration networks. The first step is to identify the institutions with higher production, in order to perform collaborative research according to the priorities of each country.

  16. SOUTH AMERICAN COLLABORATION IN SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS ON LEISHMANIASIS: BIBLIOMETRIC ANALYSIS IN SCOPUS (2000-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Huamaní

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Evaluate the production and the research collaborative network on Leishmaniasis in South America. Methods: A bibliometric research was carried out using SCOPUS database. The analysis unit was original research articles published from 2000 to 2011, that dealt with leishmaniasis and that included at least one South American author. The following items were obtained for each article: journal name, language, year of publication, number of authors, institutions, countries, and others variables. Results: 3,174 articles were published, 2,272 of them were original articles. 1,160 different institutional signatures, 58 different countries and 398 scientific journals were identified. Brazil was the country with more articles (60.7% and Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ had 18% of Brazilian production, which is the South American nucleus of the major scientific network in Leishmaniasis. Conclusions: South American scientific production on Leishmaniasis published in journals indexed in SCOPUS is focused on Brazilian research activity. It is necessary to strengthen the collaboration networks. The first step is to identify the institutions with higher production, in order to perform collaborative research according to the priorities of each country.

  17. General practitioners' perspectives of education and collaboration with physiotherapists in Primary Health Care: a discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Lourido, Berta; Kuisma, Raija M E

    2013-05-01

    This paper explores the educational factors that underlie the poor collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and physiotherapists (PTs) in Primary Health Care (PHC), from the GP's perspective. This study was conducted in Majorca, the Balearic Islands (Spain). Participants were nine GPs who graduated from different universities in mainland Spain. A discourse analysis study was developed employing the social-critical paradigm as theoretical framework and in-depth interviews for data collection. The perceived lack of knowledge about physiotherapy was considered by the interviewees as a major factor in the current poor communication between GPs and PTs. The individual learning during medical studies and poor interprofessional learning during clinical residency influenced their gatekeeper role, putting at risk the equity of the health system. Collaboration was considered beneficial for patients but challenging to improve in context due to multiple factors ranging from individual to systemic. The latter encompasses inadequate resources and organization for interprofessional learning. There is a need to further explore other factors influencing the poor collaboration, including PTs' views on this process.

  18. Collaboration Among Missouri Nonprofit Hospitals and Local Health Departments: Content Analysis of Community Health Needs Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristin D.; Ciecior, Amanda; Stringer, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We identified the levels of joint action that led to collaboration between hospitals and local health departments (LHDs) using the hospital’s community health needs assessments (CHNAs). Methods. In 2014, we conducted a content analysis of Missouri nonprofit hospitals (n = 34) CHNAs, and identified hospitals based on previously reported collaboration with LHDs. We coded the content according to the level of joint action. A comparison sample (n = 50) of Missouri nonprofit hospitals provided the basic comparative information on hospital characteristics. Results. Among the hospitals identified by LHDs, 20.6% were “networking,” 20.6% were “coordinating,” 38.2% were “cooperating,” and 2.9% were “collaborating.” Almost 18% of study hospitals had no identifiable level of joint action with LHDs based on their CHNAs. In addition, comparison hospitals were more often part of a larger system (74%) compared with study hospitals (52.9%). Conclusions. The results of our study helped develop a better understanding of levels of joint action from a hospital perspective. Our results might assist hospitals and LHDs in making more informed decisions about efficient deployment of resources for assessment processes and implementation plans. PMID:25689184

  19. Collaborative Deformation Design Using Control Integrated Analysis Methods for Hypersonic Waverider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypersonic waveriders have a large flight envelope, leading to the difficulty in keeping overall flight stability for a fixed geometry. Accordingly, hypersonic waveriders can be considered to design as a morphing vehicle such that the flight range is expanded for waveriding stability. To this end, this paper investigates the collaborative deformation design using control integrated analysis methods for the hypersonic waverider. Firstly, a parametric model is applied to combine the shape deformation with the geometrical properties. Secondly, the morphing process with regard to the change in a single geometric parameter and the static and dynamic characteristics affected by this deformation are analyzed. Afterwards, the collaborative relations are discussed for the changes in the lower forebody angle and elevon area. Furthermore, a flight control law is designed to guarantee flight stability while implementing the collaborative deformation, and the morphing results are evaluated based on the control-oriented idea. Finally, a simulation example is used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods for the hypersonic waverider.

  20. Understanding interprofessional collaboration in the context of chronic disease management for older adults living in communities: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookey-Bassett, Sue; Markle-Reid, Maureen; Mckey, Colleen A; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori

    2017-01-01

    To report a concept analysis of interprofessional collaboration in the context of chronic disease management, for older adults living in communities. Increasing prevalence of chronic disease among older adults is creating significant burden for patients, families and healthcare systems. Managing chronic disease for older adults living in the community requires interprofessional collaboration across different health and other care providers, organizations and sectors. However, there is a lack of consensus about the definition and use of interprofessional collaboration for community-based chronic disease management. Concept analysis. Electronic databases CINAHL, Medline, HealthStar, EMBASE, PsychINFO, Ageline and Cochrane Database were searched from 2000 - 2013. Rodgers' evolutionary method for concept analysis. The most common surrogate term was interdisciplinary collaboration. Related terms were interprofessional team, multidisciplinary team and teamwork. Attributes included: an evolving interpersonal process; shared goals, decision-making and care planning; interdependence; effective and frequent communication; evaluation of team processes; involving older adults and family members in the team; and diverse and flexible team membership. Antecedents comprised: role awareness; interprofessional education; trust between team members; belief that interprofessional collaboration improves care; and organizational support. Consequences included impacts on team composition and function, care planning processes and providers' knowledge, confidence and job satisfaction. Interprofessional collaboration is a complex evolving concept. Key components of interprofessional collaboration in chronic disease management for community-living older adults are identified. Implications for nursing practice, education and research are proposed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Z List of Cancers Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic ... National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators ...

  2. An economic analysis of usual care and acupuncture collaborative treatment on chronic low back pain: A Markov model decision analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Taejin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The collaborative treatment of acupuncture in addition to routine care as an approach for the management of low back pain (LBP is receiving increasing recognition from both public and professional arenas. In 2010, the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Family Affairs (MOHW of South Korea approved the practice of doctors and Oriental medical doctors (acupuncture qualified working together in the same facility and offering collaborative treatment at the same time for the same disease. However, there is little more than anecdotal evidence on the health and economic implications of this current practice. Therefore, the objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness and costs of acupuncture in addition to routine care in the treatment of chronic LBP patients in South Korea. Methods The Markov model was developed to synthesise evidence on both costs and outcomes for patients with chronic LBP. We conducted the base case analysis, univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses, and also performed the value of information analysis for future researches. Model parameters were sourced from systematic review of both alternatives, simple bibliographic reviews of relevant articles published in English or Korean, and statistical analyses of the 2005 and 2007 Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey (KNHNS data. The analyses were based on the societal perspective over a five year time horizon using a 5% discount rate. Results In the base case, collaborative treatment resulted in better outcomes, but at a relatively high cost. Overall, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of a collaborative practice was 3,421,394 KRW (Korean rate Won per QALY (Quality adjusted life year (2,895.80 USD per QALY. Univariate sensitivity analysis of indirect non-medical costs did not affect the preference order of the strategies. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis revealed that if the threshold was over 3,260,000 KRW per QALY (2,759.20 USD per QALY

  3. Collaborative multidisciplinary team approach to fertility issues among adolescent and young adult cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Kim; Cassano, Jane; Wizowski, Lindsay; Neal, Michael S

    2009-08-01

    Cancer treatment and the field of reproductive technology have each made impressive advancements in the last decade. Improved cancer treatment and survival rates have increased the number of cancer survivors, who might benefit from an array of fertility preservation strategies provided by emerging and advanced assisted conception technology. The challenge becomes bridging the gap between these two separate disciplines to ultimately improve the quality of life for cancer survivors. This paper discusses the issues and process involved with bringing these two teams of health-care professionals together. This model provides a framework for coordinating efforts in providing fertility preservation options to patients undergoing treatment for cancer. Effective multidisciplinary teams that include: oncologists, nurses in the specialties of oncology and infertility, social workers, reproductive endocrinology and infertility specialists, andrologists, and embryologists are required to work together in order to achieve success. The result of this unique team approach is not only a cancer survivor, but one whose quality of life might be enhanced by being able to have a child of his or her own in the future.

  4. Architecture for an advanced biomedical collaboration domain for the European paediatric cancer research community (ABCD-4-E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzlnader, Michael; Falgenhauer, Markus; Gossy, Christian; Schreier, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Today, progress in biomedical research often depends on large, interdisciplinary research projects and tailored information and communication technology (ICT) support. In the context of the European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents (ENCCA) project the exchange of data between data source (Source Domain) and data consumer (Consumer Domain) systems in a distributed computing environment needs to be facilitated. This work presents the requirements and the corresponding solution architecture of the Advanced Biomedical Collaboration Domain for Europe (ABCD-4-E). The proposed concept utilises public as well as private cloud systems, the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) framework and web-based applications to provide the core capabilities in accordance with privacy and security needs. The utility of crucial parts of the concept was evaluated by prototypic implementation. A discussion of the design indicates that the requirements of ENCCA are fully met. A whole system demonstration is currently being prepared to verify that ABCD-4-E has the potential to evolve into a domain-bridging collaboration platform in the future.

  5. Evaluation of a VHA collaborative to improve follow-up after a positive colorectal cancer screening test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Adam A; Nugent, Sean; Ordin, Diana L; Noorbaloochi, Siamak; Partin, Melissa R

    2011-10-01

    In 2005, the Veterans Health Administration initiated a yearlong Colorectal Cancer Care Collaborative (C4) to improve timely follow-up after positive fecal occult blood tests. Twenty-one facilities formed local quality improvement (QI) teams. Teams received QI training, created process flow maps, implemented process changes, and shared learning through 2 face-to-face meetings, conference calls, and a discussion board. We evaluated pre-post change in the timeliness of follow-up among C4 facilities and 3 control facilities. Outcome measures included the proportion of patients receiving a follow-up colonoscopy within 1 year, the proportion receiving 60-day follow-up (the focus of C4 teams), and average days to colonoscopy. Survey data from C4 team members was analyzed to identify predictors of facility-level improvement. Both C4 and control facilities improved on 1-year follow-up (10% and 9% increases, respectively, both P's<0.001). There was a statistically significant increase in the proportion receiving 60-day follow-up among C4 facilities (27% pre-C4 vs. 39% post-C4, P=0.008) but a nonsignificant decrease among control facilities (45% pre-C4 vs. 29% post-C4, P=0.14). Average days to colonoscopy decreased significantly among C4 facilities (129 pre-C4 vs. 103 post-C4, P=0.004) but increased significantly among control facilities (81 pre-C4 vs. 103 post-C4, P=0.04). Teams with the most improvement established clear roles/goals, had previous QI training, made more use of QI tools, and incorporated primary care education into their improvement work. A Veterans Health Administration improvement collaborative modestly decreased time to colonoscopy after a positive colorectal cancer screening test but significant room for improvement remains and benefits of participation were not realized by all facilities.

  6. Which strategies reduce breast cancer mortality most? Collaborative modeling of optimal screening, treatment, and obesity prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelblatt, Jeanne; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien; Schechter, Clyde; Chang, Yaojen; Huang, An-Tsun; Near, Aimee M; de Koning, Harry; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2013-07-15

    US breast cancer mortality is declining, but thousands of women still die each year. Two established simulation models examine 6 strategies that include increased screening and/or treatment or elimination of obesity versus continuation of current patterns. The models use common national data on incidence and obesity prevalence, competing causes of death, mammography characteristics, treatment effects, and survival/cure. Parameters are modified based on obesity (defined as BMI  ≥  30 kg/m(2) ). Outcomes are presented for the year 2025 among women aged 25+ and include numbers of cases, deaths, mammograms and false-positives; age-adjusted incidence and mortality; breast cancer mortality reduction and deaths averted; and probability of dying of breast cancer. If current patterns continue, the models project that there would be about 50,100-57,400 (range across models) annual breast cancer deaths in 2025. If 90% of women were screened annually from ages 40 to 54 and biennially from ages 55 to 99 (or death), then 5100-6100 fewer deaths would occur versus current patterns, but incidence, mammograms, and false-positives would increase. If all women received the indicated systemic treatment (with no screening change), then 11,400-14,500 more deaths would be averted versus current patterns, but increased toxicity could occur. If 100% received screening plus indicated therapy, there would be 18,100-20,400 fewer deaths. Eliminating obesity yields 3300-5700 fewer breast cancer deaths versus continuation of current obesity levels. Maximal reductions in breast cancer deaths could be achieved through optimizing treatment use, followed by increasing screening use and obesity prevention. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  7. Towards optimised information about clinical trials; identification and validation of key issues in collaboration with cancer patient advocates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, P; Nilbert, M; Bendahl, P-O

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trials are crucial to improve cancer treatment but recruitment is difficult. Optimised patient information has been recognised as a key issue. In line with the increasing focus on patients' perspectives in health care, we aimed to study patients' opinions about the written information used...... in three clinical trials for breast cancer. Primary data collection was done in focus group interviews with breast cancer patient advocates. Content analysis identified three major themes: comprehensibility, emotions and associations, and decision making. Based on the advocates' suggestions...... the possibility to discontinue treatment were perceived as the most important issues. Patients' views of the information in clinical trials provide new insights and identify key issues to consider in optimising future written information and may improve recruitment to clinical cancer trials....

  8. Towards optimised information about clinical trials; identification and validation of key issues in collaboration with cancer patient advocates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellson, P; Nilbert, M; Bendahl, P-O;

    2011-01-01

    the possibility to discontinue treatment were perceived as the most important issues. Patients' views of the information in clinical trials provide new insights and identify key issues to consider in optimising future written information and may improve recruitment to clinical cancer trials.......Clinical trials are crucial to improve cancer treatment but recruitment is difficult. Optimised patient information has been recognised as a key issue. In line with the increasing focus on patients' perspectives in health care, we aimed to study patients' opinions about the written information used...... in three clinical trials for breast cancer. Primary data collection was done in focus group interviews with breast cancer patient advocates. Content analysis identified three major themes: comprehensibility, emotions and associations, and decision making. Based on the advocates' suggestions...

  9. Performance Analysis Of A Upnp/Dhcompliant Robotic Adapter For Collaborative Tasks Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Alvarez Vazquez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the performance analysis of an adapter in accordance with standard UPnP DHCompliant (Digital Home Compliant for a service robot. The DHCompliant adapter has been developed to solve some limitations that UPnP protocol suffers and to develop new DHC concepts. Moreover, it showcases with a particular example how the open protocol DHC is useful for the development of collaborative tasks, localization, energy management and other fields altogether. That interoperability is being done between devices obtaining a virtual device which can obtain the controlpoint logic and the device logic simultaneously.

  10. WHIPPET: a collaborative software environment for medical image processing and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Haynor, David R.; Maravilla, Kenneth R.

    2007-03-01

    While there are many publicly available software packages for medical image processing, making them available to end users in clinical and research labs remains non-trivial. An even more challenging task is to mix these packages to form pipelines that meet specific needs seamlessly, because each piece of software usually has its own input/output formats, parameter sets, and so on. To address these issues, we are building WHIPPET (Washington Heterogeneous Image Processing Pipeline EnvironmenT), a collaborative platform for integrating image analysis tools from different sources. The central idea is to develop a set of Python scripts which glue the different packages together and make it possible to connect them in processing pipelines. To achieve this, an analysis is carried out for each candidate package for WHIPPET, describing input/output formats, parameters, ROI description methods, scripting and extensibility and classifying its compatibility with other WHIPPET components as image file level, scripting level, function extension level, or source code level. We then identify components that can be connected in a pipeline directly via image format conversion. We set up a TWiki server for web-based collaboration so that component analysis and task request can be performed online, as well as project tracking, knowledge base management, and technical support. Currently WHIPPET includes the FSL, MIPAV, FreeSurfer, BrainSuite, Measure, DTIQuery, and 3D Slicer software packages, and is expanding. Users have identified several needed task modules and we report on their implementation.

  11. Cancer Patients' Informational Needs: Qualitative Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Haydeh; Mardani-Hamooleh, Marjan

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the informational needs of cancer patients is a requirement to plan any educative care program for them. The aim of this study was to identify Iranian cancer patients' perceptions of informational needs. The study took a qualitative approach. Semi-structured interviews were held with 25 cancer patients in two teaching hospitals in Iran. Transcripts of the interviews underwent conventional content analysis, and categories were extracted. The results came under two main categories: disease-related informational needs and information needs related to daily life. Disease-related informational needs had two subcategories: obtaining information about the nature of disease and obtaining information about disease prognosis. Information needs related to daily life also had two subcategories: obtaining information about healthy lifestyle and obtaining information about regular activities of daily life. The findings provide deep understanding of cancer patients' informational needs in Iran.

  12. The 15-Country Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry: estimates of radiation-related cancer risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardis, E; Vrijheid, M; Blettner, M; Gilbert, E; Hakama, M; Hill, C; Howe, G; Kaldor, J; Muirhead, C R; Schubauer-Berigan, M; Yoshimura, T; Bermann, F; Cowper, G; Fix, J; Hacker, C; Heinmiller, B; Marshall, M; Thierry-Chef, I; Utterback, D; Ahn, Y-O; Amoros, E; Ashmore, P; Auvinen, A; Bae, J-M; Bernar, J; Biau, A; Combalot, E; Deboodt, P; Diez Sacristan, A; Eklöf, M; Engels, H; Engholm, G; Gulis, G; Habib, R R; Holan, K; Hyvonen, H; Kerekes, A; Kurtinaitis, J; Malker, H; Martuzzi, M; Mastauskas, A; Monnet, A; Moser, M; Pearce, M S; Richardson, D B; Rodriguez-Artalejo, F; Rogel, A; Tardy, H; Telle-Lamberton, M; Turai, I; Usel, M; Veress, K

    2007-04-01

    A 15-Country collaborative cohort study was conducted to provide direct estimates of cancer risk following protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. Analyses included 407,391 nuclear industry workers monitored individually for external radiation and 5.2 million person-years of follow-up. A significant association was seen between radiation dose and all-cause mortality [excess relative risk (ERR) 0.42 per Sv, 90% CI 0.07, 0.79; 18,993 deaths]. This was mainly attributable to a dose-related increase in all cancer mortality (ERR/Sv 0.97, 90% CI 0.28, 1.77; 5233 deaths). Among 31 specific types of malignancies studied, a significant association was found for lung cancer (ERR/Sv 1.86, 90% CI 0.49, 3.63; 1457 deaths) and a borderline significant (P = 0.06) association for multiple myeloma (ERR/Sv 6.15, 90% CI risk estimates.

  13. Mind the gap in clinical trials: A participatory action analysis with citizen collaborators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Amy; Liew, Su May; Kirkpatrick, Jo; Price, Jazmin; Lopreto, Taylor; Nelken, Yasmin

    2017-02-01

    What are the strengths, gaps, expectations, and barriers to research engagement in clinical trials as communicated through social media? Clinical trials test treatments to provide reliable information for safety and effectiveness. Trials are building blocks in which what is learned in earlier research can be used to improve treatments, compare alternatives, and improve quality of life. For 20 years, the percentages of clinical trials volunteers have decreased whereas the costs of running clinical trials have multiplied. Participants enroll in trials to access latest treatments, to help others, and to advance science, but there is growing unrest. The priorities of those running the trials differ from those of the participants, and the roles for public research involvement lack clarity. Changes to bridge these gaps in the research culture are proposed through the use of participatory action research (PAR) in which stakeholders collaborate to improve research methodology, galvanize citizen participation, multiply health knowledge, problem-solve barriers to access, and explore the value of research volunteers as collaborators. PAR enabled the inclusion of citizens as full collaborators. Social media data were gathered for 120 days until saturation was reached. De-identified data were organized into a Strengths Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats framework and coded into themes for analysis. After the analysis, the authors prioritized potential solutions for improving research engagement. Strengths and opportunities remained constant through trial phases, disease burdens, and interventions. Threats included alienation, litigation, disparity, and shaming. Poor management and barriers to inclusion were identified as weaknesses. Opportunities included improving resource management and information quality. Barriers were minimized when relationships between staff and participants were inclusive, respectful, tolerant, and open to change. Participants' communications

  14. Functional categories of TP53 mutation in colorectal cancer: results of an International Collaborative Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacopetta, B.; Russo, A.; Bazan, V.; Dardanoni, G.; Gebbia, N.; Soussi, T.; Kerr, D.J.; Elsaleh, H.; Soong, R.; Kandioler, D.; Janschek, E.; Kappel, S.; Lung, M.; Leung, C.S.; Ko, J.M.; Yuen, S.; Ho, J.; Leung, S.Y.; Crapez, E.; Duffour, J.; Ychou, M.; Leahy, D.T.; O'Donoghue, D.P.; Agnese, V.; Cascio, S.; Fede, G. Di; Chieco-Bianchi, L.; Bertorelle, R.; Belluco, C.; Giaretti, W.; Castagnola, P.; Ricevuto, E.; Ficorella, C.; Bosari, S.; Arizzi, C.D.; Miyaki, M.; Onda, M.; Kampman, E.; Diergaarde, B.; Royds, J.; Lothe, R.A.; Diep, C.B.; Meling, G.I.; Ostrowski, J.; Trzeciak, L.; Guzinska-Ustymowicz, K.; Zalewski, B.; Capella, G.M.; Moreno, V.; Peinado, M.A.; Lonnroth, C.; Lundholm, K.; Sun, X.F.; Jansson, A.; Bouzourene, H.; Hsieh, L.L.; Tang, R.; Smith, D.R.; Allen-Mersh, T.G.; Khan, Z.A.; Shorthouse, A.J.; Silverman, M.L.; Kato, S.; Ishioka, C.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss of TP53 function through gene mutation is a critical event in the development and progression of many tumour types including colorectal cancer (CRC). In vitro studies have found considerable heterogeneity amongst different TP53 mutants in terms of their transactivating abilities. Th

  15. Functional categories of TP53 mutation in colorectal cancer: results of an International Collaborative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacopetta, B.; Russo, A.; Bazan, V.; Kampman, E.; Diergaarde, B.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Loss of TP53 function through gene mutation is a critical event in the development and progression of many tumour types including colorectal cancer (CRC). In vitro studies have found considerable heterogeneity amongst different TP53 mutants in terms of their transactivating abilities. Th

  16. Cancer detection by quantitative fluorescence image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, W L; Hemstreet, G P

    1988-02-01

    Quantitative fluorescence image analysis is a rapidly evolving biophysical cytochemical technology with the potential for multiple clinical and basic research applications. We report the application of this technique for bladder cancer detection and discuss its potential usefulness as an adjunct to methods used currently by urologists for the diagnosis and management of bladder cancer. Quantitative fluorescence image analysis is a cytological method that incorporates 2 diagnostic techniques, quantitation of nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid and morphometric analysis, in a single semiautomated system to facilitate the identification of rare events, that is individual cancer cells. When compared to routine cytopathology for detection of bladder cancer in symptomatic patients, quantitative fluorescence image analysis demonstrated greater sensitivity (76 versus 33 per cent) for the detection of low grade transitional cell carcinoma. The specificity of quantitative fluorescence image analysis in a small control group was 94 per cent and with the manual method for quantitation of absolute nuclear fluorescence intensity in the screening of high risk asymptomatic subjects the specificity was 96.7 per cent. The more familiar flow cytometry is another fluorescence technique for measurement of nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid. However, rather than identifying individual cancer cells, flow cytometry identifies cellular pattern distributions, that is the ratio of normal to abnormal cells. Numerous studies by others have shown that flow cytometry is a sensitive method to monitor patients with diagnosed urological disease. Based upon results in separate quantitative fluorescence image analysis and flow cytometry studies, it appears that these 2 fluorescence techniques may be complementary tools for urological screening, diagnosis and management, and that they also may be useful separately or in combination to elucidate the oncogenic process, determine the biological potential of tumors

  17. Longitudinal burnout-collaboration patterns in Japanese medical care workers at special needs schools: a latent class growth analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanayama M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mieko Kanayama,1 Machiko Suzuki,1 Yoshikazu Yuma2 1Department of Human Health Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan; 2Department of Human Development Education, Graduate School of Education, Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Kato, Hyogo, Japan Abstract: The present study aimed to identify and characterize potential burnout types and the relationship between burnout and collaboration over time. Latent class growth analysis and the growth mixture model were used to identify and characterize heterogeneous patterns of longitudinal stability and change in burnout, and the relationship between burnout and collaboration. We collected longitudinal data at three time points based on Japanese academic terms. The 396 study participants included academic teachers, yogo teachers, and registered nurses in Japanese special needs schools. The best model included four types of both burnout and collaboration in latent class growth analysis with intercept, slope, and quadratic terms. The four types of burnout were as follows: low stable, moderate unstable, high unstable, and high decreasing. They were identified as involving inverse collaboration function. The results indicated that there could be dynamic burnout types, namely moderate unstable, high unstable, and high decreasing, when focusing on growth trajectories in latent class analyses. The finding that collaboration was dynamic for dynamic burnout types and stable for stable burnout types is of great interest. This was probably related to the inverse relationship between the two constructs. Keywords: burnout, collaboration, latent class growth analysis, interprofessional care, special needs schools

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research Research on Causes of ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  19. Content analysis of cancer blog posts*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The efficacy of user-defined subject tagging and software-generated subject tagging for describing and organizing cancer blog contents was explored. Methods: The Technorati search engine was used to search the blogosphere for cancer blog postings generated during a two-month period. Postings were mined for relevant subject concepts, and blogger-defined tags and Text Analysis Portal for Research (TAPoR) software–defined tags were generated for each message. Descriptive data were collected, and the blogger-defined tags were compared with software-generated tags. Three standard vocabularies (Opinion Templates, Basic Resource, and Medical Subject Headings [MeSH] Resource) were used to assign subject terms to the blogs, with results compared for efficacy in information retrieval. Results: Descriptive data showed that most of the studied cancer blogs (80%) contained fewer than 500 words each. The numbers of blogger-defined tags per posting (M = 4.49 per posting) were significantly smaller than the TAPoR keywords (M = 23.55 per posting). Both blogger-defined subject tags and software-generated subject tags were often overly broad or overly narrow in focus, producing less than effective search results for those seeking to extract information from cancer blogs. Conclusions: Additional exploration into methods for systematically organizing cancer blog postings is necessary if blogs are to become stable and efficacious information resources for cancer patients, friends, families, or providers. PMID:19851489

  20. Content analysis of cancer blog posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin

    2009-10-01

    The efficacy of user-defined subject tagging and software-generated subject tagging for describing and organizing cancer blog contents was explored. The Technorati search engine was used to search the blogosphere for cancer blog postings generated during a two-month period. Postings were mined for relevant subject concepts, and blogger-defined tags and Text Analysis Portal for Research (TAPoR) software-defined tags were generated for each message. Descriptive data were collected, and the blogger-defined tags were compared with software-generated tags. Three standard vocabularies (Opinion Templates, Basic Resource, and Medical Subject Headings [MeSH] Resource) were used to assign subject terms to the blogs, with results compared for efficacy in information retrieval. Descriptive data showed that most of the studied cancer blogs (80%) contained fewer than 500 words each. The numbers of blogger-defined tags per posting (M = 4.49 per posting) were significantly smaller than the TAPoR keywords (M = 23.55 per posting). Both blogger-defined subject tags and software-generated subject tags were often overly broad or overly narrow in focus, producing less than effective search results for those seeking to extract information from cancer blogs. Additional exploration into methods for systematically organizing cancer blog postings is necessary if blogs are to become stable and efficacious information resources for cancer patients, friends, families, or providers.

  1. Collaboration 'Engineerability'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn L.; de Vreede, Gert-Jan; Briggs, Robert O.; Sol, Henk G.

    2010-01-01

    Collaboration Engineering is an approach to create sustained collaboration support by designing collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks, and transferring those designs to practitioners to execute for themselves without ongoing support from collaboration professionals. A key assum

  2. Risk analysis of colorectal cancer incidence by gene expression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangkuan, Wei-Chuan; Lin, Hung-Che; Chang, Yu-Tien; Jian, Chen-En; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Chen, Kang-Hua; Liu, Ya-Fang; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Chou, Hsiu-Ling; Yao, Chung-Tay

    2017-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading cancers worldwide. Several studies have performed microarray data analyses for cancer classification and prognostic analyses. Microarray assays also enable the identification of gene signatures for molecular characterization and treatment prediction. Objective Microarray gene expression data from the online Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database were used to to distinguish colorectal cancer from normal colon tissue samples. Methods We collected microarray data from the GEO database to establish colorectal cancer microarray gene expression datasets for a combined analysis. Using the Prediction Analysis for Microarrays (PAM) method and the GSEA MSigDB resource, we analyzed the 14,698 genes that were identified through an examination of their expression values between normal and tumor tissues. Results Ten genes (ABCG2, AQP8, SPIB, CA7, CLDN8, SCNN1B, SLC30A10, CD177, PADI2, and TGFBI) were found to be good indicators of the candidate genes that correlate with CRC. From these selected genes, an average of six significant genes were obtained using the PAM method, with an accuracy rate of 95%. The results demonstrate the potential of utilizing a model with the PAM method for data mining. After a detailed review of the published reports, the results confirmed that the screened candidate genes are good indicators for cancer risk analysis using the PAM method. Conclusions Six genes were selected with 95% accuracy to effectively classify normal and colorectal cancer tissues. We hope that these results will provide the basis for new research projects in clinical practice that aim to rapidly assess colorectal cancer risk using microarray gene expression analysis. PMID:28229027

  3. Open source platform for collaborative construction of wearable sensor datasets for human motion analysis and an application for gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, César; González, Manuel A; Hernández, Carmen; Vegas, Jesús

    2016-10-01

    Nearly every practical improvement in modeling human motion is well founded in a properly designed collection of data or datasets. These datasets must be made publicly available for the community could validate and accept them. It is reasonable to concede that a collective, guided enterprise could serve to devise solid and substantial datasets, as a result of a collaborative effort, in the same sense as the open software community does. In this way datasets could be complemented, extended and expanded in size with, for example, more individuals, samples and human actions. For this to be possible some commitments must be made by the collaborators, being one of them sharing the same data acquisition platform. In this paper, we offer an affordable open source hardware and software platform based on inertial wearable sensors in a way that several groups could cooperate in the construction of datasets through common software suitable for collaboration. Some experimental results about the throughput of the overall system are reported showing the feasibility of acquiring data from up to 6 sensors with a sampling frequency no less than 118Hz. Also, a proof-of-concept dataset is provided comprising sampled data from 12 subjects suitable for gait analysis.

  4. The SWENOTECA group: A good example of continuous binational and multidisciplinary collaboration for patients with testicular cancer in Sweden and Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandstad, Torgrim; Ståhl, Olof; Håkansson, Ulf; Wahlqvist, Rolf; Klepp, Olbjørn; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the Swedish and Norwegian Testicular Cancer Group (SWENOTECA), with an emphasis on the history of SWENOTECA, organization, results and current status. SWENOTECA was founded in 1981 as a binational organization open to hospitals in Sweden and Norway treating testicular cancer. It has since published treatment protocols for testicular cancer and prospectively registered patients with testicular cancer. Today, all hospitals in Norway and Sweden involved in the care of testicular cancer participate in SWENOTECA, and all patients with testicular cancer are prospectively registered in a population-based database. Nine protocols with standardized guidelines on the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of testicular cancer have been published. In addition to the guidelines, several studies have been performed or initiated within the scope of SWENOTECA. The details are presented in this article. SWENOTECA has been a very fruitful binational collaboration and has thoughtfully evolved over time. The group's continuous work and dedication have provided an example for other national and international cancer networks. The binational implementation of standardized guidelines has resulted in excellent patient outcomes, regardless of place of residence. Although testicular cancer is a relatively rare disease, the population-based binational organization of SWENOTECA has made it possible to publish some of the largest studies in the field of testicular cancer.

  5. Mobilising collaborative consumption lifestyles: a comparative frame analysis of time banking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laamanen, M.; Wahlen, S.

    2015-01-01

    AbstractIn this paper we elaborate how the framing of lifestyle-based collaborative consumption impacts local mobilisation. We present time banking as a collaborative consumption lifestyle emerging from literatures on collaborative consumption and lifestyle movements. The cultural processes of

  6. User-Centered Design Guidelines for Collaborative Software for Intelligence Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtz, Jean; Endert, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    In this position paper we discuss the necessity of using User-Centered Design (UCD) methods in order to design collaborative software for the intelligence community. We discuss a number of studies of collaboration in the intelligence community and use this information to provide some guidelines for collaboration software.

  7. LabKey Server: An open source platform for scientific data integration, analysis and collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lum Karl

    2011-03-01

    countries and 350 organizations. It tracks roughly 27,000 assay runs, 860,000 specimen vials and 1,300,000 vial transfers. Conclusions Sharing data, analysis tools and infrastructure can speed the efforts of large research consortia by enhancing efficiency and enabling new insights. The Atlas installation of LabKey Server demonstrates the utility of the LabKey platform for collaborative research. Stable, supported builds of LabKey Server are freely available for download at http://www.labkey.org. Documentation and source code are available under the Apache License 2.0.

  8. Measuring Nutrition Governance: An Analysis of Commitment, Capability, and Collaboration in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Patrick; Ghosh, Shibani; Shrestha, Robin; Namirembe, Grace; Gurung, Sabi; Sapkota, Diplav; Bell, Winnie Fay; Davis, Dale; Kennedy, Eileen; Neupane, Shailes; Manohar, Swetha; Baral, Kedar

    2016-12-01

    Global commitments to nutrition have supported calls for better evidence to support effective investments at national level. However, too little attention has so far been paid to the role of governance in achieving impacts. This article explores the ways by which the commitment and capabilities of policy implementers affect collaborative efforts for achieving nutrition goals. Over 1370 structured interviews were held with government and nongovernment officials over 3 years in 21 districts. Coded responses supported quantitative analysis of stakeholders' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding policy implementation. Stakeholder commitment was already high in 2013 when a new national policy was adopted, but capabilities were weak. Only one-third of interviewed respondents had any nutrition training. Rollout of training focusing on districts targeted for early implementation of multisector programming. This raised levels of nutrition training among interviewed respondents to 57% in 2015, which raised demand for technical information to support actions. Better understanding of the complexity of cross-sector work led to calls for higher budgets and more effective cross-sectoral collaboration. Nepal offers an example of effective efforts to improve nutrition governance across sectors at all levels of administration. The promotion of awareness, capacity, and new ways of working shows promise. Trainings, information sharing, and management support led to growing willingness among civil servants to engage across sectors. Structured surveys offer a viable way to track change across institutions and sectors. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. STATICS ANALYSIS AND OPENGL BASED 3D SIMULATION OF COLLABORATIVE RECONFIGURABLE PLANETARY ROBOTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zheng; Ma Shugen; Li Bin; Zhang Liping; Cao Binggang

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study mechanics characteristics of two cooperative reconfigurable planetary robots when they get across an obstacle, and to find out the relationship between the maximum height of a stair with the configuration of the two-robot, and to find some restrictions of kinematics for the cooperation. Methods Multirobot cooperation theory is used in the whole study process. Inverse kinematics of the robot is used to form a desired configuration in the cooperation process. Static equations are established to analyze the relations between the friction factor, the configuration of robots and the maximum height of a stair. Kinematics analysis is used to find the restrictions of the two collaborative robots in position, velocity and acceleration. Results 3D simulation shows that the two cooperative robots can climb up a stair under the condition of a certain height and a certain friction factor between robot wheel and the surface of the stair. Following the restrictions of kinematics, the climbing mission is fulfilled successfully and smoothly. Conclusion The maximum height of a stair, which the two cooperative robots can climb up, is involved in the configuration of robots, friction factor between the stair and the robots. The most strict restriction of the friction factor does not appear in the horizontal position. In any case, the maximum height is smaller than half of the distance between the centroid of robot1 with the centroid of robot2. However, the height can be higher than the radius of one robot wheel, which profit from the collaboration.

  10. CM-DataONE: A Framework for collaborative analysis of climate model output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Bai, Yuqi; Li, Sha; Dong, Wenhao; Huang, Wenyu; Xu, Shiming; Lin, Yanluan; Wang, Bin

    2015-04-01

    CM-DataONE is a distributed collaborative analysis framework for climate model data which aims to break through the data access barriers of increasing file size and to accelerate research process. As data size involved in project such as the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) has reached petabytes, conventional methods for analysis and diagnosis of model outputs have been rather time-consuming and redundant. CM-DataONE is developed for data publishers and researchers from relevant areas. It can enable easy access to distributed data and provide extensible analysis functions based on tools such as NCAR Command Language, NetCDF Operators (NCO) and Climate Data Operators (CDO). CM-DataONE can be easily installed, configured, and maintained. The main web application has two separate parts which communicate with each other through APIs based on HTTP protocol. The analytic server is designed to be installed in each data node while a data portal can be configured anywhere and connect to a nearest node. Functions such as data query, analytic task submission, status monitoring, visualization and product downloading are provided to end users by data portal. Data conform to CMIP5 Model Output Format in each peer node can be scanned by the server and mapped to a global information database. A scheduler included in the server is responsible for task decomposition, distribution and consolidation. Analysis functions are always executed where data locate. Analysis function package included in the server has provided commonly used functions such as EOF analysis, trend analysis and time series. Functions are coupled with data by XML descriptions and can be easily extended. Various types of results can be obtained by users for further studies. This framework has significantly decreased the amount of data to be transmitted and improved efficiency in model intercomparison jobs by supporting online analysis and multi-node collaboration. To end users, data query is

  11. Social network analysis as a method for analyzing interaction in collaborative online learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Rice Doran

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Social network analysis software such as NodeXL has been used to describe participation and interaction in numerous social networks, but it has not yet been widely used to examine dynamics in online classes, where participation is frequently required rather than optional and participation patterns may be impacted by the requirements of the class, the instructor’s activities, or participants’ intrinsic engagement with the subject matter. Such social network analysis, which examines the dynamics and interactions among groups of participants in a social network or learning group, can be valuable in programs focused on teaching collaborative and communicative skills, including teacher preparation programs. Applied to these programs, social network analysis can provide information about instructional practices likely to facilitate student interaction and collaboration across diverse student populations. This exploratory study used NodeXL to visualize students’ participation in an online course, with the goal of identifying (1 ways in which NodeXL could be used to describe patterns in participant interaction within an instructional setting and (2 identifying specific patterns in participant interaction among students in this particular course. In this sample, general education teachers demonstrated higher measures of connection and interaction with other participants than did those from specialist (ESOL or special education backgrounds, and tended to interact more frequently with all participants than the majority of participants from specialist backgrounds. We recommend further research to delineate specific applications of NodeXL within an instructional context, particularly to identify potential patterns in student participation based on variables such as gender, background, cultural and linguistic heritage, prior training and education, and prior experience so that instructors can ensure their practice helps to facilitate student interaction

  12. Radiation-Therapeutic Agent Clinical Trials: Leveraging Advantages of a National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Naoko; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bernhard, Eric J; Zwiebel, James; Norman Coleman, C; Kunos, Charles A

    2016-10-01

    A number of oncology phase II radiochemotherapy trials with promising results have been conducted late in the overall experimental therapeutic agent development process. Accelerated development and approval of experimental therapeutic agents have stimulated further interest in much earlier radiation-agent studies to increase the likelihood of success in phase III trials. To sustain this interest, more forward-thinking preclinical radiobiology experimental designs are needed to improve discovery of promising radiochemotherapy plus agent combinations for clinical trial testing. These experimental designs should better inform next-step radiation-agent clinical trial dose, schedule, exposure, and therapeutic effect. Recognizing the need for a better strategy to develop preclinical data supporting radiation-agent phase I or II trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and the NCI-Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch of the Radiation Research Program have partnered to promote earlier radiobiology studies of CTEP portfolio agents. In this Seminars in Radiation Oncology article, four key components of this effort are discussed. First, we outline steps for accessing CTEP agents for preclinical testing. Second, we propose radiobiology studies that facilitate transition from preclinical testing to early phase trial activation. Third, we navigate steps that walk through CTEP agent strategic development paths available for radiation-agent testing. Fourth, we highlight a new NCI-sponsored cooperative agreement grant supporting in vitro and in vivo radiation-CTEP agent testing that informs early phase trial designs. Throughout the article, we include contemporary examples of successful radiation-agent development initiatives.

  13. Evaluate the Impact of your Education and Outreach Program Using the Quantitative Collaborative Impact Analysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalice, D.; Davis, H. B.

    2015-12-01

    The AGU scientific community has a strong motivation to improve the STEM knowledge and skills of today's youth, and we are dedicating increasing amounts of our time and energy to education and outreach work. Scientists and educational project leads can benefit from a deeper connection to the value of evaluation, how to work with an evaluator, and how to effectively integrate evaluation into projects to increase their impact. This talk will introduce a method for evaluating educational activities, including public talks, professional development workshops for educators, youth engagement programs, and more. We will discuss the impetus for developing this method--the Quantitative Collaborative Impact Analysis Method--how it works, and the successes we've had with it in the NASA Astrobiology education community.

  14. Collaborative analysis of alpha-synuclein gene promoter variability and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraganore, Demetrius M; de Andrade, Mariza; Elbaz, Alexis; Farrer, Matthew J; Ioannidis, John P; Krüger, Rejko; Rocca, Walter A; Schneider, Nicole K; Lesnick, Timothy G; Lincoln, Sarah J; Hulihan, Mary M; Aasly, Jan O; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Chartier-Harlin, Marie-Christine; Checkoway, Harvey; Ferrarese, Carlo; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios; Hattori, Nobutaka; Kawakami, Hideshi; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Lynch, Timothy; Mellick, George D; Papapetropoulos, Spiridon; Parsian, Abbas; Quattrone, Aldo; Riess, Olaf; Tan, Eng-King; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2006-08-09

    Identification and replication of susceptibility genes for Parkinson disease at the population level have been hampered by small studies with potential biases. Alpha-synuclein (SNCA) has been one of the most promising susceptibility genes, but large-scale studies have been lacking. To determine whether allele-length variability in the dinucleotide repeat sequence (REP1) of the SNCA gene promoter is associated with Parkinson disease susceptibility, whether SNCA promoter haplotypes are associated with Parkinson disease, and whether REP1 variability modifies age at onset. We performed a collaborative analysis of individual-level data on SNCA REP1 and flanking markers in patients with Parkinson disease and controls. Study site recruitment, data collection, and analyses were performed between April 5, 2004, and December 31, 2005. Eighteen participating sites of a global genetics consortium provided clinical data. Genotyping was performed for SNCA REP1, -770, and -116 markers at individual sites; however, each site also provided 20 DNA samples for regenotyping centrally. Measures included estimations of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in controls; a test of heterogeneity; analyses for association of single variants or haplotypes; and survival analyses for age at onset. Of the 18 sites, 11 met stringent criteria for concordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and low genotyping error rate. These 11 sites provided complete data for 2692 cases and 2652 controls. There was no heterogeneity across studies (P>.60). The SNCA REP1 alleles differed in frequency for cases and controls (PParkinson disease (odds ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.69; PParkinson disease only when they included REP1 as one of the loci. However, genotypes defined by REP1 alleles did not modify age at onset (P = .55). This large-scale collaborative analysis demonstrates that SNCA REP1 allele-length variability is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease.

  15. NeOProM: Neonatal Oxygenation Prospective Meta-analysis Collaboration study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The appropriate level of oxygenation for extremely preterm neonates (90% have been reported to have greater rates of morbidity including retinopathy of prematurity and chronic lung disease. In order to answer this clinical dilemma reliably, large scale trial evidence is needed. Methods/Design To detect a small but important 4% increase in death or severe disability in survivors, over 5000 neonates would need to be recruited. As extreme prematurity affects 1% of births, such a project undertaken by one trial group would be prohibitively lengthy and expensive. Hence, the Neonatal Oxygenation Prospective Meta-analysis (NeOProM Collaboration has been formed. A prospective meta-analysis (PMA is one where studies are identified, evaluated, and determined to be eligible before the results of any included studies are known or published, thereby avoiding some of the potential biases inherent in standard, retrospective meta-analyses. This methodology provides the same strengths as a single large-scale multicentre randomised study whilst allowing greater pragmatic flexibility. The NeOProM Collaboration protocol (NCT01124331 has been agreed prior to the results of individual trials being available. This includes pre-specifying the hypotheses, inclusion criteria and outcome measures to be used. Each trial will first publish their respective results as they become available and the combined meta-analytic results, using individual patient data, will be published when all trials are complete. The primary outcome to be assessed is a composite outcome of death or major disability at 18 months - 2 years corrected age. Secondary outcomes include several measures of neonatal morbidity. The size of the combined dataset will allow the effect of the interventions to be explored more reliably with respect to pre-specified patient- and intervention-level characteristics. Discussion Results should be available by 2014.

  16. A New Approach to Analyzing Patterns of Collaboration in Co-authorship Networks - Mesoscopic Analysis and Interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Velden, Theresa A; Lagoze, Carl J

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on methods to study patterns of collaboration in co-authorship networks at the mesocopic level. We combine qualitative methods (participant interviews) with quantitative methods (network analysis) and demonstrate the value of our approach in a case study comparing three research fields in chemistry. A mesoscopic level of analysis means that in addition to the basic analytic unit of the individual researcher as node in a co-author network, we analyse the clustering of authors into groups that we interpret as basic collective units of knowledge production in a research specialty. We find a variety of structural types of these clusters that point to potential variations in the underlying social configurations and collaborative working modes of the collective units in the respective research specialties. We further identify two types of co-authorship relations between clusters of authors based on linkage patterns. One type corresponds to extensive inter-group collaboration and the other type to...

  17. Assessing the scientific research productivity of Puerto Rican cancer researchers: bibliometric analysis from the Science Citation Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, William A; Suárez-Balseiro, Carlos; Suárez, Erick; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Santiago-Rodríguez, Eduardo J; Ortiz, Ana P

    2010-09-01

    The analysis of cancer scientific production in Puerto Rico is largely unexplored. The objective of this study was to characterize trends in cancer-related research publications by authors affiliated to Puerto Rican institutions in recent decades. Manuscripts were retrieved from the Science Citation Index (SCI) database from 1982 to 2009. Search criterions were that the author's affiliation field contained some institution located in Puerto Rico and that the manuscripts were related to cancer research (according to keywords from the National Cancer Institute' cancer definition). Indexes measured in our analysis included number and type of manuscript, scientific collaboration, author's affiliation, and journal visibility. All the analyses were conducted using ProCite for bibliographic information management and STATA and SEER Joinpoint for the statistical inquiry. From 1982-2009, cancer-related papers authored by scientists located in Puerto Rico came to 451. Over the last three decades the scientific production underwent significant growth (APC = 6.4%, p scientific production in Puerto Rico underwent constant growth during the last three decades. A complete understanding of citing, publishing, and collaboration patterns in Puerto Rico is critical to researchers, policy makers, and health-care professionals in order to make informed decisions about cancer research priorities.

  18. Effects of enterprise technology on supply chain collaboration: analysis of China-linked supply chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling

    2012-02-01

    Supply chain collaboration has received increasing attention from scholars and practitioners in recent years. However, our understanding of how enterprise information technology facilitates supply chain collaboration is still very limited, especially with regard to Chinese enterprise ownerships such as state-owned firms, joint-venture firms and local village-owned firms. This paper extends the theory established in enterprise information technology (IT) and supply chain collaboration literature and relates it with coordination in China-linked supply chain. Drawing upon an empirical study from 177 Chinese companies, we provide three major findings: (i) uncovered the importance of leveraging enterprise IT through supply chain collaboration; (ii) identified the relationship between enterprise ownership and enterprise technology use and supply chain collaboration in China-linked supply chain and (iii) illustrated effects of supply chain collaborative activities on operational and market performance.

  19. Nanotechnology researchers' collaboration relationships: a gender analysis of access to scientific information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Felez, Africa; Woolley, Richard; Cañibano, Carolina

    2015-02-01

    Women are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields, particularly at higher levels of organizations. This article investigates the impact of this underrepresentation on the processes of interpersonal collaboration in nanotechnology. Analyses are conducted to assess: (I) the comparative tie strength of women's and men's collaborations, (2) whether women and men gain equal access to scientific information through collaborators, (3) which tie characteristics are associated with access to information for women and men, and (4) whether women and men acquire equivalent amounts of information by strengthening ties. Our results show that the overall tie strength is less for women's collaborations and that women acquire less strategic information through collaborators. Women and men rely on different tie characteristics in accessing information, but are equally effective in acquiring additional information resources by strengthening ties. This article demonstrates that the underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics has an impact on the interpersonal processes of scientific collaboration, to the disadvantage of women scientists.

  20. SibRank: Signed bipartite network analysis for neighbor-based collaborative ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Bita; Haratizadeh, Saman

    2016-09-01

    Collaborative ranking is an emerging field of recommender systems that utilizes users' preference data rather than rating values. Unfortunately, neighbor-based collaborative ranking has gained little attention despite its more flexibility and justifiability. This paper proposes a novel framework, called SibRank that seeks to improve the state of the art neighbor-based collaborative ranking methods. SibRank represents users' preferences as a signed bipartite network, and finds similar users, through a novel personalized ranking algorithm in signed networks.

  1. Scientific collaboration: a social network analysis based on literature of animal-derived regenerative implantable medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shu-Yang; Wang, Hong-Man

    2016-09-01

    The collaboration network of English publications on animal-derived regenerative implantable medical devices based on tissue engineering technology and its evolving processes and current states were mapped in this paper. A total of 10 159 English papers published before 1 January 2015 were obtained in eight databases. Social network analysis was conducted on these papers by utilizing UCINET software and Statistical Analysis Software for Informatics researched and developed by Peking University. The collaboration network has evolved from scattered formation to single-core dominated, and then to a core-edge one; collaboration has become more frequent and wider; network density and centrality have decreased; USA, UK and China are the top three countries with Wake Forest University, Harvard University and Tufts University being the top three contributing institutions cooperated mostly during the period between 2010 and 2014; plenty of edge institutes exist. In conclusion, more collaboration among different institutions and countries is needed; Edge institutions and developing countries should expand their scope of collaboration.

  2. Longitudinal burnout-collaboration patterns in Japanese medical care workers at special needs schools: a latent class growth analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Mieko; Suzuki, Machiko; Yuma, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify and characterize potential burnout types and the relationship between burnout and collaboration over time. Latent class growth analysis and the growth mixture model were used to identify and characterize heterogeneous patterns of longitudinal stability and change in burnout, and the relationship between burnout and collaboration. We collected longitudinal data at three time points based on Japanese academic terms. The 396 study participants included academic teachers, yogo teachers, and registered nurses in Japanese special needs schools. The best model included four types of both burnout and collaboration in latent class growth analysis with intercept, slope, and quadratic terms. The four types of burnout were as follows: low stable, moderate unstable, high unstable, and high decreasing. They were identified as involving inverse collaboration function. The results indicated that there could be dynamic burnout types, namely moderate unstable, high unstable, and high decreasing, when focusing on growth trajectories in latent class analyses. The finding that collaboration was dynamic for dynamic burnout types and stable for stable burnout types is of great interest. This was probably related to the inverse relationship between the two constructs.

  3. Cloud hosting of the IPython Notebook to Provide Collaborative Research Environments for Big Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Philip; Lawrence, Bryan; Gomez-Dans, Jose; Holt, John

    2015-04-01

    We explore how the popular IPython Notebook computing system can be hosted on a cloud platform to provide a flexible virtual research hosting environment for Earth Observation data processing and analysis and how this approach can be expanded more broadly into a generic SaaS (Software as a Service) offering for the environmental sciences. OPTIRAD (OPTImisation environment for joint retrieval of multi-sensor RADiances) is a project funded by the European Space Agency to develop a collaborative research environment for Data Assimilation of Earth Observation products for land surface applications. Data Assimilation provides a powerful means to combine multiple sources of data and derive new products for this application domain. To be most effective, it requires close collaboration between specialists in this field, land surface modellers and end users of data generated. A goal of OPTIRAD then is to develop a collaborative research environment to engender shared working. Another significant challenge is that of data volume and complexity. Study of land surface requires high spatial and temporal resolutions, a relatively large number of variables and the application of algorithms which are computationally expensive. These problems can be addressed with the application of parallel processing techniques on specialist compute clusters. However, scientific users are often deterred by the time investment required to port their codes to these environments. Even when successfully achieved, it may be difficult to readily change or update. This runs counter to the scientific process of continuous experimentation, analysis and validation. The IPython Notebook provides users with a web-based interface to multiple interactive shells for the Python programming language. Code, documentation and graphical content can be saved and shared making it directly applicable to OPTIRAD's requirements for a shared working environment. Given the web interface it can be readily made into a hosted

  4. [Research of Electroencephalogram for Sleep Stage Based on Collaborative Representation and Kernel Entropy Component Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Panbo; Shi, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Jiang, Qikun; Gu, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Sleep quality is closely related to human health. It is very important to correctly discriminate the sleep stages for evaluating sleep quality, diagnosing and analyzing the sleep-related disorders. Polysomnography (PSG) signals are commonly used to record and analyze sleep stages. Effective feature extraction and representation is one of the most important steps to improve the performance of sleep stage classification. In this work, a collaborative representation (CR) algorithm was adopted to re-represent the original extracted features from electroencephalogram sig- nal, and then the kernel entropy component analysis (KECA) algorithm was further used to reduce the feature dimension of CR-feature. To evaluate the performance of CR-KECA, we compared the original feature, CR feature and readied CR feature (CR-PCA) after principal component analysis (PCA). The experimental results of sleep stage classification indicated that the CR-KECA method achieved the best performance compared with the original feature, CR feature, and CR-PCA feature with the classification accuracy of 68.74 +/- 0.46%, sensitivity of 68.76 +/- 0.43% and specificity of 92.19 +/- 0.11%. Moreover, CR algorithm had low computational complexity, and the feature dimension after KECA was much smaller, which made CR-KECA algorithm suitable for the analysis of large-scale sleep data.

  5. Multidisciplinary Inverse Reliability Analysis Based on Collaborative Optimization with Combination of Linear Approximations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Jia Meng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidisciplinary reliability is an important part of the reliability-based multidisciplinary design optimization (RBMDO. However, it usually has a considerable amount of calculation. The purpose of this paper is to improve the computational efficiency of multidisciplinary inverse reliability analysis. A multidisciplinary inverse reliability analysis method based on collaborative optimization with combination of linear approximations (CLA-CO is proposed in this paper. In the proposed method, the multidisciplinary reliability assessment problem is first transformed into a problem of most probable failure point (MPP search of inverse reliability, and then the process of searching for MPP of multidisciplinary inverse reliability is performed based on the framework of CLA-CO. This method improves the MPP searching process through two elements. One is treating the discipline analyses as the equality constraints in the subsystem optimization, and the other is using linear approximations corresponding to subsystem responses as the replacement of the consistency equality constraint in system optimization. With these two elements, the proposed method realizes the parallel analysis of each discipline, and it also has a higher computational efficiency. Additionally, there are no difficulties in applying the proposed method to problems with nonnormal distribution variables. One mathematical test problem and an electronic packaging problem are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Enrichr: interactive and collaborative HTML5 gene list enrichment analysis tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edward Y; Tan, Christopher M; Kou, Yan; Duan, Qiaonan; Wang, Zichen; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Clark, Neil R; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2013-04-15

    System-wide profiling of genes and proteins in mammalian cells produce lists of differentially expressed genes/proteins that need to be further analyzed for their collective functions in order to extract new knowledge. Once unbiased lists of genes or proteins are generated from such experiments, these lists are used as input for computing enrichment with existing lists created from prior knowledge organized into gene-set libraries. While many enrichment analysis tools and gene-set libraries databases have been developed, there is still room for improvement. Here, we present Enrichr, an integrative web-based and mobile software application that includes new gene-set libraries, an alternative approach to rank enriched terms, and various interactive visualization approaches to display enrichment results using the JavaScript library, Data Driven Documents (D3). The software can also be embedded into any tool that performs gene list analysis. We applied Enrichr to analyze nine cancer cell lines by comparing their enrichment signatures to the enrichment signatures of matched normal tissues. We observed a common pattern of up regulation of the polycomb group PRC2 and enrichment for the histone mark H3K27me3 in many cancer cell lines, as well as alterations in Toll-like receptor and interlukin signaling in K562 cells when compared with normal myeloid CD33+ cells. Such analyses provide global visualization of critical differences between normal tissues and cancer cell lines but can be applied to many other scenarios. Enrichr is an easy to use intuitive enrichment analysis web-based tool providing various types of visualization summaries of collective functions of gene lists. Enrichr is open source and freely available online at: http://amp.pharm.mssm.edu/Enrichr.

  7. Open for Business: On What Terms? An Analysis of 12 Collaborations between Canadian Universities and Corporations, Donors and Governments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Association of University Teachers, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The distinctive role of the university in society is always fragile and always in jeopardy. At its core, that role is primarily extending and deepening human understanding through research, scholarship, and teaching. This report presents an analysis of the following 12 collaborations between Canadian Universities and corporations, donors, and…

  8. Prognosis of HIV-1-infected patients up to 5 years after initiation of HAART: collaborative analysis of prospective studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, M; Sterne, JAC; Sabin, C

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prognosis over 5 years of HIV-1-infected, treatment-naive patients starting HAART, taking into account the immunological and virological response to therapy. DESIGN: A collaborative analysis of data from 12 cohorts in Europe and North America on 20,379 adults who starte...

  9. RNA/DNA co-analysis from blood stains--Results of a second collaborative EDNAP exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, C.; Hanson, E.; Anjos, M.J.;

    2012-01-01

    A second collaborative exercise on RNA/DNA co-analysis for body fluid identification and STR profiling was organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP). Six human blood stains, two blood dilution series (5-0.001 [mu]l blood) and, optionally, bona fide or mock casework samples of human or...

  10. Maternal age and Alzheimer's disease: a collaborative re-analysis of case-control studies. EURODEM Risk Factors Research Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Rocca; C.M. van Duijn (Cock); D.G. Clayton (David); V. Chandra; L. Fratiglioni (Laura); A.B. Graves; A. Heyman; A.F. Jorm; E. Kokmen (Emre); K. Kondo; J.A. Mortimer; S.L. Shalat; H. Soininen; A. Hofman (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractTo investigate the possible association between Alzheimer's disease and late maternal age at index birth, we conducted a collaborative re-analysis of existing case-control data sets. Of the 11 studies participating in the EURODEM project, four were included in the analyses regarding mate

  11. Computer-Supported Collaborative Inquiry on Buoyancy: A Discourse Analysis Supporting the "Pieces" Position on Conceptual Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    This article describes in detail a conversation analysis of conceptual change in a computer-supported collaborative learning environment. Conceptual change is an essential learning process in science education that has yet to be fully understood. While many models and theories have been developed over the last three decades, empirical data to…

  12. Open for Business: On What Terms? An Analysis of 12 Collaborations between Canadian Universities and Corporations, Donors and Governments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Association of University Teachers, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The distinctive role of the university in society is always fragile and always in jeopardy. At its core, that role is primarily extending and deepening human understanding through research, scholarship, and teaching. This report presents an analysis of the following 12 collaborations between Canadian Universities and corporations, donors, and…

  13. Learning Needs Analysis of Collaborative E-Classes in Semi-Formal Settings: The REVIT Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mavroudi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis, the first phase of the typical instructional design process, is often downplayed. This paper focuses on the analysis concerning a series of e-courses for collaborative adult education in semi-formal settings by reporting and generalizing results from the REVIT project. REVIT, an EU-funded research project, offered custom e-courses to learners in several remote European areas and received a ‘best practice’ distinction in social inclusion. These e-courses were designed and developed for the purpose of providing training in aspects of the learners’ professional domains related to the utilization of information and communication technologies. The main challenge was to prove that it is possible and economically feasible to provide meaningful training opportunities via distance education, by utilizing existing infrastructure (“revitalizing schools” and by making use of modern digital technology affordances coupled with suitable distance learning techniques and Web 2.0 tools. ADDIE, the generic instructional systems design model, enhanced with a rapid prototyping phase, was put forth in order to allow stakeholders to interact with a prototypical e-course, which served as an introductory lesson and as a reference point, since its evaluation informed the design choices of all subsequent e-courses. The learning needs approach adopted in REVIT combined learner analysis, context analysis, and needs analysis into a coherent analysis framework in which several methods (observation, estimation, document analysis, survey, and dialogue were exploited. Putting emphasis on the analysis phase and decoupling the design from the delivery of the e-courses facilitated adaptation and localization. Adaptation and localization issues concerning the adoption of the REVIT distance learning framework, taking into account the socio-cultural and pedagogical context, are discussed. A central result reported is that the analysis phase was crucial for the

  14. Tobacco smoking, polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzyme genes, and risk of localized and advanced prostate cancer: results from the California Collaborative Prostate Cancer Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Ahva; Corral, Román; Catsburg, Chelsea; Joshi, Amit D; Kim, Andre; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Koo, Jocelyn; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Stern, Mariana C

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between tobacco smoking and prostate cancer (PCa) remains inconclusive. This study examined the association between tobacco smoking and PCa risk taking into account polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzyme genes as possible effect modifiers (9 polymorphisms and 1 predicted phenotype from metabolism enzyme genes). The study included cases (n = 761 localized; n = 1199 advanced) and controls (n = 1139) from the multiethnic California Collaborative Case–Control Study of Prostate Cancer. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between tobacco smoking variables and risk of localized and advanced PCa risk. Being a former smoker, regardless of time of quit smoking, was associated with an increased risk of localized PCa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.6). Among non-Hispanic Whites, ever smoking was associated with an increased risk of localized PCa (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1–2.1), whereas current smoking was associated with risk of advanced PCa (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.0–1.9). However, no associations were observed between smoking intensity, duration or pack-year variables, and advanced PCa. No statistically significant trends were seen among Hispanics or African-Americans. The relationship between smoking status and PCa risk was modified by the CYP1A2 rs7662551 polymorphism (P-interaction = 0.008). In conclusion, tobacco smoking was associated with risk of PCa, primarily localized disease among non-Hispanic Whites. This association was modified by a genetic variant in CYP1A2, thus supporting a role for tobacco carcinogens in PCa risk. PMID:25355624

  15. Optical spectra analysis for breast cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkov, S. A.; Kochemasov, G. G.; Lyubynskaya, T. E.; Maslov, N. V.; Nuzhny, A. S.; da Silva, L. B.; Rubenchik, A.

    2011-11-01

    Minimally invasive probe and optical biopsy system based on optical spectra recording and analysis seem to be a promising tool for early diagnostics of breast cancer. Light scattering and absorption spectra are generated continuously as far as the needle-like probe with one emitting and several collecting optical fibers penetrates through the tissues toward to the suspicious area. That allows analyzing not only the state of local site, but also the structure of tissues along the needle trace. The suggested method has the advantages of automated on-line diagnosing and minimal tissue destruction and in parallel with the conventional diagnostic procedures provides the ground for decision-making. 165 medical trials were completed in Nizhny Novgorod Regional Oncology Centre, Russia. Independent diagnoses were the results of fine biopsy and histology. Application of wavelet expansion and clasterization techniques for spectra analysis revealed several main spectral types for malignant and benign tumors. Automatic classification algorithm demonstrated specificity ˜90% and sensitivity ˜91%. Large amount of information, fuzziness in criteria and data noisiness make neural networks to be an attractive analytic tool. The model based on three-layer perceptron was tested over the sample of 29 `cancer' and 29 `non-cancer' cases and demonstrated total separation.

  16. User-Centered Design Guidelines for Collaborative Software for Intelligence Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtz, Jean; Endert, Alexander N.

    2014-08-01

    In this position paper we discuss the necessity of using User-Centered Design (UCD) methods in order to design collaborative software for the intelligence community. We present some standing issues in collaborative software based on existing work within the intelligence community. Based on this information we present opportunities to address some of these challenges.

  17. Culture, Role and Group Work: A Social Network Analysis Perspective on an Online Collaborative Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Karen; Mather, Richard; Dalrymple, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the patterns of network dynamics within a multicultural online collaborative learning environment. It analyses the interaction of participants (both students and facilitators) within a discussion board that was established as part of a 3-month online collaborative course. The study employs longitudinal probabilistic social…

  18. Social Network Analysis of 50 Years of International Collaboration in the Research of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shesen; Zhang, Ganzhou; Guo, Yufei

    2016-01-01

    The definition of the field of educational technology has evolved over 50 years. New inventions and economic globalization increasingly facilitate people's communication for exchange of ideas and collaboration. This work attempts to describe international research collaboration in educational technology for the past 50 years. This article intends…

  19. The Answering Process for Multiple-Choice Questions in Collaborative Learning: A Mathematical Learning Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Nishi, Shinnosuke; Muramatsu, Yuta; Yasutake, Koichi; Yamakawa, Osamu; Tagawa, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a mathematical model for collaborative learning and the answering process for multiple-choice questions. The collaborative learning model is inspired by the Ising spin model and the model for answering multiple-choice questions is based on their difficulty level. An intensive simulation study predicts the possibility of…

  20. Assessing Collaboration Networks in Educational Research: A Co-Authorship-Based Social Network Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, David Andres; Queupil, Juan Pablo; Fraser, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze collaboration networks and their patterns among higher education institutions (HEIs) in Chile and the Latin American region. This will provide evidence to educational managements in order to properly allocate their efforts to improve collaboration. Design/methodology/approach: This quantitative…

  1. A Grounded Theory Analysis of E-Collaboration Effects for Distributed Project Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Qureshi (Sadja); M. Liu (Miaojia); D. Vogel

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe emergence and widespread use of collaborative technologies for distributed project management has brought opened up a myriad of opportunities for business. While the opportunities for off-shore outsourcing and collaborative development are enticing, most tools and techniques for proj

  2. Culture, Role and Group Work: A Social Network Analysis Perspective on an Online Collaborative Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Karen; Mather, Richard; Dalrymple, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the patterns of network dynamics within a multicultural online collaborative learning environment. It analyses the interaction of participants (both students and facilitators) within a discussion board that was established as part of a 3-month online collaborative course. The study employs longitudinal probabilistic social…

  3. Opinion-enhanced collaborative filtering for recommender systems through sentiment analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Hongwei

    2015-10-01

    The motivation of collaborative filtering (CF) comes from the idea that people often get the best recommendations from someone with similar tastes. With the growing popularity of opinion-rich resources such as online reviews, new opportunities arise as we can identify the preferences from user opinions. The main idea of our approach is to elicit user opinions from online reviews, and map such opinions into preferences that can be understood by CF-based recommender systems. We divide recommender systems into two types depending on the number of product category recommended: the multiple-category recommendation and the single-category recommendation. For the former, sentiment polarity in coarse-grained manner is identified while for the latter fine-grained sentiment analysis is conducted for each product aspect. If the evaluation frequency for an aspect by a user is greater than the average frequency by all users, it indicates that the user is more concerned with that aspect. If a user's rating for an aspect is lower than the average rating by all users, he or she is much pickier than others on that aspect. Through sentiment analysis, we then build an opinion-enhanced user preference model, where the higher the similarity between user opinions the more consistent preferences between users are. Experiment results show that the proposed CF algorithm outperforms baseline methods for product recommendation in terms of accuracy and recall.

  4. An analysis of buyer-supplier collaboration in the South African textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Parker

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore perceptions regarding buyer and supplier collaboration around product development. The aim is to gain an understanding of which factors influence buyer-supplier collaboration outcomes in the South African textile industry. Methodology: This study comprised two data collection stages. The first stage comprised the design and administration of a questionnaire survey. The second stage utilised a qualitative interview methodology and entailed interviewing a subset of the questionnaire respondents in order to probe respondents’ own experiences in collaborative product developments and their perception of the factors that determine collaboration outcome. Findings: This study has shed light on the experiences of South African firms in the textile industry engaging in buyer-supplier collaboration around product development. While this study is exploratory, it has provided evidence that there are certain factors which are perceived to have a significant influence on collaboration. Implications: Under the past protective shield of tariffs, South African clothing and textile manufacturers could afford to allow an adversarial mode of operation to perpetuate inefficiencies. However, the increasing external pressures, including the very real threat of overseas competition, heighten the need for collaboration between buyers and suppliers. This relates, in particular, to collaboration aimed at new product development, which can be seen as a new imperative for the survival and growth of this industry. Currently, there are numerous barriers to effective collaboration. The overwhelming power of retailers in the value chain is one such barrier, as it creates an environment which is pressurised, strained and not conducive to buyer-supplier collaboration. Contribution and Value: Studies on collaborative new product development have primarily been done in developed countries, with a focus on technology intensive

  5. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A; Simera, I; Collingwood, M; Williams, C; Kitchener, H

    2007-10-01

    The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in stage I endometrial cancer following surgery remains unclear. The management for these patients varies widely, particularly in stage I patients with different risk factors. Using the methodology of Cochrane Collaboration, we did a systematic and meta-analysis of all know randomised controlled trials which compared adjuvant radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer. The meta-analysis was carried out on four trials (three published and one unpublished) and a total of 1770 patients. The addition of pelvic external beam radiotherapy to surgery reduced locoregional recurrence, a relative risk (RR) of 0.28 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17-0.44, P endometrial cancer death or distant recurrence. A subgroup analysis showed a trend towards the reduction in the risks of death from all causes and endometrial cancer in patients with multiple high risk factors (including stage 1c and grade 3). External beam pelvic radiotherapy should be considered in patients with multiple high-risk features including stage 1c and grade 3. However, it carries an inherent risk of damage and toxicity and should be avoided in stage 1 endometrial cancer patients with no high risk factors.

  6. COLLABORATIVE MODELING OF THE BENEFITS AND HARMS ASSOCIATED WITH DIFFERENT U.S. BREAST CANCER SCREENING STRATEGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.; Stout, Natasha K.; Schechter, Clyde B.; van den Broek, Jeroen J.; Miglioretti, Diana; Krapcho, Martin; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Munoz, Diego; Lee, Sandra J.; Berry, Donald A.; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T.; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Kerlikowske, Karla; Tosteson, Anna N.A.; Near, Aimee M.; Hoeffken, Amanda; Chang, Yaojen; Heijnsdijk, Eveline A.; Chisholm, Gary; Huang, Xuelin; Huang, Hui; Ergun, Mehmet Ali; Gangnon, Ronald; Sprague, Brian L.; Plevritis, Sylvia; Feuer, Eric; de Koning, Harry J.; Cronin, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Controversy persists about optimal mammography screening strategies. Objective To evaluate mammography strategies considering screening and treatment advances. Design Collaboration of six simulation models. Data Sources National data on incidence, risk, breast density, digital mammography performance, treatment effects, and other-cause mortality. Target Population An average-risk cohort. Time Horizon Lifetime. Perspective Societal. Interventions Mammograms from age 40, 45 or 50 to 74 at annual or biennial intervals, or annually from 40 or 45 to 49 then biennially to 74, assuming 100% screening and treatment adherence. Outcome Measures Screening benefits (vs. no screening) include percent breast cancer mortality reduction, deaths averted, and life-years gained. Harms include number of mammograms, false-positives, benign biopsies, and overdiagnosis. Results for Average-Risk Women Biennial strategies maintain 79.8%-81.3% (range across strategies and models: 68.3–98.9%) of annual screening benefits with almost half the false-positives and fewer overdiagnoses. Screening biennially from ages 50–74 achieves a median 25.8% (range: 24.1%-31.8%) breast cancer mortality reduction; annual screening from ages 40–74 years reduces mortality an additional 12.0% (range: 5.7%-17.2%) vs. no screening, but yields 1988 more false-positives and 7 more overdiagnoses per 1000 women screened. Annual screening from ages 50–74 had similar benefits as other strategies but more harms, so would not be recommended. Sub-population Results Annual screening starting at age 40 for women who have a two- to four-fold increase in risk has a similar balance of harms and benefits as biennial screening of average-risk women from 50–74. Limitations We do not consider other imaging technologies, polygenic risk, or non-adherence. Conclusion These results suggest that biennial screening is efficient for average-risk groups, but decisions on strategies depend on the weight given to the

  7. Collaborative care to improve the management of depressive disorders: a community guide systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Anilkrishna B; Sipe, Theresa Ann; Byard, Guthrie J; Zometa, Carlos S; Hahn, Robert A; McKnight-Eily, Lela R; Chapman, Daniel P; Abraido-Lanza, Ana F; Pearson, Jane L; Anderson, Clinton W; Gelenberg, Alan J; Hennessy, Kevin D; Duffy, Farifteh F; Vernon-Smiley, Mary E; Nease, Donald E; Williams, Samantha P

    2012-05-01

    To improve the quality of depression management, collaborative care models have been developed from the Chronic Care Model over the past 20 years. Collaborative care is a multicomponent, healthcare system-level intervention that uses case managers to link primary care providers, patients, and mental health specialists. In addition to case management support, primary care providers receive consultation and decision support from mental health specialists (i.e., psychiatrists and psychologists). This collaboration is designed to (1) improve routine screening and diagnosis of depressive disorders; (2) increase provider use of evidence-based protocols for the proactive management of diagnosed depressive disorders; and (3) improve clinical and community support for active client/patient engagement in treatment goal-setting and self-management. A team of subject matter experts in mental health, representing various agencies and institutions, conceptualized and conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis on collaborative care for improving the management of depressive disorders. This team worked under the guidance of the Community Preventive Services Task Force, a nonfederal, independent, volunteer body of public health and prevention experts. Community Guide systematic review methods were used to identify, evaluate, and analyze available evidence. An earlier systematic review with 37 RCTs of collaborative care studies published through 2004 found evidence of effectiveness of these models in improving depression outcomes. An additional 32 studies of collaborative care models conducted between 2004 and 2009 were found for this current review and analyzed. The results from the meta-analyses suggest robust evidence of effectiveness of collaborative care in improving depression symptoms (standardized mean difference [SMD]=0.34); adherence to treatment (OR=2.22); response to treatment (OR=1.78); remission of symptoms (OR=1.74); recovery from symptoms (OR=1.75); quality of

  8. GRDC. A Collaborative Framework for Radiological Background and Contextual Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiter, Brian J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ramakrishnan, Lavanya [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bandstra, Mark S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The Radiation Mobile Analysis Platform (RadMAP) is unique in its capability to collect both high quality radiological data from both gamma-ray detectors and fast neutron detectors and a broad array of contextual data that includes positioning and stance data, high-resolution 3D radiological data from weather sensors, LiDAR, and visual and hyperspectral cameras. The datasets obtained from RadMAP are both voluminous and complex and require analyses from highly diverse communities within both the national laboratory and academic communities. Maintaining a high level of transparency will enable analysis products to further enrich the RadMAP dataset. It is in this spirit of open and collaborative data that the RadMAP team proposed to collect, calibrate, and make available online data from the RadMAP system. The Berkeley Data Cloud (BDC) is a cloud-based data management framework that enables web-based data browsing visualization, and connects curated datasets to custom workflows such that analysis products can be managed and disseminated while maintaining user access rights. BDC enables cloud-based analyses of large datasets in a manner that simulates real-time data collection, such that BDC can be used to test algorithm performance on real and source-injected datasets. Using the BDC framework, a subset of the RadMAP datasets have been disseminated via the Gamma Ray Data Cloud (GRDC) that is hosted through the National Energy Research Science Computing (NERSC) Center, enabling data access to over 40 users at 10 institutions.

  9. Repeat endocarditis: analysis of risk factors based on the International Collaboration on Endocarditis - Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagna, L; Park, L P; Nicholson, B P; Keiger, A J; Strahilevitz, J; Morris, A; Wray, D; Gordon, D; Delahaye, F; Edathodu, J; Miró, J M; Fernández-Hidalgo, N; Nacinovich, F M; Shahid, R; Woods, C W; Joyce, M J; Sexton, D J; Chu, V H

    2014-06-01

    Repeat episodes of infective endocarditis (IE) can occur in patients who survive an initial episode. We analysed risk factors and 1-year mortality of patients with repeat IE. We considered 1874 patients enrolled in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis - Prospective Cohort Study between January 2000 and December 2006 (ICE-PCS) who had definite native or prosthetic valve IE and 1-year follow-up. Multivariable analysis was used to determine risk factors for repeat IE and 1-year mortality. Of 1874 patients, 1783 (95.2%) had single-episode IE and 91 (4.8%) had repeat IE: 74/91 (81%) with new infection and 17/91 (19%) with presumed relapse. On bivariate analysis, repeat IE was associated with haemodialysis (p 0.002), HIV (p 0.009), injection drug use (IDU) (p < 0.001), Staphylococcus aureus IE (p 0.003), healthcare acquisition (p 0.006) and previous IE before ICE enrolment (p 0.001). On adjusted analysis, independent risk factors were haemodialysis (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2-5.3), IDU (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.6-5.4), previous IE (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.5-5.1) and living in the North American region (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.4). Patients with repeat IE had higher 1-year mortality than those with single-episode IE (p 0.003). Repeat IE is associated with IDU, previous IE and haemodialysis. Clinicians should be aware of these risk factors in order to recognize patients who are at risk of repeat IE.

  10. Internet cancer support groups: a feminist analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Lin, Li-Chen; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2005-01-01

    Internet Cancer Support Groups (ICSGs) are an emerging form of support group on Internet specifically for cancer patients. Previous studies have indicated the effectiveness of ICSGs as a research setting or a data-collection method. Yet recent studies have also indicated that ICSGs tend to serve highly educated, high-income White males who tend to be at an early stage of cancer. In this article, a total of 317 general ICSGs and 229 ethnic-specific ICSGs searched through Google.com, Yahoo.com, Msn.com, AOL.com, and ACOR.org are analyzed from a feminist perspective. The written records of group discussions and written memos by the research staff members were also analyzed using content analysis. The idea categories that emerged about these groups include (a) authenticity issues; (b) ethnicity and gender issues; (c) intersubjectivity issues; and (d) potential ethical issues. The findings suggest that (a) researchers adopt multiple recruitment strategies through various Internet sites and/or real settings; (b) researchers raise their own awareness of the potential influences of the health-related resources provided by ICSGs and regularly update their knowledge related to the federal and state standards and/or policies related to ICSGs; and (c) researchers consider adopting a quota-sampling method.

  11. Are we all on the same page? A discourse analysis of interprofessional collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddara, Wael; Lingard, Lorelei

    2013-10-01

    Interprofessional collaboration (IPC) has become a dominant idea in both medical education and clinical care as reflected in its incorporation into competency-based educational frameworks and hospital accreditation models. This study examined the published literature to explore whether a shared IPC discourse underpins these current efforts. Using a critical discourse analysis methodology informed by Michel Foucault's approach, the authors analyzed an archive of 188 texts published from 1960 through 2011. The authors identified the texts through a search of PubMed and CINAHL. The authors identified two major discourses in IPC: utilitarian and emancipatory. The utilitarian discourse is characterized by a positivist, experimental approach to the question of whether IPC is useful in patient care and, if so, what features best promote successful outcomes. This discourse uses the language of "evidence" and "validity." The emancipatory discourse is characterized by a constructivist approach concerned primarily with equalizing power relations among health practitioners; its language includes "power" and "dominance." This study suggests that IPC is not a single, coherent idea in medical education and health care. At least two different IPC discourses exist, each with its own distinctive truths, objects, and language. The extent to which educators and health care practitioners may tacitly align with one discourse or the other may explain the tensions that have accompanied the conceptualization, implementation, and assessment of IPC. Explicit acknowledgment of and attention to these discourses could improve the coherence and impact of IPC efforts in educational and clinical settings.

  12. Extracting Usage Patterns and the Analysis of Tag Connection Dynamics within Collaborative Tagging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel MICAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative tagging has become a very popular way of annotation, thanks to the fact that any entity may be labeled by any individual based on his own reason. In this paper we present the results of the case study carried out on the basis of data gathered at different time intervals from the social tagging system developed and implemented on Întelepciune.ro. Analyzing collective data referring to the way in which community members associate different tags, we have observed that between tags, links are formed which become increasingly stable with the passing of time. Following the application of methodology specific to network analysis, we have managed to extract information referring to tag popularity, their influence within the network and the degree to which a tag depends upon another. As such, we have succeeded in determining different semantic structures within the collective tagging system and see their evolution at different stages in time. Furthermore, we have pictured the way in which tag rec-ommendations can be executed and that they can be integrated within recommendation sys-tems. Thus, we will be able to identify experts and trustworthy content based on different cat-egories of interest.

  13. Dynamics of Disagreement: Large-Scale Temporal Network Analysis Reveals Negative Interactions in Online Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkova, Milena; García-Gavilanes, Ruth; Yasseri, Taha

    2016-11-01

    Disagreement and conflict are a fact of social life. However, negative interactions are rarely explicitly declared and recorded and this makes them hard for scientists to study. In an attempt to understand the structural and temporal features of negative interactions in the community, we use complex network methods to analyze patterns in the timing and configuration of reverts of article edits to Wikipedia. We investigate how often and how fast pairs of reverts occur compared to a null model in order to control for patterns that are natural to the content production or are due to the internal rules of Wikipedia. Our results suggest that Wikipedia editors systematically revert the same person, revert back their reverter, and come to defend a reverted editor. We further relate these interactions to the status of the involved editors. Even though the individual reverts might not necessarily be negative social interactions, our analysis points to the existence of certain patterns of negative social dynamics within the community of editors. Some of these patterns have not been previously explored and carry implications for the knowledge collection practice conducted on Wikipedia. Our method can be applied to other large-scale temporal collaboration networks to identify the existence of negative social interactions and other social processes.

  14. Cancer Nursing Education: Literature Review and Documentary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Helen; Blunden, Gillian; Hek, Gill

    The knowledge and skills needed by cancer nurses and the content and strategies of England's existing cancer nursing education programs were examined. The study included a comprehensive literature review and an analysis of course documents from selected English National Board-approved post-qualifying cancer nursing and palliative care courses…

  15. Consortium analysis of 7 candidate SNPs for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, S.J.; Vierkant, R.A.; Johnatty, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium selected 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for which there is evidence from previous studies of an association with variation in ovarian cancer or breast cancer risks. The SNPs selected for analysis were F31I (rs2273535) in AURKA, N372H...

  16. Serum insulin-like growth factors I and II, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and risk of breast cancer in the Japan Collaborative Cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakauchi, Fumio; Nojima, Masanori; Mori, Mitsuru; Wakai, Kenji; Suzuki, Sadao; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei

    2009-12-01

    The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk (JACC Study) was planned in the late 1980s as a large-scale cohort study of persons in various areas of Japan. In the present study, we conducted a nested case-control study and examined associations of breast cancer risk with serum levels of insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I, IGF-II), as well as insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), among women who participated in the JACC Study and donated blood at the baseline. Sixty-three women who died or suffered from breast cancer were examined. Two or three controls were selected to match each case for age at recruitment and the study area. Controls were alive and not diagnosed as having breast cancer at the diagnosis date of the cases. Associations between the serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3 and breast cancer risk were evaluated using a conditional logistic regression model. In premenopausal Japanese women, IGF-I showed a marginal negative dose-dependent association with the breast cancer risk (trend P= 0.08), but any link disappeared on taking into account IGFBP-3 (trend P= 0.47), which was likely to be inversely associated with the risk. In postmenopausal women, IGFBP-3 showed a marginal dose-dependent association with the risk (trend P= 0.06). Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  17. Simplification of the DREAM collaboration's "Q/S method" in dual readout calorimetry analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Groom, Donald E

    2012-01-01

    The DREAM collaboration has introduced the "Q/S Method" for obtaining the energy estimator from simultaneous Cherenkov and scintillator readouts of individual hadronic events. We show that the algorithm is equivalent to an elementary method.

  18. Segmentation and Analysis of Cancer Cells in Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Nelikanti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Blood cancer is an umbrella term for cancers that affect the blood, bone marrow and lymphatic system. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL is one of the kinds of blood cancer which can be affected at any age in the humans. The analysis of peripheral blood samples is an important test in the procedures for the diagnosis of leukemia. In this paper the blood sample images are used and implementing a clustering algorithm for detection of the cancer cells. This paper also implements morphological operations and feature extraction techniques using MATLAB for the analysis of cancer cells in the images.

  19. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF UROTHELIAL BLADDER CANCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Bevizova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant cancers of urinary bladder are the second most common malignancy of the urinary tract and the fourth most common malignancy in general, especially in men. The aim of this study was a retrospective analysis of selected markers (p53, Ki-67 and E-cadherin of urinary bladder cancers from the Department of Urology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic between years 2007 and 2009. We analysed 244 patients (202 males, 42 females with diagnosed bladder cancer via cystoscopy and subsequent transurethral resection. Patients’ age varied from 36 to 98 years. Obtained samples were fixed by 10% buffered formalin for 24 to 48 h. Subsequently, they were dehydrated in ascending ethanol series and embedded in paraffin. The parafin sections of 5 µm were prepared by microtome and they were stained by haematoxylin and eosin. The antibodies against to p53, Ki-67 and E-cadherin were used in immunohistochemical analysis. Statistical evaluation was performed via SPSS using non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test and p values<0.05 were considered statistically significant. No significant differences in the expression of selected markers were found between genders. Expression of p53 and Ki-67, in G1 and G2 of low grade tumours was lower in comparison to their expression in G3 tumors. Expression of E-cadherin was the opposite in this case. The expression of p53 and Ki-67 positively correlated with tumor’s depth of invasion, while the expression of E-cadherin significantly decreased. In case of T4 tumors, the expression of all markers exhibited consistently high values. When analysing tumor multiplicity, the expression of p53 and Ki-67 significantly decreased, while the expression of E-cadherin significantly increased. Based on the obtained results it can be concluded that the analysis of p53, Ki-67 and E-cadherin expression is essential for diagnostics and prognostics of bladder cancer and should be routinely used in daily practise together with

  20. SURVIVAL ANALYSIS OF CANCER CASES FROM QIDONG CANCER REGISTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-guo; Sankaranarayanan R; SHEN Zhuo-cai; Black RJ; YAO Hong-yu; LI Wen-guang; Parkin DM

    1999-01-01

    Objective: 16,922 patients with cancers from 15 sites of Qidong population-based cancer registry in the period of 1982-1991 were analyzed for evaluation of cancer survival as well as different cancer control measures.Methods: Observed survival rate (OS) was computed by the Kaplan-Meier method using EGRET statistical software package. Relative survival (RS) which is the ratio of the OS to the expected rate was calculated by using Qidong life table with respect to sex, age and calendar period of observation. Results: The five-year OS for the 5 leading sites of cancers, liver, stomach, lung,oesophagus, and rectum were 1.8%, 11.6%, 3.0% 3.3%,and 19.9%, respectively. The five-year RS for the 5 sites were 1.9%, 14.0%, 3.6%, 4.2%, and 23.7%, respectively,in which, 1.7%, 14.8%, 3.4%, 4.2%, and 26.0% for males, and 2.7%, 12.7%, 4.1%, 4.0%, and 22.0% for females, respectively. Female patients with breast cancer and cervix cancer had 5-year RS of 54.6% and 33.0%.Conclusion: Cancer survival rates for all sites are poor,in which that of the liver is the lowest, while that of the breast, the highest. The survivals of cancers for all sites,especially for breast, cervix, and leukemia are seen to be lower than those of European countries except for oesophagus, pancreas and lung cancer which do not achieve improved survival both in developing and developed countries. There will be a long way to improve the total cancer survival, as well as the cancer treatment in the developing countries.

  1. Using Social Network Analysis to Evaluate Community Capacity Building of a Regional Community Cancer Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, John; Tyson, Dinorah Martinez; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Gwede, Clement; Vadaparampil, Susan; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Meade, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) is one of 25 Community Network Programs funded by the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities with the objectives to create a collaborative infrastructure of academic and community based organizations and to develop effective and sustainable interventions to…

  2. Collaboration and E-collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding student’s perception of collaboration and how collaboration is supported by ICT is important for its efficient use in the classroom. This article aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and how they use new technologies in collaborative group work. Furthermore, it tr...

  3. The Role of Gender in Chagas Disease Prevention and Control in Honduras: An Analysis of Communication and Collaboration Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Diana Rocío Rodríguez; Mertens, Frédéric; Zúniga, Concepción Valeriano; Mendoza, Yolanda; Nakano, Eduardo Yoshio; Monroy, Maria Carlota

    2016-09-01

    In Honduras, where Chagas disease is a serious health and environmental concern, prevention measures face the challenge of achieving widespread and long-term sustainable adoption by communities. The article integrates social network analysis and a gender-sensitive approach to understand the role of men and women in the implementation of a community-level intervention, based on the adoption of housing improvements to reduce the presence of the insect vector. A total of 108 people in the community of El Salitre were interviewed. Data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics, participation in project activities, communication and collaboration networks related to Chagas disease prevention, knowledge of Chagas disease, and adoption of housing improvements techniques. Communication mostly occurred between the same gender individuals and was associated with knowledge of Chagas disease. Socioeconomic status, Chagas disease knowledge, and collaboration with men were associated with women adopting housing improvements. For men, however, participation in project activities, formal education, and collaboration with women were associated with adoption. These findings suggest that men and women were driven by distinct concerns, interests, and motivations when adopting new Chagas disease prevention strategies. Participatory community interventions that seek to generate health knowledge and foster collaborations to reduce health risk should address gender differences.

  4. RNA/DNA co-analysis from human saliva and semen stains--results of a third collaborative EDNAP exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, Claus; Hanson, E; Anjos, M J;

    2013-01-01

    A third collaborative exercise on RNA/DNA co-analysis for body fluid identification and STR profiling was organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP). Twenty saliva and semen stains, four dilution series (10-0.01 µl saliva, 5-0.01 µl semen) and, optionally, bona fide or mock casework......), but allowed an STR profile of the stain donor to be obtained as well. The method proved to be reproducible and sensitive, with as little as 0.05 µl saliva or semen, using different analysis strategies. Additionally, we demonstrated the ability to positively identify the presence of saliva and semen, as well...... as obtain high quality DNA profiles, from old and compromised casework samples. The results of this collaborative exercise involving an RNA/DNA co-extraction strategy support the potential use of an mRNA based system for the identification of saliva and semen in forensic casework that is compatible...

  5. CRCDA--Comprehensive resources for cancer NGS data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangam, Manonanthini; Gopal, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) innovations put a compelling landmark in life science and changed the direction of research in clinical oncology with its productivity to diagnose and treat cancer. The aim of our portal comprehensive resources for cancer NGS data analysis (CRCDA) is to provide a collection of different NGS tools and pipelines under diverse classes with cancer pathways and databases and furthermore, literature information from PubMed. The literature data was constrained to 18 most common cancer types such as breast cancer, colon cancer and other cancers that exhibit in worldwide population. NGS-cancer tools for the convenience have been categorized into cancer genomics, cancer transcriptomics, cancer epigenomics, quality control and visualization. Pipelines for variant detection, quality control and data analysis were listed to provide out-of-the box solution for NGS data analysis, which may help researchers to overcome challenges in selecting and configuring individual tools for analysing exome, whole genome and transcriptome data. An extensive search page was developed that can be queried by using (i) type of data [literature, gene data and sequence read archive (SRA) data] and (ii) type of cancer (selected based on global incidence and accessibility of data). For each category of analysis, variety of tools are available and the biggest challenge is in searching and using the right tool for the right application. The objective of the work is collecting tools in each category available at various places and arranging the tools and other data in a simple and user-friendly manner for biologists and oncologists to find information easier. To the best of our knowledge, we have collected and presented a comprehensive package of most of the resources available in cancer for NGS data analysis. Given these factors, we believe that this website will be an useful resource to the NGS research community working on cancer. Database URL: http://bioinfo.au-kbc.org.in/ngs/ngshome.html.

  6. Clearing your Desk! Software and Data Services for Collaborative Web Based GIS Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Idaszak, R.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Ames, D. P.; Goodall, J. L.; Band, L. E.; Merwade, V.; Couch, A.; Hooper, R. P.; Maidment, D. R.; Dash, P. K.; Stealey, M.; Yi, H.; Gan, T.; Gichamo, T.; Yildirim, A. A.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Can your desktop computer crunch the large GIS datasets that are becoming increasingly common across the geosciences? Do you have access to or the know-how to take advantage of advanced high performance computing (HPC) capability? Web based cyberinfrastructure takes work off your desk or laptop computer and onto infrastructure or "cloud" based data and processing servers. This talk will describe the HydroShare collaborative environment and web based services being developed to support the sharing and processing of hydrologic data and models. HydroShare supports the upload, storage, and sharing of a broad class of hydrologic data including time series, geographic features and raster datasets, multidimensional space-time data, and other structured collections of data. Web service tools and a Python client library provide researchers with access to HPC resources without requiring them to become HPC experts. This reduces the time and effort spent in finding and organizing the data required to prepare the inputs for hydrologic models and facilitates the management of online data and execution of models on HPC systems. This presentation will illustrate the use of web based data and computation services from both the browser and desktop client software. These web-based services implement the Terrain Analysis Using Digital Elevation Model (TauDEM) tools for watershed delineation, generation of hydrology-based terrain information, and preparation of hydrologic model inputs. They allow users to develop scripts on their desktop computer that call analytical functions that are executed completely in the cloud, on HPC resources using input datasets stored in the cloud, without installing specialized software, learning how to use HPC, or transferring large datasets back to the user's desktop. These cases serve as examples for how this approach can be extended to other models to enhance the use of web and data services in the geosciences.

  7. Collaborative e-Business Process Modelling: A Holistic Analysis Framework focused on Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Volker; Christ, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we propose a holistic analysis framework for collaborative e-Business process modelling approaches that takes into account the specific challenges small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) are facing with regard to modelling inter-organizational processes. Based on concepts of the management approach Balanced Scorecard (BSC) four different perspectives are derived from empirical studies, conceptual research results and completed with modelling experiences of an EU-funded proje...

  8. Enabling model checking for collaborative process analysis: from BPMN to `Network of Timed Automata'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallek, Sihem; Daclin, Nicolas; Chapurlat, Vincent; Vallespir, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Interoperability is a prerequisite for partners involved in performing collaboration. As a consequence, the lack of interoperability is now considered a major obstacle. The research work presented in this paper aims to develop an approach that allows specifying and verifying a set of interoperability requirements to be satisfied by each partner in the collaborative process prior to process implementation. To enable the verification of these interoperability requirements, it is necessary first and foremost to generate a model of the targeted collaborative process; for this research effort, the standardised language BPMN 2.0 is used. Afterwards, a verification technique must be introduced, and model checking is the preferred option herein. This paper focuses on application of the model checker UPPAAL in order to verify interoperability requirements for the given collaborative process model. At first, this step entails translating the collaborative process model from BPMN into a UPPAAL modelling language called 'Network of Timed Automata'. Second, it becomes necessary to formalise interoperability requirements into properties with the dedicated UPPAAL language, i.e. the temporal logic TCTL.

  9. Trend Analysis of Cancer Mortality and Incidence in Panama, Using Joinpoint Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politis, Michael; Higuera, Gladys; Chang, Lissette Raquel; Gomez, Beatriz; Bares, Juan; Motta, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and its incidence is expected to increase in the future. In Panama, cancer is also one of the leading causes of death. In 1964, a nationwide cancer registry was started and it was restructured and improved in 2012. The aim of this study is to utilize Joinpoint regression analysis to study the trends of the incidence and mortality of cancer in Panama in the last decade. Cancer mortality was estimated from the Panamanian National Institute of Census and Statistics Registry for the period 2001 to 2011. Cancer incidence was estimated from the Panamanian National Cancer Registry for the period 2000 to 2009. The Joinpoint Regression Analysis program, version 4.0.4, was used to calculate trends by age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for selected cancers. Overall, the trend of age-adjusted cancer mortality in Panama has declined over the last 10 years (−1.12% per year). The cancers for which there was a significant increase in the trend of mortality were female breast cancer and ovarian cancer; while the highest increases in incidence were shown for breast cancer, liver cancer, and prostate cancer. Significant decrease in the trend of mortality was evidenced for the following: prostate cancer, lung and bronchus cancer, and cervical cancer; with respect to incidence, only oral and pharynx cancer in both sexes had a significant decrease. Some cancers showed no significant trends in incidence or mortality. This study reveals contrasting trends in cancer incidence and mortality in Panama in the last decade. Although Panama is considered an upper middle income nation, this study demonstrates that some cancer mortality trends, like the ones seen in cervical and lung cancer, behave similarly to the ones seen in high income countries. In contrast, other types, like breast cancer, follow a pattern seen in countries undergoing a transition to a developed economy with its associated lifestyle, nutrition, and

  10. Differential network analysis in human cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ryan; Datta, Somnath; Datta, Susmita

    2014-01-01

    A complex disease like cancer is hardly caused by one gene or one protein singly. It is usually caused by the perturbation of the network formed by several genes or proteins. In the last decade several research teams have attempted to construct interaction maps of genes and proteins either experimentally or reverse engineer interaction maps using computational techniques. These networks were usually created under a certain condition such as an environmental condition, a particular disease, or a specific tissue type. Lately, however, there has been greater emphasis on finding the differential structure of the existing network topology under a novel condition or disease status to elucidate the perturbation in a biological system. In this review/tutorial article we briefly mention some of the research done in this area; we mainly illustrate the computational/statistical methods developed by our team in recent years for differential network analysis using publicly available gene expression data collected from a well known cancer study. This data includes a group of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a group with acute myeloid leukemia. In particular, we describe the statistical tests to detect the change in the network topology based on connectivity scores which measure the association or interaction between pairs of genes. The tests under various scores are applied to this data set to perform a differential network analysis on gene expression for human leukemia. We believe that, in the future, differential network analysis will be a standard way to view the changes in gene expression and protein expression data globally and these types of tests could be useful in analyzing the complex differential signatures.

  11. A Framework for the Analysis of Collaborative and Interactive Elements in MOOCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmus Kvist, Andersen,; Garp, Kristian; Nellemann, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    in the discussion forums of a MOOC, and relate this to the overall learning objective and educational design for learning of the specific MOOC that is analyzed. The analytical frame builds on two theoretical mindsets on interaction and collaboration. Language Games (LG) (as defined by Wittgenstein and applied...... from, and if any progression occurs in the duration of the course. Moreover, the overall educational design is evaluated on the basis of Salmon’s ideas. In the winter of 2013, the Coursera course ‘A Brief History of Humankind’ was analyzed. The findings show that the collaborative knowledge...... be very few compared to the number of people enrolled. There are signs of collaboration, where the disruptive nature of MOOCs as a learning innovation argues against the postulate that MOOCs are solely transmissive in nature. Perhaps, MOOCs instead transcend the traditional Computer Supported...

  12. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer Symptoms Symptoms of cancer ... tumor Obesity Pancreatic cancer Prostate cancer Stomach cancer Testicular cancer Throat or larynx cancer Thyroid cancer Patient Instructions ...

  13. Time to benefit for colorectal cancer screening: survival meta-analysis of flexible sigmoidoscopy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Victoria; Boscardin, W John; Stijacic-Cenzer, Irena; Lee, Sei J

    2015-04-16

    To determine the time to benefit of using flexible sigmoidoscopy for colorectal cancer screening. Survival meta-analysis. A Cochrane Collaboration systematic review published in 2013, Medline, and Cochrane Library databases. Randomized controlled trials comparing screening flexible sigmoidoscopy with no screening. Trials with fewer than 100 flexible sigmoidoscopy screenings were excluded. Four studies were eligible (total n = 459,814). They were similar for patients' age (50-74 years), length of follow-up (11.2-11.9 years), and relative risk for colorectal cancer related mortality (0.69-0.78 with flexible sigmoidoscopy screening). For every 1000 people screened at five and 10 years, 0.3 and 1.2 colorectal cancer related deaths, respectively, were prevented. It took 4.3 years (95% confidence interval 2.8 to 5.8) to observe an absolute risk reduction of 0.0002 (one colorectal cancer related death prevented for every 5000 flexible sigmoidoscopy screenings). It took 9.4 years (7.6 to 11.3) to observe an absolute risk reduction of 0.001 (one colorectal cancer related death prevented for every 1000 flexible sigmoidoscopy screenings). Our findings suggest that screening flexible sigmoidoscopy is most appropriate for older adults with a life expectancy greater than approximately 10 years. © Tang et al 2015.

  14. Analysis of Production, Impact, and Scientific Collaboration on Difficult Airway Through the Web of Science and Scopus (1981-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Aroca, Miguel Ángel; Pandiella-Dominique, Andrés; Navarro-Suay, Ricardo; Alonso-Arroyo, Adolfo; Granda-Orive, José Ignacio; Anguita-Rodríguez, Francisco; López-García, Andrés

    2017-06-01

    Bibliometrics, the statistical analysis of written publications, is an increasingly popular approach to the assessment of scientific activity. Bibliometrics allows researchers to assess the impact of a field, or research area, and has been used to make decisions regarding research funding. Through bibliometric analysis, we hypothesized that a bibliometric analysis of difficult airway research would demonstrate a growth in authors and articles over time. Using the Web of Science (WoS) and Scopus databases, we conducted a search of published manuscripts on the difficult airway from January 1981 to December 2013. After removal of duplicates, we identified 2412 articles. We then analyzed the articles as a group to assess indicators of productivity, collaboration, and impact over this time period. We found an increase in productivity over the study period, with 37 manuscripts published between 1981 and 1990, and 1268 between 2001 and 2010 (P research in general, with CAGR (cumulative average growth rate) since 1999 for difficult airway >9% for both WoS and Scopus, and CAGR for anesthesiology as a whole =0.64% in WoS, and =3.30% in Scopus. Furthermore, we found a positive correlation between the number of papers published per author and the number of coauthored manuscripts (P international cooperation between institutions, and in the number of citations for each manuscript. For any author, we also identified a positive relationship between the number of citations per manuscript and the number of papers published (P research overall. We found that collaboration between authors increases their impact, and that an increase in collaboration increases citation rates. Publishing in English and in certain journals, and collaborating with certain authors and institutions, increases the visibility of manuscripts published on this subject.

  15. Pyrosequencing Analysis for Breast Cancer DNA Methylome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuscu, Cem; Kuscu, Canan

    2016-01-01

    Unraveling DNA methylation profile of tumor is important for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients. Because of the heterogeneity of clinical samples, it is very difficult to get methylation profile of only tumor cells. Laser capture Microdissection (LCM) is giving us a chance to isolate the DNA only from the tumor cells without any stroma cell's DNA contamination. Once we capture the breast tumor cells, we can isolate the genomic DNA which is followed by the bisulfite treatment in which unmethylated cytosines of the CG pairs are converted into uracil; however, methylated cytosine does not go into any chemical change during this reaction. Next, bisulfite treated DNA is used in the regular PCR reaction to get a single band PCR amplicon which will be used as a template for the pyrosequencing. Pyrosequencing is a powerful method to make a quantitative methylation analysis for each specific CG pair.

  16. Toward Collaboration Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bertrand; Pea, Roy

    2014-01-01

    We describe preliminary applications of network analysis techniques to eye-tracking data collected during a collaborative learning activity. This paper makes three contributions: first, we visualize collaborative eye-tracking data as networks, where the nodes of the graph represent fixations and edges represent saccades. We found that those…

  17. Rectal cancer surgery: volume-outcome analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Emmeline

    2010-12-01

    There is strong evidence supporting the importance of the volume-outcome relationship with respect to lung and pancreatic cancers. This relationship for rectal cancer surgery however remains unclear. We review the currently available literature to assess the evidence base for volume outcome in relation to rectal cancer surgery.

  18. A Data-Centered Collaboration Portal to Support Global Carbon-Flux Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Humphrey, Marty [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Beekwilder, Norm [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jackson, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Goode, Monte [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); van Ingen, Catharine [Microsoft. San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-04-07

    Carbon-climate, like other environmental sciences, has been changing. Large-scalesynthesis studies are becoming more common. These synthesis studies are often conducted by science teams that are geographically distributed and on datasets that are global in scale. A broad array of collaboration and data analytics tools are now available that could support these science teams. However, building tools that scientists actually use is hard. Also, moving scientists from an informal collaboration structure to one mediated by technology often exposes inconsistencies in the understanding of the rules of engagement between collaborators. We have developed a scientific collaboration portal, called fluxdata.org, which serves the community of scientists providing and analyzing the global FLUXNET carbon-flux synthesis dataset. Key things we learned or re-learned during our portal development include: minimize the barrier to entry, provide features on a just-in-time basis, development of requirements is an on-going process, provide incentives to change leaders and leverage the opportunity they represent, automate as much as possible, and you can only learn how to make it better if people depend on it enough to give you feedback. In addition, we also learned that splitting the portal roles between scientists and computer scientists improved user adoption and trust. The fluxdata.org portal has now been in operation for ~;;1.5 years and has become central to the FLUXNET synthesis efforts.

  19. Analyzing the Impact of a Data Analysis Process to Improve Instruction Using a Collaborative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Rebecca B.

    2006-01-01

    The Data Collaborative Model (DCM) assembles assessment literacy, reflective practices, and professional development into a four-component process. The sub-components include assessing students, reflecting over data, professional dialogue, professional development for the teachers, interventions for students based on data results, and re-assessing…

  20. What Comes out of Incentivized Collaboration: A Qualitative Analysis of Eight Flemish School Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feys, Ellen; Devos, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Incentivized collaboration, schools that receive incentives such as public funding or additional resources if they join a network, has become quite popular in Europe and North America (e.g. England, Flanders, United States). We used a comparative case study design to explore why schools would enter such an incentivized network and what role…

  1. University-Industry Collaboration from a Relationship Marketing Perspective: An Empirical Analysis in a Spanish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasquet, Marta; Calderon, Haydee; Cervera, Amparo

    2012-01-01

    Building relationships between universities and industry bodies is of prime importance for creating value for universities' stakeholders. This paper focuses on relationships in relation to undergraduate internship programmes in the Social Sciences. Using the relationship marketing approach, we analyze this type of collaboration of firms with a…

  2. A Data-Centered Collaboration Portal to Support Global Carbon-Flux Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Humphrey, Marty [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Beekwilder, Norm [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jackson, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Goode, Monte [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); van Ingen, Catharine [Microsoft. San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-04-07

    Carbon-climate, like other environmental sciences, has been changing. Large-scalesynthesis studies are becoming more common. These synthesis studies are often conducted by science teams that are geographically distributed and on datasets that are global in scale. A broad array of collaboration and data analytics tools are now available that could support these science teams. However, building tools that scientists actually use is hard. Also, moving scientists from an informal collaboration structure to one mediated by technology often exposes inconsistencies in the understanding of the rules of engagement between collaborators. We have developed a scientific collaboration portal, called fluxdata.org, which serves the community of scientists providing and analyzing the global FLUXNET carbon-flux synthesis dataset. Key things we learned or re-learned during our portal development include: minimize the barrier to entry, provide features on a just-in-time basis, development of requirements is an on-going process, provide incentives to change leaders and leverage the opportunity they represent, automate as much as possible, and you can only learn how to make it better if people depend on it enough to give you feedback. In addition, we also learned that splitting the portal roles between scientists and computer scientists improved user adoption and trust. The fluxdata.org portal has now been in operation for ~;;1.5 years and has become central to the FLUXNET synthesis efforts.

  3. Exploring Students' Knowledge Construction Strategies in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Discussions Using Sequential Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shukor, N.B.A.; Tasir, Z.; Meijden, H.A.T. van der; Harun, J.

    2014-01-01

    Online collaborative learning allows discussion to occur at greater depth where knowledge can be constructed remotely. However students were found to construct knowledge at low-level where they discussed by sharing and comparing opinions; those are inadequate for new knowledge creation. As such,

  4. Public, environmental, and occupational health research activity in Arab countries: bibliometric, citation, and collaboration analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweileh, Waleed M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sawalha, Ansam F

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze quantity, assess quality, and investigate international collaboration in research from Arab countries in the field of public, environmental and occupational health. Original scientific articles and reviews published from the 22 Arab countries in the category "public, environmental & occupational health" during the study period (1900 - 2012) were screened using the ISI Web of Science database. The total number of original and review research articles published in the category of "public, environmental & occupational health" from Arab countries was 4673. Main area of research was tropical medicine (1862; 39.85%). Egypt with 1200 documents (25.86%) ranked first in quantity and ranked first in quality of publications (h-index = 51). The study identified 2036 (43.57%) documents with international collaboration. Arab countries actively collaborated with authors in Western Europe (22.91%) and North America (21.04%). Most of the documents (79.9%) were published in public health related journals while 21% of the documents were published in journals pertaining to prevention medicine, environmental, occupational health and epidemiology. Research in public, environmental and occupational health in Arab countries is in the rise. Public health research was dominant while environmental and occupation health research was relatively low. International collaboration was a good tool for increasing research quantity and quality.

  5. University-Industry Collaboration from a Relationship Marketing Perspective: An Empirical Analysis in a Spanish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasquet, Marta; Calderon, Haydee; Cervera, Amparo

    2012-01-01

    Building relationships between universities and industry bodies is of prime importance for creating value for universities' stakeholders. This paper focuses on relationships in relation to undergraduate internship programmes in the Social Sciences. Using the relationship marketing approach, we analyze this type of collaboration of firms with a…

  6. Getting personalized cancer genome analysis into the clinic: the challenges in bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Alfonso; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Progress in genomics has raised expectations in many fields, and particularly in personalized cancer research. The new technologies available make it possible to combine information about potential disease markers, altered function and accessible drug targets, which, coupled with pathological and medical information, will help produce more appropriate clinical decisions. The accessibility of such experimental techniques makes it all the more necessary to improve and adapt computational strategies to the new challenges. This review focuses on the critical issues associated with the standard pipeline, which includes: DNA sequencing analysis; analysis of mutations in coding regions; the study of genome rearrangements; extrapolating information on mutations to the functional and signaling level; and predicting the effects of therapies using mouse tumor models. We describe the possibilities, limitations and future challenges of current bioinformatics strategies for each of these issues. Furthermore, we emphasize the need for the collaboration between the bioinformaticians who implement the software and use the data resources, the computational biologists who develop the analytical methods, and the clinicians, the systems' end users and those ultimately responsible for taking medical decisions. Finally, the different steps in cancer genome analysis are illustrated through examples of applications in cancer genome analysis.

  7. Capitalizing on synergies-a discourse analysis of the process of collaboration among providers of integrative health care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Andermo

    Full Text Available Integrative health care (IHC combines therapies and providers from complementary and conventional health care. Previous studies on IHC have shown power relations between providers but few studies have explored how the interaction develops over time. The objective of this study was to explore the development of IHC collaboration and interaction among participating providers during a series of consensus case conferences for managing patients with back and neck pain.This qualitative study was conducted within a pragmatic randomized controlled clinical trial in primary care. Patients' treatment plans were developed based on IHC provider consensus conferences (n = 26 of which 15 (5 of the first, 5 in the middle, and 5 of the last in the clinical trial were selected for analysis. Findings were derived by means of discourse analysis, focusing on the participants' use of subject positions during the conferences.The IHC team in this study gradually formed a group identity, moving their subject positions from individual treating subjects to members of a team and were able to make consensus-based decisions about patients' individual treatment plans. In the discourse, the IHC team identified collaborative shortcomings and problematized the provision of IHC. They were able to capitalize on the synergies in their collaboration and developed a shared vision of IHC provision.The process of IHC collaboration involved the gradual formation of an IHC team identity, which facilitated interdisciplinary, non-hierarchical consensus-based decision-making in the team. The discourse further suggests that a reform of some legal and organizational health sector barriers might be needed to realize sustainable implementation of IHC services in Sweden.

  8. The Geology Robot: A Collaborative Effort for improving Outcrop Visualization and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, K. C.; Valoski, M. P.; Rodi, A. F.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic mapping is one of the most important skills a geologist will attempt to master during their education and well into their career. Mapping requires the ability to identify rocks and minerals, an understanding of geologic principles of history, deformation, and tectonics, as well as the ability to access the geology in question. As a student, the first two items are cognitive, and generally gained through education and experience. However, the third involves external, especially physical factors, often outside of a student’s control. Mapping and outcrop analysis can be difficult in areas of especially varied terrain depending on one’s will and physical ability. In our area of southwestern Pennsylvania, steep terrain and dense vegetation dominate the landscape. Road cuts are often the only options for identifying local bedrock. Many outcrops are avoided based on their sheer size or integrity, which can pose risks of physical harm. In order to address some of these concerns, we have developed a robot, able to scale and image rocks in the vertical. The principle behind the robot’s capabilities is to reach steep or over-steep cliff faces to view and measure rock type and stratigraphic relationships. The robot carries a movable camera, allowing the operator a clear view of the rock face in an area that he or she wouldn’t normally be able to access. The robot is suspended from climbing rope over the cliff edge and connected to a power source and video monitor. The current prototype is operated with a handheld remote control including independent camera manipulation. Future development may include detachable wheel tracks for navigating less than vertical surfaces and a coring bit for sampling. Potential uses exist beyond visualization for classroom instruction, including detailed mapping, evaluating geological engineering challenges, viewing down-well conditions in large-bore wells, etc. We believe this robot will allow students (and possibly professionals

  9. The collaboration of general practitioners and nurses in primary care: a comparative analysis of concepts and practices in Slovenia and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämel, Kerstin; Vössing, Carina

    2017-09-01

    Aim A comparative analysis of concepts and practices of GP-nurse collaborations in primary health centres in Slovenia and Spain. Cross-professional collaboration is considered a key element for providing high-quality comprehensive care by combining the expertise of various professions. In many countries, nurses are also being given new and more extensive responsibilities. Implemented concepts of collaborative care need to be analysed within the context of care concepts, organisational structures, and effective collaboration. Background review of primary care concepts (literature analysis, expert interviews), and evaluation of collaboration in 'best practice' health centres in certain regions of Slovenia and Spain. Qualitative content analysis of expert interviews, presentations, observations, and group discussions with professionals and health centre managers. Findings In Slovenian health centres, the collaboration between GPs and nurses has been strongly shaped by their organisation in separate care units and predominantly case-oriented functions. Conventional power structures between professions hinder effective collaboration. The introduction of a new cross-professional primary care concept has integrated advanced practice nurses into general practice. Conventional hierarchies still exist, but a shared vision of preventive care is gradually strengthening attitudes towards team-oriented care. Formal regulations or incentives for teamwork have yet to be implemented. In Spain, health centres were established along with a team-based care concept that encompasses close physician-nurse collaboration and an autonomous role for nurses in the care process. Nurses collaborate with GPs on more equal terms with conflicts centring on professional disagreements. Team development structures and financial incentives for team achievements have been implemented, encouraging teams to generate their own strategies to improve teamwork. Clearly defined structures, shared visions of

  10. Association between endometriosis and risk of histological subtypes of ovarian cancer: a pooled analysis of case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Templeman, Claire; Rossing, Mary Anne; Lee, Alice; Near, Aimee M; Webb, Penelope M; Nagle, Christina M; Doherty, Jennifer A; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L; Wicklund, Kristine G; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R; Carney, Michael E; Goodman, Marc T; Moysich, Kirsten; Kjaer, Susanne K; Hogdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Larson, Melissa C; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Palmieri, Rachel T; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Vitonis, Allison F; Titus, Linda J; Ziogas, Argyrios; Brewster, Wendy; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Alexandra; Ramus, Susan J; Anderson, A Rebecca; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Fasching, Peter A; Gayther, Simon A; Huntsman, David G; Menon, Usha; Ness, Roberta B; Pike, Malcolm C; Risch, Harvey; Wu, Anna H; Berchuck, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    Endometriosis is a risk factor for epithelial ovarian cancer; however, whether this risk extends to all invasive histological subtypes or borderline tumours is not clear. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess the association between endometriosis and histological subtypes of ovarian cancer. Data from 13 ovarian cancer case-control studies, which were part of the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, were pooled and logistic regression analyses were undertaken to assess the association between self-reported endometriosis and risk of ovarian cancer. Analyses of invasive cases were done with respect to histological subtypes, grade, and stage, and analyses of borderline tumours by histological subtype. Age, ethnic origin, study site, parity, and duration of oral contraceptive use were included in all analytical models. 13 226 controls and 7911 women with invasive ovarian cancer were included in this analysis. 818 and 738, respectively, reported a history of endometriosis. 1907 women with borderline ovarian cancer were also included in the analysis, and 168 of these reported a history of endometriosis. Self-reported endometriosis was associated with a significantly increased risk of clear-cell (136 [20·2%] of 674 cases vs 818 [6·2%] of 13 226 controls, odds ratio 3·05, 95% CI 2·43-3·84, pSmith Foundation, European Community's Seventh Framework Programme, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany, Programme of Clinical Biomedical Research, German Cancer Research Centre, Eve Appeal, Oak Foundation, UK National Institute of Health Research, National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Cancer Council Tasmania, Cancer Foundation of Western Australia, Mermaid 1, Danish Cancer Society, and Roswell Park Alliance Foundation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Preferred roles in treatment decision making among patients with cancer: a pooled analysis of studies using the Control Preferences Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Sloan, Jeff A; Atherton, Pamela J; Smith, Tenbroeck; Hack, Thomas F; Huschka, Mashele M; Rummans, Teresa A; Clark, Matthew M; Diekmann, Brent; Degner, Lesley F

    2010-09-01

    To collect normative data, assess differences between demographic groups, and indirectly compare US and Canadian medical systems relative to patient expectations of involvement in cancer treatment decision making. Meta-analysis. Individual patient data were compiled across 6 clinical studies among 3491 patients with cancer who completed the 2-item Control Preferences Scale indicating the roles they preferred versus actually experienced in treatment decision making. The roles in treatment decision making that patients preferred were 26% active, 49% collaborative, and 25% passive. The roles that patients reported actually experiencing were 30% active, 34% collaborative, and 36% passive. Roughly 61% of patients reported having their preferred role; only 6% experienced extreme discordance between their preferred versus actual roles. More men than women (66% vs 60%, P = .001) and more US patients than Canadian patients (84% vs 54%, P roles. More Canadian patients than US patients preferred and actually experienced (42% vs 18%, P roles. More women than men reported taking a passive role (40% vs 24%, P role. Roughly half of the studied patients with cancer indicated that they preferred to have a collaborative relationship with physicians. Although most patients had the decision-making role they preferred, about 40% experienced discordance. This highlights the need for incorporation of individualized patient communication styles into treatment plans.

  12. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach – The analysis is based on a multiple-case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new......, clothes-sharing concept that has emerged as a fashion niche within the last decade. Findings – It is concluded that fashion libraries offers interesting perspectives, e.g. by allowing people to experiment with styles without having to pay the full cost and becoming a meeting place for young designers...... and end consumers. However, at present fashion libraries remain a small-scale phenomenon with difficulties reaching the mainstream market, not least due to limited financial and human resources as well as conventional fashion consumption patterns. Research limitations/implications – The study is limited...

  13. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach: The analysis is based on a multiple-­‐‑case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new......, clothes-­‐‑sharing concept that has emerged as a fashion niche within the last decade. Findings: It is concluded that fashion libraries offers interesting perspectives, e.g. by allowing people to experiment with styles without having to pay the full cost and becoming a meeting place for young designers...... and end consumers. However, at present fashion libraries remain a small-­‐‑scale phenomenon with difficulties reaching the mainstream market, not least due to limited financial and human resources as well as conventional fashion consumption patterns. Research limitations/implications: The study is limited...

  14. Contested collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    support patterns of work activities, social groups, and personal beliefs. In these situations, design is fundamentally an interactive process that requires communication among users, designers, and developers. However, communication among these groups is often difficult although of paramount importance...... to design outcomes. Through a qualitative analysis of a house, expert system, and telecommunications network architecture and management system design situations, a descriptive model of design that characterizes communication among users, designers, and developers as they create an artifact was developed....... The model describes design phases, roles, themes, and intergroup communication networks as they evolve throughout the design process and characterizes design as a process of "contested collaboration". It is a first step towards a predictive design model that suggests strategies which may help participants...

  15. Scientific authorships and collaboration network analysis on Chagas disease: papers indexed in PubMed (1940-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorio González-Alcaide

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a chronic, tropical, parasitic disease, endemic throughout Latin America. The large-scale migration of populations has increased the geographic distribution of the disease and cases have been observed in many other countries around the world. To strengthen the critical mass of knowledge generated in different countries, it is essential to promote cooperative and translational research initiatives. We analyzed authorship of scientific documents on Chagas disease indexed in the Medline database from 1940 to 2009. Bibliometrics was used to analyze the evolution of collaboration patterns. A Social Network Analysis was carried out to identify the main research groups in the area by applying clustering methods. We then analyzed 13,989 papers produced by 21,350 authors. Collaboration among authors dramatically increased over the study period, reaching an average of 6.2 authors per paper in the last five-year period. Applying a threshold of collaboration of five or more papers signed in co-authorship, we identified 148 consolidated research groups made up of 1,750 authors. The Chagas disease network identified constitutes a "small world," characterized by a high degree of clustering and a notably high number of Brazilian researchers.

  16. Collaborative Virtual Queue: Fair Management of Congested Departure Operations and Benefit Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Burgain, Pierrick; Clarke, John-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Due to the stochastic nature of departure operations, working at full capacity makes major US airports very sensitive to uncertainties. Consequently, airport ground operations face critically congested taxiways and long runway queues. In this report, we show how improved management of departure operations from the ready-to-push-back time to the wheels-off time can potentially yield significant benefits to airlines and air traffic services. We develop a Collaborative Virtual Queue to enable better optimization capabilities during congested situations while taking into account the laissez-faire competitive environment. Results are evaluated using a departure system model, validated using current statistics and previous studies. First, the Collaborative Virtual Queue enables keeping aircraft away from runway queues, which increases wheels-off time predictability. Second, holding aircraft enables last-minute intra-airline flight switching. This creates new optimization capabilities for airlines i.e. it gives airl...

  17. Leadership in practice: an analysis of collaborative leadership in the conception of a virtual ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockham, Alayne

    2016-09-30

    The National Health Service (NHS) in the UK is evolving to meet the needs of society, but success depends on effective leadership. The World Health Organization identified intersectoral and multidisciplinary working as key to improving the quality and sustainability of the service, highlighting the need for a new leadership style. This article describes how collaborative leadership was used to successfully implement a virtual ward in the primary care setting in south-east Powys, Wales. The author describes the leadership style and addresses strategies used to manage the change process. The journey demonstrates how collaborative leadership and working collectively enabled a new service to be developed, and established a mutual respect for different professionals' roles.

  18. A Proactive Strategy for Safe Human-Robot Collaboration based on a Simplified Risk Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audun Sanderud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In an increasing demand for human-robot collaboration systems, the need for safe robots is crucial. This paper presents a proactive strategy to enable an awareness of the current risk for the robot. The awareness is based upon a map of historically occupied space by the operator. The map is built based on a risk evaluation of each pose presented by the operator. The risk evaluation results in a risk field that can be used to evaluate the risk of a collaborative task. Based on this risk field, a control algorithm that constantly reduces the current risk within its task constraints was developed. Kinematic redundancy was exploited for simultaneous task performance within task constraints, and risk minimization. Sphere-based geometric models were used both for the human and robot. The strategy was tested in simulation, and implemented and experimentally tested on a NACHI MR20 7-axes industrial robot.

  19. New Approaches for Collaborative Sharing of Chemical Model Data and Analysis Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchardt, K; Oluwole, O; Pitz, W; Rahn, L A; Green, Jr., W H; Leahy, D; Pancerella, C; Sj?berg, M; Dec, J

    2005-01-19

    The urgent need for high-efficiency, low-emission energy utilization technologies for transportation, power generation, and manufacturing processes presents difficult challenges to the combustion research community. The required predictive understanding requires systematic knowledge across the full range of physical scales involved in combustion processes--from the properties and interactions of individual molecules to the dynamics and products of turbulent multi-phase reacting flows. Innovative experimental techniques and computational approaches are revolutionizing the rate at which chemical science research can produce the new information necessary to advance our combustion knowledge. But the increased volume and complexity of this information often makes it even more difficult to derive the systems-level knowledge we need. Combustion researchers have responded by forming interdisciplinary communities intent on sharing information and coordinating research priorities. Such efforts face many barriers, however, including lack of data accessibility and interoperability, missing metadata and pedigree information, efficient approaches for sharing data and analysis tools, and the challenges of working together across geography, disciplines, and a very diverse spectrum of applications and funding. This challenge is especially difficult for those developing, sharing and/or using detailed chemical models of combustion to treat the oxidation of practical fuels. This is a very complex problem, and the development of new chemistry models requires a series of steps that involve acquiring and keeping track of a large amount of data and its pedigree. Also, this data is developed using a diverse range of codes and experiments spanning ab initio chemistry codes, laboratory kinetics and flame experiments, all the way to reacting flow simulations on massively parallel computers. Each of these processes typically requires different data formats, and often the data and/or analysis

  20. LabKey Server: An open source platform for scientific data integration, analysis and collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Lum Karl; Nathe Cory; Ramsay Sarah; Hussey Peter; Bellew Matthew; Rauch Adam; Eckels Josh; Piehler Britt; Nelson Elizabeth K; Krouse Kevin; Stearns David; Connolly Brian; Skillman Tom; Igra Mark

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Broad-based collaborations are becoming increasingly common among disease researchers. For example, the Global HIV Enterprise has united cross-disciplinary consortia to speed progress towards HIV vaccines through coordinated research across the boundaries of institutions, continents and specialties. New, end-to-end software tools for data and specimen management are necessary to achieve the ambitious goals of such alliances. These tools must enable researchers to organize ...

  1. Analysis of Social Network Collaboration Using Selected APAN Communications from the Haiti Earthquake of 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    State University ASI Group U.S. Air Force USAF Navy, Netherlands Department of Homeland Security DHS Field Director Caribbean Missions...10.1177/001872678503801001 Gray, B. (1989). Collaborating: Finding Common Ground for Multiparty Problems (1st ed.). San Francisco : Jossey-Bass. Gwet...Proceedings of the 73rd ASIS &T Annual Meeting on Navigating Streams in an Information Ecosystem. Retrieved April 20, 2012, from http

  2. Network Analysis of an Emergent Massively Collaborative Creation on Video Sharing Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Masahiro; Takeda, Hideaki; Nishimura, Takuichi

    The Web technology enables numerous people to collaborate in creation. We designate it as massively collaborative creation via the Web. As an example of massively collaborative creation, we particularly examine video development on Nico Nico Douga, which is a video sharing website that is popular in Japan. We specifically examine videos on Hatsune Miku, a version of a singing synthesizer application software that has inspired not only song creation but also songwriting, illustration, and video editing. As described herein, creators of interact to create new contents through their social network. In this paper, we analyzed the process of developing thousands of videos based on creators' social networks and investigate relationships among creation activity and social networks. The social network reveals interesting features. Creators generate large and sparse social networks including some centralized communities, and such centralized community's members shared special tags. Different categories of creators have different roles in evolving the network, e.g., songwriters gather more links than other categories, implying that they are triggers to network evolution.

  3. Temporal Analysis of Activity Patterns of Editors in Collaborative Mapping Project of OpenStreetMap

    CERN Document Server

    Yasseri, Taha; Mashhadi, Afra

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years Wikis have become an attractive platform for social studies of the human behaviour. Containing millions records of edits across the globe, collaborative systems such as Wikipedia have allowed researchers to gain a better understanding of editors participation and their activity patterns. However, contributions made to Geo-wikis_wiki-based collaborative mapping projects_ differ from systems such as Wikipedia in a fundamental way due to spatial dimension of the content that limits the contributors to a set of those who posses local knowledge about a specific area and therefore cross-platform studies and comparisons are required to build a comprehensive image of online open collaboration phenomena. In this work, we study the temporal behavioural pattern of OpenStreetMap editors, a successful example of geo-wiki, for two European capital cities. We categorise different type of temporal patterns and report on the historical trend within a period of 7 years of the project age. We also draw a com...

  4. Effectiveness of music intervention in ameliorating cancer patients' anxiety, depression, pain, and fatigue: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu F; Chen, Ying R; Chung, Min H; Liao, Yuan M; Chi, Mei J; Chang, Chia C; Chou, Kuei R

    2014-01-01

    This is the first study to use meta-analysis as a scientific technique to provide an integrated analysis of the effectiveness of music intervention in cancer patients. The purpose of this study was, using the meta-analysis method, to present a summary of existing research and explore the effectiveness of music intervention in ameliorating anxiety, depression, pain, and fatigue in cancer patients. The present study collected quantitative study designs sought of music intervention for cancer patients published from 2002 to 2012. These studies were then cross-referenced using Medical Subject Headings for topics on music intervention and cancer patients. Outcome indicators were anxiety, depression, pain, and fatigue. The quality of the studies was evaluated using Cochrane Collaboration Guidelines. The effect size on outcome indicators used the formula devised by Hedges and Olkin (1985). Results showed that music interventions were significantly effective in ameliorating anxiety (g = -0.553), depression (g = -0.510), pain (g = -0.656), and fatigue (g = -0.422) in cancer patients. Subgroup analyses revealed that age and who selected the music were major factors influencing the effect size on anxiety reduction. Music interventions significantly ameliorate anxiety, depression, pain, and fatigue in cancer patients, especially adults. Music interventions were more effective in adults than in children or adolescents and more effective when patients, rather than researchers, chose the music. Our findings provide important information for future music-intervention planners to improve the design and processes that will benefit patients in such programs.

  5. Analysis of intratumor heterogeneity unravels lung cancer evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Bruin, Elza C de; McGranahan, Nicholas; Swanton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a disease with dismal outcome. We recently reported a detailed intratumor heterogeneity analysis in 7 non-small cell lung cancer samples, revealing spatially separated driver events as well as the temporal dynamics of mutational processes and demonstrating an important role for APOBEC-mediated heterogeneity later in disease evolution.

  6. Pan-cancer analysis of ROS1 genomic aberrations

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yidan; 王奕丹

    2015-01-01

    The ROS proto-oncogene 1 (ROS1) encodes the ROS1 receptor kinase. ROS1 rearrangements are known to be oncogenic in glioblastoma, non–small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and cholangiocarcinoma. The clinical relevance of ROS1 genomic aberrations in other human cancers is largely unexamined. Here, we performed a pan-cancer analysis of ROS1 genomic aberrations across 20 cancer sites by interrogating the whole-exome sequencing data of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) via the cBioportal (www.cbioportal...

  7. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    Literature review: Collaborative experience has been shown to have a positive effect on the collaborative outcome in general (Anand & Khanna, 2000; Kale, Dyer & Singh, 2002). Furthermore, it has been linked to the ability to exploit the network of the firm for learning (Powell, Koput and Smith...... experience was largest the higher the hypothesized ambiguity. Theoretically contribution: This research project aims at contributing to existing literature by arguing, that collaborative experience is a moderating variable which moderates the effects on collaborative outcome from the level of complexity......, that the largest effects from collaborative experience is from recent collaborative experience, since knowledge depreciates when it is not used. Methodologically contribution: The research project studies the dyad and aims at introducing, to this field of research, an established way of collecting data, a new...

  8. Working Collaboratively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holder, Anna; Lovett, George

    2009-01-01

    Working collaboratively is arguably an essential skill in architectural practice as the complexity of contemporary projects involves multiple agents in the conception, construction and use of architecture. This has been emphasised by recent government rhetoric. Mass collaboration has been...... identified as a transformative global force of the last decade, most notably in knowledge and information publishing, communication and creation. This paper presents a structured conversation on changing understandings of collaboration, and the realities of collaborative methodology in architectural work....... Ideas of the platforms and structures necessary to support ‘creative’ collaborations are advanced and tested, and a vocabulary of key terms is developed. The conversation extends to reflect on the role of the architecture profession in supporting or enabling collaboration in architectural works....

  9. Task modeling for collaborative authoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, van der Gerrit; Kulyk, Olga; Vyas, Dhaval; Kubbe, Onno; Ebert, Achim; Dittmar, A.; Forbrig, P.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation –Task analysis for designing modern collaborative work needs a more fine grained approach. Especially in a complex task domain, like collaborative scientific authoring, when there is a single overall goal that can only be accomplished only by collaboration between multiple roles, each req

  10. The Influence of Game Design on the Collaborative Problem Solving Process: A Cross-Case Study of Multi-Player Collaborative Gameplay Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Nilay

    2013-01-01

    This cross-case study examines the relationships between game design attributes and collaborative problem solving process in the context of multi-player video games. The following game design attributes: sensory stimuli elements, level of challenge, and presentation of game goals and rules were examined to determine their influence on game…

  11. Non-target screening with high-resolution mass spectrometry : critical review using a collaborative trial on water analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Emma L. Schymanski; Singer, Heinz P.; Slobodnik, Jaroslav; Onghena, Matthias; et al

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: In this article, a dataset from a collaborative non-target screening trial organised by the NORMAN Association is used to review the state-of-the-art and discuss future perspectives of non-target screening using high-resolution mass spectrometry in water analysis. A total of 18 institutes from 12 European countries analysed an extract of the same water sample collected from the River Danube with either one or both of liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry detec...

  12. Survivor in the cancer context: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebdon, Megan; Foli, Karen; McComb, Sara

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this analysis was to define survivor in the cancer context. Cancer survivor has been used in the cancer lexicon, but may not represent the individuals it defines. This concept analysis was completed according to Walker and Avant's method. PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL, JSTOR, Google and medical and public health websites. Thirty sources from multiple disciplines, published between 1987-2013, were analysed for recurrent themes and conceptual meaning. Critical attributes, antecedents and consequences were extrapolated. Model, related and contrary cases were developed based on an amalgamation of clinical observations. Illegitimate, borderline and invented cases were excluded for this reason. Survivor in the cancer context is an individual with a history of malignancy, who has lived through a personalized challenge and has ongoing positive and negative consequences. Not all cancer survivors would identify themselves using the term survivor. This contributes to the paradigm shift of cancer as a chronic disease as it establishes the unique nature of the cancer experience while highlighting the long-term concerns related to this set of diseases. The Theory of Uncertainty in Illness provides a framework to understand the individualized nature of being a cancer survivor. Nursing research and practice should address the personal experiences of cancer survivors while still focusing on general survivorship needs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Pathway and network analysis of cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell, Pau; Reimand, Jueri; Haider, Syed

    2015-01-01

    Genomic information on tumors from 50 cancer types cataloged by the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) shows that only a few well-studied driver genes are frequently mutated, in contrast to many infrequently mutated genes that may also contribute to tumor biology. Hence there has been...

  14. Gene Expression Analysis of Breast Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Giri D, Chen B, Gerald W Molecular Diagnosis of Breast Cancer Therapeutic Biomarkers Using Oligonucleotide Arrays Abstract presentation USCAP 2005. 5...Bone Metastasis. Submitted Lal P, Donaton M, Girl D, Chen B, Gerald W Molecular Diagnosis of Breast Cancer Therapeutic Biomarkers Using Oligonucleotide

  15. Cancer during pregnancy: an analysis of 215 patients emphasizing the obstetrical and the neonatal outcomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calsteren, K. van; Heyns, L.; Smet, F. De; Eycken, L. Van; Gziri, M.M.; Gemert, W. Van; Halaska, M.; Vergote, I.; Ottevanger, N.; Amant, F.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess the management and the obstetrical and neonatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In an international collaborative setting, patients with invasive cancer diagnosed during pregnancy between 1998 and 2008 were identified.

  16. Software Speeds Up Analysis of Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161117.html Software Speeds Up Analysis of Breast Cancer Risk: Study ... 22, 2016 THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Software that quickly analyzes mammograms and patient history to ...

  17. Analysis of the collaborative environment created for a mobile learning experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Suárez Gómez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 125 688 USAL 5 1 812 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:ES; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} We present the results of an investigation about the conceptions and uses of mobile devices in a group of students who worked on a collaborative learning environment as part of an e-learning process. We used two research methods, first  analyzing the content of messages posted on a discussion forum throughout the course, to collect data on the use and evaluation the students made of the mobile learning process. Subsequently, in-depth interviews, we examined the perception of mobile learning and the changes produced during the course in the collaborative learning environment. The results indicate that the exchange environment created amplifies the participation and collaboration between students in the process of mobile learning, encouraging a greater role for students in an online learning experience.

  18. Meta analysis of risk factors for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Chen; Jiong-Liang Qiu; Yang Zhang; Yu-Wan Zhao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the risk factors for colorectal cancer in China.METHODS: A meta-analysis of the risk factors of colorectal cancer was conducted for 14 case-control studies, and reviewed 14 reports within 13 years which included 5034cases and 5205 controls. Dersimonian and Laird random effective models were used to process the results.RESULTS: Meta analysis of the 14 studies demonstrated that proper physical activites and dietary fibers were protective factors (pooled OR<0.8), while fecal mucohemorrhage,chronic diarrhea and polyposis were highly associated with colorectal cancer (all pooled OR>4). The stratified results showed that different OR values of some factors were due to geographic factors or different resourses.CONCLUSION: Risks of colorectal cancer are significantly associated with the histories of intestinal diseases or relative symptoms, high lipid diet, emotional trauma and family history of cancers. The suitable physical activities and dietary fibers are protective factors.

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research Research on Causes of ...

  20. Cancer incidence in men: a cluster analysis of spatial patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Alò Daniela

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spatial clustering of different diseases has received much less attention than single disease mapping. Besides chance or artifact, clustering of different cancers in a given area may depend on exposure to a shared risk factor or to multiple correlated factors (e.g. cigarette smoking and obesity in a deprived area. Models developed so far to investigate co-occurrence of diseases are not well-suited for analyzing many cancers simultaneously. In this paper we propose a simple two-step exploratory method for screening clusters of different cancers in a population. Methods Cancer incidence data were derived from the regional cancer registry of Umbria, Italy. A cluster analysis was performed on smoothed and non-smoothed standardized incidence ratios (SIRs of the 13 most frequent cancers in males. The Besag, York and Mollie model (BYM and Poisson kriging were used to produce smoothed SIRs. Results Cluster analysis on non-smoothed SIRs was poorly informative in terms of clustering of different cancers, as only larynx and oral cavity were grouped, and of characteristic patterns of cancer incidence in specific geographical areas. On the other hand BYM and Poisson kriging gave similar results, showing cancers of the oral cavity, larynx, esophagus, stomach and liver formed a main cluster. Lung and urinary bladder cancers clustered together but not with the cancers mentioned above. Both methods, particularly the BYM model, identified distinct geographic clusters of adjacent areas. Conclusion As in single disease mapping, non-smoothed SIRs do not provide reliable estimates of cancer risks because of small area variability. The BYM model produces smooth risk surfaces which, when entered into a cluster analysis, identify well-defined geographical clusters of adjacent areas. It probably enhances or amplifies the signal arising from exposure of more areas (statistical units to shared risk factors that are associated with different cancers. In

  1. The Early Prevention of Obesity in CHildren (EPOCH Collaboration - an Individual Patient Data Prospective Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simes John

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efforts to prevent the development of overweight and obesity have increasingly focused early in the life course as we recognise that both metabolic and behavioural patterns are often established within the first few years of life. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs of interventions are even more powerful when, with forethought, they are synthesised into an individual patient data (IPD prospective meta-analysis (PMA. An IPD PMA is a unique research design where several trials are identified for inclusion in an analysis before any of the individual trial results become known and the data are provided for each randomised patient. This methodology minimises the publication and selection bias often associated with a retrospective meta-analysis by allowing hypotheses, analysis methods and selection criteria to be specified a priori. Methods/Design The Early Prevention of Obesity in CHildren (EPOCH Collaboration was formed in 2009. The main objective of the EPOCH Collaboration is to determine if early intervention for childhood obesity impacts on body mass index (BMI z scores at age 18-24 months. Additional research questions will focus on whether early intervention has an impact on children's dietary quality, TV viewing time, duration of breastfeeding and parenting styles. This protocol includes the hypotheses, inclusion criteria and outcome measures to be used in the IPD PMA. The sample size of the combined dataset at final outcome assessment (approximately 1800 infants will allow greater precision when exploring differences in the effect of early intervention with respect to pre-specified participant- and intervention-level characteristics. Discussion Finalisation of the data collection procedures and analysis plans will be complete by the end of 2010. Data collection and analysis will occur during 2011-2012 and results should be available by 2013. Trial registration number ACTRN12610000789066

  2. Sparse discriminant analysis for breast cancer biomarker identification and classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Shi; Daoqing Dai; Chaochun Liu; Hong Yan

    2009-01-01

    Biomarker identification and cancer classification are two important procedures in microarray data analysis. We propose a novel uni-fied method to carry out both tasks. We first preselect biomarker candidates by eliminating unrelated genes through the BSS/WSS ratio filter to reduce computational cost, and then use a sparse discriminant analysis method for simultaneous biomarker identification and cancer classification. Moreover, we give a mathematical justification about automatic biomarker identification. Experimental results show that the proposed method can identify key genes that have been verified in biochemical or biomedical research and classify the breast cancer type correctly.

  3. Change in weight and waist circumference and risk of colorectal cancer: results from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahalios, Amalia; Simpson, Julie A; Baglietto, Laura; MacInnis, Robert J; Hodge, Allison M; Giles, Graham G; English, Dallas R

    2016-02-25

    Studies reporting the association between change in weight or body mass index during midlife and risk of colorectal cancer have found inconsistent results, and only one study to date has reported the association between change in waist circumference (a measure of central adiposity) and risk of colorectal cancer. We investigated the association between risk of colorectal cancer and changes in directly measured waist circumference and weight from baseline (1990-1994) to wave 2 (2003-2007). Cox regression, with age as the time metric and follow-up starting at wave 2, adjusted for covariates selected from a causal model, was used to estimate the Hazard Ratios (HRs) and 95 % Confidence Intervals (CIs) for the change in waist circumference and weight in relation to risk of colorectal cancer. A total of 373 cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed during an average 9 years of follow-up of 20,605 participants. Increases in waist circumference and weight were not associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (HR per 5 cm increase in waist circumference = 1.02; 95 % CI: 0.95, 1.10; HR per 5 kg increase in weight = 0.93; 0.85, 1.02). For individuals with a waist circumference at baseline that was less than the sex-specific mean value there was a slight increased risk of colorectal cancer associated with a 5 cm increase in waist circumference at wave 2 (HR = 1.08; 0.97, 1.21). Increases in waist circumference and weight during midlife do not appear to be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer.

  4. Professional Learning of K-6 Teachers in Science Through Collaborative Action Research: An Activity Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnough, Karen

    2016-11-01

    Primary/elementary teachers are uniquely positioned in terms of their need for ongoing, science-focused professional development. They are usually generalists, having limited preparation for teaching science, and often do not feel prepared or comfortable in teaching science. In this case study, CHAT or cultural-historical activity theory is used as a lens to examine primary/elementary teachers' activity system as they engaged in a teacher-driven professional development initiative. Teachers engaged in collaborative action research to change their practice, with the objective of making their science teaching more engaging and hands-on for students. A range of qualitative methods and sources such as teacher interviews and reflections, teacher-created artifacts, and researcher observational notes were adopted to gain insight into teacher learning. Outcomes report on how the teachers' activity system changed as they participated in two cycles of collaborative action research and how the contradictions that arose in their activity system became sources of professional growth. Furthermore, this research shows how the framework of activity theory may be used to garner insight into the activity and learning of teachers as both their professional activities and the context change over time.

  5. IMEP-115: determination of methylmercury in seafood by elemental mercury analysis: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Fernando; Calderón, Josep; Gonçalves, Susana; Lourenço, Maria Helena; Robouch, Piotr; Emteborg, Hakan; Conneely, Patrick; Tumba-Tshilumba, Marie-France; de la Calle, Maria Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study IMEP-115 was organized by the European Union Reference Laboratory for Heavy Metals in Feed and Food (EURL-HM) to validate a method for the determination of methylmercury in seafood. The method was based on a liquid-liquid extraction with an organic solvent and with an aqueous cysteine solution. The final quantitation was done with an elemental mercury analyzer. Fifteen laboratories experienced in elemental mercury analyses, from 10 European countries, took part in the exercise. Five test items were selected to cover the concentration range from 0.013 to 5.12 mg/kg. All test items were reference materials certified for the methylmercury mass fraction: DOLT-4 (dogfish liver), TORT-2 (lobster hepatopancreas), SRM 2974a (mussel), SRM 1566b (oyster), and ERM CE-464 (tuna). Participants also received a bottle of ERM CE-463 (tuna) to test their analytical method before starting the collaborative study. Method validation showed adequate accuracy and acceptable precision for all test items, thus fitting its intended analytical purpose. The repeatability RSD ranged from 3.9 to 12.3%, while the reproducibility RSD ranged from 8.4 to 24.8%.

  6. Contributions of team climate in the study of interprofessional collaboration: A conceptual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agreli, Heloise F; Peduzzi, Marina; Bailey, Christopher

    2017-09-06

    The concept of team climate is widely used to understand and evaluate working environments. It shares some important features with Interprofessional Collaboration (IPC). The four-factor theory of climate for work group innovation, which underpins team climate, could provide a better basis for understanding both teamwork and IPC. This article examines in detail the common ground between team climate and IPC, and assesses the relevance of team climate as a theoretical approach to understanding IPC. There are important potential areas of overlap between team climate and IPC that we have grouped under four headings: (1) interaction and communication between team members; (2) common objectives around which collective work is organised; (3) responsibility for performing work to a high standard; and (4) promoting innovation in working practices. These overlapping areas suggest common characteristics that could provide elements of a framework for considering the contribution of team climate to collaborative working, both from a conceptual perspective and, potentially, in operational terms as, for example, a diagnostic tool.

  7. Analyzing Collaborative Governance Through Social Network Analysis: A Case Study of River Management Along the Waal River in The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliervoet, J. M.; Geerling, G. W.; Mostert, E.; Smits, A. J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Until recently, governmental organizations played a dominant and decisive role in natural resource management. However, an increasing number of studies indicate that this dominant role is developing towards a more facilitating role as equal partner to improve efficiency and create a leaner state. This approach is characterized by complex collaborative relationships between various actors and sectors on multiple levels. To understand this complexity in the field of environmental management, we conducted a social network analysis of floodplain management in the Dutch Rhine delta. We charted the current interorganizational relationships between 43 organizations involved in flood protection (blue network) and nature management (green network) and explored the consequences of abolishing the central actor in these networks. The discontinuation of this actor will decrease the connectedness of actors within the blue and green network and may therefore have a large impact on the exchange of ideas and decision-making processes. Furthermore, our research shows the dependence of non-governmental actors on the main governmental organizations. It seems that the Dutch governmental organizations still have a dominant and controlling role in floodplain management. This challenges the alleged shift from a dominant government towards collaborative governance and calls for detailed analysis of actual governance.

  8. Analyzing Collaborative Governance Through Social Network Analysis: A Case Study of River Management Along the Waal River in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliervoet, J M; Geerling, G W; Mostert, E; Smits, A J M

    2016-02-01

    Until recently, governmental organizations played a dominant and decisive role in natural resource management. However, an increasing number of studies indicate that this dominant role is developing towards a more facilitating role as equal partner to improve efficiency and create a leaner state. This approach is characterized by complex collaborative relationships between various actors and sectors on multiple levels. To understand this complexity in the field of environmental management, we conducted a social network analysis of floodplain management in the Dutch Rhine delta. We charted the current interorganizational relationships between 43 organizations involved in flood protection (blue network) and nature management (green network) and explored the consequences of abolishing the central actor in these networks. The discontinuation of this actor will decrease the connectedness of actors within the blue and green network and may therefore have a large impact on the exchange of ideas and decision-making processes. Furthermore, our research shows the dependence of non-governmental actors on the main governmental organizations. It seems that the Dutch governmental organizations still have a dominant and controlling role in floodplain management. This challenges the alleged shift from a dominant government towards collaborative governance and calls for detailed analysis of actual governance.

  9. Examining patterns of political, social service, and collaborative involvement of religious congregations: a latent class and transition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nathan R; Houston, Jaclyn D

    2013-06-01

    This investigation examines typologies of congregations based on patterns of congregational political and social service activities and collaborative partners. Based on a latent class analysis of a national random sample of 2,153 congregations, results indicated four distinct types of congregations with unique patterns of political, social service, and collaborative partnerships labeled: (a) Active, (b) Not Active, (c) Social Service Not Political, and (d) Political Not Social Service. Moreover, congregational characteristics such as religious tradition and clergy characteristics predicted membership in certain types. A latent transition analysis using an additional 262 congregations revealed distinct patterns of how congregations changed types across a nine year period. Results showed both congregational continuity (e.g., Not Active congregations remained Not Active) and change (e.g., Active congregations were likely to change type membership). This study advances congregational research by examining congregational types, what predicts certain types, and how congregations change types across time. Implications for future research and partnership with religious congregations also are discussed.

  10. Reliability analysis for aeroengine turbine disc fatigue life with multiple random variables based on distributed collaborative response surface method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高海峰; 白广忱; 高阳; 鲍天未

    2015-01-01

    The fatigue life of aeroengine turbine disc presents great dispersion due to the randomness of the basic variables, such as applied load, working temperature, geometrical dimensions and material properties. In order to ameliorate reliability analysis efficiency without loss of reliability, the distributed collaborative response surface method (DCRSM) was proposed, and its basic theories were established in this work. Considering the failure dependency among the failure modes, the distributed response surface was constructed to establish the relationship between the failure mode and the relevant random variables. Then, the failure modes were considered as the random variables of system response to obtain the distributed collaborative response surface model based on structure failure criterion. Finally, the given turbine disc structure was employed to illustrate the feasibility and validity of the presented method. Through the comparison of DCRSM, Monte Carlo method (MCM) and the traditional response surface method (RSM), the results show that the computational precision for DCRSM is more consistent with MCM than RSM, while DCRSM needs far less computing time than MCM and RSM under the same simulation conditions. Thus, DCRSM is demonstrated to be a feasible and valid approach for improving the computational efficiency of reliability analysis for aeroengine turbine disc fatigue life with multiple random variables, and has great potential value for the complicated mechanical structure with multi-component and multi-failure mode.

  11. 19 July 2013 - Chairman of the Policy Committee, European Cancer Organisation, President, European Association for Cancer Research E. Celis visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, B. Heinemann and signing the Guest Book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers. Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    19 July 2013 - Chairman of the Policy Committee, European Cancer Organisation, President, European Association for Cancer Research E. Celis visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, B. Heinemann and signing the Guest Book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers. Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

  12. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    sample of firms, an establish way of measuring the outcome of product development and a new way of measuring experience. Where the previous research in this field primarily uses secondary databases, this research project collects primary data by an online questionnaire to the NPD manager from one......, that the largest effects from collaborative experience is from recent collaborative experience, since knowledge depreciates when it is not used. Methodologically contribution: The research project studies the dyad and aims at introducing, to this field of research, an established way of collecting data, a new...... of the new product development as a performance measure. Finally, where previous research primarily has used the number of collaborations as a measure of collaborative experience, this research includes the recency in the measure of collaborative experience. Results: Since data has not yet been collected...

  13. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    of the prototyping process, the actual prototype was used as a tool for communication or development, thus serving as a platform for the cross-fertilization of knowledge. In this way, collaborative prototyping leads to a better balance between functionality and usability; it translates usability problems into design......This paper presents an inductive study that shows how collaborative prototyping across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries can improve the overall prototyping process. Our combined action research and case study approach provides new insights into how collaborative prototyping...... can provide a platform for prototype-driven problem solving in early new product development (NPD). Our findings have important implications for how to facilitate multistakeholder collaboration in prototyping and problem solving, and more generally for how to organize collaborative and open innovation...

  14. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an inductive study that shows how collaborative prototyping across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries can improve the overall prototyping process. Our combined action research and case study approach provides new insights into how collaborative prototyping...... constraints in involving the appropriate stakeholders at the right time. The paper specifically elaborates on the role of users in collaborative prototyping, which is important in order to cover all phases of the problem-solving cycle but triggers an interesting challenge due to the “reverse empathy...... can provide a platform for prototype-driven problem solving in early new product development (NPD). Our findings have important implications for how to facilitate multistakeholder collaboration in prototyping and problem solving, and more generally for how to organize collaborative and open innovation...

  15. Cardiovascular disease after treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma: an analysis of nine collaborative EORTC-LYSA trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Giusti, Francesco; Vogelius, Ivan R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease after treatment is an important concern in cancer survivors. However, knowledge of cardiotoxicity is limited by the retrospective nature of data, which often does not contain details of treatment exposure. To facilitate individual risk counselling of patients, we...

  16. Cardiovascular disease after treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma : an analysis of nine collaborative EORTC-LYSA trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Giusti, Francesco; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Lundemann, Michael; van der Kaaij, Marleen A. E.; Ramadan, Safaa; Meulemans, Bart; Henry-Amar, Michel; Aleman, Berthe M. P.; Raemaekers, John; Meijnders, Paul; Moser, Elisabeth C.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Feugier, Pierre; Casasnovas, Olivier; Fortpied, Catherine; Specht, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease after treatment is an important concern in cancer survivors. However, knowledge of cardiotoxicity is limited by the retrospective nature of data, which often does not contain details of treatment exposure. To facilitate individual risk counselling of patients, we ai

  17. Cardiovascular disease after treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma: an analysis of nine collaborative EORTC-LYSA trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maraldo, M.V.; Giusti, F.; Vogelius, I.R.; Lundemann, M.; Kaaij, M.A. van der; Ramadan, S.; Meulemans, B.; Henry-Amar, M.; Aleman, B.M.; Raemaekers, J.M.M.; Meijnders, P.; Moser, E.C.; Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.; Feugier, P.; Casasnovas, O.; Fortpied, C.; Specht, L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease after treatment is an important concern in cancer survivors. However, knowledge of cardiotoxicity is limited by the retrospective nature of data, which often does not contain details of treatment exposure. To facilitate individual risk counselling of patients, we a

  18. Single-cell analysis in cancer genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatpour, Assieh; Lai, Shujing; Guo, Guoji; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Genetic changes and environmental differences result in cellular heterogeneity among cancer cells within the same tumor, thereby complicating treatment outcomes. Recent advances in single-cell technologies have opened new avenues to characterize the intra-tumor cellular heterogeneity, identify rare cell types, measure mutation rates, and, ultimately, guide diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we review the recent single-cell technological and computational advances at the genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels, and discuss their applications in cancer research. PMID:26450340

  19. Meta-Analysis of Massage Therapy on Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Yeop; Yeo, Sujung; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lim, Sabina

    2015-07-01

    Cancer pain is the most common complaint among patients with cancer. Conventional treatment does not always relieve cancer pain satisfactorily. Therefore, many patients with cancer have turned to complementary therapies to help them with their physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Massage therapy is increasingly used for symptom relief in patients with cancer. The current study aimed to investigate by meta-analysis the effects of massage therapy for cancer patients experiencing pain. Nine electronic databases were systematically searched for studies published through August 2013 in English, Chinese, and Korean. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and Cochrane risk-of-bias scales. Twelve studies, including 559 participants, were used in the meta-analysis. In 9 high-quality studies based on the PEDro scale (standardized mean difference, -1.24; 95% confidence interval, -1.72 to -0.75), we observed reduction in cancer pain after massage. Massage therapy significantly reduced cancer pain compared with no massage treatment or conventional care (standardized mean difference, -1.25; 95% confidence interval, -1.63 to -0.87). Our results indicate that massage is effective for the relief of cancer pain, especially for surgery-related pain. Among the various types of massage, foot reflexology appeared to be more effective than body or aroma massage. Our meta-analysis indicated a beneficial effect of massage for relief of cancer pain. Further well-designed, large studies with longer follow-up periods are needed to be able to draw firmer conclusions regarding the effectiveness.

  20. Genomic analysis of epithelial ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Farley; Laurent L Ozbun; Michael J Birrer

    2008-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a major health problem for women in the United States.Despite evidence of considerable heterogeneity,most cases of ovarian cancer are treated in a similar fashion.The molecular basis for the clinicopathologic characteristics of these tumors remains poorly defined.Whole genome expression profiling is a genomic tool,which can identify dysregulated genes and uncover unique sub-classes of tumors.The application of this technology to ovarian cancer has provided a solid molecular basis for differences in histology and grade of ovarian tumors.Differentially expressed genes identified pathways implicated in cell proliferation,invasion,motility,chromosomal instability,and gene silencing and provided new insights into the origin and potential treatment of these cancers.The added knowledge provided by global gene expression profiling should allow for a more rational treatment of ovarian cancers.These techniques are leading to a paradigm shift from empirical treatment to an individually tailored approach.This review summarizes the new genomic data on epithelial ovarian cancers of different histology and grade and the impact it will have on our understanding and treatment of this disease.

  1. Ovarian cancer and oral contraceptives: collaborative reanalysis of data from 45 epidemiological studies including 23,257 women with ovarian cancer and 87,303 controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancer, Collaborative Group on Epidemiological Studies of Ovarian; Beral, V.; Doll, R.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral contraceptives were introduced almost 50 years ago, and over 100 million women currently use them. Oral contraceptives can reduce the risk of ovarian cancer, but the eventual public-health effects of this reduction will depend on how long the protection lasts after use ceases. We...... aimed to assess these effects. METHODS: Individual data for 23,257 women with ovarian cancer (cases) and 87,303 without ovarian cancer (controls) from 45 epidemiological studies in 21 countries were checked and analysed centrally. The relative risk of ovarian cancer in relation to oral contraceptive use...... was estimated, stratifying by study, age, parity, and hysterectomy. FINDINGS: Overall 7308 (31%) cases and 32,717 (37%) controls had ever used oral contraceptives, for average durations among users of 4.4 and 5.0 years, respectively. The median year of cancer diagnosis was 1993, when cases were aged an average...

  2. International collaboration towards a global analysis of volcanic hazards and risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughlin, Susan; Duncan, Melanie; Volcano Model Network, Global

    2017-04-01

    Approximately 800 million people live within 100km of an active volcano and such environments are often subject to multiple natural hazards. Volcanic eruptions and related volcanic hazards are less frequent than many other natural hazards but when they occur they can have immediate and long-lived impacts so it is important that they are not overlooked in a multi-risk assessment. Based on experiences to date, it's clear that natural hazards communities need to address a series of challenges in order to move to a multi-hazard approach to risk assessment. Firstly, the need to further develop synergies and coordination within our own communities at local to global scales. Secondly, we must collaborate and identify opportunities for harmonisation across natural hazards communities: for instance, by ensuring our databases are accessible and meet certain standards, a variety of users will be then able to contribute and access data. Thirdly, identifying the scale and breadth of multi-risk assessments needs to be co-defined with decision-makers, which will constrain the relevant potential cascading/compounding hazards to consider. Fourthly, and related to all previous points, multi-risk assessments require multi-risk knowledge, requiring interdisciplinary perspectives, as well as discipline specific expertise. The Global Volcano Model network (GVM) is a growing international network of (public and private) institutions and organisations, which have the collective aim of identifying and reducing volcanic risks. GVM's values embody collaboration, scientific excellence, open-access (wherever possible) and, above all, public good. GVM highlights and builds on the best research available within the volcanological community, drawing on the work of IAVCEI Commissions and other research initiatives. It also builds on the local knowledge of volcano observatories and collaborating scientists, ensuring that global efforts are underpinned by local evidence. Some of GVM's most

  3. Cancer risk in waterpipe smokers: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtani, Ravinder; Cheema, Sohaila; Sheikh, Javaid; Al Mulla, Ahmad; Lowenfels, Albert; Maisonneuve, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    To quantify by meta-analysis the relationship between waterpipe smoking and cancer, including cancer of the head and neck, esophagus, stomach, lung and bladder. We performed a systematic literature search to identify relevant studies, scored their quality, used fixed and random-effect models to estimate summary relative risks (SRR), evaluated heterogeneity and publication bias. We retrieved information from 28 published reports. Considering only highquality studies, waterpipe smoking was associated with increased risk of head and neck cancer (SRR 2.97; 95 % CI 2.26-3.90), esophageal cancer (1.84; 1.42-2.38) and lung cancer (2.22; 1.24-3.97), with no evidence of heterogeneity or publication bias. Increased risk was also observed for stomach and bladder cancer but based mainly on poor-quality studies. For colorectum, liver and for all sites combined risk estimates were elevated, but there were insufficient reports to perform a meta-analysis. Contrary to the perception of the relative safety of waterpipe smoking, this meta-analysis provides quantitative estimates of its association with cancers of the head and neck, esophagus and lung. The scarcity and limited quality of available reports point out the need for larger carefully designed studies in well-defined populations.

  4. [Risk profiling in cancer surveillance in contaminated sites: an example from the ISS-AIRTUM collaborative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelan, Dolores; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Coviello, Enzo; Crocetti, Emanuele; Pasetto, Roberto; Pirastu, Roberta; Biggeri, Annibale

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological surveillance on high risk environmental areas or areas covered by cancer registration yields long inventories of relative risks. Summaries of the results' tables must be produced to identify priorities and tailor public health actions. The aim is, therefore, to draw conclusions from each area's disease profile, or from the area signature of each disease.With this inmind, we used data on cancer incidence from 17 Cancer Registries that participated in the ISS-AIRTUM (National Institute of Health-Italian Network of Cancer Registries) study, and we produced conditional and marginal rankings of areas/diseases using a multivariate hierarchical Bayesian model. In this context, it is important to obtain an uncertainty evaluation by calculating the credibility intervals of ranks. The areas marginal ranking shows a large overlapping of credibility intervals, such that it is not possible to speak of a limited number of ISS-AIRTUM areas as being particularly affected. Every ISS-AIRTUMarea, therefore,must be considered individually and ordering themby ranking of cancer incidence wouldn't be appropriate. Instead,marginal ranking of diseases highlights the impact of asbestos exposure in all the analyzed areas.

  5. Family history of cancer and risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Eric J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Fuchs, Charles S.; LaCroix, Andrea; McWilliams, Robert R.; Steplowski, Emily; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Arslan, Alan A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gross, Myron; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Petersen, Gloria; Zheng, Wei; Agalliu, Ilir; Allen, Naomi E.; Amundadottir, Laufey; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Buring, Julie E.; Canzian, Federico; Clipp, Sandra; Dorronsoro, Miren; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Kraft, Peter; Kooperberg, Charles; Lynch, Shannon M.; Sund, Malin; Mendelsohn, Julie B.; Mouw, Tracy; Newton, Christina C.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Thomas, Gilles; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wolpin, Brian M.; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne

    2010-01-01

    A family history of pancreatic cancer has consistently been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, uncertainty remains about the strength of this association. Results from previous studies suggest a family history of select cancers (i.e. ovarian, breast, and colorectal) could also be associated, although not as strongly, with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We examined the association between a family history of five types of cancer (pancreas, prostate, ovarian, breast, and colorectal) and risk of pancreatic cancer using data from a collaborative nested case-control study conducted by the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium. Cases and controls were from cohort studies from the United States, Europe, and China, and a case-control study from the Mayo Clinic. Analyses of family history of pancreatic cancer included 1,183 cases and 1,205 controls. A family history of pancreatic cancer in a parent, sibling, or child was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer (multivariate-adjusted OR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.19–2.61). A family history of prostate cancer was also associated with increased risk (OR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.12–1.89). There were no statistically significant associations with a family history of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.52–1.31), breast cancer (OR = 1.21, 95% CI 0.97–1.51), or colorectal cancer (OR = 1.17, 95% CI 0.93–1.47). Our results confirm a moderate sized association between a family history of pancreatic cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer and also provide evidence for an association with a family history of prostate cancer worth further study. PMID:20049842

  6. Collaborative Business Models for Energy Efficient Solutions An Exploratory Analysis of Danish and German Manufacturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Brem, Alexander; Bogers, Marcel

    energy network and innovative business models for energy efficient solutions. In order to carry out the above research activities, a first-stage screening of Southern Danish and Northern German companies that are energy efficient and of high performance is crucial to our research. By conducting...... efficiency and innovation management. Then, based on the findings open and collaborative business models could be suggested. Open business models get more important because innovation no longer takes place within a single organization, but are distributed across stakeholders in a value network (Bogers & West......The growing dynamics of innovation and productivity affect businesses in most industries and countries. Companies face these challenges by constantly developing new technologies and business models - the logic with which they create and capture value (Afuah, 2014; Osterwalder & Pigneur, 2010; Zott...

  7. Microfluidics and cancer analysis: cell separation, cell/tissue culture, cell mechanics, and integrated analysis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Dimitri

    2016-01-21

    Among the growing number of tools available for cancer studies, microfluidic systems have emerged as a promising analytical tool to elucidate cancer cell and tumor function. Microfluidic methods to culture cells have created approaches to provide a range of environments from single-cell analysis to complex three-dimensional devices. In this review we discuss recent advances in tumor cell culture, cancer cell analysis, and advanced studies enabled by microfluidic systems.

  8. International Scientific Collaboration of China: Collaborating Countries, Institutions and Individuals

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xianwen; Wang, Zhi; Peng, Lian; Wang, Chuanli

    2014-01-01

    Using bibliometric methods, we investigate China's international scientific collaboration from 3 levels of collaborating countries, institutions and individuals. We design a database in SQL Server, and make analysis of Chinese SCI papers based on the corresponding author field. We find that China's international scientific collaboration is focused on a handful of countries. Nearly 95% international co-authored papers are collaborated with only 20 countries, among which the USA account for more than 40% of all. Results also show that Chinese lineage in the international co-authorship is obvious, which means Chinese immigrant scientists are playing an important role in China's international scientific collaboration, especially in English-speaking countries.

  9. What does cancer treatment look like in consumer cancer magazines? An exploratory analysis of photographic content in consumer cancer magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Selene G; Della, Lindsay J; Sohn, Steve H

    2011-04-01

    In an exploratory analysis of several highly circulated consumer cancer magazines, the authors evaluated congruency between visual images of cancer patients and target audience risk profile. The authors assessed 413 images of cancer patients/potential patients for demographic variables such as age, gender, and ethnicity/race. They compared this profile with actual risk statistics. The images in the magazines are considerably younger, more female, and more White than what is indicated by U.S. cancer risk statistics. The authors also assessed images for visual signs of cancer testing/diagnosis and treatment. Few individuals show obvious signs of cancer treatment (e.g., head scarves, skin/nail abnormalities, thin body types). Most images feature healthier looking people, some actively engaged in construction work, bicycling, and yoga. In contrast, a scan of the editorial content showed that nearly two thirds of the articles focus on treatment issues. To explicate the implications of this imagery-text discontinuity on readers' attention and cognitive processing, the authors used constructs from information processing and social identity theories. On the basis of these models/theories, the authors provide recommendations for consumer cancer magazines, suggesting that the imagery be adjusted to reflect cancer diagnosis realities for enhanced message attention and comprehension.

  10. Comparative trace elemental analysis of cancerous and non-cancerous tissues of rectal cancer patients using PIXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga Raju, G. J.; Sarita, P.; Murthy, K. S. R.

    2017-08-01

    Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), an accelerator based analytical technique has been employed in this work for the analysis of trace elements in the cancerous and non-cancerous tissues of rectal cancer patients. A beam of 3 MeV protons generated from 3 MV Pelletron accelerator at the Ion Beam Laboratory of Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India was used as projectile to excite the atoms present in the tissues samples. PIXE technique, with its capability to detect simultaneously several elements present at very low concentrations, offers an excellent tool for trace element analysis. The characteristic X-rays emitted by the samples were recorded by a high resolution Si (Li) detector. On the basis of the PIXE spectrum obtained for each sample, the elements Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, and Br were identified and their relative concentrations were estimated in the cancerous and non-cancerous tissues of rectum. The levels of Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, and As were higher (p < 0.005) while the levels of Ca, Cr and Ni were lower (p < 0.005) in the cancer tissues relative to the normal tissues. The alterations in the levels of the trace elements observed in the present work are discussed in this paper with respect to their potential role in the initiation, promotion and inhibition of cancer of the rectum.

  11. Tailoring Breast Cancer Screening Intervals by Breast Density and Risk for Women Aged 50 Years or Older: Collaborative Modeling of Screening Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Kerlikowske, Karla; Stout, Natasha K; Miglioretti, Diana L; Schechter, Clyde B; Ergun, Mehmet Ali; van den Broek, Jeroen J; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Sprague, Brian L; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Near, Aimee M; Gangnon, Ronald E; Hampton, John M; Chandler, Young; de Koning, Harry J; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Tosteson, Anna N A

    2016-11-15

    Biennial screening is generally recommended for average-risk women aged 50 to 74 years, but tailored screening may provide greater benefits. To estimate outcomes for various screening intervals after age 50 years based on breast density and risk for breast cancer. Collaborative simulation modeling using national incidence, breast density, and screening performance data. United States. Women aged 50 years or older with various combinations of breast density and relative risk (RR) of 1.0, 1.3, 2.0, or 4.0. Annual, biennial, or triennial digital mammography screening from ages 50 to 74 years (vs. no screening) and ages 65 to 74 years (vs. biennial digital mammography from ages 50 to 64 years). Lifetime breast cancer deaths, life expectancy and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), false-positive mammograms, benign biopsy results, overdiagnosis, cost-effectiveness, and ratio of false-positive results to breast cancer deaths averted. Screening benefits and overdiagnosis increase with breast density and RR. False-positive mammograms and benign results on biopsy decrease with increasing risk. Among women with fatty breasts or scattered fibroglandular density and an RR of 1.0 or 1.3, breast cancer deaths averted were similar for triennial versus biennial screening for both age groups (50 to 74 years, median of 3.4 to 5.1 vs. 4.1 to 6.5 deaths averted; 65 to 74 years, median of 1.5 to 2.1 vs. 1.8 to 2.6 deaths averted). Breast cancer deaths averted increased with annual versus biennial screening for women aged 50 to 74 years at all levels of breast density and an RR of 4.0, and those aged 65 to 74 years with heterogeneously or extremely dense breasts and an RR of 4.0. However, harms were almost 2-fold higher. Triennial screening for the average-risk subgroup and annual screening for the highest-risk subgroup cost less than $100 000 per QALY gained. Models did not consider women younger than 50 years, those with an RR less than 1, or other imaging methods. Average-risk women

  12. Comparative proteomics analysis of human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Jian-Fang Li; Ying Qu; Xue-Hua Chen; Jian-Min Qin; Qin-Long Gu; Min Yan; Zheng-Gang Zhu; Bing-Ya Liu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To isolate and identify differentially expressed proteins between cancer and normal tissues of gastric cancer by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).METHODS: Soluble fraction proteins of gastric cancer tissues and paired normal tissues were separated by 2-DE.The differentially expressed proteins were selected and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and database search.RESULTS: 2-DE profiles with high resolution and reproducibility were obtained.Twenty-three protein spots were excised from sliver staining gel and digested in gel by trypsin,in which fifteen protein spots were identified successfully.Among the identified proteins,there were ten over-expressed and five under-expressed proteins in stomach cancer tissues compared with normal tissues.CONCLUSION: In this study,the well-resolved,reproducible 2-DE patterns of human gastric cancer tissue and paired normal tissue were established and optimized and certain differentially-expressed proteins were identified.The combined use of 2-DE and MS provides an effective approach to screen for potential tumor markers.

  13. Collaboration and entanglement: An actor-network theory analysis of team-based intraprofessional care for patients with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, A; Goldszmidt, M; Kinsella, E A; Smith, S; Lingard, L

    2016-09-01

    Despite calls for more interprofessional and intraprofessional team-based approaches in healthcare, we lack sufficient understanding of how this happens in the context of patient care teams. This multi-perspective, team-based interview study examined how medical teams negotiated collaborative tensions. From 2011 to 2013, 50 patients across five sites in three Canadian provinces were interviewed about their care experiences and were asked to identify members of their health care teams. Patient-identified team members were subsequently interviewed to form 50 "Team Sampling Units" (TSUs), consisting of 209 interviews with patients, caregivers and healthcare providers. Results are gathered from a focused analysis of 13 TSUs where intraprofessional collaborative tensions involved treating fluid overload, or edema, a common HF symptom. Drawing on actor-network theory (ANT), the analysis focused on intraprofessional collaboration between specialty care teams in cardiology and nephrology. The study found that despite a shared narrative of common purpose between cardiology teams and nephrology teams, fluid management tools and techniques formed sites of collaborative tension. In particular, care activities involved asynchronous clinical interpretations, geographically distributed specialist care, fragmented forms of communication, and uncertainty due to clinical complexity. Teams 'disentangled' fluid in order to focus on its physiological function and mobilisation. Teams also used distinct 'framings' of fluid management that created perceived collaborative tensions. This study advances collaborative entanglement as a conceptual framework for understanding, teaching, and potentially ameliorating some of the tensions that manifest during intraprofessional care for patients with complex, chronic disease.

  14. A collaborative resource management workspace and project management application for data collection, analysis and visualization: OpenNRM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, A.

    2013-12-01

    During the process of research and design for OpenNRM, we imagined a place where diverse groups of people and communities could effectively and efficiently collaborate to manage large-scale environmental problems and projects. Our research revealed the need to combine a variety of software components. Users can explore and analyze a topic while simultaneously develop stories and solve problems in a way that the end result is consumable by their colleagues and the general public. To do this we brought together software modules that are typically separate: Document and Asset Management, GIS and Interactive Mapping, WIKI and Information Libraries, Data Catalogs and Services, Project Management Tools and Storytelling templates. These components, along with others are supported by extensive data catalogs (NWIS, Storet, CDEC, Cuahsi), data analysis tools and web services for a turn-key workspace that will allow you to quickly build project communities and data stories. In this presentation we will show you how our investigation into these collaborative efforts are implemented and working for some of our clients, including the State of California's Sacramento San Joaquin Bay-Delta and San Joaquin River Basin. The case study will display the use of the OpenNRM workspace for real time environmental conditions management, data visualization, project operations, environmental restoration, high frequency monitoring and data reporting. We will demonstrate how scientists and policy makers are working together to tell the story of this complicated and divisive system and how they are becoming better managers of that system. Using the genius of web services, we will show you how OpenNRM was designed to allow you to build your own community while easily sharing data stories, project data, monitoring results, document libraries, interactive maps and datasets with others. We will get into more technical detail by presenting how our data interpolation tools can show high frequency

  15. Collaboration, not competition: cost analysis of neonatal nurse practitioner plus neonatologist versus neonatologist-only care models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosque, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Although advanced practice in neonatal nursing is accepted and supported by the American Academy of Pediatrics and National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners, less than one-half of all states allow independent prescriptive authority by advanced practice nurse practitioners. The purpose of this study was to compare costs of a collaborative practice model that includes neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) plus neonatologist (Neo) versus a neonatologist only (Neo-Only) practice in Washington state. Published Internet median salary figures from 3 sources were averaged to produce mean ± SD provider salaries, and costs for each care model were calculated in this descriptive, comparative study. Median NNP versus Neo salaries were $99,773 ± $5206 versus $228,871 ± $9654, respectively (P cost $1,185,475 versus Neo-Only (8 Neo FTEs) cost $1,830,960. The NNP + Neo practice model with 8 FTEs suggests a cost savings, with assumed equivalent reimbursement, of $645,485/year. These results may provide the impetus for more states to adopt broader scope of practice licensure for NNPs. These data may provide rationale for analysis of actual costs and outcomes of collaborative practice.

  16. Immunoexpression analysis and prognostic value of BLCAP in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Gromova

    Full Text Available Bladder Cancer Associated Protein (BLCAP, formerly Bc10, was identified by our laboratory as being down-regulated in bladder cancer with progression. BLCAP is ubiquitously expressed in different tissues, and several studies have found differential expression of BLCAP in various cancer types, such as cervical and renal cancer, as well as human tongue carcinoma and osteosarcoma. Here we report the first study of the expression patterns of BLCAP in breast tissue. We analyzed by immunohistochemistry tissue sections of normal and malignant specimens collected from 123 clinical high-risk breast cancer patients within the Danish Center for Translational Breast Cancer Research (DCTB prospective study dataset. The staining pattern, the distribution of the immunostaining, and its intensity were studied in detail. We observed weak immunoreactivity for BLCAP in mammary epithelial cells, almost exclusively localizing to the cytoplasm and found that levels of expression of BLCAP were generally higher in malignant cells as compared to normal cells. Quantitative IHC analysis of BLCAP expression in breast tissues confirmed this differential BLCAP expression in tumor cells, and we could establish, in a 62-patient sample matched cohort, that immunostaining intensity for BLCAP was increased in tumors relative to normal tissue, in more than 45% of the cases examined, indicating that BLCAP may be of value as a marker for breast cancer. We also analyzed BLCAP expression and prognostic value using a set of tissue microarrays comprising an independent cohort of 2,197 breast cancer patients for which we had follow-up clinical information.

  17. Comparative proteome analysis of human epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagné Jean-Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial ovarian cancer is a devastating disease associated with low survival prognosis mainly because of the lack of early detection markers and the asymptomatic nature of the cancer until late stage. Using two complementary proteomics approaches, a differential protein expression profile was carried out between low and highly transformed epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines which realistically mimic the phenotypic changes observed during evolution of a tumour metastasis. This investigation was aimed at a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying differentiation, proliferation and neoplastic progression of ovarian cancer. Results The quantitative profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer model cell lines TOV-81D and TOV-112D generated using iTRAQ analysis and two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled to liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry revealed some proteins with altered expression levels. Several of these proteins have been the object of interest in cancer research but others were unrecognized as differentially expressed in a context of ovarian cancer. Among these, series of proteins involved in transcriptional activity, cellular metabolism, cell adhesion or motility and cytoskeleton organization were identified, suggesting their possible role in the emergence of oncogenic pathways leading to aggressive cellular behavior. Conclusion The differential protein expression profile generated by the two proteomics approaches combined to complementary characterizations studies will open the way to more exhaustive and systematic representation of the disease and will provide valuable information that may be helpful to uncover the molecular mechanisms related to epithelial ovarian cancer.

  18. A meta-analysis of male breast cancer in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndom, Paul; Um, Germaine; Bell, Esther Mbassi Dina; Eloundou, Albertine; Hossain, Nasheed M; Huo, Dezheng

    2012-06-01

    To characterize male breast cancer in Africa in recent decades, we systematically reviewed literature and conducted a meta-analysis of available data on male breast cancer in Africa. A paper was included if both male and female breast cancer were available. If two publications covered the same geographic area, only the publication with a longer study period was included. Random effects models and mixed effect meta-regressions were used to analyze data of 1201 male and 36,172 female breast cancer patients from 27 African countries. We showed that the male-to-female breast cancer ratio was 0.042 overall and it has decreased in recent years. Additionally, male breast cancer patients in Africa had the disease at age 54.6 on average, 7 years older than female patients. In conclusion, male breast cancers in Africa are characterized as late onset and male-to-female breast cancer ratio in Africa is higher than populations in developed countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnosis of breast cancer by tissue analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debnath Bhattacharyya; Samir Kumar Bandyopadhyay; Tai-hoon Kim

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we propose a technique to locate abnormal growth of cells in breast tissue and suggest further pathological test,when require.We compare normal breast tissue with malignant invasive breast tissue by a series of image processing steps.Normal ductal epithelial cells and ductal/lobular invasive carcinogenic cells also consider for comparison here in this paper.In fact,features of cancerous breast tissue (invasive) are extracted and analyses with normal breast tissue.We also suggest the breast cancer recognition technique through image processing and prevention by controlling p53 gene mutation to some extent.

  20. Retrospective analysis of cases with Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Aytek Şık

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We planned this study with the aim of determining histological types, clinical, surgical stage and grade of endometrial cancer cases which were followed-up and operated on in our clinic and giving an opinion on epidemiological features. Our study was a retrospective study consisted of 298 patients who had medical operations with the diagnosis of endometrial cancer. Endometrial cancer was diagnosed via dilatation and curettage. Routine preoperative examinations were wanted from the cases. Clinical stage was determined. After the diagnosis, total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-ooforectomy (TAH+BSO were applied; while only pelvic lymph node dissection was applied on the patients who had good prognostic data, total pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection were applied to the group with bad prognostic data. All materials were examined in the pathology laboratory of our hospital. In endometrial cancer staging, FIGO surgical staging system -2009 was used. FIGO was used in grade classification and World Health Organization Classification of Tumors system was used for the histological classification. Our study was composed of 298 patients who had endometrial cancer. Of the patients who were included in the study, average age was 56.54±9.69, BMI average was 31.47±6.20, gravida average was 4.16±2.59, and parity average was 3.41±2.15. Distributions of the patients by surgical stages were as follows; there were 32 patients whose tumor stage was in 1A (%10.7, 127 patients in 1B  (42.6%, 47 patients in 1C  (15.8%, 18 patients in 2A  (6.0%, 7 patients in 2B   (2.3%, 30 patients in 3A  (10.1%, 2 patients in 3B  (0.7%, 30 patients in 3C  (10.1%, 2 patients in 4A  (0.7% and 3 patients in 4B  (1.0%. Of the patients with endometrial cancer in our study, tumors of 102 patients were (34.2% in grade I, 139 were (46.6% in grade II and 57 were (19.1% in grade III. Because endometrial cancer shows earlier symptoms than the other

  1. Fulvestrant and male breast cancer: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagouri, Flora; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Chrysikos, Dimosthenis; Dimopoulos, Meletios-Athanasios; Psaltopoulou, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Male breast cancer is an uncommon malignancy; little is known regarding hormonal manipulations for tamoxifen-resistant male breast cancer patients. This is the first pooled analysis of the literature to synthesize all available data and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of fulvestrant in male breast cancer. This study was performed in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. All studies that examined the efficacy of fulvestrant in male breast cancer, regardless of sample size, were considered eligible. The search strategy retrieved 31 articles; of these, five articles were eligible (23 patients) for this pooled analysis. The mean age of the study sample was 63.1 years. Adjuvant hormonal treatment was administered in 87.5 % of cases. Fulvestrant was given as first or second line in 40 % of patients, while as third line or beyond in 60 % of patients. 79.0 % of patients at fulvestrant administration had visceral metastases. Regarding best response, in 26.1 % PR was achieved, in 47.8 % of cases SD was recorded, whereas in 26.1 % of patients PD was noted. The median PFS was equal to 5 months. No grade 3 and 4 adverse events were recorded; of note, hot flashes were reported in 18.2 % of male breast cancer patients. Fulvestrant may potentially play a promising role in the optimal therapeutic strategy for male patients with breast cancer diagnosis. However, further clinical and pharmacokinetic investigations are more than warranted before fulvestrant use becomes a common practice in male breast cancer patients.

  2. Supporting Analysis and Audit of Collaborative OAIS’s by use of an Outer OAIS – Inner OAIS (OO-IO) Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierau, Eld; McGovern, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    the known threats to digital content through time. The main purpose of the paper is to present an Outer OAIS-Inner OAIS (OO-IO) Model that can support the analysis and audit of collaborative interactions between multiple OAIS’s to enable distributed digital preservation. The paper provides extensive...... community to address the analysis and audit necessary for distributed digital preservation....

  3. Germ line mutations of mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer patients with small bowel cancer: International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours Collaborative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Jae-Gahb; Kim, Duck-Woo; Hong, Chang Won;

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of study was to determine the clinical characteristics and mutational profiles of the mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients with small bowel cancer (SBC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A questionnaire was mailed to 55 members of the Internatio.......8%, P teens. The distribution of MSH2 mutations found in patients with HNPCC-associated SBCs significantly differed from that found in the control group (P

  4. 企业协同专利分析平台%Enterprise collaborative platform for patents analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐河杭; 顾新建; 祁国宁; 王海军; 张玉梅

    2009-01-01

    A new patent analysis method based on enterprise collaboration was put forward to better use patent resources for enterprise innovation. A patent analysis platform prototype based on enterprises collaboration was constituted, which can support accurate and complete patent search by constituting and improving the ontology database. The enterprises are encouraged to upload their private patent information by incentive mechanism and confidential mechanism. Patent information in the platform database was analyzed. In addition, the platform takes advantage of relations between product technique classification and international patent classification(IPC) to form the product based patent technique classification database. An application in a digital television enterprise showed that associate patents were found by patents combination analysis with different enterprises, so as to achieve the patent collaboration, patent sharing and patent pool between enterprises%在研究如何更好的发挥专利资源对企业的创新作用基础上,提出了企业协同专利分析的思想和方法.构建出一个企业协同专利分析平台原型,通过本体库的构建和完善来支持更准、更全的专利信息搜索,通过激励机制和保密机制来鼓励企业上传其私有的专利信息.对平台专利数据库中的专利信息进行分析,其中平台还利用产品的技术分类和国际专利分类(IPC)的关联对应,形成比较完整的基于产品的专利技术分类库.其在数字电视行业中做应用尝试,将不同企业的专利组合进行分析,发现关联专利,从而促进企业之间的专利合作和专利资源共享,促进企业专利联盟和专利池的构建.

  5. A novel meta-analysis approach of cancer transcriptomes reveals prevailing transcriptional networks in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niida, Atsushi; Imoto, Seiya; Nagasaki, Masao; Yamaguchi, Rui; Miyano, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Although microarray technology has revealed transcriptomic diversities underlining various cancer phenotypes, transcriptional programs controlling them have not been well elucidated. To decode transcriptional programs governing cancer transcriptomes, we have recently developed a computational method termed EEM, which searches for expression modules from prescribed gene sets defined by prior biological knowledge like TF binding motifs. In this paper, we extend our EEM approach to predict cancer transcriptional networks. Starting from functional TF binding motifs and expression modules identified by EEM, we predict cancer transcriptional networks containing regulatory TFs, associated GO terms, and interactions between TF binding motifs. To systematically analyze transcriptional programs in broad types of cancer, we applied our EEM-based network prediction method to 122 microarray datasets collected from public databases. The data sets contain about 15000 experiments for tumor samples of various tissue origins including breast, colon, lung etc. This EEM based meta-analysis successfully revealed a prevailing cancer transcriptional network which functions in a large fraction of cancer transcriptomes; they include cell-cycle and immune related sub-networks. This study demonstrates broad applicability of EEM, and opens a way to comprehensive understanding of transcriptional networks in cancer cells.

  6. The cost of cancer: a retrospective analysis of the financial impact of cancer on young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landwehr, Michelle S; Watson, Samantha E; Macpherson, Catherine F; Novak, Katherine A; Johnson, Rebecca H

    2016-05-01

    Young adult cancer survivors (YAs) are confronted with immense financial challenges in the wake of their treatment. Medical bills and loss of savings may cause YAs to forgo recommended medications or follow-up appointments. Young survivors with financial concerns also report depression, stress and anxiety. The Samfund is a national nonprofit organization that provides financial support to YAs post-treatment. To quantify the financial burden of cancer in YAs, a retrospective analysis was performed of data collected from Samfund grant applications of 334 YA cancer survivors. Grants were awarded between 2007 and 2013 and grant recipients were consented electronically in 2014 for retrospective data analysis. Recipients ranged from 19 to 39 years of age at the time of their grant applications. Descriptive statistics were calculated and compared to the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) and U.S. census data on age-matched peers. Financial indicators of YA cancer survivors are worse in many domains than those of age-matched controls. Furthermore, YA survivors in their 30s report more perilous prefunding financial situations than younger grant recipients. Cancer has a devastating and age-specific impact on the finances of YAs. Philanthropic grants from the cancer support community, in conjunction with healthcare policy reforms, have the potential to break the cycle of financial need and help YAs move forward with their lives after cancer treatment.

  7. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and communities 13.Embedding social values in tourism management: Community currencies as laboratories of social entrepreneurship? Rita Cannas 14.Improvising Economy: Everyday encounters and tourism consumption Gunnar Thór Jóhannesson and Katrín Anna Lund 15.Community and connection: Exploring the outcomes......This book employs an interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral lens to explore the collaborative dynamics that are currently disrupting, re-creating and transforming the production and consumption of tourism. House swapping, ridesharing, voluntourism, couchsurfing, dinner hosting, social enterprise...... collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...

  8. Collaborative tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Manickam

    2007-01-01

    @@ A successful next generation fusion experiment, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project, will need experimentalists, theorists, and computational scientists to collaborate efficiently, to understand the overwhelming amount of information from experiments, codes, and theory.

  9. Efficiency of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation in China: An empirical study based on DEA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper is an attempt to investigate the current issues and development of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation in China. Design/methodology/approach: DEA is employed to measure the efficiency of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation. Findings: From the results of this research, we can get the conclusion that there are big spaces for improvement for the selected companies in terms of supply chain collaborative technological innovation, especially in the collaborative benefit aspect. The efficiencies of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation in the selected companies vary a lot. Research limitations: More industries are needed to generalize the conclusions. Practical implications: Our practical recommendations for improving supply chain companies in terms of improving their collaborative technological innovation efficiency are: (1 expanding the cooperative scope; (2 optimizing the collaboration operations; (3 improving the compactness in supply chain; (4 increasing the innovation input; and (5 improving the knowledge exchange capacity. Originality/value: The evaluation and the measure of the efficiency of performance of the collaborative technological innovation both in theory and in practice have been proven to be very important and quite complex, and there have been limited researches in the current literature. From observations, however, the efficiency of supply chain collaborative technological innovation is relatively low. This research investigates the current issues and development of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation in China, and provides the guideline in terms of improving the efficiency of supply chain collaborative technological innovation.

  10. Collaborative Appropriation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Michael; Neureiter, Katja; Verdezoto, Nervo;

    2016-01-01

    Previous workshops and papers have examined how individual users adopt and adapt technologies to meet their own local needs, by “completing design through use.” However, there has been little systematic study of how groups of people engage collaboratively in these activities. This workshop opens ...... a discussion for these under-studied forms of collaborative appropriation, using a broad range of perspectives including empirical data, design explorations, research, and critique....

  11. Collaborative Multidisciplinary Sciences for Analysis and Design of Aerospace Vehicles. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Optimization, High-Performance Computing and Optimization, Parametric Representation of MAVs, Closed-Loop control of MAVS, Multi- Scale Analysis of...Multifunctional Structures, Model-Form and Parametric Uncertainty, Structural-Acoustic Analysis, MDO Space Exploration with Additive Manufacturing

  12. Coupled Two-Way Clustering Analysis of Breast Cancer and Colon Cancer Gene Expression Data

    CERN Document Server

    Getz, G; Kela, I; Domany, E; Notterman, D A; Getz, Gad; Gal, Hilah; Kela, Itai; Domany, Eytan; Notterman, Dan A.

    2003-01-01

    We present and review Coupled Two Way Clustering, a method designed to mine gene expression data. The method identifies submatrices of the total expression matrix, whose clustering analysis reveals partitions of samples (and genes) into biologically relevant classes. We demonstrate, on data from colon and breast cancer, that we are able to identify partitions that elude standard clustering analysis.

  13. Dietary Patterns and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Pei-Ying; Shu, Long; Shen, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xu-Jiao; Zhang, Xiao-Yan

    2017-01-05

    A number of studies have examined the associations between dietary patterns and pancreatic cancer risk, but the findings have been inconclusive. Herein, we conducted this meta-analysis to assess the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of pancreatic cancer. MEDLINE (provided by the National Library of Medicine) and EBSCO (Elton B. Stephens Company) databases were searched for relevant articles published up to May 2016 that identified common dietary patterns. Thirty-two studies met the inclusion criteria and were finally included in this meta-analysis. A reduced risk of pancreatic cancer was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy patterns (odds ratio, OR = 0.86; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.77-0.95; p = 0.004) and light-moderate drinking patterns (OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.83-0.98; p = 0.02). There was evidence of an increased risk for pancreatic cancer in the highest compared with the lowest categories of western-type pattern (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.06-1.45; p = 0.008) and heavy drinking pattern (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.10-1.48; p = 0.002). The results of this meta-analysis demonstrate that healthy and light-moderate drinking patterns may decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas western-type and heavy drinking patterns may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. Additional prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  14. Pleiotropic Analysis of Lung Cancer and Blood Triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Verena; Marconett, Crystal N; Shi, Jianxin; Hua, Xing; Wheeler, William; Yang, Chenchen; Song, Lei; Dale, Anders M; Laplana, Marina; Risch, Angela; Witoelar, Aree; Thompson, Wesley K; Schork, Andrew J; Bettella, Francesco; Wang, Yunpeng; Djurovic, Srdjan; Zhou, Beiyun; Borok, Zea; van der Heijden, Henricus F M; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Swinkels, Dorine; Aben, Katja K; McKay, James; Hung, Rayjean J; Bikeböller, Heike; Stevens, Victoria L; Albanes, Demetrius; Caporaso, Neil E; Han, Younghun; Wei, Yongyue; Panadero, Maria Angeles; Mayordomo, Jose I; Christiani, David C; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Andreassen, Ole A; Houlston, Richard; Amos, Christopher I; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Laird-Offringa, Ite A; Mills, Ian G; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2016-12-01

    Epidemiologically related traits may share genetic risk factors, and pleiotropic analysis could identify individual loci associated with these traits. Because of their shared epidemiological associations, we conducted pleiotropic analysis of genome-wide association studies of lung cancer (12 160 lung cancer case patients and 16 838 control subjects) and cardiovascular disease risk factors (blood lipids from 188 577 subjects, type 2 diabetes from 148 821 subjects, body mass index from 123 865 subjects, and smoking phenotypes from 74 053 subjects). We found that 6p22.1 (rs6904596, ZNF184) was associated with both lung cancer (P = 5.50x10(-6)) and blood triglycerides (P = 1.39x10(-5)). We replicated the association in 6097 lung cancer case patients and 204 657 control subjects (P = 2.40 × 10(-4)) and in 71 113 subjects with triglycerides data (P = .01). rs6904596 reached genome-wide significance in lung cancer meta-analysis (odds ratio = 1.15, 95% confidence interval = 1.10 to 1.21 ,: Pcombined = 5.20x10(-9)). The large sample size provided by the lipid GWAS data and the shared genetic risk factors between the two traits contributed to the uncovering of a hitherto unidentified genetic locus for lung cancer. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  15. Cancer Reporting: Timeliness Analysis and Process Reengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabour, Abdulrahman M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cancer registries collect tumor-related data to monitor incident rates and support population-based research. A common concern with using population-based registry data for research is reporting timeliness. Data timeliness have been recognized as an important data characteristic by both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention…

  16. ANOVA like analysis of cancer death age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areia, Aníbal; Mexia, João T.

    2016-06-01

    We use ANOVA to study the influence of year, sex, country and location on the average cancer death age. The data used was from the World Health Organization (WHO) files for 1999, 2003, 2007 and 2011. The locations considered were: kidney, leukaemia, melanoma of skin and oesophagus and the countries: Portugal, Norway, Greece and Romania.

  17. Collaborative human-machine analysis to disambiguate entities in unstructured text and structured datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Jack H.

    2016-05-01

    Intelligence analysts demand rapid information fusion capabilities to develop and maintain accurate situational awareness and understanding of dynamic enemy threats in asymmetric military operations. The ability to extract relationships between people, groups, and locations from a variety of text datasets is critical to proactive decision making. The derived network of entities must be automatically created and presented to analysts to assist in decision making. DECISIVE ANALYTICS Corporation (DAC) provides capabilities to automatically extract entities, relationships between entities, semantic concepts about entities, and network models of entities from text and multi-source datasets. DAC's Natural Language Processing (NLP) Entity Analytics model entities as complex systems of attributes and interrelationships which are extracted from unstructured text via NLP algorithms. The extracted entities are automatically disambiguated via machine learning algorithms, and resolution recommendations are presented to the analyst for validation; the analyst's expertise is leveraged in this hybrid human/computer collaborative model. Military capability is enhanced by these NLP Entity Analytics because analysts can now create/update an entity profile with intelligence automatically extracted from unstructured text, thereby fusing entity knowledge from structured and unstructured data sources. Operational and sustainment costs are reduced since analysts do not have to manually tag and resolve entities.

  18. Collaborative Public Management and Collaborative Governance: Conceptual Similarities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Kapucu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable interest among Public Administration scholars in collaborative public management and governance. However, there is a need for conceptual analysis of the two terms which share common aspects and differ essentially in scope and substance. We found that collaborative public management has a more local approach and focuses on the substance of collaboration practiced to solve societal problems and reach community goals at the organizational level. On the other hand, widely researched in management, political science, and public administration disciplines, collaborative governance has a global scope and focuses on both substance and process of collaboration in effectively solving societal problems with improved structures of nonhierarchical and decentralized institutions and mechanisms of citizen participation both through partnership projects and e-governance tools. The paper contributes to the better understanding of collaborative public management and collaborative governance with implications for both future research and practice.

  19. Dietary acrylamide and cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelucchi, Claudio; Bosetti, Cristina; Galeone, Carlotta; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2015-06-15

    The debate on the potential carcinogenic effect of dietary acrylamide is open. In consideration of the recent findings from large prospective investigations, we conducted an updated meta-analysis on acrylamide intake and the risk of cancer at several sites. Up to July 2014, we identified 32 publications. We performed meta-analyses to calculate the summary relative risk (RR) of each cancer site for the highest versus lowest level of intake and for an increment of 10 µg/day of dietary acrylamide, through fixed-effects or random-effects models, depending on the heterogeneity test. Fourteen cancer sites could be examined. No meaningful associations were found for most cancers considered. The summary RRs for high versus low acrylamide intake were 0.87 for oral and pharyngeal, 1.14 for esophageal, 1.03 for stomach, 0.94 for colorectal, 0.93 for pancreatic, 1.10 for laryngeal, 0.88 for lung, 0.96 for breast, 1.06 for endometrial, 1.12 for ovarian, 1.00 for prostate, 0.93 for bladder and 1.13 for lymphoid malignancies. The RR was of borderline significance only for kidney cancer (RR = 1.20; 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.00-1.45). All the corresponding continuous estimates ranged between 0.95 and 1.03, and none of them was significant. Among never-smokers, borderline associations with dietary acrylamide emerged for endometrial (RR = 1.23; 95% CI, 1.00-1.51) and ovarian (RR = 1.39; 95% CI, 0.97-2.00) cancers. This systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies indicates that dietary acrylamide is not related to the risk of most common cancers. A modest association for kidney cancer, and for endometrial and ovarian cancers in never smokers only, cannot be excluded. © 2014 UICC.

  20. Project-focused activity and knowledge tracker: a unified data analysis, collaboration, and workflow tool for medicinal chemistry project teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodney, Marian D; Brosius, Arthur D; Gregory, Tracy; Heck, Steven D; Klug-McLeod, Jacquelyn L; Poss, Christopher S

    2009-12-01

    Advances in the field of drug discovery have brought an explosion in the quantity of data available to medicinal chemists and other project team members. New strategies and systems are needed to help these scientists to efficiently gather, organize, analyze, annotate, and share data about potential new drug molecules of interest to their project teams. Herein we describe a suite of integrated services and end-user applications that facilitate these activities throughout the medicinal chemistry design cycle. The Automated Data Presentation (ADP) and Virtual Compound Profiler (VCP) processes automate the gathering, organization, and storage of real and virtual molecules, respectively, and associated data. The Project-Focused Activity and Knowledge Tracker (PFAKT) provides a unified data analysis and collaboration environment, enhancing decision-making, improving team communication, and increasing efficiency.

  1. RNA/DNA co-analysis from human skin and contact traces – results of a sixth collaborative EDNAP exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, C; Hanson, E; Banemann, R

    2015-01-01

    RNA in contact traces (e.g., human skin, palm-, hand- and fingerprints, clothing, car interiors, computer accessories and electronic devices). The simultaneous extraction of RNA and DNA provides an opportunity for positive identification of the tissue source of origin by mRNA profiling as well as a simultaneous......The European DNA profiling group (EDNAP) organized a sixth collaborative exercise on RNA/DNA co-analysis for body fluid/tissue identification and STR profiling. The task was to identify skin samples/contact traces using specific RNA biomarkers and test three housekeeping genes for their suitability...... identification of the body fluid donor by STR profiling. The skin markers LCE1C and LOR and the housekeeping gene marker B2M were detected in the majority of contact traces. Detection of the other markers was inconsistent, possibly due to the low amounts and/or poor quality of the genetic material present...

  2. Spatial Analysis of Stomach Cancer Incidence in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakzad, Reza; Khani, Yousef; Pakzad, Iraj; Momenimovahed, Zohre; Mohammadian-Hashejani, Abdollah; Salehiniya, Hamid; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza

    2016-01-01

    Stomach cancer, the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death through the world, is very common in parts of Iran. Geographic variation in the incidence of stomach cancer is due to many different factors. The aim of this study was to assess the geographical and spatial distribution of stomach cancer in Iran using data from the cancer registry program in Iran for the year 2009. The reported incidences of stomach cancer for different provinces were standardized to the world population structure. ArcGIS software was used to analyse the data. Hot spots and high risk areas were determined using spatial analysis (Getis-Ord Gi). Hot and cold spots were determined as more than or less than 2 standard deviations from the national average, respectively. A significance level of 0.10 was used for statistical judgment. In 2009, a total of 6,886 cases of stomach cancers were reported of which 4,891 were in men and 1,995 in women (standardized incidence rates of 19.2 and 10.0, respectively, per 100,000 population). The results showed that stomach cancer was concentrated mainly in northwest of the country in both men and women. In women, northwest provinces such as Ardebil, East Azerbaijan, West Azerbaijan, Gilan, and Qazvin were identified as hot spots (pQazvin, Zanjan and Kurdistan, the incidences were higher than the national average and these were identified as hot spots (P<0.01). As stomach cancer is clustered in the northwest of the country, further epidemiological studies are needed to identify factors contributing to this concentration.

  3. Collaborative Strategies for Sustainable EU Flood Risk Management: FOSS and Geospatial Tools—Challenges and Opportunities for Operative Risk Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Albano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of global statistics shows a substantial increase in flood damage over the past few decades. Moreover, it is expected that flood risk will continue to rise due to the combined effect of increasing numbers of people and economic assets in risk-prone areas and the effects of climate change. In order to mitigate the impact of natural hazards on European economies and societies, improved risk assessment, and management needs to be pursued. With the recent transition to a more risk-based approach in European flood management policy, flood analysis models have become an important part of flood risk management (FRM. In this context, free and open-source (FOSS geospatial models provide better and more complete information to stakeholders regarding their compliance with the Flood Directive (2007/60/EC for effective and collaborative FRM. A geospatial model is an essential tool to address the European challenge for comprehensive and sustainable FRM because it allows for the use of integrated social and economic quantitative risk outcomes in a spatio-temporal domain. Moreover, a FOSS model can support governance processes using an interactive, transparent and collaborative approach, providing a meaningful experience that both promotes learning and generates knowledge through a process of guided discovery regarding flood risk management. This article aims to organize the available knowledge and characteristics of the methods available to give operational recommendations and principles that can support authorities, local entities, and the stakeholders involved in decision-making with regard to flood risk management in their compliance with the Floods Directive (2007/60/EC.

  4. Individual patient data meta-analysis of acupuncture for chronic pain: protocol of the Acupuncture Trialists' Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Karen J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of clinical trials of acupuncture is to help clinicians and patients make decisions about treatment. Yet this is not straightforward: some trials report acupuncture to be superior to sham (placebo acupuncture while others show evidence that acupuncture is superior to usual care but not sham, and still others conclude that acupuncture is no better than usual care. Meta-analyses of these trials tend to come to somewhat indeterminate conclusions. This appears to be because, until recently, acupuncture research was dominated by small trials of questionable quality. The Acupuncture Trialists' Collaboration, a group of trialists, statisticians and other researchers, was established to synthesize patient-level data from several recently published large, high-quality trials. Methods There are three distinct phases to the Acupuncture Trialists Collaboration: a systematic review to identify eligible studies; collation and harmonization of raw data; statistical analysis. To be eligible, trials must have unambiguous allocation concealment. Eligible pain conditions are osteoarthritis; chronic headache (tension or migraine headache; shoulder pain; and non-specific back or neck pain. Once received, patient-level data will undergo quality checks and the results of prior publications will be replicated. The primary analysis will be to determine the effect size of acupuncture. Each trial will be evaluated by analysis of covariance with the principal endpoint as the dependent variable and, as covariates, the baseline score for the principal endpoint and the variables used to stratify randomization. The effect size for acupuncture from each trial - that is, the coefficient and standard error from the analysis of covariance - will then be entered into a meta-analysis. We will compute effect sizes separately for comparisons of acupuncture with sham acupuncture, and acupuncture with no acupuncture control for each pain condition. Other

  5. Gene-based analysis of the fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling pathway in relation to breast cancer in African American women: the AMBER consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Haddad, Stephen A; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Yao, Song; Bensen, Jeannette T; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Hong, Chi-Chen; Haiman, Christopher A; Olshan, Andrew F; Ambrosone, Christine B; Palmer, Julie R

    2016-01-01

    We conducted gene-based analysis in 26 genes in the FGFR signaling pathway to identify genes carrying genetic variation affecting risk of breast cancer and the specific estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes. Tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for each gene were selected and genotyped on a customized Illumina Exome Array. Imputation was carried out using 1000 Genomes haplotypes. The analysis included 3237 SNPs in 3663 breast cancer cases (including 1983 ER-positive, and 1098 ER-negative) and 4687 controls from the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk consortium, a collaborative project of four large studies of breast cancer in African American women (Carolina Breast Cancer Study, Black Women's Health Study, Women's Circle of Health Study, and Multiethnic Cohort). We used a multi-locus adaptive joint (AdaJoint) test to determine the association of each gene in the FGFR signaling pathway with overall breast cancer and ER subtypes. The FGF1 gene was significantly associated with risk of ER-negative breast cancer (P = 0.001). The FGFR2 gene was associated with risk of overall breast cancer (P = 0.002) and ER-positive breast cancer (P = 0.002). The FGF1 gene affects risk of ER-negative breast cancer in African American women. We confirmed the association of the FGFR2 gene with risk of overall and ER-positive breast cancer. These results highlight the importance of the FGFR signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, and suggest that different genes in the same pathway may be associated with different ER breast cancer subtypes.

  6. Diagnosis of Lung Cancer by Fractal Analysis of Damaged DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Namazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer starts when cells in a part of the body start to grow out of control. In fact cells become cancer cells because of DNA damage. A DNA walk of a genome represents how the frequency of each nucleotide of a pairing nucleotide couple changes locally. In this research in order to study the cancer genes, DNA walk plots of genomes of patients with lung cancer were generated using a program written in MATLAB language. The data so obtained was checked for fractal property by computing the fractal dimension using a program written in MATLAB. Also, the correlation of damaged DNA was studied using the Hurst exponent measure. We have found that the damaged DNA sequences are exhibiting higher degree of fractality and less correlation compared with normal DNA sequences. So we confirmed this method can be used for early detection of lung cancer. The method introduced in this research not only is useful for diagnosis of lung cancer but also can be applied for detection and growth analysis of different types of cancers.

  7. Feasibility of breast cancer screening by PIXE analysis of hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, N; Kabiri, Z; Kakuee, O; Saleh-Kotahi, M; Changizi, V; Fathollahi, V; Oliaiy, P; Omranipour, R

    2013-06-01

    To reveal the role of key elements present in the hair of breast cancer patients on cancer development, the levels of a number of elements in scalp hair samples of 82 people including healthy individuals, people suffering from benign breast disease, and breast cancer patients were measured by PIXE analysis. Pellets of hair samples were prepared and bombarded by 2.2 MeV proton beam of a 3-MV Van de Graaff accelerator. The number of incident ions hitting the sample was indirectly measured using the RBS spectrum of a thin Ag film placed in the beam path. The concentrations of S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, and Cu in the hair of healthy individuals were in agreement with those observed in the hair of hyperplasia and cancer patients within standard deviations. However, a lower average level of zinc was found in samples from hyperplasia and breast cancer patients. Strong positive correlations were found between iron and potassium as well as between calcium and potassium in the cancer patients. These results could be of significance in the screening for breast cancer.

  8. Proteomics Analysis for Finding Serum Markers of Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushan Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of peptide ligand library beads (PLLB and 1D gel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (1DGel-LC-MS/MS was employed to analyze serum samples from patients with ovarian cancer and from healthy controls. Proteomic analysis identified 1200 serum proteins, among which 57 proteins were upregulated and 10 were downregulated in the sera from cancer patients. Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4 is highly upregulated in the ovarian cancer serum samples. ELISA was employed to measure plasma concentrations of RBP4 in 80 samples from ovarian cancer patients, healthy individuals, myoma patients, and patients with benign ovarian tumor, respectively. The plasma concentrations of RBP4 ranging from 76.91 to 120.08 ng/mL with the mean value 89.13±1.67 ng/mL in ovarian cancer patients are significantly higher than those in healthy individuals (10.85±2.38 ng/mL. Results were further confirmed with immunohistochemistry, demonstrating that RBP4 expression levels in normal ovarian tissue were lower than those in ovarian cancer tissues. Our results suggested that RBP4 is a potential biomarker for diagnostic of screening ovarian cancer.

  9. Integrated genomic analysis of breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addou-Klouche, L; Adélaïde, J; Cornen, S; Bekhouche, I; Finetti, P; Guille, A; Sircoulomb, F; Raynaud, S; Bertucci, F; Birnbaum, D; Chaffanet, M

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent and the most deadly cancer in women in Western countries. Different classifications of disease (anatomoclinical, pathological, prognostic, genetic) are used for guiding the management of patients. Unfortunately, they fail to reflect the whole clinical heterogeneity of the disease. Consequently, molecularly distinct diseases are grouped in similar clinical classes, likely explaining the different clinical outcome between patients in a given class, and the fact that selection of the most appropriate diagnostic or therapeutic strategy for each patient is not done accurately. Today, treatment is efficient in only 70.0-75.0% of cases overall. Our repertoire of efficient drugs is limited but is being expanded with the discovery of new molecular targets for new drugs, based on the identification of candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSG) functionally relevant in disease. Development of new drugs makes therapeutical decisions even more demanding of reliable classifiers and prognostic/predictive tests. Breast cancer is a complex, heterogeneous disease at the molecular level. The combinatorial molecular origin and the heterogeneity of malignant cells, and the variability of the host background, create distinct subgroups of tumors endowed with different phenotypic features such as response to therapy and clinical outcome. Cellular and molecular analyses can identify new classes biologically and clinically relevant, as well as provide new clinically relevant markers and targets. The various stages of mammary tumorigenesis are not clearly defined and the genetic and epigenetic events critical to the development and aggressiveness of breast cancer are not precisely known. Because the phenotype of tumors is dependent on many genes, a large-scale and integrated molecular characterization of the genetic and epigenetic alterations and gene expression deregulation should allow the identification of new molecular classes clinically

  10. Selenium Exposure and Cancer Risk: an Updated Meta-analysis and Meta-regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xianlei; Wang, Chen; Yu, Wanqi; Fan, Wenjie; Wang, Shan; Shen, Ning; Wu, Pengcheng; Li, Xiuyang; Wang, Fudi

    2016-01-20

    The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between selenium exposure and cancer risk. We identified 69 studies and applied meta-analysis, meta-regression and dose-response analysis to obtain available evidence. The results indicated that high selenium exposure had a protective effect on cancer risk (pooled OR = 0.78; 95%CI: 0.73-0.83). The results of linear and nonlinear dose-response analysis indicated that high serum/plasma selenium and toenail selenium had the efficacy on cancer prevention. However, we did not find a protective efficacy of selenium supplement. High selenium exposure may have different effects on specific types of cancer. It decreased the risk of breast cancer, lung cancer, esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, and prostate cancer, but it was not associated with colorectal cancer, bladder cancer, and skin cancer.

  11. Patent trend and competitive analysis of cancer immunotherapy in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chia-Lin; Chen, Feng-Chi

    2017-09-07

    Immunotherapy has brought high hopes for cancer treatment, and attracted tremendous resources from the biopharmaceutical community. Here we analyze cancer immunotherapy-related patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office in the past decade (2006-2016). A total of 2,229 patents were identified in 13 subfields. The growth of patent number in this field has outpaced the background rate, with cytokine-related therapies, immune checkpoint inhibitors, and natural killer cell therapies growing the most rapidly. The top 15 assignees possess 27.6% (616) of the patents. Amgen is the largest patent holder, followed by Novartis, and then by Chugai Seiyaku. The top assignees have focused on different subfields, and collaborated with each other for technology development. Our competitive analysis reveals that Novartis, Chugai Seiyaku, and Abbvie lead in both patent number and average quality of patents. Meanwhile, Immunomedics owns a high-quality though relatively small patent portfolio in single-chain variable fragment technology, which is not the focus of the abovementioned forerunners. Overall, our analysis illustrates an ecosystem where industry giants and smaller-size players each occupies a niche. Selection and succession are expected to continue for years in this young ecosystem.

  12. The feeling of hope in cancer patients: an existential analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Aparecida Sales

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at unveiling the feeling of hope in people who experience cancer in their existence. Qualitative study based on Heidegger’s phenomenology, performed with eight cancer patients assisted in a philanthropic organization, between December 2013 and February 2014, in a northwestern city in Paraná, Brazil, using the following guiding question: “How do you perceive the feeling of hope at this time in your life?” The analysis resulted in the ontological themes: searching for hope in dealing with cancer, and experiencing feelings of hope and despair in being with others. Patients revealed mixed feelings, going from the lack of hope at the time of diagnosis to a rekindling of hope, as well as those who never lost the will to live. We conclude that living with cancer causes extreme feelings; and hope emerges as a feeling capable of influencing and causes an expressive impact in coping with that.

  13. Invasive cervical cancer risk among HIV-infected women: A North American multi-cohort collaboration prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Alison G; Strickler, Howard D; Jing, Yuezhou; Gange, Stephen J; Sterling, Timothy R; Silverberg, Michael; Saag, Michael; Rourke, Sean; Rachlis, Anita; Napravnik, Sonia; Moore, Richard D; Klein, Marina; Kitahata, Mari; Kirk, Greg; Hogg, Robert; Hessol, Nancy A; Goedert, James J; Gill, M John; Gebo, Kelly; Eron, Joseph J; Engels, Eric A; Dubrow, Robert; Crane, Heidi M; Brooks, John T; Bosch, Ronald; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2013-01-01

    Objective HIV infection and low CD4+ T-cell count are associated with an increased risk of persistent oncogenic HPV infection – the major risk factor for cervical cancer. Few reported prospective cohort studies have characterized the incidence of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in HIV-infected women. Methods Data were obtained from HIV-infected and -uninfected female participants in the NA-ACCORD with no history of ICC at enrollment. Participants were followed from study entry or January, 1996 through ICC, loss-to follow-up or December, 2010. The relationship of HIV infection and CD4+ T-cell count with risk of ICC was assessed using age-adjusted Poisson regression models and standardized incidence ratios (SIR). All cases were confirmed by cancer registry records and/or pathology reports. Cervical cytology screening history was assessed through medical record abstraction. Results A total of 13,690 HIV-infected and 12,021 HIV-uninfected women contributed 66,249 and 70,815 person-years (pys) of observation, respectively. Incident ICC was diagnosed in 17 HIV-infected and 4 HIV-uninfected women (incidence rate of 26 and 6 per 100,000 pys, respectively). HIV-infected women with baseline CD4+ T-cells of ≥ 350, 200–349 and <200 cells/uL had a 2.3-times, 3.0-times and 7.7-times increase in ICC incidence, respectively, compared with HIV-uninfected women (Ptrend =0.001). Of the 17 HIV-infected cases, medical records for the 5 years prior to diagnosis showed that 6 had no documented screening, 5 had screening with low grade or normal results, and 6 had high-grade results. Conclusions This study found elevated incidence of ICC in HIV-infected compared to -uninfected women, and these rates increased with immunosuppression. PMID:23254153

  14. Individual motivation and threat indicators of collaboration readiness in scientific knowledge producing teams: a scoping review and domain analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano R. Lotrecchiano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies a gap in the team science literature that considers intrapersonal indicators of collaboration as motivations and threats to participating in collaborative knowledge producing teams (KPTs. Through a scoping review process, over 150 resources were consulted to organize 6 domains of motivation and threat to collaboration in KPTs: Resource Acquisition, Advancing Science, Building Relationships, Knowledge Transfer, Recognition and Reward, and Maintenance of Beliefs. Findings show how domains vary in their presentation of depth and diversity of motivation and threat indicators as well as their relationship with each other within and across domains. The findings of 51 indicators resulting from the review provide a psychosocial framework for which to establish a hierarchy of collaborative reasoning for individual engagement in KPTs thus allowing for further research into the mechanism of collaborative engagement. The indicators serve as a preliminary step in establishing a protocol for testing of the psychometric properties of intrapersonal measures of collaboration readiness.

  15. Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer: 13 collaborative analyses of individual data from European case-control studies;Exposition au radon dans les habitations et risque de cancer du poumon: analyse conjointe des donnees individuelles de 13 etudes cas-temoins europeennes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darby, S.; Hill, D.; Doll, R. [Radcliffe Infirmary (United Kingdom); Auvinen, A. [Ecole de Sante Publique, Tampere (Finland); Barros Dios, J.M.; Ruano Ravina, A. [Santiago de Compostela Univ. (Spain); Baysson, H.; Tirmarche, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Bochicchio, F. [Institut National Italien de la Sante, Rome (Italy); Deo, H. [Reading Univ. (United Kingdom); Falk, R. [Autorite suedoise de Radioprotection, Stockholm (Sweden); Forastiere, F. [Departement d' Epidemiologie, Rome (Italy); Hakama, M. [Registre du cancer finlandais, Helsinki (Finland); Heid, I.; Schaffrath Rosario, A.; Wichmann, H.E. [Centre de recherche GSF pour l' Environnement et la Sante, Neuherberg (Germany); Kreienbrock, L. [Institut de Biometrie, d' Epidemiologie et de Traitement de l' Information, Hannovre (Germany); Kreuzer, M. [Departement de Radioprotection et de Sante, Neuherberg (Germany); Lagarde, F.; Pershagen, G. [Institut de Medecine Environnementale, Stockholm (Sweden); Makelainen, I.; Ruosteenoja, E. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire et de Radioprotection, Helsinki (Finland); Muirhead, C. [Autorite Nationale de Radioprotection, Chilton (United Kingdom); Oberaigner, W. [Tumorregister Tirol, Innsbruck (Austria); TomaBek, L. [Institut National de Radioprotection, Prague, Republique Tcheque (Czech Republic); Whitley, E. [Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    Objective: To determine the risk of lung cancer associated with exposure at home to the radioactive disintegration products of naturally occurring radon gas. Design: Collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 case-control studies of residential radon and lung cancer. Setting: Nine European countries. Subjects: 7148 cases of lung cancer and 14 208 controls. Main outcome measures: Relative risks of lung cancer and radon gas concentrations in homes inhabited during the previous 5-34 years measured in becquerels (radon disintegrations per second) per cubic metre (Bq/m3) of household air. Results: The mean measured radon concentration in homes of people in the control group was 97 Bq/m3, with 11% measuring > 200 and 4% measuring > 400 Bq/m3. For cases of lung cancer the mean concentration was 104 Bq/m3. The risk of lung cancer increased by 8.4% (95% confidence interval 3.0% to 15.8%) per 100 Bq/m3 increase in measured radon (P=0.0007). This corresponds to an increase of 16% (5% to 31%) per 100 Bq/m3 increase in usual radon- that is, after correction for the dilution caused by random uncertainties in measuring radon concentrations. The dose-response relation seemed to be linear with no threshold and remained significant (P = 0.04) in analyses limited to individuals from homes with measured radon < 200 Bq/m3. The proportionate excess risk did not differ significantly with study, age, sex, or smoking. In the absence of other causes of death, the absolute risks of lung cancer by age 75 years at usual radon concentrations of 0, 100, and 400 Bq/m3 would be about 0.4%, 0.5%, and 0.7%, respectively, for lifelong non-smokers, and about 25 times greater (10%, 12%, and 16%) for cigarette smokers. Conclusions: Collectively, though not separately, these studies show appreciable hazards from residential radon, particularly for smokers and recent ex-smokers, and indicate that it is responsible for about 2% of all deaths from cancer in Europe. (author)

  16. The situation analysis of the international relations management and inter-university collaboration in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during the years 2005-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Farajollahi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nowadays, with the development of science and communication, collaboration with other countriesand universities seems inevitable to universities. The aim of this study was to analyze the situation of internationalrelations management and inter-university collaboration (IRM-IUC in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (TUMS,Iran, during the years 2005-2010. METHODS: In this descriptive study, one checklist was used for analysis of the inter-university collaboration management and another one for the situation analysis of international relations management which included 4 sections itself. There were a total of 56 questions designed and developed through literature review and the expert panel.RESULTS: The results indicated the poor performance of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in the international relations management and inter-university collaboration fields. Most of the reviewed items had not been adequatelypaid attention to in the management of international relations and only one out of 14 evaluated items was considered inthe field of inter-university collaboration. CONCLUSIONS: In line with the overall globalization process, education and research have also become globalizedprocesses, and as a result, it is necessary for universities to develop effective ties and relationships with otherorganizations. However, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences has not been doing quite optimally in this regard. Thus,it is suggested that, based on the shortcomings pointed out in this study, new appropriate plans and policies be set todevelop fruitful and effective relations and correspondences with other universities and countries.

  17. Multi-View Interaction Modelling of human collaboration processes: a business process study of head and neck cancer care in a Dutch academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuit, Marco; Wortmann, Hans; Szirbik, Nick; Roodenburg, Jan

    2011-12-01

    In the healthcare domain, human collaboration processes (HCPs), which consist of interactions between healthcare workers from different (para)medical disciplines and departments, are of growing importance as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly integrated. Existing workflow-based process modelling tools for healthcare process management, which are the most commonly applied, are not suited for healthcare HCPs mainly due to their focus on the definition of task sequences instead of the graphical description of human interactions. This paper uses a case study of a healthcare HCP at a Dutch academic hospital to evaluate a novel interaction-centric process modelling method. The HCP under study is the care pathway performed by the head and neck oncology team. The evaluation results show that the method brings innovative, effective, and useful features. First, it collects and formalizes the tacit domain knowledge of the interviewed healthcare workers in individual interaction diagrams. Second, the method automatically integrates these local diagrams into a single global interaction diagram that reflects the consolidated domain knowledge. Third, the case study illustrates how the method utilizes a graphical modelling language for effective tree-based description of interactions, their composition and routing relations, and their roles. A process analysis of the global interaction diagram is shown to identify HCP improvement opportunities. The proposed interaction-centric method has wider applicability since interactions are the core of most multidisciplinary patient-care processes. A discussion argues that, although (multidisciplinary) collaboration is in many cases not optimal in the healthcare domain, it is increasingly considered a necessity to improve integration, continuity, and quality of care. The proposed method is helpful to describe, analyze, and improve the functioning of healthcare collaboration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New analysis of the low-energy $\\pi^\\pm p$ differential cross sections of the CHAOS Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Matsinos, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    In a previous paper, we reported the results of a partial-wave analysis of the pion-nucleon ($\\pi N$) differential cross sections (DCSs) of the CHAOS Collaboration and came to the conclusion that the angular distribution of their $\\pi^+ p$ data sets is incompatible with the rest of the modern (meson-factory) database. The present work, re-addressing this issue, has been instigated by a number of recent improvements in our analysis, namely regarding the inclusion of the theoretical uncertainties when investigating the reproduction of experimental data sets on the basis of a given `theoretical' solution, modifications in the parameterisation of the form factors of the proton and of the pion entering the electromagnetic part of the $\\pi N$ amplitude, and the inclusion of the effects of the variation of the $\\sigma$-meson mass when fitting the ETH model of the $\\pi N$ interaction to the experimental data. The new analysis of the CHAOS DCSs confirms our earlier conclusions and casts doubt on the value for the $\\pi...

  19. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies (De...... learn how to improve operations in (hopefully) a win-win like manner through collaboration.......The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies...... (Denmark, Italy and The Netherlands) each with three to five suppliers were involved. The CO-IMPROVE project and the thesis is based on “action research” and “action learning”. The main aim of the whole project is through actual involvement and actions make the researchers, companies and selected suppliers...

  20. Interprofessional Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Prentice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this hermeneutic phenomenological study, we examined the experience of interprofessional collaboration from the perspective of nursing and medical students. Seventeen medical and nursing students from two different universities participated in the study. We used guiding questions in face-to-face, conversational interviews to explore students’ experience and expectations of interprofessional collaboration within learning situations. Three themes emerged from the data: the great divide, learning means content, and breaking the ice. The findings suggest that the experience of interprofessional collaboration within learning events is influenced by the natural clustering of shared interests among students. Furthermore, the carry-forward of impressions about physician–nurse relationships prior to the educational programs and during clinical placements dominate the formation of new relationships and acquisition of new knowledge about roles, which might have implications for future practice.

  1. Integrative Analysis of Prognosis Data on Multiple Cancer Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Yawei; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zheng, Tongzhang; Ma, Shuangge

    2014-01-01

    Summary In cancer research, profiling studies have been extensively conducted, searching for genes/SNPs associated with prognosis. Cancer is diverse. Examining the similarity and difference in the genetic basis of multiple subtypes of the same cancer can lead to a better understanding of their connections and distinctions. Classic meta-analysis methods analyze each subtype separately and then compare analysis results across subtypes. Integrative analysis methods, in contrast, analyze the raw data on multiple subtypes simultaneously and can outperform meta-analysis methods. In this study, prognosis data on multiple subtypes of the same cancer are analyzed. An AFT (accelerated failure time) model is adopted to describe survival. The genetic basis of multiple subtypes is described using the heterogeneity model, which allows a gene/SNP to be associated with prognosis of some subtypes but not others. A compound penalization method is developed to identify genes that contain important SNPs associated with prognosis. The proposed method has an intuitive formulation and is realized using an iterative algorithm. Asymptotic properties are rigorously established. Simulation shows that the proposed method has satisfactory performance and outperforms a penalization-based meta-analysis method and a regularized thresholding method. An NHL (non-Hodgkin lymphoma) prognosis study with SNP measurements is analyzed. Genes associated with the three major subtypes, namely DLBCL, FL, and CLL/SLL, are identified. The proposed method identifies genes that are different from alternatives and have important implications and satisfactory prediction performance. PMID:24766212

  2. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    -called Extended Manufacturing Enterprises (EMEs). In effect, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of EMEs. Consequently, new approaches must be developed not only to enhance the business performance of EMEs, but also, in particular, the inter-organisational......Many companies have gradually moved from vertically aligned operations to horizontally aligned operations, a change implying that co-ordination is shifting from the hierarchy to the market place with emphasis on collaboration with other companies. One form of collaboration with companies is so...

  3. Analysis of Ethnic Admixture in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0181 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Cathryn Bock, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...Our project uses a novel approach to gene discovery with greater power to detect genetic effects, admixture mapping, to identify prostate cancer...available through HapMap . Because ParAllele was out of business when we were ready to genotype, we used a panel of 1536 ancestry informative SNPs

  4. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: Parallel Analysis Tools and New Visualization Techniques for Ultra-Large Climate Data Set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    middleton, Don [Co-PI; Haley, Mary

    2014-12-10

    ParVis was a project funded under LAB 10-05: “Earth System Modeling: Advanced Scientific Visualization of Ultra-Large Climate Data Sets”. Argonne was the lead lab with partners at PNNL, SNL, NCAR and UC-Davis. This report covers progress from January 1st, 2013 through Dec 1st, 2014. Two previous reports covered the period from Summer, 2010, through September 2011 and October 2011 through December 2012, respectively. While the project was originally planned to end on April 30, 2013, personnel and priority changes allowed many of the institutions to continue work through FY14 using existing funds. A primary focus of ParVis was introducing parallelism to climate model analysis to greatly reduce the time-to-visualization for ultra-large climate data sets. Work in the first two years was conducted on two tracks with different time horizons: one track to provide immediate help to climate scientists already struggling to apply their analysis to existing large data sets and another focused on building a new data-parallel library and tool for climate analysis and visualization that will give the field a platform for performing analysis and visualization on ultra-large datasets for the foreseeable future. In the final 2 years of the project, we focused mostly on the new data-parallel library and associated tools for climate analysis and visualization.

  5. Effects of Computer Support, Collaboration, and Time Lag on Performance Self-Efficacy and Transfer of Training: A Longitudinal Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Veermans, Koen; Vauras, Marja

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis (29 studies, k = 33, N = 4158) examined the longitudinal development of the relationship between performance self-efficacy and transfer before and after training. A specific focus was on training programs that afforded varying degrees of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Consistent with social cognitive theory,…

  6. Effects of Computer Support, Collaboration, and Time Lag on Performance Self-Efficacy and Transfer of Training: A Longitudinal Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Veermans, Koen; Vauras, Marja

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis (29 studies, k = 33, N = 4158) examined the longitudinal development of the relationship between performance self-efficacy and transfer before and after training. A specific focus was on training programs that afforded varying degrees of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Consistent with social cognitive theory,…

  7. Transcriptional master regulator analysis in breast cancer genetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Hugo; García-Herrera, Rodrigo; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    Gene regulatory networks account for the delicate mechanisms that control gene expression. Under certain circumstances, gene regulatory programs may give rise to amplification cascades. Such transcriptional cascades are events in which activation of key-responsive transcription factors called master regulators trigger a series of gene expression events. The action of transcriptional master regulators is then important for the establishment of certain programs like cell development and differentiation. However, such cascades have also been related with the onset and maintenance of cancer phenotypes. Here we present a systematic implementation of a series of algorithms aimed at the inference of a gene regulatory network and analysis of transcriptional master regulators in the context of primary breast cancer cells. Such studies were performed in a highly curated database of 880 microarray gene expression experiments on biopsy-captured tissue corresponding to primary breast cancer and healthy controls. Biological function and biochemical pathway enrichment analyses were also performed to study the role that the processes controlled - at the transcriptional level - by such master regulators may have in relation to primary breast cancer. We found that transcription factors such as AGTR2, ZNF132, TFDP3 and others are master regulators in this gene regulatory network. Sets of genes controlled by these regulators are involved in processes that are well-known hallmarks of cancer. This kind of analyses may help to understand the most upstream events in the development of phenotypes, in particular, those regarding cancer biology.

  8. BMI in relation to sperm count : an updated systematic review and collaborative meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sermondade, N.; Faure, C.; Fezeu, L.; Shayeb, A. G.; Bonde, J. P.; Jensen, T. K.; Van Wely, M.; Cao, J.; Martini, A. C.; Eskandar, M.; Chavarro, J. E.; Koloszar, S.; Twigt, J. M.; Ramlau-Hansen, C. H.; Borges, E.; Lotti, F.; Steegers-Theunissen, R. P. M.; Zorn, B.; Polotsky, A. J.; La Vignera, S.; Eskenazi, B.; Tremellen, K.; Magnusdottir, E. V.; Fejes, I.; Hercberg, S.; Levy, R.; Czernichow, S.

    2013-01-01

    The global obesity epidemic has paralleled a decrease in semen quality. Yet, the association between obesity and sperm parameters remains controversial. The purpose of this report was to update the evidence on the association between BMI and sperm count through a systematic review with meta-analysis

  9. Using Social Network Analysis to Predict Early Collaboration within Health Advocacy Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Todd C.; Strong, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Within coalitions of consumer advocates formed to advance health insurance coverage expansions, engaging in united advocacy activities soon after formation might be an important precursor to attaining coalition effectiveness in shaping policy. In this article, the authors apply social network analysis (SNA) to examine how organizational…

  10. Statins and risk of incident diabetes: a collaborative meta-analysis of randomised statin trials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sattar, Naveed

    2010-02-27

    Trials of statin therapy have had conflicting findings on the risk of development of diabetes mellitus in patients given statins. We aimed to establish by a meta-analysis of published and unpublished data whether any relation exists between statin use and development of diabetes.

  11. Collaborative Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Debora

    2014-01-01

    This practitioner research study investigates the power of multimodal texts within a real-world context and argues that a participatory culture focused on literary arts offers marginalized high school students opportunities for collaborative design and authoring. Additionally, this article invites educators to rethink the at-risk label. This…

  12. New malignancies following cancer of the urinary bladder: analysis of German cancer registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, M; Kraywinkel, K; Pesch, B; Holleczek, B; Brüning, T

    2012-05-01

    This analysis aimed at occurrence and distribution patterns of new malignancies following bladder cancer. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for two German population-based cancer registries of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) and Saarland to access risks for subsequent primaries. An elevated risk for secondary cancer of any site but urothelium was observed in NRW men [SIR 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-1.49]. The corresponding risk in Saarland was not significantly elevated (SIR 1.06, 95% CI 0.97-1.15). In data of both registries excess risks were observed for cancer of the respiratory tract (SIR 1.54, CI 1.23-1.89 in NRW men) and the prostate (SIR 1.91, 95% CI 1.61-2.24 in NRW; SIR 1.25, 95% CI 1.07-1.45 in Saarland). Common risk factors and incidental findings during follow-up care of bladder cancer patients might explain most of the observed patterns. In addition SIRs were throughout particular high for subsequent cancer of the renal pelvis and the ureter due to pathological characteristics of urothelial neoplasms.

  13. Regional tendencies of research collaboration of social sciences in China:Analysis based on papers of economic journals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinyan; SU

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:This study intends to evaluate the regional tendencies of research collaboration of social sciences in China,and shows the pattern of China’s inter-regional research collaboration(IRRC).Design/methodology/approach:By using 10 years’ data of 150 economic journals in CNKI database,this paper used the Salton index as the indicator to measure the collaborative intensity of 31 regions in China.Findings:First,regional tendencies of research collaboration in social sciences do exist in China.Second,there is a positive correlation between collaborative tendency and regional scientific productivity.Every region would like to cooperate with high productive regions,and high productive regions tend to have collaborations within the region itself.Third,geographical proximity is an important factor affecting China’s IRRC.Research limitations:There are many other important external conditions which may affect research collaboration,but not all of them have been taken into account in this research.Practical implications:The proposed method can be also applied to detect cooperation preference of different authors,scientific research institutions and countries.And the study will help us understand the importance of distance in scholarly cooperation.Originality/value:Previous researches proved that regional research collaborations exist in natural sciences in China,while this research showed that the same phenomenon also appears in social sciences in China.

  14. Dietary Factors Affecting Thyroid Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Ae; Kim, Jeongseon

    2015-01-01

    Some dietary factors are proposed to affect thyroid carcinogenesis, but previous studies have reported inconsistent findings. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis, including 18 eligible studies, to clarify the role of dietary factors in the risk of thyroid cancer. The relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated to assess the association and heterogeneity tests and subgroup and sensitivity analyses, and bias assessments were performed. When the results from all studies were combined, dietary iodine, fish, and cruciferous vegetable intake were not associated with thyroid cancer. However, when the data were divided by geographic location based on iodine availability, a slight increase in the risk of thyroid cancer was observed among those consuming a high total amount of fish in iodine nondeficient areas (RR: 1.18; 95% CI: 1.03-1.35; P for heterogeneity = 0.282). When excluding the studies examining a single food item and hospital-based controls, a high intake of cruciferous vegetables was associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer in iodine-deficient areas (RR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.18-1.74; P for heterogeneity = 0.426). This meta-analysis implies that the role of dietary factors, such as fish and cruciferous vegetables, in thyroid cancer risk can differ based on iodine availability.

  15. Selenium and lung cancer: a systematic review and meta analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Fritz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selenium is a natural health product widely used in the treatment and prevention of lung cancers, but large chemoprevention trials have yielded conflicting results. We conducted a systematic review of selenium for lung cancers, and assessed potential interactions with conventional therapies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Two independent reviewers searched six databases from inception to March 2009 for evidence pertaining to the safety and efficacy of selenium for lung cancers. Pubmed and EMBASE were searched to October 2009 for evidence on interactions with chemo- or radiation-therapy. In the efficacy analysis there were nine reports of five RCTs and two biomarker-based studies, 29 reports of 26 observational studies, and 41 preclinical studies. Fifteen human studies, one case report, and 36 preclinical studies were included in the interactions analysis. Based on available evidence, there appears to be a different chemopreventive effect dependent on baseline selenium status, such that selenium supplementation may reduce risk of lung cancers in populations with lower baseline selenium status (serum<106 ng/mL, but increase risk of lung cancers in those with higher selenium (≥ 121.6 ng/mL. Pooling data from two trials yielded no impact to odds of lung cancer, OR 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.61-1.43; other cancers that were the primary endpoints of these trials, OR 1.51 (95%CI 0.70-3.24; and all-cause-death, OR 0.93 (95%CI 0.79-1.10. In the treatment of lung cancers, selenium may reduce cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and side effects associated with radiation therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Selenium may be effective for lung cancer prevention among individuals with lower selenium status, but at present should not be used as a general strategy for lung cancer prevention. Although promising, more evidence on the ability of selenium to reduce cisplatin and radiation therapy toxicity is required to ensure that therapeutic efficacy is maintained before

  16. A collaborative biomedical image mining framework: application on the image analysis of microscopic kidney biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudas, T; Doukas, C; Chatziioannou, A; Maglogiannis, I

    2013-01-01

    The analysis and characterization of biomedical image data is a complex procedure involving several processing phases, like data acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation, feature extraction and classification. The proper combination and parameterization of the utilized methods are heavily relying on the given image data set and experiment type. They may thus necessitate advanced image processing and classification knowledge and skills from the side of the biomedical expert. In this work, an application, exploiting web services and applying ontological modeling, is presented, to enable the intelligent creation of image mining workflows. The described tool can be directly integrated to the RapidMiner, Taverna or similar workflow management platforms. A case study dealing with the creation of a sample workflow for the analysis of kidney biopsy microscopy images is presented to demonstrate the functionality of the proposed framework.

  17. Description of the data from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) and single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping for Genetic Analysis Workshop 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenberg, Howard J; Bierut, Laura J; Boyce, Paul; Cao, Manqiu; Cawley, Simon; Chiles, Richard; Doheny, Kimberly F; Hansen, Mark; Hinrichs, Tony; Jones, Kevin; Kelleher, Mark; Kennedy, Giulia C; Liu, Guoying; Marcus, Gregory; McBride, Celeste; Murray, Sarah Shaw; Oliphant, Arnold; Pettengill, James; Porjesz, Bernice; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Rice, John P; Rubano, Todd; Shannon, Stu; Steeke, Rhoberta; Tischfield, Jay A; Tsai, Ya Yu; Zhang, Chun; Begleiter, Henri

    2005-12-30

    The data provided to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 14 (GAW 14) was the result of a collaboration among several different groups, catalyzed by Elizabeth Pugh from The Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) and the organizers of GAW 14, Jean MacCluer and Laura Almasy. The DNA, phenotypic characterization, and microsatellite genomic survey were provided by the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA), a nine-site national collaboration funded by the National Institute of Alcohol and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) with the overarching goal of identifying and characterizing genes that affect the susceptibility to develop alcohol dependence and related phenotypes. CIDR, Affymetrix, and Illumina provided single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping of a large subset of the COGA subjects. This article briefly describes the dataset that was provided.

  18. Fine scale mapping of the 17q22 breast cancer locus using dense SNPs, genotyped within the Collaborative Oncological Gene-Environment Study (COGs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darabi, Hatef; Beesley, Jonathan; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have found SNPs at 17q22 to be associated with breast cancer risk. To identify potential causal variants related to breast cancer risk, we performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis that involved genotyping 517 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (i......COGS) followed by imputation of genotypes for 3,134 SNPs in more than 89,000 participants of European ancestry from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). We identified 28 highly correlated common variants, in a 53 Kb region spanning two introns of the STXBP4 gene, that are strong candidates...... for driving breast cancer risk (lead SNP rs2787486 (OR = 0.92; CI 0.90-0.94; P = 8.96 × 10(-15))) and are correlated with two previously reported risk-associated variants at this locus, SNPs rs6504950 (OR = 0.94, P = 2.04 × 10(-09), r(2) = 0.73 with lead SNP) and rs1156287 (OR = 0.93, P = 3.41 × 10(-11), r(2...

  19. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine as an Anticancer Vaccine: Collaborative Efforts to Promote Human Papillomavirus Vaccine in the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Julie S; Steele, C Brooke; Hayes, Nikki; Bhatt, Achal; Moore, Angela R

    2017-03-06

    Widespread use of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has the potential to reduce incidence from HPV-associated cancers. However, vaccine uptake among adolescents remains well below the Healthy People 2020 targets. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) awardees are well positioned to work with immunization programs to increase vaccine uptake. The CDC chronic disease management information system was queried for objectives and activities associated with HPV vaccine that were reported by NCCCP awardees from 2013 to 2016 as part of program reporting requirements. A content analysis was conducted on the query results to categorize interventions according to strategies outlined in The Guide to Community Preventive Services and the 2014 President's Cancer Panel report. Sixty-two percent of NCCCP awardees had planned or implemented at least one activity since 2013 to address low HPV vaccination coverage in their jurisdictions. Most NCCCP awardees (86%) reported community education activities, while 65% reported activities associated with provider education. Systems-based strategies such as client reminders or provider assessment and feedback were each reported by less than 25% of NCCCP awardees. Many NCCCP awardees report planning or implementing activities to address low HPV vaccination coverage, often in conjunction with state immunization programs. NCCCP awardees can play a role in increasing HPV vaccination coverage through their cancer prevention and control expertise and access to partners in the healthcare community.

  20. Physician attitudes toward dissemination of optical spectroscopy devices for cervical cancer control: An Industrial-Academic collaborative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Eileen; Qazi, Usman; Gera, Shalini; Brodovsky, Joan; Simpson, Jessica; Follen, Michele; Basen-Engquist, Karen; MacAulay, Calum

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Optical Spectroscopy has been studied for biologic plausisbility, technical efficacy, clinical effectiveness, patient satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. We sought to identify healthcare provider attitudes or practices that might act as barriers or to the dissemination of this new technology. Methods Through an academic-industrial partnership, we conducted a series of focus groups to examine physician barriers to optical diagnosis. The study was conducted in two stages. First, a pilot group of ten physicians (8 obstetrician gynecologists and two family practitioners) was randomly selected from 8 regions of the US and interviewed individually. They were presented with the results of a large trial (N=980) testing the accuracy of a spectroscopy based device in the detection of cervical neoplasia. They were also shown a prototype of the device and were given a period of time to ask questions and receive answers regarding the device. They were also asked to provide feedback of a questionnaire (provided in Appendix A) which was then revised and presented to three larger focus groups (n=13, 15, 17 for a total n=45). The larger focus groups were conducted during national scientific meetings with 20 obstetrician gynecologists and 25 primary care physicians (family practitioners and internists). Results When asked about the dissemination potential of the new cervical screening technology, all study groups tended to rely on established clinical guidelines from their respective professional societies with regard to the screening and diagnosis of cervical cancer. In addition, study participants consistently agreed that real-time spectroscopy would be viewed positively by their patients. Participants were positive about the new technology's potential as an adjunct to colposcopy and agreed that the improved accuracy would result in reduced healthcare costs (due to decreased biopsies and decreased visits). However, while all saw the potential of real-time diagnosis

  1. Dietary Patterns and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Pei-Ying; Shu, Long; Shen, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xu-Jiao; Zhang, Xiao-Yan

    2017-01-01

    A number of studies have examined the associations between dietary patterns and pancreatic cancer risk, but the findings have been inconclusive. Herein, we conducted this meta-analysis to assess the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of pancreatic cancer. MEDLINE (provided by the National Library of Medicine) and EBSCO (Elton B. Stephens Company) databases were searched for relevant articles published up to May 2016 that identified common dietary patterns. Thirty-two studies met the inclusion criteria and were finally included in this meta-analysis. A reduced risk of pancreatic cancer was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy patterns (odds ratio, OR = 0.86; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.77–0.95; p = 0.004) and light–moderate drinking patterns (OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.83–0.98; p = 0.02). There was evidence of an increased risk for pancreatic cancer in the highest compared with the lowest categories of western-type pattern (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.06–1.45; p = 0.008) and heavy drinking pattern (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.10–1.48; p = 0.002). The results of this meta-analysis demonstrate that healthy and light–moderate drinking patterns may decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas western-type and heavy drinking patterns may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. Additional prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:28067765

  2. Persuading Collaboration: Analysing Persuasion in Online Collaboration Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McHugh, Ronan; Larsen, Birger

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose that online collaborative production sites can be fruitfully analysed in terms of the general theoretical framework of Persuasive Design. OpenStreetMap and The Pirate Bay are used as examples of collaborative production sites. Results of a quantitative analysis of persuas...

  3. Analysis, biomedicine, collaboration, and determinism challenges and guidance: wish list for biopharmaceuticals on the interface of computing and statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Arnold F

    2011-11-01

    I have personally witnessed processing advance from desk calculators and mainframes, through timesharing and PCs, to supercomputers and cloud computing. I have also witnessed resources grow from too little data into almost too much data, and from theory dominating data into data beginning to dominate theory while needing new theory. Finally, I have witnessed problems advance from simple in a lone discipline into becoming almost too complex in multiple disciplines, as well as approaches evolve from analysis driving solutions into solutions by data mining beginning to drive the analysis itself. How we do all of this has transitioned from competition overcoming collaboration into collaboration starting to overcome competition, as well as what is done being more important than how it is done has transitioned into how it is done becoming as important as what is done. In addition, what or how we do it being more important than what or how we should actually do it has shifted into what or how we should do it becoming just as important as what or how we do it, if not more so. Although we have come a long way in both our methodology and technology, are they sufficient for our current or future complex and multidisciplinary problems with their massive databases? Since the apparent answer is not a resounding yes, we are presented with tremendous challenges and opportunities. This personal perspective adapts my background and experience to be appropriate for biopharmaceuticals. In these times of exploding change, informed perspectives on what challenges should be explored with accompanying guidance may be even more valuable than the far more typical literature reviews in conferences and journals of what has already been accomplished without challenges or guidance. Would we believe that an architect who designs a skyscraper determines the skyscraper's exact exterior, interior and furnishings or only general characteristics? Why not increase dependability of conclusions in

  4. Teaching and cultural education in the knowledge society. Evolutive analysis of a strategy of collaborative learning in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela FABBRI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 214 1180 Instituto Universitario de Ciencias de la Educación 9 2 1392 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:ES; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} This paper discuss in a pedagogical level an experience on the use of Forum as a telematic device. The part of e-learning comprised, together with contents and different kind of exercises, a forum. It was prepared for udergraduated students (third year in Social and Cultural Education (Faculty of Education, University of Bologna. From a brief analysis of the context for the Forum on collaborative learning, authors present a description of the quantitative data from experience, some reflections about the research for techno-social goals, and extract some conclusions from positive elements and limits when using TICs in Higher Education system. From assessment and analysis of the educational process and experience of social formation that develops in the Forum, the authors present an instructional design proposal from the critical and reflective paradigm, after evaluating various comments on the results, related with the strengths and limitations of the instrument in the university context. The conclusions guide the work in the subject of educational technology to not only a reflection of the disciplinary nature focused on the use of ICT, but also an approach to collaborative learning strategies and throughout lifelong learning

  5. Molecular network analysis of human microRNA targetome: from cancers to Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoh Jun-ichi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a class of endogenous small noncoding RNAs, mediate posttranscriptional regulation of protein-coding genes by binding chiefly to the 3’ untranslated region of target mRNAs, leading to translational inhibition, mRNA destabilization or degradation. A single miRNA concurrently downregulates hundreds of target mRNAs designated “targetome”, and thereby fine-tunes gene expression involved in diverse cellular functions, such as development, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis and metabolism. Recently, we characterized the molecular network of the whole human miRNA targetome by using bioinformatics tools for analyzing molecular interactions on the comprehensive knowledgebase. We found that the miRNA targetome regulated by an individual miRNA generally constitutes the biological network of functionally-associated molecules in human cells, closely linked to pathological events involved in cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. We also identified a collaborative regulation of gene expression by transcription factors and miRNAs in cancer-associated miRNA targetome networks. This review focuses on the workflow of molecular network analysis of miRNA targetome in silico. We applied the workflow to two representative datasets, composed of miRNA expression profiling of adult T cell leukemia (ATL and Alzheimer’s disease (AD, retrieved from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO repository. The results supported the view that miRNAs act as a central regulator of both oncogenesis and neurodegeneration.

  6. Mammographic density and ageing: A collaborative pooled analysis of cross-sectional data from 22 countries worldwide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anya Burton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammographic density (MD is one of the strongest breast cancer risk factors. Its age-related characteristics have been studied in women in western countries, but whether these associations apply to women worldwide is not known.We examined cross-sectional differences in MD by age and menopausal status in over 11,000 breast-cancer-free women aged 35-85 years, from 40 ethnicity- and location-specific population groups across 22 countries in the International Consortium on Mammographic Density (ICMD. MD was read centrally using a quantitative method (Cumulus and its square-root metrics were analysed using meta-analysis of group-level estimates and linear regression models of pooled data, adjusted for body mass index, reproductive factors, mammogram view, image type, and reader. In all, 4,534 women were premenopausal, and 6,481 postmenopausal, at the time of mammography. A large age-adjusted difference in percent MD (PD between post- and premenopausal women was apparent (-0.46 cm [95% CI: -0.53, -0.39] and appeared greater in women with lower breast cancer risk profiles; variation across population groups due to heterogeneity (I2 was 16.5%. Among premenopausal women, the √PD difference per 10-year increase in age was -0.24 cm (95% CI: -0.34, -0.14; I2 = 30%, reflecting a compositional change (lower dense area and higher non-dense area, with no difference in breast area. In postmenopausal women, the corresponding difference in √PD (-0.38 cm [95% CI: -0.44, -0.33]; I2 = 30% was additionally driven by increasing breast area. The study is limited by different mammography systems and its cross-sectional rather than longitudinal nature.Declines in MD with increasing age are present premenopausally, continue postmenopausally, and are most pronounced over the menopausal transition. These effects were highly consistent across diverse groups of women worldwide, suggesting that they result from an intrinsic biological, likely hormonal, mechanism common to

  7. Objective Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer by Tissue Protein Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Bhat, Sujatha; Rai, Lavanya; Kartha, V. B.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2011-07-01

    Protein profiles of homogenized normal cervical tissue samples from hysterectomy subjects and cancerous cervical tissues from biopsy samples collected from patients with different stages of cervical cancer were recorded using High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with Laser Induced Fluorescence (HPLC-LIF). The Protein profiles were subjected to Principle Component Analysis to derive statistically significant parameters. Diagnosis of sample types were carried out by matching three parameters—scores of factors, squared residuals, and Mahalanobis Distance. ROC and Youden's Index curves for calibration standards were used for objective estimation of the optimum threshold for decision making and performance.

  8. COLLABORATIVE DESIGN OF MULTIPHYSICS PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Shaoyun; LI Shiqi

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative design is recommendedto solve multiphysics problems (MPPS). Firstly,mathematical model of MPPS is constructed and solved by a proposed partitioned method, analysis of which suggests that collaborative design be feasible to solve MPPS. As the key technology of collaborative design of MPPS, a task collaboration algorithm is then proposed. To develop the application framework of collaborative design, applied unified process(AUP) is proposed based on rational unified process(RUP). Then AUP is used to develop the collaborative design platform, whose function framework is constructed according to the process of project management. Finally three MPPS are solved on this platform and the results suggest that the proposed model, algorithm and framework be feasible.

  9. Team Collaboration Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Schrock, Mitchell; Baldwin, John R.; Borden, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The Ground Resource Allocation and Planning Environment (GRAPE 1.0) is a Web-based, collaborative team environment based on the Microsoft SharePoint platform, which provides Deep Space Network (DSN) resource planners tools and services for sharing information and performing analysis.

  10. Climate for Collaboration: Analysis of US and EU Lessons and Opportunities in Energy and Climate Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vita, A.; de Connick, H.; McLaren, J.; Cochran, J.

    2009-11-01

    A deepening of cooperation between the United States and the European Union requires mutual trust, and understanding of current policies, challenges and successes. Through providing such understanding among policymakers, industry and other stakeholders in both economies, opportunities for transatlantic cooperation on climate change and energy policy emerge. This paper sets out by discussing the environmental, legislative, and economic contexts of the EU and US as related to climate. This context is essential to understanding how cap-and-trade, renewable energy and sustainable transportation policies have taken shape in the EU and the US, as described in Chapter 3.1. For each of these policies, a barrier analysis and discussion is provided. Chapter 4 builds off this improved understanding to listobservations and possible lessons learned. The paper concludes with recommendations on topics where EU and US interests align, and where further cooperation could prove beneficial.

  11. Solar-Terrestrial Data Analysis and Reference System (STARS - Its High Potentiality for Collaborative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kunitake

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional studies have become important for an improved understanding of various Solar-Terrestrial Physics (STP fields, given the great variety and different types of observations from the Sun to the Earth. In order to better combine, compare, and analyze different types of data together, a system named STARS (Solar-Terrestrial data Analysis and Reference System has been developed. Cross-sectional study requires cooperative work. STARS has two functions for cooperative work, the "Stars Project List (SPL" and the "Event Listing". The SPL is used for exchanges of plotting information by cooperating persons. The event list database provides all users of STARS hints for recognizing typical occurrences of STP phenomena.

  12. Epidemiology of Cancers in Kashmir, India: An Analysis of Hospital Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qurieshi, Mariya A; Khan, S M Salim; Masoodi, Muneer A; Qurieshi, Uruj; Ain, Quratul; Jan, Yasmeen; Haq, Inaamul; Ahmad, Sheikh Zahoor

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. The aim of the present study was to measure the pattern of different cancers in Kashmir, India, a cancer belt with peculiar cancer profile. A hospital based cancer registry was started by the Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Srinagar, in January 2006, wherein information was collected from cancer patients who were diagnosed and treated in the hospital. Data has been analysed for a period extending from January 2006 to December 2012. Descriptive analysis has been done by using statistical software. A total of 1598 cancer patients were admitted during this period. Overall male to female ratio was 1.33 : 1. Stomach cancer was the most commonly reported cancer (25.2%), followed by colorectal cancer (16.4%) and lung cancer (13.2%) among males. For females, colorectal cancer (16.8%), breast cancer (16.1%), and stomach cancer (10.4%) were the most frequently reported cancers in order of frequency. Tobacco related cancers contributed to more than three-fourths of cancers among men and more than half of cancers for women. There is an urgent need to set up a population based cancer registration system to understand the profile of cancers specific to this geographic region.

  13. ANALYSIS OF THE EFFICIENCY OF CRYOGENIC TREATMENT FOR TONGUE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Tabolinovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cryogenic treatment results that have no analogues in Russian and foreign practice were analyzed in 121 patients with tongue cancer. The data on survival rates were used to objectively evaluate the efficiency of tongue cancer cryodestruction in accordance with the extent and pattern of a tumor process. Analysis of long-term (5–30-years results indicated the efficiency of cryodestruction used alone and in combination with radiation and drug therapies in 83.6 % of the new-onset patients and in 73.3 % of the patients with circumscribed recurrences and residual tumors. Recurrent cancer occurred in 19.3 % of 109 patients who had completed treatment: in 16.4 % of the new-onset patients and in 26.7 % of the patients with recurrences and uncured tumors. Local complications from the wound occurred in 6.6 % of the patients and were abolished in the postoperative period.

  14. Analysis of cytotoxic T cell epitopes in relation to cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranzl, Thomas

    kill the infected cells. The focus of my PhD project has been on improving a method for CTL epitope pathway prediction, on analyzing the epitope density in the alternative cancer exome, and on a study investigating minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags) associated with leukemia. Part I......CTL methods, the experimental effort to identify 90% of new epitopes can be reduced by 15% and 40%, respectively. Part III reports the results of an analysis investigating how the alternatively spliced cancer exome differs from the exome of normal tissue in terms of containing predicted MHC class I binding...... epitopes. We show that peptides unique to cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes than peptides unique to spliced transcripts in normal tissue. We furthermore find that hydrophilic amino acids are significantly enriched in the unique carcinoma sequences, which...

  15. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Siegel

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2. A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003. Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  16. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  17. A historical discourse analysis of the cancerous and non-cancerous body in secondary biology textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Neil Thomas

    This dissertation applies the archeological concepts developed by Michel Foucault to a study of thirteen biology textbooks (1993-2004) in order to develop an understanding of 'purchased truths' concerning cancer. This study focuses on the construction of the health/illness dialogue concerning cancer within the textbooks and not the meaning that the individual makes from reading the text; as such this study concerns itself with social truths rather than the search for an individual awareness of names, dates, or places. This study investigates the practices that allow the creation of dialogues that are inserted into a biology textbook and looks at how discursive formations create the 'truth regime' from which the biology textbook is said to speak. Using the Foucaultian themes of 'event', 'emergence', 'enunciation', and 'exteriority' a new reading of topics concerning cancer emerge from biology textbooks. Cancer is a disease that will impact the lives of countless individuals but coverage devoted to the pathology of cancer in secondary biology textbooks is very limited and no study textbook devoted a whole chapter to the discussion of cancer. There is an identified reduction in the number of pages and depth of coverage devoted to cancer in the newer biology texts compared to the older texts. Humans are pictured more than plants or animals in presentations concerning cancer with emphasis being placed on the digitalization of human cells via the scanning electron microscope. When the whole body is presented it is seldom located within the technology of disease diagnosis and treatment but rather is posed for specific social control. Just as each digitized picture of the cancerous cell in the texts is used to create a story so too are the pictures of the whole body in action. Possible story lines offered by the publishing houses concerning the reaction of the body to cancer are shown to intermingle with risk factor analysis to project a sense of Foucaultian

  18. Integrated proteomic analysis of human cancer cells and plasma from tumor bearing mice for ovarian cancer biomarker discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon J Pitteri

    Full Text Available The complexity of the human plasma proteome represents a substantial challenge for biomarker discovery. Proteomic analysis of genetically engineered mouse models of cancer and isolated cancer cells and cell lines provide alternative methods for identification of potential cancer markers that would be detectable in human blood using sensitive assays. The goal of this work is to evaluate the utility of an integrative strategy using these two approaches for biomarker discovery.We investigated a strategy that combined quantitative plasma proteomics of an ovarian cancer mouse model with analysis of proteins secreted or shed by human ovarian cancer cells. Of 106 plasma proteins identified with increased levels in tumor bearing mice, 58 were also secreted or shed from ovarian cancer cells. The remainder consisted primarily of host-response proteins. Of 25 proteins identified in the study that were assayed, 8 mostly secreted proteins common to mouse plasma and human cancer cells were significantly upregulated in a set of plasmas from ovarian cancer patients. Five of the eight proteins were confirmed to be upregulated in a second independent set of ovarian cancer plasmas, including in early stage disease.Integrated proteomic analysis of cancer mouse models and human cancer cell populations provides an effective approach to identify potential circulating protein biomarkers.

  19. RNA/DNA co-analysis from human saliva and semen stains--results of a third collaborative EDNAP exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, Claus; Hanson, E; Anjos, M J;

    2013-01-01

    A third collaborative exercise on RNA/DNA co-analysis for body fluid identification and STR profiling was organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP). Twenty saliva and semen stains, four dilution series (10-0.01 µl saliva, 5-0.01 µl semen) and, optionally, bona fide or mock casework...... samples of human or non-human origin were analyzed by 20 participating laboratories using an RNA extraction or RNA/DNA co-extraction method. Two novel mRNA multiplexes were used: a saliva triplex (HTN3, STATH and MUC7) and a semen pentaplex (PRM1, PRM2, PSA, SEMG1 and TGM4). The laboratories used...... different chemistries and instrumentation and a majority (16/20) were able to successfully isolate and detect mRNA in dried stains. The simultaneous extraction of RNA and DNA from individual stains not only permitted a confirmation of the presence of saliva/semen (i.e. tissue/fluid source of origin...

  20. Comparison of Collaborative Risk Informed Decision analysis and IWRM for a water supply case in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeuken, Ad; Gilroy, Kristin

    2017-04-01

    We have compared the Collaborative Risk Informed Decision Analysis(CRIDA) method to traditional Integrated Water Resources Management Planning (IWRM) through a water supply case study in Central Cebu, the Philippines. In 2006 an IWRM planning process was applied to the Central Cebu region with the goal to "meet demand for safe water supply and lay the foundation in addressing the related issues of water quality and watershed protection". The stakeholder led process resulted in the selection of a final water management strategy titled, "Water for all Cebuanos". While the 2006 planning study was successful in selecting a stakeholder approved water management strategy, much advancement has since been made in decision making under uncertainty. The CRIDA approach, combining a bottom up decision scaling approach with adaptation pathways, to planning under uncertainty was applied in hindsight to the same case study. This resulted in updated recommendations for the Central Cebu water supply system. The paper shows how and why by following the CRIDA methodology we may arrive at different recommended pathways for adaptation given the set of decision criteria and the methods used for incorporating long term uncertainty in the evaluation

  1. Determination of total sulfite in shrimp, potatoes, dried pineapple, and white wine by flow injection analysis: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J J; Hollingworth, T A; Wekell, M M; Meo, V A; Saba, H H; Etemad-Moghadam, A; Eklund, C; Phillips, J G; Gump, B H

    1990-01-01

    A method for the determination of total sulfite in shrimp, potatoes, dried pineapple, and white wine by flow injection analysis (FIA) was collaboratively studied by 8 laboratories. In the method, the sample solution is reacted with sodium hydroxide to liberate aldehyde-bound sulfite. The sample stream is acidified to produce SO2 gas, which diffuses across a Teflon membrane in the gas diffusion cell into a flowing stream of malachite green. The degree of discoloration of the malachite green is proportional to the amount of sulfite in the sample solution. Red wine was included in the study but interlaboratory precision for these samples was not satisfactory and correlation with Monier-Williams results was poor. The present method is not recommended for use with these samples. For shrimp, potatoes, dried pineapple, and white wine, average reproducibility (RSDR) of results was 25% for samples at 10 ppm SO2 and 10% for samples at greater than 50 ppm. Overall average reproducibility was 14%. Recoveries of sulfite added to samples averaged 80%. Comparison of FIA with the Monier-Williams method indicated comparable results by the 2 methods. The FIA method has been adopted official first action for determination of greater than or equal to 5 ppm total sulfite in shrimp, potatoes, dried pineapple, and white wine.

  2. Analysis of clinical characteristics of 950 cases of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-li ZHU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the clinical features of the patients suffering from cervical cancer who visited Daping Hospital affiliated to Third Military Medical University in recent 10 years. Methods The clinical data of the patients who were pathologically diagnosed as invasive cervical cancer in Daping Hospital of TMMU from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into different age groups and analyzed according to age, clinical features, pathological type, and surgical approach. Results Clinical data of 950 patients with invasive cervical cancer were reviewed in this study. The mean age of the patients was 46.9 years. The clinical features, pathological type, and surgical approaches were different in different age groups. Analysis of the age structure of the patients, the onset age of cervical cancer seemed to increase year by year. Conclusion The clinical features of cervical cancer are diversity in different age, and the strategy for controlling its development should be varied according to age. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.09

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging texture analysis classification of primary breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, S.A.; Lerski, R.A. [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Medical Physics, Dundee (United Kingdom); Purdie, C.A.; Jordan, L.B. [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Pathology, Dundee (United Kingdom); Vinnicombe, S. [University of Dundee, Division of Imaging and Technology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); Martin, P. [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Clinical Radiology, Dundee (United Kingdom); Thompson, A.M. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Surgical Oncology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Patient-tailored treatments for breast cancer are based on histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) subtypes. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) may be useful in non-invasive lesion subtype classification. Women with newly diagnosed primary breast cancer underwent pre-treatment dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI. TA was performed using co-occurrence matrix (COM) features, by creating a model on retrospective training data, then prospectively applying to a test set. Analyses were blinded to breast pathology. Subtype classifications were performed using a cross-validated k-nearest-neighbour (k = 3) technique, with accuracy relative to pathology assessed and receiver operator curve (AUROC) calculated. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to assess raw entropy feature values. Histological subtype classifications were similar across training (n = 148 cancers) and test sets (n = 73 lesions) using all COM features (training: 75 %, AUROC = 0.816; test: 72.5 %, AUROC = 0.823). Entropy features were significantly different between lobular and ductal cancers (p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U). IHC classifications using COM features were also similar for training and test data (training: 57.2 %, AUROC = 0.754; test: 57.0 %, AUROC = 0.750). Hormone receptor positive and negative cancers demonstrated significantly different entropy features. Entropy features alone were unable to create a robust classification model. Textural differences on contrast-enhanced MR images may reflect underlying lesion subtypes, which merits testing against treatment response. (orig.)

  4. Performance Analysis of 3D Massive MIMO Cellular Systems with Collaborative Base Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive MIMO have drawn considerable attention as they enable significant capacity and coverage improvement in wireless cellular network. However, pilot contamination is a great challenge in massive MIMO systems. Under this circumstance, cooperation and three-dimensional (3D MIMO are emerging technologies to eliminate the pilot contamination and to enhance the performance relative to the traditional interference-limited implementations. Motivated by this, we investigate the achievable sum rate performance of MIMO systems in the uplink employing cooperative base station (BS and 3D MIMO systems. In our model, we consider the effects of both large-scale and small-scale fading, as well as the spatial correlation and indoor-to-outdoor high-rise propagation environment. In particular, we investigate the cooperative communication model based on 3D MIMO and propose a closed-form lower bound on the sum rate. Utilizing this bound, we pursue a “large-system” analysis and provide the asymptotic expression when the number of antennas at the BS grows large, and when the numbers of antennas at transceiver grow large with a fixed ratio. We demonstrate that the lower bound is very tight and becomes exact in the massive MIMO system limits. Finally, under the sum rate maximization condition, we derive the optimal number of UTs to be served.

  5. Indirect and direct determination of the casein content of milk by Kjeldahl nitrogen analysis: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J M; Barbano, D M; Fleming, J R

    1998-01-01

    The classic method for determination of milk casein is based on precipitation of casein at pH 4.6. Precipitated milk casein is removed by filtration and the nitrogen content of either the precipitate (direct casein method) or filtrate (noncasein nitrogen; NCN) is determined by Kjeldahl analysis. For the indirect casein method, milk total nitrogen (TN; Method 991.20) is also determined and casein is calculated as TN minus NCN. Ten laboratories tested 9 pairs of blind duplicate raw milk materials with a casein range of 2.42-3.05% by both the direct and indirect casein methods. Statistical performance expressed in protein equivalents (nitrogen x 6.38) with invalid and outlier data removed was as follows: NCN method (wt%), mean = 0.762, sr = 0.010, sR = 0.016, repeatability relative standard deviation (RSDr) = 1.287%, reproducibility relative standard deviation (RSDr) = 2.146%; indirect casein method (wt%), mean = 2.585, repeatability = 0.015, reproducibility = 0.022, RSDr = 0.560%, RSDR = 0.841; direct casein method (wt%), mean = 2.575, sr = 0.015, sR = 0.025, RSDr = 0.597%, RSDR = 0.988%. Method performance was acceptable and comparable to similar Kjeldahl methods for determining nitrogen content of milk (Methods 991.20, 991.21, 991.22, 991.23). The direct casein, indirect casein, and noncasein nitrogen methods have been adopted by AOAC INTERNATIONAL.

  6. Innovation and network collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Müller, Sabine; Jørgensen, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can benefit from network collaboration by enhancing opportunities for innovation. Managing the necessary collaboration to benefit from network participation may however be particularly challenging for SMEs due to their size...... and their inherent shortage of resources. In this paper, we propose that human resource management (HRM) practices may provide a means by which SMEs can increase their innovation capacity through network collaboration. Following a brief presentation of the relevant literature on networks, and innovation in networks...... in particular, and HRM, we analyse and evaluate the potential applicability of existing models for supporting innovation in SMEs participating in networks. Finally, we propose several lines of inquiry arising from our analysis that provide directions for future research....

  7. NCI collaborates with Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) announced a collaboration with the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) to incorporate MMRF's wealth of genomic and clinical data on the disease into the NCI Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a publicly available datab

  8. Mueller matrix polarimetry imaging for breast cancer analysis (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Adam; Vitkin, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Polarized light has many applications in biomedical imaging. The interaction of a biological sample with polarized light reveals information about its biological composition, both structural and functional. The most comprehensive type of polarimetry analysis is to measure the Mueller matrix, a polarization transfer function that completely describes how a sample interacts with polarized light. However, determination of the Mueller matrix requires tissue analysis under many different states of polarized light; a time consuming and measurement intensive process. Here we address this limitation with a new rapid polarimetry system, and use this polarimetry platform to investigate a variety of tissue changes associated with breast cancer. We have recently developed a rapid polarimetry imaging platform based on four photoelastic modulators (PEMs). The PEMs generate fast polarization modulations that allow the complete sample Mueller matrix to be imaged over a large field of view, with no moving parts. This polarimetry system is then demonstrated to be sensitive to a variety of tissue changes that are relevant to breast cancer. Specifically, we show that changes in depolarization can reveal tumor margins, and can differentiate between viable and necrotic breast cancer metastasized to the lymph nodes. Furthermore, the polarimetric property of linear retardance (related to birefringence) is dependent on collagen organization in the extracellular matrix. These findings indicate that our polarimetry platform may have future applications in fields such as breast cancer diagnosis, improving the speed and efficacy of intraoperative pathology, and providing prognostic information that may be beneficial for guiding treatment.

  9. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of Ovarian and Breast Cancer Tumor Peptidomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhe; Wu, Chaochao; Xie, Fang; Slysz, Gordon W.; Tolic, Nikola; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Payne, Samuel H.; Fujimoto, Grant M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Davies, Sherri; Li, Shunqiang; Ellis, Matthew; Boja, Emily; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-02

    Aberrant degradation of proteins is associated with many pathological states, including cancers. Mass spectrometric analysis of tumor peptidomes, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide biological insights on proteolytic processing in cancer. However, attempts to use the information on these smaller protein degradation products from tumors for biomarker discovery and cancer biology studies have been fairly limited to date, largely due to the lack of effective approaches for robust peptidomics identification and quantification, and the prevalence of confounding factors and biases associated with sample handling and processing. Herein, we have developed an effective and robust analytical platform for comprehensive analyses of tissue peptidomes, which is suitable for high throughput quantitative studies. The reproducibility and coverage of the platform, as well as the suitability of clinical ovarian tumor and patient-derived breast tumor xenograft samples with post-excision delay of up to 60 min before freezing for peptidomics analysis, have been demonstrated. Moreover, our data also show that the peptidomics profiles can effectively separate breast cancer subtypes, reflecting tumor-associated protease activities. Peptidomics complements results obtainable from conventional bottom-up proteomics, and provides insights not readily obtainable from such approaches.

  10. AFM-based analysis of human metastatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Tondre, Julianne; Wong, Roger; Rao, Jian Yu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    Recently biomechanics of cancer cells, in particular stiffness or elasticity, has been identified as an important factor relating to cancer cell function, adherence, motility, transformation and invasion. We report on the nanomechanical responses of metastatic cancer cells and benign mesothelial cells taken from human body cavity fluids using atomic force microscopy. Following our initial study (Cross et al 2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 780-3), we report on the biophysical properties of patient-derived effusion cells and address the influence of cell morphology on measured cell stiffness. Using a cytocentrifugation method, which yields morphologically indistinguishable cells that can be prepared in 1 min and avoids any possible artifacts due to 12 h ex vivo culture, we find that metastatic tumor cells are more than 80% softer than benign cells with a distribution over six times narrower than that of normal cells. Consistent with our previous study, which yielded distinguishable cell populations based on ex vivo growth and morphological characteristics, our results show it is unlikely that morphology alone is sufficient to explain the difference in elastic moduli for these two cell types. Moreover, analysis of non-specific cell adhesion inherent to tumor and normal cells collected from patients show surface adhesion of tumor cells is ~33% less adhesive compared to that of normal cells. Our findings indicate that biomechanical-based functional analysis may provide an additional platform for cytological evaluation and diagnosis of cancer in the future.

  11. AFM-based analysis of human metastatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, Sarah E; Gimzewski, James K [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jin Yusheng; Tondre, Julianne; Wong, Roger [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rao Jianyu [California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)], E-mail: jrao@mednet.ucla.edu, E-mail: gim@chem.ucla.edu

    2008-09-24

    Recently biomechanics of cancer cells, in particular stiffness or elasticity, has been identified as an important factor relating to cancer cell function, adherence, motility, transformation and invasion. We report on the nanomechanical responses of metastatic cancer cells and benign mesothelial cells taken from human body cavity fluids using atomic force microscopy. Following our initial study (Cross et al 2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 780-3), we report on the biophysical properties of patient-derived effusion cells and address the influence of cell morphology on measured cell stiffness. Using a cytocentrifugation method, which yields morphologically indistinguishable cells that can be prepared in 1 min and avoids any possible artifacts due to 12 h ex vivo culture, we find that metastatic tumor cells are more than 80% softer than benign cells with a distribution over six times narrower than that of normal cells. Consistent with our previous study, which yielded distinguishable cell populations based on ex vivo growth and morphological characteristics, our results show it is unlikely that morphology alone is sufficient to explain the difference in elastic moduli for these two cell types. Moreover, analysis of non-specific cell adhesion inherent to tumor and normal cells collected from patients show surface adhesion of tumor cells is {approx}33% less adhesive compared to that of normal cells. Our findings indicate that biomechanical-based functional analysis may provide an additional platform for cytological evaluation and diagnosis of cancer in the future.

  12. Analysis of team types based on collaborative relationships among doctors, home-visiting nurses and care managers for effective support of patients in end-of-life home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Junko; Fukui, Sakiko; Ikezaki, Sumie; Otoguro, Chizuru; Tsujimura, Mayuko

    2017-02-21

    To define the team types consisting of doctors, home-visiting nurses and care managers for end-of-life care by measuring the collaboration relationship, and to identify the factors related to the team types. A questionnaire survey of 43 teams including doctors, home-visiting nurses and care managers was carried out. The team types were classified based on mutual evaluations of the collaborative relationships among the professionals. To clarify the factors between team types with the patient characteristics, team characteristics and collaboration competency, univariate analysis was carried out with the Fisher's exact test or one-way analysis and multiple comparison analysis. Three team types were classified: the team where the collaborative relationships among all healthcare professionals were good; the team where the collaborative relationships between the doctors and care managers were poor; and the team where the collaborative relationships among all of the professionals were poor. There was a statistically significant association between the team types and the following variables: patient's dementia level, communication tool, professionals' experience of working with other team members, home-visiting nurses' experience of caring for dying patients, care managers' background qualifications, doctor's face-to-face cooperation with other members and home-visiting nurses' collaborative practice. It is suggested that a collaborative relationship would be fostered by more experience of working together, using communication tools and enhancing each professional's collaboration competency. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Meta-analysis of cancer transcriptomes: A new approach to uncover molecular pathological events in different cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundus Iqbal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To explore secrets of metastatic cancers, individual expression of true sets of respective genes must spread across the tissue. In this study, meta-analysis for transcriptional profiles of oncogenes was carried out to hunt critical genes or networks helping in metastasizing cancers. For this, transcriptomic analysis of different cancerous tissues causing leukemia, lung, liver, spleen, colorectal, colon, breast, bladder, and kidney cancers was performed by extracting microarray expression data from online resource; Gene Expression Omnibus. A newly developed bioinformatics technique; Dynamic Impact Approach (DIA was applied for enrichment analysis of transcriptional profiles using Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID. Furthermore, oPOSSUM (v. 2.0 and Cytoscape (v. 2.8.2 were used for in-depth analysis of transcription factors and regulatory gene networks respectively. DAVID analysis uncovered the most significantly enriched pathways in molecular functions that were 'Ubiquitin thiolesterase activity' up regulated in blood, breast, bladder, colorectal, lung, spleen, prostrate cancer. 'Transforming growth factor beta receptor activity' was inhibited in all cancers except leukemia, colon and liver cancer. oPOSSUM further revealed highly over-represented Transcription Factors (TFs; Broad-complex_3, Broad-complex_4, and Foxd3 except for leukemia and bladder cancer. From these findings, it is possible to target genes and networks, play a crucial role in the development of cancer. In the future, these transcription factors can serve as potential candidates for the therapeutic drug targets which can impede the deadly spread.

  14. Differential Regulatory Analysis Based on Coexpression Network in Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With rapid development of high-throughput techniques and accumulation of big transcriptomic data, plenty of computational methods and algorithms such as differential analysis and network analysis have been proposed to explore genome-wide gene expression characteristics. These efforts are aiming to transform underlying genomic information into valuable knowledges in biological and medical research fields. Recently, tremendous integrative research methods are dedicated to interpret the development and progress of neoplastic diseases, whereas differential regulatory analysis (DRA based on gene coexpression network (GCN increasingly plays a robust complement to regular differential expression analysis in revealing regulatory functions of cancer related genes such as evading growth suppressors and resisting cell death. Differential regulatory analysis based on GCN is prospective and shows its essential role in discovering the system properties of carcinogenesis features. Here we briefly review the paradigm of differential regulatory analysis based on GCN. We also focus on the applications of differential regulatory analysis based on GCN in cancer research and point out that DRA is necessary and extraordinary to reveal underlying molecular mechanism in large-scale carcinogenesis studies.

  15. [Morbidity, mortality and analysis of prognostic factors for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauer, U; Schäfer, J; Roder, J

    2015-06-01

    This study analyzed morbidity, mortality and prognostic factors for patient survival in a single center collective of patients with colorectal cancer and a high follow-up rate. A total of 698 consecutive patients were included in this study. Data were collected prospectively. Descriptive and survival analyses as well as Cox regression analyses were performed to identify factors for morbidity, mortality and prognostic factors for survival. At presentation 78.8 % of the colon cancer patients and 83.5 % of rectal cancer patients showed symptomatic disease and 6.5 % of patients underwent an emergency procedure. Mortality was 3.6 %, morbidity was 42.7 % and 4.3 % of patients developed an anastomotic leakage with the need of reoperation. In spite of the regular application of a fast-track program, 10 % of patients had a prolonged duration of bowel paralysis. In patients with colon cancer there were no differences between overall survival (OAS) and disease-free survival, whereas there was a significant difference in patients with rectal cancer. The mean survival of all patients was 65.39 ± 1.722 months. The ASA score, cardiovascular disease, number of metastatic lymph nodes, lymph node ratio, residual tumor and general or surgery-associated complications were strongly independent influencing factors on OAS. A Cox analysis revealed age at diagnosis and microscopic residual tumor (TNM R1) as highly significant influencing factors on OAS. Other significant factors of influence on OAS were development of general or surgery-associated complications and the presence of cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular disease leads to a higher morbidity rate whereas age, International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stage, R-status, lymphatic spread and occurrence of complications are important prognostic factors for survival.

  16. Relative expression analysis for molecular cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, James A; Sung, Jaeyun; Geman, Donald; Price, Nathan D

    2010-04-01

    The enormous amount of biomolecule measurement data generated from high-throughput technologies has brought an increased need for computational tools in biological analyses. Such tools can enhance our understanding of human health and genetic diseases, such as cancer, by accurately classifying phenotypes, detecting the presence of disease, discriminating among cancer sub-types, predicting clinical outcomes, and characterizing disease progression. In the case of gene expression microarray data, standard statistical learning methods have been used to identify classifiers that can accurately distinguish disease phenotypes. However, these mathematical prediction rules are often highly complex, and they lack the convenience and simplicity desired for extracting underlying biological meaning or transitioning into the clinic. In this review, we survey a powerful collection of computational methods for analyzing transcriptomic microarray data that address these limitations. Relative Expression Analysis (RXA) is based only on the relative orderings among the expressions of a small number of genes. Specifically, we provide a description of the first and simplest example of RXA, the K-TSP classifier, which is based on _ pairs of genes; the case K = 1 is the TSP classifier. Given their simplicity and ease of biological interpretation, as well as their invariance to data normalization and parameter-fitting, these classifiers have been widely applied in aiding molecular diagnostics in a broad range of human cancers. We review several studies which demonstrate accurate classification of disease phenotypes (e.g., cancer vs. normal), cancer subclasses (e.g., AML vs. ALL, GIST vs. LMS), disease outcomes (e.g., metastasis, survival), and diverse human pathologies assayed through blood-borne leukocytes. The studies presented demonstrate that RXA-specifically the TSP and K-TSP classifiers-is a promising new class of computational methods for analyzing high-throughput data, and has the

  17. Fine scale mapping of the 17q22 breast cancer locus using dense SNPs, genotyped within the Collaborative Oncological Gene-Environment Study (COGs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, Hatef; Beesley, Jonathan; Droit, Arnaud; Kar, Siddhartha; Nord, Silje; Moradi Marjaneh, Mahdi; Soucy, Penny; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Fues Wahl, Hanna; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Alonso, M. Rosario; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Conroy, Don M.; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Easton, Douglas F.; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Galle, Eva; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L.; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Johnson, Nichola; Kang, Daehee; Khan, Sofia; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Soo Chin; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mayes, Rebecca; McKay, James; Meindl, Alfons; Milne, Roger L.; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Olswold, Curtis; Orr, Nick; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pita, Guillermo; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Stram, Daniel O.; Surowy, Harald; Swerdlow, Anthony; Teo, Soo H.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine M.; Vincent, Daniel; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yip, Cheng Har; Zheng, Wei; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Hall, Per; Edwards, Stacey L.; Simard, Jacques; French, Juliet D.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have found SNPs at 17q22 to be associated with breast cancer risk. To identify potential causal variants related to breast cancer risk, we performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis that involved genotyping 517 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS) followed by imputation of genotypes for 3,134 SNPs in more than 89,000 participants of European ancestry from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). We identified 28 highly correlated common variants, in a 53 Kb region spanning two introns of the STXBP4 gene, that are strong candidates for driving breast cancer risk (lead SNP rs2787486 (OR = 0.92; CI 0.90–0.94; P = 8.96 × 10−15)) and are correlated with two previously reported risk-associated variants at this locus, SNPs rs6504950 (OR = 0.94, P = 2.04 × 10−09, r2 = 0.73 with lead SNP) and rs1156287 (OR = 0.93, P = 3.41 × 10−11, r2 = 0.83 with lead SNP). Analyses indicate only one causal SNP in the region and several enhancer elements targeting STXBP4 are located within the 53 kb association signal. Expression studies in breast tumor tissues found SNP rs2787486 to be associated with increased STXBP4 expression, suggesting this may be a target gene of this locus. PMID:27600471

  18. Fine scale mapping of the 17q22 breast cancer locus using dense SNPs, genotyped within the Collaborative Oncological Gene-Environment Study (COGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, Hatef; Beesley, Jonathan; Droit, Arnaud; Kar, Siddhartha; Nord, Silje; Moradi Marjaneh, Mahdi; Soucy, Penny; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Fues Wahl, Hanna; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Alonso, M Rosario; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Conroy, Don M; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Easton, Douglas F; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Galle, Eva; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Johnson, Nichola; Kang, Daehee; Khan, Sofia; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Soo Chin; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mayes, Rebecca; McKay, James; Meindl, Alfons; Milne, Roger L; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Olswold, Curtis; Orr, Nick; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pita, Guillermo; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Stram, Daniel O; Surowy, Harald; Swerdlow, Anthony; Teo, Soo H; Tessier, Daniel C; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine M; Vincent, Daniel; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yip, Cheng Har; Zheng, Wei; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Edwards, Stacey L; Simard, Jacques; French, Juliet D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M

    2016-09-07

    Genome-wide association studies have found SNPs at 17q22 to be associated with breast cancer risk. To identify potential causal variants related to breast cancer risk, we performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis that involved genotyping 517 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS) followed by imputation of genotypes for 3,134 SNPs in more than 89,000 participants of European ancestry from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). We identified 28 highly correlated common variants, in a 53 Kb region spanning two introns of the STXBP4 gene, that are strong candidates for driving breast cancer risk (lead SNP rs2787486 (OR = 0.92; CI 0.90-0.94; P = 8.96 × 10(-15))) and are correlated with two previously reported risk-associated variants at this locus, SNPs rs6504950 (OR = 0.94, P = 2.04 × 10(-09), r(2) = 0.73 with lead SNP) and rs1156287 (OR = 0.93, P = 3.41 × 10(-11), r(2) = 0.83 with lead SNP). Analyses indicate only one causal SNP in the region and several enhancer elements targeting STXBP4 are located within the 53 kb association signal. Expression studies in breast tumor tissues found SNP rs2787486 to be associated with increased STXBP4 expression, suggesting this may be a target gene of this locus.

  19. Collaborative Care

    OpenAIRE

    コラボレイティブケア研究科

    2005-01-01

    本書を著したHornbyは英国のソーシャルワーカーである。彼女は1983年に「Collaboration in social work(Journal of social work practice,1.1)」を発表し、ソーシャルワークでの職種間の連携の重要性について報告している。さらに1993年に発刊した本書では、同一機関内の人間関係 ...

  20. Timeline Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohøj, Morten; Borchorst, Nikolaj Gandrup; Bouvin, Niels Olof

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores timelines as a web-based tool for collaboration between citizens and municipal caseworkers. The paper takes its outset in a case study of planning and control of parental leave; a process that may involve surprisingly many actors. As part of the case study, a web-based timeline......, CaseLine, was designed. This design crosses the boundaries between leisure and work, in ways that are different from what is often seen in current HCI. The timeline has several roles on these boundaries: It is a shared planning and visualization tool that may be used by parents and caseworkers alone......, and beyond this case....

  1. Stability analysis of liver cancer-related microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Li; Zhenggang Jiang; Lijian Xu; Hu Yao; Jiangfeng Guo; Xianfeng Ding

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs(miRNAs)are non-coding,single-stranded RNAs of ~22 nt and constitute a novel class of gene regulators that are found in both plants and animals.Several studies have demonstrated that serum miRNAs could serve as potential biomarkers for the detection of various cancers and other diseases.A few documents regarding the stability of liver cancer-related miRNAs in serum are available.A systemic analysis of the stability of miRNA in serum is quite necessary.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability of miRNAs from three different sources,cultured liver cancer Huh-7 cell line,clinical liver cancer,and serum under different experimental conditions,including different temperature,time duration,pH values,Rnase A digestion,Dnase Ⅰ digestion,and various freeze-thaw cycles.The qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated that liver cancer-related miRNAs were detectable under each of test conditions,indicating that miRNAs were extremely stable and resistant to destruction and degradation under harsh environmental conditions.However,ribosomal RNA was fragile and easily degraded by demonstrating sharp decrease of relative expression under the non-physiological test conditions.We also established a robust procedure for serum RNA extraction,which is greatly important not only for the miRNA profiling studies bat also for the disease prognosis based on abnormal miRNA expression.

  2. Metabolism and cell shape in cancer: a fractal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anselmi, Fabrizio; Valerio, Mariacristina; Cucina, Alessandra; Galli, Luca; Proietti, Sara; Dinicola, Simona; Pasqualato, Alessia; Manetti, Cesare; Ricci, Giulia; Giuliani, Alessandro; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2011-07-01

    Fractal analysis in cancer cell investigation provided meaningful insights into the relationship between morphology and phenotype. Some reports demonstrated that changes in cell shape precede and trigger dramatic modifications in both gene expression and enzymatic function. Nonetheless, metabolomic pattern in cells undergoing shape changes have been not still reported. Our study was aimed to investigate if modifications in cancer cell morphology are associated to relevant transition in tumour metabolome, analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and principal component analysis. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, exposed to an experimental morphogenetic field, undergo a dramatic change in their membrane profiles. Both cell lines recover a more rounded shape, loosing spindle and invasive protrusions, acquiring a quite "normal" morphology. This result, quantified by fractal analysis, shows that normalized bending energy (a global shape characterization expressing the amount of energy needed to transform a specific shape into its lowest energy state) decreases after 48 h. Later on, a significant shift from a high to a low glycolytic phenotype was observed on both cell lines: glucose flux begins to drop off at 48 h, leading to reduced lactate accumulation, and fatty acids and citrate synthesis slow-down after 72 h. Moreover, de novo lipidogenesis is inhibited and nucleotide synthesis is reduced, as indicated by the positive correlation between glucose and formate. In conclusion, these data indicate that the reorganization of cell membrane architecture, induced by environmental cues, is followed by a relevant transition of the tumour metabolome, suggesting cells undergo a dramatic phenotypic reversion.

  3. Transcriptomic Analysis of Calcium Remodeling in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Riesgo, Enrique; Gutiérrez, Lucía G; Ubierna, Daniel; Acedo, Alberto; Moyer, Mary P; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2017-04-27

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) cells undergo the remodeling of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, which contributes to cancer hallmarks such as enhanced proliferation, invasion and survival. Ca(2+) remodeling includes critical changes in store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and Ca(2+) store content. Some changes have been investigated at the molecular level. However, since nearly 100 genes are involved in intracellular Ca(2+) transport, a comprehensive view of Ca(2+) remodeling in CRC is lacking. We have used Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to investigate differences in expression of 77 selected gene transcripts involved in intracellular Ca(2+) transport in CRC. To this end, mRNA from normal human colonic NCM460 cells and human colon cancer HT29 cells was isolated and used as a template for transcriptomic sequencing and expression analysis using Ion Torrent technology. After data transformation and filtering, exploratory analysis revealed that both cell types were well segregated. In addition, differential gene expression using R and bioconductor packages show significant differences in expression of selected voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels and store-operated Ca(2+) entry players, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, Ca(2+) release channels, Ca(2+) pumps, Na⁺/Ca(2+) exchanger isoforms and genes involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport. These data provide the first comprehensive transcriptomic analysis of Ca(2+) remodeling in CRC.

  4. Treatment and multivariate analysis of colorectal cancer with liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Duan, Boshi; Shen, Chunjian; Wu, Bo; Luo, Ji; Zhao, Guohua

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the influencing factors related to outcome of patients of colorectal cancer with liver metastasis. From January 1999 to January 2009, 293 cases of colorectal cancer with liver metastasis undergoing surgery were analysised retrospectively. Relationships between survival and clinicopathological factors including patient demographics and tumor characteristics were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: The 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates of patients after resection were 58.3%, 26.4%, and 11.3%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that preoperative CEA level, degree of primary tumor differentiation, resection margin, number of liver metastases, resection of liver metastases were prognostic impacts. The difference was statistically significant (pmultivariate analysis showed that preoperative CEA level, number of liver metastases, and resection of liver metastases are three separate prognostic factors. Racical resection is the key to improve the long-term survival rate of colorectal cancer with liver metastasis. Important predictive factors related to poor survival are preoperative CEA level and number of liver metastases.

  5. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  6. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  7. Collaborative Environments. Considerations Concerning Some Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela I. MUNTEAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious, that all collaborative environments (workgroups, communities of practice, collaborative enterprises are based on knowledge and between collaboration and knowledge management there is a strong interdependence. The evolution of information systems in these collaborative environments led to the sudden necessity to adopt, for maintaining the virtual activities and processes, the latest technologies/systems, which are capable to support integrated collaboration in business services. In these environments, portal-based IT platforms will integrate multi-agent collaborative systems, collaborative tools, different enterprise applications and other useful information systems.

  8. A Validation Study of Vascular Cognitive Impairment Genetics Meta-Analysis Findings in an Independent Collaborative Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrobot, Olivia Anna; McKnight, Amy Jayne; Passmore, Peter Anthony; Seripa, Davide; Mecocci, Patrizia; Panza, Francesco; Kalaria, Rajesh; Wilcock, Gordon; Munafò, Marcus; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Karhunen, Pekka; Pessi, Tanja; Martiskainen, Mika; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin

    2016-06-15

    Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), including its severe form, vascular dementia (VaD), is the second most common form of dementia. The genetic etiology of sporadic VCI remains largely unknown. We previously conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all published genetic association studies of sporadic VCI prior to 6 July 2012, which demonstrated that APOE (ɛ4, ɛ2) and MTHFR (rs1801133) variants were associated with susceptibility for VCI. De novo genotyping was conducted in a new independent relatively large collaborative European cohort of VaD (nmax = 549) and elderly non-demented samples (nmax = 552). Where available, genotype data derived from Illumina's 610-quad array for 1210 GERAD1 control samples were also included in analyses of genes examined. Associations were tested using the Cochran-Armitage trend test: MTHFR rs1801133 (OR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.16-1.58, p = <0.0001), APOE rs7412 (OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.42-0.90, p = 0.01), and APOE rs429358 (OR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.17-2.16, p = 0.003). Association was also observed with APOE epsilon alleles; ɛ4 (OR = 1.85, 95% CI 1.35-2.52, p = <0.0001) and ɛ2 (OR = 0.67, 95% CI 0.46-0.98, p = 0.03). Logistic regression and Bonferroni correction in a subgroup of the cohort adjusted for gender, age, and population maintained the association of APOE rs429358 and ɛ4 allele.

  9. Non-target screening with high-resolution mass spectrometry: critical review using a collaborative trial on water analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Emma L; Singer, Heinz P; Slobodnik, Jaroslav; Ipolyi, Ildiko M; Oswald, Peter; Krauss, Martin; Schulze, Tobias; Haglund, Peter; Letzel, Thomas; Grosse, Sylvia; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Bletsou, Anna; Zwiener, Christian; Ibáñez, María; Portolés, Tania; de Boer, Ronald; Reid, Malcolm J; Onghena, Matthias; Kunkel, Uwe; Schulz, Wolfgang; Guillon, Amélie; Noyon, Naïke; Leroy, Gaëla; Bados, Philippe; Bogialli, Sara; Stipaničev, Draženka; Rostkowski, Pawel; Hollender, Juliane

    2015-08-01

    In this article, a dataset from a collaborative non-target screening trial organised by the NORMAN Association is used to review the state-of-the-art and discuss future perspectives of non-target screening using high-resolution mass spectrometry in water analysis. A total of 18 institutes from 12 European countries analysed an extract of the same water sample collected from the River Danube with either one or both of liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry detection. This article focuses mainly on the use of high resolution screening techniques with target, suspect, and non-target workflows to identify substances in environmental samples. Specific examples are given to emphasise major challenges including isobaric and co-eluting substances, dependence on target and suspect lists, formula assignment, the use of retention information, and the confidence of identification. Approaches and methods applicable to unit resolution data are also discussed. Although most substances were identified using high resolution data with target and suspect-screening approaches, some participants proposed tentative non-target identifications. This comprehensive dataset revealed that non-target analytical techniques are already substantially harmonised between the participants, but the data processing remains time-consuming. Although the objective of a "fully-automated identification workflow" remains elusive in the short term, important steps in this direction have been taken, exemplified by the growing popularity of suspect screening approaches. Major recommendations to improve non-target screening include better integration and connection of desired features into software packages, the exchange of target and suspect lists, and the contribution of more spectra from standard substances into (openly accessible) databases. Graphical Abstract Matrix of identification approach versus identification confidence.

  10. Extending oral health care services to underserved children through a school-based collaboration: Part 3--A cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siruta, Kylie J; Simmer-Beck, Melanie L; Ahmed, Arif; Holt, Lorie A; Villalpando-Mitchell, Tanya; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript was to conduct a cost analysis of the Miles of Smiles Program, a collaboration between the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry and the Olathe School District in Kansas. This preventive program was implemented to improve the access to oral health care for low income children within the school district. An inventory list and de-identified patient records were used to determine the costs associated with operating the program to serve 339 elementary school students during the 2008 to 2009 school term. Costs related to equipment, supplies and personnel were included. The costs were then compared to the amount of Medicaid reimbursement obtained for the services provided. Additionally, the cost of operating a similar program, if staffed by dental professionals rather than supervised dental hygiene students, was estimated. The cost of operating the program during the 2008 to 2009 school term was $107,515.74. The program received Medicaid reimbursement for approximately 1.5% of the total operating cost of and approximately 6.3% of the total billable services, however, challenges with submitting and billing Medicaid claims for the first time contributed to this low rate of reimbursement. If a similar program that utilized dental professionals was implemented and treated the same number of patients, the cost would be approximately $37,529.65 more due to higher expenses associated with personnel and supplies. The program is not self-sustainable based on Medicaid government-funded insurance reimbursement alone, and therefore continuous external sources of funding or a change in the program design would be necessary for long-term sustainability of the program. Copyright © 2014 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  11. Mortality of treated HIV-1 positive individuals according to viral subtype in Europe and Canada: collaborative cohort analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate prognosis by viral subtype in HIV-1-infected individuals from start of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and after viral failure. Design: Collaborative analysis of data from eight European and three Canadian cohorts. Methods: Adults (N>20 000) who started triple ART between 1996 and 2012 and had data on viral subtype were followed for mortality. We estimated crude and adjusted (for age, sex, regimen, CD4+ cell count, and AIDS at baseline, period of starting ART, stratified by cohort, region of origin and risk group) mortality hazard ratios (MHR) by subtype. We estimated MHR subsequent to viral failure defined as two HIV-RNA measurements greater than 500 copies/ml after achieving viral suppression. Results: The most prevalent subtypes were B (15 419; 74%), C (2091; 10%), CRF02AG (1057; 5%), A (873; 4%), CRF01AE (506; 2.4%), G (359; 1.7%), and D (232; 1.1%). Subtypes were strongly patterned by region of origin and risk group. During 104 649 person-years of observation, 1172/20 784 patients died. Compared with subtype B, mortality was higher for subtype A, but similar for all other subtypes. MHR for A versus B were 1.13 (95% confidence interval 0.85,1.50) when stratified by cohort, increased to 1.78 (1.27,2.51) on stratification by region and risk, and attenuated to 1.59 (1.14,2.23) on adjustment for covariates. MHR for A versus B was 2.65 (1.64,4.28) and 0.95 (0.57,1.57) for patients who started ART with CD4+ cell count below, or more than, 100 cells/μl, respectively. There was no difference in mortality between subtypes A, B and C after viral failure. Conclusion: Patients with subtype A had worse prognosis, an observation which may be confounded by socio-demographic factors. PMID:26562844

  12. Photoacoustic analysis of thyroid cancer in vivo: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Min-Hee; Jo, Kwanhoon; Ha, Jeonghoon; Kim, Yongmin; Lim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Chulhong

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers. About 3-8% of the people in the United States have thyroid nodules, and 5-15% of these nodules are malignant. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a standard procedure to diagnose malignity of nodules. However, about 10-20% of FNABs produce indeterminable results, which leads to repeat biopsies and unnecessary surgical operations. We have explored photoacoustic (PA) imaging as a new method to identify cancerous nodules. In a pilot study to test its feasibility, we recruited patients with thyroid nodules (currently 36 cases with 21 malignant and 15 benign nodules), acquired in vivo PA and ultrasound (US) images of the nodules in real time using a recently-developed clinical PA/US imaging system, and analyzed the acquired data offline. The preliminary results show that malignant and benign nodules could be differentiated by utilizing their PA amplitudes at different excitation wavelengths. This is the first in vivo PA analysis of thyroid nodules. Although a larger-scale study is needed for statistical significance, the preliminary results show the good potential of PA imaging as a non-invasive tool for triaging thyroid cancer.

  13. Prevalence of cancer in membranous nephropathy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeaphorn, Napat; Kue-A-Pai, Pogsathorn; Thamcharoen, Natanong; Ungprasert, Patompong; Stokes, Michael B; Knight, Eric L

    2014-01-01

    The association between membranous nephropathy (MN) and cancer has been well documented. However, the true prevalence and characteristics of cancer associated with MN have not been well described. A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies was conducted to summarize the prevalence of cancer-associated MN as well as patient characteristics and types of cancer in this population. We used a random-effects meta-analysis model to estimate the prevalence of cancer. We included 6 studies (n = 785). The estimated prevalence of cancer was 10.0% (95% CI, 6.1-14.6). The mean age of MN patients with cancer was 67 ± 7 years. The diagnosis of cancer preceded the diagnosis of MN in 20 ± 6.8%. Lung cancer was the most common type of tumor, accounting for 22 cases (26%), followed by prostate cancer (13 cases, 15%), hematologic malignancies (12 cases, 14%), colorectal cancer (9 cases, 11%), breast cancer (6 cases, 7%), and stomach and esophageal cancer (5 cases, 6%). The estimated prevalence of cancer in patients with MN is 10% (95% CI, 6.1-14.6). The vast majority of tumors associated with MN are lung and prostate cancer. Hematologic malignancies should also be considered as one of the potential cancers associated with MN. Our study was based on a largely Caucasian population; therefore, the findings might not be applicable to other populations. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Obesity and incidence of lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Dong, Jiayi; Sun, Kekang; Zhao, Lin; Zhao, Fei; Wang, Lili; Jiao, Yang

    2013-03-01

    To date, the relationship between obesity and the incidence of lung cancer remains unclear and inconclusive. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis of published studies to provide a quantitative evaluation of this association. Relevant studies were identified through PubMed and EMBASE databases from 1966 to December 2011, as well as through the reference lists of retrieved articles. A total of 31 articles were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, excess body weight (body mass index, BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) was inversely associated with lung cancer incidence (relative risk, RR = 0.79; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.73-0.85) compared with normal weight (BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)). The association did not change with stratification by sex, study population, study design, and BMI measurement method. However, when stratified by smoking status, the inverse association between excess body weight and lung cancer incidence in current (RR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.57-0.70) and former (RR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.58-0.91) smokers was strengthened. In non-smokers, the association was also statistically significant (RR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70-0.98), although the link was weakened to some extent. The stratified analyses also showed that excess body weight was inversely associated with squamous cell carcinoma (RR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.58-0.80) and adenocarcinoma (RR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.65-0.96). No statistically significant link was found between excess body weight and small cell carcinoma (RR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.66-1.48). The results of this meta-analysis indicate that overweight and obesity are protective factors against lung cancer, especially in current and former smokers. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  15. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue. A meta-analysis of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svahn, Malene F; Faber, Mette Tuxen; Christensen, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue.......The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue....

  16. DNA adducts and cancer risk in prospective studies: a pooled analysis and a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veglia, Fabrizio; Loft, Steffen; Matullo, Giuseppe;

    2008-01-01

    Bulky DNA adducts are biomarkers of exposure to aromatic compounds and of the ability of the individual to metabolically activate carcinogens and to repair DNA damage. Their ability to predict cancer onset is uncertain. We have performed a pooled analysis of three prospective studies on cancer risk...... in which bulky DNA adducts have been measured in blood samples collected from healthy subjects (N = 1947; average follow-up 51-137 months). In addition, we have performed a meta-analysis by identifying all articles on the same subject published up to the end of 2006, including case-control studies....... In the pooled analysis, a weakly statistically significant increase in the risk of lung cancer was apparent (14% per unit standard deviation change in adduct levels, 95% confidence interval 1-28%; using the weighted mean difference method, 0.15 SD, units higher adducts in cases than in controls...

  17. Scientific collaboration and team science: a social network analysis of the centers for population health and health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Janet

    2015-03-01

    The past decade has seen dramatic shifts in the way that scientific research is conducted as networks, consortia, and large research centers are funded as transdisciplinary, team-based enterprises to tackle complex scientific questions. Key investigators (N = 167) involved in ten health disparities research centers completed a baseline social network and collaboration readiness survey. Collaborative ties existed primarily between investigators from the same center, with just 7 % of ties occurring across different centers. Grants and work groups were the most common types of ties between investigators, with shared presentations the most common tie across different centers. Transdisciplinary research orientation was associated with network position and reciprocity. Center directors/leaders were significantly more likely to form ties with investigators in other roles, such as statisticians and trainees. Understanding research collaboration networks can help to more effectively design and manage future team-based research, as well as pinpoint potential issues and continuous evaluation of existing efforts.

  18. [Peruvian scientific production in medicine and collaboration networks, analysis of the Science Citation Index 2000-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huamaní, Charles; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2010-09-01

    To describe the Peruvian scientific production in indexed journals in the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) and the characteristics of the institutional collaborative networks. All papers published in the ISI database (Clinical Medicine collection) were included during 2000 to 2009 with at least one author with a Peruvian affiliation. The publication trend, address of corresponding author, type of article, institution, city (only for Peru), and country were evaluated. The collaborative networks were analized using the Pajek® software. 1210 papers were found, increasing from 61 in 2000 to 200 in 2009 (average of 121 articles/year). 30.4% articles included a corresponding author from a Peruvian institution. The average of authors per article was 8.3. Original articles represented 82.1% of total articles. Infectious diseases-related journals concentrated most of the articles. The main countries that collaborate with Peru are: USA (60.4%), England (12.9%), and Brazil (8.0%). Lima concentrated 94.7% of the publications and three regions (Huancavelica, Moquegua and Tacna) did not register any publication. Only two universities published more than one article/year and four institutions published more than 10 articles/year. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia published 45% of the total number of articles, being the most productive institution and which concentrated the most number of collaborations with foreign institutions. The ministry of Health--including all dependencies--published 37.3% of the total number of publications. There is a higher level of collaboration with foreign institutions rather than local institutions. The Peruvian scientific production in medicine represented in the ISI database is very low but growing, and is concentrated in Lima and in a few institutions. The most productive Peruvian institutions collaborate more intensively with foreign journals rather than local institutions.

  19. BOERHAAVIA DIFFUSA IN CANCER THERAPY – AN INSILICO ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Antony.P

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and it is characterized by uncontrolled growth of cells in the body. Apoptosis or programmed cell death plays a major role in normal cell development and tissue homeostasis and cancer cells do lack this property. The Bcl-2 family of proteins regulates apoptotic pathway by the interaction of pro apoptotic and anti apoptotic proteins. They maintain a balance between newly forming cells and old dying cells. Over expressed anti apoptotic Bcl-2 will alter the ratio of pro and anti apoptotic proteins, resulting in the prevention of apoptosis. Elevated levels of apoptosis-inhibitory protein Bcl-2 has frequently been detected in many forms of human cancer. Therefore, Bcl-2 appears to be a relevant target for cancer therapy. Plants have been used for treating various diseases since ancient times. Boerhaavia diffusa is an important medicinal plant used in various human ailments, including cancer, diabetes, hepatoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. However, most of the reports in traditional medicine are yet to be validated through scientific studies. The present study focuses on identifying phytocompounds in Boerhaavia diffusa having anticancer potential to effectively inhibit the action of Bcl- 2 protein. Insilico docking analysis are well adapted for screening of phytocompounds so as to find the inhibitory or promotive role of potent lead molecules against respective targets. Thirty seven ligands of various confirmations were docked to target protein Bcl-2 using Discovery studio 3.5. The most effective ones were identified through docking score and interaction energy.

  20. Investigation of Common Symptoms of Cancer and Reliability Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To identify cancer distribution and treatment requirements, a questionnaire on cancer patients was conducted. It was our objective to validate a series of symptoms commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Methods: The M. D. Anderson Symptom Assessment Inventory (MDASI) was used with 10 more TCM items added. Questions regarding TCM application requested in cancer care were also asked. A multi-center, cross-sectional study was conducted in 340 patients from 4 hospitals in Beijing and Dalian. SPSS and Excel software were adopted for statistical analysis. The questionnaire was self-evaluated with the Cronbach's alpha score. Results: The most common symptoms were fatigue 89.4%, sleep disturbance 74.4%, dry mouth 72.9%, poor appetite 72.9%, and difficulty remembering 71.2%. These symptoms affected work (89.8%), mood (82.6%),and activity (76.8%), resulting in poor quality of life. Eighty percent of the patients wanted to regulate the body with TCM. Almost 100% of the patients were interested in acquiring knowledge regarding the integrated traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Western medicine (WM) in the treatment and rehabilitation of cancer. Cronbach's alpha score indicated that there was acceptable internal consistency within both the MDASI and TCM items, 0.86 for MDASI, 0.78 for TCM, and 0.90 for MDASI-TCM (23 items). Conclusions: Fatigue, sleep disturbance, dry mouth, poor appetite, and difficulty remembering are the most common symptoms in cancer patients. These greatly affect the quality of life for these patients. Patients expressed a strong desire for TCM holistic regulation. The MDASI and its TCM-adapted model could be a critical tool for the quantitative study of TCM symptoms.

  1. International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium (ICPC), is a voluntary scientific organization that provides a forum for collaboration among some of the world's leading cancer and proteogenomic research centers.

  2. Technology collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Jacob [Halliburton (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present Halliburton's Brazilian technology center. Halliburton has technology centers in the United States, Saudi Arabia, India, Singapore and Brazil, all of which aim at delivering accelerated innovation in the oil sector. The technology centers engage in research and development activities with the help of various universities and in collaboration with the customer or supplier. The Halliburton Brazil technology center provides its customers with timely research and development solutions for enhancing recovery and mitigating reservoir uncertainty; they are specialized in finding solutions for pre- and post-salt carbonate drilling and in the enhancement of production from mature fields. This presentation showcased the work carried out by the Halliburton Brazil technology center to help customers develop their deepwater field activities.

  3. Association between the CYP1B1 polymorphisms and risk of cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie-Ying; Yang, Yu; Liu, Zhi-Zhong; Xie, Jian-Jun; Du, Ya-Ping; Wang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The previous, published data on the association between CYP1B1 polymorphisms and cancer risk remained controversial. To derive a more precise estimation of the association between the CYP1B1 polymorphisms and cancer risk, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between cancer susceptibility and CYP1B1 Leu432Val, Asn453Ser, Arg48Gly, and Ala119Ser polymorphisms. For Asn453Ser and Arg48Gly polymorphisms, significantly decreased endometrial cancer was observed among Caucasians. For Ala119Ser polymorphism, we found that individuals with the minor variant genotypes had a high risk of prostate cancer. For Leu432Val polymorphism, we found that individuals with the minor variant genotypes had a higher risk of endometrial cancer and lung cancer and had a lower risk of ovarian cancer. In summary, this meta-analysis suggests that Leu432Val polymorphism is associated with ovarian cancer, lung cancer, and endometrial cancer risk; Asn453Ser and Arg48Gly polymorphisms are associated with endometrial cancer risk among Caucasians, Ala119Ser polymorphism is associated with prostate cancer risk, and Ala119Ser polymorphism is associated with breast cancer risk in Caucasians. In addition, our work also points out the importance of new studies for Ala119Ser polymorphism in endometrial cancer, because high heterogeneity was observed (I (2) > 75 %).

  4. Collaboration in scientific practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenknecht, Susann

    2014-01-01

    This monograph investigates the collaborative creation of scientific knowledge in research groups. To do so, I combine philosophical analysis with a first-hand comparative case study of two research groups in experimental science. Qualitative data are gained through observation and interviews......, and I combine empirical insights with existing approaches to knowledge creation in philosophy of science and social epistemology. On the basis of my empirically-grounded analysis I make several conceptual contributions. I study scientific collaboration as the interaction of scientists within research...... groups. Thereby, I argue that research groups and their role in scientific practice deserve more philosophical attention than they have hitherto received. In contemporary natural science, research groups are key to the formulation and corroboration of scientific knowledge claims prior...

  5. Collaborative Tax Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    2016-01-01

    their customer bases decline to commercially non-viable levels. The analysis is framed by public governance literature and argues that the regulation is an example of collaborative or interactive governance, because the tax administrators do not regulate non-compliance directly, but activate external...... stakeholders, i.e. the consumers, in the regulatory craft. The study is based on a qualitative methodology and draws on a unique case of regulation in the cleaning sector. This sector is at high risk of tax evasion and human exploitation of vulnerable workers operating in the informal economy. The article has...... implications for how tax practitioners think about collaborative and interactive regulatory initiatives. While the tax administration in the study sees the approach as effective, the analysis shows that there are a number of caveats in relation to regularity, public listing, costs and revenue focus...

  6. Collaborative Tax Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This article shows a new form of regulation within a tax administration where tax administrators abate tax evasion by nudging and motivating consumers to only purchase services from tax compliant businesses. This indirectly closes or forces tax evading businesses to change their practices, because...... their customer bases decline to commercially non-viable levels. The analysis is framed by public governance literature and argues that the regulation is an example of collaborative or interactive governance, because the tax administrators do not regulate non-compliance directly, but activate external...... implications for how tax practitioners think about collaborative and interactive regulatory initiatives. While the tax administration in the study sees the approach as effective, the analysis shows that there are a number of caveats in relation to regularity, public listing, costs and revenue focus...

  7. Discrimination analysis of mass spectrometry proteomics for ovarian cancer detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-jun HONG; Xiao-dan WANG; David SHEN; Su ZENG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:A discrimination analysis has been explored for the probabilistic classifica-tion of healthy versus ovarian cancer serum samples using proteomics data from mass spectrometry (MS).Methods:The method employs data normalization,clustering,and a linear discriminant analysis on surface-enhanced laser desorp-tion ionization (SELDI) time-of-flight MS data.The probabilistic classification method computes the optimal linear discriminant using the complex human blood serum SELDI spectra.Cross-validation and training/testing data-split experi-ments are conducted to verify the optimal discriminant and demonstrate the accu-racy and robustness of the method.Results:The cluster discrimination method achieves excellent performance.The sensitivity,specificity,and positive predic-tive values are above 97% on ovarian cancer.The protein fraction peaks,which significantly contribute to the classification,can be available from the analysis process.Conclusion:The discrimination analysis helps the molecular identities of differentially expressed proteins and peptides between the healthy and ovarian patients.

  8. 酵母转录调控协作网络的分析%Analysis of Transcriptional Regulation Collaboration Networks in Saccharomy cescerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration networks have proven informative when used to describe various kinds of human relationships. Similar strategy could be used in the transcriptional regulatory network. A collaboration network of target genes (TGs) was constructed based on common transcription factors (TFs), and similarly, a smaller network of transcription factors was constructed based on their common target genes. After clustering the target gene collaboration networks, genes in the same cluster were often enriched for one or more GO terms. The results also showed that genes with specific GO terms tend to share similar regulatory mechanisms. It indicates that in a collaboration network approach the relatively simple "regulatory mechanism" measure used here was able to extract considerable biologically relevant information. Moreover, a definition of anomaly used before in a bipartite graph analysis method was applied into the collaboration networks analysis. And the correlation between the anomalies and the essential genes was discovered. In a conclusion,a collaboration network approach may be a valuable supplement to other analyses of transcriptional networks.%协作网通常被用于描述各种社会关系,相似的概念也可以应用到转录调控网络的研究中.针对被调控基因共享转录因子的相似性,可以建立一个被调控基因协作网,同样,根据转录因子调控基因的相似性可以建立一个相对较小的转录因子协作网.对被调控基因协作网的聚类研究发现,大部分的类都显著地富集一个或者多个GO功能注释.进一步的结果分析发现某些GO注释的基因更倾向于共享相似的调控机制.这表明,在协作网中,相对简单的调控机制相似性能捕捉生物功能相关的信息.并且,将在二部图分析中使用的概念--"异常点"引入到协作网的分析中,发现协作网的异常点和致死基因有相关性.综上所述,协作网的方法是分析转录调控网络的一个有用的补充.

  9. Y-STR analysis on DNA mixture samples--results of a collaborative project of the ENFSI DNA Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parson, Walther; Niederstätter, Harald; Lindinger, Alexandra;

    2008-01-01

    The ENFSI (European Network of Forensic Science Institutes) DNA Working Group undertook a collaborative project on Y-STR typing of DNA mixture samples that were centrally prepared and thoroughly tested prior to the shipment. Four commercial Y-STR typing kits (Y-Filer, Applied Biosystems, Foster C...

  10. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Caroline S.; Horlings, Edwin; Whetsell, Travis A.; Mattson, Pauline; Nordqvist, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index,

  11. A leadership-as-practice perspective on design in architecture, engineering and construction projects: interaction analysis of a collaborative workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zerjav, Vedran; Hartmann, Timo; van Amstel, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an alternative perspective on the role of leadership in the context of collaborative practices in architecture, engineering and construction design. While most of current leadership literature is focused on outstanding individuals with abilities to influence others, the aim of

  12. Who is driving my car? Development and analysis of a control transition strategy for collaborative automated congestion driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urhahne, Joseph Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The role of the driver is changing now that vehicles with driving automation technologies appear on the road. It evolves from being an active controller of the vehicle to being a supervisor of the automated ride. The driver has to collaborate with the driving automation and remains responsible for t

  13. Empty Success or Brilliant Failure: An Analysis of Chinese Students' Study Abroad Experience in a Collaborative Master of Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wang; Clarke, Anthony; Wei, Yu

    2016-01-01

    More than at any other time, the importance of internationalization and of establishing global partnerships in education is acknowledged by governments and higher education institutions. As a result, collaboration between institutions resulting in increased study abroad opportunities, now viewed as signifiers of internationalization, have…

  14. Empty Success or Brilliant Failure: An Analysis of Chinese Students' Study Abroad Experience in a Collaborative Master of Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wang; Clarke, Anthony; Wei, Yu

    2016-01-01

    More than at any other time, the importance of internationalization and of establishing global partnerships in education is acknowledged by governments and higher education institutions. As a result, collaboration between institutions resulting in increased study abroad opportunities, now viewed as signifiers of internationalization, have…

  15. Collaborative Multicash Servicedesk – An Intelligent Collaborative Banking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Ciurea

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the role of intelligent agents in collaborative systems and their use in the banking information systems. The Collaborative Multicash Servicedesk application is presented, seen as an intelligent banking system and being optimized for mobile access. A real data analysis is performed in order to determine which are the most frequently requests of the bank customers and how these problems can be minimized. Some further research perspectives are indicated in order to analyze how intelligent are the collaborative banking systems.

  16. Collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2008-01-01

    , the activities involved in information seeking are often performed by varying subgroups of actors. Consequently, collaborative grounding is necessary to share information among collaborating actors and, thereby, establish and maintain the common ground necessary for their collaborative work. By focusing......Since common ground is pivotal to collaboration, this paper proposes to define collaborative information seeking as the combined activity of information seeking and collaborative grounding. While information-seeking activities are necessary for collaborating actors to acquire new information...... on the collaborative level, collaborative information seeking aims to avoid both individual reductionism and group reductionism, while at the same time recognizing that only some information and understanding need be shared....

  17. Multi-view interaction modelling of human collaboration processes : A business process study of head and neck cancer care in a Dutch academic hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuit, M.; Wortmann, J.C.; Szirbik, N.; Roodenburg, J.

    2011-01-01

    In the healthcare domain, human collaboration processes (HCPs), which consist of interactions between healthcare workers from different (para)medical disciplines and departments, are of growing importance as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly integrated. Existing workflow-based process modelli

  18. Multi-view interaction modelling of human collaboration processes : A business process study of head and neck cancer care in a Dutch academic hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuit, M.; Wortmann, J.C.; Szirbik, N.; Roodenburg, J.

    2011-01-01

    In the healthcare domain, human collaboration processes (HCPs), which consist of interactions between healthcare workers from different (para)medical disciplines and departments, are of growing importance as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly integrated. Existing workflow-based process

  19. Tubal sterilization and breast cancer incidence: results from the cancer prevention study II nutrition cohort and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Patel, Alpa V; Sun, Juzhong; Teras, Lauren R; Gapstur, Susan M

    2013-03-15

    Tubal sterilization is a common form of contraception in the United States and is hypothesized to be associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. However, prior observational studies have reported inconsistent results. We investigated the association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk among 77,249 postmenopausal, cancer-free women in the Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II) Nutrition Cohort, enrolled in 21 states in the United States during 1992-1993. During 15 years of follow-up through June 30, 2007, 4,084 invasive breast cancer cases were diagnosed. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. A meta-analysis including the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort results with other published results from 4 case-control studies and 3 prospective studies was conducted to provide a summary estimate for the association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk. In the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort, tubal sterilization was not associated with breast cancer incidence (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.08, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.20). Associations stratified by year of tubal sterilization, age, and time since surgery were also null. The meta-analysis also found no association between tubal sterilization and breast cancer risk (odds ratio = 0.97, 95% confidence interval: 0.84, 1.09). Tubal sterilization does not appear to be associated with breast cancer risk.

  20. The benchmark analysis of gastric, colorectal and rectal cancer pathways: toward establishing standardized clinical pathway in the cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Munemasa; Hamano, Masaaki; Nakagawara, Akira; Shinoda, Masayuki; Shimizu, Hideaki; Miura, Takeshi; Yoshida, Isao; Nemoto, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Aki

    2011-01-01

    Most clinical pathways in treating cancers in Japan are based on individual physician's personal experiences rather than on an empirical analysis of clinical data such as benchmark comparison with other hospitals. Therefore, these pathways are far from being standardized. By comparing detailed clinical data from five cancer centers, we have observed various differences among hospitals. By conducting benchmark analyses, providing detailed feedback to the participating hospitals and by repeating the benchmark a year later, we strive to develop more standardized clinical pathways for the treatment of cancers. The Cancer Quality Initiative was launched in 2007 by five cancer centers. Using diagnosis procedure combination data, the member hospitals benchmarked their pre-operative and post-operative length of stays, the duration of antibiotics administrations and the post-operative fasting duration for gastric, colon and rectal cancers. The benchmark was conducted by disclosing hospital identities and performed using 2007 and 2008 data. In the 2007 benchmark, substantial differences were shown among five hospitals in the treatment of gastric, colon and rectal cancers. After providing the 2007 results to the participating hospitals and organizing several brainstorming discussions, significant improvements were observed in the 2008 data study. The benchmark analysis of clinical data is extremely useful in promoting more standardized care and, thus in improving the quality of cancer treatment in Japan. By repeating the benchmark analyses, we can offer truly clinical evidence-based higher quality standardized cancer treatment to our patients.